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Sample records for dioxide capture process

  1. Carbon dioxide capture process with regenerable sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Pennline, Henry W.; Hoffman, James S.

    2002-05-14

    A process to remove carbon dioxide from a gas stream using a cross-flow, or a moving-bed reactor. In the reactor the gas contacts an active material that is an alkali-metal compound, such as an alkali-metal carbonate, alkali-metal oxide, or alkali-metal hydroxide; or in the alternative, an alkaline-earth metal compound, such as an alkaline-earth metal carbonate, alkaline-earth metal oxide, or alkaline-earth metal hydroxide. The active material can be used by itself or supported on a substrate of carbon, alumina, silica, titania or aluminosilicate. When the active material is an alkali-metal compound, the carbon-dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate bicarbonate. When the active material is an alkaline-earth metal, the carbon dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate carbonate. Spent sorbent containing the bicarbonate or carbonate is moved to a second reactor where it is heated or treated with a reducing agent such as, natural gas, methane, carbon monoxide hydrogen, or a synthesis gas comprising of a combination of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The heat or reducing agent releases carbon dioxide gas and regenerates the active material for use as the sorbent material in the first reactor. New sorbent may be added to the regenerated sorbent prior to subsequent passes in the carbon dioxide removal reactor.

  2. Carbon dioxide capture from a cement manufacturing process

    DOEpatents

    Blount, Gerald C.; Falta, Ronald W.; Siddall, Alvin A.

    2011-07-12

    A process of manufacturing cement clinker is provided in which a clean supply of CO.sub.2 gas may be captured. The process also involves using an open loop conversion of CaO/MgO from a calciner to capture CO.sub.2 from combustion flue gases thereby forming CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2. The CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2 is then returned to the calciner where CO.sub.2 gas is evolved. The evolved CO.sub.2 gas, along with other evolved CO.sub.2 gases from the calciner are removed from the calciner. The reactants (CaO/MgO) are feed to a high temperature calciner for control of the clinker production composition.

  3. Carbon dioxide capture from power or process plant gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bearden, Mark D; Humble, Paul H

    2014-06-10

    The present invention are methods for removing preselected substances from a mixed flue gas stream characterized by cooling said mixed flue gas by direct contact with a quench liquid to condense at least one preselected substance and form a cooled flue gas without substantial ice formation on a heat exchanger. After cooling additional process methods utilizing a cryogenic approach and physical concentration and separation or pressurization and sorbent capture may be utilized to selectively remove these materials from the mixed flue gas resulting in a clean flue gas.

  4. The clathrate hydrate process for post and pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Linga, Praveen; Kumar, Rajnish; Englezos, Peter

    2007-11-19

    One of the new approaches for capturing carbon dioxide from treated flue gases (post-combustion capture) is based on gas hydrate crystallization. The basis for the separation or capture of the CO(2) is the fact that the carbon dioxide content of gas hydrate crystals is different than that of the flue gas. When a gas mixture of CO(2) and H(2) forms gas hydrates the CO(2) prefers to partition in the hydrate phase. This provides the basis for the separation of CO(2) (pre-combustion capture) from a fuel gas (CO(2)/H(2)) mixture. The present study illustrates the concept and provides basic thermodynamic and kinetic data for conceptual process design. In addition, hybrid conceptual processes for pre and post-combustion capture based on hydrate formation coupled with membrane separation are presented.

  5. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Farnum, Rachel; Perry, Robert; Wood, Benjamin

    2014-12-31

    GE Global Research is developing technology to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2) from the flue gas of coal-fired powerplants. A mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) and triethylene glycol (TEG) is the preferred CO2-capture solvent. GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to test a pilot-scale continuous CO2 absorption/desorption system using a GAP-1m/TEG mixture as the solvent. As part of that effort, an Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH&S) assessment for a CO2-capture system for a 550 MW coal-fired powerplant was conducted. Five components of the solvent, CAS#2469-55-8 (GAP-0), CAS#106214-84-0 (GAP-1-4), TEG, and methanol and xylene (minor contaminants from the aminosilicone) are included in this assessment. One by-product, GAP- 1m/SOX salt, and dodecylbenzenesulfonicacid (DDBSA) were also identified foranalysis. An EH&S assessment was also completed for the manufacturing process for the GAP-1m solvent. The chemicals associated with the manufacturing process include methanol, xylene, allyl chloride, potassium cyanate, sodium hydroxide (NaOH), tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO), tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide, Karstedt catalyst, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), Aliquat 336, methyl carbamate, potassium chloride, trimethylamine, and (3-aminopropyl) dimethyl silanol. The toxicological effects of each component of both the CO2 capture system and the manufacturing process were defined, and control mechanisms necessary to comply with U.S. EH&S regulations are summarized. Engineering and control systems, including environmental abatement, are described for minimizing exposure and release of the chemical components. Proper handling and storage recommendations are made for each chemical to minimize risk to workers and the surrounding community.

  6. CFD Simulations of a Regenerative Process for Carbon Dioxide Capture in Advanced Gasification Based Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Arastoopour, Hamid; Abbasian, Javad

    2014-07-31

    estimated cost of carbon v capture is in the range of $31-$44/ton, suggesting that a regenerative MgO-Based process can be a viable option for pre-combustion carbon dioxide capture in advanced gasification based power systems.

  7. An Integrated, Low Temperature Process to Capture and Sequester Carbon Dioxide from Industrial Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendlandt, R. F.; Foremski, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Laboratory experiments show that it is possible to integrate (1) the chemistry of serpentine dissolution, (2) capture of CO2 gas from the combustion of natural gas and coal-fired power plants using aqueous amine-based solvents, (3) long-term CO2 sequestration via solid phase carbonate precipitation, and (4) capture solvent regeneration with acid recycling in a single, continuous process. In our process, magnesium is released from serpentine at 300°C via heat treatment with ammonium sulfate salts or at temperatures as low as 50°C via reaction with sulfuric acid. We have also demonstrated that various solid carbonate phases can be precipitated directly from aqueous amine-based (NH3, MEA, DMEA) CO2 capture solvent solutions at room temperature. Direct precipitation from the capture solvent enables regenerating CO2 capture solvent without the need for heat and without the need to compress the CO2 off gas. We propose that known low-temperature electrochemical methods can be integrated with this process to regenerate the aqueous amine capture solvent and recycle acid for dissolution of magnesium-bearing mineral feedstocks and magnesium release. Although the direct precipitation of magnesite at ambient conditions remains elusive, experimental results demonstrate that at temperatures ranging from 20°C to 60°C, either nesquehonite Mg(HCO3)(OH)●2H2O or a double salt with the formula [NH4]2Mg(CO3)2●4H2O or an amorphous magnesium carbonate precipitate directly from the capture solvent. These phases are less desirable for CO2 sequestration than magnesite because they potentially remove constituents (water, ammonia) from the reaction system, reducing the overall efficiency of the sequestration process. Accordingly, the integrated process can be accomplished with minimal energy consumption and loss of CO2 capture and acid solvents, and a net generation of 1 to 4 moles of H2O/6 moles of CO2 sequestered (depending on the solid carbonate precipitate and amount of produced H2

  8. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin; Hancu, Dan; Chen, Wei

    2014-07-01

    This report presents system and economicanalysis for a carbon-capture unit which uses an aminosilicone-based solvent for CO₂ capture in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The aminosilicone solvent is a 60/40 wt/wt mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. Forcomparison purposes, the report also shows results for a carbon-capture unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). The first year removal cost of CO₂ for the aminosilicone-based carbon-capture process is $46.04/ton of CO₂ as compared to $60.25/ton of CO₂ when MEA is used. The aminosilicone- based process has <77% of the CAPEX of a system using MEA solvent. The lower CAPEX is due to several factors, including the higher working capacity of the aminosilicone solvent compared the MEA, which reduces the solvent flow rate required, reducing equipment sizes. If it is determined that carbon steel can be used in the rich-lean heat exchanger in the carbon capture unit, the first year removal cost of CO₂ decreases to $44.12/ton. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a higherthermal stability than MEA, allowing desorption to be conducted at higher temperatures and pressures, decreasing the number of compressor stages needed. The aminosilicone-based solvent also has a lowervapor pressure, allowing the desorption to be conducted in a continuous-stirred tank reactor versus a more expensive packed column. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a lowerheat capacity, which decreases the heat load on the desorber. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages overconventional systems using MEA.

  9. Carbon Dioxide Capture Adsorbents: Chemistry and Methods.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hasmukh A; Byun, Jeehye; Yavuz, Cafer T

    2016-12-21

    Excess carbon dioxide (CO2 ) emissions and their inevitable consequences continue to stimulate hard debate and awareness in both academic and public spaces, despite the widespread lack of understanding on what really is needed to capture and store the unwanted CO2 . Of the entire carbon capture and storage (CCS) operation, capture is the most costly process, consisting of nearly 70 % of the price tag. In this tutorial review, CO2 capture science and technology based on adsorbents are described and evaluated in the context of chemistry and methods, after briefly introducing the current status of CO2 emissions. An effective sorbent design is suggested, whereby six checkpoints are expected to be met: cost, capacity, selectivity, stability, recyclability, and fast kinetics.

  10. Capture of carbon dioxide by hybrid sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasachar, Srivats

    2014-09-23

    A composition, process and system for capturing carbon dioxide from a combustion gas stream. The composition has a particulate porous support medium that has a high volume of pores, an alkaline component distributed within the pores and on the surface of the support medium, and water adsorbed on the alkaline component, wherein the proportion of water in the composition is between about 5% and about 35% by weight of the composition. The process and system contemplates contacting the sorbent and the flowing gas stream together at a temperature and for a time such that some water remains adsorbed in the alkaline component when the contact of the sorbent with the flowing gas ceases.

  11. Encapsulated liquid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Vericella, John J; Baker, Sarah E; Stolaroff, Joshuah K; Duoss, Eric B; Hardin, James O; Lewicki, James; Glogowski, Elizabeth; Floyd, William C; Valdez, Carlos A; Smith, William L; Satcher, Joe H; Bourcier, William L; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Lewis, Jennifer A; Aines, Roger D

    2015-02-05

    Drawbacks of current carbon dioxide capture methods include corrosivity, evaporative losses and fouling. Separating the capture solvent from infrastructure and effluent gases via microencapsulation provides possible solutions to these issues. Here we report carbon capture materials that may enable low-cost and energy-efficient capture of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Polymer microcapsules composed of liquid carbonate cores and highly permeable silicone shells are produced by microfluidic assembly. This motif couples the capacity and selectivity of liquid sorbents with high surface area to facilitate rapid and controlled carbon dioxide uptake and release over repeated cycles. While mass transport across the capsule shell is slightly lower relative to neat liquid sorbents, the surface area enhancement gained via encapsulation provides an order-of-magnitude increase in carbon dioxide absorption rates for a given sorbent mass. The microcapsules are stable under typical industrial operating conditions and may be used in supported packing and fluidized beds for large-scale carbon capture.

  12. Subsurface capture of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, Gerald; Siddal, Alvin A.; Falta, Ronald W.

    2014-07-22

    A process and apparatus of separating CO.sub.2 gas from industrial off-gas source in which the CO.sub.2 containing off-gas is introduced deep within an injection well. The CO.sub.2 gases are dissolved in the, liquid within the injection well while non-CO.sub.2 gases, typically being insoluble in water or brine, are returned to the surface. Once the CO.sub.2 saturated liquid is present within the injection well, the injection well may be used for long-term geologic storage of CO.sub.2 or the CO.sub.2 saturated liquid can be returned to the surface for capturing a purified CO.sub.2 gas.

  13. Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Westendorf, Tiffany; Caraher, Joel; Chen, Wei; Farnum, Rachael; Perry, Robert; Spiry, Irina; Wilson, Paul; Wood, Benjamin

    2015-03-31

    The objective of this project is to design and build a bench-scale process for a novel phase-changing aminosilicone-based CO2-capture solvent. The project will establish scalability and technical and economic feasibility of using a phase-changing CO2-capture absorbent for post-combustion capture of CO2 from coal-fired power plants with 90% capture efficiency and 95% CO2 purity at a cost of $40/tonne of CO2 captured by 2025 and a cost of <$10/tonne of CO2 captured by 2035. In the first budget period of this project, the bench-scale phase-changing CO2 capture process was designed using data and operating experience generated under a previous project (ARPA-e project DE-AR0000084). Sizing and specification of all major unit operations was completed, including detailed process and instrumentation diagrams. The system was designed to operate over a wide range of operating conditions to allow for exploration of the effect of process variables on CO2 capture performance.

  14. Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Sam

    2007-04-15

    Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage is a technology that could be used to reduce carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere from large industrial installations such as fossil fuel-fired power stations by 80-90%. It involves the capture of carbon dioxide at a large industrial plant, its transport to a geological storage site and its long-term isolation in a geological storage reservoir. The technology has aroused considerable interest because it can help reduce emissions from fossil fuels which are likely to remain the dominant source of primary energy for decades to come. The main issues for the technology are cost and its implications for financing new or retrofitted plants, and the security of underground storage.

  15. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-07-01

    Sodium based sorbents including sodium carbonate may be used to capture carbon dioxide from flue gas. A relatively concentrated carbon dioxide stream may be recoverable for sequestration when the sorbent is regenerated. Electrobalance tests indicated that sodium carbonate monohydrate was formed in a mixture of helium and water vapor at temperatures below 65 C. Additional compounds may also form, but this could not be confirmed. In the presence of carbon dioxide and water vapor, both the initial reaction rate of sodium carbonate with carbon dioxide and water and the sorbent capacity decreased with increasing temperature, consistent with the results from the previous quarter. Increasing the carbon dioxide concentration at constant temperature and water vapor concentration produced a measurable increase in rate, as did increasing the water vapor concentration at constant carbon dioxide concentration and temperature. Runs conducted with a flatter TGA pan resulted in a higher initial reaction rate, presumably due to improved gas-solid contact, but after a short time, there was no significant difference in the rates measured with the different pans. Analyses of kinetic data suggest that the surface of the sodium carbonate particles may be much hotter than the bulk gas due to the highly exothermic reaction with carbon dioxide and water, and that the rate of heat removal from the particle may control the reaction rate. A material and energy balance was developed for a cyclic carbonation/calcination process which captures about 26 percent of the carbon dioxide present in flue gas available at 250 C.

  16. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture Preliminary Techno-Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin; Hance, Dan; Chen, Wei; Kehmna, Mark; McDuffie, Dwayne

    2014-03-31

    This report presents system and economic analysis for a carbon-capture unit which uses an aminosilicone-based solvent for CO{sub 2} capture in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The aminosilicone solvent is a 60/40 wt/wt mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. For comparison purposes, the report also shows results for a carbon-capture unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). The first year removal cost of CO{sub 2} for the aminosilicone-based carbon-capture process is $46.04/ton of CO2 as compared to $60.25/ton of CO{sub 2} when MEA is used. The aminosilicone-based process has <77% of the CAPEX of a system using MEA solvent. The lower CAPEX is due to several factors, including the higher working capacity of the aminosilicone solvent compared the MEA, which reduces the solvent flow rate required, reducing equipment sizes. If it is determined that carbon steel can be used in the rich-lean heat exchanger in the carbon capture unit, the first year removal cost of CO{sub 2} decreases to $44.12/ton. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a higher thermal stability than MEA, allowing desorption to be conducted at higher temperatures and pressures, decreasing the number of compressor stages needed. The aminosilicone-based solvent also has a lower vapor pressure, allowing the desorption to be conducted in a continuous-stirred tank reactor versus a more expensive packed column. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a lower heat capacity, which decreases the heat load on the desorber. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages over conventional systems using MEA.

  17. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

    2004-07-01

    This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2004 and June 30, 2004 on the preparation and use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Support materials and supported sorbents were prepared by spray drying. Sorbents consisting of 20 to 50% sodium carbonate on a ceramic support were prepared by spray drying in batches of approximately 300 grams. The supported sorbents exhibited greater carbon dioxide capture rates than unsupported calcined sodium bicarbonate in laboratory tests. Preliminary process design and cost estimation for a retrofit application suggested that costs of a dry regenerable sodium carbonate-based process could be lower than those of a monoethanolamine absorption system. In both cases, the greatest part of the process costs come from power plant output reductions due to parasitic consumption of steam for recovery of carbon dioxide from the capture medium.

  18. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-01-07

    New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 °C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture.

  19. Magnesian calcite sorbent for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Mabry, James C; Mondal, Kanchan

    2011-01-01

    Magnesian calcite with controlled properties was synthesized for the removal of carbon dioxide. The results from characterization, reactivity and CO2 capture capacity for different synthesis conditions are reported. The magnesian calcite samples (CaCO3:MgCO3) were synthesized by the coprecipitation of specific amounts of commercially available CaO and MgO by carbon dioxide. Characterization was done with BET, SEM/EDS, particle size analysis and XRD. The capacity was measured using TGA cycles at 800 degrees C and compared for different preparation conditions. The effects of CaO, MgO and surfactant loading on the physical properties and carbonation activity were studied to determine the optimal synthesis condition. A long-term carbonation-calcination cycling test was conducted on the optimal sample. It was observed that the sample maintained its capacity to 86% of its original uptake even after 50 cycles.

  20. A new porous material to enhance the kinetics of clathrate process: application to precombustion carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Babu, Ponnivalavan; Kumar, Rajnish; Linga, Praveen

    2013-11-19

    In this work, the performance of a new porous medium, polyurethane (PU) foam in a fixed bed reactor for carbon dioxide separation from fuel gas mixture using the hydrate based gas separation process is evaluated. The kinetics of hydrate formation in the presence of 2.5 mol % propane as thermodynamic promoter was investigated at 4.5, 5.5, and 6.0 MPa and 274.2 K. Significantly higher gas consumption and water conversion to hydrate was achieved when PU foam was employed. PU foam as a porous medium can help convert 54% of water to hydrate in two hours of hydrate formation. In addition the induction times were very low (<3.67 min at 6.0 MPa). A normalized rate of hydrate formation of 64.48 (±3.82) mol x min(-1) x m(-3) was obtained at 6.0 MPa and 274.2 K. Based on a morphological study, the mechanism of hydrate formation from water dispersed in interstitial pore space of the porous medium is presented. Finally, we propose a four step operation of the hydrate based gas separation process to scale up.

  1. Moisture swing sorbent for carbon dioxide capture from ambient air.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Lackner, Klaus S; Wright, Allen

    2011-08-01

    An amine-based anion exchange resin dispersed in a flat sheet of polypropylene was prepared in alkaline forms so that it would capture carbon dioxide from air. The resin, with quaternary ammonium cations attached to the polymer structure and hydroxide or carbonate groups as mobile counterions, absorbs carbon dioxide when dry and releases it when wet. In ambient air, the moist resin dries spontaneously and subsequently absorbs carbon dioxide. This constitutes a moisture induced cycle, which stands in contrast to thermal pressure swing based cycles. This paper aims to determine the isothermal performance of the sorbent during such a moisture swing. Equilibrium experiments show that the absorption and desorption process can be described well by a Langmuir isothermal model. The equilibrium partial pressure of carbon dioxide over the resin at a given loading state can be increased by 2 orders of magnitude by wetting the resin.

  2. Biotechnology for the acceleration of carbon dioxide capture and sequestration.

    PubMed

    Savile, Christopher K; Lalonde, James J

    2011-12-01

    The potential for enzymatic acceleration of carbon dioxide capture from combustion products of fossil fuels has been demonstrated. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) accelerates post combustion CO(2) capture, but available CAs are woefully inadequate for the harsh conditions employed in most of these processes. In this review, we summarize recent approaches to improve CA, and processes employing this enzyme, to maximize the benefit from this extremely fast biocatalyst. Approaches to overcoming limitations include sourcing CAs from thermophilic organisms, using protein engineering to evolve thermo-tolerant enzymes, immobilizing the enzyme for stabilization and confinement to cooler regions and process modifications that minimize the (thermo-, solvent) stress on the enzyme.

  3. Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture

    DOEpatents

    Li, Bingyun; Jiang, Bingbing; Gray, McMahan L; Fauth, Daniel J; Pennline, Henry W; Richards, George A

    2014-11-18

    A solid sorbent for the capture and the transport of carbon dioxide gas is provided having at least one first layer of a positively charged material that is polyethylenimine or poly(allylamine hydrochloride), that captures at least a portion of the gas, and at least one second layer of a negatively charged material that is polystyrenesulfonate or poly(acryclic acid), that transports the gas, wherein the second layer of material is in juxtaposition to, attached to, or crosslinked with the first layer for forming at least one bilayer, and a solid substrate support having a porous surface, wherein one or more of the bilayers is/are deposited on the surface of and/or within the solid substrate. A method of preparing and using the solid sorbent is provided.

  4. Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bingyun; Jiang, Bingbing; Gray, McMahan L; Fauth, Daniel J; Pennline, Henry W; Richards, George A

    2013-02-25

    A solid sorbent for the capture and the transport of carbon dioxide gas is provided having at least one first layer of a positively charged material that is polyethylenimine or poly(allylamine hydrochloride), that captures at least a portion of the gas, and at least one second layer of a negatively charged material that is polystyrenesulfonate or poly(acryclic acid), that transports the gas, wherein the second layer of material is in juxtaposition to, attached to, or crosslinked with the first layer for forming at least one bilayer, and a solid substrate support having a porous surface, wherein one or more of the bilayers is/are deposited on the surface of and/or within the solid substrate. A method of preparing and using the solid sorbent is provided.

  5. Development of a Steel-Slag-Based, Iron-Functionalized Sorbent for an Autothermal Carbon Dioxide Capture Process.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sicong; Jiang, Jianguo; Hosseini, Davood; Kierzkowska, Agnieszka M; Imtiaz, Qasim; Broda, Marcin; Müller, Christoph R

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new class of autothermal CO2 -capture process that relies on the integration of chemical looping combustion (CLC) into calcium looping (CaL). In the new process, the heat released during the oxidation of a reduced metallic oxide is utilized to drive the endothermic calcination of CaCO3 (the regeneration step in CaL). Such a process is potentially very attractive (both economically and technically) as it can be applied to a variety of oxygen carriers and CaO is not in direct contact with coal (and the impurities associated with it) in the calciner (regeneration step). To demonstrate the practical feasibility of the process, we developed a low-cost, steel-slag-based, Fe-functionalized CO2 sorbent. Using this material, we confirm experimentally the feasibility to heat-integrate CaCO3 calcination with a Fe(II)/Fe(III) redox cycle (with regards to the heat of reaction and kinetics). The autothermal calcination of CaCO3 could be achieved for a material that contained a Ca/Fe ratio of 5:4. The uniform distribution of Ca and Fe in a solid matrix provides excellent heat transfer characteristics. The cyclic CO2 uptake and redox stability of the material is good, but there is room for further improvement.

  6. Biochemical Capture and Removal of Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trachtenberg, Michael C.

    1998-01-01

    We devised an enzyme-based facilitated transport membrane bioreactor system to selectively remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the space station environment. We developed and expressed site-directed enzyme mutants for CO2 capture. Enzyme kinetics showed the mutants to be almost identical to the wild type save at higher pH. Both native enzyme and mutant enzymes were immobilized to different supports including nylons, glasses, sepharose, methacrylate, titanium and nickel. Mutant enzyme could be attached and removed from metal ligand supports and the supports reused at least five times. Membrane systems were constructed to test CO2 selectivity. These included proteic membranes, thin liquid films and enzyme-immobilized teflon membranes. Selectivity ratios of more than 200:1 were obtained for CO2 versus oxygen with CO2 at 0.1%. The data indicate that a membrane based bioreactor can be constructed which could bring CO2 levels close to Earth.

  7. Carbon dioxide removal process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Da Costa, Andre R.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2003-11-18

    A process and apparatus for separating carbon dioxide from gas, especially natural gas, that also contains C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons. The invention uses two or three membrane separation steps, optionally in conjunction with cooling/condensation under pressure, to yield a lighter, sweeter product natural gas stream, and/or a carbon dioxide stream of reinjection quality and/or a natural gas liquids (NGL) stream.

  8. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M.; Eisenberg, David S.

    2014-01-01

    New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 °C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture. PMID:24367077

  9. Amine reclaiming technologies in post-combustion carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tielin; Hovland, Jon; Jens, Klaus J

    2015-01-01

    Amine scrubbing is the most developed technology for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. Degradation of amine solvents due to the presence of high levels of oxygen and other impurities in flue gas causes increasing costs and deterioration in long term performance, and therefore purification of the solvents is needed to overcome these problems. This review presents the reclaiming of amine solvents used for post combustion CO2 capture (PCC). Thermal reclaiming, ion exchange, and electrodialysis, although principally developed for sour gas sweetening, have also been tested for CO2 capture from flue gas. The three technologies all have their strengths and weaknesses, and further development is needed to reduce energy usage and costs. An expected future trend for amine reclamation is to focus on process integration of the current reclaiming technologies into the PCC process in order to drive down costs.

  10. Microporous metal-organic framework with potential for carbon dioxide capture at ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shengchang; He, Yabing; Zhang, Zhangjing; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Wei; Krishna, Rajamani; Chen, Banglin

    2012-07-17

    Carbon dioxide capture and separation are important industrial processes that allow the use of carbon dioxide for the production of a range of chemical products and materials, and to minimize the effects of carbon dioxide emission. Porous metal-organic frameworks are promising materials to achieve such separations and to replace current technologies, which use aqueous solvents to chemically absorb carbon dioxide. Here we show that a metal-organic frameworks (UTSA-16) displays high uptake (160 cm(3) cm(-3)) of CO(2) at ambient conditions, making it a potentially useful adsorbent material for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture and biogas stream purification. This has been further confirmed by simulated breakthrough experiments. The high storage capacities and selectivities of UTSA-16 for carbon dioxide capture are attributed to the optimal pore cages and the strong binding sites to carbon dioxide, which have been demonstrated by neutron diffraction studies.

  11. Self-Assembled Enzyme Nanoparticles for Carbon Dioxide Capture.

    PubMed

    Shanbhag, Bhuvana Kamath; Liu, Boyin; Fu, Jing; Haritos, Victoria S; He, Lizhong

    2016-05-11

    Enzyme-based processes have shown promise as a sustainable alternative to amine-based processes for carbon dioxide capture. In this work, we have engineered carbonic anhydrase nanoparticles that retain 98% of hydratase activity in comparison to their free counterparts. Carbonic anhydrase was fused with a self-assembling peptide that facilitates the noncovalent assembly of the particle and together were recombinantly expressed from a single gene construct in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes, when subjected to a reduced pH, form 50-200 nm nanoparticles. The CO2 capture capability of enzyme nanoparticles was demonstrated at ambient (22 ± 2 °C) and higher (50 °C) temperatures, under which the nanoparticles maintain their assembled state. The carrier-free enzymatic nanoparticles demonstrated here offer a new approach to stabilize and reuse enzymes in a simple and cost-effective manner.

  12. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Ya Liang; Tyler Moore; Douglas P. Harrison

    2003-08-01

    This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2003 and June 30, 2003 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for concentration of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Grade 1 sodium bicarbonate performed similarly to grade 5 sodium bicarbonate in fixed bed testing in that activity improved after the first carbonation cycle and did not decline over the course of 5 cycles. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that sodium bicarbonate sorbents produced by calcination of sodium bicarbonate are superior to either soda ash or calcined trona. Energy requirements for regeneration of carbon dioxide sorbents (either wet or dry) is of primary importance in establishing the economic feasibility of carbon dioxide capture processes. Recent studies of liquid amine sorption processes were reviewed and found to incorporate conflicting assumptions of energy requirements. Dry sodium based processes have the potential to be less energy intensive and thus less expensive than oxygen inhibited amine based systems. For dry supported sorbents, maximizing the active fraction of the sorbent is of primary importance in developing an economically feasible process.

  13. Calcium looping process for high purity hydrogen production integrated with capture of carbon dioxide, sulfur and halides

    DOEpatents

    Ramkumar, Shwetha; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2015-11-04

    A process for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: (i) gasifying a fuel into a raw synthesis gas comprising CO, hydrogen, steam, sulfur and halide contaminants in the form of H.sub.2S, COS, and HX, wherein X is a halide; (ii) passing the raw synthesis gas through a water gas shift reactor (WGSR) into which CaO and steam are injected, the CaO reacting with the shifted gas to remove CO.sub.2, sulfur and halides in a solid-phase calcium-containing product comprising CaCO.sub.3, CaS and CaX.sub.2; (iii) separating the solid-phase calcium-containing product from an enriched gaseous hydrogen product; and (iv) regenerating the CaO by calcining the solid-phase calcium-containing product at a condition selected from the group consisting of: in the presence of steam, in the presence of CO.sub.2, in the presence of synthesis gas, in the presence of H.sub.2 and O.sub.2, under partial vacuum, and combinations thereof.

  14. Calcium looping process for high purity hydrogen production integrated with capture of carbon dioxide, sulfur and halides

    DOEpatents

    Ramkumar, Shwetha; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2013-07-30

    A process for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: (i) gasifying a fuel into a raw synthesis gas comprising CO, hydrogen, steam, sulfur and halide contaminants in the form of H.sub.2S, COS, and HX, wherein X is a halide; (ii) passing the raw synthesis gas through a water gas shift reactor (WGSR) into which CaO and steam are injected, the CaO reacting with the shifted gas to remove CO.sub.2, sulfur and halides in a solid-phase calcium-containing product comprising CaCO.sub.3, CaS and CaX.sub.2; (iii) separating the solid-phase calcium-containing product from an enriched gaseous hydrogen product; and (iv) regenerating the CaO by calcining the solid-phase calcium-containing product at a condition selected from the group consisting of: in the presence of steam, in the presence of CO.sub.2, in the presence of synthesis gas, in the presence of H.sub.2 and O.sub.2, under partial vacuum, and combinations thereof.

  15. Carbon dioxide capture and use: organic synthesis using carbon dioxide from exhaust gas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Hyo; Kim, Kwang Hee; Hong, Soon Hyeok

    2014-01-13

    A carbon capture and use (CCU) strategy was applied to organic synthesis. Carbon dioxide (CO2) captured directly from exhaust gas was used for organic transformations as efficiently as hyper-pure CO2 gas from a commercial source, even for highly air- and moisture-sensitive reactions. The CO2 capturing aqueous ethanolamine solution could be recycled continuously without any diminished reaction efficiency.

  16. Capture and storage of Carbon dioxid: a method for countering climatic changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benea, L. M.

    2017-01-01

    One of the options aimed at preventing climatic changes is the capture and storage of carbon dioxide, a method with a great potential for reducing greenhouse gases. Capturing and storing carbon dioxide in the soil involves new benefits for the communities in the respective areas. Those benefits also follow from the fact that the organic compound has an essential factor in the soil, determining its properties. The paper presents several results concerning the determination of the quantity of carbon dioxide in different types of soil and it is intended to be the beginning of the process of data collection and the analysis of the reserves and the flow of carbon.

  17. Carbon dioxide absorption methanol process

    SciTech Connect

    Apffel, F.

    1989-08-29

    This patent describes a process for removing carbon dioxide from a feed stream of natural gas having at least methane, ethane and heavier. It comprises: first, separating the feed stream in a first separator to form a first stream having substantially all of the propane and heavier hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide and ethane and a second stream, having methane, carbon dioxide and ethane; separating the second stream in a second separator into a stream of carbon dioxide product and a third stream having ethane, methane and carbon dioxide: mixing at least a portion of the third stream with a polar compound; stream after the mixing in an absorber; separating the vapor and liquid of the third stream after the mixing in an absorber; absorbing the remaining unabsorbed carbon dioxide in a lean portion of the polar compound in the absorber, the absorber carbon dioxide and ethane with the polar; separating the first stream in a third separator to separate the propane and heavier hydrocarbons from the carbon dioxide and ethane, which carbon dioxide and ethane forms a fifth stream; and separating the polar compound/carbon dioxide effluent of the absorber in a fourth separator, to separate the carbon dioxide from the polar compound, the polar compound forming a sixth stream.

  18. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box Raghubir P. Gupta

    2006-09-30

    This report describes research conducted between July 1, 2006 and September 30, 2006 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal combustion flue gas. Modifications to the integrated absorber/ sorbent regenerator/ sorbent cooler system were made to improve sorbent flow consistency and measurement reliability. Operation of the screw conveyor regenerator to achieve a sorbent temperature of at least 120 C at the regenerator outlet is necessary for satisfactory carbon dioxide capture efficiencies in succeeding absorption cycles. Carbon dioxide capture economics in new power plants can be improved by incorporating increased capacity boilers, efficient flue gas desulfurization systems and provisions for withdrawal of sorbent regeneration steam in the design.

  19. Direct electrochemical capture and release of carbon dioxide using an industrial organic pigment: quinacridone.

    PubMed

    Apaydin, Dogukan Hazar; Głowacki, Eric Daniel; Portenkirchner, Engelbert; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar

    2014-06-23

    Limiting anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions constitutes a major issue faced by scientists today. Herein we report an efficient way of controlled capture and release of carbon dioxide using nature inspired, cheap, abundant and non-toxic, industrial pigment namely, quinacridone. An electrochemically reduced electrode consisting of a quinacridone thin film (ca. 100 nm thick) on an ITO support forms a quinacridone carbonate salt. The captured CO2 can be released by electrochemical oxidation. The amount of captured CO2 was quantified by FT-IR. The uptake value for electrochemical release process was 4.61 mmol g(-1). This value is among the highest reported uptake efficiencies for electrochemical CO2 capture. For comparison, the state-of-the-art aqueous amine industrial capture process has an uptake efficiency of ca. 8 mmol g(-1).

  20. Carbon dioxide absorption methanol process

    SciTech Connect

    Apffel, F.P.

    1987-06-23

    A process is described for removing carbon dioxide from a feed stream of natural gas, having at least methane, ethane and heavier hydrocarbon, comprising: separating the feed stream in a first separator to form a first stream, having substantially all of the propane and heavier hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide and ethane, and a second stream, having methane, carbon dioxide and ethane; mixing the second stream with a polar compound to form a third stream; separating the vapor and liquid of the third stream in the bottom portion of an absorber; absorbing carbon dioxide and ethane from the separated vapor of Step C in a lean portion of the polar compound in the absorber, the absorber carbon dioxide and ethane forming a fourth stream; separating the ethane from the polar compound and carbon dioxide in a separator; separating the first stream in a third separator to separate the propane and heavier hydrocarbons from the carbon dioxide and ethane: carbon dioxide and ethane forms a fifth stream; and separating the polar compound/carbon dioxide effluent of the second separator in a fourth separator, to separate the carbon dioxide from the polar compound. The polar compound forming a sixth stream.

  1. Carbon dioxide capture and utilization: using dinuclear catalysts to prepare polycarbonates.

    PubMed

    Yi, N; Unruangsri, J; Shaw, J; Williams, C K

    2015-01-01

    The copolymerization of epoxides, including cyclohexene oxide and vinyl-cyclohexene oxide with carbon dioxide are presented. These processes are catalyzed using a homogeneous di-zinc complex that shows good activity and very high selectivities for polycarbonate polyol formation. The polymerizations are investigated in the presence of different amounts of exogenous reagents, including water, diols and diamines, as models for common contaminants in any carbon dioxide capture and utilization scenario.

  2. Designing and Demonstrating a Master Student Project to Explore Carbon Dioxide Capture Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asherman, Florine; Cabot, Gilles; Crua, Cyril; Estel, Lionel; Gagnepain, Charlotte; Lecerf, Thibault; Ledoux, Alain; Leveneur, Sebastien; Lucereau, Marie; Maucorps, Sarah; Ragot, Melanie; Syrykh, Julie; Vige, Manon

    2016-01-01

    The rise in carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) concentration in the Earth's atmosphere, and the associated strengthening of the greenhouse effect, requires the development of low carbon technologies. New carbon capture processes are being developed to remove CO[subscript 2] that would otherwise be emitted from industrial processes and fossil fuel…

  3. Carbon Dioxide Capture and Transportation Options in the Illinois Basin

    SciTech Connect

    M. Rostam-Abadi; S. S. Chen; Y. Lu

    2004-09-30

    This report describes carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture options from large stationary emission sources in the Illinois Basin, primarily focusing on coal-fired utility power plants. The CO{sub 2} emissions data were collected for utility power plants and industrial facilities over most of Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and western Kentucky. Coal-fired power plants are by far the largest CO{sub 2} emission sources in the Illinois Basin. The data revealed that sources within the Illinois Basin emit about 276 million tonnes of CO2 annually from 122 utility power plants and industrial facilities. Industrial facilities include 48 emission sources and contribute about 10% of total emissions. A process analysis study was conducted to review the suitability of various CO{sub 2} capture technologies for large stationary sources. The advantages and disadvantages of each class of technology were investigated. Based on these analyses, a suitable CO{sub 2} capture technology was assigned to each type of emission source in the Illinois Basin. Techno-economic studies were then conducted to evaluate the energy and economic performances of three coal-based power generation plants with CO{sub 2} capture facilities. The three plants considered were (1) pulverized coal (PC) + post combustion chemical absorption (monoethanolamine, or MEA), (2) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) + pre-combustion physical absorption (Selexol), and (3) oxygen-enriched coal combustion plants. A conventional PC power plant without CO2 capture was also investigated as a baseline plant for comparison. Gross capacities of 266, 533, and 1,054 MW were investigated at each power plant. The economic study considered the burning of both Illinois No. 6 coal and Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. The cost estimation included the cost for compressing the CO{sub 2} stream to pipeline pressure. A process simulation software, CHEMCAD, was employed to perform steady-state simulations of power generation systems

  4. Atmospheric CO2 capture by algae: Negative carbon dioxide emission path.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Diana; Pires, José C M

    2016-09-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the most important greenhouse gas, which concentration increase in the atmosphere is associated to climate change and global warming. Besides CO2 capture in large emission point sources, the capture of this pollutant from atmosphere may be required due to significant contribution of diffuse sources. The technologies that remove CO2 from atmosphere (creating a negative balance of CO2) are called negative emission technologies. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage may play an important role for CO2 mitigation. It represents the combination of bioenergy production and carbon capture and storage, keeping carbon dioxide in geological reservoirs. Algae have a high potential as the source of biomass, as they present high photosynthetic efficiencies and high biomass yields. Their biomass has a wide range of applications, which can improve the economic viability of the process. Thus, this paper aims to assess the atmospheric CO2 capture by algal cultures.

  5. Carbon Capture by a Continuous, Regenerative Ammonia-Based Scrubbing Process

    SciTech Connect

    Resnik, K.P.; Yeh, J.T.; Pennline, H.W.

    2006-10-01

    Overview: To develop a knowledge/data base to determine whether an ammonia-based scrubbing process is a viable regenerable-capture technique that can simultaneously remove carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitric oxides, and trace pollutants from flue gas.

  6. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

    2007-06-30

    Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that includes a co

  7. Microporous polystyrene particles for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Kaliva, Maria; Armatas, Gerasimos S; Vamvakaki, Maria

    2012-02-07

    This study presents the synthesis of microporous polystyrene particles and the potential use of these materials in CO(2) capture for biogas purification. Highly cross-linked polystyrene particles are synthesized by the emulsion copolymerization of styrene (St) and divinylbenzene (DVB) in water. The cross-link density of the polymer is varied by altering the St/DVB molar ratio. The size and the morphology of the particles are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Following supercritical point drying with carbon dioxide or lyophilization from benzene, the polystyrene nanoparticles exhibit a significant surface area and permanent microporosity. The dried particles comprising 35 mol % St and 65 mol % DVB possess the largest surface area, ∼205 m(2)/g measured by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and ∼185 m(2)/g measured by the Dubinin-Radushkevich method, and a total pore volume of 1.10 cm(3)/g. Low pressure measurements suggest that the microporous polystyrene particles exhibit a good separation performance of CO(2) over CH(4), with separation factors in the range of ∼7-13 (268 K, CO(2)/CH(4) = 5/95 gas mixture), which renders them attractive candidates for use in gas separation processes.

  8. Antarctic Pumpdown---a New Geoengineering Concept for Capturing and Storing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beget, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Growing concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are increasing global temperatures. This is projected to impact human society in negative ways. Multiple geoengineering approaches have been suggested that might counteract problems created by greenhouse warming, but geoengineering itself can be problematic as some proposed methods would pose environmental risks to the oceans, atmosphere, and biosphere. I propose a new approach that would remove CO2 from the atmosphere and store it in the cryosphere. Carbon dioxide would be captured by seeding the atmosphere over a designated small region of central Antarctica with monoethanolamine (MEA), a well known compound commonly used for CO2 capture in submarines and industrial processes. Monoethanolamine captures and retains carbon dioxide until it encounters water. Because MEA crystals are stable when dry, they would fall from the atmosphere just in the local area where the seeding is done, and they would be naturally buried by snowfalls and preserved in the upper parts of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, where thawing does not occur. The carbon dioxide removed from the atmosphere by this process could reside safely in this geologic reservoir for thousands of years, based on known flow characteristic of the ice sheet. Also, carbon dioxide stored in this way could be recovered in the future by drilling into the ice sheet to the frozen storage zone. The CO2 Antarctic Pumpdown (CAP) concept could potentially be used to stabilize or reduce the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, and then to store the carbon dioxide safely and inexpensively in a stable geologic reservoir

  9. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson; Santosh Gangwal; Ya Liang; Tyler Moore; Margaret Williams; Douglas P. Harrison

    2004-09-30

    Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate dry, regenerable, alkali carbonate-based sorbents for the capture of CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Electrobalance, fixed-bed and fluid-bed reactors were used to examine both the CO{sub 2} capture and sorbent regeneration phases of the process. Sodium carbonate-based sorbents (calcined sodium bicarbonate and calcined trona) were the primary focus of the testing. Supported sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate sorbents were also tested. Sodium carbonate reacts with CO{sub 2} and water vapor contained in flue gas at temperatures between 60 and 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate, or an intermediate salt (Wegscheider's salt). Thermal regeneration of this sorbent produces an off-gas containing equal molar quantities of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The low temperature range in which the carbonation reaction takes place is suited to treatment of coal-derived flue gases following wet flue gas desulfurization processes, but limits the concentration of water vapor which is an essential reactant in the carbonation reaction. Sorbent regeneration in an atmosphere of CO{sub 2} and water vapor can be carried out at a temperature of 160 C or higher. Pure CO{sub 2} suitable for use or sequestration is available after condensation of the H{sub 2}O. Flue gas contaminants such as SO{sub 2} react irreversibly with the sorbent so that upstream desulfurization will be required when sulfur-containing fossil fuels are used. Approximately 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a simulated flue gas was achieved during the early stages of fixed-bed reactor tests using a nominal carbonation temperature of 60 C. Effectively complete sorbent carbonation is possible when the fixed-bed test is carried out to completion. No decrease in sorbent activity was noted in a 15-cycle test using the above carbonation conditions coupled with regeneration in pure CO{sub 2} at 160 C. Fluidized-bed reactor tests of up to five cycles were conducted. Carbonation of sodium

  10. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

    2004-11-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate dry, regenerable, alkali carbonate-based sorbents for the capture of CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Electrobalance, fixed-bed and fluid-bed reactors were used to examine both the CO{sub 2} capture and sorbent regeneration phases of the process. Sodium carbonate-based sorbents (calcined sodium bicarbonate and calcined trona) were the primary focus of the testing. Supported sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate sorbents were also tested. Sodium carbonate reacts with CO{sub 2} and water vapor contained in flue gas at temperatures between 60 and 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate, or an intermediate salt (Wegscheider's salt). Thermal regeneration of this sorbent produces an off-gas containing equal molar quantities of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The low temperature range in which the carbonation reaction takes place is suited to treatment of coal-derived flue gases following wet flue gas desulfurization processes, but limits the concentration of water vapor which is an essential reactant in the carbonation reaction. Sorbent regeneration in an atmosphere of CO{sub 2} and water vapor can be carried out at a temperature of 160 C or higher. Pure CO{sub 2} suitable for use or sequestration is available after condensation of the H{sub 2}O. Flue gas contaminants such as SO{sub 2} react irreversibly with the sorbent so that upstream desulfurization will be required when sulfur-containing fossil fuels are used. Approximately 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a simulated flue gas was achieved during the early stages of fixed-bed reactor tests using a nominal carbonation temperature of 60 C. Effectively complete sorbent carbonation is possible when the fixed-bed test is carried out to completion. No decrease in sorbent activity was noted in a 15-cycle test using the above carbonation conditions coupled with regeneration in pure CO{sub 2} at 160 C. Fluidized-bed reactor tests of up to five cycles were conducted. Carbonation of sodium

  11. PRELIMINARY TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY STUDY ON THE INTEGRATION OF A PROCESS UTILIZING LOW-ENERGY SOLVENTS FOR CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE ENABLED BY A COMBINATION OF ENZYMES AND ULTRASONICS WITH A SUBCRITICAL PC POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Swaminathan, Saravanan; Kuczynska, Agnieszka; Hume, Scott; Mulgundmath, Vinay; Freeman, Charles; Bearden, Mark; Remias, Joe; Ambedkar, Balraj; Salmon, Sonja; House, Alan

    2012-11-01

    The results of the preliminary techno-economic assessment for integrating a process utilizing low-energy solvents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture enabled by a combination of enzymes and ultrasonics with a subcritical pulverized coal (PC) power plant are presented. Four cases utilizing the enzyme-activated solvent are compared using different methodologies of regeneration against the DOE/NETL reference MEA case. The results are shown comparing the energy demand for post-combustion CO2 capture and the net higher heating value (HHV) efficiency of the power plant integrated with the post-combustion capture (PCC) plant. A levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) assessment was performed showing the costs of the options presented in the study. The key factors contributing to the reduction of LCOE were identified as enzyme make-up rate and the capability of the ultrasonic regeneration process. The net efficiency of the integrated PC power plant with CO2 capture changes from 24.9% with the reference Case 10 plant to between 24.34% and 29.97% for the vacuum regeneration options considered, and to between 26.63% and 31.41% for the ultrasonic regeneration options. The evaluation also shows the effect of the critical parameters on the LCOE, with the main variable being the initial estimation of enzyme dosing rate. The LCOE ($/MWh) values range from 112.92 to 125.23 for the vacuum regeneration options and from 108.9 to 117.50 for the ultrasonic regeneration cases considered in comparison to 119.6 for the reference Case 10. A sensitivity analysis of the effect of critical parameters on the LCOE was also performed. The results from the preliminary techno-economic assessment show that the proposed technology can be investigated further with a view to being a viable alternative to conventional CO2 scrubbing technologies.

  12. Rapid setting of portland cement by greenhouse carbon dioxide capture

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Knox, L.J.

    1994-04-01

    Following the work by Berger et al. on rapid setting of calcium silicates by carbonation, a method of high-volume capture of CO{sub 2} in portland cement has been developed. Typically, 10--24 wt. % of CO{sub 2} produced by the calcination of calcium carbonate during clinkering, may be captured, and the set cement acquires most of its full strength in less than a day. The approach will have economic advantages in fabrication of precast structures, in emergency development of infrastructure during natural disasters, and in defense applications. Moreover, it will help the cement industry comply with the Clean Air Act of 1990 by sequestering the greenhouse carbon dioxide.

  13. EVALUATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM EXISTING COAL FIRED PLANTS BY HYBRID SORPTION USING SOLID SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Steven; Browers, Bruce; Srinivasachar, Srivats; Laudal, Daniel

    2014-12-31

    Under contract DE-FE0007603, the University of North Dakota conducted the project Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Existing Coal Fired Plants by Hybrid Sorption Using Solid Sorbents. As an important element of this effort, a Technical and Economic Feasibility Study was conducted by Barr Engineering Co. (Barr) in association with the University of North Dakota. The assessment developed a process flow diagram, major equipment list, heat balances for the SCPC power plant, capital cost estimate, operating cost estimate, levelized cost of electricity, cost of CO2 capture ($/ton) and three sensitivity cases for the CACHYS™ process.

  14. Modeling Carbon Dioxide Capture by Monoethanolamine Solvent with ASPEN Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Tianyi

    Fossil fuels provide approximately 80% of the world's energy demands. Methods for reducing CO2 emissions resulting from fossil fuels include increasing the efficiency of power plants and production processes, decreasing energy demands, in combination with CO2 capture and long term storage (CCS). CO2 capture technologies include post-combustion, pre-combustion, and oxyfuel combustion. The amine-based post-combustion CO2 capture from a coal-fired power plant was studied in this thesis. In case of post-combustion capture, CO2 can be captured by Monoethanolamine solvent (MEA), a primary ethanolamine. MEA can associate with H3O+ to form an ion MEAH+, and can react with CO2 to form a carbonate ion MEACOO-. Commercial code ASPEN Plus was used to simulate the process of CO2 capture and optimize the process parameters and required energy duty. The major part of thermal energy requirement is from the Absorber and Stripper columns. This suggests that process optimization should focus on the Absorption/Desorption process. Optimization results show that the gas-liquid reaction equilibrium is affected by several operating parameters including solvent flow rate, stream temperature, column operating pressure, flue gas composition, solvent concentration and absorber design. With optimized CO2 capture, the energy consumption for solvent regeneration (reboiler thermal duty) was decreased from 5.76 GJ/ton captured CO2 to 4.56 GJ/t CO2. On the other hand, the cost of CO2 capture (and sequestration) could be reduced by limiting size of the Absorber column and operating pressure.

  15. High-Performance Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture from Air

    SciTech Connect

    Sholl, David; Jones, Christopher

    2013-03-13

    This project has focused on capture of CO{sub 2} from ambient air (“air capture”). If this process is technically and economically feasible, it could potentially contribute to net reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in ways that are complementary to better developed techniques for CO{sub 2} from concentrated point sources. We focused on cyclic adsorption processes for CO{sub 2} capture from air in which the entire cycle is performed at moderate temperatures. The project involved both experimental studies of sorbent materials and process level modeling of cyclic air capture processes. In our experimental work, a series of amine-functionalized silica adsorbents were prepared and characterized to determine the impact of molecular architecture on CO{sub 2} capture. Some key findings were: • Amine functionalized silicas can be prepared with high enough CO{sub 2} capacities under ambient conditions to merit consideration for use in air capture processes. • Primary amines are better candidates for CO{sub 2} capture than secondary or tertiary amines, both in terms of amine efficiency for CO{sub 2} adsorption and enhanced water affinity. • Mechanistic understanding of degradation of these materials can enable control of molecular architecture to significantly improve material stability. Our process modeling work provided the first publically available cost and energy estimates for cyclic adsorption processes for air capture of CO{sub 2}. Some key findings were: • Cycles based on diurnal ambient heating and cooling cannot yield useful purities or amounts of captured CO{sub 2}. • Cycles based on steam desorption at 110 oC can yield CO{sub 2} purities of ~88%. • The energy requirements for cycles using steam desorption are dominated by needs for thermal input, which results in lower costs than energy input in the form of electricity. Cyclic processes with operational costs of less than $100 tCO{sub 2}-net were described, and these results point to process and

  16. Application of halloysite nanotubes for carbon dioxide capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinsoo; Rubino, Ilaria; Lee, Joo-Youp; Choi, Hyo-Jick

    2016-04-01

    Halloysite is a naturally occurring clay, with physical structure represented by halloysite nanotubes (HNTs). We investigated the potential applicability of HNTs for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, using two amine-functionalized HNTs: (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES)-grafted HNTs and polyethylenimine (PEI)-impregnated HNTs. APTES-HNTs and PEI-HNTs resulted in 5.6 and 30 wt. % (in sorbent) in functionalization onto HNTs, respectively. Capture efficiency was higher in APTES-HNTs at lower temperatures, while it was maximum in PEI-HNTs at 70°C-75 °C. At 75 °C, adsorption/desorption tests showed that 95% of the two reactions occurred within 30 min, and exhibited 0.15 and 0.21 millimole of CO2 adsorption capacity per millimole of amine group for APTES-HNTs and PEI-HNTs, respectively. During 10 cycles of CO2 adsorption/desorption, there was no significant decrease in sorbent weight and adsorption capacity in both HNTs. These results show that inherent structural features of HNTs can be easily tailored for the development of operational condition-specific CO2 capture system.

  17. Atmospheric Capture On Mars (and Processing)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Tony

    2017-01-01

    The ultimate destination of NASA's human exploration program is Mars. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) is a key technology required to enable such missions, as first proposed by Prof. Robert Ash in 1976. This presentation will review progress in the systems required to produce rocket propellant, oxygen, and other consumables on Mars using the carbon dioxide atmosphere and other potential resources. For many years, NASA, commercial companies, and academia have been developing, and demonstrating techniques to capture and purify Martian atmospheric gases for their utilization for the production of hydrocarbons, oxygen, and water in ISRU systems. Other gases will be required to be separated from Martian atmospheric gases to provide pure CO2 for processing elements. Significant progress has been demonstrated in CO2 collection via adsorption by molecular sieves, freezing, and direct compression. Early stage work in adsorption in Ionic Liquids followed by electrolysis to oxygen is also underway. In addition, other Martian gases, such as nitrogen and argon, occur in concentrations high enough to be useful as buffer gas and could be captured as well. Gas separation requirements include, but are not limited to the selective separation of: (1) methane and water from unreacted carbon oxides (CO2-CO) and hydrogen typical of a Sabatier-type process, (2) carbon oxides and water from unreacted hydrogen from a Reverse Water-Gas Shift process, and (3) carbon oxides from oxygen from a trash/waste processing reaction.

  18. Preliminary carbon dioxide capture technical and economic feasibility study evaluation of carbon dioxide capture from existing fired plants by hybrid sorption using solid sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Steven; Envergex, Srivats; Browers, Bruce; Thumbi, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Barr Engineering Co. was retained by the Institute for Energy Studies (IES) at University of North Dakota (UND) to conduct a technical and economic feasibility analysis of an innovative hybrid sorbent technology (CACHYS™) for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and separation from coal combustion–derived flue gas. The project team for this effort consists of the University of North Dakota, Envergex LLC, Barr Engineering Co., and Solex Thermal Science, along with industrial support from Allete, BNI Coal, SaskPower, and the North Dakota Lignite Energy Council. An initial economic and feasibility study of the CACHYS™ concept, including definition of the process, development of process flow diagrams (PFDs), material and energy balances, equipment selection, sizing and costing, and estimation of overall capital and operating costs, is performed by Barr with information provided by UND and Envergex. The technology—Capture from Existing Coal-Fired Plants by Hybrid Sorption Using Solid Sorbents Capture (CACHYS™)—is a novel solid sorbent technology based on the following ideas: reduction of energy for sorbent regeneration, utilization of novel process chemistry, contactor conditions that minimize sorbent-CO2 heat of reaction and promote fast CO2 capture, and a low-cost method of heat management. The technology’s other key component is the use of a low-cost sorbent.

  19. Process for sequestering carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Maroto-Valer, M. Mercedes; Zhang, Yinzhi; Kuchta, Matthew E.; Andresen, John M.; Fauth, Dan J.

    2009-10-20

    A process for sequestering carbon dioxide, which includes reacting a silicate based material with an acid to form a suspension, and combining the suspension with carbon dioxide to create active carbonation of the silicate-based material, and thereafter producing a metal salt, silica and regenerating the acid in the liquid phase of the suspension.

  20. Carbon dioxide capture and nutrients removal utilizing treated sewage by concentrated microalgae cultivation in a membrane photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Honda, Ryo; Boonnorat, Jarungwit; Chiemchaisri, Chart; Chiemchaisri, Wilai; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2012-12-01

    A highly efficient microalgae cultivation process was developed for carbon dioxide capture using nutrients from treated sewage. A submerged-membrane filtration system was installed in a photobioreactor to achieve high nutrient loading and to maintain a high concentration and production of microalgae. Chlorella vulgaris, Botryococcus braunii and Spirulina platensis were continuously cultivated with simulated treated sewage and 1%-CO(2) gas. The optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) and solids retention time (SRT) were explored to achieve the maximum CO(2) capture rate, nutrient removal rate and microalgae biomass productivity. The carbon dioxide capture rate and volumetric microalgae productivity were high when the reactor was operated under 1-day (HRT) and 18-days (SRT) conditions. The independent control of HRT and SRT is effective for efficient microalgae cultivation and carbon dioxide capture using treated sewage.

  1. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-05-01

    Electrobalance studies of calcination and carbonation of sodium bicarbonate materials were conducted at Louisiana State University. Calcination in an inert atmosphere was rapid and complete at 120 C. Carbonation was temperature dependent, and both the initial rate and the extent of reaction were found to decrease as temperature was increased between 60 and 80 C. A fluidization test apparatus was constructed at RTI and two sodium bicarbonate materials were fluidized in dry nitrogen at 22 C. The bed was completely fluidized at between 9 and 11 in. of water pressure drop. Kinetic rate expression derivations and thermodynamic calculations were conducted at RTI. Based on literature data, a simple reaction rate expression, which is zero order in carbon dioxide and water, was found to provide the best fit against reciprocal temperature. Simulations based on process thermodynamics suggested that approximately 26 percent of the carbon dioxide in flue gas could be recovered using waste heat available at 240 C.

  2. Carbon dioxide capture capacity of sodium hydroxide aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Miran; Han, Sang-Jun; Wee, Jung-Ho

    2013-01-15

    The present paper investigates the various features of NaOH aqueous solution when applied as an absorbent to capture carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emitted with relatively high concentration in the flue gas. The overall CO(2) absorption reaction was carried out according to consecutive reaction steps that are generated in the order of Na(2)CO(3) and NaHCO(3). The reaction rate and capture efficiency were strongly dependent on the NaOH concentration in the Na(2)CO(3) production range, but were constant in the NaHCO(3) production step, irrespective of the NaOH concentration. The amount of CO(2) absorbed in the solution was slightly less than the theoretical value, which was ascribed to the low trona production during the reaction and the consequent decrease in CO(2) absorption in the NaOH solution. The mass ratio of absorbed CO(2) that participated in the Na(2)CO(3), NaHCO(3), and trona production reactions was calculated to be 20:17:1, respectively.

  3. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P.Gupta; William J. McMichael; Ya Liang; Douglas P. Harrison

    2002-10-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple and inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests suggested that higher temperature calcination of trona leds to reduced carbonation activity in subsequent cycles, but that calcination in dry carbon dioxide did not result in decreased activity relative to calcination in helium. Following higher temperature calcination, sodium bicarbonate (SBC) No.3 has greater activity than either coarse or fine grades of trona. Fixed bed testing of calcined SBC No.3 at 70 C confirmed that high rates of carbon dioxide absorption are possible and that the resulting product is a mixture of Wegscheider's salt and sodium carbonate. In fluidized bed testing of supported potassium carbonate, very rapid carbonation rates were observed. Activity of the support material complicated the data analysis. A milled, spherical grade of SBC appeared to be similar in attrition and abrasion characteristics to an unmilled, less regularly shaped SBC. The calcination behavior, at 107 C, for the milled and unmilled materials was also similar.

  4. Thermodynamic and kinetic verification of tetra-n-butyl ammonium nitrate (TBANO3) as a promoter for the clathrate process applicable to precombustion carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Babu, Ponnivalavan; Yao, Minghuang; Datta, Stuti; Kumar, Rajnish; Linga, Praveen

    2014-03-18

    In this study, tetra-n-butyl ammonium nitrate (TBANO3) is evaluated as a promoter for precombustion capture of CO2 via hydrate formation. New hydrate phase equilibrium data for fuel gas (CO2/H2) mixture in presence of TBANO3 of various concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 3.7 mol % was determined and presented. Heat of hydrate dissociation was calculated using Clausius-Clapeyron equation and as the concentration of TBANO3 increases, the heat of hydrate dissociation also increases. Kinetic performance of TBANO3 as a promoter at different concentrations was evaluated at 6.0 MPa and 274.2 K. Based on induction time, gas uptake, separation factor, hydrate phase CO2 composition, and rate of hydrate growth, 1.0 mol % TBANO3 solution was found to be the optimum concentration at the experimental conditions of 6.0 MPa and 274.2 K for gas hydrate formation. A 93.0 mol % CO2 rich stream can be produced with a gas uptake of 0.0132 mol of gas/mol of water after one stage of hydrate formation in the presence of 1.0 mol % TBANO3 solution. Solubility measurements and microscopic images of kinetic measurements provide further insights to understand the reason for 1.0 mol % TBANO3 to be the optimum concentration.

  5. Kinetic and economic analysis of reactive capture of dilute carbon dioxide with Grignard reagents.

    PubMed

    Dowson, G R M; Dimitriou, I; Owen, R E; Reed, D G; Allen, R W K; Styring, P

    2015-01-01

    Carbon Dioxide Utilisation (CDU) processes face significant challenges, especially in the energetic cost of carbon capture from flue gas and the uphill energy gradient for CO2 reduction. Both of these stumbling blocks can be addressed by using alkaline earth metal compounds, such as Grignard reagents, as sacrificial capture agents. We have investigated the performance of these reagents in their ability to both capture and activate CO2 directly from dried flue gas (essentially avoiding the costly capture process entirely) at room temperature and ambient pressures with high yield and selectivity. Naturally, to make the process sustainable, these reagents must then be recycled and regenerated. This would potentially be carried out using existing industrial processes and renewable electricity. This offers the possibility of creating a closed loop system whereby alcohols and certain hydrocarbons may be carboxylated with CO2 and renewable electricity to create higher-value products containing captured carbon. A preliminary Techno-Economic Analysis (TEA) of an example looped process has been carried out to identify the electrical and raw material supply demands and hence determine production costs. These have compared broadly favourably with existing market values.

  6. New Adsorption Cycles for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    James Ritter; Armin Ebner; Steven Reynolds Hai Du; Amal Mehrotra

    2008-07-31

    The objective of this three-year project was to study new pressure swing adsorption (PSA) cycles for CO{sub 2} capture and concentration at high temperature. The heavy reflux (HR) PSA concept and the use of a hydrotalcite like (HTlc) adsorbent that captures CO{sub 2} reversibly at high temperatures simply by changing the pressure were two key features of these new PSA cycles. Through the completion or initiation of nine tasks, a bench-scale experimental and theoretical program has been carried out to complement and extend the process simulation study that was carried out during Phase I (DE-FG26-03NT41799). This final report covers the entire project from August 1, 2005 to July 31, 2008. This program included the study of PSA cycles for CO{sub 2} capture by both rigorous numerical simulation and equilibrium theory analysis. The insight gained from these studies was invaluable toward the applicability of PSA for CO{sub 2} capture, whether done at ambient or high temperature. The rigorous numerical simulation studies showed that it is indeed possible to capture and concentrate CO{sub 2} by PSA. Over a wide range of conditions it was possible to achieve greater than 90% CO{sub 2} purity and/or greater than 90% CO{sub 2} recovery, depending on the particular heavy reflux (HR) PSA cycle under consideration. Three HR PSA cycles were identified as viable candidates for further study experimentally. The equilibrium theory analysis, which represents the upper thermodynamic limit of the performance of PSA process, further validated the use of certain HR PSA cycles for CO{sub 2} capture and concentration. A new graphical approach for complex PSA cycle scheduling was also developed during the course of this program. This new methodology involves a priori specifying the cycle steps, their sequence, and the number of beds, and then following a systematic procedure that requires filling in a 2-D grid based on a few simple rules, some heuristics and some experience. It has been

  7. Carbon Dioxide Capture and Separation Techniques for Gasification-based Power Generation Point Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Jones, K.L.; Morsi, B.I.; Heintz, Y.J.; Ilconich, J.B.

    2007-06-01

    The capture/separation step for carbon dioxide (CO2) from large-point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large-point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the in-house research area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and reduced costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the research has focused on capture/separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas (post-combustion from fossil fuel-fired combustors) and from fuel gas (precombustion, such as integrated gasification combined cycle or IGCC). With respect to fuel gas applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical absorption; chemical absorption with solid sorbents; and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Pertaining to another separation technology, fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. Finally, dry, regenerable processes based on sorbents are additional techniques for CO2 capture from fuel gas. An overview of these novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of technologies related to membranes and physical solvents.

  8. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates, through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests conducted at LSU indicated that exposure of sorbent to water vapor prior to contact with carbonation gas does not significantly increase the reaction rate. Calcined fine mesh trona has a greater initial carbonation rate than calcined sodium bicarbonate, but appears to be more susceptible to loss of reactivity under severe calcination conditions. The Davison attrition indices for Grade 5 sodium bicarbonate, commercial grade sodium carbonate and extra fine granular potassium carbonate were, as tested, outside of the range suitable for entrained bed reactor testing. Fluidized bed testing at RTI indicated that in the initial stages of reaction potassium carbonate removed 35% of the carbon dioxide in simulated flue gas, and is reactive at higher temperatures than sodium carbonate. Removals declined to 6% when 54% of the capacity of the sorbent was exhausted. Carbonation data from electrobalance testing was correlated using a shrinking core reaction model. The activation energy of the reaction of sodium carbonate with carbon dioxide and water vapor was determined from nonisothermal thermogravimetry.

  9. Amine enriched solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture

    DOEpatents

    Gray, McMahan L.; Soong, Yee; Champagne, Kenneth J.

    2003-04-15

    A new method for making low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. The new method entails treating a solid substrate with acid or base and simultaneous or subsequent treatment with a substituted amine salt. The method eliminates the need for organic solvents and polymeric materials for the preparation of CO.sub.2 capture systems.

  10. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Thomas Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul Box; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-10-01

    This report describes research conducted between July 1, 2005, and September 30, 2005, on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from flue gas from coal combustion. A new batch of supported sorbent containing 10% sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) was obtained and characterized. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) testing confirmed that the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} sorbent reacted with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) at temperatures between 40 and 160 C. Although the rate of reaction was more rapid at lower temperatures, these data suggest that SO{sub 2} will not be released from the sorbent under expected sorbent-regeneration conditions. Preliminary work has been conducted to establish the design specifications for a laboratory screw-conveyor sorbent regeneration/cooling apparatus. A plan for a scheduled pilot-scale test of a heated hollow-screw conveyor was developed. This test will be conducted at facilities of the screw conveyor fabricator. This test will confirm the extent of sorbent regeneration and will provide data to evaluate multi-cycle sorbent attrition rates associated with this type of processing.

  11. Feasibility study of algae-based Carbon Dioxide capture ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SUMMARY: The biomass of microalgae contains approximately 50% carbon, which is commonly obtained from the atmosphere, but can also be taken from commercial sources that produce CO2, such as coal-fired power plants. A study of operational demonstration projects is being undertaken to evaluate the benefits of using algae to reduce CO2 emissions from industrial and small-scale utility power boilers. The operations are being studied for the use of CO2 from flue gas for algae growth along with the production of biofuels and other useful products to prepare a comprehensive characterization of the economic feasibility of using algae to capture CO2. Information is being generated for analyses of the potential for these technologies to advance in the market and assist in meeting environmental goals, as well as to examine their associated environmental implications. Three electric power generation plants (coal and fuel oil fired) equipped to send flue-gas emissions to algae culture at demonstration facilities are being studied. Data and process information are being collected and developed to facilitate feasibility and modeling evaluations of the CO2 to algae technology. An understanding of process requirements to apply this technology to existing industries would go far in advancing carbon capture opportunities. Documenting the successful use of this technology could help bring “low-tech”, low-cost, CO2 to algae, carbon capture to multiple size industries and

  12. Carbon dioxide capture with the ozone-like polynitrogen molecule Li3N3.

    PubMed

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Varandas, António J C

    2014-12-26

    In a very recent article (Chem.-Eur. J. 2014, 20, 6636), Olson et al. performed a theoretical study of the low-lying isomers of Li3N3 and found that two of the most stable structures show a novel N3(3-) molecular motif, which possesses structural and chemical bonding features similar to ozone. We explore a first application of these new Li3N3 species as a captor of carbon dioxide. Our results conclude that this is a very exothermic and exoergic process (the capture of one and two carbon dioxide molecules on Li3N3 releases, respectively, 42 and 70 kcal mol(-1) in relative free energy values evaluated at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory), which apparently occurs without any energy barrier but requires a nonlinear N3(3-) molecular motif.

  13. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-10-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbent being used in this project is sodium carbonate which is converted to sodium bicarbonate, ''baking soda,'' through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Sodium bicarbonate is regenerated to sodium carbonate when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. Testing conducted previously confirmed that the reaction rate and achievable CO{sub 2} capacity of sodium carbonate decreased with increasing temperature, and that the global rate of reaction of sodium carbonate to sodium bicarbonate increased with an increase in both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O concentrations. Energy balance calculations indicated that the rate of heat removal from the particle surface may determine the reaction rate for a particular particle system. This quarter, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) were conducted which indicated that calcination of sodium bicarbonate at temperatures as high as 200 C did not cause a significant decrease in activity in subsequent carbonation testing. When sodium bicarbonate was subjected to a five cycle calcination/carbonation test, activity declined slightly over the first two cycles but was constant thereafter. TGA tests were also conducted with two other potential sorbents. Potassium carbonate was found to be less active than sodium carbonate, at conditions of interest in preliminary TGA tests. Sodium carbonate monohydrate showed negligible activity. Testing was also conducted in a 2-inch internal diameter quartz fluidized-bed reactor system. A five cycle test demonstrated that initial removals of 10 to 15 percent of the carbon dioxide in a simulated flue gas could be achieved. The carbonation reaction proceeded at temperatures as low as 41 C. Future work by TGA and in fixed-bed, fluidized-bed, and transport

  14. Managing uncertainties: the making of the IPCC's special report on carbon dioxide capture and storage.

    PubMed

    Narita, Daiju

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is a technology that receives growing recognition because of its extremely great in mitigating climate change. However, uncertainties concerning the viability of this approach exist. With this background, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published a report in 2005 assessing of CCS. This article discusses the compilation process of the report, based on information collected through interviews with key participants and document research, highlighting how CCS's key uncertainties were estimated in the face of two disparate needs: scientific rigor and policy relevance.

  15. Moisture-swing sorption for carbon dioxide capture from ambient air: a thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Lackner, Klaus S; Wright, Allen B

    2013-01-14

    An ideal chemical sorbent for carbon dioxide capture from ambient air (air capture) must have a number of favourable properties, such as environmentally benign behaviour, a high affinity for CO(2) at very low concentration (400 ppm), and a low energy cost for regeneration. The last two properties seem contradictory, especially for sorbents employing thermal swing adsorption. On the other hand, thermodynamic analysis shows that the energy cost of an air capture device need only be slightly larger than that of a flue gas scrubber. The moisture swing separation process studied in this paper provides a novel approach to low cost CO(2) capture from air. The anionic exchange resin sorbent binds CO(2) when dry and releases it when wet. A thermodynamic model with coupled phase and chemical equilibria is developed to study the complex H(2)O-CO(2)-resin system. The moisture swing behaviour is compatible with hydration energies changing with the activity of water on the resin surfaces. This activity is in turn set by the humidity. The rearrangement of hydration water on the resin upon the sorption of a CO(2) molecule is predicted as a function of the humidity and temperature. Using water as fuel to drive the moisture swing enables an economical, large-scale implementation of air capture. By generating CO(2) with low partial pressures, the present technology has implications for in situ CO(2) utilizations which require low pressure CO(2) gas rather than liquid CO(2).

  16. Carbon dioxide capture and separation techniques for advanced power generation point sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Morsi, B.I.; Heintz, Y.J.; Jones, K.L.; Ilconich, J.B.

    2006-09-01

    The capture/separation step for carbon dioxide (CO2) from large-point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large-point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the in-house research area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the research has focused on capture/separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas (postcombustion from fossil fuel-fired combustors) and from fuel gas (precombustion, such as integrated gasification combined cycle – IGCC). With respect to fuel gas applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical absorption; chemical absorption with solid sorbents; and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for hybrid membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic silanes incorporated into an alumina support or ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. An overview of two novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of each technology.

  17. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Thomas Nelson; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-01-01

    This report describes research conducted between October 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Two supported sorbents were tested in a bench scale fluidized bed reactor system. The sorbents were prepared by impregnation of sodium carbonate on to an inert support at a commercial catalyst manufacturing facility. One sorbent, tested through five cycles of carbon dioxide sorption in an atmosphere of 3% water vapor and 0.8 to 3% carbon dioxide showed consistent reactivity with sodium carbonate utilization of 7 to 14%. A second, similarly prepared material, showed comparable reactivity in one cycle of testing. Batches of 5 other materials were prepared in laboratory scale quantities (primarily by spray drying). These materials generally have significantly greater surface areas than calcined sodium bicarbonate. Small scale testing showed no significant adsorption of mercury on representative carbon dioxide sorbent materials under expected flue gas conditions.

  18. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Ya Liang; Douglas P. Harrison

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple and inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates or intermediate salts through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests suggested that high calcination temperatures decrease the activity of sodium bicarbonate Grade 1 (SBC No.1) during subsequent carbonation cycles, but there is little or no progressive decrease in activity in successive cycles. SBC No.1 appears to be more active than SBC No.3. As expected, the presence of SO{sub 2} in simulated flue gas results in a progressive loss of sorbent capacity with increasing cycles. This is most likely due to an irreversible reaction to produce Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3}. This compound appears to be stable at calcination temperatures as high as 200 C. Tests of 40% supported potassium carbonate sorbent and plain support material suggest that some of the activity observed in tests of the supported sorbent may be due to adsorption by the support material rather than to carbonation of the sorbent.

  19. Capturing carbon dioxide as a polymer from natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Chih-Chau; Tour, Josiah J.; Kittrell, Carter; Espinal, Laura; Alemany, Lawrence B.; Tour, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Natural gas is considered the cleanest and recently the most abundant fossil fuel source, yet when it is extracted from wells, it often contains 10-20 mol% carbon dioxide (20-40 wt%), which is generally vented to the atmosphere. Efforts are underway to contain this carbon dioxide at the well-head using inexpensive and non-corrosive methods. Here we report nucleophilic porous carbons are synthesized from simple and inexpensive carbon-sulphur and carbon-nitrogen precursors. Infrared, Raman and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance signatures substantiate carbon dioxide fixation by polymerization in the carbon channels to form poly(CO2) under much lower pressures than previously required. This growing chemisorbed sulphur- or nitrogen-atom-initiated poly(CO2) chain further displaces physisorbed hydrocarbon, providing a continuous carbon dioxide selectivity. Once returned to ambient conditions, the poly(CO2) spontaneously depolymerizes, leading to a sorbent that can be easily regenerated without the thermal energy input that is required for traditional sorbents.

  20. Neutron capture in the r-process

    SciTech Connect

    Surman, Rebecca; Mclaughlin, Gail C; Mumpower, Matthew; Hix, William Raphael; Jones, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    Recently we have shown that neutron capture rates on nuclei near stability significantly influence the r-process abundance pattern. We discuss the different mechanisms by which the abundance pattern is sensitive to the capture rates and identify key nuclei whose rates are of particular im- portance. Here we consider nuclei in the A = 130 and A = 80 regions.

  1. Neutron captures and the r-process

    SciTech Connect

    Farouqi, K.; Kratz, K.-L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2006-03-13

    In order to study possible neutron-capture effects during an r-process, it is necessary to perform fully dynamical simulations. We have performed such calculations within the model of an adiabatically expanding high-entropy bubble of a SN II, using temperature-dependent reaction rates including the NON-SMOKER neutron-capture rates of Rauscher et al.

  2. Synergistic Carbon Dioxide Capture and Conversion in Porous Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yugen; Lim, Diane S W

    2015-08-24

    Global climate change and excessive CO2 emissions have caused widespread public concern in recent years. Tremendous efforts have been made towards CO2 capture and conversion. This has led to the development of numerous porous materials as CO2 capture sorbents. Concurrently, the conversion of CO2 into value-added products by chemical methods has also been well-documented recently. However, realizing the attractive prospect of direct, in situ chemical conversion of captured CO2 into other chemicals remains a challenge.

  3. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbent being used in this project is sodium carbonate which is converted to sodium bicarbonate, or ''baking soda,'' through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Sodium bicarbonate is regenerated to sodium carbonate when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, five cycle thermogravimetric tests were conducted at the Louisiana State University (LSU) with sodium bicarbonate Grade 3 (SBC{number_sign}3) which showed that carbonation activity declined slightly over 5 cycles following severe calcination conditions of 200 C in pure CO{sub 2}. Three different sets of calcination conditions were tested. Initial carbonation activity (as measured by extent of reaction in the first 25 minutes) was greatest subsequent to calcination at 120 C in He, slightly less subsequent to calcination in 80% CO{sub 2}/20% H{sub 2}O, and lowest subsequent to calcination in pure CO{sub 2} at 200 C. Differences in the extent of reaction after 150 minutes of carbonation, subsequent to calcination under the same conditions followed the same trend but were less significant. The differences between fractional carbonation under the three calcination conditions declined with increasing cycles. A preliminary fixed bed reactor test was also conducted at LSU. Following calcination, the sorbent removed approximately 19% of the CO{sub 2} in the simulated flue gas. CO{sub 2} evolved during subsequent calcination was consistent with an extent of carbonation of approximately 49%. Following successful testing of SBC{number_sign}3 sorbent at RTI reported in the last quarter, a two cycle fluidized bed reactor test was conducted with trona as the sorbent precursor, which was calcined to sodium carbonate. In the first carbonation cycle, CO

  4. Carbon dioxide capture from atmospheric air using sodium hydroxide spray.

    PubMed

    Stolaroff, Joshuah K; Keith, David W; Lowry, Gregory V

    2008-04-15

    In contrast to conventional carbon capture systems for power plants and other large point sources, the system described in this paper captures CO2 directly from ambient air. This has the advantages that emissions from diffuse sources and past emissions may be captured. The objective of this research is to determine the feasibility of a NaOH spray-based contactor for use in an air capture system by estimating the cost and energy requirements per unit CO2 captured. A prototype system is constructed and tested to measure CO2 absorption, energy use, and evaporative water loss and compared with theoretical predictions. A numerical model of drop collision and coalescence is used to estimate operating parameters for a full-scale system, and the cost of operating the system per unit CO2 captured is estimated. The analysis indicates that CO2 capture from air for climate change mitigation is technically feasible using off-the-shelf technology. Drop coalescence significantly decreases the CO2 absorption efficiency; however, fan and pump energy requirements are manageable. Water loss is significant (20 mol H2O/mol CO2 at 15 degrees C and 65% RH) but can be lowered by appropriately designing and operating the system. The cost of CO2 capture using NaOH spray (excluding solution recovery and CO2 sequestration, which may be comparable) in the full-scale system is 96 $/ton-CO2 in the base case, and ranges from 53 to 127 $/ton-CO2 under alternate operating parameters and assumptions regarding capital costs and mass transfer rate. The low end of the cost range is reached by a spray with 50 microm mean drop diameter, which is achievable with commercially available spray nozzles.

  5. Regenerable immobilized aminosilane sorbents for carbon dioxide capture applications

    DOEpatents

    Gay, McMahan; Choi, Sunho; Jones, Christopher W

    2014-09-16

    A method for the separation of carbon dioxide from ambient air and flue gases is provided wherein a phase separating moiety with a second moiety are simultaneously coupled and bonded onto an inert substrate to create a mixture which is subsequently contacted with flue gases or ambient air. The phase-separating moiety is an amine whereas the second moiety is an aminosilane, or a Group 4 propoxide such as titanium (IV) propoxide (tetrapropyl orthotitanate, C.sub.12H.sub.28O.sub.4Ti). The second moiety makes the phase-separating moiety insoluble in the pores of the inert substrate. The new sorbents have a high carbon dioxide loading capacity and considerable stability over hundreds of cycles. The synthesis method is readily scalable for commercial and industrial production.

  6. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2006-03-31

    This report describes research conducted between January 1, 2006, and March 31, 2006, on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal combustion flue gas. An integrated system composed of a downflow co-current contact absorber and two hollow screw conveyors (regenerator and cooler) was assembled, instrumented, debugged, and calibrated. A new batch of supported sorbent containing 15% sodium carbonate was prepared and subjected to surface area and compact bulk density determination.

  7. Generation, capture, and utilization of industrial carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Andrew J; Sin, Emily H K; Marriott, Ray; Clark, James H

    2010-03-22

    As a carbon-based life form living in a predominantly carbon-based environment, it is not surprising that we have created a carbon-based consumer society. Our principle sources of energy are carbon-based (coal, oil, and gas) and many of our consumer goods are derived from organic (i.e., carbon-based) chemicals (including plastics, fabrics and materials, personal care and cleaning products, dyes, and coatings). Even our large-volume inorganic-chemicals-based industries, including fertilizers and construction materials, rely on the consumption of carbon, notably in the form of large amounts of energy. The environmental problems which we now face and of which we are becoming increasingly aware result from a human-induced disturbance in the natural carbon cycle of the Earth caused by transferring large quantities of terrestrial carbon (coal, oil, and gas) to the atmosphere, mostly in the form of carbon dioxide. Carbon is by no means the only element whose natural cycle we have disturbed: we are transferring significant quantities of elements including phosphorus, sulfur, copper, and platinum from natural sinks or ores built up over millions of years to unnatural fates in the form of what we refer to as waste or pollution. However, our complete dependence on the carbon cycle means that its disturbance deserves special attention, as is now manifest in indicators such as climate change and escalating public concern over global warming. As with all disturbances in materials balances, we can seek to alleviate the problem by (1) dematerialization: a reduction in consumption; (2) rematerialization: a change in what we consume; or (3) transmaterialization: changing our attitude towards resources and waste. The "low-carbon" mantra that is popularly cited by organizations ranging from nongovernmental organizations to multinational companies and from local authorities to national governments is based on a combination of (1) and (2) (reducing carbon consumption though greater

  8. Carbon dioxide capture using polyethylenimine-loaded mesoporous carbons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jitong; Chen, Huichao; Zhou, Huanhuan; Liu, Xiaojun; Qiao, Wenming; Long, Donghui; Ling, Licheng

    2013-01-01

    A high efficiency sorbent for CO2 capture was developed by loading polyethylenimine (PEI) on mesoporous carbons which possessed well-developed mesoporous structures and large pore volume. The physicochemical properties of the sorbent were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques followed by testing for CO2 capture. Factors that affected the sorption capacity of the sorbent were studied. The sorbent exhibited extraordinary capture capacity with CO2 concentration ranging from 5% to 80%. The optimal PEI loading was determined to be 65 wt.% with a CO2 sorption capacity of 4.82 mmol-CO2/g-sorbent in 15% CO2/N2 at 75 degrees C, owing to low mass-transfer resistance and a high utilization ratio of the amine compound (63%). Moisture had a promoting effect on the sorption separation of CO2. In addition, the developed sorbent could be regenerated easily at 100 degrees C, and it exhibited excellent regenerability and stability. These results indicate that this PEI-loaded mesoporous carbon sorbent should have a good potential for CO2 capture in the future.

  9. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

    2004-04-01

    This report describes research conducted between January 1, 2004 and March 31, 2004 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. RTI has produced laboratory scale batches (approximately 300 grams) of supported sorbents (composed of 20 to 40% sodium carbonate) with high surface area and acceptable activity. Initial rates of weight gain of the supported sorbents when exposed to a simulated flue gas exceeded that of 100% calcined sodium bicarbonate. One of these sorbents was tested through six cycles of carbonation/calcination by thermogravimetric analysis and found to have consistent carbonation activity. Kinetic modeling of the regeneration cycle on the basis of diffusion resistance at the particle surface is impractical, because the evolving gases have an identical composition to those assumed for the bulk fluidization gas. A kinetic model of the reaction has been developed on the basis of bulk motion of water and carbon dioxide at the particle surface (as opposed to control by gas diffusion). The model will be used to define the operating conditions in future laboratory- and pilot-scale testing.

  10. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box; Andreas Weber; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2006-01-01

    This report describes research conducted between October 1, 2005, and December 31, 2005, on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from flue gas from coal combustion. A field test was conducted to examine the extent to which RTI's supported sorbent can be regenerated in a heated, hollow screw conveyor. This field test was conducted at the facilities of a screw conveyor manufacturer. The sorbent was essentially completely regenerated during this test, as confirmed by thermal desorption and mass spectroscopy analysis of the regenerated sorbent. Little or no sorbent attrition was observed during 24 passes through the heated screw conveyor system. Three downflow contactor absorption tests were conducted using calcined sodium bicarbonate as the absorbent. Maximum carbon dioxide removals of 57 and 91% from simulated flue gas were observed at near ambient temperatures with water-saturated gas. These tests demonstrated that calcined sodium carbonate is not as effective at removing CO{sub 2} as are supported sorbents containing 10 to 15% sodium carbonate. Delivery of the hollow screw conveyor for the laboratory-scale sorbent regeneration system was delayed; however, construction of other components of this system continued during the quarter.

  11. Progress in carbon dioxide separation and capture: a review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongqun; Xu, Zhenghe; Fan, Maohong; Gupta, Rajender; Slimane, Rachid B; Bland, Alan E; Wright, Ian

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the progress made in CO2 separation and capture research and engineering. Various technologies, such as absorption, adsorption, and membrane separation, are thoroughly discussed. New concepts such as chemical-looping combustion and hydrate-based separation are also introduced briefly. Future directions are suggested. Sequestration methods, such as forestation, ocean fertilization and mineral carbonation techniques are also covered. Underground injection and direct ocean dump are not covered.

  12. Carbon dioxide capture using resin-wafer electrodeionization

    DOEpatents

    Lin, YuPo J.; Snyder, Seth W.; Trachtenberg, Michael S.; Cowan, Robert M.; Datta, Saurav

    2015-09-08

    The present invention provides a resin-wafer electrodeionization (RW-EDI) apparatus including cathode and anode electrodes separated by a plurality of porous solid ion exchange resin wafers, which when in use are filled with an aqueous fluid. The apparatus includes one or more wafers comprising a basic ion exchange medium, and preferably includes one or more wafers comprising an acidic ion exchange medium. The wafers are separated from one another by ion exchange membranes. The fluid within the acidic and/or basic ion exchange wafers preferably includes, or is in contact with, a carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme to facilitate conversion of bicarbonate ion to carbon dioxide within the acidic medium. A pH suitable for exchange of CO.sub.2 is electrochemically maintained within the basic and acidic ion exchange wafers by applying an electric potential across the cathode and anode.

  13. Economics of carbon dioxide capture and utilization-a supply and demand perspective.

    PubMed

    Naims, Henriette

    2016-11-01

    Lately, the technical research on carbon dioxide capture and utilization (CCU) has achieved important breakthroughs. While single CO2-based innovations are entering the markets, the possible economic effects of a large-scale CO2 utilization still remain unclear to policy makers and the public. Hence, this paper reviews the literature on CCU and provides insights on the motivations and potential of making use of recovered CO2 emissions as a commodity in the industrial production of materials and fuels. By analyzing data on current global CO2 supply from industrial sources, best practice benchmark capture costs and the demand potential of CO2 utilization and storage scenarios with comparative statics, conclusions can be drawn on the role of different CO2 sources. For near-term scenarios the demand for the commodity CO2 can be covered from industrial processes, that emit CO2 at a high purity and low benchmark capture cost of approximately 33 €/t. In the long-term, with synthetic fuel production and large-scale CO2 utilization, CO2 is likely to be available from a variety of processes at benchmark costs of approx. 65 €/t. Even if fossil-fired power generation is phased out, the CO2 emissions of current industrial processes would suffice for ambitious CCU demand scenarios. At current economic conditions, the business case for CO2 utilization is technology specific and depends on whether efficiency gains or substitution of volatile priced raw materials can be achieved. Overall, it is argued that CCU should be advanced complementary to mitigation technologies and can unfold its potential in creating local circular economy solutions.

  14. Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture by a New Dual Phase Ceramic-Carbonate Membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry Y. S.

    2015-01-31

    This report documents synthesis, characterization and carbon dioxide permeation and separation properties of a new group of ceramic-carbonate dual-phase membranes and results of a laboratory study on their application for water gas shift reaction with carbon dioxide separation. A series of ceramic-carbonate dual phase membranes with various oxygen ionic or mixed ionic and electronic conducting metal oxide materials in disk, tube, symmetric, and asymmetric geometric configurations was developed. These membranes, with the thickness of 10 μm to 1.5 mm, show CO2 permeance in the range of 0.5-5×10-7 mol·m-2·s-1·Pa-1 in 500-900°C and measured CO2/N2 selectivity of up to 3000. CO2 permeation mechanism and factors that affect CO2 permeation through the dual-phase membranes have been identified. A reliable CO2 permeation model was developed. A robust method was established for the optimization of the microstructures of ceramic-carbonate membranes. The ceramic-carbonate membranes exhibit high stability for high temperature CO2 separations and water gas shift reaction. Water gas shift reaction in the dual-phase membrane reactors was studied by both modeling and experiments. It is found that high temperature syngas water gas shift reaction in tubular ceramic-carbonate dual phase membrane reactor is feasible even without catalyst. The membrane reactor exhibits good CO2 permeation flux, high thermal and chemical stability and high thermal shock resistance. Reaction and separation conditions in the membrane reactor to produce hydrogen of 93% purity and CO2 stream of >95% purity, with 90% CO2 capture have been identified. Integration of the ceramic-carbonate dual-phase membrane reactor with IGCC process for carbon dioxide capture was analyzed. A methodology was developed to identify optimum operation conditions for a

  15. Water surface capturing by image processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An alternative means of measuring the water surface interface during laboratory experiments is processing a series of sequentially captured images. Image processing can provide a continuous, non-intrusive record of the water surface profile whose accuracy is not dependent on water depth. More trad...

  16. An investigation of carbon dioxide capture by chitin acetate/DMSO binary system.

    PubMed

    Eftaiha, Ala'a F; Alsoubani, Fatima; Assaf, Khaleel I; Troll, Carsten; Rieger, Bernhard; Khaled, Aseel H; Qaroush, Abdussalam K

    2016-11-05

    Chitin is considered to be the second most abundant naturally-occurring polysaccharide. Also, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is the second highest dielectric constant polar solvent after water. Despite the low solubility of chitin in common organic solvents, and due to its high nitrogen content, it may serve as a potential scrubbing agent "wet scrubbing" for carbon dioxide (CO2) capturing as an alternative to monoethanolamine "renewables for renewables approach". Briefly, a detailed investigation for the utilization of low molecular weight, chitin-acetate (CA) in DMSO for the capturing of CO2 is reported. As carbonation process takes place, the formation of ionic alkylcarbonate was confirmed throughout spectroscopic and computational studies. Supramolecular chemisorption was proven throughout (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H NMR) together with the absence of sorption of CO2 by the monomeric repeating unit, glucosamine hydrochloride. Further, Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations supported the formation of the CA/CO2 adduct through a newly formed supramolecular ionic interaction and hydrogen bonding along the oligosaccharide backbone between the neighboring ammonium ion and hydroxyl functional groups. The sorption capacity was measured volumetrically within an in situ Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared coupled (in situ ATR-FTIR) autoclave at 25.0°C, and 4.0bar CO2, with a maximum sorption capacity of 3.63 [Formula: see text] /gsorbent at 10.0% (w/v).

  17. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Capture by Montmorillonite Using an Accurate and Flexible Force Field

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, V N; Cygan, R T; Myshakin, E M

    2012-06-21

    Naturally occurring clay minerals provide a distinctive material for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. Swelling clay minerals, such as the smectite variety, possess an aluminosilicate structure that is controlled by low-charge layers that readily expand to accommodate water molecules and, potentially, CO2. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intercalating CO2 in the interlayer of layered clays, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the process and the extent of carbon capture as a function of clay charge and structure. A series of molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational analyses have been completed to assess the molecular interactions associated with incorporation of CO2 and H2O in the interlayer of montmorillonite clay and to help validate the models with experimental observation. An accurate and fully flexible set of interatomic potentials for CO2 is developed and combined with Clayff potentials to help evaluate the intercalation mechanism and examine the effect of molecular flexibility onthe diffusion rate of CO2 in water.

  18. Yeast-based microporous carbon materials for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wenzhong; He, Yue; Zhang, Shouchun; Li, Junfen; Fan, Weibin

    2012-07-01

    A hierarchical microporous carbon material with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of 1348 m(2) g(-1) and a pore volume of 0.67 cm(3) g(-1) was prepared from yeast through chemical activation with potassium hydroxide. This type of material contains large numbers of nitrogen-containing groups (nitrogen content >5.3 wt%), and, consequently, basic sites. As a result, this material shows a faster adsorption rate and a higher adsorption capacity of CO(2) than the material obtained by directly carbonizing yeast under the same conditions. The difference is more pronounced in the presence of N(2) or H(2)O, showing that chemical activation of discarded yeast with potassium hydroxide could afford high-performance microporous carbon materials for the capture of CO(2).

  19. Synthesis and characterization of functional thienyl-phosphine microporous polymers for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianghui; Qiao, Shanlin; Du, Zhengkun; Zhou, Yuanhang; Yang, Renqiang

    2013-07-25

    A novel kind of functional organic microporous polymer is designed by introducing polar organic groups (P=O and P=S) and electron-rich heterocyclic into the framework to obtain high carbon dioxide capture capacity. The estimated Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas of these polymers are about 600 m(2) g(-1) and the highest CO2 uptake is 2.26 mmol g(-1) (1.0 bar/273 K). Interestingly, the polymer containing P=O groups shows greater CO2 capture capacity than that containing P=S groups at the same temperature. In addition, these polymers show high isosteric heats of CO2 adsorption (28.6 kJ mol(-1) ), which can be competitive with some nitrogen-rich networks. Therefore, these microporous polymers are promising candidates for carbon dioxide capture.

  20. Asphalt-derived high surface area activated porous carbons for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Jalilov, Almaz S; Ruan, Gedeng; Hwang, Chih-Chau; Schipper, Desmond E; Tour, Josiah J; Li, Yilun; Fei, Huilong; Samuel, Errol L G; Tour, James M

    2015-01-21

    Research activity toward the development of new sorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture have been increasing quickly. Despite the variety of existing materials with high surface areas and high CO2 uptake performances, the cost of the materials remains a dominant factor in slowing their industrial applications. Here we report preparation and CO2 uptake performance of microporous carbon materials synthesized from asphalt, a very inexpensive carbon source. Carbonization of asphalt with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at high temperatures (>600 °C) yields porous carbon materials (A-PC) with high surface areas of up to 2780 m(2) g(-1) and high CO2 uptake performance of 21 mmol g(-1) or 93 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C. Furthermore, nitrogen doping and reduction with hydrogen yields active N-doped materials (A-NPC and A-rNPC) containing up to 9.3% nitrogen, making them nucleophilic porous carbons with further increase in the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas up to 2860 m(2) g(-1) for A-NPC and CO2 uptake to 26 mmol g(-1) or 114 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C for A-rNPC. This is the highest reported CO2 uptake among the family of the activated porous carbonaceous materials. Thus, the porous carbon materials from asphalt have excellent properties for reversibly capturing CO2 at the well-head during the extraction of natural gas, a naturally occurring high pressure source of CO2. Through a pressure swing sorption process, when the asphalt-derived material is returned to 1 bar, the CO2 is released, thereby rendering a reversible capture medium that is highly efficient yet very inexpensive.

  1. Electropolymerized carbonic anhydrase immobilization for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Merle, Geraldine; Fradette, Sylvie; Madore, Eric; Barralet, Jake E

    2014-06-17

    Biomimetic carbonation carried out with carbonic anhydrase (CA) in CO2-absorbing solutions, such as methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), is one approach that has been developed to accelerate the capture of CO2. However, there are several practical issues, such as high cost and limited enzyme stability, that need to be overcome. In this study, the capacity of CA immobilization on a porous solid support was studied to improve the instability in the tertiary amine solvent. We have shown that a 63% porosity macroporous carbon foam support makes separation and reuse facile and allows for an efficient supply and presentation of CO2 to an aqueous solvent and the enzyme catalytic center. These enzymatic supports conserved 40% of their initial activity after 42 days at 70 °C in an amine solvent, whereas the free enzyme shows no activity after 1 h in the same conditions. In this work, we have overcome the technical barrier associated with the recovery of the biocatalyst after operation, and most of all, these electropolymerized enzymatic supports have shown a remarkable increase of thermal stability in an amine-based CO2 sequestration solvent.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of low-temperature carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide capture from coal-burning power plants.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Charles E; Elzey, John W; Hershberger, Robert E; Donnelly, Russell J; Pfotenhauer, John

    2012-07-01

    We discuss the possibility of capturing carbon dioxide from the flue gas of a coal-fired electrical power plant by cryogenically desublimating the carbon dioxide and then preparing it for transport in a pipeline to a sequestration site. Various other means have been proposed to accomplish the same goal. The problem discussed here is to estimate the "energy penalty" or "parasitic energy loss,' defined as the fraction of electrical output that will be needed to provide the refrigeration and that will then not be deliverable. We compute the energy loss (7.9-9.2% at 1 atm) based on perfect Carnot efficiency and estimate the achievable parasitic energy loss (22-26% at 1 atm) by incorporating the published coefficient of performance values for appropriately sized refrigeration or liquefaction cycles at the relevant temperatures. The analyses at 1 atm represent a starting point for future analyses using elevated pressures.

  3. Design of protonation constant measurement apparatus for carbon dioxide capturing solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma'mun, S.; Amelia, E.; Rahmat, V.; Alwani, D. R.; Kurniawan, D.

    2016-11-01

    Global warming phenomenon has led to world climate change caused by high concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG), e.g. carbon dioxide (CO2), in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is produced in large amount from coal-fired power plants, iron and steel production, cement production, chemical and petrochemical manufacturing, natural gas purification, and transportation. Carbon dioxide emissions seem to rise from year to year; some efforts to reduce the emissions are, therefore, required. Amine-based absorption could be deployed for post-combustion capture. Some parameters, e.g. mass transfer coefficients and chemical equilibrium constants, are required for a vapor-liquid equilibrium modeling. Protonation constant (pKa), as one of those parameters, could then be measured experimentally. Therefore, an experimental setup to measure pKa of CO2 capturing solvents was designed and validated by measuring the pKa of acetic acid at 30 to 70 °C by a potentiometric titration method. The set up was also used to measure the pKa of MEA at 27 °C. Based on the validation results and due to low vapor pressure of CO2 capturing solvents in general, e.g. alkanolamines, the setup could therefore be used for measuring pKa of the CO2 capturing solvents at temperatures up to 70 °C.

  4. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz

    2001-01-01

    Four grades of sodium bicarbonate and two grades of trona were characterized in terms of particle size distribution, surface area, pore size distribution, and attrition. Surface area and pore size distribution determinations were conducted after calcination of the materials. The sorbent materials were subjected to thermogravimetric testing to determine comparative rates and extent of calcination (in inert gas) and sorption (in a simulated coal combustion flue gas mixture). Selected materials were exposed to five calcination/sorption cycles and showed no decrease in either sorption capacity or sorption rate. Process simulations were conducted involving different heat recovery schemes. The process is thermodynamically feasible. The sodium-based materials appear to have suitable physical properties for use as regenerable sorbents and, based on thermogravimetric testing, are likely to have sorption and calcination rates that are rapid enough to be of interest in full-scale carbon sequestration processes.

  5. Bench Scale Thin Film Composite Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, Paul; Bhandari, Dhaval; Narang, Kristi; McCloskey, Pat; Singh, Surinder; Ananthasayanam, Balajee; Howson, Paul; Lee, Julia; Wroczynski, Ron; Stewart, Frederick; Orme, Christopher; Klaehn, John; McNally, Joshua; Rownaghi, Ali; Lu, Liu; Koros, William; Goizueta, Roberto; Sethi, Vijay

    2015-04-01

    GE Global Research, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), and Western Research Institute (WRI) proposed to develop high performance thin film polymer composite hollow fiber membranes and advanced processes for economical post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from pulverized coal flue gas at temperatures typical of existing flue gas cleanup processes. The project sought to develop and then optimize new gas separations membrane systems at the bench scale, including tuning the properties of a novel polyphosphazene polymer in a coating solution and fabricating highly engineered porous hollow fiber supports. The project also sought to define the processes needed to coat the fiber support to manufacture composite hollow fiber membranes with high performance, ultra-thin separation layers. Physical, chemical, and mechanical stability of the materials (individual and composite) towards coal flue gas components was considered via exposure and performance tests. Preliminary design, technoeconomic, and economic feasibility analyses were conducted to evaluate the overall performance and impact of the process on the cost of electricity (COE) for a coal-fired plant including capture technologies. At the onset of the project, Membranes based on coupling a novel selective material polyphosphazene with an engineered hollow fiber support was found to have the potential to capture greater than 90% of the CO2 in flue gas with less than 35% increase in COE, which would achieve the DOE-targeted performance criteria. While lab-scale results for the polyphosphazene materials were very promising, and the material was incorporated into hollow-fiber modules, difficulties were encountered relating to the performance of these membrane systems over time. Performance, as measured by both flux of and selectivity for CO2 over other flue gas constituents was found to deteriorate over time, suggesting a system that was

  6. Two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks for carbon dioxide capture through channel-wall functionalization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ning; Chen, Xiong; Krishna, Rajamani; Jiang, Donglin

    2015-03-02

    Ordered open channels found in two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks (2D COFs) could enable them to adsorb carbon dioxide. However, the frameworks' dense layer architecture results in low porosity that has thus far restricted their potential for carbon dioxide adsorption. Here we report a strategy for converting a conventional 2D COF into an outstanding platform for carbon dioxide capture through channel-wall functionalization. The dense layer structure enables the dense integration of functional groups on the channel walls, creating a new version of COFs with high capacity, reusability, selectivity, and separation productivity for flue gas. These results suggest that channel-wall functional engineering could be a facile and powerful strategy to develop 2D COFs for high-performance gas storage and separation.

  7. TARGET: Rapid Capture of Process Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, C. J.; Ly, H. V.; Saito, T.; Loftin, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    TARGET (Task Analysis/Rule Generation Tool) represents a new breed of tool that blends graphical process flow modeling capabilities with the function of a top-down reporting facility. Since NASA personnel frequently perform tasks that are primarily procedural in nature, TARGET models mission or task procedures and generates hierarchical reports as part of the process capture and analysis effort. Historically, capturing knowledge has proven to be one of the greatest barriers to the development of intelligent systems. Current practice generally requires lengthy interactions between the expert whose knowledge is to be captured and the knowledge engineer whose responsibility is to acquire and represent the expert's knowledge in a useful form. Although much research has been devoted to the development of methodologies and computer software to aid in the capture and representation of some types of knowledge, procedural knowledge has received relatively little attention. In essence, TARGET is one of the first tools of its kind, commercial or institutional, that is designed to support this type of knowledge capture undertaking. This paper will describe the design and development of TARGET for the acquisition and representation of procedural knowledge. The strategies employed by TARGET to support use by knowledge engineers, subject matter experts, programmers and managers will be discussed. This discussion includes the method by which the tool employs its graphical user interface to generate a task hierarchy report. Next, the approach to generate production rules for incorporation in and development of a CLIPS based expert system will be elaborated. TARGET also permits experts to visually describe procedural tasks as a common medium for knowledge refinement by the expert community and knowledge engineer making knowledge consensus possible. The paper briefly touches on the verification and validation issues facing the CLIPS rule generation aspects of TARGET. A description of

  8. Diffusive capture process on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungmin; Yook, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Yup

    2006-10-01

    We study the dynamical properties of a diffusing lamb captured by a diffusing lion on the complex networks with various sizes of N . We find that the lifetime ⟨T⟩ of a lamb scales as ⟨T⟩˜N and the survival probability S(N→∞,t) becomes finite on scale-free networks with degree exponent γ>3 . However, S(N,t) for γ<3 has a long-living tail on tree-structured scale-free networks and decays exponentially on looped scale-free networks. This suggests that the second moment of degree distribution ⟨k2⟩ is the relevant factor for the dynamical properties in the diffusive capture process. We numerically find that the normalized number of capture events at a node with degree k , n(k) , decreases as n(k)˜k-σ . When γ<3 , n(k) still increases anomalously for k≈kmax , where kmax is the maximum value of k of given networks with size N . We analytically show that n(k) satisfies the relation n(k)˜k2P(k) for any degree distribution P(k) and the total number of capture events Ntot is proportional to ⟨k2⟩ , which causes the γ -dependent behavior of S(N,t) and ⟨T⟩ .

  9. Does Involuntary Attentional Capture Curtail Stimulus Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W.; McLean, John P.; Folk, Charles L.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Under certain conditions uninformative visual cues at non-target locations increase target RTs. The typical explanation is that visual attention has been involuntarily summoned to the cued location and is unavailable when needed at the target location. Here we present evidence that capture has not just oriented attention away from the target location, but has lead to the processing of stimuli at the location of the uninformative cue.

  10. Made-to-order metal-organic frameworks for trace carbon dioxide removal and air capture.

    PubMed

    Shekhah, Osama; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Chen, Zhijie; Guillerm, Vincent; Cairns, Amy; Adil, Karim; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2014-06-25

    Direct air capture is regarded as a plausible alternate approach that, if economically practical, can mitigate the increasing carbon dioxide emissions associated with two of the main carbon polluting sources, namely stationary power plants and transportation. Here we show that metal-organic framework crystal chemistry permits the construction of an isostructural metal-organic framework (SIFSIX-3-Cu) based on pyrazine/copper(II) two-dimensional periodic 4(4) square grids pillared by silicon hexafluoride anions and thus allows further contraction of the pore system to 3.5 versus 3.84 Å for the parent zinc(II) derivative. This enhances the adsorption energetics and subsequently displays carbon dioxide uptake and selectivity at very low partial pressures relevant to air capture and trace carbon dioxide removal. The resultant SIFSIX-3-Cu exhibits uniformly distributed adsorption energetics and offers enhanced carbon dioxide physical adsorption properties, uptake and selectivity in highly diluted gas streams, a performance, to the best of our knowledge, unachievable with other classes of porous materials.

  11. Made-to-order metal-organic frameworks for trace carbon dioxide removal and air capture

    PubMed Central

    Shekhah, Osama; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Chen, Zhijie; Guillerm, Vincent; Cairns, Amy; Adil, Karim; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Direct air capture is regarded as a plausible alternate approach that, if economically practical, can mitigate the increasing carbon dioxide emissions associated with two of the main carbon polluting sources, namely stationary power plants and transportation. Here we show that metal-organic framework crystal chemistry permits the construction of an isostructural metal-organic framework (SIFSIX-3-Cu) based on pyrazine/copper(II) two-dimensional periodic 44 square grids pillared by silicon hexafluoride anions and thus allows further contraction of the pore system to 3.5 versus 3.84 Å for the parent zinc(II) derivative. This enhances the adsorption energetics and subsequently displays carbon dioxide uptake and selectivity at very low partial pressures relevant to air capture and trace carbon dioxide removal. The resultant SIFSIX-3-Cu exhibits uniformly distributed adsorption energetics and offers enhanced carbon dioxide physical adsorption properties, uptake and selectivity in highly diluted gas streams, a performance, to the best of our knowledge, unachievable with other classes of porous materials. PMID:24964404

  12. Method and system for capturing carbon dioxide and/or sulfur dioxide from gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Li, Yang; Zhao, Xinglei

    2014-07-08

    The present invention provides a system for capturing CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2, comprising: (a) a CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2 absorber comprising an amine and/or amino acid salt capable of absorbing the CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2 to produce a CO.sub.2- and/or SO.sub.2-containing solution; (b) an amine regenerator to regenerate the amine and/or amino acid salt; and, when the system captures CO.sub.2, (c) an alkali metal carbonate regenerator comprising an ammonium catalyst capable catalyzing the aqueous alkali metal bicarbonate into the alkali metal carbonate and CO.sub.2 gas. The present invention also provides for a system for capturing SO.sub.2, comprising: (a) a SO.sub.2 absorber comprising aqueous alkali metal carbonate, wherein the alkali metal carbonate is capable of absorbing the SO.sub.2 to produce an alkali metal sulfite/sulfate precipitate and CO.sub.2.

  13. Simteche Hydrate CO2 Capture Process

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant and Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2006-09-30

    As a result of an August 4, 2005 project review meeting held at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to assess the project's technical progress, Nexant/Simteche/LANL project team was asked to meet four targets related to the existing project efforts. The four targets were to be accomplished by the September 30, 2006. These four targets were: (1) The CO{sub 2} hydrate process needs to show, through engineering and sensitivity analysis, that it can achieve 90% CO{sub 2} capture from the treated syngas stream, operating at 1000 psia. The cost should indicate the potential of achieving the Sequestration Program's cost target of less than 10% increase in the cost of electricity (COE) of the non-CO{sub 2} removal IGCC plant or demonstrate a significant cost reduction from the Selexol process cost developed in the Phase II engineering analysis. (2) The ability to meet the 20% cost share requirement for research level efforts. (3) LANL identifies through equilibrium and bench scale testing a once-through 90% CO{sub 2} capture promoter that supports the potential to achieve the Sequestration Program's cost target. Nexant is to perform an engineering analysis case to verify any economic benefits, as needed; no ETM validation is required, however, for this promoter for FY06. (4) The CO{sub 2} hydrate once-through process is to be validated at 1000 psia with the ETM at a CO{sub 2} capture rate of 60% without H{sub 2}S. The performance of 68% rate of capture is based on a batch, equilibrium data with H{sub 2}S. Validation of the test results is required through multiple runs and engineering calculations. Operational issues will be solved that will specifically effect the validation of the technology. Nexant was given the primary responsibility for Target No.1, while Simteche was mainly responsible for Target No.2; with LANL having the responsibility of Targets No.3 and No.4.

  14. Capturing the Local Adsorption Structures of Carbon Dioxide in Polyamine-Impregnated Mesoporous Silica Adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shing-Jong; Hung, Chin-Te; Zheng, Anmin; Lin, Jen-Shan; Yang, Chun-Fei; Chang, Yu-Chi; Deng, Feng; Liu, Shang-Bin

    2014-09-18

    Interactions between amines and carbon dioxide (CO2) are essential to amine-functionalized solid adsorbents for carbon capture, and an in-depth knowledge of these interactions is crucial to adsorbent design and fabrication as well as adsorption/desorption processes. The local structures of CO2 adsorbed on a tetraethylenepentamine-impregnated mesoporous silica SBA-15 were investigated by solid-state (13)C{(14)N} S-RESPDOR MAS NMR technique and theoretical DFT calculations. Two types of adsorption species, namely, secondary and tertiary carbamates as well as distant ammonium groups were identified together with their relative concentrations and relevant (14)N quadrupolar parameters. Moreover, a dipolar coupling of 716 Hz was derived, corresponding to a (13)C-(14)N internuclear distance of 1.45 Å. These experimental data are in excellent agreement with results obtained from DFT calculations, revealing that the distribution of surface primary and secondary amines readily dictates the CO2 adsorption/desorption properties of the adsorbent.

  15. Combustion systems and power plants incorporating parallel carbon dioxide capture and sweep-based membrane separation units to remove carbon dioxide from combustion gases

    DOEpatents

    Wijmans, Johannes G [Menlo Park, CA; Merkel, Timothy C [Menlo Park, CA; Baker, Richard W [Palo Alto, CA

    2011-10-11

    Disclosed herein are combustion systems and power plants that incorporate sweep-based membrane separation units to remove carbon dioxide from combustion gases. In its most basic embodiment, the invention is a combustion system that includes three discrete units: a combustion unit, a carbon dioxide capture unit, and a sweep-based membrane separation unit. In a preferred embodiment, the invention is a power plant including a combustion unit, a power generation system, a carbon dioxide capture unit, and a sweep-based membrane separation unit. In both of these embodiments, the carbon dioxide capture unit and the sweep-based membrane separation unit are configured to be operated in parallel, by which we mean that each unit is adapted to receive exhaust gases from the combustion unit without such gases first passing through the other unit.

  16. Carbon dioxide reduction by the Bosch process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, M. P.; Reid, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Prototype units for carrying out the reduction of carbon dioxide to elementary carbon have been built and operated successfully. In some cases, however, startup difficulties have been reported. Moreover, the recycle reactor product has been reported to contain only small amounts of water and undesirably high yields of methane. This paper presents the results of the first phase of an experimental study that was carried out to define the mechanisms occurring in the reduction process. Conclusions are drawn and possible modifications to the present recycle process are suggested.

  17. Energy and economic analysis of the carbon dioxide capture installation with the use of monoethanolamine and ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochon, Krzysztof; Chmielniak, Tadeusz

    2015-03-01

    In the study an accurate energy and economic analysis of the carbon capture installation was carried out. Chemical absorption with the use of monoethanolamine (MEA) and ammonia was adopted as the technology of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from flue gases. The energy analysis was performed using a commercial software package to analyze the chemical processes. In the case of MEA, the demand for regeneration heat was about 3.5 MJ/kg of CO2, whereas for ammonia it totalled 2 MJ/kg CO2. The economic analysis was based on the net present value (NPV) method. The limit price for CO2 emissions allowances at which the investment project becomes profitable (NPV = 0) was more than 160 PLN/Mg for MEA and less than 150 PLN/Mg for ammonia. A sensitivity analysis was also carried out to determine the limit price of CO2 emissions allowances depending on electricity generation costs at different values of investment expenditures.

  18. Carbon dioxide capture strategies from flue gas using microalgae: a review.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daniya M; Mechery, Jerry; Paulose, Sylas V

    2016-09-01

    Global warming and pollution are the twin crises experienced globally. Biological offset of these crises are gaining importance because of its zero waste production and the ability of the organisms to thrive under extreme or polluted condition. In this context, this review highlights the recent developments in carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from flue gas using microalgae and finding the best microalgal remediation strategy through contrast and comparison of different strategies. Different flue gas microalgal remediation strategies discussed are as follows: (i) Flue gas to CO2 gas segregation using adsorbents for microalgal mitigation, (ii) CO2 separation from flue gas using absorbents and later regeneration for microalgal mitigation, (iii) Flue gas to liquid conversion for direct microalgal mitigation, and (iv) direct flue gas mitigation using microalgae. This work also studies the economic feasibility of microalgal production. The study discloses that the direct convening of flue gas with high carbon dioxide content, into microalgal system is cost-effective.

  19. Carbon dioxide postcombustion capture: a novel screening study of the carbon dioxide absorption performance of 76 amines

    SciTech Connect

    Graeme Puxty; Robert Rowland; Andrew Allport; Qi Yang; Mark Bown; Robert Burns; Marcel Maeder; Moetaz Attalla

    2009-08-15

    The significant and rapid reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is recognized as necessary to mitigate the potential climate effects from global warming. The postcombustion capture (PCC) and storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced from the use of fossil fuels for electricity generation is a key technology needed to achieve these reductions. The most mature technology for CO{sub 2} capture is reversible chemical absorption into an aqueous amine solution. In this study the results from measurements of the CO{sub 2} absorption capacity of aqueous amine solutions for 76 different amines are presented. Measurements were made using both a novel isothermal gravimetric analysis (IGA) method and a traditional absorption apparatus. Seven amines, consisting of one primary, three secondary, and three tertiary amines, were identified as exhibiting outstanding absorption capacities. Most have a number of structural features in common including steric hindrance and hydroxyl functionality 2 or 3 carbons from the nitrogen. Initial CO{sub 2} absorption rate data from the IGA measurements was also used to indicate relative absorption rates. Most of the outstanding performers in terms of capacity also showed initial absorption rates comparable to the industry standard monoethanolamine (MEA). This indicates, in terms of both absorption capacity and kinetics, that they are promising candidates for further investigation. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Carbon dioxide postcombustion capture: a novel screening study of the carbon dioxide absorption performance of 76 amines.

    PubMed

    Puxty, Graeme; Rowland, Robert; Allport, Andrew; Yang, Qi; Bown, Mark; Burns, Robert; Maeder, Marcel; Attalla, Moetaz

    2009-08-15

    The significant and rapid reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is recognized as necessary to mitigate the potential climate effects from global warming. The postcombustion capture (PCC) and storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) produced from the use of fossil fuels for electricity generation is a key technology needed to achieve these reductions. The most mature technology for CO2 capture is reversible chemical absorption into an aqueous amine solution. In this study the results from measurements of the CO2 absorption capacity of aqueous amine solutions for 76 different amines are presented. Measurements were made using both a novel isothermal gravimetric analysis (IGA) method and a traditional absorption apparatus. Seven amines, consisting of one primary, three secondary, and three tertiary amines, were identified as exhibiting outstanding absorption capacities. Most have a number of structural features in common including steric hindrance and hydroxyl functionality 2 or 3 carbons from the nitrogen. Initial CO2 absorption rate data from the IGA measurements was also used to indicate relative absorption rates. Most of the outstanding performers in terms of capacity also showed initial absorption rates comparable to the industry standard monoethanolamine (MEA). This indicates, in terms of both absorption capacity and kinetics, that they are promising candidates for further investigation.

  1. Predicting Large CO2 Adsorption in Aluminosilicate Zeolites for Postcombustion Carbon Dioxide Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J; Lin, LC; Swisher, JA; Haranczyk, M; Smit, B

    2012-11-21

    Large-scale simulations of aluminosilicate zeolites were conducted to identify structures that possess large CO2 uptake for postcombustion carbon dioxide capture. In this study, we discovered that the aluminosilicate zeolite structures with the highest CO2 uptake values have an idealized silica lattice with a large free volume and a framework topology that maximizes the regions with nearest-neighbor framework atom distances from 3 to 4.5 angstrom. These predictors extend well to different Si:Al ratios and for both Na+ and Ca2+ cations, demonstrating their universal applicability in identifying the best-performing aluminosilicate zeolite structures.

  2. Analysis and status of post-combustion carbon dioxide capture technologies.

    PubMed

    Bhown, Abhoyjit S; Freeman, Brice C

    2011-10-15

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) undertook a multiyear effort to understand the landscape of postcombustion CO₂ capture technologies globally. In this paper we discuss several central issues facing CO₂ capture involving scale, energy, and overall status of development. We argue that the scale of CO₂ emissions is sufficiently large to place inherent limits on the types of capture processes that could be deployed broadly. We also discuss the minimum energy usage in terms of a parasitic load on a power plant. Finally, we present summary findings of the landscape of capture technologies using an index of technology readiness levels.

  3. Capture of carbon dioxide by amine-impregnated as-synthesized MCM-41.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianwen; Liao, Lei; Xiao, Yu; Zhang, Pei; Shi, Yao

    2010-01-01

    The novel carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorbents with a high capture efficiency were prepared through impregnating the as-synthesized MCM-41 with three kinds of amines, namely diethylenetriamine (DETA), triethylenetetramine (TETA) and 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP). The resultant samples were characterized by small angle X-ray diffraction and low temperature N2 adsorption. The synthesis way not only saves the energy or extractor to remove the template but also is environmentally friendly due to the absence of the potential pollutants such as toluene. CO2 capture was investigated in a dynamic packed column. The sample impregnated by TETA showed the highest adsorption capacity, approximately 2.22 mmol/g at 60 degrees C due to its highest amino-groups content among the three amines. The CO2 adsorption behavior was also investigated with the deactivation model, which showed an excellent prediction for the breakthrough curves.

  4. Automated full matrix capture for industrial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Roy H.; Pierce, S. Gareth; Collison, Ian; Dutton, Ben; Dziewierz, Jerzy; Jackson, Joseph; Lardner, Timothy; MacLeod, Charles; Morozov, Maxim

    2015-03-01

    Full matrix capture (FMC) ultrasound can be used to generate a permanent re-focusable record of data describing the geometry of a part; a valuable asset for an inspection process. FMC is a desirable acquisition mode for automated scanning of complex geometries, as it allows compensation for surface shape in post processing and application of the total focusing method. However, automating the delivery of such FMC inspection remains a significant challenge for real industrial processes due to the high data overhead associated with the ultrasonic acquisition. The benefits of NDE delivery using six-axis industrial robots are well versed when considering complex inspection geometries, but such an approach brings additional challenges to scanning speed and positional accuracy when combined with FMC inspection. This study outlines steps taken to optimize the scanning speed and data management of a process to scan the diffusion bonded membrane of a titanium test plate. A system combining a KUKA robotic arm and a reconfigurable FMC phased array controller is presented. The speed and data implications of different scanning methods are compared, and the impacts on data visualization quality are discussed with reference to this study. For the 0.5 m2 sample considered, typical acquisitions of 18 TB/m2 were measured for a triple back wall FMC acquisition, illustrating the challenge of combining high data throughput with acceptable scanning speeds.

  5. Electrocatalytic process for carbon dioxide conversion

    DOEpatents

    Masel, Richard I.; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2017-01-31

    An electrocatalytic process for carbon dioxide conversion includes combining a Catalytically Active Element and Helper Catalyst in the presence of carbon dioxide, allowing a reaction to proceed to produce a reaction product, and applying electrical energy to said reaction to achieve electrochemical conversion of said reactant to said reaction product. The Catalytically Active Element can be a metal in the form of supported or unsupported particles or flakes with an average size between 0.6 nm and 100 nm. the reaction products comprise at least one of CO, HCO.sup.-, H.sub.2CO, (HCO.sub.2).sup.-, H.sub.2CO.sub.2, CH.sub.3OH, CH.sub.4, C.sub.2H.sub.4, CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH, CH.sub.3COO.sup.-, CH.sub.3COOH, C.sub.2H.sub.6, (COOH).sub.2, (COO.sup.-).sub.2, and CF.sub.3COOH.

  6. Electrochemical Capture and Release of Carbon Dioxide Using a Disulfide-Thiocarbonate Redox Cycle.

    PubMed

    Singh, Poonam; Rheinhardt, Joseph H; Olson, Jarred Z; Tarakeshwar, Pilarisetty; Mujica, Vladimiro; Buttry, Daniel A

    2017-01-25

    We describe a new electrochemical cycle that enables capture and release of carbon dioxide. The capture agent is benzylthiolate (RS(-)), generated electrochemically by reduction of benzyldisulfide (RSSR). Reaction of RS(-) with CO2 produces a terminal, sulfur-bound monothiocarbonate, RSCO2(-), which acts as the CO2 carrier species, much the same as a carbamate serves as the CO2 carrier for amine-based capture strategies. Oxidation of the thiocarbonate releases CO2 and regenerates RSSR. The newly reported S-benzylthiocarbonate (IUPAC name benzylsulfanylformate) is characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR, FTIR, and electrochemical analysis. The capture-release cycle is studied in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BMP TFSI) and dimethylformamide. Quantum chemical calculations give a binding energy of CO2 to benzyl thiolate of -66.3 kJ mol(-1), consistent with the experimental observation of formation of a stable CO2 adduct. The data described here represent the first report of electrochemical behavior of a sulfur-bound terminal thiocarbonate.

  7. The Biological Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent as a Model to Study Carbon Dioxide Capturing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Minic, Zoran; Thongbam, Premila D.

    2011-01-01

    Deep sea hydrothermal vents are located along the mid-ocean ridge system, near volcanically active areas, where tectonic plates are moving away from each other. Sea water penetrates the fissures of the volcanic bed and is heated by magma. This heated sea water rises to the surface dissolving large amounts of minerals which provide a source of energy and nutrients to chemoautotrophic organisms. Although this environment is characterized by extreme conditions (high temperature, high pressure, chemical toxicity, acidic pH and absence of photosynthesis) a diversity of microorganisms and many animal species are specially adapted to this hostile environment. These organisms have developed a very efficient metabolism for the assimilation of inorganic CO2 from the external environment. In order to develop technology for the capture of carbon dioxide to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, enzymes involved in CO2 fixation and assimilation might be very useful. This review describes some current research concerning CO2 fixation and assimilation in the deep sea environment and possible biotechnological application of enzymes for carbon dioxide capture. PMID:21673885

  8. The biological deep sea hydrothermal vent as a model to study carbon dioxide capturing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zoran; Thongbam, Premila D

    2011-01-01

    Deep sea hydrothermal vents are located along the mid-ocean ridge system, near volcanically active areas, where tectonic plates are moving away from each other. Sea water penetrates the fissures of the volcanic bed and is heated by magma. This heated sea water rises to the surface dissolving large amounts of minerals which provide a source of energy and nutrients to chemoautotrophic organisms. Although this environment is characterized by extreme conditions (high temperature, high pressure, chemical toxicity, acidic pH and absence of photosynthesis) a diversity of microorganisms and many animal species are specially adapted to this hostile environment. These organisms have developed a very efficient metabolism for the assimilation of inorganic CO₂ from the external environment. In order to develop technology for the capture of carbon dioxide to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, enzymes involved in CO₂ fixation and assimilation might be very useful. This review describes some current research concerning CO₂ fixation and assimilation in the deep sea environment and possible biotechnological application of enzymes for carbon dioxide capture.

  9. A Novel System for Carbon Dioxide Capture Utilizing Electrochemical Membrane Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein; Jolly, Stephen; Patel, Dilip; Hunt, Jennifer; Steen, William A.; Richardson, Carl F.; Marina, Olga A.

    2013-06-03

    FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and URS Corporation, is developing a novel Combined Electric Power and Carbon-Dioxide Separation (CEPACS) system, under a contract from the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FE0007634), to efficiently and cost effectively separate carbon dioxide from the emissions of existing coal fired power plants. The CEPACS system is based on FCE’s electrochemical membrane (ECM) technology utilizing the Company’s internal reforming carbonate fuel cell products carrying the trade name of Direct FuelCell® (DFC®). The unique chemistry of carbonate fuel cells offers an innovative approach for separation of CO2 from existing fossil-fuel power plant exhaust streams (flue gases). The ECM-based CEPACS system has the potential to become a transformational CO2-separation technology by working as two devices in one: it separates the CO2 from the exhaust of other plants such as an existing coal-fired plant and simultaneously produces clean and environmentally benign (green) electric power at high efficiency using a supplementary fuel. The overall objective of this project is to successfully demonstrate the ability of FCE’s electrochemical membrane-based CEPACS system technology to separate ≥ 90% of the CO2 from a simulated Pulverized Coal (PC) power plant flue-gas stream and to compress the captured CO2 to a state that can be easily transported for sequestration or beneficial use. Also, a key project objective is to show, through a Technical and Economic Feasibility Study and bench scale testing (11.7 m2 area ECM), that the electrochemical membrane-based CEPACS system is an economical alternative for CO2 capture in PC power plants, and that it meets DOE objectives for the incremental cost of electricity (COE) for post-combustion CO2 capture.

  10. Feasibility study of using brine for carbon dioxide capture and storage from fixed sources

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Dziedzic; Kenneth B. Gross; Robert A. Gorski; John T. Johnson

    2006-12-15

    A laboratory-scale reactor was developed to evaluate the capture of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from a gas into a liquid as an approach to control greenhouse gases emitted from fixed sources. CO{sub 2} at 5-50% concentrations was passed through a gas-exchange membrane and transferred into liquid media - tap water or simulated brine. When using water, capture efficiencies exceeded 50% and could be enhanced by adding base (e.g., sodium hydroxide) or the combination of base and carbonic anhydrase, a catalyst that speeds the conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonic acid. The transferred CO{sub 2} formed ions, such as bicarbonate or carbonate, depending on the amount of base present. Adding precipitating cations, like Ca{sup ++}, produced insoluble carbonate salts. Simulated brine proved nearly as efficient as water in absorbing CO{sub 2}, with less than a 6% reduction in CO{sub 2} transferred. The CO{sub 2} either dissolved into the brine or formed a mixture of gas and ions. If the chemistry was favorable, carbonate precipitate spontaneously formed. Energy expenditure of pumping brine up and down from subterranean depths was modeled. We concluded that using brine in a gas-exchange membrane system for capturing CO{sub 2} from a gas stream to liquid is technically feasible and can be accomplished at a reasonable expenditure of energy. 24 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs., 1 app.

  11. An Assessment of the Commercial Availability of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies as of June 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.; Davidson, Casie L.; Dahowski, Robert T.

    2009-06-26

    Currently, there is considerable confusion within parts of the carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technical and regulatory communities regarding the maturity and commercial readiness of the technologies needed to capture, transport, inject, monitor and verify the efficacy of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in deep, geologic formations. The purpose of this technical report is to address this confusion by discussing the state of CCS technological readiness in terms of existing commercial deployments of CO2 capture systems, CO2 transportation pipelines, CO2 injection systems and measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) systems for CO2 injected into deep geologic structures. To date, CO2 has been captured from both natural gas and coal fired commercial power generating facilities, gasification facilities and other industrial processes. Transportation via pipelines and injection of CO2 into the deep subsurface are well established commercial practices with more than 35 years of industrial experience. There are also a wide variety of MMV technologies that have been employed to understand the fate of CO2 injected into the deep subsurface. The four existing end-to-end commercial CCS projects – Sleipner, Snøhvit, In Salah and Weyburn – are using a broad range of these technologies, and prove that, at a high level, geologic CO2 storage technologies are mature and capable of deploying at commercial scales. Whether wide scale deployment of CCS is currently or will soon be a cost-effective means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions is largely a function of climate policies which have yet to be enacted and the public’s willingness to incur costs to avoid dangerous anthropogenic interference with the Earth’s climate. There are significant benefits to be had by continuing to improve through research, development, and demonstration suite of existing CCS technologies. Nonetheless, it is clear that most of the core technologies required to address capture, transport

  12. Purification of carbonic anhydrase from bovine erythrocytes and its application in the enzymic capture of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    da Costa Ores, Joana; Sala, Luisa; Cerveira, Guido Picaluga; Kalil, Susana Juliano

    2012-06-01

    This work presents a study of industrially applicable techniques to obtain a biologically supported carbon dioxide capture system, based on the extraction of carbonic anhydrase from bovine blood. Carbonic anhydrase is a metalloenzyme which catalyzes the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide. The objective of this study was to establish conditions to obtain carbonic anhydrase from bovine erythrocytes and apply it in the capture of carbon dioxide. To achieve this, two different purification techniques were evaluated: one by extraction with the organic solvents chloroform and ethanol, where different solvent proportions were studied; and the other by ammonium sulfate precipitation, testing percent saturations between 10% and 80%. Carbon dioxide was enzymatically captured by its precipitation as calcium carbonate with the enzyme obtained by both techniques. The enzyme extracted by ethanol and chloroform showed an activity of 2623 U mL(-1), recovery of 98% and purification factor of 104-fold. That precipitated by ammonium sulfate showed an activity of 2162 U mL(-1), recovery of 66% and purification factor of 1.4-fold using 60% ammonium sulfate saturation. The results obtained in the carbon dioxide capture experiments showed that the carbonic anhydrase extracted in this study not only enhanced the hydration of CO(2), but also promoted the formation of CaCO(3).

  13. Coprecipitated, copper-based, alumina-stabilized materials for carbon dioxide capture by chemical looping combustion.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Qasim; Kierzkowska, Agnieszka Marta; Müller, Christoph Rüdiger

    2012-08-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) has emerged as a carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) process to produce a pure stream of CO(2) at very low costs when compared with alternative CCS technologies, such as scrubbing with amines. From a thermodynamic point of view, copper oxide is arguably the most promising candidate for the oxygen carrier owing to its exothermic reduction and oxidation reactions and high oxygen-carrying capacity. However, the low melting point of pure copper of only 1085 °C has so far prohibited the synthesis of copper-rich oxygen carriers. This paper is concerned with the development of copper-based and Al(2)O(3)-stabilized oxygen carriers that contain a high mass fraction of CuO, namely, 82.4 wt %. The oxygen carriers were synthesized by using a coprecipitation technique. The synthesized oxygen carriers were characterized in detail with regards to their morphological properties, chemical composition, and surface topography. It was found that both the precipitating agent and the pH at which the precipitation was performed strongly influenced the structure and chemical composition of the oxygen carriers. In addition, XRD analysis confirmed that, for the majority of the precipitation conditions investigated, CuO reacted with Al(2)O(3) to form fully reducible CuAl(2)O(4). The redox characteristics of the synthesized materials were evaluated at 800 °C by using methane as the fuel and air for reoxidation. It was found that the oxygen-carrying capacity of the synthesized oxygen carriers was strongly influenced by both the precipitating agent and the pH at which the precipitation was performed; however, all oxygen carriers tested showed a stable cyclic oxygen-carrying capacity. The oxygen carriers synthesized at pH 5.5 using NaOH or Na(2)CO(3) as the precipitating agents were the best oxygen carriers synthesized owing to their high and stable oxygen transfer and uncoupling capacities. The excellent redox characteristics of the best oxygen carrier

  14. Super liquid-repellent gas membranes for carbon dioxide capture and heart-lung machines.

    PubMed

    Paven, Maxime; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Schöttler, Susanne; Deng, Xu; Mailänder, Volker; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    In a gas membrane, gas is transferred between a liquid and a gas through a microporous membrane. The main challenge is to achieve a high gas transfer while preventing wetting and clogging. With respect to the oxygenation of blood, haemocompatibility is also required. Here we coat macroporous meshes with a superamphiphobic-or liquid repellent-layer to meet this challenge. The superamphiphobic layer consists of a fractal-like network of fluorinated silicon oxide nanospheres; gas trapped between the nanospheres keeps the liquid from contacting the wall of the membrane. We demonstrate the capabilities of the membrane by capturing carbon dioxide gas into a basic aqueous solution and in addition use it to oxygenate blood. Usually, blood tends to clog membranes because of the abundance of blood cells, platelets, proteins and lipids. We show that human blood stored in a superamphiphobic well for 24 h can be poured off without leaving cells or adsorbed protein behind.

  15. EVALUATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM EXISTING COAL FIRED PLANTS BY HYBRID SORPTION USING SOLID SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Steven; Palo, Daniel; Srinivasachar, Srivats; Laudal, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Under contract DE-FE0007603, the University of North Dakota conducted the project Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Existing Coal Fired Plants by Hybrid Sorption Using Solid Sorbents. As an important element of this effort, an Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) Assessment was conducted by Barr Engineering Co. (Barr) in association with the University of North Dakota. The assessment addressed air and particulate emissions as well as solid and liquid waste streams. The magnitude of the emissions and waste streams was estimated for evaluation purposes. EH&S characteristics of materials used in the system are also described. This document contains data based on the mass balances from both the 40 kJ/mol CO2 and 80 kJ/mol CO2 desorption energy cases evaluated in the Final Technical and Economic Feasibility study also conducted by Barr Engineering.

  16. Conceptual Design of Optimized Fossil Energy Systems with Capture and Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Nils Johnson; Joan Ogden

    2010-12-31

    In this final report, we describe research results from Phase 2 of a technical/economic study of fossil hydrogen energy systems with carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and storage (CCS). CO{sub 2} capture and storage, or alternatively, CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration, involves capturing CO{sub 2} from large point sources and then injecting it into deep underground reservoirs for long-term storage. By preventing CO{sub 2} emissions into the atmosphere, this technology has significant potential to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from fossil-based facilities in the power and industrial sectors. Furthermore, the application of CCS to power plants and hydrogen production facilities can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions associated with electric vehicles (EVs) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs) and, thus, can also improve GHG emissions in the transportation sector. This research specifically examines strategies for transitioning to large-scale coal-derived energy systems with CCS for both hydrogen fuel production and electricity generation. A particular emphasis is on the development of spatially-explicit modeling tools for examining how these energy systems might develop in real geographic regions. We employ an integrated modeling approach that addresses all infrastructure components involved in the transition to these energy systems. The overall objective is to better understand the system design issues and economics associated with the widespread deployment of hydrogen and CCS infrastructure in real regions. Specific objectives of this research are to: Develop improved techno-economic models for all components required for the deployment of both hydrogen and CCS infrastructure, Develop novel modeling methods that combine detailed spatial data with optimization tools to explore spatially-explicit transition strategies, Conduct regional case studies to explore how these energy systems might develop in different regions of the United States, and Examine how the

  17. Toward the understanding of chemical absorption processes for post-combustion capture of carbon dioxide: electronic and steric considerations from the kinetics of reactions of CO2(aq) with sterically hindered amines.

    PubMed

    Conway, William; Wang, Xiaoguang; Fernandes, Debra; Burns, Robert; Lawrance, Geoffrey; Puxty, Graeme; Maeder, Marcel

    2013-01-15

    The present study reports (a) the determination of both the kinetic rate constants and equilibrium constants for the reaction of CO(2)(aq) with sterically hindered amines and (b) an attempt to elucidate a fundamental chemical understanding of the relationship between the amine structure and chemical properties of the amine that are relevant for postcombustion capture of CO(2) (PCC) applications. The reactions of CO(2)(aq) with a series of linear and methyl substituted primary amines and alkanolamines have been investigated using stopped-flow spectrophotometry and (1)H NMR measurements at 25.0 °C. The specific mechanism of absorption for each of the amines, that is CO(2) hydration and/or carbamate formation, is examined and, based on the mechanism, the kinetic and equilibrium constants for the formation of carbamic acid/carbamates, including protonation constants of the carbamate, are reported for amines that follow this pathway. A Brønsted correlation relating the kinetic rate constants and equilibrium constants for the formation of carbamic acid/carbamates with the protonation constant of the amine is reported. Such a relationship facilitates an understanding of the effects of steric and electronic properties of the amine toward its reactivity with CO(2). Further, such relationships can be used to guide the design of new amines with improved properties relevant to PCC applications.

  18. PRELIMINARY ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH AND SAFETY RISK ASSESSMENT ON THE INTEGRATION OF A PROCESS UTILIZING LOW-ENERGY SOLVENTS FOR CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE ENABLED BY A COMBINATION OF ENZYMES AND VACUUM REGENERATION WITH A SUBCRITICAL PC POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, David; Vidal, Rafael; Russell, Tania; Babcock, Doosan; Freeman, Charles; Bearden, Mark; Whyatt, Greg; Liu, Kun; Frimpong, Reynolds; Lu, Kunlei; Salmon, Sonja; House, Alan; Yarborough, Erin

    2014-12-31

    The results of the preliminary environmental, health and safety (EH&S) risk assessment for an enzyme-activated potassium carbonate (K2CO3) solution post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC) plant, integrated with a subcritical pulverized coal (PC) power plant, are presented. The expected emissions during normal steady-state operation have been estimated utilizing models of the PCC plant developed in AspenTech’s AspenPlus® software, bench scale test results from the University of Kentucky, and industrial experience of emission results from a slipstream PCC plant utilizing amine based solvents. A review of all potential emission species and their sources was undertaken that identified two credible emission sources, the absorber off-gas that is vented to atmosphere via a stack and the waste removed from the PCC plant in the centrifuge used to reclaim enzyme and solvent. The conditions and compositions of the emissions were calculated and the potential EH&S effects were considered as well as legislative compliance requirements. Potential mitigation methods for emissions during normal operation have been proposed and solutions to mitigate uncontrolled releases of species have been considered. The potential emissions were found to pose no significant EH&S concerns and were compliant with the Federal legislation reviewed. The limitations in predicting full scale plant performance from bench scale tests have been noted and further work on a larger scale test unit is recommended to reduce the level of uncertainty.

  19. Carbon dioxide capture by aminoalkyl imidazolium-based ionic liquid: a computational investigation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie-Jie; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Xue-Liang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2012-04-07

    Efficient technologies/processes for CO(2) capture are greatly desired, and ionic liquids are recognized as promising materials for this purpose. However, the mechanisms for selectively capturing CO(2) by ionic liquids are unclear. In this study, the interactions between CO(2) and 1-n-amino-alkyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetrafluoroborate, an amino imidazolium ionic liquid (AIIL), in its CO(2) capturing process, are elucidated with both quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics approaches on the molecular level. The effects of the straight aminoalkyl chain length in imidazolium-based cations on CO(2) capture are explored, and thereby the factors governing CO(2) capture for this ionic liquid family, e.g., ionic liquid structure, charge distribution, intermolecular interactions, thermodynamic properties and absorption kinetics, are analyzed. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the diffusion of the involved compounds and liquid structures of the CO(2)-AIIL systems. The results show that the amino-alkyl chain length plays an important role in governing the absorption properties of AIILs, including the free energies of absorption, equilibrium constants, desorption temperature, absorption rate constants, diffusion coefficients, and organization of CO(2) around cations and anions. This study provides useful information about rational design of ionic liquids for efficient CO(2) capture.

  20. Selective and Regenerative Carbon Dioxide Capture by Highly Polarizing Porous Carbon Nitride.

    PubMed

    Oh, Youngtak; Le, Viet-Duc; Maiti, Uday Narayan; Hwang, Jin Ok; Park, Woo Jin; Lim, Joonwon; Lee, Kyung Eun; Bae, Youn-Sang; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-09-22

    Energy-efficient CO2 capture is a stringent demand for green and sustainable energy supply. Strong adsorption is desirable for high capacity and selective capture at ambient conditions but unfavorable for regeneration of adsorbents by a simple pressure control process. Here we present highly regenerative and selective CO2 capture by carbon nitride functionalized porous reduced graphene oxide aerogel surface. The resultant structure demonstrates large CO2 adsorption capacity at ambient conditions (0.43 mmol·g(-1)) and high CO2 selectivity against N2 yet retains regenerability to desorb 98% CO2 by simple pressure swing. First-principles thermodynamics calculations revealed that microporous edges of graphitic carbon nitride offer the optimal CO2 adsorption by induced dipole interaction and allows excellent CO2 selectivity as well as facile regenerability. This work identifies a customized route to reversible gas capture using metal-free, two-dimensional carbonaceous materials, which can be extended to other useful applications.

  1. Mesoporous magnesium oxide nanoparticles derived via complexation-combustion for enhanced performance in carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Vishwanath; Shavi, Raghavendra; Gil Seo, Jeong

    2017-03-10

    Magnesium oxide (MgO) is a promising candidate for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture at high temperature applicable to pre-combustion capture in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) scheme. In this work, mesoporous MgO nanoparticles were synthesized via simple complexation-combustion method by using glycine (G) and urea (U) as fuels (F). The obtained sorbents were thoroughly characterized in terms of the crystalline structure, morphology, nature of the fuel, F/O ratio, and their consequent effects on CO2 sorption. It was observed that due to the complexation followed by combustion in the presence of glycine, MgO with crystallite size as small as∼8nm could be derived. The synthesized MgO nanoparticles exhibited exceptionally high CO2 sorption at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, CO2 sorption isotherms in assistance with FT-IR and DSC experiments demonstrated that the low CO2 uptake at ambient temperature (25-100°C) may be due to the formation of monodentate carbonates, whereas predominant bicarbonates enhance the CO2 uptake at elevated temperatures (100-300°C). MgO-1.5(G) obtained the highest sorption corresponding to 1.34mmol/g at 200°C.

  2. Capture of carbon dioxide from flue gases by amine-functionalized TiO2 nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Fujiao; Zhao, Yunxia; Cao, Yan; Ding, Jie; Bu, Yunfei; Zhong, Qin

    2013-03-01

    The novel carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorbents with high capture efficiency were prepared through impregnating TiO2 nanotubes (TiNT) with four kinds of amines, namely monoethanolamine (MEA), ethylenediamine (EDA), triethylenetetramine (TETA) and tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA), respectively. The samples were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, low temperature N2 adsorption and transmission electron microscopy. CO2 capture was investigated in a dynamic packed column. The TEPA-loaded sample showed a better adsorption capacity due to its higher amino-groups content. In condition, TiNT-TEPA-69 shows the highest CO2 adsorption capacity among the four TEPA-loaded samples, approximately 4.37 mmol/g at 60 °C. The adsorption capacity was enhanced to 5.24 mmol/g under moisture conditions. TiNT-TEPA-69 was selected as adsorbent to study the adsorption/desorption behavior in the absence of moisture and in the presence of moisture. While the former is fairly stable after 5 adsorption/desorption cycles, the latter decreases dramatically.

  3. Novel Application of Carbonate Fuel Cell for Capturing Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Jolly, Stephen; Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein; Willman, Carl; Patel, Dilip; DiNitto, M.; Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Steen, William A.

    2015-09-30

    To address concerns about climate change resulting from emission of CO2 by coal-fueled power plants, FuelCell Energy, Inc. has developed the Combined Electric Power and Carbon-dioxide Separation (CEPACS) system concept. The CEPACS system utilizes Electrochemical Membrane (ECM) technology derived from the Company’s Direct FuelCell® products. The system separates the CO2 from the flue gas of other plants and produces electric power using a supplementary fuel. FCE is currently evaluating the use of ECM to cost effectively separate CO2 from the flue gas of Pulverized Coal (PC) power plants under a U.S. Department of Energy contract. The overarching objective of the project is to verify that the ECM can achieve at least 90% CO2 capture from the flue gas with no more than 35% increase in the cost of electricity. The project activities include: 1) laboratory scale operational and performance tests of a membrane assembly, 2) performance tests of the membrane to evaluate the effects of impurities present in the coal plant flue gas, in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3) techno-economic analysis for an ECM-based CO2 capture system applied to a 550 MW existing PC plant, in partnership with URS Corporation, and 4) bench scale (11.7 m2 area) testing of an ECM-based CO2 separation and purification system.

  4. High Temperature Polybenzimidazole Hollow Fiber Membranes for Hydrogen Separation and Carbon Dioxide Capture from Synthesis Gas

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Rajinder P.; Dahe, Ganpat J.; Dudeck, Kevin W.; ...

    2014-12-31

    Sustainable reliance on hydrocarbon feedstocks for energy generation requires CO₂ separation technology development for energy efficient carbon capture from industrial mixed gas streams. High temperature H₂ selective glassy polymer membranes are an attractive option for energy efficient H₂/CO₂ separations in advanced power production schemes with integrated carbon capture. They enable high overall process efficiencies by providing energy efficient CO₂ separations at process relevant operating conditions and correspondingly, minimized parasitic energy losses. Polybenzimidazole (PBI)-based materials have demonstrated commercially attractive H₂/CO₂ separation characteristics and exceptional tolerance to hydrocarbon fuel derived synthesis (syngas) gas operating conditions and chemical environments. To realize a commerciallymore » attractive carbon capture technology based on these PBI materials, development of high performance, robust PBI hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) is required. In this work, we discuss outcomes of our recent efforts to demonstrate and optimize the fabrication and performance of PBI HFMs for use in pre-combustion carbon capture schemes. These efforts have resulted in PBI HFMs with commercially attractive fabrication protocols, defect minimized structures, and commercially attractive permselectivity characteristics at IGCC syngas process relevant conditions. The H₂/CO₂ separation performance of these PBI HFMs presented in this document regarding realistic process conditions is greater than that of any other polymeric system reported to-date.« less

  5. High Temperature Polybenzimidazole Hollow Fiber Membranes for Hydrogen Separation and Carbon Dioxide Capture from Synthesis Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rajinder P.; Dahe, Ganpat J.; Dudeck, Kevin W.; Welch, Cynthia F.; Berchtold, Kathryn A.

    2014-12-31

    Sustainable reliance on hydrocarbon feedstocks for energy generation requires CO₂ separation technology development for energy efficient carbon capture from industrial mixed gas streams. High temperature H₂ selective glassy polymer membranes are an attractive option for energy efficient H₂/CO₂ separations in advanced power production schemes with integrated carbon capture. They enable high overall process efficiencies by providing energy efficient CO₂ separations at process relevant operating conditions and correspondingly, minimized parasitic energy losses. Polybenzimidazole (PBI)-based materials have demonstrated commercially attractive H₂/CO₂ separation characteristics and exceptional tolerance to hydrocarbon fuel derived synthesis (syngas) gas operating conditions and chemical environments. To realize a commercially attractive carbon capture technology based on these PBI materials, development of high performance, robust PBI hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) is required. In this work, we discuss outcomes of our recent efforts to demonstrate and optimize the fabrication and performance of PBI HFMs for use in pre-combustion carbon capture schemes. These efforts have resulted in PBI HFMs with commercially attractive fabrication protocols, defect minimized structures, and commercially attractive permselectivity characteristics at IGCC syngas process relevant conditions. The H₂/CO₂ separation performance of these PBI HFMs presented in this document regarding realistic process conditions is greater than that of any other polymeric system reported to-date.

  6. Geologic Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage via Low-Temperature Carbonation of Peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matter, J. M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Mervine, E. M.; Paukert, A. N.; Streit, E.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is naturally captured and stored in mantle peridotite in two forms: travertine deposits on the surface and carbonate-filled veins in the subsurface. Both are the product of near-surface reactions of CO2-bearing fluids with peridotite in an open and closed system reaction path. As originally discussed by Barnes and O'Neil [1], meteoric water infiltrates and reacts with peridotite in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2, resulting in increasing Mg, Ca and SiO2 concentrations. Further reaction with peridotite at closed system conditions leads to the precipitation of Mg-carbonates and serpentine. The resulting alkaline Ca-OH water absorbs CO2 from the atmosphere and precipitates calcite as travertine deposits when it exits the peridotite as spring water. In order to evaluate the potential of enhancing peridotite carbonation, we have to better understand the processes that occur along the reaction path, and the time scales involved in these processes. For the past few years we have been investigating natural CO2 mineralization in the peridotite of the Samail Ophiolite in northern Oman. We have obtained fluid and rock samples for chemical and isotopic analysis from at least 15 active alkaline spring systems. Concerning the residence time of groundwater along the reaction path, measured tritium concentrations in shallow groundwater and alkaline spring water range from 1.4-2.6 and 0.05-0.15 TU, respectively. Alkaline spring waters with values close to the detection limit (<0.005 TU) are considered sub-modern or older (recharged prior to 1952), whereas the shallow groundwater is most likely a mixture between sub-modern and modern recharge. Recently analyzed 14CDIC data support the tritium data. An additional indicator of the circulation path of groundwater in the peridotite is temperature measurements of the spring water. They are within a few degrees of the mean annual air temperature of Oman, which does not indicate deep circulation of the alkaline water. In

  7. Metal-Organic Frameworks as Potential Platforms for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Chemical Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wenyang

    The anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emission into the atmosphere, mainly through the combustion of fossil fuels, has resulted in a balance disturbance of the carbon cycle. Overwhelming scientific evidence proves that the escalating level of atmospheric CO2 is deemed as the main culprit for global warming and climate change. It is thus imperative to develop viable CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies to reduce CO2 emissions, which is also essential to avoid the potential devastating effects in future. The drawbacks of energy-cost, corrosion and inefficiency for amine-based wet-scrubbing systems which are currently used in industry, have prompted the exploration of alternative approaches for CCS. Extensive efforts have been dedicated to the development of functional porous materials, such as activated carbons, zeolites, porous organic polymers, and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to capture CO2. However, these adsorbents are limited by either poor selectivity for CO2 separation from gas mixtures or low CO2 adsorption capacity. Therefore, it is still highly demanding to design next-generation adsorbent materials fulfilling the requirements of high CO2 selectivity and enough CO2 capacity, as well as high water/moisture stability under practical conditions. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been positioned at the forefront of this area as a promising type of candidate amongst various porous materials. This is triggered by the modularity and functionality of pore size, pore walls and inner surface of MOFs by use of crystal engineering approaches. In this work, several effective strategies, such as incorporating 1,2,3-triazole groups as moderate Lewis base centers into MOFs and employing flexible azamacrocycle-based ligands to build MOFs, demonstrate to be promising ways to enhance CO 2 uptake capacity and CO2 separation ability of porous MOFs. It is revealed through in-depth studies on counter-intuitive experimental observations that the local electric

  8. Functionalization of Metal-Organic Frameworks for Enhanced Stability under Humid Carbon Dioxide Capture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Andirova, Dinara; Lei, Yu; Zhao, Xiaodan; Choi, Sunho

    2015-10-26

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been highlighted recently as promising materials for CO2 capture. However, in practical CO2 capture processes, such as capture from flue gas or ambient air, the adsorption properties of MOFs tend to be harmed by the presence of moisture possibly because of the hydrophilic nature of the coordinatively unsaturated sites (CUSs) within their framework. In this work, the CUSs of the MOF framework are functionalized with amine-containing molecules to prevent structural degradation in a humid environment. Specifically, the framework of the magnesium dioxybenzenedicarboxylate (Mg/DOBDC) MOF was functionalized with ethylenediamine (ED) molecules to make the overall structure less hydrophilic. Structural analysis after exposure to high-temperature steam showed that the ED-functionalized Mg/DOBDC (ED-Mg/DOBDC) is more stable under humid conditions, than Mg/DOBDC, which underwent drastic structural changes. ED-Mg/DOBDC recovered its CO2 adsorption capacity and initial adsorption rate quite well as opposed to the original Mg/DOBDC, which revealed a significant reduction in its capture capacity and kinetics. These results suggest that the amine-functionalization of the CUSs is an effective way to enhance the structural stability of MOFs as well as their capture of humid CO2 .

  9. Acid sorption regeneration process using carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    King, C. Judson; Husson, Scott M.

    2001-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks onto a solid adsorbent in the presence of carbon dioxide under pressure. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by a suitable regeneration method, one of which is treating them with an organic alkylamine solution thus forming an alkylamine-carboxylic acid complex which thermally decomposes to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine.

  10. Post combustion carbon dioxide capture using amine functionalized carbon nanotubes: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Sukanta K.

    2016-04-01

    Many technological viable options available for post combustion CO2 capture (PCC) from fossil fuel based power plants, such as amine absorption, adsorption, membrane separation, cryogenic separation processes. Out of these technological pathways adsorption using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has shown potential advantages compared to other techniques for CO2 capture from flue gas streams which is evident form published literature from various research groups. Considering the recent developments, this work presents a state-of-the-art review on CO2 capture process using CNTs, amine functionalized CNTs and membrane based CNTs. One of the major challenges in developing CNT adsorption technology lies in the choice and development of an adsorbent material that can efficiently adsorb and also easily desorb and concentrate the captured CO2 with low energy input. This review work consists of a number of interdisciplinary research activities that are focused on the feasibility of developing a small scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) based on the adsorption properties of chemically functionalized CNTs. Another recent development for CO2 separation from flue gas is the application of membrane-based CNTs. Membrane based CO2 separation invites several advantages such as no need of an additional chemical or physical solvent; low energy use; simple process, hence easy to operate. In this work analysis and literature reviews carried out in the recent development in CNTs and membrane based CNTs for CO2 adsorption and separation to update the recent progress in this area. Finally a comparison with amine absorption process and retrofitting option has been discussed with few recommendations.

  11. New demands, new supplies : a national look at the water balance of carbon dioxide capture and sequestration.

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, James Lee; McNemar, Andrea , Morgantown, WV); Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2010-12-01

    Concerns over rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have resulted in serious consideration of policies aimed at reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. If large scale abatement efforts are undertaken, one critical tool will be geologic sequestration of CO2 captured from large point sources, specifically coal and natural gas fired power plants. Current CO2 capture technologies exact a substantial energy penalty on the source power plant, which must be offset with make-up power. Water demands increase at the source plant due to added cooling loads. In addition, new water demand is created by water requirements associated with generation of the make-up power. At the sequestration site however, saline water may be extracted to manage CO2 plum migration and pressure build up in the geologic formation. Thus, while CO2 capture creates new water demands, CO2 sequestration has the potential to create new supplies. Some or all of the added demand may be offset by treatment and use of the saline waters extracted from geologic formations during CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories, with guidance and support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, is creating a model to evaluate the potential for a combined approach to saline formations, as a sink for CO2 and a source for saline waters that can be treated and beneficially reused to serve power plant water demands. This presentation will focus on the magnitude of added U.S. power plant water demand under different CO2 emissions reduction scenarios, and the portion of added demand that might be offset by saline waters extracted during the CO2 sequestration process.

  12. New Demands, New Supplies: A National Look at the Water Balance of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, J. D.; Kobos, P.; Klise, G. T.; Krumhansl, J. L.; McNemar, A.

    2010-12-01

    Concerns over rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have resulted in serious consideration of policies aimed at reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. If large scale abatement efforts are undertaken, one critical tool will be geologic sequestration of CO2 captured from large point sources, specifically coal and natural gas fired power plants. Current CO2 capture technologies exact a substantial energy penalty on the source power plant, which must be offset with make-up power. Water demands increase at the source plant due to added cooling loads. In addition, new water demand is created by water requirements associated with generation of the make-up power. At the sequestration site however, saline water may be extracted to manage CO2 plum migration and pressure build up in the geologic formation. Thus, while CO2 capture creates new water demands, CO2 sequestration has the potential to create new supplies. Some or all of the added demand may be offset by treatment and use of the saline waters extracted from geologic formations during CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories, with guidance and support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, is creating a model to evaluate the potential for a combined approach to saline formations, as a sink for CO2 and a source for saline waters that can be treated and beneficially reused to serve power plant water demands. This presentation will focus on the magnitude of added U.S. power plant water demand under different CO2 emissions reduction scenarios, and the portion of added demand that might be offset by saline waters extracted during the CO2 sequestration process. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Early atmospheric detection of carbon dioxide from carbon capture and storage sites

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Nasrin Mostafavi; Rempillo, Ofelia; Norman, Ann-Lise; Layzell, David B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The early atmospheric detection of carbon dioxide (CO2) leaks from carbon capture and storage (CCS) sites is important both to inform remediation efforts and to build and maintain public support for CCS in mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. A gas analysis system was developed to assess the origin of plumes of air enriched in CO2, as to whether CO2 is from a CCS site or from the oxidation of carbon compounds. The system measured CO2 and O2 concentrations for different plume samples relative to background air and calculated the gas differential concentration ratio (GDCR = −ΔO2/ΔCO2). The experimental results were in good agreement with theoretical calculations that placed GDCR values for a CO2 leak at 0.21, compared with GDCR values of 1–1.8 for the combustion of carbon compounds. Although some combustion plume samples deviated in GDCR from theoretical, the very low GDCR values associated with plumes from CO2 leaks provided confidence that this technology holds promise in providing a tool for the early detection of CO2 leaks from CCS sites.  Implications: This work contributes to the development of a cost-effective technology for the early detection of leaks from sites where CO2 has been injected into the subsurface to enhance oil recovery or to permanently store the gas as a strategy for mitigating climate change. Such technology will be important in building public confidence regarding the safety and security of carbon capture and storage sites. PMID:27111469

  14. Surface modification of oil fly ash and its application in selective capturing of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaumi, Ali L.; Hussien, Ibnelwaleed A.; Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

    2013-02-01

    Oil fly ash from power generation plants was activated with 30% NH4OH and used for selective adsorption of carbon dioxide from CO2/N2 mixture. The treated samples were characterized for their surface area, morphology, crystalline phase, chemical composition and surface functional groups. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis showed an increase in the carbon contents from 45 to 73 wt% as a result of leaching out metal oxides. XRD proved that chemical activation of ash resulted in diminishing of major crystalline phases of zeolite, and other alumino-silicates leaving only quartz and mullite. BET analysis showed an increase in surface area from 59 to 318 m2/g after chemical activation and the pore volume increased from 0.0368 to 0.679 cm3/g. This increase in pore volume is supported by the results of SEM, where more micropores were opened with well-defined particle sizes and porous structure. The TGA of the treated fly ash showed stability at higher temperature as the weight loss decreased with increasing temperature. For treated ash, the FTIR displayed new peaks of amine functional group. The treated ash was used for the removal of CO2 from CO2/N2 mixture and the maximum adsorption/capturing capacity was found to be 240 mg/g. This capacity increases with increase in initial gas concentration, inlet flow rate and temperature suggesting the endothermic nature of the interaction between the gas molecules and the surface of the ash.

  15. Temporal and Spatial Deployment of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies across the Representative Concentration Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2011-04-18

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) Fifth Assessment (to be published in 2013-2014) will to a significant degree be built around four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) that are intended to represent four scenarios of future development of greenhouse gas emissions, land use, and concentrations that span the widest range of potential future atmospheric radiative forcing. Under the very stringent climate policy implied by the 2.6 W/m2 overshoot scenario, all electricity is eventually generated from low carbon sources. However, carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies never comprise more than 50% of total electricity generation in that very stringent scenario or in any of the other cases examined here. There are significant differences among the cases studied here in terms of how CCS technologies are used, with the most prominent being is the significant expansion of biomass+CCS as the stringency of the implied climate policy increases. Cumulative CO2 storage across the three cases that imply binding greenhouse gas constraints ranges by nearly an order of magnitude from 170GtCO2 (radiative forcing of 6.0W/m2 in 2100) to 1600GtCO2 (2.6W/m2 in 2100) over the course of this century. This potential demand for deep geologic CO2 storage is well within published estimates of total global CO2 storage capacity.

  16. Capture and release of carbon dioxide by carbon nanotubes via temperature cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rende{2}, Deniz; Baysal, Nihat; Ozisik, Rahmi

    2011-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) received remarkable attention since they were shown to possess many unique properties as well as being effective and stable adsorbent materials that make them potentially useful for gas storage and separation of various gas mixtures. In this study, the effect of temperature variations on carbon dioxide (CO2) capture via single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. SWNTs of type (10,10), (15,15), and (20,20) and MWNTs formed from the combination of these were simulated. The temperature was varied between 300 and 360 K. The results suggest that absorption of CO2 into the CNTs were directly related to the internal volume of the nanotube, but the cross-sectional area of the tube entrance had a significant effect on the number of CO2 molecules retained. The number of CO2 molecules collected in CNTs gradually decreases with increasing temperature. Separate simulations were performed to understand the potential use of CNTs as thermal pumps to collect/discharge CO2 molecules via temperature cycling. Supported by the NSF (CMMI-0500324 and DMR-0117792).

  17. Hybrid Encapsulated Ionic Liquids for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Brennecke, Joan; Degnan, Thomas; McCready, Mark; Stadtherr, Mark; Stolaroff, Joshuah; Ye, Congwang

    2016-09-30

    Ionic liquids (ILs) and Phase Change Ionic Liquids (PCILs) are excellent materials for selective removal of carbon dioxide from dilute post-combustion streams. However, they are typically characterized as having high viscosities, which impairs their effectiveness due to mass transfer limitations, caused by the high viscosities. In this project, we are examining the benefits of encapsulating ILs and PCILs in thin polymeric shells to produce particles of approximately 100 to 600 μm in diameter that can be used in a fluidized bed absorber. The particles are produced by microencapsulation of the ILs and PCILs in CO2-permeable polymer shells. Here we report on the synthesis of the IL and PCIL materials, measurements of thermophysical properties including CO2 capacity and reprotonation equilibrium and kinetics, encapsulation of the ILs and PCILs, mechanical and thermodynamic testing of the encapsulated materials, development of a rate based model of the absorber, and the design of a laboratory scale unit to test the encapsulated particles for CO2 capture ability and efficiency. We show that the IL/PCIL materials can be successfully encapsulated, that they retain CO2 uptake capacity, and that the uptake rates are increased relative to a stagnant sample of IL liquid or PCIL powder.

  18. Carbon dioxide capture by an amine functionalized ionic liquid: fundamental differences of surface and bulk behavior.

    PubMed

    Niedermaier, Inga; Bahlmann, Matthias; Papp, Christian; Kolbeck, Claudia; Wei, Wei; Krick Calderón, Sandra; Grabau, Mathias; Schulz, Peter S; Wasserscheid, Peter; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Maier, Florian

    2014-01-08

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption by the amine-functionalized ionic liquid (IL) dihydroxyethyldimethylammonium taurinate at 310 K was studied using surface- and bulk-sensitive experimental techniques. From near-ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at 0.9 mbar CO2, the amount of captured CO2 per mole of IL in the near-surface region is quantified to ~0.58 mol, with ~0.15 mol in form of carbamate dianions and ~0.43 mol in form of carbamic acid. From isothermal uptake experiments combined with infrared spectroscopy, CO2 is found to be bound in the bulk as carbamate (with nominally 0.5 mol of CO2 bound per 1 mol of IL) up to ~2.5 bar CO2, and as carbamic acid (with nominally 1 mol CO2 bound per 1 mol IL) at higher pressures. We attribute the fact that at low pressures carbamic acid is the dominating species in the near-surface region, while only carbamate is formed in the bulk, to differences in solvation in the outermost IL layers as compared to the bulk situation.

  19. Attentional Capture by Emotional Stimuli Is Modulated by Semantic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yang-Ming; Baddeley, Alan; Young, Andrew W.

    2008-01-01

    The attentional blink paradigm was used to examine whether emotional stimuli always capture attention. The processing requirement for emotional stimuli in a rapid sequential visual presentation stream was manipulated to investigate the circumstances under which emotional distractors capture attention, as reflected in an enhanced attentional blink…

  20. Regional Opportunities for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in China: A Comprehensive CO2 Storage Cost Curve and Analysis of the Potential for Large Scale Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the People’s Republic of China

    SciTech Connect

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Li, Xiaochun; Davidson, Casie L.; Wei, Ning; Dooley, James J.

    2009-12-01

    This study presents data and analysis on the potential for carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies to deploy within China, including a survey of the CO2 source fleet and potential geologic storage capacity. The results presented here indicate that there is significant potential for CCS technologies to deploy in China at a level sufficient to deliver deep, sustained and cost-effective emissions reductions for China over the course of this century.

  1. Computational evaluation of metal-organic frameworks for carbon dioxide capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiamei

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a new class of porous solids comprised of metal-containing nodes linked by organic ligands, have become promising materials for gas separations. In particular, their flexible chemistry makes them attractive for CO2 capture from flue gas streams in post-combustion plants. Although numerous efforts have been exerted on the investigation of MOFs for CO2 capture, the exploration of the effects from coexisting components present in very dilute proportions in flue gases is limited because of the experimental difficulty to determine the coadsorption of CO2 with trace components. In this regard, molecular simulations show superiority. In this study, molecular simulations are used to estimate the influence of impurities: water, O2, and SO2 on post-combustion CO2 capture in MOFs. Firstly, two MOFs with coordinatively unsaturated metal sites (CUMs), HKUST-1 and Mg-MOF-74 are explored. Increase of CO 2 adsorption is observed for hydrated HKUST-1; on the contrary, the opposite water adsorption behavior is observed in hydrated Mg-MOF-74, leading to decrease of CO2 adsorption. Further, water effects on CO 2 capture in M-HKUST1 (M = Mg, Zn, Co, Ni) are evaluated to test whether comparing the binding energy could be a general method to evaluate water effects in MOFs with CUMs. It is found that the method works well for Zn-, Co-, and Ni-HKUST1 but partially for Mg-HKUST1. In addition, the effects of O2 and SO2 on CO2 capture in MOFs are also investigated for the first time, showing that the effects of O2 may be negligible but SO2 has negative effects in the CO 2 capture process in HKUST-1 systems. Secondly, the influences of water on CO2 capture in three UiO-66 MOFs with functional groups, --NH2, --OH and --Br are explored, respectively. For UiO-66-NH2 and -OH, the presence of water lowers CO2 adsorption significantly; in contrast, water shows much smaller effects in UiO-66-Br. Moreover, the presence of SO 2 decreases water adsorption but enhances CO

  2. Attentional capture by emotional stimuli is modulated by semantic processing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yang-Ming; Baddeley, Alan; Young, Andrew W

    2008-04-01

    The attentional blink paradigm was used to examine whether emotional stimuli always capture attention. The processing requirement for emotional stimuli in a rapid sequential visual presentation stream was manipulated to investigate the circumstances under which emotional distractors capture attention, as reflected in an enhanced attentional blink effect. Emotional distractors did not cause more interference than neutral distractors on target identification when perceptual or phonological processing of stimuli was required, showing that emotional processing is not as automatic as previously hypothesized. Only when semantic processing of stimuli was required did emotional distractors capture more attention than neutral distractors and increase attentional blink magnitude. Combining the results from 5 experiments, the authors conclude that semantic processing can modulate the attentional capture effect of emotional stimuli.

  3. Adsorbent materials for carbon dioxide capture from large anthropogenic point sources.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunho; Drese, Jeffrey H; Jones, Christopher W

    2009-01-01

    Since the time of the industrial revolution, the atmospheric CO(2) concentration has risen by nearly 35 % to its current level of 383 ppm. The increased carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere has been suggested to be a leading contributor to global climate change. To slow the increase, reductions in anthropogenic CO(2) emissions are necessary. Large emission point sources, such as fossil-fuel-based power generation facilities, are the first targets for these reductions. A benchmark, mature technology for the separation of dilute CO(2) from gas streams is via absorption with aqueous amines. However, the use of solid adsorbents is now being widely considered as an alternative, potentially less-energy-intensive separation technology. This Review describes the CO(2) adsorption behavior of several different classes of solid carbon dioxide adsorbents, including zeolites, activated carbons, calcium oxides, hydrotalcites, organic-inorganic hybrids, and metal-organic frameworks. These adsorbents are evaluated in terms of their equilibrium CO(2) capacities as well as other important parameters such as adsorption-desorption kinetics, operating windows, stability, and regenerability. The scope of currently available CO(2) adsorbents and their critical properties that will ultimately affect their incorporation into large-scale separation processes is presented.

  4. Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Capture From Existing Coal Fired Plants by Hybrid Sorption Using Solid Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Steven; Srinivasachar, Srivats; Laudal, Daniel; Browers, Bruce

    2014-12-31

    A novel hybrid solid sorbent technology for CO₂ capture and separation from coal combustion-derived flue gas was evaluated. The technology – Capture of CO₂ by Hybrid Sorption (CACHYS™) – is a solid sorbent technology based on the following ideas: 1) reduction of energy for sorbent regeneration, 2) utilization of novel process chemistry, 3) contactor conditions that minimize sorbent-CO₂ heat of reaction and promote fast CO₂ capture, and 4) low-cost method of heat management. This report provides key information developed during the course of the project that includes sorbent performance, energy for sorbent regeneration, physical properties of the sorbent, the integration of process components, sizing of equipment, and overall capital and operational cost of the integrated CACHYS™ system. Seven sorbent formulations were prepared and evaluated at the lab-scale for energy requirements and CO₂ capture performance. Sorbent heat of regeneration ranged from 30-80 kJ/mol CO₂ and was found to be dependent on process conditions. Two sorbent formulations (designated HCK-4 & HCK-7) were down-selected for additional fixed-bed testing. Additional testing involved subjecting the sorbents to 100 continuous cycles in the fixed-bed reactor to determine performance as a function of time. The working capacity achieved for HCK-4 sorbent ranged from 5.5-8.0 g CO₂/100 g sorbent, while the HCK-7 typically ranged from 8.0-10.0 g CO₂/100 g sorbent. Overall, there was no deterioration in capacity with continuous cycling for either sorbent. The CACHYS™ bench-scale testing system designed and fabricated under this award consists of a dual circulating fluidized-bed adsorber and a moving-bed regenerator. The system takes a flue gas slipstream from the University of North Dakota’s coal-fired steam plant. Prior to being sent to the adsorber, the flue gas is scrubbed to remove SO₂ and particulate. During parametric testing of the adsorber, CO₂ capture achieved using

  5. Post-combustion carbon dioxide capture cost reduction to 2030 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Adderley, B; Carey, J; Gibbins, J; Lucquiaud, M; Smith, R

    2016-10-20

    Post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC) can be achieved using a variety of technologies. Importantly it is applicable to a wide range of processes and may also be retrofitted in certain cases. This paper covers the use of PCC for low carbon power generation from new natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plants that are expected to be built in the UK in the 2020s and 2030s and that will run into the 2050s. Costs appear potentially comparable with other low carbon and controllable generation sources such as nuclear or renewables plus storage, especially with the lower gas prices that can be expected in a carbon-constrained world. Non-fuel cost reduction is still, however, desirable and, since CO2 capture is a new application, significant potential is likely to exist. For the NGCC+PCC examples shown in this paper, moving from 'first of a kind' (FOAK) to 'nth of a kind' (NOAK) gives significant improvements through both reduced financing costs and capital cost reductions. To achieve this the main emphasis needs to be on 'commercial readiness', rather than on system-level 'technical readiness', and on improvements through innovation activities, supported by underpinning research, that develop novel sub-processes; this will also maintain NOAK status for cost-effective financing. Feasible reductions in the energy penalty for PCC capture have much less impact, reflecting the inherently high levels of efficiency for modern NGCC+PCC plants.

  6. METAL CAPTURE BY SORBENTS IN COMBUSTION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article gives results of an investigation of the use of sorbents to control trace metal emissions from combustion processes and an exploration of the underlying mechanisms. mphasis was on mechanisms in which the metal vapor was reactively scavenged by simple commercial sorben...

  7. Critical review of existing nanomaterial adsorbents to capture carbon dioxide and methane.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Amanda; Moral-Vico, J; Abo Markeb, Ahmad; Busquets-Fité, Martí; Komilis, Dimitrios; Puntes, Victor; Sánchez, Antoni; Font, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    Innovative gas capture technologies with the objective to mitigate CO2 and CH4 emissions are discussed in this review. Emphasis is given on the use of nanoparticles (NP) as sorbents of CO2 and CH4, which are the two most important global warming gases. The existing NP sorption processes must overcome certain challenges before their implementation to the industrial scale. These are: i) the utilization of the concentrated gas stream generated by the capture and gas purification technologies, ii) the reduction of the effects of impurities on the operating system, iii) the scale up of the relevant materials, and iv) the retrofitting of technologies in existing facilities. Thus, an innovative design of adsorbents could possibly address those issues. Biogas purification and CH4 storage would become a new motivation for the development of new sorbent materials, such as nanomaterials. This review discusses the current state of the art on the use of novel nanomaterials as adsorbents for CO2 and CH4. The review shows that materials based on porous supports that are modified with amine or metals are currently providing the most promising results. The Fe3O4-graphene and the MOF-117 based NPs show the greatest CO2 sorption capacities, due to their high thermal stability and high porosity. Conclusively, one of the main challenges would be to decrease the cost of capture and to scale-up the technologies to minimize large-scale power plant CO2 emissions.

  8. Composite Membranes for CO2 Capture: High Performance Metal Organic Frameworks/Polymer Composite Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    IMPACCT Project: A team of six faculty members at Georgia Tech are developing an enhanced membrane by fitting metal organic frameworks, compounds that show great promise for improved carbon capture, into hollow fiber membranes. This new material would be highly efficient at removing CO2 from the flue gas produced at coal-fired power plants. The team is analyzing thousands of metal organic frameworks to identify those that are most suitable for carbon capture based both on their ability to allow coal exhaust to pass easily through them and their ability to select CO2 from that exhaust for capture and storage. The most suitable frameworks would be inserted into the walls of the hollow fiber membranes, making the technology readily scalable due to their high surface area. This composite membrane would be highly stable, withstanding the harsh gas environment found in coal exhaust.

  9. Multiple-predators-based capture process on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramiz Sharafat, Rajput; Pu, Cunlai; Li, Jie; Chen, Rongbin; Xu, Zhongqi

    2017-03-01

    The predator/prey (capture) problem is a prototype of many network-related applications. We study the capture process on complex networks by considering multiple predators from multiple sources. In our model, some lions start from multiple sources simultaneously to capture the lamb by biased random walks, which are controlled with a free parameter $\\alpha$. We derive the distribution of the lamb's lifetime and the expected lifetime $\\left\\langle T\\right\\rangle $. Through simulation, we find that the expected lifetime drops substantially with the increasing number of lions. We also study how the underlying topological structure affects the capture process, and obtain that locating on small-degree nodes is better than large-degree nodes to prolong the lifetime of the lamb. Moreover, dense or homogeneous network structures are against the survival of the lamb.

  10. Carbon Dioxide Capture and Release by Anions with Solvent-Dependent Behaviour: A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Varandas, António J C

    2016-09-19

    Recently, Clyburne and co-workers [Science, 2014, 344, 75-78] reported the novel synthesis of the elusive cyanoformate anion, NCCO2(-) . The stability of this anion is dependent on the dielectric constant of the local environment (polarity-switchable solvent): it is stable in low-polarity media and unstable in high-polarity solvents; hence, capturing and then releasing CO2 . The possibility of extending such behaviour to other anions is explored herein. Specifically, the CO2 capture process is studied for 26 anions in the gas phase and 3 distinct solvents (water, tetrahydrofuran, and toluene) by using the polarisable continuum model. Calculations are performed with the M06-2X and B3LYP-D3 density functionals and the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. The design of new CO2 complexes with the anion, which can be formed or destroyed on demand by changing the solvent, is possible; the results for the alkoxylate and thiolate anions are especially promising. The nature of the substituents connected to the atom that bonds to CO2 in the anion is crucial in modulating the relative stability of the products-a key point for reversibility in the CO2 capture process. A moderate interaction for the anion-CO2 adduct-about 10 kcal mol(-1) relative free energy with respect to the isolated reactants in the gas phase-and a relevant effect in the dielectric constant of the local environment are also key ingredients to achieve solvent dependency.

  11. A Process for Capturing the Art of Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Clark V., III; Sekeres, Carrie; Roumie, Yasmeen

    2016-01-01

    There is both an art and a science to systems engineering. The science of systems engineering is effectively captured in processes and procedures, but the art is much more elusive. We propose that there is six step process that can be applied to any systems engineering organization to create an environment from which the "art" of that organization can be captured, be allowed to evolve collaboratively and be shared with all members of the organization. This paper details this process as it was applied to NASA Launch Services Program (LSP) Integration Engineering Branch during a pilot program of Confluence, a Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) wiki tool.

  12. Transport Properties of Amine/Carbon Dioxide Reactive Mixtures and Implications to Carbon Capture Technologies.

    PubMed

    Turgman-Cohen, Salomon; Giannelis, Emmanuel P; Escobedo, Fernando A

    2015-08-19

    The structure and transport properties of physisorbed and chemisorbed CO2 in model polyamine liquids (hexamethylenediamine and diethylenetriamine) are studied via molecular dynamics simulations. Such systems are relevant to CO2 absorption processes where nonaqueous amines are used as absorbents (e.g., when impregnated or grafted onto mesoporous media or misted in the gas phase). It is shown that accounting for the ionic speciation resulting from CO2 chemisorption enabled us to capture the qualitative changes in extent of absorption and fluidity with time that are observed in thermogravimetric experiments. Simulations reveal that high enough concentration of reacted CO2 leads to strong intermolecular ionic interactions and the arrest of molecular translations. The transport properties obtained from the simulations of the ionic speciated mixtures are also used to construct an approximate continuum-level model for the CO2 absorption process that mimics thermogravimetric experiments.

  13. Natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) as green solvents for carbon dioxide capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulia, Kamarza; Putri, Sylvania; Krisanti, Elsa; Nasruddin

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of Natural Deep Eutectic Solvent (NADES), consisting of choline chloride and a hydrogen bonding donor (HBD) compound, in terms of carbon dioxide absorption. Solubility of carbon dioxide in NADES was found to be influenced HBD compound used and choline chloride to HBD ratio, carbon dioxide pressure, and contact time. HBD and choline/HBD ratios used were 1,2-propanediol (1:2), glycerol (1:2), and malic acid (1:1). The carbon dioxide absorption measurement was conducted using an apparatus that utilizes the volumetric method. Absorption curves were obtained up to pressures of 30 bar, showing a linear relationship between the amount absorbed and the final pressure of carbon dioxide. The choline and 1,2-propanediol eutectic mixture absorbs the highest amount of carbon dioxide, approaching 0.1 mole-fraction at 3.0 MPa and 50°C. We found that NADES ability to absorb carbon dioxide correlates with its polarity as tested using Nile Red as a solvatochromic probe.

  14. Capture process in nuclear reactions with a quantum master equation

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Scheid, W.

    2009-09-15

    Projectile-nucleus capture by a target nucleus at bombarding energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier is treated with the reduced-density-matrix formalism. The effects of dissipation and fluctuations on the capture process are taken self-consistently into account within the quantum model suggested. The excitation functions for the capture in the reactions {sup 16}O, {sup 19}F, {sup 26}Mg, {sup 28}Si, {sup 32,34,36,38}S, {sup 40,48}Ca, {sup 50}Ti, {sup 52}Cr+{sup 208}Pb with spherical nuclei are calculated and compared with the experimental data. At bombarding energies about (15-25) MeV above the Coulomb barrier the maximum of capture cross section is revealed for the {sup 58}Ni+{sup 208}Pb reaction.

  15. Easily regenerable solid adsorbents based on polyamines for carbon dioxide capture from the air.

    PubMed

    Goeppert, Alain; Zhang, Hang; Czaun, Miklos; May, Robert B; Prakash, G K Surya; Olah, George A; Narayanan, S R

    2014-05-01

    Adsorbents prepared easily by impregnation of fumed silica with polyethylenimine (PEI) are promising candidates for the capture of CO2 directly from the air. These inexpensive adsorbents have high CO2 adsorption capacity at ambient temperature and can be regenerated in repeated cycles under mild conditions. Despite the very low CO2 concentration, they are able to scrub efficiently all CO2 out of the air in the initial hours of the experiments. The influence of parameters such as PEI loading, adsorption and desorption temperature, particle size, and PEI molecular weight on the adsorption behavior were investigated. The mild regeneration temperatures required could allow the use of waste heat available in many industrial processes as well as solar heat. CO2 adsorption from the air has a number of applications. Removal of CO2 from a closed environment, such as a submarine or space vehicles, is essential for life support. The supply of CO2-free air is also critical for alkaline fuel cells and batteries. Direct air capture of CO2 could also help mitigate the rising concerns about atmospheric CO2 concentration and associated climatic changes, while, at the same time, provide the first step for an anthropogenic carbon cycle.

  16. Easily Regenerable Solid Adsorbents Based on Polyamines for Carbon Dioxide Capture from the Air

    SciTech Connect

    Goeppert, A; Zhang, H; Czaun, M; May, RB; Prakash, GKS; Olah, GA; Narayanan, SR

    2014-03-18

    Adsorbents prepared easily by impregnation of fumed silica with polyethylenimine (PEI) are promising candidates for the capture of CO2 directly from the air. These inexpensive adsorbents have high CO2 adsorption capacity at ambient temperature and can be regenerated in repeated cycles under mild conditions. Despite the very low CO2 concentration, they are able to scrub efficiently all CO2 out of the air in the initial hours of the experiments. The influence of parameters such as PEI loading, adsorption and desorption temperature, particle size, and PEI molecular weight on the adsorption behavior were investigated. The mild regeneration temperatures required could allow the use of waste heat available in many industrial processes as well as solar heat. CO2 adsorption from the air has a number of applications. Removal of CO2 from a closed environment, such as a submarine or space vehicles, is essential for life support. The supply of CO2-free air is also critical for alkaline fuel cells and batteries. Direct air capture of CO2 could also help mitigate the rising concerns about atmospheric CO2 concentration and associated climatic changes, while, at the same time, provide the first step for an anthropogenic carbon cycle.

  17. Process for separating carbon dioxide from flue gas using sweep-based membrane separation and absorption steps

    DOEpatents

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Baker, Richard W.; Merkel, Timothy C.

    2012-08-21

    A gas separation process for treating flue gases from combustion processes, and combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the flue gas stream to be treated to an absorption-based carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the flue gas across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas to the combustor.

  18. Supercritical carbon dioxide process for pasteurization of fruit juices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) nonthermal processing inactivates microorganisms in juices using non-toxic and non-reactive CO2. However, data is lacking on the inactivation of E. coli K12 and L. plantarum in apple cider using pilot plant scale SCCO2 equipment. For this study, pasteurized pres...

  19. Exposures to carbon dioxide in the poultry processing industry

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, D.E.; Smith, M.S.

    1988-12-01

    The use of dry ice has increased dramatically in poultry processing plants because of changes in the fast food industry. Concentrations of carbon dioxide in four such plants were measured and were found to exceed the Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health Level (50,000 ppm) inside holding coolers where ventilation is poor. In other areas, where dry ice is delivered to poultry packages, time-weighted average exposures can exceed the threshold limit value of 5000 ppm by substantial margins, even if local exhaust ventilation systems are present. Reports of adverse health effects from carbon dioxide exposure and various control measures are reviewed. Recommendations regarding sampling and analytical techniques also are presented. Operators of poultry plants where dry ice is used need to recognize the occupational hazards of exposure to carbon dioxide.

  20. Metal-organic frameworks with precisely designed interior for carbon dioxide capture in the presence of water.

    PubMed

    Fracaroli, Alejandro M; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Suzuki, Mitsuharu; Dodd, Matthew; Okajima, Satoshi; Gándara, Felipe; Reimer, Jeffrey A; Yaghi, Omar M

    2014-06-25

    The selective capture of carbon dioxide in the presence of water is an outstanding challenge. Here, we show that the interior of IRMOF-74-III can be covalently functionalized with primary amine (IRMOF-74-III-CH2NH2) and used for the selective capture of CO2 in 65% relative humidity. This study encompasses the synthesis, structural characterization, gas adsorption, and CO2 capture properties of variously functionalized IRMOF-74-III compounds (IRMOF-74-III-CH3, -NH2, -CH2NHBoc, -CH2NMeBoc, -CH2NH2, and -CH2NHMe). Cross-polarization magic angle spinning (13)C NMR spectra showed that CO2 binds chemically to IRMOF-74-III-CH2NH2 and -CH2NHMe to make carbamic species. Carbon dioxide isotherms and breakthrough experiments show that IRMOF-74-III-CH2NH2 is especially efficient at taking up CO2 (3.2 mmol of CO2 per gram at 800 Torr) and, more significantly, removing CO2 from wet nitrogen gas streams with breakthrough time of 610 ± 10 s g(-1) and full preservation of the IRMOF structure.

  1. Molecular simulation of carbon dioxide adsorption for carbon capture and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenney, Craig M.

    Capture of CO2 from fossil fuel power plants and sequestration in unmineable coal seams are achievable methods for reducing atmospheric emissions of this greenhouse gas. To aid the development of effective CO2 capture and sequestration technologies, a series of molecular simulation studies were conducted to study the adsorption of CO2 and related species onto heterogeneous, solid adsorbents. To investigate the influence of surface heterogeneity upon adsorption behavior in activated carbons and coal, isotherms were generated via grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulation for CO2 adsorption in slit-shaped pores with several variations of chemical and structural heterogeneity. Adsorption generally increased with increasing oxygen content and the presence of holes or furrows, which acted as preferred binding sites. To investigate the potential use of the flexible metal organic framework (MOF) Cu(BF4)2(bpy)2 (bpy=bipyridine) for CO2 capture, pure- and mixed-gas adsorption was simulated at conditions representative of power plant process streams. This MOF was chosen because it displays a novel behavior in which the crystal structure reversibly transitions from an empty, zero porosity state to a saturated, expanded state at the "gate pressure". Estimates of CO2 capacity above the gate pressure from GCMC simulations using a rigid MOF model showed good agreement with experiment. The CO2 adsorption capacity and estimated heats of adsorption are comparable to common physi-adsorbents under similar conditions. Mixed-gas simulations predicted CO2/N2 and CO2/H 2selectivities higher than typical microporous materials. To more closely investigate this gating effect, hybrid Monte-Carlo/molecular-dynamics (MCMD) was used to simulate adsorption using a flexible MOF model. Simulation cell volumes remained relatively constant at low gas pressures before increasing at higher pressure. Mixed-gas simulations predicted CO2/N 2 selectivities comparable to other microporous adsorbents. To

  2. Process for CO2 Capture Using Ionic Liquid That Exhibits Phase Change

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, RS; Keller, GE

    2014-11-01

    A novel process for capturing carbon dioxide from the flue gas of a coal-fired power plant has been shown to reduce parasitic power consumption substantially. The process employs an ionic liquid created at the University of Notre Dame that has a high capacity for absorbing CO2 by chemical reaction. A distinguishing property of this ionic liquid is that it changes phase from solid to liquid upon reaction with CO2. The process uses heat generated by this phase transition to lower parasitic power consumption. The driving force for CO2 separation is a combination of temperature and pressure differences; the process could even work without the addition of heat. A realistic process was created to capture CO2 efficiently. Computer simulation of the process enabled calculation of viable process conditions and power usage. The main concepts of the process were shown to work using a lab-scale apparatus. Parasitic power consumes 23% of net power generation, 55% lower than that of the monoethanolamine (MEA) process. However, capital cost is higher. The cost of electricity (COE) is 28% lower than that of the MEA process.

  3. Evaluating metal-organic frameworks for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture via temperature swing adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, JA; Sumida, K; Herm, ZR; Krishna, R; Long, JR

    2011-08-01

    Two representative metal-organic frameworks, Zn4O(BTB)(2)(BTB3- = 1,3,5-benzenetribenzoate; MOF-177) and Mg-2(dobdc) (dobdc(4-) = 1,4-dioxido-2,5-benzenedicarboxylate; Mg-MOF-74, CPO-27-Mg), are evaluated in detail for their potential use in post-combustion CO2 capture via temperature swing adsorption (TSA). Low-pressure single-component CO2 and N-2 adsorption isotherms were measured every 10 degrees C from 20 to 200 degrees C, allowing the performance of each material to be analyzed precisely. In order to gain a more complete understanding of the separation phenomena and the thermodynamics of CO2 adsorption, the isotherms were analyzed using a variety of methods. With regard to the isosteric heat of CO2 adsorption, Mg-2(dobdc) exhibits an abrupt drop at loadings approaching the saturation of the Mg2+ sites, which has significant implications for regeneration in different industrial applications. The CO2/N-2 selectivities were calculated using ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) for MOF-177, Mg-2(dobdc), and zeolite NaX, and working capacities were estimated using a simplified TSA model. Significantly, MOF-177 fails to exhibit a positive working capacity even at regeneration temperatures as high as 200 degrees C, while Mg-2(dobdc) reaches a working capacity of 17.6 wt% at this temperature. Breakthrough simulations were also performed for the three materials, demonstrating the superior performance of Mg-2(dobdc) over MOF-177 and zeolite NaX. These results show that the presence of strong CO2 adsorption sites is essential for a metal-organic framework to be of utility in post-combustion CO2 capture via a TSA process, and present a methodology for the evaluation of new metal-organic frameworks via analysis of single-component gas adsorption isotherms.

  4. Optimization of carbon capture systems using surrogate models of simulated processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Cozad, A.; Chang, Y.; Sahinidis, N.; Miller, D.

    2011-01-01

    With increasing demand placed on power generation plants to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, processes to separate and capture CO2 for eventual sequestration are highly sought after. Carbon capture processes impart a parasitic load on the power plants; it is estimated that this would increase the cost of electricity from existing pulverized coal plants anywhere from 71-85 percent [1]. The National Energy and Technology Lab (NETL) is working to lower this to below a 30 percent increase. To reach this goal, work is being done not only to accurately simulate these processes, but also to leverage those accurate and detailed simulations to design optimal carbon capture processes. The major challenges include the lack of accurate algebraic models of the processes, computationally costly simulations, and insufficiently robust simulations. The first challenge bars the use of provable derivative-based optimization algorithms. The latter two can either lead to difficult or impossible direct derivative-free optimization. To overcome these difficulties, we take a more indirect method to solving this problem by, first, generating an accurate set of algebraic surrogate models from the simulation then using derivative-based solvers to optimize the surrogate models. We developed a method that uses derivative-based and derivative-free optimization alongside machine learning and statistical techniques to generate the set of low-complexity surrogate models using data sampled from detailed simulations. The models are validated and improved through the use of derivative-free solvers to adaptively sample new simulation points. The resulting surrogate models can then be used in a superstructure-based process synthesis and solved using derivative-based methods to optimize carbon capture processes.

  5. System and process for capture of H.sub.2S from gaseous process streams and process for regeneration of the capture agent

    SciTech Connect

    Heldenbrant, David J; Koech, Phillip K; Rainbolt, James E; Bearden, Mark D; Zheng, Feng

    2014-02-18

    A system and process are disclosed for selective removal and recovery of H.sub.2S from a gaseous volume, e.g., from natural gas. Anhydrous organic, sorbents chemically capture H.sub.2S gas to form hydrosulfide salts. Regeneration of the capture solvent involves addition of an anti-solvent that releases the captured H.sub.2S gas from the capture sorbent. The capture sorbent and anti-solvent are reactivated for reuse, e.g., by simple distillation.

  6. Understanding Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide Leakage from Carbon Capture and Sequestration

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA held a technical Geochemical Impact Workshop in Washington, DC on July 10 and 11, 2007 to discuss geological considerations and Area of Review (AoR) issues related to geologic sequestration (GS) of Carbon Dioxide (CO2). Seventy=one (71) representatives of the electric uti...

  7. CO₂ Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Toy, Lora; Kataria, Atish; Gupta, Raghubir

    2012-04-01

    Because the fleet of coal-fired power plants is of such importance to the nation's energy production while also being the single largest emitter of CO₂, the development of retrofit, post-combustion CO₂ capture technologies for existing and new, upcoming coal power plants will allow coal to remain a major component of the U.S. energy mix while mitigating global warming. Post-combustion carbon capture technologies are an attractive option for coal-fired power plants as they do not require modification of major power-plant infrastructures, such as fuel processing, boiler, and steam-turbine subsystems. In this project, the overall objective was to develop an advanced, hollow-fiber, polymeric membrane process that could be cost-effectively retrofitted into current pulverized coal-fired power plants to capture at least 90% of the CO₂ from plant flue gas with 95% captured CO₂ purity. The approach for this project tackled the technology development on three different fronts in parallel: membrane materials R&D, hollow-fiber membrane module development, and process development and engineering. The project team consisted of RTI (prime) and two industrial partners, Arkema, Inc. and Generon IGS, Inc. Two CO₂-selective membrane polymer platforms were targeted for development in this project. For the near term, a next-generation, high-flux polycarbonate membrane platform was spun into hollow-fiber membranes that were fabricated into both lab-scale and larger prototype (~2,200 ft²) membrane modules. For the long term, a new fluoropolymer membrane platform based on poly(vinylidene fluoride) [PVDF] chemistry was developed using a copolymer approach as improved capture membrane materials with superior chemical resistance to flue-gas contaminants (moisture, SO₂, NOx, etc.). Specific objectives were: - Development of new, highly chemically resistant, fluorinated polymers as membrane materials with minimum selectivity of 30 for CO₂ over N₂ and CO₂ permeance

  8. High-throughput screening of metal-porphyrin-like graphenes for selective capture of carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hyeonhu; Park, Minwoo; Jang, Byungryul; Kang, Yura; Park, Jinwoo; Lee, Hosik; Chung, Haegeun; Chung, ChiHye; Hong, Suklyun; Kwon, Yongkyung; Yakobson, Boris I.; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured materials, such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks, have been considered to capture CO2. However, their application has been limited largely because they exhibit poor selectivity for flue gases and low capture capacity under low pressures. We perform a high-throughput screening for selective CO2 capture from flue gases by using first principles thermodynamics. We find that elements with empty d orbitals selectively attract CO2 from gaseous mixtures under low CO2 pressures (~10−3 bar) at 300 K and release it at ~450 K. CO2 binding to elements involves hybridization of the metal d orbitals with the CO2 π orbitals and CO2-transition metal complexes were observed in experiments. This result allows us to perform high-throughput screening to discover novel promising CO2 capture materials with empty d orbitals (e.g., Sc– or V–porphyrin-like graphene) and predict their capture performance under various conditions. Moreover, these findings provide physical insights into selective CO2 capture and open a new path to explore CO2 capture materials. PMID:26902156

  9. High-throughput screening of metal-porphyrin-like graphenes for selective capture of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hyeonhu; Park, Minwoo; Jang, Byungryul; Kang, Yura; Park, Jinwoo; Lee, Hosik; Chung, Haegeun; Chung, ChiHye; Hong, Suklyun; Kwon, Yongkyung; Yakobson, Boris I; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2016-02-23

    Nanostructured materials, such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks, have been considered to capture CO2. However, their application has been limited largely because they exhibit poor selectivity for flue gases and low capture capacity under low pressures. We perform a high-throughput screening for selective CO2 capture from flue gases by using first principles thermodynamics. We find that elements with empty d orbitals selectively attract CO2 from gaseous mixtures under low CO2 pressures (~10(-3) bar) at 300 K and release it at ~450 K. CO2 binding to elements involves hybridization of the metal d orbitals with the CO2 π orbitals and CO2-transition metal complexes were observed in experiments. This result allows us to perform high-throughput screening to discover novel promising CO2 capture materials with empty d orbitals (e.g., Sc- or V-porphyrin-like graphene) and predict their capture performance under various conditions. Moreover, these findings provide physical insights into selective CO2 capture and open a new path to explore CO2 capture materials.

  10. High-throughput screening of metal-porphyrin-like graphenes for selective capture of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Hyeonhu; Park, Minwoo; Jang, Byungryul; Kang, Yura; Park, Jinwoo; Lee, Hosik; Chung, Haegeun; Chung, Chihye; Hong, Suklyun; Kwon, Yongkyung; Yakobson, Boris I.; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured materials, such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks, have been considered to capture CO2. However, their application has been limited largely because they exhibit poor selectivity for flue gases and low capture capacity under low pressures. We perform a high-throughput screening for selective CO2 capture from flue gases by using first principles thermodynamics. We find that elements with empty d orbitals selectively attract CO2 from gaseous mixtures under low CO2 pressures (~10‑3 bar) at 300 K and release it at ~450 K. CO2 binding to elements involves hybridization of the metal d orbitals with the CO2 π orbitals and CO2-transition metal complexes were observed in experiments. This result allows us to perform high-throughput screening to discover novel promising CO2 capture materials with empty d orbitals (e.g., Sc– or V–porphyrin-like graphene) and predict their capture performance under various conditions. Moreover, these findings provide physical insights into selective CO2 capture and open a new path to explore CO2 capture materials.

  11. Carbon dioxide capture utilizing zeolites synthesized with paper sludge and scrap-glass.

    PubMed

    Espejel-Ayala, F; Corella, R Chora; Pérez, A Morales; Pérez-Hernández, R; Ramírez-Zamora, R M

    2014-12-01

    The present work introduces the study of the CO2 capture process by zeolites synthesized from paper sludge and scrap glass. Zeolites ZSM-5, analcime and wairakite were produced by means of two types of Structure Directing Agents (SDA): tetrapropilamonium (TPA) and ethanol. On the one hand, zeolite ZSM-5 was synthesized using TPA; on the other hand, analcime and wairakite were produced with ethanol. The temperature programmed desorption (TPD) technique was performed for determining the CO2 sorption capacity of these zeolites at two sorption temperatures: 50 and 100 °C. CO2 sorption capacity of zeolite ZSM-5 synthesized at 50 °C was 0.683 mmol/g representing 38.2% of the value measured for a zeolite ZSM-5 commercial. Zeolite analcime showed a higher CO2 sorption capacity (1.698 mmol/g) at 50 °C and its regeneration temperature was relatively low. Zeolites synthesized in this study can be used in the purification of biogas and this will produce energy without increasing the atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

  12. Application Of Optical Processing For Growth Of Silicon Dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1997-06-17

    A process for producing a silicon dioxide film on a surface of a silicon substrate. The process comprises illuminating a silicon substrate in a substantially pure oxygen atmosphere with a broad spectrum of visible and infrared light at an optical power density of from about 3 watts/cm.sup.2 to about 6 watts/cm.sup.2 for a time period sufficient to produce a silicon dioxide film on the surface of the silicon substrate. An optimum optical power density is about 4 watts/cm.sup.2 for growth of a 100.ANG.-300.ANG. film at a resultant temperature of about 400.degree. C. Deep level transient spectroscopy analysis detects no measurable impurities introduced into the silicon substrate during silicon oxide production and shows the interface state density at the SiO.sub.2 /Si interface to be very low.

  13. Application of optical processing for growth of silicon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1997-06-17

    A process for producing a silicon dioxide film on a surface of a silicon substrate is disclosed. The process comprises illuminating a silicon substrate in a substantially pure oxygen atmosphere with a broad spectrum of visible and infrared light at an optical power density of from about 3 watts/cm{sup 2} to about 6 watts/cm{sup 2} for a time period sufficient to produce a silicon dioxide film on the surface of the silicon substrate. An optimum optical power density is about 4 watts/cm{sup 2} for growth of a 100{angstrom}-300{angstrom} film at a resultant temperature of about 400 C. Deep level transient spectroscopy analysis detects no measurable impurities introduced into the silicon substrate during silicon oxide production and shows the interface state density at the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface to be very low. 1 fig.

  14. Synthesis, structure, and carbon dioxide capture properties of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks.

    PubMed

    Phan, Anh; Doonan, Christian J; Uribe-Romo, Fernando J; Knobler, Carolyn B; O'Keeffe, Michael; Yaghi, Omar M

    2010-01-19

    capture of CO(2) and its selective separation from industrially relevant gas mixtures. Currently, ZIFs are the best porous materials for the selective capture of CO(2); furthermore, they show exceptionally high capacity for CO(2) among adsorbents operating by physisorption. The stability of ZIFs has also enabled organic transformations to be carried out on the crystals, yielding covalently functionalized isoreticular structures wherein the topology, crystallinity, and porosity of the ZIF structure are maintained throughout the reaction process. These reactions, being carried out on macroscopic crystals that behave as single molecules, have enabled the realization of the chemist's dream of using "crystals as molecules", opening the way for the application of the extensive library of organic reactions to the functionalization of useful extended porous structures.

  15. New rht-Type Metal-Organic Frameworks Decorated with Acylamide Groups for Efficient Carbon Dioxide Capture and Chemical Fixation from Raw Power Plant Flue Gas.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiangyang; Zhou, Zhen; Chen, Cong; Bai, Junfeng; He, Cheng; Duan, Chunying

    2016-11-23

    The combination of carbon dioxide capture and chemical fixation in a one-pot process is attractive for both chemists and governments. The cycloaddition of carbon dioxide with epoxides to produce cyclic carbonates is an atomic economical reaction without any side products. By incorporating acylamide to enhance the binding affinity toward CO2, new rht-type metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with (3, 28) and (3, 24) connected units were constructed. Zn-NTTA with two types of dinuclear paddlewheel building blocks-{Zn2(OOC(-))4} and {Zn2(OOC(-))3}. The high uptake of CO2 (115.6 cm(3)·g(-1)) and selectivity over N2 (30:1) at 273 K indicated that these MOFs are excellent candidates for postcombustion CO2 isolation and capture. The MOFs feature high catalytic activity, rapid dynamics of transformation and excellent stability with turnover number (TON) values up to 110 000 per paddlewheel unit after 5 × 6 rounds of recyclability, demonstrating that they are promising heterogeneous catalysts for CO2 cyclo-addition to value-added cyclic carbonates. The cycloaddition of epoxides with wet gases demonstrated that the catalyst activity was not affected by moisture, and the indices of the PXRD patterns of the bulk samples filtered from the catalytic reaction revealed that the crystallinities were maintained. The combination of the selective capture and catalytic transformation in one-pot enables the use of a negative-cost feedstock-raw power plant flue gas without any separation and purification-revealing the broad prospects of such MOFs for practical CO2 fixation in industry.

  16. Capturing, processing, and rendering real-world scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyland, Lars S.; Lastra, Anselmo A.; McAllister, David K.; Popescu, Voicu; McCue, Chris; Fuchs, Henry

    2000-12-01

    While photographs vividly capture a scene from a single viewpoint, it is our goal to capture a scene in such a way that a viewer can freely move to any viewpoint, just as he or she would in an actual scene. We have built a prototype system to quickly digitize a scene using a laser rangefinder and a high-resolution digital camera that accurately captures a panorama of high-resolution range and color information. With real-world scenes, we have provided data to fuel research in many area, including representation, registration, data fusion, polygonization, rendering, simplification, and reillumination. The real-world scene data can be used for many purposes, including immersive environments, immersive training, re-engineering and engineering verification, renovation, crime-scene and accident capture and reconstruction, archaeology and historic preservation, sports and entertainment, surveillance, remote tourism and remote sales. We will describe our acquisition system, the necessary processing to merge data from the multiple input devices and positions. We will also describe high quality rendering using the data we have collected. Issues about specific rendering accelerators and algorithms will also be presented. We will conclude by describing future uses and methods of collection for real- world scene data.

  17. Nanoclay-Based Solid-Amine Adsorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Elliot A.

    The objective of this research was to develop an efficient, low cost, recyclable solid sorbent for carbon dioxide adsorption from large point sources, such as coal-fired power plants. The current commercial way to adsorb CO 2 is to use a liquid amine or ammonia process. These processes are used in industry in the "sweetening" of natural gas, but liquid based technologies are not economically viable in the adsorption of CO2 from power plants due to the extremely large volume of CO2 and the inherent high regeneration costs of cycling the sorbent. Therefore, one of the main objectives of this research was to develop a novel sorbent that can be cycled and uses very little energy for regeneration. The sorbent developed here is composed of a nanoclay (montmorillonite), commonly used in the production of polymer nanocomposites, grafted with commercially available amines. (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTMS) was chemically grafted to the edge hydroxyl groups of the clay. While another amine, polyethylenimine (PEI), was attached to the surface of the clay by electrostatic interactions. To confirm the attachment of amines to the clay, the samples were characterized using FTIR and the corresponding peaks for amines were observed. The amount of amine loaded onto the support was determined by TGA techniques. The treated clay was initially analyzed for CO2 adsorption in a pure CO 2 stream. The adsorption temperatures that had the highest adsorption capacity were determined to be between 75°C and 100°C for all of the samples tested at atmospheric pressure. The maximum CO2 adsorption capacity observed was with nanoclay treated with both APTMS and PEI at 85°C. In a more realistic flue gas of 10% CO2 and 90% N2, the adsorbents had essentially the same overall CO2 adsorption capacity indicating that the presence of nitrogen did not hinder the adsorption of CO2. Adsorption studies in pure CO2 at room temperature under pressure from 40-300 PSI were also conducted. The average

  18. System and process for capture of acid gasses at elevated pressure from gaseous process streams

    SciTech Connect

    Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Linehan, John C.; Rainbolt, James E.; Bearden, Mark D.; Zheng, Feng

    2016-09-06

    A system, method, and material that enables the pressure-activated reversible chemical capture of acid gasses such as CO.sub.2 from gas volumes such as streams, flows or any other volume. Once the acid gas is chemically captured, the resulting product typically a zwitterionic salt, can be subjected to a reduced pressure whereupon the resulting product will release the captures acid gas and the capture material will be regenerated. The invention includes this process as well as the materials and systems for carrying out and enabling this process.

  19. Calcium-decorated carbon nanostructures for the selective capture of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Koo, Jahyun; Bae, Hyeonhu; Kang, Lei; Huang, Bing; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2016-10-26

    The development of advanced materials for CO2 capture is of great importance for mitigating climate change. In this paper, we outline our discovery that calcium-decorated carbon nanostructures, i.e., zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs), carbyne, and graphyne, have great potential for selective CO2 capture, as demonstrated via first-principles calculations. Our findings show that Ca-decorated ZGNRs can bind up to three CO2 molecules at each Ca atom site with an adsorption energy of ∼-0.8 eV per CO2, making them suitable for reversible CO2 capture. They adsorb CO2 molecules preferentially, compared with other gas molecules such as H2, N2, and CH4. Moreover, based on equilibrium thermodynamical simulations, we confirm that Ca-decorated ZGNRs can capture CO2 selectively from a gas mixture with a capacity of ∼4.5 mmol g(-1) under ambient conditions. Similar results have been found in other carbon nanomaterials, indicating the generality of carbon based nanostructures for selective CO2 capture under ambient conditions.

  20. Synthesis, Structure, and Carbon Dioxide Capture Properties of Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, Anh; Doonan, Christian J.; Uribe-Romo, Fernando J.; Knobler, Carolyn B.; O’Keeffe, Michael; Yaghi, Omar M.

    2010-01-19

    capture of CO2 and its selective separation from industrially relevant gas mixtures. Currently, ZIFs are the best porous materials for the selective capture of CO2; furthermore, they show exceptionally high capacity for CO2 among adsorbents operating by physisorption. The stability of ZIFs has also enabled organic transformations to be carried out on the crystals, yielding covalently functionalized isoreticular structures wherein the topology, crystallinity, and porosity of the ZIF structure are maintained throughout the reaction process. Finally, these reactions, being carried out on macroscopic crystals that behave as single molecules, have enabled the realization of the chemist’s dream of using “crystals as molecules”, opening the way for the application of the extensive library of organic reactions to the functionalization of useful extended porous structures.

  1. Research on data capture, processing, and application of ADS40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Miaozhong; Tu, Xinru

    2008-12-01

    ADS40 from Leica Geosystems is new-type airborne digital camera, which has aggregated worldwide focus in application fields of aerial photogrammetry and remote sensing nowadays, with its noticeable superiority in interpreting and mapping the comprehensive conditions of ground surface. At the same time, its special characteristics make the data processing some complicated. Based on the long-team research and the experiment on usage of ADS40, the paper presented the workflow in details including data capture, processing and application of ADS40, described some problem and exercise in practice.

  2. Simple template-free synthesis of high surface area mesoporous ceria and its new use as a potential adsorbent for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Yoshihiro; Shimomura, Marie; Endo, Akira

    2014-12-15

    The development of an efficient technique for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from a variety of large stationary sources is in important global issue. If we are to achieve an energy-efficient and effectively higher CO2 capture process based on an adsorption approach, we need new adsorbent materials realistic enough to provide higher CO2 loading on a volumetric basis. For this reason we have focused on the practical use of high surface area mesoporous ceria as a new application in the field of CO2 capture. In this regard, we demonstrate the simple and inexpensive template-free synthesis of mesoporous ceria with a high surface area up to 200 m(2) g(-1), and characterize it as an effective CO2 adsorbent for the first time. The mesoporous ceria is prepared based on sol-gel chemistry, where the product is simply precipitated by the self-assembly of ceria nanoparticles within a short reaction period at room temperature under highly alkaline conditions with optimized chemical compositions. The results of CO2 adsorption-desorption measurement at 298 K show that the obtained ceria with an enhanced surface area exhibits a noticeably higher CO2 adsorption capacity per volume than commercially available non-porous ceria, activated carbon and zeolite 13X over a wide pressure range with robust stability as well as regenerability. This work enables us to prepare promising new materials for the CO2 capture process based on an easy-to-handle synthesis system, and this effective material will have a broad applicability to the efficient CO2 separation from variety of industrial emission sources. The features of the obtained mesoporous ceria are reported and discussed.

  3. Computational Tools for Accelerating Carbon Capture Process Development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David

    2013-01-01

    The goals of the work reported are: to develop new computational tools and models to enable industry to more rapidly develop and deploy new advanced energy technologies; to demonstrate the capabilities of the CCSI Toolset on non-proprietary case studies; and to deploy the CCSI Toolset to industry. Challenges of simulating carbon capture (and other) processes include: dealing with multiple scales (particle, device, and whole process scales); integration across scales; verification, validation, and uncertainty; and decision support. The tools cover: risk analysis and decision making; validated, high-fidelity CFD; high-resolution filtered sub-models; process design and optimization tools; advanced process control and dynamics; process models; basic data sub-models; and cross-cutting integration tools.

  4. Carbon dioxide capture in 2-aminoethanol aqueous solution from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Yoshiyuki; Ohnuma, Toshiharu; Bučko, Tomáš

    2017-03-01

    The reaction of carbon dioxide (CO2) with aqueous 2-aminoethanol (MEA) has been investigated using both blue moon ensemble and metadynamics approaches combined with ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. The AIMD simulations predicted the spontaneous deprotonation of the intermediate compound, MEA zwitterion, and they were used to study two possible routes for subsequent proton transfer reactions: the formation of the protonated MEA and the formation of MEA carbamic acid. The free-energy curve depicted by blue moon ensemble technique supported the favorable deprotonation of MEA zwitterion. The overall free-energy profile showed the favorable formation of the ionic products of MEA carbamate ion and protonated MEA.

  5. The synthesis and the chemical and physical properties of non-aqueous silylamine solvents for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Rohan, Amy L; Switzer, Jackson R; Flack, Kyle M; Hart, Ryan J; Sivaswamy, Swetha; Biddinger, Elizabeth J; Talreja, Manish; Verma, Manjusha; Faltermeier, Sean; Nielsen, Paul T; Pollet, Pamela; Schuette, George F; Eckert, Charles A; Liotta, Charles L

    2012-11-01

    Silylamine reversible ionic liquids were designed to achieve specific physical properties in order to address effective CO₂ capture. The reversible ionic liquid systems reported herein represent a class of switchable solvents where a relatively non-polar silylamine (molecular liquid) is reversibly transformed to a reversible ionic liquid (RevIL) by reaction with CO₂ (chemisorption). The RevILs can further capture additional CO₂ through physical absorption (physisorption). The effects of changes in structure on (1) the CO₂ capture capacity (chemisorption and physisorption), (2) the viscosity of the solvent systems at partial and total conversion to the ionic liquid state, (3) the energy required for reversing the CO₂ capture process, and (4) the ability to recycle the solvents systems are reported.

  6. Rate-based process modeling study of CO{sub 2} capture with aqueous monoethanolamine solution

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, C.C.; Plaza, J.M.; Dugas, R.; Rochelle, G.T.

    2009-10-15

    Rate-based process modeling technology has matured and is increasingly gaining acceptance over traditional equilibrium-stage modeling approaches. Recently comprehensive pilot plant data for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture with aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA) solution have become available from the University of Texas at Austin. The pilot plant data cover key process variables including CO{sub 2} concentration in the gas stream, CO{sub 2} loading in lean MEA solution, liquid to gas ratio, and packing type. In this study, we model the pilot plant operation with Aspen RateSep, a second generation rate-based multistage separation unit operation model in Aspen Plus. After a brief review of rate-based modeling, thermodynamic and kinetic models for CO{sub 2} absorption with the MEA solution, and transport property models, we show excellent match of the rate-based model predictions against the comprehensive pilot plant data and we validate the superiority of the rate-based models over the traditional equilibrium-stage models. We further examine the impacts of key rate-based modeling options, i.e., film discretization options and flow model options. The rate-based model provides excellent predictive capability, and it should be very useful for design and scale-up of CO{sub 2} capture processes.

  7. Membrane Process to Capture CO{sub 2} from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, Tim; Wei, Xiaotong; Firat, Bilgen; He, Jenny; Amo, Karl; Pande, Saurabh; Baker, Richard; Wijmans, Hans; Bhown, Abhoyjit

    2012-03-31

    This final report describes work conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) on development of an efficient membrane process to capture carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from power plant flue gas (award number DE-NT0005312). The primary goal of this research program was to demonstrate, in a field test, the ability of a membrane process to capture up to 90% of CO{sub 2} in coal-fired flue gas, and to evaluate the potential of a full-scale version of the process to perform this separation with less than a 35% increase in the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) conducted this project in collaboration with Arizona Public Services (APS), who hosted a membrane field test at their Cholla coal-fired power plant, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and WorleyParsons (WP), who performed a comparative cost analysis of the proposed membrane CO{sub 2} capture process. The work conducted for this project included membrane and module development, slipstream testing of commercial-sized modules with natural gas and coal-fired flue gas, process design optimization, and a detailed systems and cost analysis of a membrane retrofit to a commercial power plant. The Polaris? membrane developed over a number of years by MTR represents a step-change improvement in CO{sub 2} permeance compared to previous commercial CO{sub 2}-selective membranes. During this project, membrane optimization work resulted in a further doubling of the CO{sub 2} permeance of Polaris membrane while maintaining the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity. This is an important accomplishment because increased CO{sub 2} permeance directly impacts the membrane skid cost and footprint: a doubling of CO{sub 2} permeance halves the skid cost and footprint. In addition to providing high CO{sub 2} permeance, flue gas CO{sub 2} capture membranes must be stable in the presence of contaminants including SO{sub 2}. Laboratory tests showed no

  8. Biorefineries of carbon dioxide: From carbon capture and storage (CCS) to bioenergies production.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Wai Yan; Ling, Tau Chuan; Juan, Joon Ching; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu; Show, Pau Loke

    2016-09-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions have several adverse environmental effects, like pollution and climate change. Currently applied carbon capture and storage (CCS) methods are not cost effective and have not been proven safe for long term sequestration. Another attractive approach is CO2 valorization, whereby CO2 can be captured in the form of biomass via photosynthesis and is subsequently converted into various form of bioenergy. This article summarizes the current carbon sequestration and utilization technologies, while emphasizing the value of bioconversion of CO2. In particular, CO2 sequestration by terrestrial plants, microalgae and other microorganisms are discussed. Prospects and challenges for CO2 conversion are addressed. The aim of this review is to provide comprehensive knowledge and updated information on the current advances in biological CO2 sequestration and valorization, which are essential if this approach is to achieve environmental sustainability and economic feasibility.

  9. Pilot project at Hazira, India, for capture of carbon dioxide and its biofixation using microalgae.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anant; Choudhary, Piyush; Atri, Neelam; Teir, Sebastian; Mutnuri, Srikanth

    2016-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to set up a small-scale pilot reactor at ONGC Hazira, Surat, for capturing CO2 from vent gas. The studies were carried out for CO2 capture by either using microalgae Chlorella sp. or a consortium of microalgae (Scenedesmus quadricauda, Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorococcum humicola). The biomass harvested was used for anaerobic digestion to produce biogas. The carbonation column was able to decrease the average 34 vol.% of CO2 in vent gas to 15 vol.% of CO2 in the outlet gas of the carbonation column. The yield of Chlorella sp. was found to be 18 g/m(2)/day. The methane yield was 386 l CH4/kg VSfed of Chlorella sp. whereas 228 l CH4/kg VSfed of the consortium of algae.

  10. A three-dimensional microvascular gas exchange unit for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Du T; Leho, Y T; Esser-Kahn, Aaron P

    2012-04-07

    For the capture of CO(2) from mixed gas streams, materials for increased gas exchange are necessary. Efficient gas exchange systems already exist in the form of vascularized lung-tissue. Herein we report a fabrication technique for the synthesis of three-dimensional microvascular gas exchange units capable of removing CO(2) from flowing gas created using the recently reported Vaporization of a Sacrificial Component (VaSC) technique. We demonstrate the spatiotemporal pattern of CO(2) reactivity in the microvascular gas exchange unit using colorimetric, pH sensitive dyes. Control over three-dimensional placement of channels is shown to increase capture efficiencies. A computational finite element model validates and explains the experimental observations.

  11. Computational investigation of reactive to nonreactive capture of carbon dioxide by oxygen-containing Lewis bases.

    PubMed

    Teague, Craig M; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, De-en

    2010-11-04

    Recent work has shown that room temperature ionic liquid systems reactively absorb CO(2) and offer distinct advantages over current CO(2) capture technologies. Here we computationally evaluated CO(2) interaction energies with a series of oxygen-containing Lewis base anions (including cyclohexanolate and phenolate and their respective derivatives). Our results show that the interaction energy can be tuned across a range from reactive to nonreactive (or physical) interactions. We evaluated different levels of theory as well as possible corrections to the interaction energy, and we explained our calculated trends on the basis of properties of the individual anions. We found that the interaction energy between CO(2) and the Lewis bases examined here correlates most strongly with the atomic charge on the oxygen atom. This insight provides a useful handle to tune the anion-CO(2) interaction energy for future experimental and computational studies of novel CO(2) capture systems.

  12. A new class of single-component absorbents for reversible carbon dioxide capture under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Barzagli, Francesco; Lai, Sarah; Mani, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Some inexpensive and commercially available secondary amines reversibly react with CO2 at room temperature and ambient pressure to yield carbonated species in the liquid phase in the absence of any additional solvent. These solvent-free absorbents have a high CO2 capture capacity (0.63-0.65 mol CO2 /mol amine) at 1.0 bar (=100 kPa), combined with low-temperature reversibility at ambient pressure. (13) C NMR spectroscopy analysis identified the carbonated species as the carbamate salts and unexpected carbamic acids. These absorbents were used for CO2 (15 and 40 % in air) capture in continuous cycles of absorption-desorption carried out in packed columns, yielding an absorption efficiency of up to 98.5 % at absorption temperatures of 40-45 °C and desorption temperatures of 70-85 °C at ambient pressure. The absence of any parasitic solvent that requires to be heated and stability towards moisture and heating could result in some of these solvent-free absorbents being a viable alternative to aqueous amines for CO2 chemical capture.

  13. Carbon dioxide capture using Escherichia coli expressing carbonic anhydrase in a foam bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Watson, Stuart K; Han, Zhenlin; Su, Wei Wen; Deshusses, Marc A; Kan, Eunsung

    2016-12-01

    The present study reports CO2 capture and conversion to bicarbonate using Escherichia coli expressing carbonic anhydrase (CA) on its cell surface in a novel foam bioreactor. The very large gas-liquid interfacial area in the foam bioreactor promoted rapid CO2 absorption while the CO2 in the aqueous phase was subsequently converted to bicarbonate ions by the CA. CO2 gas removal in air was investigated at various conditions such as gas velocity, cell density and CO2 inlet concentration. Regimes for kinetic and mass transfer limitations were defined. Very high removal rates of CO2 were observed: 9570 g CO2 m(-3) bioreactor h(-1) and a CO2 removal efficiency of 93% at 4% inlet CO2 when the gas retention time was 24 s, and cell concentration was 4 gdw L(-1). These performances are superior to earlier reports of experimental bioreactors using CA for CO2 capture. Overall, this bioreactor system has significant potential as an alternative CO2 capture technology.

  14. Recent advances in carbon dioxide capture, fixation, and activation by using N-heterocyclic carbenes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Longhua; Wang, Hongming

    2014-04-01

    In the last two decades, CO2 emission has caused a lot of environmental problems. To mitigate the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere, various strategies have been implemented, one of which is the use of N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) and related complexes to accomplish the capture, fixation, and activation of CO2 effectively. In this review, we summarize CO2 capture, fixation, and activation by utilizing NHCs and related complexes; homogeneous reactions and their reaction mechanisms are discussed. Free NHCs and NHC salts can capture CO2 in both direct and indirect ways to form imidazolium carboxylates, and they can also catalyze the reaction of aromatic aldehydes with CO2 to form carboxylic acids and derivatives. Moreover, associated with transition metals (TMs), NHCs can form NHC-TM complexes to transform CO2 into industrial acid or esters. Non-metal-NHC complexes can also catalyze the reactions of silicon and boron complexes with CO2 . In addition, catalytic cycloaddition of epoxides with CO2 is another effective function of NHC complexes, and NHC ionic liquids perform excellently in this aspect.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Capture with Ionic Liquids and Deep Eutectic Solvents: A New Generation of Sorbents.

    PubMed

    Sarmad, Shokat; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka; Ji, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-20

    High cost and high energy penalty for CO2 uptake from flue gases are important obstacles in large-scale industrial applications, and developing efficient technology for CO2 capture from technical and economic points is crucial. Ionic liquids (ILs) show the potential for CO2 separation owing to their inherent advantages, and have been proposed as alternatives to overcome the drawbacks of conventional sorbents. Chemical modification of ILs to improve their performance in CO2 absorption has received more attention. Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) as a new generation of ILs are considered as more economical alternatives to cope with the deficiencies of high cost and high viscosity of conventional ILs. This Review discusses the potential of functionalized ILs and DESs as CO2 sorbents. Incorporation of CO2 -philic functional groups, such as amine, in cation and/or anion moiety of ILs can promot their absorption capacity. In general, the functionalization of the anion part of ILs is more effective than the cation part. DESs represent favorable solvent properties and are capable of capturing CO2 , but the research work is scarce and undeveloped compared to the studies conducted on ILs. It is possible to develop novel DESs with promising absorption capacity. However, more investigation needs to be carried out on the mechanism of CO2 sorption of DESs to clarify how these novel sorbents can be adjusted and fine-tuned to be best tailored as optimized media for CO2 capture.

  16. Swellable, water- and acid-tolerant polymer sponges for chemoselective carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Robert T; Stevens, Lee A; Dawson, Robert; Vijayaraghavan, Meera; Hasell, Tom; Silverwood, Ian P; Ewing, Andrew V; Ratvijitvech, Thanchanok; Exley, Jason D; Chong, Samantha Y; Blanc, Frédéric; Adams, Dave J; Kazarian, Sergei G; Snape, Colin E; Drage, Trevor C; Cooper, Andrew I

    2014-06-25

    To impact carbon emissions, new materials for carbon capture must be inexpensive, robust, and able to adsorb CO2 specifically from a mixture of other gases. In particular, materials must be tolerant to the water vapor and to the acidic impurities that are present in gas streams produced by using fossil fuels to generate electricity. We show that a porous organic polymer has excellent CO2 capacity and high CO2 selectivity under conditions relevant to precombustion CO2 capture. Unlike polar adsorbents, such as zeolite 13x and the metal-organic framework, HKUST-1, the CO2 adsorption capacity for the hydrophobic polymer is hardly affected by the adsorption of water vapor. The polymer is even stable to boiling in concentrated acid for extended periods, a property that is matched by few microporous adsorbents. The polymer adsorbs CO2 in a different way from rigid materials by physical swelling, much as a sponge adsorbs water. This gives rise to a higher CO2 capacities and much better CO2 selectivity than for other water-tolerant, nonswellable frameworks, such as activated carbon and ZIF-8. The polymer has superior function as a selective gas adsorbent, even though its constituent monomers are very simple organic feedstocks, as would be required for materials preparation on the large industrial scales required for carbon capture.

  17. Bacterial Synthesis of Unusual Sulfonamide and Sulfone Antibiotics by Flavoenzyme-Mediated Sulfur Dioxide Capture.

    PubMed

    Baunach, Martin; Ding, Ling; Willing, Karsten; Hertweck, Christian

    2015-11-02

    Sulfa drugs, such as sulfonilamide and dapsone, are classical antibiotics that have been in clinical use worldwide. Despite the relatively simple architectures, practically no natural products are known to feature such aromatic sulfonamide or diarylsulfone substructures. We report the unexpected discovery of three fully unprecedented, sulfonyl-bridged alkaloid dimers (sulfadixiamycins A-C) from recombinant Streptomyces species harboring the entire xiamycin biosynthesis gene cluster. Sulfadixiamycins exhibit moderate antimycobacterial activities and potent antibiotic activities even against multidrug-resistant bacteria. Gene inactivation, complementation, and biotransformation experiments revealed that a flavin-dependent enzyme (XiaH) plays a key role in sulfadixiamycin biosynthesis. XiaH mediates a radical-based, three-component reaction involving two equivalents of xiamycin and sulfur dioxide, which is reminiscent of radical styrene/SO2 copolymerization.

  18. Ambient carbon dioxide capture by different dimensional AlN nanostructures: A comparative DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Nurazar, Roghaye; Nematollahi, Parisa

    2016-08-01

    Strong binding of an isolated carbon dioxide molecule over three different aluminium nitride (AlN) nanostructures (nanocage, nanotube and nanosheet) is verified using density functional calculations. Equilibrium geometries, electronic properties, adsorption energies and thermodynamic stability of each adsorbed configuration are also identified. Optimized configurations are shown at least one corresponding physisorption and chemisorption of CO2 molecule over different AlN nanostructures. Also, the effect of chirality on the adsorption of CO2 molecule is studied over two different finite-sized zigzag (6,0) and armchair (4,4) AlN nanotubes. It is found that the electronic properties of the Al12N12 nanocage are more sensitive to the CO2 molecule than other AlN nanostructures. This indicates the significant potential of Al12N12 nanocage toward the CO2 adsorption, fixation and catalytic applications in contrast to other AlN nanostructures.

  19. Comparison of three carbon dioxide sources on phlebotomine sand fly capture in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hoel, D F; Zollner, G E; El-Hossary, S S; Fawaz, E Y; Watany, N; Hanafi, H A; Obenauer, P J; Kirsch, P

    2011-09-01

    Lighted Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) light traps were baited with carbon dioxide (CO2) produced from three different sources to compare the efficacy of each in collecting phlebotomine sand flies in Bahrif village, Aswan Governorate, Egypt. Treatments consisted of compressed CO2 gas released at a rate of 250 ml/min, 1.5 kg of dry ice (replaced daily) sublimating from an insulated plastic container, CO2 gas produced from a prototype FASTGAS (FG) CO2 generator system (APTIV Inc., Portland, OR), and a CDC light trap without a CO2 source. Carbon dioxide was released above each treatment trap's catch opening. Traps were placed in a 4 x 4 Latin square designed study with three replications completed after four consecutive nights in August 2007. During the study, 1,842 phlebotomine sand flies were collected from two genera and five species. Traps collected 1,739 (94.4%) Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli), 19 (1.0%) Phlebotomus sergenti, 64 (3.5%) Sergentomyia schwetzi, 16 (0.9%) Sergentomyia palestinensis, and four (0.2%) Sergentomyia tiberiadis. Overall treatment results were dry ice (541) > FG (504) > compressed gas (454) > no CO2 (343). Total catches of P. papatasi were not significantly different between treatments, although CO2-baited traps collected 23-34% more sand flies than the unbaited (control) trap. Results indicate that the traps baited with a prototype CO2 generator were as attractive as traps supplied with CO2 sources traditionally used in sand fly surveillance efforts. Field-deployable CO2 generators are particularly advantageous in remote areas where dry ice or compressed gas is difficult to obtain.

  20. Capture reaction measurements for the astrophysical p-process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, S. J.; Simon, A.; Spyrou, A.; Dombos, A. C.; SuN Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    An accurate description of the nucleosynthesis of the group of stable, neutron deficient isotopes heavier than iron remains one of the main open questions in the field of nuclear astrophysics. These isotopes, known as the p-nuclei, are shielded from production by the s- and r-neutron capture processes by the valley of β-stability and therefore must originate from some other astrophysical scenario or scenarios. The most heavily studied scenario to date, the p-process or γ-process, involves photodisintegration reactions, their inverse capture reactions, and β+ decays on existing seed nuclei in the shock front of Type II SNe. The complete description of the p-process involves reaction networks of over ten-thousand reactions, including many reactions on unstable isotopes. Since only limited experimental data exists, nearly all p-process reaction rates are calculated by the statistical Hauser-Feshbach model, which rely on accurate optical model potentials, level densities, and γ-widths. In an effort to improve the input parameters to the statistical model, particularly the troublesome α-optical model potential, a series of (α, γ) reactions were carried out at the FN Tandem Accelerator at the University of Notre Dame in combination with the NSCL SuN detector. Cross section results and their comparison to theoretical calculations will be presented. Also discussed will be the results of the first ever (p, γ) measurements using the summing technique in inverse kinematics, a significant experimental development towards measuring p-process reaction cross sections with unstable isotopes. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation, Grants No. PHY 102511, PHY 08-22648, and PHY 0969058.

  1. Carbon dioxide capture on amine-rich carbonaceous materials derived from glucose.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Bacsik, Zoltan; Hedin, Niklas; Wei, Wei; Sun, Yuhan; Antonietti, Markus; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena

    2010-07-19

    The synthesis of carbonaceous materials with a high surface density of amino functions for CO(2) sorption and sequestration is reported. The amino-rich carbonaceous materials are characterized by elemental analysis, N(2) sorption, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, zeta potential, TGA and FTIR measurements. A detailed discussion on the use of these materials in CO(2) capture is provided. The materials show significant sorption capabilities for CO(2) (4.3 mmol g(-1)at -20 degrees C and 1 bar). Furthermore, they show a high apparent selectivity for CO(2) over N(2) at both low and high temperatures.

  2. Evaluation of cation-exchanged zeolite adsorbents for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, TH; Hudson, MR; Mason, JA; Queen, WL; Dutton, JJ; Sumida, K; Micklash, KJ; Kaye, SS; Brown, CM; Long, JR

    2013-01-01

    A series of zeolite adsorbents has been evaluated for potential application in post-combustion CO2 capture using a new high-throughput gas adsorption instrument capable of measuring 28 samples in parallel. Among the zeolites tested, Ca-A exhibits the highest CO2 uptake (3.72 mmol g(-1) and 5.63 mmol cm(-3)) together with an excellent CO2 selectivity over N-2 under conditions relevant to capture from the dry flue gas stream of a coal-fired power plant. The large initial isosteric heat of adsorption of -58 kJ mol(-1) indicates the presence of strong interactions between CO2 and the Ca-A framework. Neutron and X-ray powder diffraction studies reveal the precise location of the adsorption sites for CO2 in Ca-A and Mg-A. A detailed study of CO2 adsorption kinetics further shows that the performance of Ca-A is not limited by slow CO2 diffusion within the pores. Significantly, Ca-A exhibited a higher volumetric CO2 uptake and CO2/N-2 selectivity than Mg-2(dobdc) (dobdc(4-) = 1,4-dioxido-2,5-benzenedicarboxylate; Mg-MOF-74, CPO-27-Mg), one of the best performing adsorbents. The exceptional performance of Ca-A was maintained in CO2 breakthrough simulations.

  3. Carbon dioxide capture using a CO{sub 2}-selective facilitated transport membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.; Zou, J.; Ho, W.S.W.

    2008-02-15

    A novel CO{sub 2}-selective membrane with the facilitated transport mechanism has been synthesized to capture CO{sub 2} from the industrial gas mixtures, including flue gas. Both mobile and fixed amine carriers were incorporated into the cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) during the membrane synthesis. The membrane showed desirable CO{sub 2} permeability (with a suitable effective thickness) and CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity up to 170{sup o} C. In the CO{sub 2} capture experiments from a gas mixture with N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}, a permeate CO{sub 2} dry concentration of {gt}98% was obtained, using steam as the sweep gas. The effects of the feed flow rate and the sweep:feed molar ratio on the membrane separation performance were investigated. A one-dimensional isothermal model was established to examine the performance of a hollow-fiber membrane module composed of the described CO{sub 2}-selective membrane. The modeling results show that a CO{sub 2} recovery of {gt}95% and a permeate CO{sub 2} dry concentration of {gt}98% are achievable from a 1000 standard cubic feet per minute (SCFM) (or 21.06 mol/s) flue gas stream with a 2 ft (0.61 m) hollow-fiber module that contained 980 000 fibers.

  4. Using scenarios to capture work processes in shared home care.

    PubMed

    Hägglund, Maria; Scandurra, Isabella; Koch, Sabine

    2007-01-01

    Shared home care is increasingly common, and in order to develop ICT that support such complex cooperative work it is crucial obtain an understanding of the work routines, information demands, and other central preconditions at the clinical level before the development is initiated. Scenarios are proposed as a technique that can be useful for capturing work processes in shared home care and experiences from the Old@Home project are presented. The scenarios are useful not only in the initial phases of the development project but throughout the development process, improving the accessibility of end user requirements and usability issues for the design team, and as a basis for use cases and further design.

  5. Equilibrium and kinetics analysis of carbon dioxide capture using immobilized amine on a mesoporous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Monazam, E., Shadle, L., Pennline, H., Miller, D., Fauth, D., Hoffman, J., Gray, M.

    2012-01-01

    The equilibrium and conversion-time data on the absorption of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with amine-based solid sorbent were analyzed over the range of 303–373 K. Data on CO{sub 2} loading on amine based solid sorbent at these temperatures and CO{sub 2} partial pressure between 10 and 760 mm Hg obtained from volumetric adsorption apparatus were fitted to a simple equilibrium model to generate the different parameters (including equilibrium constant) in the model. Using these constants, a correlation was obtained to define equilibrium constant and maximum CO{sub 2} loading as a function of temperature. In this study, a shrinking core model (SCM) was applied to elucidate the relative importance of pore diffusion and surface chemical reaction in controlling the rate of reaction. Application of SCM to the data suggested a surface reaction-controlled mechanism for the temperature of up to 40°C and pore-diffusion mechanism at higher temperature.

  6. Effects of Carbonization Parameters of Moso-Bamboo-Based Porous Charcoal on Capturing Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Jhan, Jhih-Wei; Cheng, Yi-Ming; Cheng, Hau-Hsein

    2014-01-01

    This study experimentally analyzed the carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of Moso-bamboo- (Phyllostachys edulis-) based porous charcoal. The porous charcoal was prepared at various carbonization temperatures and ground into powders with 60, 100, and 170 meshes, respectively. In order to understand the adsorption characteristics of porous charcoal, its fundamental properties, namely, charcoal yield, ash content, pH value, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, iodine number, pore volume, and powder size, were analyzed. The results show that when the carbonization temperature was increased, the charcoal yield decreased and the pH value increased. Moreover, the bamboo carbonized at a temperature of 1000°C for 2 h had the highest iodine sorption value and BET surface area. In the experiments, charcoal powders prepared at various carbonization temperatures were used to adsorb 1.854% CO2 for 120 h. The results show that the bamboo charcoal carbonized at 1000°C and ground with a 170 mesh had the best adsorption capacity, significantly decreasing the CO2 concentration to 0.836%. At room temperature and atmospheric pressure, the Moso-bamboo-based porous charcoal exhibited much better CO2 adsorption capacity compared to that of commercially available 350-mesh activated carbon. PMID:25225639

  7. Effects of carbonization parameters of Moso-bamboo-based porous charcoal on capturing carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei-Hsing; Jhan, Jhih-Wei; Cheng, Yi-Ming; Cheng, Hau-Hsein

    2014-01-01

    This study experimentally analyzed the carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of Moso-bamboo- (Phyllostachys edulis-) based porous charcoal. The porous charcoal was prepared at various carbonization temperatures and ground into powders with 60, 100, and 170 meshes, respectively. In order to understand the adsorption characteristics of porous charcoal, its fundamental properties, namely, charcoal yield, ash content, pH value, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, iodine number, pore volume, and powder size, were analyzed. The results show that when the carbonization temperature was increased, the charcoal yield decreased and the pH value increased. Moreover, the bamboo carbonized at a temperature of 1000(°)C for 2 h had the highest iodine sorption value and BET surface area. In the experiments, charcoal powders prepared at various carbonization temperatures were used to adsorb 1.854% CO2 for 120 h. The results show that the bamboo charcoal carbonized at 1000(°)C and ground with a 170 mesh had the best adsorpt on capacity, significantly decreasing the CO2 concentration to 0.836%. At room temperature and atmospheric pressure, the Moso-bamboo-based porous charcoal exhibited much better CO2 adsorption capacity compared to that of commercially available 350-mesh activated carbon.

  8. A Hierarchical Bipyridine-Constructed Framework for Highly Efficient Carbon Dioxide Capture and Catalytic Conversion.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhifeng; Sun, Qi; Liu, Xiaolong; Guo, Liping; Li, Jixue; Pan, Shuxiang; Bian, Chaoqun; Wang, Liang; Hu, Xin; Meng, Xiangju; Zhao, Leihong; Deng, Feng; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2017-03-22

    As a C1 feedstock, CO2 has the potential to be uniquely highly economical in both a chemical and a financial sense. Porous materials bearing particular binding and active sites that can capture and convert CO2 simultaneously are promising candidates for CO2 utilization. In this work, a bipyridine-constructed polymer featuring a high surface area, a hierarchical porous structure, and excellent stability was synthesized through free-radical polymerization. After metalation, the resultant catalysts exhibited superior activities in comparison with those of their homogeneous counterparts in the cycloaddition of CO2 to epoxides. The high performance of the heterogeneous catalysts originates from cooperative effects between the CO2 -philic polymer and the embedded metal species. In addition, the catalysts showed excellent stabilities and are readily recyclable; thus, they are promising for practical utilization for the conversion of CO2 into value-added chemicals.

  9. Design of poly(ether block amide)/polyacrylonitrile composite membrane for carbon dioxide capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lianjun; Ji, Pengfei; Li, Yang; di, Mingming; Lv, Quan; Li, Shuguang

    2015-03-01

    In this study, poly(ether block amide) was used as coating material to develop a novel composite polymer membrane for CO2 capture. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) ultrafiltration membrane was applied as substrate. Between them, a gutter layer prepared from cross-linked polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) blending with amino silicone was introduced to improve separation performance of the composite membrane. The separation properties of resultant triple layer composite membrane was characterized using pure CO2 and N2 gases. It was found that the crosslinking degree of the gutter layer had great influence on membrane performance, which could be significantly improved with the help of amino-PDMS gutter layer compared with that of the membrane having Pebax coating directly onto PAN substrate. Using 2 wt.% Pebax coating solution and properly cross-linked gutter layer, the designed Pebax/amino-PDMS/PAN composite membrane showed CO2 permeance of 147 GPU and CO2/N2 selectivity of 62.

  10. Carbon dioxide capture by functionalized solid amine sorbents with simulated flue gas conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yamin; Ye, Qing; Shen, Mei; Shi, Jingjin; Chen, Jie; Pan, Hua; Shi, Yao

    2011-07-01

    A novel solid amine sorbent was prepared using KIT-6-type mesoporous silica modified with tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA). Its adsorption behavior toward CO(2) from simulated flue gases is investigated using an adsorption column. The adsorption capacities at temperatures of 303, 313, 333, 343, and 353 K are 2.10, 2.29, 2.58, 2.85, and 2.71 mmol g(-1), respectively. Experimental adsorption isotherms were obtained, and the average isosteric heat of adsorption was 43.8 kJ/mol. The adsorption capacity increases to 3.2 mmol g(-1) when the relative humidity (RH) of the simulated flue gas reaches 37%. The adsorption capacity is inhibited slightly by the presence of SO(2) at concentrations lower than 300 ppm but is not significantly influenced by NO at concentrations up to 400 ppm. The adsorbent is completely regenerated in 10 min at 393 K and a pressure of 5 KPa, with expected consumption energy of about 1.41 MJ kg(-1) CO(2). The adsorption capacity remains almost the same after 10 cycles of adsorption/regeneration with adsorption conditions of 10 vol % CO(2), 100 ppm SO(2), 200 ppm NO, 100% relative humidity, and a temperature of 393 K. The solid amine sorbent, KIT-6(TEPA), performs excellently for CO(2) capture and its separation from flue gas.

  11. Capture of carbon dioxide by amine-loaded as-synthesized TiO2 nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Song, Fujiao; Zhao, Yunxia; Ding, Huiling; Cao, Yan; Ding, Jie; Bu, Yunfei; Zhong, Qin

    2013-01-01

    Titanium-based adsorbents for CO2 capture were prepared through impregnating the as-synthesized TiO2 nanotubes (TiNT) with four kinds of amines, namely monoethanolamine (MEA), ethylenediamine (EDA), triethylenetetramine (TETA) and tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA). The resultant samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, low-temperature N2 adsorption as well as transmission electron microscopy. The absorption of CO2 was carried out in a dynamic packed column. The sample impregnated with TEPA showed a better adsorption capacity due to its higher amino groups content. In addition, CO2 adsorption capacity increases as the amount of amine loaded increases. Therefore, TiNT-TEPA-69 showed the highest CO2 adsorption capacity among the three samples impregnated with TETA; approximately 4.10 mmol/g at 30 degrees C. In addition, the dynamic adsorption/desorption performance was investigated. The adsorption capacity of TiNT-TEPA-69 dropped slightly (about 2%) during a total of five cycles. The TiNT-TEPA-69 adsorbent exhibited excellent CO2 adsorption/desorption performance.

  12. Microbial carbon capture cell using cyanobacteria for simultaneous power generation, carbon dioxide sequestration and wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Soumya; Nayak, Bikram Kumar; Das, Debabrata

    2012-03-01

    Microbial carbon capture cells (MCCs) were constructed with cyanobacteria growing in a photo biocathode in dual-chambered flat plate mediator-less MFCs separated by an anion exchange membrane from the anode compartment containing Shewanella putrefaciens. The performance of the MCC with Anabaena sparged with CO(2)-air mixture was compared with that of a conventional cathode sparged with air only. The power densities achieved were 57.8 mW/m(2) for Anabaena sparged with a CO(2)-air mixture, 39.2 mW/m(2) for CO(2)-air mixture sparging only, 29.7 mW/m(2) for Anabaena sparged with air, and 19.6 mW/m(2) for air sparging only. The pH of the cathode containing Anabaena gradually increased from 7 to 9.12 and power generation decreased from 34.7 to 23.8 mW/m(2) 17 due to pH imbalance associated voltage losses without CO(2)-air mixture sparging. Sparging with a 5% CO(2)-air mixture produced maximum power of 100.1 mW/m(2). In addition, the power density of MCC increased by 31% when nitrate was added into the catholyte.

  13. The Ubiquity of the Rapid Neutron-capture Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Cowan, John J.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Kratz, Karl-Ludwig; Lugaro, Maria; Simmerer, Jennifer; Farouqi, Khalil; Sneden, Christopher

    2010-12-01

    To better characterize the abundance patterns produced by the r-process, we have derived new abundances or upper limits for the heavy elements zinc (Zn, Z= 30), yttrium (Y, Z= 39), lanthanum (La, Z= 57), europium (Eu, Z= 63), and lead (Pb, Z= 82). Our sample of 161 metal-poor stars includes new measurements from 88 high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra obtained with the Tull Spectrograph on the 2.7 m Smith Telescope at the McDonald Observatory, and other abundances are adopted from the literature. We use models of the s-process in asymptotic giant branch stars to characterize the high Pb/Eu ratios produced in the s-process at low metallicity, and our new observations then allow us to identify a sample of stars with no detectable s-process material. In these stars, we find no significant increase in the Pb/Eu ratios with increasing metallicity. This suggests that s-process material was not widely dispersed until the overall Galactic metallicity grew considerably, perhaps even as high as [Fe/H] =-1.4, in contrast with earlier studies that suggested a much lower mean metallicity. We identify a dispersion of at least 0.5 dex in [La/Eu] in metal-poor stars with [Eu/Fe] <+0.6 attributable to the r-process, suggesting that there is no unique "pure" r-process elemental ratio among pairs of rare earth elements. We confirm earlier detections of an anti-correlation between Y/Eu and Eu/Fe bookended by stars strongly enriched in the r-process (e.g., CS 22892-052) and those with deficiencies of the heavy elements (e.g., HD 122563). We can reproduce the range of Y/Eu ratios using simulations of high-entropy neutrino winds of core-collapse supernovae that include charged-particle and neutron-capture components of r-process nucleosynthesis. The heavy element abundance patterns in most metal-poor stars do not resemble that of CS 22892-052, but the presence of heavy elements such as Ba in nearly all metal-poor stars without s-process enrichment suggests that the r-process

  14. THE UBIQUITY OF THE RAPID NEUTRON-CAPTURE PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Roederer, Ian U.; Sneden, Christopher; Cowan, John J.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Kratz, Karl-Ludwig; Lugaro, Maria; Simmerer, Jennifer; Farouqi, Khalil

    2010-12-01

    To better characterize the abundance patterns produced by the r-process, we have derived new abundances or upper limits for the heavy elements zinc (Zn, Z= 30), yttrium (Y, Z= 39), lanthanum (La, Z= 57), europium (Eu, Z= 63), and lead (Pb, Z= 82). Our sample of 161 metal-poor stars includes new measurements from 88 high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra obtained with the Tull Spectrograph on the 2.7 m Smith Telescope at the McDonald Observatory, and other abundances are adopted from the literature. We use models of the s-process in asymptotic giant branch stars to characterize the high Pb/Eu ratios produced in the s-process at low metallicity, and our new observations then allow us to identify a sample of stars with no detectable s-process material. In these stars, we find no significant increase in the Pb/Eu ratios with increasing metallicity. This suggests that s-process material was not widely dispersed until the overall Galactic metallicity grew considerably, perhaps even as high as [Fe/H] =-1.4, in contrast with earlier studies that suggested a much lower mean metallicity. We identify a dispersion of at least 0.5 dex in [La/Eu] in metal-poor stars with [Eu/Fe] <+0.6 attributable to the r-process, suggesting that there is no unique 'pure' r-process elemental ratio among pairs of rare earth elements. We confirm earlier detections of an anti-correlation between Y/Eu and Eu/Fe bookended by stars strongly enriched in the r-process (e.g., CS 22892-052) and those with deficiencies of the heavy elements (e.g., HD 122563). We can reproduce the range of Y/Eu ratios using simulations of high-entropy neutrino winds of core-collapse supernovae that include charged-particle and neutron-capture components of r-process nucleosynthesis. The heavy element abundance patterns in most metal-poor stars do not resemble that of CS 22892-052, but the presence of heavy elements such as Ba in nearly all metal-poor stars without s-process enrichment suggests that the r-process

  15. Capture cross sections for the astrophysical p process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Stephen J.

    This dissertation includes the design and development of the Summing NaI (SuN) 4pi gamma-ray detector at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory to measure proton and alpha radiative capture reactions relevant in the astrophysical p process. Discussions of p-process nucleosynthesis, the relevant nuclear reaction theory, experimental details, and analysis procedures are included. All reaction measurements were performed at the Nuclear Science Laboratory of the University of Notre Dame. The commissioning experiments in both regular and inverse kinematics were done using known resonances in the 27Al(p,gamma)28Si and 58Ni(p,gamma) 59Cu reactions, and the results agree well with previous literature values. The success of these proof-of-principle measurements marks the first time that the gamma-summing technique has been implemented in inverse kinematics. Furthermore, in an effort to investigate the synthesis of the light p-process nuclei, the 74Ge(p,gamma)75As, 74Ge(alpha,gamma) 78Se, and 90,92Zr(alpha,gamma)94,96Mo reactions were measured and compared to theoretical calculations using the nuclear statistical model. It was found that the new 74Ge(p,gamma) 75As measurements cause an enhancement in the overproduction of 74Se in p-process models, and that the updated 90Zr(alpha,gamma) 94Mo reaction rate seems to confirms the p-process branching point at 94Mo. Finally, the 58Ni(alpha,gamma) 62Zn reaction was measured for its role in nucleosynthesis in type Ia supernovae. The measurements here lower the reaction rate used in astrophysical models, which leads to a 5% reduction in the calculated abundances of several isotopes. All of the measurements in this dissertation greatly reduce the uncertainty in the reaction cross section.

  16. Competence-based and integrity-based trust as predictors of acceptance of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS).

    PubMed

    Terwel, Bart W; Harinck, Fieke; Ellemers, Naomi; Daamen, Dancker D L

    2009-08-01

    Public trust in organizations that are involved in the management and use of new technologies affects lay judgments about the risks and benefits associated with these technologies. In turn, judgments about risks and benefits influence lay attitudes toward these technologies. The validity of this (indirect) effect of trust on lay attitudes toward new technologies, which is referred to as the causal chain account of trust, has up till now only been examined in correlational research. The two studies reported in this article used an experimental approach to more specifically test the causal chain account of trust in the context of carbon dioxide capture and storage technology (CCS). Complementing existing literature, the current studies explicitly distinguished between two different types of trust in organizations: competence-based trust (Study 1) and integrity-based trust (Study 2). In line with predictions, results showed that the organizational position regarding CCS implementation (pro versus con) more strongly affected people's risk and benefit perceptions and their subsequent acceptance of CCS when competence-based trust was high rather than low. In contrast, the organizational position had a greater impact on people's level of CCS acceptance when integrity-based trust was low rather than high.

  17. Capture of carbon dioxide from flue gas on TEPA-grafted metal-organic framework Mg2(dobdc).

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan; Song, Fujiao; Zhao, Yunxia; Zhong, Qin

    2013-10-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption on a standard metal-organic framework Mg2(dobdc) (Mg/DOBDC or Mg-MOF-74) and a tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) modified Mg2(dobdc) (TEPA-Mg/DOBDC) were investigated and compared. The structural information, surface chemistry and thermal behavior of the adsorbent samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm analysis. CO2 adsorption capacity was measured by dynamic adsorption experiments with N2-CO2 mixed gases at 60 degrees C. Results showed that the CO2 adsorption capacity of Mg/DOBDC was significantly improved after amine modification, with an increase from 2.67 to 6.06 mmol CO2/g adsorbent. Moreover, CO2 adsorption on the TEPA-Mg/DOBDC adsorbent was promoted by water vapor, and the adsorption capacity was enhanced to 8.31 mmol CO2/g absorbent. The adsorption capacity of the TEPA-Mg/DOBDC adsorbent dropped only 3% after 5 consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. Therefore, this kind of adsorbent can be considered as a promising material for the capture of CO2 from flue gas.

  18. Moving from Misinformation Derived from Public Attitude Surveys on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage toward Realistic Stakeholder Involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Elizabeth L.; Dooley, James J.; Bradbury, Judith A.

    2010-03-01

    Stakeholder involvement can include many activities, from providing information on a website to one-on-one conversations with people confronting an issue in their community. For carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) a major tool of SI to date has been the survey. Recent surveys and other research into stakeholder involvement focused on the nascent commercial deployment of CCS technologies have provided valuable information about the state of general knowledge and attitudes toward these technologies. Most importantly, these research efforts reveal that the general public has relatively little knowledge about CCS. Given this lack of knowledge with respect to the concept of CCS let alone first-hand experiential knowledge derived from seeing these technologies deployed in local communities this paper critiques the methodology and results of the survey research. Then the framing of SI in CCS is examined, including the assumption that clear stakeholder acceptance is a realistic goal and that the public has a decisive say in choosing the energy technologies of the present and the future. Finally, a broader suite of SI activities is recommended as more suited to realistic and contextual goals.

  19. Patient flow scorecards capture complexity in the patient flow process.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    To get a larger, more holistic view of the patient flow process, a multidisciplinary improvement team at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) developed a five-domain patient flow scorecard. Each domain has several weighted sub-metrics that add up to 20 points, so the maximum number of points in the composite score is 100. Improvement team leaders say the approach has helped them home in on specific reasons for hold-ups so that resources can be focused in the most effective way. The "ED and ED-to-inpatient transition" domain includes eight sub-metrics that cover five specific time intervals, the leave-without-being-seen (LWBS) rate, and two adjustment measures that are used to account for high volumes and high admission rates from the ED. The other domains cover bed management, the discharge process, room turnover and environmental services, and scheduling and utilization. Administrators say it is important to establish metrics that can be captured easily along with entry points that tie in with workflows.

  20. Simulation of the capture process in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, S.; Ankenbrandt, C.

    1987-09-01

    A progress report on efforts to understand and improve adiabatic capture in the Fermilab Booster by experiment and simulation is presented. In particular, a new RF voltage program for capture which ameliorates transverse space-charge effects is described and simulated. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  1. IMPACCT: Carbon Capture Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    IMPACCT Project: IMPACCT’s 15 projects seek to develop technologies for existing coal-fired power plants that will lower the cost of carbon capture. Short for “Innovative Materials and Processes for Advanced Carbon Capture Technologies,” the IMPACCT Project is geared toward minimizing the cost of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plant exhaust by developing materials and processes that have never before been considered for this application. Retrofitting coal-fired power plants to capture the CO2 they produce would enable greenhouse gas reductions without forcing these plants to close, shifting away from the inexpensive and abundant U.S. coal supply.

  2. Proton transfer step in the carbon dioxide capture by monoethanol amine: a theoretical study at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Iida, Kenji; Sato, Hirofumi

    2012-02-23

    An aqueous solution of monoethanol amine (MEA) has been utilized in an industrial process of CO(2) absorption. The chemical reaction between CO(2) and MEA, which is employed in the process, consists of two steps. After the formation of the MEA-CO(2) complex ("capture"), a proton transfers from the complex to give a final product. In the present study, the overall mechanism of the reaction is discussed, especially focusing on the proton transfer step. Using RISM-SCF-SEDD, a hybrid method of electronic structure theory and statistical mechanics for molecular liquid, we clarified that the role of MEA as a base is crucial in the proton transfer step.

  3. Cyclic process for the removal of sulfur dioxide and the recovery of sulfur from gases

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C.L.

    1991-11-19

    This patent describes a process for the removal of sulfur dioxide from a gas containing sulfur dioxide. It comprises contacting a gas containing sulfur dioxide with an aqueous solution comprising water, ferric chloride and a salt selected from the group consisting of barium chloride and calcium chloride to form ferrous chloride, hydrochloric acid and a precipitate selected from the group consisting of barium sulfate and calcium sulfate; and treating the aqueous solution with an oxidizing agent to convert ferrous chloride to ferric chloride.

  4. Analysis of electron capture process in charge pumping sequence using time domain measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Masahiro Watanabe, Tokinobu; Ono, Yukinori; Tsuchiya, Toshiaki

    2014-12-29

    A method for analyzing the electron capture process in the charge pumping (CP) sequence is proposed and demonstrated. The method monitors the electron current in the CP sequence in time domain. This time-domain measurements enable us to directly access the process of the electron capture to the interface defects, which are obscured in the conventional CP method. Using the time-domain measurements, the rise time dependence of the capture process is systematically investigated. We formulate the capture process based on the rate equation and derive an analytic form of the current due to the electron capture to the defects. Based on the formula, the experimental data are analyzed and the capture cross section is obtained. In addition, the time-domain data unveil that the electron capture process completes before the electron channel opens, or below the threshold voltage in a low frequency range of the pulse.

  5. CO2 Capture with Liquid-to-Solid Absorbents: CO2 Capture Process Using Phase-Changing Absorbents

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    IMPACCT Project: GE and the University of Pittsburgh are developing a unique CO2 capture process in which a liquid absorbent, upon contact with CO2, changes into a solid phase. Once in solid form, the material can be separated and the CO2 can be released for storage by heating. Upon heating, the absorbent returns to its liquid form, where it can be reused to capture more CO2. The approach is more efficient than other solventbased processes because it avoids the heating of extraneous solvents such as water. This ultimately leads to a lower cost of CO2 capture and will lower the additional cost to produce electricity for coal-fired power plants that retrofit their facilities to include this technology.

  6. Enhanced carbon dioxide capture upon incorporation of N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine in the metal–organic framework CuBTTri

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Thomas M.; D'Alessandro, Deanna M.; Krishna, Rajamani; Long, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    High capacity, high selectivity, and low-cost regeneration conditions are the most important criteria by which new adsorbents for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture will be judged. The incorporation of N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine (mmen) into H₃[(Cu₄Cl)₃(BTTri)₈ (CuBTTri; H₃BTTri = 1,3,5-tri(1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)benzene), a water-stable, triazolate-bridged framework, is shown to drastically enhance CO₂ adsorption, resulting in one of the best performing metal–organic frameworks for CO₂ separation reported to date. High porosity was maintained despite stoichiometric attachment of mmen to the open metal sites of the framework, resulting in a BET surface area of 870 m2 g-1. At 25 °C under a 0.15 bar CO₂/0.75 bar N₂ mixture, mmen-CuBTTri adsorbs 2.38 mmol CO2 g-1 (9.5 wt%) with a selectivity of 327, as determined using Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST). The high capacity and selectivity are consequences of the exceptionally large isosteric heat of CO₂ adsorption, calculated to be -96 kJ mol-1 at zero coverage. Infrared spectra support chemisorption between amines and CO₂ as one of the primary mechanisms of uptake. Despite the large initial heat of adsorption, the CO₂ uptake was fully reversible and the framework could be easily regenerated at 60 °C, enabling a cycling time of just 27 min with no loss of capacity over the course of 72 adsorption/desorption cycles.

  7. Thermodynamic and Experimental Study of the Energetic Cost Involved in the Capture of Carbon Dioxide by Aqueous Mixtures of Commonly Used Primary and Tertiary Amines.

    PubMed

    Arcis, Hugues; Coulier, Yohann; Coxam, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-05

    The capture of carbon dioxide with chemical solvents is one solution to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources and thus tackle climate change. Recent research has been focused on optimizing new kinds of advanced absorbents including aqueous amine blends, but critical downsides such as the large energetic cost involved with the industrial process remain. To address this issue, a better understanding of the energetic interactions existing in solution is necessary. In this paper, we report direct experimental measurements of the energy cost involved in the solvation of CO2 in two aqueous amine blends at different temperatures. The chemical solvents were designed as aqueous mixtures of commonly used primary and tertiary amines to study the influence of the different chemical properties inferred by the amine class. We have also applied a thermodynamic model to represent the energetic effects that take place in solution during CO2 dissolution in these mixtures, where all parameters were taken from previous studies focused on single amine absorbents. The noteworthy agreement observed with the reported experimental heats of absorption and with literature vapor liquid equilibrium properties confirmed the relevance of the underlying molecular mechanisms considered in our model, and suggest that this model would prove useful to investigate CO2 dissolution in other amine blends.

  8. Quantum chemical studies on solvents for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture: calculation of pKa and carbamate stability of disubstituted piperazines.

    PubMed

    Gangarapu, Satesh; Wierda, Gerben J; Marcelis, Antonius T M; Zuilhof, Han

    2014-06-23

    Piperazine is a widely studied solvent for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture. To investigate the possibilities of further improving this process, the electronic and steric effects of -CH(3), -CH(2)F, -CH(2)OH, -CH(2)NH(2), -COCH3 , and -CN groups of 2,5-disubstituted piperazines on the pKa and carbamate stability towards hydrolysis are investigated by quantum chemical methods. For the calculations, B3LYP, M11L, and spin-component-scaled MP2 (SCS-MP2) methods are used and coupled with the SMD solvation model. The experimental pK(a) values of piperazine, 2-methylpiperazine, and 2,5-dimethylpiperazine agree well with the calculated values. The present study indicates that substitution of -CH(3), -CH(2) NH(2), and -CH(2) OH groups on the 2- and 5-positions of piperazine has a positive impact on the CO(2) absorption capacity by reducing the carbamate stability towards hydrolysis. Furthermore, their higher boiling points, relative to piperazine itself, will lead to a reduction of volatility-related losses.

  9. Carbon Dioxide Reduction Post-Processing Sub-System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee A.; Greenwood, Zachary; Barton, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    The state-of-the-art Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the International Space Station (ISS) facilitates the recovery of oxygen from metabolic CO2. The CRA utilizes the Sabatier process to produce water with methane as a byproduct. The methane is currently vented overboard as a waste product. Because the CRA relies on hydrogen for oxygen recovery, the loss of methane ultimately results in a loss of oxygen. For missions beyond low earth orbit, it will prove essential to maximize oxygen recovery. For this purpose, NASA is exploring an integrated post-processor system to recover hydrogen from CRA methane. The post-processor, called a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) partially pyrolyzes methane to recover hydrogen with acetylene as a byproduct. In-flight operation of post-processor will require a Methane Purification Assembly (MePA) and an Acetylene Separation Assembly (ASepA). Recent efforts have focused on the design, fabrication, and testing of these components. The results and conclusions of these efforts will be discussed as well as future plans.

  10. Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for Carbon Dioxide Capture from Existing Coal-fired Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan; Dietz, Steven

    2016-03-03

    In this project TDA Research, Inc (TDA) has developed a new post combustion carbon capture technology based on a vacuum swing adsorption system that uses a steam purge and demonstrated its technical feasibility and economic viability in laboratory-scale tests and tests in actual coal derived flue gas. TDA uses an advanced physical adsorbent to selectively remove CO2 from the flue gas. The sorbent exhibits a much higher affinity for CO2 than N2, H2O or O2, enabling effective CO2 separation from the flue gas. We also carried out a detailed process design and analysis of the new system as part of both sub-critical and super-critical pulverized coal fired power plants. The new technology uses a low cost, high capacity adsorbent that selectively removes CO2 in the presence of moisture at the flue gas temperature without a need for significant cooling of the flue gas or moisture removal. The sorbent is based on a TDA proprietary mesoporous carbon that consists of surface functionalized groups that remove CO2 via physical adsorption. The high surface area and favorable porosity of the sorbent also provides a unique platform to introduce additional functionality, such as active groups to remove trace metals (e.g., Hg, As). In collaboration with the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California, Irvine (UCI), TDA developed system simulation models using Aspen PlusTM simulation software to assess the economic viability of TDA’s VSA-based post-combustion carbon capture technology. The levelized cost of electricity including the TS&M costs for CO2 is calculated as $116.71/MWh and $113.76/MWh for TDA system integrated with sub-critical and super-critical pulverized coal fired power plants; much lower than the $153.03/MWhand $147.44/MWh calculated for the corresponding amine based systems. The cost of CO2 captured for TDA’s VSA based system is $38

  11. Optimal synthesis of a pressure swing adsorption process for CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.; Biegler, L.; Zitney, S.

    2008-01-01

    The emission of carbon dioxide from cement industry and power plants that burn fossil fuels is the major cause for the accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere, which causes long-range environmental problems. One option to mitigate the emission of CO2 is to capture it from the emission sources and store it to the ocean or depleted oil field or use it for enhanced oil recovery. CO2 recovery has been achieved by gas absorption employing solutions of carbonates and alkanolamines. However, this process is energy-intensive for the regeneration of solvent and also faces problems due to corrosion. Recently, the pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process has been considered as an alternative to the absorption process. PSA processes have been widely applied for the removal of CO2 from various feed mixtures, such as CO2 in the steam reformer off gas, landfill gas and natural gas. In all these commercial PSA cycles, the weakly adsorbed component in the mixture is the desired product and enriching the strongly adsorbed CO2 is not a concern. On the other hand, for the capture of CO2 for sequestration, it is necessary to concentrate the CO2 to a high purity to reduce the compression and transportation cost. Thus, it is necessary to develop a PSA cycle by which a high-purity product for the strongly adsorbed component with a high recovery is obtained. A multitude of PSA cycles and adsorbents have been developed for producing highly pure heavy component (CO2) from feedstock with low CO2 concentration. Kikkinides et al. suggested a 4-bed 4-step process with activated carbon as the sorbent and could recover 68% of CO2 at 99.997% purity. Chue et al. compared activated carbon and zeolite 13X on a 3-bed 7-step process and concluded that the latter is better than the former for CO2 recovery. However, the CO2 recovery was low in their process due to the lack of a countercurrent step in the chosen cycle. Choi et al. reported more than 70% CO2 recovery at more than 90% purity for a modified 3

  12. New Technical Risk Management Development for Carbon Capture Process

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, David W.; Letellier, Bruce; Edwards, Brian; Leclaire, Rene; Jones, Edward

    2012-04-30

    The basic CCSI objective of accelerating technology development and commercial deployment of carbon capture technologies through the extensive use of numerical simulation introduces a degree of unfamiliarity and novelty that potentially increases both of the traditional risk elements. In order to secure investor confidence and successfully accelerate the marketability of carbon capture technologies, it is critical that risk management decision tools be developed in parallel with numerical simulation capabilities and uncertainty quantification efforts. The focus of this paper is on the development of a technical risk model that incorporates the specific technology maturity development (level).

  13. Twin-column CaptureSMB: a novel cyclic process for protein A affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Angarita, Monica; Müller-Späth, Thomas; Baur, Daniel; Lievrouw, Roel; Lissens, Geert; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-04-10

    A twin-column counter-current chromatography processes, CaptureSMB, was used for the protein A affinity capture of a monoclonal antibody (mAb). By means of sequential loading, the process improves the utilization of the stationary phase by achieving loadings much closer to the static binding capacity of the resin in comparison to batch chromatography. Using a mAb capture case study with protein A affinity chromatography, the performance and product quality obtained from CaptureSMB and batch processes were compared. The effect of the flow rate, column length and titer concentration on the process performance and product quality were evaluated. CaptureSMB showed superior performance compared to batch chromatography with respect to productivity, capacity utilization, product concentration and buffer consumption. A simplified economic evaluation showed that CaptureSMB could decrease resin costs of 10-30% depending on the manufacturing scenario.

  14. CO2 leakage from carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) systems affects organic matter cycling in surface marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Rastelli, Eugenio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Amaro, Teresa; Greco, Silvestro; Lo Martire, Marco; Carugati, Laura; Queirós, Ana M; Widdicombe, Stephen; Danovaro, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), involving the injection of CO2 into the sub-seabed, is being promoted worldwide as a feasible option for reducing the anthropogenic CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. However, the effects on the marine ecosystems of potential CO2 leakages originating from these storage sites have only recently received scientific attention, and little information is available on the possible impacts of the resulting CO2-enriched seawater plumes on the surrounding benthic ecosystem. In the present study, we conducted a 20-weeks mesocosm experiment exposing coastal sediments to CO2-enriched seawater (at 5000 or 20,000 ppm), to test the effects on the microbial enzymatic activities responsible for the decomposition and turnover of the sedimentary organic matter in surface sediments down to 15 cm depth. Our results indicate that the exposure to high-CO2 concentrations reduced significantly the enzymatic activities in the top 5 cm of sediments, but had no effects on subsurface sediment horizons (from 5 to 15 cm depth). In the surface sediments, both 5000 and 20,000 ppm CO2 treatments determined a progressive decrease over time in the protein degradation (up to 80%). Conversely, the degradation rates of carbohydrates and organic phosphorous remained unaltered in the first 2 weeks, but decreased significantly (up to 50%) in the longer term when exposed at 20,000 ppm of CO2. Such effects were associated with a significant change in the composition of the biopolymeric carbon (due to the accumulation of proteins over time in sediments exposed to high-pCO2 treatments), and a significant decrease (∼20-50% at 5000 and 20,000 ppm respectively) in nitrogen regeneration. We conclude that in areas immediately surrounding an active and long-lasting leak of CO2 from CCS reservoirs, organic matter cycling would be significantly impacted in the surface sediment layers. The evidence of negligible impacts on the deeper sediments should be considered with

  15. Acceleration of integral imaging based incoherent Fourier hologram capture using graphic processing unit.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyeong-Min; Kim, Hee-Seung; Hong, Sung-In; Lee, Sung-Keun; Jo, Na-Young; Kim, Yong-Soo; Lim, Hong-Gi; Park, Jae-Hyeung

    2012-10-08

    Speed enhancement of integral imaging based incoherent Fourier hologram capture using a graphic processing unit is reported. Integral imaging based method enables exact hologram capture of real-existing three-dimensional objects under regular incoherent illumination. In our implementation, we apply parallel computation scheme using the graphic processing unit, accelerating the processing speed. Using enhanced speed of hologram capture, we also implement a pseudo real-time hologram capture and optical reconstruction system. The overall operation speed is measured to be 1 frame per second.

  16. In situ Formation of a Monodispersed Spherical Mesoporous Nanosilica-Torlon Hollow-Fiber Composite for Carbon Dioxide Capture.

    PubMed

    Rownaghi, Ali A; Rezaei, Fateme; Labreche, Ying; Brennan, Patrick J; Johnson, Justin R; Li, Fuyue Stephanie; Koros, William J

    2015-10-26

    We describe a new template-free method for the in situ formation of a monodispersed spherical mesoporous nanosilica-Torlon hollow-fiber composite. A thin layer of Torlon hollow fiber that comprises silica nanoparticles was created by the in situ extrusion of a tetraethyl orthosilicate/N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone solution in a sheath layer and a Torlon polymer dope in a core support layer. This new method can be integrated easily into current hollow-fiber composite fabrication processes. The hollow-fiber composites were then functionalized with 3-aminopropyltrimethoxy silane (APS) and evaluated for their CO2 -capture performance. The resulting APS-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles/Torlon hollow fibers exhibited a high CO2 equilibrium capacity of 1.5 and 1.9 mmol g(-1) at 35 and 60 °C, respectively, which is significantly higher than values for fiber sorbents without nanoparticles reported previously.

  17. Low-Energy Solvents For Carbon Dioxide Capture Enabled By A Combination Of Enzymes And Vacuum Regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, Sonja; House, Alan; Liu, Kun; Frimpong, Reynolds; Liu, Kunlei; Freeman, Charles; Whyatt, Greg; Slater, Jonathan; Fitzgerald, David

    2015-08-31

    An integrated bench-scale system combining the attributes of the bio-renewable enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) with low-enthalpy CO2 absorption solvents and vacuum regeneration was designed, built and operated for 500 hours using simulated flue gas. The objective was to develop a CO2 capture process with improved efficiency and sustainability when compared to NETL Case 10 monoethanolamine (MEA) scrubbing technology. The use of CA accelerates inter-conversion between dissolved CO2 and bicarbonate ion to enhance CO2 absorption, and the use of low enthalpy CO2 absorption solvents makes it possible to regenerate the solvent at lower temperatures relative to the reference MEA-based solvent. The vacuum regeneration-based integrated bench-scale system operated successfully for an accumulated 500 hours using aqueous 23.5 wt% K2CO3-based solvent containing 2.5 g/L enzyme to deliver an average 84% CO2 capture when operated with a 20% enzyme replenishment rate per ~7 hour steady-state run period. The total inlet gas flow was 30 standard liters per minute with 15% CO2 and 85% N2. The absorber temperature was 40°C and the stripper operated under 35 kPa pressure with an approximate 77°C stripper bottom temperature. Tests with a 30°C absorber temperature delivered >90% capture. On- and off-line operational measurements provided a full process data set, with recirculating enzyme, that allowed for enzyme replenishment and absorption/desorption kinetic parameter calculations. Dissolved enzyme replenishment and conventional process controls were demonstrated as straightforward approaches to maintain system performance. Preliminary evaluation of a novel flow-through ultrasonically enhanced regeneration system was also conducted, yet resulted in CO2 release within the range of temperature-dependent release, and further work would be needed to validate the benefits of ultrasonic enhanced stripping. A full technology assessment was completed in which four techno-economic cases for

  18. Membrane loop process for separating carbon dioxide for use in gaseous form from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Baker, Richard W; Merkel, Timothy C

    2014-10-07

    The invention is a process involving membrane-based gas separation for separating and recovering carbon dioxide emissions from combustion processes in partially concentrated form, and then transporting the carbon dioxide and using or storing it in a confined manner without concentrating it to high purity. The process of the invention involves building up the concentration of carbon dioxide in a gas flow loop between the combustion step and a membrane separation step. A portion of the carbon dioxide-enriched gas can then be withdrawn from this loop and transported, without the need to liquefy the gas or otherwise create a high-purity stream, to a destination where it is used or confined, preferably in an environmentally benign manner.

  19. Membrane loop process for separating carbon dioxide for use in gaseous form from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Baker, Richard W; Merkel, Timothy C

    2016-09-06

    The invention is a process involving membrane-based gas separation for separating and recovering carbon dioxide emissions from combustion processes in partially concentrated form, and then transporting the carbon dioxide and using or storing it in a confined manner without concentrating it to high purity. The process of the invention involves building up the concentration of carbon dioxide in a gas flow loop between the combustion step and a membrane separation step. A portion of the carbon dioxide-enriched gas can then be withdrawn from this loop and transported, without the need to liquefy the gas or otherwise create a high-purity stream, to a destination where it is used or confined, preferably in an environmentally benign manner.

  20. New phase equilibrium analyzer for determination of the vapor-liquid equilibrium of carbon dioxide and permanent gas mixtures for carbon capture and storage.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jie; Parrott, Andrew J; Sanchez-Vicente, Yolanda; Fields, Peter; Wilson, Richard; Drage, Trevor C; Poliakoff, Martyn; George, Michael W

    2014-08-01

    A high-pressure, phase equilibrium analyzer incorporating a fiber-optic reflectometer is described. The analyzer has been designed for measuring the vapor-liquid equilibrium data of multi-component mixtures of carbon dioxide and permanent gases, providing a novel tool to acquire of a large number of phase equilibrium data for the development of the new carbon capture and storage technologies. We demonstrate that the analyzer is suitable for determining both the bubble- and dew-point lines at temperature from 253 K and pressure up to 25 MPa using pure CO2 and two binary mixtures of CO2 + N2 and CO2 + H2.

  1. New phase equilibrium analyzer for determination of the vapor-liquid equilibrium of carbon dioxide and permanent gas mixtures for carbon capture and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Jie; Parrott, Andrew J.; Sanchez-Vicente, Yolanda; Fields, Peter; Wilson, Richard; Drage, Trevor C.; Poliakoff, Martyn; George, Michael W.

    2014-08-01

    A high-pressure, phase equilibrium analyzer incorporating a fiber-optic reflectometer is described. The analyzer has been designed for measuring the vapor-liquid equilibrium data of multi-component mixtures of carbon dioxide and permanent gases, providing a novel tool to acquire of a large number of phase equilibrium data for the development of the new carbon capture and storage technologies. We demonstrate that the analyzer is suitable for determining both the bubble- and dew-point lines at temperature from 253 K and pressure up to 25 MPa using pure CO2 and two binary mixtures of CO2 + N2 and CO2 + H2.

  2. Neutron Capture Reactions on Fe and Ni Isotopes for the Astrophysical s-process

    SciTech Connect

    Lederer, C.; Giubrone, G.; Massimi, C.; Žugec, P.; Barbagallo, M.; Colonna, N.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Käppeler, F.; Tain, J.L.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bečvář, F.; and others

    2014-06-15

    Neutron capture cross sections in the keV neutron energy region are the key nuclear physics input to study the astrophysical slow neutron capture process. In the past years, a series of neutron capture cross section measurements has been performed at the neutron time-of-flight facility n{sub T}OF at CERN focussing on the Fe/Ni mass region. Recent results and future developments in the neutron time-of-flight technique are discussed.

  3. Whiteboard sharing: capture, process, and print or email

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormish, Michael; Erol, Berna; Van Olst, Daniel G.; Li, Tim; Mariotti, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Whiteboards support face to face meetings by facilitating the sharing of ideas, focusing attention, and summarizing. However, at the end of the meeting participants desire some record of the information from the whiteboard. While there are whiteboards with built-in printers, they are expensive and relatively uncommon. We consider the capture of the information on a whiteboard with a mobile phone, improving the image quality with a cloud service, and sharing the results. This paper describes the algorithm for improving whiteboard image quality, the user experience for both a web widget and a smartphone application, and the necessary adaptations for providing this as a web service. The web widget, and mobile apps for both iPhone and Android are currently freely available, and have been used by more than 50,000 people.

  4. Comparison of batch and continuous multi-column protein A capture processes by optimal design.

    PubMed

    Baur, Daniel; Angarita, Monica; Müller-Späth, Thomas; Steinebach, Fabian; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Multi-column capture processes show several advantages compared to batch capture. It is however not evident how many columns one should use exactly. To investigate this issue, twin-column CaptureSMB, 3- and 4-column periodic counter-current chromatography (PCC) and single column batch capture are numerically optimized and compared in terms of process performance for capturing a monoclonal antibody using protein A chromatography. Optimization is carried out with respect to productivity and capacity utilization (amount of product loaded per cycle compared to the maximum amount possible), while keeping yield and purity constant. For a wide range of process parameters, all three multi-column processes show similar maximum capacity utilization and performed significantly better than batch. When maximizing productivity, the CaptureSMB process shows optimal performance, except at high feed titers, where batch chromatography can reach higher productivity values than the multi-column processes due to the complete decoupling of the loading and elution steps, albeit at a large cost in terms of capacity utilization. In terms of trade-off, i.e. how much the capacity utilization decreases with increasing productivity, CaptureSMB is optimal for low and high feed titers, whereas the 3-column process is optimal in an intermediate region. Using these findings, the most suitable process can be chosen for different production scenarios.

  5. Silica-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes impregnated with polyethyleneimine for carbon dioxide capture under the flue gas condition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Sang; Park, Soo-Jin

    2015-03-15

    In this study, silica-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes impregnated with polyethyleneimine (PEI) were prepared via a two-step process: (i) hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and (ii) impregnation of PEI. The adsorption properties of CO{sub 2} were investigated using CO{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms at 298 K and thermogravimetric analysis under the flue gas condition (15% CO{sub 2}/85% N{sub 2}). The results obtained in this study indicate that CO{sub 2} adsorption increases after impregnation of PEI. The increase in CO{sub 2} capture was attributed to the affinity between CO{sub 2} and the amine groups. CO{sub 2} adsorption–desorption experiments, which were repeated five times, also showed that the prepared adsorbents have excellent regeneration properties. - Graphical abstract: Fabrication and CO{sub 2} adsorption process of the S-MWCNTs impregnated with PEI. - Highlights: • Silica coated-MWCNT impregnated with PEI was synthesized. • Amine groups of PEI gave CO{sub 2} affinity sites on MWCNT surfaces. • The S-MWCNT/PEI(50) exhibited the highest CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity.

  6. Computational Tools for Accelerating Carbon Capture Process Development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David; Sahinidis, N V; Cozad, A; Lee, A; Kim, H; Morinelly, J; Eslick, J; Yuan, Z

    2013-06-04

    This presentation reports development of advanced computational tools to accelerate next generation technology development. These tools are to develop an optimized process using rigorous models. They include: Process Models; Simulation-Based Optimization; Optimized Process; Uncertainty Quantification; Algebraic Surrogate Models; and Superstructure Optimization (Determine Configuration).

  7. Theoretical research of the carbon dioxide injection process into the rock saturated with ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musakaev, N. G.; Khasanov, M. K.

    2016-10-01

    The results of the theoretical research of the carbon dioxide injection process into the reservoir initially saturated with methane and ice are presented. In the rectilinear-parallel approach the analytical solutions which describe the distributions of temperature and pressure in the reservoir were built. It is shown, that modes with different quantity of the interphase boundaries of the carbon dioxide hydrate formation are possible.

  8. Electron capture processes in ZnS: The role of Al related and other donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybylińska, H.; Godlewski, M.

    1986-12-01

    A transient electron spin resonance experiment shows that the Al-related donor in ZnS plays an insignificant role in electron-capture processes, which are dominated by a 35-meV native donor of unknown nature. The methods of determining effective capture cross sections of these donors are discussed.

  9. Comparing the effectiveness of heat rate improvements in different coal-fired power plants utilizing carbon dioxide capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Martin Jeremy

    New Congressional legislation may soon require coal-fired power generators to pay for their CO2 emissions and capture a minimum level of their CO2 output. Aminebased CO2 capture systems offer plants the most technically proven and commercially feasible option for CO2 capture at this time. However, these systems require a large amount of heat and power to operate. As a result, amine-based CO2 capture systems significantly reduce the net power of any units in which they are installed. The Energy Research Center has compiled a list of heat rate improvements that plant operators may implement before installing a CO2 capture system. The goal of these improvements is to upgrade the performance of existing units and partially offset the negative effects of adding a CO2 capture system. Analyses were performed in Aspen Plus to determine the effectiveness of these heat rate improvements in preserving the net power and net unit heat rate (NUHR) of four different power generator units. For the units firing high-moisture sub-bituminous coal, the heat rate improvements reduced NUHR by an average of 13.69% across a CO 2 capture level range of 50% to 90%. For the units firing bituminous coal across the same CO2 capture range, the heat rate improvements reduced NUHR by an average of 12.30%. Regardless of the units' coal or steam turbine cycle type, the heat rate improvements preserved 9.7% to 11.0% of each unit's net power across the same CO2 capture range. In general, the heat rate improvements were found to be most effective in improving the performance of units firing high-moisture sub-bituminous. The effect of the CO2 capture system on these units and the reasons for the improvements' greater effectiveness in them are described in this thesis.

  10. Bisphosphine dioxides

    DOEpatents

    Moloy, K.G.

    1990-02-20

    A process is described for the production of organic bisphosphine dioxides from organic bisphosphonates. The organic bisphosphonate is reacted with a Grignard reagent to give relatively high yields of the organic bisphosphine dioxide.

  11. Bisphosphine dioxides

    DOEpatents

    Moloy, Kenneth G.

    1990-01-01

    A process for the production of organic bisphosphine dioxides from organic bisphosphonates. The organic bisphosphonate is reacted with a Grignard reagent to give relatively high yields of the organic bisphosphine dioxide.

  12. A scalable, fully automated process for construction of sequence-ready human exome targeted capture libraries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Genome targeting methods enable cost-effective capture of specific subsets of the genome for sequencing. We present here an automated, highly scalable method for carrying out the Solution Hybrid Selection capture approach that provides a dramatic increase in scale and throughput of sequence-ready libraries produced. Significant process improvements and a series of in-process quality control checkpoints are also added. These process improvements can also be used in a manual version of the protocol. PMID:21205303

  13. A research needs assessment for the capture, utilization and disposal of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel-fired power plants. Volume 1, Executive summary: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This study identifies and assesses system approaches in order to prioritize research needs for the capture and non-atmospheric sequestering of a significant portion of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emitted from fossil fuel-fired electric power plants (US power plants presently produce about 7% of the world`s CO{sub 2} emissions). The study considers capture technologies applicable either to existing plants or to those that optimistically might be demonstrated on a commercial scale over the next twenty years. Specific conclusions are as follows: (1) To implement CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration on a national scale will decrease power plant net efficiencies and significantly increase the cost of electricity. To make responsible societal decisions, accurate and consistent economic and environmental analysis of all alternatives for atmospheric CO{sub 2} mitigation are required. (2) Commercial CO{sub 2} capture technology, though expensive and energy intensive, exists today. (3) The most promising approach to more economical CO{sub 2} capture is to develop power plant systems that facilitate efficient CO{sub 2} capture. (4) While CO{sub 2} disposal in depleted oil and gas reservoirs is feasible today, the ability to dispose of large quantities Of CO{sub 2} is highly uncertain because of both technical and institutional issues. Disposal into the deep ocean or confined aquifers offers the potential for large quantity disposal, but there are technical, safety, liability, and environmental issues to resolve. Therefore, the highest priority research should focus on establishing the feasibility of large scale disposal options.

  14. The system-wide economics of a carbon dioxide capture, utilization, and storage network: Texas Gulf Coast with pure CO2-EOR flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Carey W.; Gülen, Gürcan; Cohen, Stuart M.; Nuñez-Lopez, Vanessa

    2013-09-01

    This letter compares several bounding cases for understanding the economic viability of capturing large quantities of anthropogenic CO2 from coal-fired power generators within the Electric Reliability Council of Texas electric grid and using it for pure CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the onshore coastal region of Texas along the Gulf of Mexico. All captured CO2 in excess of that needed for EOR is sequestered in saline formations at the same geographic locations as the oil reservoirs but at a different depth. We analyze the extraction of oil from the same set of ten reservoirs within 20- and five-year time frames to describe how the scale of the carbon dioxide capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) network changes to meet the rate of CO2 demand for oil recovery. Our analysis shows that there is a negative system-wide net present value (NPV) for all modeled scenarios. The system comes close to breakeven economics when capturing CO2 from three coal-fired power plants to produce oil via CO2-EOR over 20 years and assuming no CO2 emissions penalty. The NPV drops when we consider a larger network to produce oil more quickly (21 coal-fired generators with CO2 capture to produce 80% of the oil within five years). Upon applying a CO2 emissions penalty of 602009/tCO2 to fossil fuel emissions to ensure that coal-fired power plants with CO2 capture remain in baseload operation, the system economics drop significantly. We show near profitability for the cash flow of the EOR operations only; however, this situation requires relatively cheap electricity prices during operation.

  15. Synthesis of High-Surface-Area Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbon Microflowers and Their Efficient Carbon Dioxide Capture Performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Cao, Minhua

    2015-07-01

    Sustainable carbon materials have received particular attention in CO2 capture and storage owing to their abundant pore structures and controllable pore parameters. Here, we report high-surface-area hierarchically porous N-doped carbon microflowers, which were assembled from porous nanosheets by a three-step route: soft-template-assisted self-assembly, thermal decomposition, and KOH activation. The hydrazine hydrate used in our experiment serves as not only a nitrogen source, but also a structure-directing agent. The activation process was carried out under low (KOH/carbon=2), mild (KOH/carbon=4) and severe (KOH/carbon=6) activation conditions. The mild activated N-doped carbon microflowers (A-NCF-4) have a hierarchically porous structure, high specific surface area (2309 m(2)  g(-1)), desirable micropore size below 1 nm, and importantly large micropore volume (0.95 cm(3)  g(-1)). The remarkably high CO2 adsorption capacities of 6.52 and 19.32 mmol g(-1) were achieved with this sample at 0 °C (273 K) and two pressures, 1 bar and 20 bar, respectively. Furthermore, this sample also exhibits excellent stability during cyclic operations and good separation selectivity for CO2 over N2.

  16. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY Supercritical carbon dioxide process for releasing stuck cantilever beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui; Chaoqun, Gao; Lei, Wang; Yupeng, Jing

    2010-10-01

    The multi-SCCO2 (supercritical carbon dioxide) release and dry process based on our specialized SCCO2 semiconductor process equipment is investigated and the releasing mechanism is discussed. The experiment results show that stuck cantilever beams were held up again under SCCO2 high pressure treatment and the repeatability of this process is nearly 100%.

  17. High Purity Hydrogen Production with In-Situ Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Capture in a Single Stage Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nihar Phalak; Shwetha Ramkumar; Daniel Connell; Zhenchao Sun; Fu-Chen Yu; Niranjani Deshpande; Robert Statnick; Liang-Shih Fan

    2011-07-31

    Enhancement in the production of high purity hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from fuel gas, obtained from coal gasification, is limited by thermodynamics of the water gas shift (WGS) reaction. However, this constraint can be overcome by conducting the WGS in the presence of a CO{sub 2}-acceptor. The continuous removal of CO{sub 2} from the reaction mixture helps to drive the equilibrium-limited WGS reaction forward. Since calcium oxide (CaO) exhibits high CO{sub 2} capture capacity as compared to other sorbents, it is an ideal candidate for such a technique. The Calcium Looping Process (CLP) developed at The Ohio State University (OSU) utilizes the above concept to enable high purity H{sub 2} production from synthesis gas (syngas) derived from coal gasification. The CLP integrates the WGS reaction with insitu CO{sub 2}, sulfur and halide removal at high temperatures while eliminating the need for a WGS catalyst, thus reducing the overall footprint of the hydrogen production process. The CLP comprises three reactors - the carbonator, where the thermodynamic constraint of the WGS reaction is overcome by the constant removal of CO{sub 2} product and high purity H{sub 2} is produced with contaminant removal; the calciner, where the calcium sorbent is regenerated and a sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream is produced; and the hydrator, where the calcined sorbent is reactivated to improve its recyclability. As a part of this project, the CLP was extensively investigated by performing experiments at lab-, bench- and subpilot-scale setups. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis was also conducted to determine the feasibility of the CLP at commercial scale. This report provides a detailed account of all the results obtained during the project period.

  18. Process for the enhanced capture of heavy metal emissions

    DOEpatents

    Biswas, Pratim; Wu, Chang-Yu

    2001-01-01

    This invention is directed to a process for forming a sorbent-metal complex. The process includes oxidizing a sorbent precursor and contacting the sorbent precursor with a metallic species. The process further includes chemically reacting the sorbent precursor and the metallic species, thereby forming a sorbent-metal complex. In one particular aspect of the invention, at least a portion of the sorbent precursor is transformed into sorbent particles during the oxidation step. These sorbent particles then are contacted with the metallic species and chemically reacted with the metallic species, thereby forming a sorbent-metal complex. Another aspect of the invention is directed to a process for forming a sorbent metal complex in a combustion system. The process includes introducing a sorbent precursor into a combustion system and subjecting the sorbent precursor to an elevated temperature sufficient to oxidize the sorbent precursor and transform the sorbent precursor into sorbent particles. The process further includes contacting the sorbent particles with a metallic species and exposing the sorbent particles and the metallic species to a complex-forming temperature whereby the metallic species reacts with the sorbent particles thereby forming a sorbent-metal complex under UV irradiation.

  19. Capturing Problem-Solving Processes Using Critical Rationalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitpin, Stephanie; Simon, Marielle

    2012-01-01

    The examination of problem-solving processes continues to be a current research topic in education. Knowing how to solve problems is not only a key aspect of learning mathematics but is also at the heart of cognitive theories, linguistics, artificial intelligence, and computers sciences. Problem solving is a multistep, higher-order cognitive task…

  20. Capturing User Needs to Improve Processes at EOSDIS Data Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofinowski, E. J.; Boquist, C. L.

    2009-12-01

    Since 2004 the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) has conducted an annual comprehensive survey of user satisfaction using the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI). Customer satisfaction ratings for EOSDIS consistently rate better than the overall government ratings. As part of the survey users are asked to submit comments concerning their experiences and interests. These user comments provide valuable insight into the effect of data center processes on users' experiences. Although user satisfaction has remained high, their preferences have changed with the rapid advances in web-based services. This analysis investigates the correlation between user comments, process changes or capability improvements at the individual data centers, and whether the changes at the data centers and web sites show a corresponding increase in user satisfaction. We will evaluate the comments in the areas of Product Search, Product Selection and Order, Delivery, Product Quality and Customer Support.

  1. A straightforward methodology for designing continuous monoclonal antibody capture multi-column chromatography processes.

    PubMed

    Gjoka, Xhorxhi; Rogler, Karl; Martino, Richard Alexander; Gantier, Rene; Schofield, Mark

    2015-10-16

    A simple process development strategy for continuous capture multi-column chromatography (MCC) is described. The approach involves a few single column breakthrough experiments, based on several simplifying observations that enable users to rapidly convert batch processes into well-designed multi-column processes. The method was validated using a BioSMB(®) (Pall Life Sciences) lab scale multi-column system and a mAb capture process employing Protein A resin. The approach enables users to optimize MCC processes based on their internal preferences and constraints without requiring any mathematical modeling expertise.

  2. Slow cortical potentials capture decision processes during temporal discounting

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Felix; Sailer, Uta

    2013-01-01

    Various neuroimaging studies have detected brain regions involved in discounting the value of temporally delayed rewards. This study used slow cortical potentials (SCPs) to elaborate the time course of cognitive processing during temporal discounting. Depending on their strength of discounting, subjects were categorised as low and high impulsive. Low impulsives, but not high impulsives, showed faster reaction times for making decisions when the delayed reward was of high amount than when it was of low amount. Both low impulsives and high impulsives chose the delayed reward more often when its amount was high than when it was low, but this behavior was more pronounced for low impulsives. Moreover, only low impulsives showed more negative SCPs for low than for high amounts. All three measures indicated that only low impulsives experienced extended conflict for delayed low amounts than for high amounts. Additionally, the SCPs of low impulsives were more sensitive to the delay of the delayed reward than those of high impulsives, extending seconds after the response. This indicates that they continued evaluating their choices even after the decision. Altogether, the present study demonstrated that SCPs are sensitive to decision-related resource allocation during inter-temporal decision-making. Resource allocation depended both on the choice situation and on impulsivity. Furthermore, the time course of SCPs suggested that decision-related processes occurred both prior to and after the response. PMID:23279189

  3. Chromosome Conformation Capture on Chip (4C): Data Processing.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Benjamin; Comet, Itys; Bantignies, Frédéric; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    4C methods are useful to investigate dependencies between regulatory mechanisms and chromatin structures by revealing the frequency of chromatin contacts between a locus of interest and remote sequences on the chromosome. In this chapter we describe a protocol for the data analysis of microarray-based 4C experiments, presenting updated versions of the methods we used in a previous study of the large-scale chromatin interaction profile of a Polycomb response element in Drosophila. The protocol covers data preparation, normalization, microarray probe selection, and the multi-resolution detection of regions with enriched chromatin contacts. A reanalysis of two independent mouse datasets illustrates the versatility of this protocol and the importance of data processing in 4C. Methods were implemented in the R package MRA.TA (Multi-Resolution Analyses on Tiling Array data), and they can be used to analyze ChIP-on-chip data on broadly distributed chromatin components such as histone marks.

  4. Novel cellulose derivative, process for preparing the same and sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane comprising the same

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, K.; Shiomi, T.; Tezuka, Y.

    1987-09-15

    This patent relates to a novel cellulose derivative and a sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane comprising the same, and particularly to hydrocarbylsulfinylethyl cellulose, a process for preparing the same and the sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane comprising the same. An object of the present invention is to provide hydrocarbylsulfinylethyl cellulose which is a novel cellulose derivative and useful as a material for the sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane and a process for preparing the same. Another object of the present invention is to supply a novel sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane having an excellent sulfur dioxide gas permselectivity. The present invention provides hydrocarbylsulfinylethyl cellulose. The novel hydrocarbylsulfinylethyl cellulose of the present invention indicates markedly high sulfur dioxide gas permselectivity compared with the conventional cellulose derivatives, for example, cellulose acetate, ethyl cellulose, etc. Accordingly, the sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane of the present invention can be utilized for separation, purification of sulfur dioxide gas from a gas mixture such as air or for concentration of sulfur dioxide gas in a gas mixture, and is highly practical in industrial use. More specifically, the sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane is useful for, for example, removal of harmful sulfur dioxide gas from discharged gases from the viewpoint of environmental protection and purification of starting gases for synthesis, etc. from the viewpoint of industrial production. Further, the hydrocarbylsulfinylethyl cellulose of the present invention is useful for a thickening agent, binder, protective colloidal agent, etc.

  5. Capturing Snapshots of APE1 Processing DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent non-coding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive due in part to limited structural information. We report multiple high-resolution human APE1:DNA structures that divulge novel features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal binding site, nucleophile, and arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1:DNA structures with a T:G mismatch 5′ to the AP-site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylated CpG dinucleotides. These reveal that APE1 molds the T:G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick like geometry that distorts the active site reducing incision. These snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1, while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage. PMID:26458045

  6. Capturing snapshots of APE1 processing DNA damage

    DOE PAGES

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; ...

    2015-10-12

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent noncoding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA-repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive, owing in part to limited structural information. Here we report multiple high-resolution human APE1-DNA structures that divulge new features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal-binding site, the nucleophile and the arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1-DNA structures with a T-G mismatch 5' to the AP site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylatedmore » CpG dinucleotides. Moreover, these structures reveal that APE1 molds the T-G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick-like geometry that distorts the active site, thus reducing incision. Finally, these snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1 while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage.« less

  7. Capturing snapshots of APE1 processing DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-10-12

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent noncoding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA-repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive, owing in part to limited structural information. Here we report multiple high-resolution human APE1-DNA structures that divulge new features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal-binding site, the nucleophile and the arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1-DNA structures with a T-G mismatch 5' to the AP site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylated CpG dinucleotides. Moreover, these structures reveal that APE1 molds the T-G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick-like geometry that distorts the active site, thus reducing incision. Finally, these snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1 while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage.

  8. Sulfur dioxide removal process with gypsum and magnesium hydroxide production

    SciTech Connect

    College, J.W.; Benson, L.B.

    1992-01-28

    This patent describes improvement in a method for removing sulfur dioxide from flue gases wherein the flue gases are contacted in a wet scrubbing unit, in the absence of any substantial amount of calcium components, with an aqueous solution of magnesium components and magnesium sulfite produced, with aqueous solution, following the contact, collected and recycled to the wet scrubber for further contact with flue gases, and subjecting a portion of the aqueous discharge from the scrubbing unit, containing magnesium sulfite, to oxidation in an oxidation unit. The improvement comprises: adding calcium sulfate to the portion of aqueous discharge containing magnesium sulfite prior to oxidation in the oxidation unit to form an oxidized aqueous effluent containing calcium sulfate solids and dissolved magnesium sulfate; passing the oxidized aqueous effluent to a regeneration tank; adding lime to the regeneration tank to precipitate gypsum from and form an aqueous magnesium hydroxide suspension in the oxidized aqueous effluent; separating the precipitated gypsum from the aqueous magnesium hydroxide suspension; and returning at least a portion of the separated precipitated gypsum to the oxidizing unit as the added calcium sulfate.

  9. Application of the sol-gel technique to develop synthetic calcium-based sorbents with excellent carbon dioxide capture characteristics.

    PubMed

    Broda, Marcin; Kierzkowska, Agnieszka M; Müller, Christoph R

    2012-02-13

    An option for reducing the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere is the implementation of CO(2) capture and storage (CCS) technologies. However, the costs associated with capturing CO(2) by using the currently available technology of amine scrubbing are very high. An emerging second-generation CO(2) capture technology is the use of calcium-based sorbents, which exploit the carbonation and calcination reactions of CaO, namely, CaO+CO(2) ↔CaCO(3). Naturally occurring Ca-based sorbents are inexpensive, but show a very rapid decay of CO(2) uptake capacity with cycle number. Here, we report the development of synthetic Ca-based CO(2) sorbents using a sol-gel technique. Using this technique, we are able to synthesize a nanostructured material that possesses a high surface area and pore volume and shows excellent CO(2) capture characteristics over many cycles. Furthermore, we are able to establish a clear relationship between the structure of the sorbent and its performance. After 30 cycles of calcination and carbonation, the best material possessed a CO(2) uptake capacity of 0.51 g of CO(2) per gram of sorbent; a value that is about 250 % higher than that for naturally occurring Havelock limestone.

  10. A research needs assessment for the capture, utilization and disposal of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel-fired power plants. Volume 2, Topical reports: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This study, identifies and assesses system approaches in order to prioritize research needs for the capture and non-atmospheric sequestering of a significant portion of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emitted from fossil fuel-fired electric power plants (US power plants presently produce about 7% of the world`s CO{sub 2} emissions). The study considers capture technologies applicable either to existing plants or to those that optimistically might be demonstrated on a commercial scale over the next twenty years. The research needs that have high priority in establishing the technical, environmental, and economic feasibility of large-scale capture and disposal of CO{sub 2} from electric power plants are:(1) survey and assess the capacity, cost, and location of potential depleted gas and oil wells that are suitable CO{sub 2} repositories (with the cooperation of the oil and gas industry); (2) conduct research on the feasibility of ocean disposal, with objectives of determining the cost, residence time, and environmental effects for different methods of CO{sub 2} injection; (3) perform an in-depth survey of knowledge concerning the feasibility of using deep, confined aquifers for disposal and, if feasible, identify potential disposal locations (with the cooperation of the oil and gas industry); (4) evaluate, on a common basis, system and design alternatives for integration of CO{sub 2} capture systems with emerging and advanced technologies for power generation; and prepare a conceptual design, an analysis of barrier issues, and a preliminary cost estimate for pipeline networks necessary to transport a significant portion of the CO{sub 2} to potentially feasible disposal locations.

  11. Natural materials for carbon capture.

    SciTech Connect

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M.; Romanov, Vyacheslav N.; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2010-11-01

    Naturally occurring clay minerals provide a distinctive material for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. Swelling clay minerals, such as the smectite variety, possess an aluminosilicate structure that is controlled by low-charge layers that readily expand to accommodate water molecules and, potentially, carbon dioxide. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intercalating carbon dioxide in the interlayer of layered clays but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the process and the extent of carbon capture as a function of clay charge and structure. A series of molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational analyses have been completed to assess the molecular interactions associated with incorporation of CO2 in the interlayer of montmorillonite clay and to help validate the models with experimental observation.

  12. Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica with a Basic Urea-Derived Framework for Enhanced Carbon Dioxide Capture and Conversion Under Mild Conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengshuai; Lu, Xingyuan; Shi, Lei; Wang, Fangxiao; Sun, Jianmin

    2017-03-22

    A periodic mesoporous organosilica with a basic urea-derived framework (PMO-UDF) was prepared and characterized thoroughly. The PMO-UDF showed an enhanced CO2 capture capacity at low pressure (≤1 atm) and an exceptional catalytic activity in CO2 coupling reactions with various epoxides to yield the corresponding cyclic carbonates under mild conditions because of the presence of a high surface area, basic pyridine units, and multiple hydrogen-bond donors. The highly stable catalyst could be reused at least six successive times without a significant decrease of the catalytic efficiency or structural deterioration, thus the PMO-UDF composite is considered as a promising material for CO2 capture and conversion.

  13. Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage

    DOEpatents

    Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2013-01-29

    Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

  14. Fabrication and Scale-up of Polybenzimidazole (PBI) Membrane Based System for Precombustion-Based Capture of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Gopala; Jayaweera, Indira; Sanjrujo, Angel; O'Brien, Kevin; Callahan, Richard; Berchtold, Kathryn; Roberts, Daryl-Lynn; Johnson, Will

    2012-03-31

    The primary objectives of this project are to (1) demonstrate the performance and fabrication of a technically and economically viable pre-combustion-based CO{sub 2} capture system based on the high temperature stability and permeance of PBI membranes, (2) optimize a plan for integration of PBI capture system into an IGCC plant and (3) develop a commercialization plan that addresses technical issues and business issues to outline a clear path for technology transfer of the PBI membrane technology. This report describes research conducted from April 1, 2007 to March 30, 2012 and focused on achieving the above objectives. PBI-based hollow fibers have been fabricated at kilometer lengths and bundled as modules at a bench-scale level for the separation of CO{sub 2} from H{sub 2} at high temperatures and pressures. Long term stability of these fibers has been demonstrated with a relatively high H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity (35 to 50) and H{sub 2} permeance (80 GPU) at temperatures exceeding 225°C. Membrane performance simulations and systems analysis of an IGCC system incorporating a PBI hollow fiber membrane modules have demonstrated that the cost of electricity for CO{sub 2} capture (<10%) using such a high temperature separator. When the cost of transporting, storing, and monitoring the CO{sub 2} is accounted for, the increase in the COE is only 14.4%.

  15. DEMONSTRATION OF A LIQUID CARBON DIOXIDE PROCESS FOR CLEANING METAL PARTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration of liquid carbon dioxide (LCO2) as an alternative to chlorinated solvents for cleaning metal parts. It describes the LCO2 process, the parts tested, the contaminants removed, and results from preliminary laboratory testing and on-site d...

  16. Fractionation of whey protein isolate with supercritical carbon dioxideprocess modeling and cost estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An economical and environmentally friendly whey protein fractionation process was developed using supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) as an acid to produce enriched fractions of alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-La) and beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) from a commercial whey protein isolate (WPI) containing 55% ...

  17. Model based adaptive control of a continuous capture process for monoclonal antibodies production.

    PubMed

    Steinebach, Fabian; Angarita, Monica; Karst, Daniel J; Müller-Späth, Thomas; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-04-29

    A two-column capture process for continuous processing of cell-culture supernatant is presented. Similar to other multicolumn processes, this process uses sequential countercurrent loading of the target compound in order maximize resin utilization and productivity for a given product yield. The process was designed using a novel mechanistic model for affinity capture, which takes both specific adsorption as well as transport through the resin beads into account. Simulations as well as experimental results for the capture of an IgG antibody are discussed. The model was able to predict the process performance in terms of yield, productivity and capacity utilization. Compared to continuous capture with two columns operated batch wise in parallel, a 2.5-fold higher capacity utilization was obtained for the same productivity and yield. This results in an equal improvement in product concentration and reduction of buffer consumption. The developed model was used not only for the process design and optimization but also for its online control. In particular, the unit operating conditions are changed in order to maintain high product yield while optimizing the process performance in terms of capacity utilization and buffer consumption also in the presence of changing upstream conditions and resin aging.

  18. Optimal model-based design of the twin-column CaptureSMB process improves capacity utilization and productivity in protein A affinity capture.

    PubMed

    Baur, Daniel; Angarita, Monica; Müller-Späth, Thomas; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Multi-column chromatographic processes have recently been developed for protein A affinity chromatography to efficiently capture monoclonal antibodies from cell culture supernatant. In this work, the novel twin-column CaptureSMB process was compared to a batch capture process with dual loading flow rate to identify performance gains. As a case study, the isolation of a monoclonal antibody with the Amsphere JWT-203 protein A resin was investigated. Using model based optimization, both processes were optimized and compared over a wide range of operating conditions. A trade-off between productivity and capacity utilization was found, and the resulting pareto-curves showed that CaptureSMB dominates batch, except at very low productivity values. With a feed titer of 1.2 mg mL(-1) , CaptureSMB could reach a productivity of up to 19.5 mg mL(-1) h(-1) experimentally, while maintaining relatively high capacity utilization of 63.8%. On the other hand, at maximum capacity utilization of 95.5%, a productivity of 10.2 mg mL(-1) h(-1) could be reached. This corresponds to a performance improvement with respect batch operation of about 25% in capacity utilization and 40% in productivity, for given yield and purity. CaptureSMB therefore offers a greatly increased performance over batch capture.

  19. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) fine particle capture and BVOC emissions of Betula pendula and Betula pubescens at different wind speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räsänen, Janne V.; Leskinen, Jari T. T.; Holopainen, Toini; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Pasanen, Pertti; Kivimäenpää, Minna

    2017-03-01

    Trees are known to affect air quality by capturing a remarkable amount of particles from the atmosphere. However, the significance of trees in removing very fine particles (diameter less than 0.5 μm) is not well understood. We determined particle capture efficiency (Cp) of two birch species: Betula pendula and Betula pubescens by using inert titanium dioxide fine particles (TiO2, geometric mean diameter 0.270 μm) at three wind speeds (1, 3 and 6 ms-1) in a wind tunnel. Capture efficiencies were determined by measuring densities of TiO2 particles on leaf surfaces by scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the particle intake into an inner structure of leaves was studied by transmission electron microscopy. The effects of fine particle exposure and wind speed on emission rates of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) were measured. Particles were captured (Cp) equally efficiently on foliage of B. pendula (0.0026 ± 0.0005) % and B. pubescens (0.0025 ± 0.0006) %. Increasing wind speed significantly decreased Cp. Increasing wind speed increased deposition velocity (Vg) on B. pendula but not on B. pubescens. Particles were deposited more efficiently on the underside of B. pendula leaves, whereas deposition was similar on the upper and under sides of B. pubescens leaves. TiO2 particles were found inside three of five B. pendula leaves exposed to particles at a wind speed of 1 ms-1 indicating that particles can penetrate into the plant structure. Emission rates of several mono-, homo- and sesquiterpenes were highest at a wind speed of 3 ms-1 in B. pendula. In B. pubescens, emission rates of a few monoterpenes and nonanal decreased linearly with wind speed, but emission rates of sesquiterpenes were lowest at 3 ms-1 and increased at 6 ms-1. Emission rates of a few green leaf volatile compounds increased with increasing wind speed in both species. The results of this study suggest that the surface structure of trees is less important for capturing particles with

  20. Corrosion in CO{sub 2} capture process using blended monoethanolamine and piperazine

    SciTech Connect

    Nainar, M.; Veawab, A.

    2009-10-15

    This work explores the promise of aqueous solutions of blended monoethanolamine (MEA) and piperazine (PZ) as a cost-effective solvent for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture, from industrial flue gas streams with respect to corrosion, which is regarded as one of the, most severe operational problems in typical CO{sub 2} capture plants. Electrochemical corrosion experiments were carried out using the potentiodynamic polarization technique for corrosion measurements. The results show that the blended MEA/PZ solutions are more corrosive than the MEA solutions. The corrosion rate of carbon steel increases with concentration of PZ, total amine concentration, CO{sub 2} loading of solution, solution temperature, and the presence of heat stable salts. Among the tested heat-stable salts, formate is the most corrosive salt, followed by acetate, oxalate, and thiosulfate in the absence of oxygen (O{sub 2}), while acetate is the most corrosive salt followed by formate, oxalate, and thiosulfate in the presence of O{sub 2}.

  1. Carbon capture and biogas enhancement by carbon dioxide enrichment of anaerobic digesters treating sewage sludge or food waste.

    PubMed

    Bajón Fernández, Y; Soares, A; Villa, R; Vale, P; Cartmell, E

    2014-05-01

    The increasing concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere and the stringent greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction targets, require the development of CO2 sequestration technologies applicable for the waste and wastewater sector. This study addressed the reduction of CO2 emissions and enhancement of biogas production associated with CO2 enrichment of anaerobic digesters (ADs). The benefits of CO2 enrichment were examined by injecting CO2 at 0, 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 M fractions into batch ADs treating food waste or sewage sludge. Daily specific methane (CH4) production increased 11-16% for food waste and 96-138% for sewage sludge over the first 24h. Potential CO2 reductions of 8-34% for sewage sludge and 3-11% for food waste were estimated. The capacity of ADs to utilise additional CO2 was demonstrated, which could provide a potential solution for onsite sequestration of CO2 streams while enhancing renewable energy production.

  2. Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor Stars and the Need for an Intermediate Neutron Capture Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancliffe, Richard J.; Hampel, Melanie; Lugaro, Maria; Meyer, Bradley S.

    Carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars in the Galactic Halo display enrichments in heavy elements associated with either the s (slow) or the r (rapid) neutron-capture process (e.g., barium and europium respectively), and in some cases they display evidence of both. The abundance patterns of these CEMP-s/r stars, which show both Ba and Eu enrichment, are particularly puzzling since the s and the r processes require neutron densities that are more than ten orders of magnitude apart, and hence are thought to occur in very different stellar sites. We investigate whether the abundance patterns of CEMP-s/r stars can arise from the nucleosynthesis of the intermediate neutron-capture process (the i process), which is characterised by neutron densities between those of the s and the r processes. Using nuclear network calculations, we study neutron capture nucleosynthesis at different constant neutron densities n ranging from 107 to 1015 cm-3. Neutron densities on the highest side of this range result in abundance patterns that show an increased production of heavy s- and r-process elements but similar levels of the light s-process elements. With our i-process model, we are able to reproduce the abundance patterns of 20 CEMP-s/r stars that could not be explained by s-process nucleosynthesis.

  3. Comparative assessment of status and opportunities for carbon Dioxide Capture and storage and Radioactive Waste Disposal In North America

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-07-22

    Aside from the target storage regions being underground, geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) and radioactive waste disposal (RWD) share little in common in North America. The large volume of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) needed to be sequestered along with its relatively benign health effects present a sharp contrast to the limited volumes and hazardous nature of high-level radioactive waste (RW). There is well-documented capacity in North America for 100 years or more of sequestration of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plants. Aside from economics, the challenges of GCS include lack of fully established legal and regulatory framework for ownership of injected CO{sub 2}, the need for an expanded pipeline infrastructure, and public acceptance of the technology. As for RW, the USA had proposed the unsaturated tuffs of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the region's first high-level RWD site before removing it from consideration in early 2009. The Canadian RW program is currently evolving with options that range from geologic disposal to both decentralized and centralized permanent storage in surface facilities. Both the USA and Canada have established legal and regulatory frameworks for RWD. The most challenging technical issue for RWD is the need to predict repository performance on extremely long time scales (10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} years). While attitudes toward nuclear power are rapidly changing as fossil-fuel costs soar and changes in climate occur, public perception remains the most serious challenge to opening RW repositories. Because of the many significant differences between RWD and GCS, there is little that can be shared between them from regulatory, legal, transportation, or economic perspectives. As for public perception, there is currently an opportunity to engage the public on the benefits and risks of both GCS and RWD as they learn more about the urgent energy-climate crisis created by greenhouse gas emissions from current fossil-fuel combustion practices.

  4. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Based Processing of PEP Binder Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    ac.d-base rre S)wh« l^L SJTÄ molecule acl as an proton donor and the carbony. oxygen in the po.ymer *.an electrondonor However, Kazarian and...nonpolar cosolvent (Kiran and Xiong, 1993). Oxidized polyethylene is obtained by processing PE in an oxygen atmosphere where hydroxide, aldehyde, and...supercritical fluid solvent of meres a iS50 to 500 psi to remove traces of air. Liquid cosolvent is added with a syringe. The supercntical fluid solven

  5. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, T.R.; Golden, T.C.; Mayorga, S.G.; Brzozowski, J.R.; Taylor, F.W.

    1999-06-29

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO[sub 2] from a gaseous mixture containing CO[sub 2] comprises introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100 C and 500 C to adsorb CO[sub 2] to provide a CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent and a CO[sub 2] depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO[sub 2] laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO[sub 2] from the CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100 C and 600 C, is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions. 1 fig.

  6. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Golden, Timothy Christopher; Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard; Taylor, Fred William

    1999-01-01

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO.sub.2 from a gaseous mixture containing CO.sub.2 comprising introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. to adsorb CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent and a CO.sub.2 depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO.sub.2 laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO.sub.2 from the CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 600.degree. C., is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions.

  7. New Neutron-capture Measurements in 23 Open Clusters. I. The r-Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overbeek, Jamie C.; Friel, Eileen D.; Jacobson, Heather R.

    2016-06-01

    Neutron-capture elements, those with Z > 35, are the least well understood in terms of nucleosynthesis and formation environments. The rapid neutron-capture, or r-process, elements are formed in the environments and/or remnants of massive stars, while the slow neutron-capture, or s-process, elements are primarily formed in low-mass AGB stars. These elements can provide much information about Galactic star formation and enrichment, but observational data are limited. We have assembled a sample of 68 stars in 23 open clusters that we use to probe abundance trends for six neutron-capture elements (Eu, Gd, Dy, Mo, Pr, and Nd) with cluster age and location in the disk of the Galaxy. In order to keep our analysis as homogeneous as possible, we use an automated synthesis fitting program, which also enables us to measure multiple (3-10) lines for each element. We find that the pure r-process elements (Eu, Gd, and Dy) have positive trends with increasing cluster age, while the mixed r- and s-process elements (Mo, Pr, and Nd) have insignificant trends consistent with zero. Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, and Dy have similar, slight (although mostly statistically significant) gradients of ˜0.04 dex kpc-1. The mixed elements also appear to have nonlinear relationships with R GC.

  8. Mini-review: green sustainable processes using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Edward; Sun, Qiubai; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Chongmin; Gou, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Environmentally benign carbon dioxide offers significant potential in its supercritical fluid phase to replace current reliance on a range of hazardous, relatively expensive and environmentally damaging organic solvents that are used on an extensive global basis. The unique combination of the physical properties of supercritical fluids are being exploited and further researched to continue the development and establishment of high efficiency, compact plant to provide energy and water efficient manufacturing processes. This mini-review is focused on the use and potential applications of supercritical fluid carbon dioxide for a selected range of key and emerging industrial processes as a sustainable alternative to totally eliminate or greatly reduce the requirement of numerous conventional organic solvents. Examples of the industries include: chemical extraction and purification, synthetic chemical reactions including polymerization and inorganic catalytic processes. Biochemical reactions involving enzymes, particle size engineering, textile dyeing and advanced material manufacture provide further illustrations of vital industrial activities where supercritical fluid technology processes are being implemented or developed. Some aspects relating to the economics of sustainable supercritical fluid carbon dioxide processes are also considered.

  9. Capture of carbon dioxide from ethanol fermentation by liquid absorption for use in biological production of succinic acid.

    PubMed

    Nghiem, Nhuan P; Senske, Gerard E

    2015-02-01

    Previously, it was shown that the gas produced in an ethanol fermentor using either corn or barley as feedstock could be sparged directly into an adjacent fermentor as a feedstock for succinic acid fermentation using Escherichia coli AFP184. In the present investigation, it was demonstrated that the CO2 produced in a corn ethanol fermentor could be absorbed in a base solution and the resultant carbonate solution used both for pH control and supply of the CO2 requirement in succinic acid fermentation. Thus, the CO2 produced in a 5-L corn mash containing 30 wt% total solids was absorbed in a packed column containing 2 L of either 5 M NaOH, 5 M KOH, or 15 wt% NH4OH, and the resultant carbonate solutions were used for pH control in a succinic acid fermentor. The results obtained indicated no significant differences between succinic acid production in these experiments and when 2.5 M solutions of Na2CO3, K2CO3, and (NH4)2CO3 from commercial sources were used. In a commercial setting, the demonstrated capture of CO2 in liquid form will allow transportation of the carbonate solutions to locations not in the immediate vicinity of the ethanol plant, and excess carbonate salts can also be recovered as value-added products.

  10. Measurements of transfer process in pion capture by a series of alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Atsushi; Muroyama, Toshiharu; Shintai, Junichirou; Taniguchi, Eugene; Saito, Tadashi; Miura, Taichi; Imanishi, Nobutsugu; Yoshimura, Yoshio; Furukawa, Michiaki

    1994-12-01

    The transfer of negative pions captured by hydrogen to heavier atoms has been investigated in a series of alcohols by measuring both 2γ rays from π0 decay and pionic X rays. Capture rates for the pionic hydrogen of different chemical states in the molecule were determined from a comparison between the data for the ordinary compound and the deuterated one. The external transfer in the condensed phase was revealed by the dependence of the capture rate of hydrogen on the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl group. The influence of the chemical structure on the transfer process is discussed with respect to the large difference between the relative transfer rates, Λ C=1.5±0.2 and Λ O = 4.5±0.4, corresponding to carbon and oxygen, respectively.

  11. Enriching blast furnace gas by removing carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongmin; Sun, Zhimin; Chen, Shuwen; Wang, Baohai

    2013-12-01

    Blast furnace gas (BF gas) produced in the iron making process is an essential energy resource for a steel making work. As compared with coke oven gas, the caloric value of BF gas is too low to be used alone as fuel in hot stove because of its high concentrations of carbon dioxide and nitrogen. If the carbon dioxide in BF gas could be captured efficiently, it would meet the increasing need of high caloric BF gas, and develop methods to reusing and/or recycling the separated carbon dioxide further. Focused on this, investigations were done with simple evaluation on possible methods of removing carbon dioxide from BF gas and basic experiments on carbon dioxide capture by chemical absorption. The experimental results showed that in 100 minutes, the maximum absorbed doses of carbon dioxide reached 20 g/100 g with ionic liquid as absorbent.

  12. The Intermediate Neutron-capture Process and Carbon-enhanced Metal-poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, Melanie; Stancliffe, Richard J.; Lugaro, Maria; Meyer, Bradley S.

    2016-11-01

    Carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars in the Galactic Halo display enrichments in heavy elements associated with either the s (slow) or the r (rapid) neutron-capture process (e.g., barium and europium, respectively), and in some cases they display evidence of both. The abundance patterns of these CEMP-s/r stars, which show both Ba and Eu enrichment, are particularly puzzling, since the s and the r processes require neutron densities that are more than ten orders of magnitude apart and, hence, are thought to occur in very different stellar sites with very different physical conditions. We investigate whether the abundance patterns of CEMP-s/r stars can arise from the nucleosynthesis of the intermediate neutron-capture process (the i process), which is characterized by neutron densities between those of the s and the r processes. Using nuclear network calculations, we study neutron capture nucleosynthesis at different constant neutron densities n ranging from 107-1015 cm-3. With respect to the classical s process resulting from neutron densities on the lowest side of this range, neutron densities on the highest side result in abundance patterns, which show an increased production of heavy s-process and r-process elements, but similar abundances of the light s-process elements. Such high values of n may occur in the thermal pulses of asymptotic giant branch stars due to proton ingestion episodes. Comparison to the surface abundances of 20 CEMP-s/r stars shows that our modeled i-process abundances successfully reproduce observed abundance patterns, which could not be previously explained by s-process nucleosynthesis. Because the i-process models fit the abundances of CEMP-s/r stars so well, we propose that this class should be renamed as CEMP-i.

  13. Advanced computational tools for optimization and uncertainty quantification of carbon capture processes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C.; Ng, Brenda; Eslick, John

    2014-01-01

    Advanced multi-scale modeling and simulation has the potential to dramatically reduce development time, resulting in considerable cost savings. The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and universities that is developing, demonstrating, and deploying a suite of multi-scale modeling and simulation tools. One significant computational tool is FOQUS, a Framework for Optimization and Quantification of Uncertainty and Sensitivity, which enables basic data submodels, including thermodynamics and kinetics, to be used within detailed process models to rapidly synthesize and optimize a process and determine the level of uncertainty associated with the resulting process. The overall approach of CCSI is described with a more detailed discussion of FOQUS and its application to carbon capture systems.

  14. Solid phase extraction with silicon dioxide microsphere adsorbents in combination with gas chromatography-electron capture detection for the determination of DDT and its metabolites in water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Wu, Wei; Xie, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) microspheres without special modification to enrich dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its main metabolites, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl-2,2-dichloroethylene (p,p'-DDD) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) in combination with gas chromatography-electron-capture detection. The experimental results indicated that an excellent linear relationship between the recoveries and the concentrations of DDT and its main metabolites was obtained in the range of 0.2-30 ng mL(-1) and the correlation coefficients were in the range of 99.96-99.99%. The detection limits based on the ratio of signal to the baseline noise (S/N = 3) were 2.2, 2.9, 3.8 and 4.1 ng L(-1) for p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDT, and p,p'-DDE, respectively. The precisions of the proposed method were all below 10% (n = 6). Four real water samples were utilized for validation of the proposed method, and satisfactory spiked recoveries in the range of 72.4-112.9% were achieved. These results demonstrated that the developed method was a simple, sensitive, and robust analytical method for the monitoring of pollutants in the environment.

  15. Carbon dioxide absorbent and method of using the same

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Robert James; O'Brien, Michael Joseph

    2014-06-10

    In accordance with one aspect, the present invention provides a composition which contains the amino-siloxane structures I, or III, as described herein. The composition is useful for the capture of carbon dioxide from process streams. In addition, the present invention provides methods of preparing the amino-siloxane composition. Another aspect of the present invention provides methods for reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in a process stream employing the amino-siloxane compositions of the invention, as species which react with carbon dioxide to form an adduct with carbon dioxide.

  16. Carbon dioxide absorbent and method of using the same

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Robert James; O'Brien, Michael Joseph

    2015-12-29

    In accordance with one aspect, the present invention provides a composition which contains the amino-siloxane structures I, or III, as described herein. The composition is useful for the capture of carbon dioxide from process streams. In addition, the present invention provides methods of preparing the amino-siloxane composition. Another aspect of the present invention provides methods for reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in a process stream employing the amino-siloxane compositions of the invention, as species which react with carbon dioxide to form an adduct with carbon dioxide.

  17. Carbon dioxide mineralization process design and evaluation: concepts, case studies, and considerations.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Yeo Tze; Sharratt, Paul N; Jie, Bu

    2016-11-01

    Numerous carbon dioxide mineralization (CM) processes have been proposed to overcome the slow rate of natural weathering of silicate minerals. Ten of these proposals are mentioned in this article. The proposals are described in terms of the four major areas relating to CM process design: pre-treatment, purification, carbonation, and reagent recycling operations. Any known specifics based on probable or representative operating and reaction conditions are listed, and basic analysis of the strengths and shortcomings associated with the individual process designs are given in this article. The processes typically employ physical or chemical pseudo-catalytic methods to enhance the rate of carbon dioxide mineralization; however, both methods have its own associated advantages and problems. To examine the feasibility of a CM process, three key aspects should be included in the evaluation criteria: energy use, operational considerations as well as product value and economics. Recommendations regarding the optimal level of emphasis and implementation of measures to control these aspects are given, and these will depend very much on the desired process objectives. Ultimately, a mix-and-match approach to process design might be required to provide viable and economic proposals for CM processes.

  18. Roles of methane and carbon dioxide in geological processes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Goro; Ori, Gian Gabriele; Cardinale, Marco; Dohm, James M.; Baker, Victor R.; Vaz, David A.; Ishimaru, Ryo; Namiki, Noriyuki; Matsui, Takafumi

    2011-02-01

    We discuss in this paper possible roles of methane and carbon dioxide in geological processes on Mars. These volatiles in the martian crust may migrate upward from their sources either directly or via various traps (structural, sedimentary, ground ice, gas hydrates). They are then likely emitted to the atmosphere by seepage or through diverse vent structures. Though gas hydrates have never been directly detected on Mars, theoretical studies favor their presence in the crust and polar caps; they could have played an important role as significant gas reservoirs in the subsurface. The martian gas hydrates would possibly be a binary system of methane and carbon dioxide occupying clathrate cavities. Landforms such as mud volcanoes with well-known linkage to gas venting are extensively distributed on Earth, and methane is the primary gas involved. Thus, identification of these landforms on Mars could suggest that methane and possibly carbon dioxide have contributed to geological processes of the planet. For example, we present a newly identified field in Chryse Planitia where features closely resembling terrestrial mud volcanoes occur widely, though with no observable activity. We also present results of a preliminary search for possible recent or present-day, methane-emission zones in the regions over which enrichments of atmospheric methane have been reported.

  19. Design of Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Benjamin

    2012-06-30

    The major goal of the project is to design and optimize a bench-scale process for novel silicone CO{sub 2}-capture solvents and establish scalability and potential for commercialization of post-combustion capture of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plants. This system should be capable of 90% capture efficiency and demonstrate that less than 35% increase in the cost of energy services can be achieved upon scale-up. Experiments were conducted to obtain data required for design of the major unit operations. The bench-scale system design has been completed, including sizing of major unit operations and the development of a detailed Process and Instrument Diagram (P&ID). The system has been designed to be able to operate over a wide range of process conditions so that the effect of various process variables on performance can be determined. To facilitate flexibility in operation, the absorption column has been designed in a modular manner, so that the height of the column can be varied. The desorber has also been designed to allow for a range of residence times, temperatures, and pressures. The system will be fabricated at Techniserv Inc.

  20. Neutron Capture Rates near A=130 which Effect a Global Change to the r-Process Abundance Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Surman, Rebecca; Beun, Joshua; Mclaughlin, Gail C; Hix, William Raphael

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the impact of neutron capture rates near the A=130 peak on the r-process abundance pattern. We show that these capture rates can alter the abundances of individual nuclear species, not only in the region of A=130 peak but also throughout the abundance pattern. We discuss in general the nonequilibrium processes that produce these abundance changes and determine which capture rates have the most significant impact.

  1. Utilization of Integrated Process Control, Data Capture, and Data Analysis in Construction of Accelerator Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnie Madre; Charles Reece; Joseph Ozelis; Valerie Bookwalter

    2003-05-12

    Jefferson Lab has developed a web-based system that integrates commercial database, data analysis, document archiving and retrieval, and user interface software, into a coherent knowledge management product (Pansophy). This product provides important tools for the successful pursuit of major projects such as accelerator system development and construction, by offering elements of process and procedure control, data capture and review, and data mining and analysis. After a period of initial development, Pansophy is now being used in Jefferson Lab's SNS superconducting linac construction effort, as a means for structuring and implementing the QA program, for process control and tracking, and for cryomodule test data capture and presentation/analysis. Development of Pansophy is continuing, in particular data queries and analysis functions that are the cornerstone of its utility.

  2. Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture by a Nanoporous, Superhydrophobic Membrane Contactor Process

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Howard; Zhou, S James; Ding, Yong; Bikson, Ben

    2012-03-31

    This report summarizes progress made during Phase I and Phase II of the project: "Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture by a Nanoporous, Superhydrophobic Membrane Contactor Process," under contract DE-FE-0000646. The objective of this project is to develop a practical and cost effective technology for CO{sub 2} separation and capture for pre-combustion coal-based gasification plants using a membrane contactor/solvent absorption process. The goals of this technology development project are to separate and capture at least 90% of the CO{sub 2} from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants with less than 10% increase in the cost of energy services. Unlike conventional gas separation membranes, the membrane contactor is a novel gas separation process based on the gas/liquid membrane concept. The membrane contactor is an advanced mass transfer device that operates with liquid on one side of the membrane and gas on the other. The membrane contactor can operate with pressures that are almost the same on both sides of the membrane, whereas the gas separation membranes use the differential pressure across the membrane as driving force for separation. The driving force for separation for the membrane contactor process is the chemical potential difference of CO{sub 2} in the gas phase and in the absorption liquid. This process is thus easily tailored to suit the needs for pre-combustion separation and capture of CO{sub 2}. Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and PoroGen Corporation (PGC) have developed a novel hollow fiber membrane technology that is based on chemically and thermally resistant commercial engineered polymer poly(ether ether ketone) or PEEK. The PEEK membrane material used in the membrane contactor during this technology development program is a high temperature engineered plastic that is virtually non-destructible under the operating conditions encountered in typical gas absorption applications. It can withstand contact with most of the common treating

  3. Efficient Data Capture and Post-Processing for Real-Time Imaging Using AN Ultrasonic Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, L.; Hunter, A. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2010-02-01

    Over the past few years, ultrasonic phased arrays have shown good potential for nondestructive testing (NDT), thanks to high resolution imaging algorithms. Many algorithms are based on the full matrix capture, obtained by firing each element of an ultrasonic array independently, and collecting the data with all elements. Because of the finite sound velocity in the specimen, two consecutive firings must be separated by a minimum time interval. Therefore, more array elements require longer data acquisition times. Moreover, if the array has N elements, then the full matrix contains N2 temporal signals to be processed. Because of the limited calculation speed of current computers, a large matrix of data can result in long post-processing times. In an industrial context where real-time imaging is desirable, it is crucial to reduce acquisition and/or post-processing times. This paper investigates methods designed to reduce acquisition and post-processing times for the total focusing method and wavenumber imaging algorithms. Limited transmission cycles are used to reduce data capture and post-processing. Post-processing times are further reduced by demodulating the data to temporal baseband frequencies. Results are presented so that a compromise can be made between acquisition time, post-processing time and image quality.

  4. Advanced Amine Solvent Formulations and Process Integration for Near-Term CO2 Capture Success

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Kevin S.; Searcy, Katherine; Rochelle, Gary T.; Ziaii, Sepideh; Schubert, Craig

    2007-06-28

    This Phase I SBIR project investigated the economic and technical feasibility of advanced amine scrubbing systems for post-combustion CO2 capture at coal-fired power plants. Numerous combinations of advanced solvent formulations and process configurations were screened for energy requirements, and three cases were selected for detailed analysis: a monoethanolamine (MEA) base case and two “advanced” cases: an MEA/Piperazine (PZ) case, and a methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) / PZ case. The MEA/PZ and MDEA/PZ cases employed an advanced “double matrix” stripper configuration. The basis for calculations was a model plant with a gross capacity of 500 MWe. Results indicated that CO2 capture increased the base cost of electricity from 5 cents/kWh to 10.7 c/kWh for the MEA base case, 10.1 c/kWh for the MEA / PZ double matrix, and 9.7 c/kWh for the MDEA / PZ double matrix. The corresponding cost per metric tonne CO2 avoided was 67.20 $/tonne CO2, 60.19 $/tonne CO2, and 55.05 $/tonne CO2, respectively. Derated capacities, including base plant auxiliary load of 29 MWe, were 339 MWe for the base case, 356 MWe for the MEA/PZ double matrix, and 378 MWe for the MDEA / PZ double matrix. When compared to the base case, systems employing advanced solvent formulations and process configurations were estimated to reduce reboiler steam requirements by 20 to 44%, to reduce derating due to CO2 capture by 13 to 30%, and to reduce the cost of CO2 avoided by 10 to 18%. These results demonstrate the potential for significant improvements in the overall economics of CO2 capture via advanced solvent formulations and process configurations.

  5. Bench Scale Development and Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process for Post-Combustion CO₂ Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ravi

    2015-09-01

    A physical sorption process to produce dry CO₂ at high purity (>98%) and high recovery (>90%) from the flue gas taken before or after the FGD was demonstrated both in the lab and in the field (one ton per day scale). A CO₂ recovery of over 94% and a CO₂ purity of over 99% were obtained in the field tests. The process has a moisture, SOX, and Hg removal stage followed by a CO₂ adsorption stage. Evaluations based on field testing, process simulation and detailed engineering studies indicate that the process has the potential for more than 40% reduction in the capital and more than 40% reduction in parasitic power for CO₂ capture compared to MEA. The process has the potential to provide CO₂ at a cost (<$40/tonne) and quality (<1 ppm H₂O, <1 ppm SOX, <10 ppm O₂) suitable for EOR applications which can make CO₂ capture profitable even in the absence of climate legislation. The process is applicable to power plants without SOX, Hg and NOX removal equipment.

  6. Advanced Oxyfuel Boilers and Process Heaters for Cost Effective CO2 Capture and Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Max Christie; Rick Victor; Bart van Hassel; Nagendra Nagabushana; Juan Li; Joseph Corpus; Jamie Wilson

    2007-03-31

    The purpose of the advanced boilers and process heaters program is to assess the feasibility of integrating Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTM) into combustion processes for cost effective CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Introducing CO{sub 2} capture into traditional combustion processes can be expensive, and the pursuit of alternative methods, like the advanced boiler/process heater system, may yield a simple and cost effective solution. In order to assess the integration of an advanced boiler/process heater process, this program addressed the following tasks: Task 1--Conceptual Design; Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluation; Task 3--OTM Development; Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning; and Task 5--Program Management. This Final report documents and summarizes all of the work performed for the DOE award DE-FC26-01NT41147 during the period from January 2002-March 2007. This report outlines accomplishments for the following tasks: conceptual design and economic analysis, oxygen transport membrane (OTM) development, laboratory scale evaluations, and program management.

  7. Investigation of Ester- and Amide-Linker-Based Porous Organic Polymers for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Separation at Wide Temperatures and Pressures.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ruh; Atilhan, Mert; Anaya, Baraa; Al-Muhtaseb, Shaheen; Aparicio, Santiago; Patel, Hasmukh; Thirion, Damien; Yavuz, Cafer T

    2016-08-17

    Organic compounds, such as covalent organic framework, metal-organic frameworks, and covalent organic polymers have been under investigation to replace the well-known amine-based solvent sorption technology of CO2 and introduce the most efficient and economical material for CO2 capture and storage. Various organic polymers having different function groups have been under investigation both for low and high pressure CO2 capture. However, search for a promising material to overcome the issues of lower selectivity, less capturing capacity, lower mass transfer coefficient and instability in materials performance at high pressure and various temperatures is still ongoing process. Herein, we report synthesis of six covalent organic polymers (COPs) and their CO2, N2, and CH4 adsorption performances at low and high pressures up to 200 bar. All the presented COPs materials were characterized by using elemental analysis method, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques. Physical properties of the materials such as surface areas, pore volume and pore size were determined through BET analysis at 77 K. All the materials were tested for CO2, CH4, and N2 adsorption using state of the art equipment, magnetic suspension balance (MSB). Results indicated that, amide based material i.e. COP-33 has the largest pore volume of 0.2 cm(2)/g which can capture up to the maximum of 1.44 mmol/g CO2 at room temperature and at pressure of 10 bar. However, at higher pressure of 200 bar and 308 K ester-based compound, that is, COP-35 adsorb as large as 144 mmol/g, which is the largest gas capturing capacity of any COPs material obtained so far. Importantly, single gas measurement based selectivity of COP-33 was comparatively better than all other COPs materials at all condition. Nevertheless, overall performance of COP-35 rate of adsorption and heat of adsorption has indicated that this material can be considered for

  8. Debates—Perspectives on socio-hydrology: Capturing feedbacks between physical and social processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Viglione, Alberto; Carr, Gemma; Kuil, Linda; Yan, Kun; Brandimarte, Luigia; Blöschl, Günter

    2015-06-01

    In flood risk assessment, there remains a lack of analytical frameworks capturing the dynamics emerging from two-way feedbacks between physical and social processes, such as adaptation and levee effect. The former, "adaptation effect", relates to the observation that the occurrence of more frequent flooding is often associated with decreasing vulnerability. The latter, "levee effect", relates to the observation that the non-occurrence of frequent flooding (possibly caused by flood protection structures, e.g. levees) is often associated to increasing vulnerability. As current analytical frameworks do not capture these dynamics, projections of future flood risk are not realistic. In this paper, we develop a new approach whereby the mutual interactions and continuous feedbacks between floods and societies are explicitly accounted for. Moreover, we show an application of this approach by using a socio-hydrological model to simulate the behavior of two main prototypes of societies: green societies, which cope with flooding by resettling out of flood-prone areas; and technological societies, which deal with flooding also by building levees or dikes. This application shows that the proposed approach is able to capture and explain the aforementioned dynamics (i.e. adaptation and levee effect) and therefore contribute to a better understanding of changes in flood risk, within an iterative process of theory development and empirical research.

  9. Process analysis of CO{sub 2} capture from flue gas using carbonation/calcination cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.S.; Cai, N.S.; Croiset, E.

    2008-07-15

    Process analysis of CO{sub 2} capture from flue gas using Ca-based carbonation/calcination cycles is presented here. A carbonation/calcination system is composed essentially of two reactors (an absorber and a regenerator) with Ca-based sorbent circulating between the two reactors (assumed here as fluidized beds). CO{sub 2} is, therefore, transferred from the absorber to the regenerator. Because of the endothermicity of the calcination reaction, a certain amount of coal is burned with pure oxygen in the regenerator. Detailed mass balance, heat balance and cost of electricity and CO{sub 2} mitigation for the carbonation/calcination cycles with three Ca-based sorbents in dual fluidized beds were calculated and analyzed to study the effect of the Ca-based sorbent activity decay on CO{sub 2} capture from flue gas. The three sorbents considered were: limestone, dolomite and CaO/Ca{sub 12}Al{sub 14}O{sub 33} (75/25 wt %) sorbent. All results, including the amount of coal and oxygen required, are presented with respect to the difference in calcium oxide conversion between the absorber and the regenerator, which is an important design parameter. Finally, costs of electricity and CO{sub 2} mitigation costs using carbonation/calcination cycles for the three sorbents were estimated. The results indicate that the economics of the carbonation/calcination process compare favorably with competing technologies for capturing CO{sub 2}.

  10. Neutron capture time scale of the s-process, estimated from s-process krypton in a meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuda, J.-I.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1980-01-01

    A krypton fraction enriched in s-process isotopes was extracted from a mineral fraction of the Murchison C2 chondrite. The (Kr-86)/(Kr-84) ratio is enhanced by 6 standard deviations, showing that significant amounts of Kr-86 were made in the s-process, despite the short, 10.8 yr beta-decay half-life of its precursor, Kr-85. Judging from this sample, the mean neutron capture time in the s-process was on the order of 5-100 yr for nuclei with cross sections of 125 mb.

  11. Electron Capture Processes Following Collisions of He^2+ Ions with Molecular Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Haija, O.

    2005-05-01

    Energy-gain spectra, absolute state-selective and total cross sections have been measured for single-electron capture processes in collisions of He^2+ ions with O2, H2O, CO2, N2, and NH3 at impact energies between 100 eV and 1600 eV and scattering angles between 0^o and 6^o using the translational energy-gain spectroscopy (TES) technique. As apparent from the translational energy-gain measurements, single-electron capture (SEC) from O2 and H2O proceeds by both dissociative and non-dissociative channels, whereas for N2 and CO2 only dissociative SEC has been observed. However, for NH3 the non-dissociative SEC channel is found to be predominantly populated. Total cross sections have also been compared with available measurements and theoretical calculations based on Landua-Zener model and Demkov model.

  12. Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Vipperla, Ravikumar; Yee, Michael; Steele, Ray

    2012-11-01

    This report presents system and economic analysis for a carbon capture unit which uses an amino-silicone solvent for CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The amino-silicone solvent is based on GAP-1 with Tri-Ethylene Glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. The report also shows results for a CCS unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). Models were developed for both processes and used to calculate mass and energy balances. Capital costs and energy penalty were calculated for both systems, as well as the increase in cost of electricity. The amino-silicone solvent based system demonstrates significant advantages compared to the MEA system.

  13. Life cycle assessment of carbon capture and utilization from ammonia process in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Morales Mora, M A; Vergara, C Pretelín; Leiva, M A; Martínez Delgadillo, S A; Rosa-Domínguez, E R

    2016-12-01

    Post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC) of flue gas from an ammonia plant (AP) and the environmental performance of the carbon capture utilization (CCU) technology for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) system in Mexico was performed as case study. The process simulations (PS) and life cycle assessment (LCA) were used as supporting tools to quantify the CO2 capture and their environmental impacts, respectively. Two scenarios were considered: 1) the AP with its shift and CO2 removal unit and 2) Scenario 1 plus PCC of the flue gas from the AP primary reformer (AP-2CO2) and the global warming (GW) impact. Also, the GW of the whole of a CO2-EOR project, from these two streams of captured CO2, was evaluated. Results show that 372,426 tCO2/year can be PCC from the flue gas of the primary reformer and 480,000 tons/y of capacity from the AP. The energy requirement for solvent regeneration is estimated to be 2.8 MJ/kgCO2 or a GW impact of 0.22 kgCO2e/kgCO2 captured. GW performances are 297.6 kgCO2e emitted/barrel (bbl) for scenario one, and 106.5 kgCO2e emitted/bbl for the second. The net emissions, in scenario one, were 0.52 tCO2e/bbl and 0.33 tCO2e/bbl in scenario two. Based on PS, this study could be used to evaluate the potential of CO2 capture of 4080 t/d of 4 ammonia plants. The integration of PS-LCA to a PCC study allows the applicability as methodological framework for the development of a cluster of projects in which of CO2 could be recycled back to fuel, chemical, petrochemical products or for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). With AP-2CO2, "CO2 emission free" ammonia production could be achieved.

  14. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation: process mineralogy of feed and products

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Rush, G.E.; Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Collins, W. Keith

    2001-01-01

    Direct mineral carbonation has been investigated as a process to convert gaseous CO2 into a geologically stable final form. The process utilizes a slurry of water, with bicarbonate and salt additions, mixed with a mineral reactant, such as olivine (Mg2SiO4) or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. Carbon dioxide is dissolved into this slurry, resulting in dissolution of the mineral and precipitation of magnesium carbonate (MgCO3). Optimum results have been achieved using heat pretreated serpentine feed material and high partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2). Specific conditions include: 155?C; PCO2=185 atm; 15% solids. Under these conditions, 78% conversion of the silicate to the carbonate was achieved in 30 minutes. Process mineralogy has been utilized to characterize the feed and process products, and interpret the mineral dissolution and carbonate precipitation reaction paths.

  15. Development of a carbonate absorption-based process for post-combustion CO2 capture: The role of biocatalyst to promote CO2 absorption rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Y.; Ye, X.; Zhang, Z.; Khodayari, A.; Djukadi, T.

    2011-01-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) for post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture is described. IVCAP employs potassium carbonate (PC) as a solvent, uses waste or low quality steam from the power plant for CO2 stripping, and employs a biocatalyst, carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme, for promoting the CO2 absorption into PC solution. A series of experiments were performed to evaluate the activity of CA enzyme mixed in PC solutions in a stirred tank reactor system under various temperatures, CA dosages, CO2 loadings, CO2 partial pressures, and the presence of major flue gas contaminants. It was demonstrated that CA enzyme is an effective biocatalyst for CO2 absorption under IVCAP conditions. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Fresia, Megan; Vogt, Kirk

    2013-12-31

    GE Global Research is developing technology to remove carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. A mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) and triethylene glycol (TEG) is the preferred CO{sub 2} capture solvent. GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to test a bench-scale continuous CO{sub 2} absorption/desorption system using a GAP-1m/TEG mixture as the solvent. SiVance LLC was sub-contracted to provide the GAP-1m material and conduct an Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH&S) assessment for a 550 MW coal-fired power plant. Five components of the solvent, CAS#2469-55-8 (GAP-0), CAS#106214-84-0 (GAP-1-4), TEG, and methanol and xylene (minor contaminants from the aminosilicone) are included in this assessment. One by-product, GAP-1m/SOX salt, and dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DDBSA) were also identified for analysis. All of the solvent components and DDBSA are listed on the EPA’s TSCA Inventory allowing companies to manufacture and use the chemicals commercially. The toxicological effects of each component were defined, and control mechanisms necessary to comply with U.S. EH&S regulations are summarized. An engineering and control system, including environmental abatement, was described for minimizing exposure and release of the chemical components. Proper handling and storage recommendations are made for each chemical to minimize risk to workers and the surrounding community.

  17. Known and suspected key roles of carbon dioxide in magmatic and volcanic processes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, P.

    2009-12-01

    Carbon dioxide has long been considered to play a secondary role in magmatic processes compared to water, the prevalent volatile component in most magmas and volcanic gases. However, its much earlier exsolution than more soluble water makes it the first volatile species to form gas bubbles in decompressing magma and, hence, a key agent of deep magma ascent. Growing evidence from experimental studies, volcanic CO2 budgets and H2O-CO2 distributions in crystal melt inclusions highlight that carbon dioxide may originally be more abundant in many magmas than initially expected (and recorded by melt inclusions). The presence of a CO2-rich gas phase at deep crustal levels or even mantle depths not only influences the physical properties of a melt, but can favour earlier exsolution of H2O at equilibrium. Moreover, in low viscosity magmas, such as basalts, deeply formed CO2-rich bubbles are buoyant enough to migrate differentially in plumbing systems and to percolate through or accumulate in shallower magma. It has recently been suggested that such a ‘CO2-fluxing’ process could promote extensive dehydration and consequent crystallisation of ponding magma batches, thereby affecting their eruptive potential. Recent isotopic investigations of this process, on Etna volcano, demonstrate that it may actually provoke a magma dehydrogenation through either H2 loss or/and proton diffusion, resulting in strong deuterium enrichment and H2O depletion in ponding melt. In addition, carbon dioxide can be a key driving agent of maar formation but also of some paroxysmal explosions on volcanoes. The collapse of CO2-rich bubble foams accumulating at sill-like discontinuities of deep feeders can generate the catastrophic ascent of huge CO2-rich gas blobs that become the driving force of these explosions. CO2 precursors of such events were recently detected using multi-gas plume survey on Stromboli. Finally, carbon dioxide is the predominant component of the cold (invisible) gas emanations

  18. Chemical technologies for exploiting and recycling carbon dioxide into the value chain.

    PubMed

    Peters, Martina; Köhler, Burkhard; Kuckshinrichs, Wilhelm; Leitner, Walter; Markewitz, Peter; Müller, Thomas E

    2011-09-19

    While experts in various fields discuss the potential of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies, the utilization of carbon dioxide as chemical feedstock is also attracting renewed and rapidly growing interest. These approaches do not compete; rather, they are complementary: CCS aims to capture and store huge quantities of carbon dioxide, while the chemical exploitation of carbon dioxide aims to generate value and develop better and more-efficient processes from a limited part of the waste stream. Provided that the overall carbon footprint for the carbon dioxide-based process chain is competitive with conventional chemical production and that the reaction with the carbon dioxide molecule is enabled by the use of appropriate catalysts, carbon dioxide can be a promising carbon source with practically unlimited availability for a range of industrially relevant products. In addition, it can be used as a versatile processing fluid based on its remarkable physicochemical properties.

  19. Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-combustion CO2 Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shiguang; Shou, S.; Pyrzynski, Travis; Makkuni, Ajay; Meyer, Howard

    2013-12-31

    This report summarizes scientific/technical progress made for bench-scale membrane contactor technology for post-combustion CO2 capture from DOE Contract No. DE-FE-0004787. Budget Period 1 (BP1) membrane absorber, Budget Period 2 (BP2) membrane desorber and Budget Period 3 (BP3) integrated system and field testing studies have been completed successfully and met or exceeded the technical targets (≥ 90% CO2 removal and CO2 purity of 97% in one membrane stage). Significant breakthroughs are summarized below: BP1 research: The feasibility of utilizing the poly (ether ether ketone), PEEK, based hollow fiber contractor (HFC) in combination with chemical solvents to separate and capture at least 90% of the CO2 from simulated flue gases has been successfully established. Excellent progress has been made as we have achieved the BP1 goal: ≥ 1,000 membrane intrinsic CO2 permeance, ≥ 90% CO2 removal in one stage, ≤ 2 psi gas side pressure drop, and ≥ 1 (sec)-1 mass transfer coefficient. Initial test results also show that the CO2 capture performance, using activated Methyl Diethanol Amine (aMDEA) solvent, was not affected by flue gas contaminants O2 (~3%), NO2 (66 ppmv), and SO2 (145 ppmv). BP2 research: The feasibility of utilizing the PEEK HFC for CO2-loaded solvent regeneration has been successfully established High CO2 stripping flux, one order of magnitude higher than CO2 absorption flux, have been achieved. Refined economic evaluation based on BP1 membrane absorber and BP2 membrane desorber laboratory test data indicate that the CO2 capture costs are 36% lower than DOE’s benchmark amine absorption technology. BP3 research: A bench-scale system utilizing a membrane absorber and desorber was integrated into a continuous CO2 capture process using contactors containing 10 to 20 ft2 of membrane area. The integrated process operation was stable through a 100-hour laboratory test, utilizing a simulated flue gas stream. Greater than 90% CO2 capture combined with 97

  20. Utilization of the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. CH1 in biological carbon dioxide mitigation processes.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chang-Ling; Lee, Chi-Mei; Chen, Pei-Chung

    2011-05-01

    Before switching totally to alternative fuel stage, CO(2) mitigation process has considered a transitional strategy for combustion of fossil fuels inevitably. In comparison to other CO(2) mitigation options, such as oceanic or geologic injection, the biological photosynthetic process would present a far superior and sustainable solution under both environmental and social considerations. The utilization of the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. CH1 in carbon dioxide mitigation processes is analyzed in our research. It was found that an original developed photobioreactor with internal light source exhibits high light utilization. Anabaena sp. CH1 demonstrates excellent CO(2) tolerance even at 15% CO(2) level. This enables flue gas from power plant to be directly introduced to Anabaena sp. CH1 culture. Double light intensity and increased 47% CO(2) bubble retention time could enhance CO(2) removal efficiencies by 79% and 67%, respectively. A maximum CO(2) fixation rate of 1.01 g CO(2)L(-1)day(-1) was measured experimentally.

  1. The Ansel Adams zone system: HDR capture and range compression by chemical processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, John J.

    2010-02-01

    We tend to think of digital imaging and the tools of PhotoshopTM as a new phenomenon in imaging. We are also familiar with multiple-exposure HDR techniques intended to capture a wider range of scene information, than conventional film photography. We know about tone-scale adjustments to make better pictures. We tend to think of everyday, consumer, silver-halide photography as a fixed window of scene capture with a limited, standard range of response. This description of photography is certainly true, between 1950 and 2000, for instant films and negatives processed at the drugstore. These systems had fixed dynamic range and fixed tone-scale response to light. All pixels in the film have the same response to light, so the same light exposure from different pixels was rendered as the same film density. Ansel Adams, along with Fred Archer, formulated the Zone System, staring in 1940. It was earlier than the trillions of consumer photos in the second half of the 20th century, yet it was much more sophisticated than today's digital techniques. This talk will describe the chemical mechanisms of the zone system in the parlance of digital image processing. It will describe the Zone System's chemical techniques for image synthesis. It also discusses dodging and burning techniques to fit the HDR scene into the LDR print. Although current HDR imaging shares some of the Zone System's achievements, it usually does not achieve all of them.

  2. Advancing adsorption and membrane separation processes for the gigaton carbon capture challenge.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Jennifer; Haghpanah, Reza; Rupp, Erik C; He, Jiajun; Lee, Kyoungjin

    2014-01-01

    Reducing CO2 in the atmosphere and preventing its release from point-source emitters, such as coal and natural gas-fired power plants, is a global challenge measured in gigatons. Capturing CO2 at this scale will require a portfolio of gas-separation technologies to be applied over a range of applications in which the gas mixtures and operating conditions will vary. Chemical scrubbing using absorption is the current state-of-the-art technology. Considerably less attention has been given to other gas-separation technologies, including adsorption and membranes. It will take a range of creative solutions to reduce CO2 at scale, thereby slowing global warming and minimizing its potential negative environmental impacts. This review focuses on the current challenges of adsorption and membrane-separation processes. Technological advancement of these processes will lead to reduced cost, which will enable subsequent adoption for practical scaled-up application.

  3. Study of process variables in supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of soybeans.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Nikolas; Hilton, Ramsey; Hendry, Doug; Venkitasamy, Chandrasekar; Jacoby, William

    2014-01-01

    Soybean flakes were extracted using supercritical carbon dioxide at 48.3 MPa and 80 °C, which is a higher temperature than previously reported. Several operational parameters were explored to determine their effect on extractions. Flakes, as typically used in this industry, provided the best extraction performance. Particle size distributions were created through grinding. Reducing average particle diameters smaller than 0.069 mm had no appreciable effect on increasing extraction efficiencies. Exploration of flow rate indicated that a residence time of less than 60 s for the supercritical carbon dioxide would be sufficient for complete extractions. A solvent mass to load mass ratio of 10:1 was found to be sufficient for extraction of oils from soybean flakes. Increasing moisture in the soybeans led to decreasing extraction efficiency of oils. Finally, soybean hulls had no effect on extraction efficiency. Thus, the de-hulling procedure can be removed from the extraction process without decreasing extraction efficiency.

  4. Simple and fast annealing synthesis of titanium dioxide nanostructures and morphology transformation during annealing processes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongbok; Ryu, Yeontack; Kim, Hansoo; Yu, Choongho

    2009-03-11

    Wire- and belt-like single-crystalline titanium dioxide nanostructures were synthesized by using a simple thermal annealing method, which has often been avoided for the synthesis of metal oxide nanostructures from high melting point metals such as Ti. The synthesis method requires neither high reaction temperature nor complicated reaction processes, and can be used for producing dense nanomaterials with relatively short reaction time at temperatures much lower than the melting point of titanium and titanium dioxide. Key synthesis factors including the choice of eutectic catalyst, growth temperature, and annealing time were systematically investigated. The synthesis reaction was promoted by a copper eutectic catalyst, producing long nanostructures with short reaction times. For example, it was observed that only 30 min of annealing time at 850 degrees C was enough to produce densely grown approximately 10 microm long nanowires with diameters of approximately 100 nm, and longer reaction time brought about morphology changes from wires to belts as well as producing longer nanostructures up to approximately 30 microm. The nanostructures have the crystalline rutile structure along the [Formula: see text] growth direction. Finally, our simple and effective method for the synthesis of TiO2 nanostructures could be utilized for growing other metal oxide nanowires from high melting temperature metals.

  5. Thermal and energetic processing of ammonia and carbon dioxide bearing solid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lv, X Y; Boduch, P; Ding, J J; Domaracka, A; Langlinay, T; Palumbo, M E; Rothard, H; Strazzulla, G

    2014-02-28

    We present new experimental results on thermal and ion irradiation processing of frozen ammonia-carbon dioxide mixtures. Some mixtures were deposited at low temperatures (T ≈ 16 K). Upon warming up to 160 K, complex chemical reactions occur leading to the formation of new molecules and, in particular, of ammonium carbamate. We also show that the same species are produced when water is the dominant species in the ternary mixture with ammonia and carbon dioxide. The samples have been irradiated with 144 keV S(9+) ions at 16 K and 50 K. Also in this case, new chemical species are formed as e.g. ammonium formate, CO and OCN(-). The results are discussed in the light of their relevance to the chemical evolution of ices in the interstellar medium and in the solar system. In particular, we suggest searching for them among the gas phase species sublimating from grains around young stellar objects and from the cometary nuclei approaching the Sun.

  6. Optimization of water use and cost of electricity for an MEA carbon capture process, January 26, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Eslick, J.; Miller, D.

    2012-01-01

    DOE goals are: 90% CO{sub 2} capture, Less than 30% increase in COE, and to reduce water use by 70% at 50% cost of dry cooling. Objectives are: (1) Develop detailed models of supercritical power plant, MEA carbon capture process, CO{sub 2} compression; and (2) Optimize process for conflicting goals of minimizing water use and COE CO{sub 2} capture greatly increases COE and water use, power gen. 1/3 of fresh water use, and water scarcity is increasing.

  7. Nanostructured Graphene-Titanium Dioxide Composites Synthesized by a Single-Step Aerosol Process for Photoreduction of Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Ning; Jiang, Yi; Fortner, John D.; Biswas, Pratim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) to hydrocarbons by using nanostructured materials activated by solar energy is a promising approach to recycling CO2 as a fuel feedstock. CO2 photoreduction, however, suffers from low efficiency mainly due to the inherent drawback of fast electron-hole recombination in photocatalysts. This work reports the synthesis of nanostructured composites of titania (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) encapsulated by reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets via an aerosol approach. The role of synthesis temperature and TiO2/GO ratio in CO2 photoreduction was investigated. As-prepared nanocomposites demonstrated enhanced CO2 conversion performance as compared with that of pristine TiO2 NPs due to the strong electron trapping capability of the rGO nanosheets. PMID:25053879

  8. Subaru/HDS study of CH stars: elemental abundances for stellar neutron-capture process studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Aruna; Aoki, Wako; Karinkuzhi, Drisya

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive abundance analysis providing rare insight into the chemical history of lead stars is still lacking. We present results from high-resolution (R ˜ 50 000) spectral analyses of three CH stars, HD 26, HD 198269 and HD 224959, and, a carbon star with a dusty envelope, HD 100764. Previous studies on these objects are limited by both resolution and wavelength regions and the results differ significantly from each other. We have undertaken to reanalyse the chemical composition of these objects based on high-resolution Subaru spectra covering the wavelength regions 4020-6775 Å. Considering local thermodynamic equilibrium and using model atmospheres, we have derived the stellar parameters, the effective temperatures Teff, surface gravities log g, and metallicities [Fe/H] for these objects. The derived parameters for HD 26, HD 100764, HD 198269 and HD 224959 are (5000, 1.6, -1.13), (4750, 2.0 -0.86), (4500, 1.5, -2.06) and (5050, 2.1, -2.44), respectively. The stars are found to exhibit large enhancements of heavy elements relative to iron in conformity to previous studies. Large enhancement of Pb with respect to iron is also confirmed. Updates on the elemental abundances for several s-process elements (Y, Zr, La, Ce, Nd, Sm and Pb) along with the first-time estimates of abundances for a number of other heavy elements (Sr, Ba, Pr, Eu, Er and W) are reported. Our analysis suggests that neutron-capture elements in HD 26 primarily originate in the s-process while the major contributions to the abundances of neutron-capture elements in the more metal-poor objects HD 224959 and HD 198269 are from the r-process, possibly from materials that are pre-enriched with products of the r-process.

  9. Cribellate thread production in spiders: Complex processing of nano-fibres into a functional capture thread.

    PubMed

    Joel, Anna-Christin; Kappel, Peter; Adamova, Hana; Baumgartner, Werner; Scholz, Ingo

    2015-11-01

    Spider silk production has been studied intensively in the last years. However, capture threads of cribellate spiders employ an until now often unnoticed alternative of thread production. This thread in general is highly interesting, as it not only involves a controlled arrangement of three types of threads with one being nano-scale fibres (cribellate fibres), but also a special comb-like structure on the metatarsus of the fourth leg (calamistrum) for its production. We found the cribellate fibres organized as a mat, enclosing two parallel larger fibres (axial fibres) and forming the typical puffy structure of cribellate threads. Mat and axial fibres are punctiform connected to each other between two puffs, presumably by the action of the median spinnerets. However, this connection alone does not lead to the typical puffy shape of a cribellate thread. Removing the calamistrum, we found a functional capture thread still being produced, but the puffy shape of the thread was lost. Therefore, the calamistrum is not necessary for the extraction or combination of fibres, but for further processing of the nano-scale cribellate fibres. Using data from Uloborus plumipes we were able to develop a model of the cribellate thread production, probably universally valid for cribellate spiders.

  10. A regenerative process for carbon dioxide removal and hydrogen production in IGCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh Khayyat, Armin

    Advanced power generation technologies, such as Integrated Gasification-Combined Cycles (IGCC) processes, are among the leading contenders for power generation conversion because of their significantly higher efficiencies and potential environmental advantages, compared to conventional coal combustion processes. Although the increased in efficiency in the IGCC processes will reduce the emissions of carbon dioxide per unit of power generated, further reduction in CO2 emissions is crucial due to enforcement of green house gases (GHG) regulations. In IGCC processes to avoid efficiency losses, it is desirable to remove CO2 in the temperature range of 300° to 500°C, which makes regenerable MgO-based sorbents ideal for such operations. In this temperature range, CO2 removal results in the shifting of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction towards significant reduction in carbon monoxide (CO), and enhancement in hydrogen production. However, regenerable, reactive and attrition resistant sorbents are required for such application. In this work, a highly reactive and attrition resistant regenerable MgO-based sorbent is prepared through dolomite modification, which can simultaneously remove carbon dioxide and enhance hydrogen production in a single reactor. The results of the experimental tests conducted in High-Pressure Thermogravimetric Analyzer (HP-TGA) and high-pressure packed-bed units indicate that in the temperature range of 300° to 500°C at 20 atm more than 95 molar percent of CO2 can be removed from the simulated coal gas, and the hydrogen concentration can be increased to above 70 percent. However, a declining trend is observed in the capacity of the sorbent exposed to long-term durability analysis, which appears to level off after about 20 cycles. Based on the physical and chemical analysis of the sorbent, a two-zone expanding grain model was applied to obtain an excellent fit to the carbonation reaction rate data at various operating conditions. The modeling

  11. Theoretical investigation of the electron capture and loss processes in the collisions of He2+ + Ne.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xuhai; Wang, Feng; Jiao, Yalong; Su, Wenyong; Wang, Jianguo; Gou, Bingcong

    2013-08-28

    Based on the time-dependent density functional theory, a method is developed to study ion-atom collision dynamics, which self-consistently couples the quantum mechanical description of electron dynamics with the classical treatment of the ion motion. Employing real-time and real-space method, the coordinate space translation technique is introduced to allow one to focus on the region of target or projectile depending on the actual concerned process. The benchmark calculations are performed for the collisions of He(2+) + Ne, and the time evolution of electron density distribution is monitored, which provides interesting details of the interaction dynamics between the electrons and ion cores. The cross sections of single and many electron capture and loss have been calculated in the energy range of 1-1000 keV/amu, and the results show a good agreement with the available experiments over a wide range of impact energies.

  12. Colorimetric detection of hazardous gases using a remotely operated capturing and processing system.

    PubMed

    Montes-Robles, Roberto; Moragues, María Esperanza; Vivancos, José-Luis; Ibáñez, Javier; Fraile, Rubén; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; García-Breijo, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an electronic system for the automatic detection of hazardous gases. The proposed system implements colorimetric sensing algorithms, thus providing a low-cost solution to the problem of gas sensing. It is remotely operated and it performs the tasks of image capturing and processing, hence obtaining colour measurements in RGB (Red-Green-Blue) space that are subsequently sent to a remote operator via the internet. A prototype of the system has been built to test its performance. Specifically, experiments have been carried out aimed at the detection of CO, CO2, NO, NO2, SO2 and formaldehyde at diverse concentrations by using a chromogenic array composed by 13 active and 2 inert compounds. Statistical analyses of the results reveal a good performance of the electronic system and the feasibility of remote hazardous gas detection using colorimetric sensor arrays.

  13. Failure of the multiple peaking approximation for fast capture processes at milliradian scattering angles

    SciTech Connect

    Houamer, Salim; Popov, Yuri V.; Dal Cappello, Claude

    2010-03-15

    The first Born approximation is examined for different fast capture processes for the p+He system at incident energies of about 1 MeV. Calculations have been performed for the singly differential cross section (SDCS) for scattering angles 0-0.5 mrad in the laboratory frame. In the case of transfer ionization, we observe that the two-step-2 mechanism has a dominant contribution to the SDCS for the kinematics considered in this work. The present investigation demonstrates that the multiple peaking approximation is a very crude method which fails to describe the SDCS even at scattering angles below 0.5 mrad. We have also presented a doubly differential cross section for the fixed emission energy of 600 eV and compared our results with other theoretical calculations and experiments.

  14. Downstream processing of human antibodies integrating an extraction capture step and cation exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ana M; Rosa, Paula A J; Ferreira, I Filipa; de Vries, J; Visser, T J; Aires-Barros, M Raquel

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we explore an alternative process for the purification of human antibodies from a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell supernatant comprising a ligand-enhanced extraction capture step and cation exchange chromatography (CEX). The extraction of human antibodies was performed in an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) composed of dextran and polyethylene glycol (PEG), in which the terminal hydroxyl groups of the PEG molecule were modified with an amino acid mimetic ligand in order to enhance the partition of the antibodies to the PEG-rich phase. This capture step was optimized using a design of experiments and a central composite design allowed the determination of the conditions that favor the partition of the antibodies to the phase containing the PEG diglutaric acid (PEG-GA) polymer, in terms of system composition. Accordingly, higher recovery yields were obtained for higher concentrations of PEG-GA and lower concentrations of dextran. The highest yield experimentally obtained was observed for an ATPS composed of 5.17% (w/w) dextran and 8% (w/w) PEG-GA. Higher purities were however predicted for higher concentrations of both polymers. A compromise between yield and purity was achieved using 5% dextran and 10% PEG-GA, which allowed the recovery of 82% of the antibodies with a protein purity of 96% and a total purity of 63%, determined by size-exclusion chromatography. ATPS top phases were further purified by cation exchange chromatography and it was observed that the most adequate cation exchange ligand was carboxymethyl, as the sulfopropyl ligand induced the formation of multi-aggregates or denatured forms. This column allowed the elution of 89% of the antibodies present in the top phase, with a protein purity of 100% and a total purity of 91%. The overall process containing a ligand-enhanced extraction step and a cation exchange chromatography step had an overall yield of 73%.

  15. Design of a uranium-dioxide powder spheroidization system by plasma processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavender, Daniel

    The plasma spheroidization system (PSS) is the first process in the development of a tungsten-uranium dioxide (W-UO2) ceramic-metallic (cermet) fuel for nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion. For the purposes of fissile fuel retention, UO2 spheroids ranging in size from 50 - 100 micrometers (μm) in diameter will be encapsulated in a tungsten shell. The PSS produces spherical particles by melting angular stock particles in an argon-hydrogen plasma jet where they become spherical due to surface tension. Surrogate CeO 2 powder was used in place of UO2 for system and process parameter development. Stock and spheroidized powders were micrographed using optical and scanning electron microscopy and evaluated by statistical methods to characterize and compare the spherocity of pre and post process powders. Particle spherocity was determined by irregularity parameter. Processed powders showed a statistically significant improvement in spherocity, with greater that 60% of the examined particles having an irregularity parameter of equal to or lower than 1.2, compared to stock powder.

  16. Process modeling of an advanced NH₃ abatement and recycling technology in the ammonia-based CO₂ capture process.

    PubMed

    Li, Kangkang; Yu, Hai; Tade, Moses; Feron, Paul; Yu, Jingwen; Wang, Shujuan

    2014-06-17

    An advanced NH3 abatement and recycling process that makes great use of the waste heat in flue gas was proposed to solve the problems of ammonia slip, NH3 makeup, and flue gas cooling in the ammonia-based CO2 capture process. The rigorous rate-based model, RateFrac in Aspen Plus, was thermodynamically and kinetically validated by experimental data from open literature and CSIRO pilot trials at Munmorah Power Station, Australia, respectively. After a thorough sensitivity analysis and process improvement, the NH3 recycling efficiency reached as high as 99.87%, and the NH3 exhaust concentration was only 15.4 ppmv. Most importantly, the energy consumption of the NH3 abatement and recycling system was only 59.34 kJ/kg CO2 of electricity. The evaluation of mass balance and temperature steady shows that this NH3 recovery process was technically effective and feasible. This process therefore is a promising prospect toward industrial application.

  17. Integrated Electrochemical Processes for CO2 Capture and Conversion to Commodity Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Hatton, T. Alan; Jamison, Timothy

    2013-09-30

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Siemens Corporations (SCR) are developing new chemical synthesis processes for commodity chemicals from CO2. The process is assessed as a novel chemical sequestration technology that utilizes CO2 from dilute gas streams generated at industrial carbon emitters as a raw material to produce useful commodity chemicals. Work at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) commenced on October 1st, 2010, and finished on September 30th, 2013. During this period, we have investigated and accomplished five objectives that mainly focused on converting CO2 into high-value chemicals: 1) Electrochemical assessment of catalytic transformation of CO2 and epoxides to cyclic carbonates; 2) Investigation of organocatalytic routes to convert CO2 and epoxide to cyclic carbonates; 3) Investigation of CO2 Capture and conversion using simple olefins under continuous flow; 4) Microwave assisted synthesis of cyclic carbonates from olefins using sodium bicarbonates in a green pathway; 5) Life cycle analyses of integrated chemical sequestration process. In this final report, we will describe the detailed study performed during the three year period and findings and conclusions drawn from our research.

  18. Ab initio calculation of the $np \\to d ³$ radiative capture process

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Tiburzi, Brian C.

    2015-09-24

    In this study, lattice QCD calculations of two-nucleon systems are used to isolate the short-distance two-body electromagnetic contributions to the radiative capture process $np \\to d\\gamma$, and the photo-disintegration processes $\\gamma^{(\\ast)} d \\to np$. In nuclear potential models, such contributions are described by phenomenological meson-exchange currents, while in the present work, they are determined directly from the quark and gluon interactions of QCD. Calculations of neutron-proton energy levels in multiple background magnetic fields are performed at two values of the quark masses, corresponding to pion masses of $m_\\pi \\sim 450$ and 806 MeV, and are combined with pionless nuclear effective field theory to determine these low-energy inelastic processes. Extrapolating to the physical pion mass, a cross section of $\\sigma^{lqcd}(np\\to d\\gamma)=332.4({\\tiny \\begin{array}{l}+5.4 \\\\ - 4.7\\end{array}})\\ mb$ is obtained at an incident neutron speed of $v=2,200\\ m/s$, consistent with the experimental value of $\\sigma^{expt}(np \\to d\\gamma) = 334.2(0.5)\\ mb$.

  19. Process for CO.sub.2 capture using a regenerable magnesium hydroxide sorbent

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Stevens, Jr., Robert W

    2013-06-25

    A process for CO.sub.2 separation using a regenerable Mg(OH).sub.2 sorbent. The process absorbs CO.sub.2 through the formation of MgCO.sub.3 and releases water product H.sub.2O. The MgCO.sub.3 is partially regenerated through direct contact with steam, which acts to heat the magnesium carbonate to a higher temperature, provide heat duty required to decompose the magnesium carbonate to yield MgO and CO.sub.2, provide an H.sub.2O environment over the magnesium carbonate thereby shifting the equilibrium and increasing the potential for CO.sub.2 desorption, and supply H.sub.2O for rehydroxylation of a portion of the MgO. The mixture is polished in the absence of CO.sub.2 using water product H.sub.2O produced during the CO.sub.2 absorption to maintain sorbent capture capacity. The sorbent now comprised substantially of Mg(OH).sub.2 is then available for further CO.sub.2 absorption duty in a cyclic process.

  20. Ab initio Calculation of the n p →d γ Radiative Capture Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Tiburzi, Brian C.; Nplqcd Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Lattice QCD calculations of two-nucleon systems are used to isolate the short-distance two-body electromagnetic contributions to the radiative capture process n p →d γ , and the photo-disintegration processes γ(*)d →n p . In nuclear potential models, such contributions are described by phenomenological meson-exchange currents, while in the present work, they are determined directly from the quark and gluon interactions of QCD. Calculations of neutron-proton energy levels in multiple background magnetic fields are performed at two values of the quark masses, corresponding to pion masses of mπ˜450 and 806 MeV, and are combined with pionless nuclear effective field theory to determine the amplitudes for these low-energy inelastic processes. At mπ˜806 MeV , using only lattice QCD inputs, a cross section σ806 MeV˜17 mb is found at an incident neutron speed of v =2 ,200 m /s . Extrapolating the short-distance contribution to the physical pion mass and combining the result with phenomenological scattering information and one-body couplings, a cross section of σlqcd(n p →d γ )=334.9 ( +5.2 -5.4 ) mb is obtained at the same incident neutron speed, consistent with the experimental value of σexpt(n p →d γ )=334.2 (0.5 ) mb .

  1. COMPARISON OF SODIUM AND POTASSIUM CARBONATES AS LITHIUM ZIRCONATE MODIFIERS FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM BIOMASS-DERIVED SYNTHESIS GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Olstad, J.L.; Phillips, S.D.

    2009-01-01

    The process of gasifi cation converts biomass into synthesis gas (syngas), which can be used to produce biofuels. Solid-phase sorbents were investigated for the removal of CO2 from a N2/CO2 gas stream using a CO2 concentration similar to that found in a biomass gasifi cation process. During the gasifying process, large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) are created along with the syngas. The produced CO2 must be removed before the syngas can be used for fuel synthesis and to avoid the possible formation of unwanted byproducts. A thermogravimetric analyzer was used to test the CO2 absorption rates of sorbents composed of lithium zirconate (Li2ZrO3), as well as mixtures of Li2ZrO3 with potassium carbonate (K2CO3) and sodium carbonate (Na2CO3). The experimental results show that Li2ZrO3 has a low absorption rate, but sorbents containing combinations of Li2ZrO3 and the K2CO3 and Na2CO3 additives have high uptake rates. Using different proportions of K2CO3 and Na2CO3 produces varying uptake rates, so an optimization experiment was performed to obtain an improved sorbent. The CO2 absorption and regeneration stability of the solid-phase sorbents were also examined. A sorbent composed of Li2ZrO3 and 12.1 weight % Na2CO3 was shown to be stable, based on the consistent CO2 uptake rates. Sorbents prepared with Li2ZrO3, 17.6 weight % K2CO3 and 18.1 weight % Na2CO3 showed instability during regeneration cycles in air at 800 °C. Sorbent stability improved during regeneration cycles at 700 °C. Further testing of the Li2ZrO3 sorbent under actual syngas conditions, including higher pressure and composition, should be done. Once the optimum sorbent has been found, a suitable support will be needed to use the sorbent in an actual reactor.

  2. Ab initio calculation of the $$np \\to d ³$$ radiative capture process

    DOE PAGES

    Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William; ...

    2015-09-24

    In this study, lattice QCD calculations of two-nucleon systems are used to isolate the short-distance two-body electromagnetic contributions to the radiative capture processmore » $$np \\to d\\gamma$$, and the photo-disintegration processes $$\\gamma^{(\\ast)} d \\to np$$. In nuclear potential models, such contributions are described by phenomenological meson-exchange currents, while in the present work, they are determined directly from the quark and gluon interactions of QCD. Calculations of neutron-proton energy levels in multiple background magnetic fields are performed at two values of the quark masses, corresponding to pion masses of $$m_\\pi \\sim 450$$ and 806 MeV, and are combined with pionless nuclear effective field theory to determine these low-energy inelastic processes. Extrapolating to the physical pion mass, a cross section of $$\\sigma^{lqcd}(np\\to d\\gamma)=332.4({\\tiny \\begin{array}{l}+5.4 \\\\ - 4.7\\end{array}})\\ mb$$ is obtained at an incident neutron speed of $$v=2,200\\ m/s$$, consistent with the experimental value of $$\\sigma^{expt}(np \\to d\\gamma) = 334.2(0.5)\\ mb$$.« less

  3. Novel shortcut estimation method for regeneration energy of amine solvents in an absorption-based carbon capture process.

    PubMed

    Kim, Huiyong; Hwang, Sung June; Lee, Kwang Soon

    2015-02-03

    Among various CO2 capture processes, the aqueous amine-based absorption process is considered the most promising for near-term deployment. However, the performance evaluation of newly developed solvents still requires complex and time-consuming procedures, such as pilot plant tests or the development of a rigorous simulator. Absence of accurate and simple calculation methods for the energy performance at an early stage of process development has lengthened and increased expense of the development of economically feasible CO2 capture processes. In this paper, a novel but simple method to reliably calculate the regeneration energy in a standard amine-based carbon capture process is proposed. Careful examination of stripper behaviors and exploitation of energy balance equations around the stripper allowed for calculation of the regeneration energy using only vapor-liquid equilibrium and caloric data. Reliability of the proposed method was confirmed by comparing to rigorous simulations for two well-known solvents, monoethanolamine (MEA) and piperazine (PZ). The proposed method can predict the regeneration energy at various operating conditions with greater simplicity, greater speed, and higher accuracy than those proposed in previous studies. This enables faster and more precise screening of various solvents and faster optimization of process variables and can eventually accelerate the development of economically deployable CO2 capture processes.

  4. Digital image capture, processing, and recording system upgrade for the APS-94F SLAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraris, Guillermo L.

    2000-11-01

    The Argentine Army has been operating the APS-94F SLAR systems, on board the venerable OV-1D MOHAWK aircraft, since 1996. These systems were received from the U.S. Government through the FMS program. One major handicap of the system is due to the now obsolete imagery recording subsystem, which includes complex optical, thermal and electro-mechanical obsolete processes and components, that account for most of the degradations and distortions in the images obtained (not to mention the fact that images are recorded on a 9.5-inch silver halide film media, which has to be kept at -17 degree(s)C and has to be brought to thermal equilibrium with the environment eight hours before the mission). An integral digital capture, processing and recording subsystem was developed at CITEFA (Instituto de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas de las Fuerzas Armadas) to replace the old analog RO-495/U recorder, as an upgrade to this very robust and proven imaging radar system The subsystem developed includes three custom designed ISA boards: (1) Radar video and aircraft attitude signal conditioning board, (2) Microprocessor controlled two- channel high speed digitizing board and (3) Integrated 12- channel GPS OEM board. The operator's software interface is a PC based GUI C++ application, including radar imagery forming and processing algorithms, slant range to ground range conversion, digitally controlled image gain, bias and contrast adjustments, image registration (GPS), image file disk recording and retrieval functions, real time mensuration and MTI/FTI (moving target indication/fixed target indication) image correlation. The system also provides for the added capability to send compressed still radar images in NRT (near real time) to a ground receiving station through a secure data link. Due to serious space limitations inside the OV-1D two-seat cockpit, a military grade ruggedized laptop computer and docking station hardware implementation was selected.

  5. Production of heavy and superheavy neutron-rich nuclei in neutron capture processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrebaev, V. I.; Karpov, A. V.; Mishustin, I. N.; Greiner, Walter

    2011-10-01

    The neutron capture process is considered as an alternative method for production of superheavy (SH) nuclei. Strong neutron fluxes might be provided by nuclear reactors and nuclear explosions in the laboratory frame and by supernova explosions in nature. All these cases are discussed in the paper. There are two gaps of short-lived nuclei (one is the well-known fermium gap and the other one is located in the region of Z=106-108 and N˜170) which impede the formation of SH nuclei by rather weak neutron fluxes realized at available nuclear reactors. We find that in the course of multiple (rather “soft”) nuclear explosions these gaps may be easily bypassed, and thus, a measurable amount of the neutron-rich long-living SH nuclei located at the island of stability may be synthesized. Existing pulsed reactors do not allow one to bypass these gaps. We formulate requirements for the pulsed reactors of the next generation that could be used for production of long-living SH nuclei. Natural formation of SH nuclei (in supernova explosions) is also discussed. The yield of SH nuclei relative to lead is estimated to be about 10-12, which is not beyond the experimental sensitivity for a search of SH elements in cosmic rays.

  6. Specific capture of the hydrolysate on magnetic beads for sensitive detecting plant vacuolar processing enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Cheng, Meng; Zeng, Lizhang; Liu, Weipeng; Zhang, Tao; Xing, Da

    2016-05-15

    Conventional plant protease detection always suffers from high background interference caused by the complex coloring metabolites in plant cells. In this study, a bio-modified magnetic beads-based strategy was developed for sensitive and quantitative detection of plant vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE) activity. Cleavage of the peptide substrate (ESENCRK-FITC) after asparagine residue by VPE resulted in the 2-cyano-6-amino-benzothiazole (CABT)-functionalized magnetic beads capture of the severed substrate CRK-FITC via a condensation reaction between CABT and cysteine (Cys). The catalytic activity was subsequently obtained by the confocal microscopy imaging and flow cytometry quantitative analysis. The sensor system integrated advantages of (i) the high efficient enrichment and separation capabilities of magnetic beads and (ii) the catalyst-free properties of the CABT-Cys condensation reaction. It exhibited a linear relationship between the fluorescence signal and the concentration of severed substrate in the range of 10-600 pM. The practical results showed that, compared with normal growth conditions, VPE activity was increased by 2.7-fold (307.2 ± 25.3 μM min(-1)g(-1)) upon cadmium toxicity stress. This platform effectively overcame the coloring metabolites-caused background interference, showing fine applicability for the detection of VPE activity in real samples. The strategy offers great sensitivity and may be further extended to other protease activity detection.

  7. On the use of molecular-based thermodynamic models to assess the performance of solvents for CO2 capture processes: monoethanolamine solutions.

    PubMed

    Brand, Charles V; Graham, Edward; Rodríguez, Javier; Galindo, Amparo; Jackson, George; Adjiman, Claire S

    2016-10-20

    Predictive models play an important role in the design of post-combustion processes for the capture of carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted from power plants. A rate-based absorber model is presented to investigate the reactive capture of CO2 using aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA) as a solvent, integrating a predictive molecular-based equation of state: SAFT-VR SW (Statistical Associating Fluid Theory-Variable Range, Square Well). A distinctive physical approach is adopted to model the chemical equilibria inherent in the process. This eliminates the need to consider reaction products explicitly and greatly reduces the amount of experimental data required to model the absorber compared to the more commonly employed chemical approaches. The predictive capabilities of the absorber model are analyzed for profiles from 10 pilot plant runs by considering two scenarios: (i) no pilot-plant data are used in the model development; (ii) only a limited set of pilot-plant data are used. Within the first scenario, the mass fraction of CO2 in the clean gas is underestimated in all but one of the cases, indicating that a best-case performance of the solvent can be obtained with this predictive approach. Within the second scenario a single parameter is estimated based on data from a single pilot plant run to correct for the dramatic changes in the diffusivity of CO2 in the reactive solvent. This parameter is found to be transferable for a broad range of operating conditions. A sensitivity analysis is then conducted, and the liquid viscosity and diffusivity are found to be key properties for the prediction of the composition profiles. The temperature and composition profiles are sensitive to thermodynamic properties that correspond to major sources of heat generation or dissipation. The proposed modelling framework can be used as an early assessment of solvents to aid in narrowing the search space, and can help in determining target solvents for experiments and more detailed modelling.

  8. Impact of CO2 leakage from sub-seabed carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) reservoirs on benthic virus-prokaryote interactions and functions.

    PubMed

    Rastelli, Eugenio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Amaro, Teresa; Queirós, Ana M; Widdicombe, Stephen; Danovaro, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 emissions are a global concern due to their predicted impact on biodiversity, ecosystems functioning, and human life. Among the proposed mitigation strategies, CO2 capture and storage, primarily the injection of CO2 into marine deep geological formations has been suggested as a technically practical option for reducing emissions. However, concerns have been raised that possible leakage from such storage sites, and the associated elevated levels of pCO2 could locally impact the biodiversity and biogeochemical processes in the sediments above these reservoirs. Whilst a number of impact assessment studies have been conducted, no information is available on the specific responses of viruses and virus-host interactions. In the present study, we tested the impact of a simulated CO2 leakage on the benthic microbial assemblages, with specific focus on microbial activity and virus-induced prokaryotic mortality (VIPM). We found that exposure to levels of CO2 in the overlying seawater from 1,000 to 20,000 ppm for a period up to 140 days, resulted in a marked decrease in heterotrophic carbon production and organic matter degradation rates in the sediments, associated with lower rates of VIPM, and a progressive accumulation of sedimentary organic matter with increasing CO2 concentrations. These results suggest that the increase in seawater pCO2 levels that may result from CO2 leakage, can severely reduce the rates of microbial-mediated recycling of the sedimentary organic matter and viral infections, with major consequences on C cycling and nutrient regeneration, and hence on the functioning of benthic ecosystems.

  9. Impact of CO2 leakage from sub-seabed carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) reservoirs on benthic virus–prokaryote interactions and functions

    PubMed Central

    Rastelli, Eugenio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell’Anno, Antonio; Amaro, Teresa; Queirós, Ana M.; Widdicombe, Stephen; Danovaro, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 emissions are a global concern due to their predicted impact on biodiversity, ecosystems functioning, and human life. Among the proposed mitigation strategies, CO2 capture and storage, primarily the injection of CO2 into marine deep geological formations has been suggested as a technically practical option for reducing emissions. However, concerns have been raised that possible leakage from such storage sites, and the associated elevated levels of pCO2 could locally impact the biodiversity and biogeochemical processes in the sediments above these reservoirs. Whilst a number of impact assessment studies have been conducted, no information is available on the specific responses of viruses and virus–host interactions. In the present study, we tested the impact of a simulated CO2 leakage on the benthic microbial assemblages, with specific focus on microbial activity and virus-induced prokaryotic mortality (VIPM). We found that exposure to levels of CO2 in the overlying seawater from 1,000 to 20,000 ppm for a period up to 140 days, resulted in a marked decrease in heterotrophic carbon production and organic matter degradation rates in the sediments, associated with lower rates of VIPM, and a progressive accumulation of sedimentary organic matter with increasing CO2 concentrations. These results suggest that the increase in seawater pCO2 levels that may result from CO2 leakage, can severely reduce the rates of microbial-mediated recycling of the sedimentary organic matter and viral infections, with major consequences on C cycling and nutrient regeneration, and hence on the functioning of benthic ecosystems. PMID:26441872

  10. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Assisted Processing of Silica/PMMA Nanocomposite Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rende, Deniz; Schadler, Linda S.; Ozisik, Rahmi

    2012-02-01

    Polymer nanocomposite foams receive considerable attention in both scientific and industrial communities. These structures are defined as closed or open cells (pores) surrounded by bulk material and are widely observed in nature in the form of bone structure, sponge, corals and natural cork. Inspired by these materials, polymer nanocomposite foams are widely used in advanced applications, such as bone scaffolds, food packaging and transportation materials due to their lightweight and enhanced mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties compared to bulk polymer foams. The presence of the nanosized fillers facilitates heterogeneous bubble nucleation as a result, the number of bubbles increases while the average bubble size decreases. Therefore, the foam morphology can be controlled by the size, concentration, and surface chemistry of the nanofiller. In the current study, we used supercritical carbon dioxide as a foaming agent for silica/poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, foams. The silica nanoparticles were chemically modified by fluoroalkane chains to make them CO2-philic. The surface coverage was controlled via tethering density, and the effect of silica surface coverage and concentration on foam morphology was investigated through scanning electron microscopy and image processing. Results indicated that nanofiller concentration and filler surface chemistry (CO2-philicity) had tremendous effect on foam morphology but surface coverage did not have any effect.

  11. Low-loss titanium dioxide waveguides and resonators using a dielectric lift-off fabrication process.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher C; Liu, Chengyu; Suntivich, Jin

    2015-05-04

    We present a bi-layer lift-off fabrication approach to create low-loss amorphous titanium dioxide (TiO2) integrated optical waveguides and resonators for visible and near-infrared applications. This approach achieves single-mode waveguide losses as low as 7.5 dB/cm around 633 nm and 1.2 dB/cm around 1550 nm, a factor of 4 improvement over previous reports, without the need to optimize etching conditions. Depositing a secondary 260-nm TiO2 layer can reduce losses further, with the optimized process yielding micro-ring resonators with loaded quality factors as high as 1.5 × 10(5) around 1550 nm and 1.6×10(5) around 780 nm. These losses render our TiO2 devices suitable for visible and telecommunications applications; in addition, the simplicity of this lift-off approach is broadly applicable to other novel material platforms, particularly using near-visible wavelengths.

  12. Fabrication of micro-hollow fiber by electrospinning process in near-critical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Koichi; Wahyudiono,; Kanda, Hideki; Goto, Motonobu; Machmudah, Siti; Okubayashi, Satoko; Fukuzato, Ryuichi

    2014-02-24

    Electrospinning is a simple technique that has gained much attention because of its capability and feasibility in the fabrication of large quantities of fibers from polymer with diameters ranging in nano-microscale. These fibers provided high surface area to volume ratios, and it was of considerable interest for many applications, such as nanoparticle carriers in controlled release, scaffolds in tissue engineering, wound dressings, military wear with chemical and biological toxin-resistance, nanofibrous membranes or filters, and electronic sensors. Recently there has been a great deal of progress in the potential applications of hollow fibers in microfluids, photonics, and energy storage. In this work, electrospinning was conducted under high-pressure carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to reduce the viscosity of polymer solution. The experiments were conducted at 313 K and ∼8.0 MPa. Polymer solution containing 5 wt% polymers which prepared in dichloromethane (DCM) with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) to poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) ratio 80:20 was used as a feed solution. The applied voltage was 15 kV and the distance of nozzle and collector was 8 cm. The morphology and structure of the fibers produced were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Under pressurized CO{sub 2}, PVP electrospun was produced without bead formation with diameter ranges of 608.50 - 7943.19 nm. These behaviors hold the potential to considerably improve devolatilization electrospinning processes.

  13. Carbon Dioxide Convection in the Martian Polar Night and Its Implications for Polar Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colaprete, A.; Haberle, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    Each Martian year nearly 30% of the atmosphere is exchanged with the polar ice caps. This exchange occurs through a combination of direct surface condensation and atmospheric precipitation of carbon dioxide. It has long been thought the amount of condensation within the polar night is maintained by a balance between diabatic processes such as radiative cooling and latent heating from condensing CO2. This assumption manifests itself in Mars General Circulation Models (GCM) in such a way as to never allow the atmospheric temperature to dip below the saturation temperature of CO2. However, observations from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Radio Science (RS) and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) have demonstrated this assumption to be, at best, approximate. Both RS and TES observations within the polar nights of both poles indicate substantial supersaturated regions with respect to CO2. The observed temperature profiles suggest conditionally unstable regions containing planetary significant amounts of potential convective energy. Presented here are estimates of the total planetary inventory of convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the potential convective energy flux (PCEF). The values for CAPE and PCEF are derived from RS temperature profiles and compared to Mars GCM results using a new convective CO2 cloud model that allows for the formation of CAPE.

  14. Pilot-Scale Evaluation of an Advanced Carbon Sorbent-Based Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Hornbostel, Marc

    2016-09-01

    The overall objective of this project is to achieve the DOE’s goal to develop advanced CO2 capture and separation technologies that can realize at least 90% CO2 removal from flue gas steams produced at a pulverized coal (PC) power plant at a cost of less than $40/tonne of CO2 captured. The principal objective is to test a CO2 capture process that will reduce the parasitic plant load by using a CO2 capture sorbent that will require a reduced amount of steam. The process is based on advanced carbon sorbents having a low heat of adsorption, high CO2 adsorption capacity, and excellent selectivity. While the intent of this project was to produce design and performance data by testing the sorbent using a slipstream of coal-derived flue gas at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) under realistic conditions and continuous long-term operation, the project was terminated following completion of the detailing pilot plant design/engineering work on June 30, 2016.

  15. Nitrogen dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrogen dioxide ; CASRN 10102 - 44 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  16. Carbon dioxide absorbent and method of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert James; Lewis, Larry Neil; O'Brien, Michael Joseph; Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev; Kniajanski, Sergei; Lam, Tunchiao Hubert; Lee, Julia Lam; Rubinsztajn, Malgorzata Iwona

    2011-10-04

    In accordance with one aspect, the present invention provides an amino-siloxane composition comprising at least one of structures I, II, III, IV or V said compositions being useful for the capture of carbon dioxide from gas streams such as power plant flue gases. In addition, the present invention provides methods of preparing the amino-siloxane compositions are provided. Also provided are methods for reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in a process stream employing the amino-siloxane compositions of the invention as species which react with carbon dioxide to form an adduct with carbon dioxide. The reaction of the amino-siloxane compositions provided by the present invention with carbon dioxide is reversible and thus, the method provides for multicycle use of said compositions.

  17. Sea surface carbon dioxide at the Georgia time series site (2006-2007): Air-sea flux and controlling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Cai, Wei-Jun; Hu, Xinping; Sabine, Christopher; Jones, Stacy; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Jiang, Li-Qing; Reimer, Janet J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) in surface seawater was continuously recorded every three hours from 18 July 2006 through 31 October 2007 using a moored autonomous pCO2 (MAPCO2) system deployed on the Gray's Reef buoy off the coast of Georgia, USA. Surface water pCO2 (average 373 ± 52 μatm) showed a clear seasonal pattern, undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere in cold months and generally oversaturated in warm months. High temporal resolution observations revealed important events not captured in previous ship-based observations, such as sporadically occurring biological CO2 uptake during April-June 2007. In addition to a qualitative analysis of the primary drivers of pCO2 variability based on property regressions, we quantified contributions of temperature, air-sea exchange, mixing, and biological processes to monthly pCO2 variations using a 1-D mass budget model. Although temperature played a dominant role in the annual cycle of pCO2, river inputs especially in the wet season, biological respiration in peak summer, and biological production during April-June 2007 also substantially influenced seawater pCO2. Furthermore, sea surface pCO2 was higher in September-October 2007 than in September-October 2006, associated with increased river inputs in fall 2007. On an annual basis this site was a moderate atmospheric CO2 sink, and was autotrophic as revealed by monthly mean net community production (NCP) in the mixed layer. If the sporadic short productive events during April-May 2007 were missed by the sampling schedule, one would conclude erroneously that the site is heterotrophic. While previous ship-based pCO2 data collected around this buoy site agreed with the buoy CO2 data on seasonal scales, high resolution buoy observations revealed that the cruise-based surveys undersampled temporal variability in coastal waters, which could greatly bias the estimates of air-sea CO2 fluxes or annual NCP, and even produce contradictory results.

  18. A survey on sensor coverage and visual data capturing/processing/transmission in wireless visual sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Yap, Florence G H; Yen, Hong-Hsu

    2014-02-20

    Wireless Visual Sensor Networks (WVSNs) where camera-equipped sensor nodes can capture, process and transmit image/video information have become an important new research area. As compared to the traditional wireless sensor networks (WSNs) that can only transmit scalar information (e.g., temperature), the visual data in WVSNs enable much wider applications, such as visual security surveillance and visual wildlife monitoring. However, as compared to the scalar data in WSNs, visual data is much bigger and more complicated so intelligent schemes are required to capture/process/ transmit visual data in limited resources (hardware capability and bandwidth) WVSNs. WVSNs introduce new multi-disciplinary research opportunities of topics that include visual sensor hardware, image and multimedia capture and processing, wireless communication and networking. In this paper, we survey existing research efforts on the visual sensor hardware, visual sensor coverage/deployment, and visual data capture/ processing/transmission issues in WVSNs. We conclude that WVSN research is still in an early age and there are still many open issues that have not been fully addressed. More new novel multi-disciplinary, cross-layered, distributed and collaborative solutions should be devised to tackle these challenging issues in WVSNs.

  19. A Survey on Sensor Coverage and Visual Data Capturing/Processing/Transmission in Wireless Visual Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Florence G. H.; Yen, Hong-Hsu

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Visual Sensor Networks (WVSNs) where camera-equipped sensor nodes can capture, process and transmit image/video information have become an important new research area. As compared to the traditional wireless sensor networks (WSNs) that can only transmit scalar information (e.g., temperature), the visual data in WVSNs enable much wider applications, such as visual security surveillance and visual wildlife monitoring. However, as compared to the scalar data in WSNs, visual data is much bigger and more complicated so intelligent schemes are required to capture/process/transmit visual data in limited resources (hardware capability and bandwidth) WVSNs. WVSNs introduce new multi-disciplinary research opportunities of topics that include visual sensor hardware, image and multimedia capture and processing, wireless communication and networking. In this paper, we survey existing research efforts on the visual sensor hardware, visual sensor coverage/deployment, and visual data capture/processing/transmission issues in WVSNs. We conclude that WVSN research is still in an early age and there are still many open issues that have not been fully addressed. More new novel multi-disciplinary, cross-layered, distributed and collaborative solutions should be devised to tackle these challenging issues in WVSNs. PMID:24561401

  20. Effect of water on the physical properties and carbon dioxide capture capacities of liquid-like Nanoparticle Organic Hybrid Materials and their corresponding polymers.

    PubMed

    Petit, Camille; Bhatnagar, Sonali; Park, Ah-Hyung Alissa

    2013-10-01

    Binary systems composed of liquid-like Nanoparticle Organic Hybrid Materials (NOHMs) and the secondary fluid (i.e., water) were prepared, and their thermal stabilities, densities, viscosities, and CO2 absorption capacities were investigated. Recent work has suggested NOHMs as an alternative CO2 capture media with interesting chemical and physical tunability. Anhydrous CO2 capture solvents often degrade when they are exposed to water, while flue gas generally contains about 8-16% water. Thus, this study was conducted to investigate the effect of water on the NOHMs' properties relevant to CO2 capture as well as the chemical and thermal stabilities of H2O-loaded NOHMs. It was found that water acted as an antisolvent of NOHMs, and therefore, caused a decreased CO2 capture capacity. On the other hand, the results indicated that while water did not affect the NOHMs' thermal stability, it significantly helped lowering their density and viscosity. In order to investigate the effect of intermolecular interactions among two fluids on the density and viscosity, the excess volumes and viscosity deviations were calculated and correlated with Redlich-Kister equations. The trends revealed the existence of strong intermolecular interactions between water molecules and the poly(ethlyne glycol) component of NOHMs, which may have caused the drastic decrease in the NOHMs' viscosity with the addition of water.

  1. Catalytic dehydrogenation of propane by carbon dioxide: a medium-temperature thermochemical process for carbon dioxide utilisation.

    PubMed

    Du, X; Yao, B; Gonzalez-Cortes, S; Kuznetsov, V L; AlMegren, Hamid; Xiao, T; Edwards, P P

    2015-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of C3H8 in the presence of CO2 is an attractive catalytic route for C3H6 production. In studying the various possibilities to utilise CO2 to convert hydrocarbons using the sustainable energy source of solar thermal energy, thermodynamic calculations were carried out for the dehydrogenation of C3H8 using CO2for the process operating in the temperature range of 300-500 °C. Importantly, the results highlight the enhanced potential of C3H8 as compared to its lighter and heavier homologues (C2H6 and C4H10, respectively). To be utilised in this CO2 utilisation reaction the Gibbs free energy (ΔrGθm) of each reaction in the modelled, complete reacting system of the dehydrogenation of C3H8 in the presence of CO2 also indicate that further cracking of C3H6 will affect the ultimate yield and selectivity of the final products. In a parallel experimental study, catalytic tests of the dehydrogenation of C3H8 in the presence of CO2 over 5 wt%-Cr2O3/ZrO2 catalysts operating at 500 °C, atmospheric pressure, and for various C3H8 partial pressures and various overall GHSV (Gas Hourly Space Velocity) values. The results showed that an increase in the C3H8 partial pressure produced an inhibition of C3H8 conversion but, importantly, a promising enhancement of C3H6 selectivity. This phenomenon can be attributed to competitive adsorption on the catalyst between the generated C3H6 and inactivated C3H8, which inhibits any further cracking effect on C3H6 to produce by-products. As a comparison, the increase of the overall GHSV can also decrease the C3H8 conversion to a similar extent, but the further cracking of C3H6 cannot be limited.

  2. Determination of the neutron-capture rate of 17C for r -process nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, M.; Typel, S.; Wu, M.-R.; Adachi, T.; Aksyutina, Y.; Alcantara, J.; Altstadt, S.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ashwood, N.; Atar, L.; Aumann, T.; Avdeichikov, V.; Barr, M.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Bemmerer, D.; Benlliure, J.; Bertulani, C. A.; Boretzky, K.; Borge, M. J. G.; Burgunder, G.; Caamano, M.; Caesar, C.; Casarejos, E.; Catford, W.; Cederkäll, J.; Chakraborty, S.; Chartier, M.; Chulkov, L. V.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Crespo, R.; Datta Pramanik, U.; Diaz Fernandez, P.; Dillmann, I.; Elekes, Z.; Enders, J.; Ershova, O.; Estrade, A.; Farinon, F.; Fraile, L. M.; Freer, M.; Freudenberger, M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Galaviz, D.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Göbel, K.; Golubev, P.; Gonzalez Diaz, D.; Hagdahl, J.; Heftrich, T.; Heil, M.; Heinz, A.; Henriques, A.; Holl, M.; Ickert, G.; Ignatov, A.; Jakobsson, B.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kanungo, R.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Knöbel, R.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Kurz, N.; Labiche, M.; Langer, C.; Le Bleis, T.; Lemmon, R.; Lepyoshkina, O.; Lindberg, S.; Machado, J.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.; Maroussov, V.; Mostazo, M.; Movsesyan, A.; Najafi, A.; Neff, T.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Panin, V.; Paschalis, S.; Perea, A.; Petri, M.; Pietri, S.; Plag, R.; Prochazka, A.; Rahaman, A.; Rastrepina, G.; Reifarth, R.; Ribeiro, G.; Ricciardi, M. V.; Rigollet, C.; Riisager, K.; Röder, M.; Rossi, D.; Sanchez del Rio, J.; Savran, D.; Scheit, H.; Simon, H.; Sorlin, O.; Stoica, V.; Streicher, B.; Taylor, J. T.; Tengblad, O.; Terashima, S.; Thies, R.; Togano, Y.; Uberseder, E.; Van de Walle, J.; Velho, P.; Volkov, V.; Wagner, A.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.; Weigand, M.; Wheldon, C.; Wilson, G.; Wimmer, C.; Winfield, J. S.; Woods, P.; Yakorev, D.; Zhukov, M. V.; Zilges, A.; Zuber, K.; R3B Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    With the R 3B -LAND setup at GSI we have measured exclusive relative-energy spectra of the Coulomb dissociation of 18C at a projectile energy around 425 A MeV on a lead target, which are needed to determine the radiative neutron-capture cross sections of 17C into the ground state of 18C. Those data have been used to constrain theoretical calculations for transitions populating excited states in 18C. This allowed to derive the astrophysical cross section σnγ * accounting for the thermal population of 17C target states in astrophysical scenarios. The experimentally verified capture rate is significantly lower than those of previously obtained Hauser-Feshbach estimations at temperatures T9≤ 1 GK. Network simulations with updated neutron-capture rates and hydrodynamics according to the neutrino-driven wind model as well as the neutron-star merger scenario reveal no pronounced influence of neutron capture of 17C on the production of second- and third-peak elements in contrast to earlier sensitivity studies.

  3. Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Benjamin; Genovese, Sarah; Perry, Robert; Spiry, Irina; Farnum, Rachael; Sing, Surinder; Wilson, Paul; Buckley, Paul; Acharya, Harish; Chen, Wei; McDermott, John; Vipperia, Ravikumar; Yee, Michael; Steele, Ray; Fresia, Megan; Vogt, Kirk

    2013-12-31

    A bench-scale system was designed and built to test an aminosilicone-based solvent. A model was built of the bench-scale system and this model was scaled up to model the performance of a carbon capture unit, using aminosilicones, for CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) for a pulverized coal (PC) boiler at 550 MW. System and economic analysis for the carbon capture unit demonstrates that the aminosilicone solvent has significant advantages relative to a monoethanol amine (MEA)-based system. The CCS energy penalty for MEA is 35.9% and the energy penalty for aminosilicone solvent is 30.4% using a steam temperature of 395 °C (743 °F). If the steam temperature is lowered to 204 °C (400 °F), the energy penalty for the aminosilicone solvent is reduced to 29%. The increase in cost of electricity (COE) over the non-capture case for MEA is ~109% and increase in COE for aminosilicone solvent is ~98 to 103% depending on the solvent cost at a steam temperature of 395 °C (743 °F). If the steam temperature is lowered to 204 °C (400 °F), the increase in COE for the aminosilicone solvent is reduced to ~95-100%.

  4. Particle capture processes and evaporation on a microscopic scale in wet filters.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Benjamin J; Braddock, Roger D; Agranovski, Igor E

    2004-11-01

    This paper details results of an experimental study of the capture of solid and liquid aerosols on fibrous filters wetted with water. A microscopic cell containing a single fibre (made from a variety of materials) was observed via a microscope, with a high speed CCD camera used to dynamically image the interactions between liquid droplets, zeolite and PSL particles and fibres. Variable quantities of liquid irrigation were used, and the possibility for subsequent fibre regeneration after clogging or drying was also studied. It was found that drainage of the wetting liquid (water) from the fibres occurred, even at very low irrigation rates when the droplet consisted almost completely of captured particles. It was also found that the fibre was rapidly loaded with captured particles when the irrigation was not supplied. However, almost complete regeneration (removal of the collected cake) by the liquid droplets occurred shortly after recommencement of the water supply. The study also examined the capture of oily liquid aerosols on fibres wetted with water. A predominance of the barrel shaped droplet on the fibre was observed, with oil droplets displacing water droplets (if the oil and fibre combination created a barrel shaped droplet), creating various compound droplets of oil and water not previously reported in literature. This preferential droplet shape implies that whatever the initial substance wetting a filter, a substance with a greater preferential adherence to the fibre will displace the former one.

  5. New insights on Ba overabundance in open clusters. Evidence for the intermediate neutron-capture process at play?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishenina, T.; Pignatari, M.; Carraro, G.; Kovtyukh, V.; Monaco, L.; Korotin, S.; Shereta, E.; Yegorova, I.; Herwig, F.

    2015-02-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies were devoted to measure the abundances of neutron-capture elements heavier than iron in stars belonging to Galactic Open Clusters (OCs). OCs span a sizeable range in metallicity (-0.6 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ +0.4), and they show abundances of light elements similar to disc stars of the same age. A different pattern is observed for heavy elements. A large scatter is observed for Ba, with most OCs showing [Ba/Fe] and [Ba/La] overabundant with respect to the Sun. The origin of this overabundance is not clearly understood. With the goal of providing new observational insights, we determined radial velocities, atmospheric parameters and chemical composition of 27 giant stars members of five OCs: Cr 110, Cr 261, NGC 2477, NGC 2506 and NGC 5822. We used high-resolution spectra obtained with the UVES spectrograph at European Southern Observatory Paranal. We perform a detailed spectroscopic analysis of these stars to measure the abundance of up to 22 elements per star. We study the dependence of element abundance on metallicity and age with unprecedented detail, complementing our analysis with data culled from the literature. We confirm the trend of Ba overabundance in OCs, and show its large dispersion for clusters younger than ˜4 Gyr. Finally, the implications of our results for stellar nucleosynthesis are discussed. We show in this work that the Ba enrichment compared to other neutron-capture elements in OCs cannot be explained by the contributions from the slow neutron-capture process and the rapid neutron-capture process. Instead, we argue that this anomalous signature can be explained by assuming an additional contribution by the intermediate neutron-capture process.

  6. Synthesis of a novel β-ketoenamine-linked conjugated microporous polymer with Nsbnd H functionalized pore surface for carbon dioxide capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuangzhi, Chai; Liu, Haohan; Zhang, Xue; Han, Yang; Hu, Nantao; Wei, Liangming; Cong, Fengsong; Wei, Hao; Wang, Lin

    2016-10-01

    A novel β-ketoenamine-linked conjugated microporous polymer (KECMP-1) was synthesized via Schiff base condensation between 1,3,5-triformylphloroglucinol and m-phenylenediamine by conventional solvothermal synthesis without a template or a metal catalyst. KECMP-1 exhibits a considerable Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area (691 m2 g-1) and high physicochemical stability. By utilizing the bottom-up strategy, the surfaces of the pore walls were covered with the Nsbnd H sites, together with their microporous structures, lead to the high carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption capability (10.5 wt% at 273 K and 1.0 bar) and heat of adsorption (34.6 kJ mol-1).

  7. Recharge processes of paramagnetic centers during illumination in nitrogen-doped nanocrystalline titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, N. T.; Konstantinova, E. A.; Kokorin, A. I.; Kodom, T.; Alonso-Vante, N.

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide (N-TiO2) has been investigated by the EPR-technique. Two types of paramagnetic centers - N• and NO•-radicals - were detected in the samples. Both N• and NO•-related centers are recharged during illumination. Band diagrams of TiO2 with N• and NO• radicals energy level position are proposed.

  8. Mixed uranium dicarbide and uranium dioxide microspheres and process of making same

    DOEpatents

    Stinton, David P.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear fuel microspheres are made by sintering microspheres containing uranium dioxide and uncombined carbon in a 1 mole percent carbon monoxide/99 mole percent argon atmosphere at 1550.degree. C. and then sintering the microspheres in a 3 mole percent carbon monoxide/97 mole percent argon atmosphere at the same temperature.

  9. A low-energy chilled ammonia process exploiting controlled solid formation for post-combustion CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Daniel; Gazzani, Matteo; Mazzotti, Marco

    2016-10-20

    A new ammonia-based process for CO2 capture from flue gas has been developed, which utilizes the formation of solid ammonium bicarbonate to increase the CO2 concentration in the regeneration section of the process. Precipitation, separation, and dissolution of the solid phase are realized in a dedicated process section, while the packed absorption and desorption columns remain free of solids. Additionally, the CO2 wash section applies solid formation to enable a reduction of the wash water consumption. A rigorous performance assessment employing the SPECCA index (Specific Primary Energy Consumption for CO2 Avoided) has been implemented to allow for a comparison of the overall energy penalty between the new process and a standard ammonia-based capture process without solid formation. A thorough understanding of the relevant solid-solid-liquid-vapor phase equilibria and an accurate modeling of them have enabled the synthesis of the process, and have inspired the development of the optimization algorithm used to screen a wide range of operating conditions in equilibrium-based process simulations. Under the assumptions on which the analysis is based, the new process with controlled solid formation achieved a SPECCA of 2.43 MJ kgCO2(-1), corresponding to a reduction of 17% compared to the process without solid formation (with a SPECCA of 2.93 MJ kgCO2(-1)). Ways forward to confirm this significant improvement, and to increase the accuracy of the optimization are also discussed.

  10. A Transducer/Equipment System for Capturing Speech Information for Subsequent Processing by Computer Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-07

    have shown interest in a speech capture system that would operate in a noisy lobby, casino, airport and shopping mall floor for access to the Automated...control or selection. Vending machines, shopping dispenser kiosks , and entertainment virtual reality games of the future will all be voice activated...EVALUATION RESEARCH INC PAGE 1 TR-3150- 178 - High speech recognition accuracy for commercial applications; automated drive thru fast food ordering

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF VIBRISSAL SOMATOSENSORY PROCESSING IN RAT SUPERIOR COLLICULUS ON PREY CAPTURE

    PubMed Central

    FAVARO, P. D. N.; GOUVÊA, T. S.; DE OLIVEIRA, S. R.; VAUTRELLE, N.; REDGRAVE, P.; COMOLI, E.

    2011-01-01

    The lateral part of intermediate layer of superior colliculus (SCl) is a critical substrate for successful predation by rats. Hunting-evoked expression of the activity marker Fos is concentrated in SCl while prey capture in rats with NMDA lesions in SCl is impaired. Particularly affected are rapid orienting and stereotyped sequences of actions associated with predation of fast moving prey. Such deficits are consistent with the view that the deep layers of SC are important for sensory guidance of movement. Although much of the relevant evidence involves visual control of movement, less is known about movement guidance by somatosensory input from vibrissae. Indeed, our impression is that prey contact with whiskers is a likely stimulus to trigger predation. Moreover, SCl receives whisker and orofacial somatosensory information directly from trigeminal complex, and indirectly from zona incerta, parvicelular reticular formation and somatosensory barrel cortex. To better understand sensory guidance of predation by vibrissal information we investigated prey capture by rats after whisker removal and the role of superior colliculus (SC) by comparing Fos expression after hunting with and without whiskers. Rats were allowed to hunt cockroaches, after which their whiskers were removed. Two days later they were allowed to hunt cockroaches again. Without whiskers the rats were less able to retain the cockroaches after capture and less able to pursue them in the event of the cockroach escaping. The predatory behaviour of rats with re-grown whiskers returned to normal. In parallel, Fos expression in SCl induced by predation was significantly reduced in whiskerless animals. We conclude that whiskers contribute to the efficiency of rat prey capture and that the loss of vibrissal input to SCl, as reflected by reduced Fos expression, could play a critical role in predatory deficits of whiskerless rats. PMID:21163336

  12. Measurement of nitrosamine and nitramine formation from NOx reactions with amines during amine-based carbon dioxide capture for postcombustion carbon sequestration.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ning; Shah, Amisha D; Hu, Lanhua; Plewa, Michael J; McKague, Bruce; Mitch, William A

    2012-09-04

    With years of full-scale experience for precombustion CO(2) capture, amine-based technologies are emerging as the prime contender for postcombustion CO(2) capture. However, concerns for postcombustion applications have focused on the possible contamination of air or drinking water supplies downwind by potentially carcinogenic N-nitrosamines and N-nitramines released following their formation by NO(x) reactions with amines within the capture unit. Analytical methods for N-nitrosamines in drinking waters were adapted to measure specific N-nitrosamines and N-nitramines and total N-nitrosamines in solvent and washwater samples. The high levels of amines, aldehydes, and nitrite in these samples presented a risk for the artifactual formation of N-nitrosamines during sample storage or analysis. Application of a 30-fold molar excess of sulfamic acid to nitrite at pH 2 destroyed nitrite with no significant risk of artifactual nitrosation of amines. Analysis of aqueous morpholine solutions purged with different gas-phase NO and NO(2) concentrations indicated that N-nitrosamine formation generally exceeds N-nitramine formation. The total N-nitrosamine formation rate was at least an order of magnitude higher for the secondary amine piperazine (PZ) than for the primary amines 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) and monoethanolamine (MEA) and the tertiary amine methyldiethanolamine (MDEA). Analysis of pilot washwater samples indicated a 59 μM total N-nitrosamine concentration for a system operated with a 25% AMP/15% PZ solvent, but only 0.73 μM for a 35% MEA solvent. Unfortunately, a greater fraction of the total N-nitrosamine signal was uncharacterized for the MEA-associated washwater. At a 0.73 μM total N-nitrosamine concentration, a ~25000-fold reduction in concentration is needed between washwater units and downwind drinking water supplies to meet proposed permit limits.

  13. Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Vipperla, Ravikumar; Yee, Michael; Steele, Ray; Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin

    2013-12-30

    This report presents system and economic analysis for a carbon capture unit which uses an amino-silicone solvent for CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The amino-silicone solvent is based on GAP-1 with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. For comparison purposes, the report also shows results for a CCS unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). At a steam temperature of 395 °C (743 °F), the CCS energy penalty for amino-silicone solvent is only 30.4% which compares to a 35.9% energy penalty for MEA. The increase in COE for the amino-silicone solvent relative to the non-capture case is between 98% and 103% (depending on the solvent cost) which compares to an ~109% COE cost increase for MEA. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages over conventional systems using MEA.

  14. Image Processing Method of the Motion-Capturing PSP/TSP for the Measurement of a Free-Flight Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Masato; Goya, Hideki; Miyazaki, Takeshi; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2015-11-01

    The motion-capturing PSP/TSP system consists of a two-color PSP/TSP and a high-speed color camera. Red and green luminescent images are acquired simultaneously as signal and reference outputs by this system. Simply by rationing the red and the green images, we can obtain a pressure/temperature distribution on the surface of a target object. This system is applied to measure the surface pressure/temperature of a free-flight object. However, an acquired image includes motion blur, focus blur and random noise around the object. We discuss image processing methods and evaluations to optimize those uncertainties. Three types of the edge detect methods are used, which are the sobel, the laplassian and the canny. We will also show the evaluation results to discuss an optimized image processing for the motion-capturing PSP/TSP system.

  15. A hybrid absorption–adsorption method to efficiently capture carbon

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huang; Liu, Bei; Lin, Li-Chiang; Chen, Guangjin; Wu, Yuqing; Wang, Jin; Gao, Xueteng; Lv, Yining; Pan, Yong; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Xianren; Yang, Lanying; Sun, Changyu; Smit, Berend; Wang, Wenchuan

    2014-01-01

    Removal of carbon dioxide is an essential step in many energy-related processes. Here we report a novel slurry concept that combines specific advantages of metal-organic frameworks, ion liquids, amines and membranes by suspending zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 in glycol-2-methylimidazole solution. We show that this approach may give a more efficient technology to capture carbon dioxide compared to conventional technologies. The carbon dioxide sorption capacity of our slurry reaches 1.25 mol l−1 at 1 bar and the selectivity of carbon dioxide/hydrogen, carbon dioxide/nitrogen and carbon dioxide/methane achieves 951, 394 and 144, respectively. We demonstrate that the slurry can efficiently remove carbon dioxide from gas mixtures at normal pressure/temperature through breakthrough experiments. Most importantly, the sorption enthalpy is only −29 kJ mol−1, indicating that significantly less energy is required for sorbent regeneration. In addition, from a technological point of view, unlike solid adsorbents slurries can flow and be pumped. This allows us to use a continuous separation process with heat integration. PMID:25296559

  16. Shelf-life extension of minimally processed carrots by gaseous chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Gómez-López, V M; Devlieghere, F; Ragaert, P; Debevere, J

    2007-05-10

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) gas is a strong oxidizing and sanitizing agent that has a broad and high biocidal effectiveness and big penetration ability; its efficacy to prolong the shelf-life of a minimally processed (MP) vegetable, grated carrots (Daucus carota L.), was tested in this study. Carrots were sorted, their ends removed, hand peeled, cut, washed, spin dried and separated in 2 portions, one to be treated with ClO(2) gas and the other to remain untreated for comparisons. MP carrots were decontaminated in a cabinet at 91% relative humidity and 28 degrees C for up to 6 min, including 30 s of ClO(2) injection to the cabinet, then stored under equilibrium modified atmosphere (4.5% O(2), 8.9% CO(2), 86.6% N(2)) at 7 degrees C for shelf-life studies. ClO(2) concentration in the cabinet rose to 1.33 mg/l after 30 s of treatment, and then fell to nil before 6 min. The shelf-life study included: O(2) and CO(2) headspace concentrations, microbiological quality (mesophilic aerobic bacteria, psychrotrophs, lactic acid bacteria, and yeasts), sensory quality (odour, flavour, texture, overall visual quality, and white blushing), and pH. ClO(2) did not affect respiration rate of MP carrots significantly (alpha< or =0.05), and lowered the pH significantly (alpha< or =0.05). The applied packaging configuration kept O(2) headspace concentrations in treated samples in equilibrium and prevented CO(2) accumulation. After ClO(2) treatment, the decontamination levels (log CFU/g) achieved were 1.88, 1.71, 2.60, and 0.66 for mesophilic aerobic bacteria, psychrotrophs, and yeasts respectively. The initial sensory quality of MP carrots was not impaired significantly (alpha< or =0.05). A lag phase of at least 2 days was observed for mesophilic aerobic bacteria, psychrotrophs, and lactic acid bacteria in treated samples, while mesophilic aerobic bacteria and psychrotrophs increased parallelly. Odour was the only important attribute in sensory deterioration, but it reached an

  17. On the origin of preferred bicarbonate production from carbon dioxide (CO₂) capture in aqueous 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP).

    PubMed

    Stowe, Haley M; Vilčiauskas, Linas; Paek, Eunsu; Hwang, Gyeong S

    2015-11-21

    AMP and its blends are an attractive solvent for CO2 capture, but the underlying reaction mechanisms still remain uncertain. We attempt to elucidate the factors enhancing bicarbonate production in aqueous AMP as compared to MEA which, like most other primary amines, preferentially forms carbamate. According to our predicted reaction energies, AMP and MEA exhibit similar thermodynamic favorability for bicarbonate versus carbamate formation; moreover, the conversion of carbamate to bicarbonate also does not appear more favorable kinetically in aqueous AMP compared to MEA. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, however, demonstrate that bicarbonate formation tends to be kinetically more probable in aqueous AMP while carbamate is more likely to form in aqueous MEA. Analysis of the solvation structure and dynamics shows that the enhanced interaction between N and H2O may hinder CO2 accessibility while facilitating the AMP + H2O → AMPH(+) + OH(-) reaction, relative to the MEA case. This study highlights the importance of not only thermodynamic but also kinetic factors in describing CO2 capture by aqueous amines.

  18. Crystal-Size Effects on Carbon Dioxide Capture of a Covalently Alkylamine-Tethered Metal-Organic Framework Constructed by a One-Step Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun Kyeong; Hyun, Sung-min; Lee, Jae Hwa; Kim, Tae Kyung; Moon, Dohyun; Moon, Hoi Ri

    2016-01-01

    To enhance the carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), amine functionalization of their pore surfaces has been studied extensively. In general, amine-functionalized MOFs have been synthesized via post-synthetic modifications. Herein, we introduce a one-step construction of a MOF ([(NiLethylamine)(BPDC)] = MOFNH2; [NiLethylamine]2+ = [Ni(C12H32N8)]2+; BPDC2− = 4,4‘-biphenyldicarboxylate) possessing covalently tethered alkylamine groups without post-synthetic modification. Two-amine groups per metal centre were introduced by this method. MOFNH2 showed enhanced CO2 uptake at elevated temperatures, attributed to active chemical interactions between the amine groups and the CO2 molecules. Due to the narrow channels of MOFNH2, the accessibility to the channel of CO2 is the limiting factor in its sorption behaviour. In this context, only crystal size reduction of MOFNH2 led to much faster and greater CO2 uptake at low pressures. PMID:26757890

  19. Crystal-Size Effects on Carbon Dioxide Capture of a Covalently Alkylamine-Tethered Metal-Organic Framework Constructed by a One-Step Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yun Kyeong; Hyun, Sung-Min; Lee, Jae Hwa; Kim, Tae Kyung; Moon, Dohyun; Moon, Hoi Ri

    2016-01-01

    To enhance the carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), amine functionalization of their pore surfaces has been studied extensively. In general, amine-functionalized MOFs have been synthesized via post-synthetic modifications. Herein, we introduce a one-step construction of a MOF ([(NiLethylamine)(BPDC)] = MOFNH2 [NiLethylamine]2+ = [Ni(C12H32N8)]2+ BPDC2‑ = 4,4‘-biphenyldicarboxylate) possessing covalently tethered alkylamine groups without post-synthetic modification. Two-amine groups per metal centre were introduced by this method. MOFNH2 showed enhanced CO2 uptake at elevated temperatures, attributed to active chemical interactions between the amine groups and the CO2 molecules. Due to the narrow channels of MOFNH2, the accessibility to the channel of CO2 is the limiting factor in its sorption behaviour. In this context, only crystal size reduction of MOFNH2 led to much faster and greater CO2 uptake at low pressures.

  20. JPL Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer Data Processing Results for the 2010 Flight Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Joseph C.; Spiers, Gary D.; Menzie, Robert T.; Christensen, Lance E.

    2011-01-01

    As a precursor to and validation of the core technology necessary for NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days,and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission, we flew JPL's Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) in a campaign of five flights onboard NASA's DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in July 2010. This is the latest in a series of annual flight campaigns that began in 2006, and our first on the DC-8 aircraft.

  1. Processing-property relationships in epoxy resin/titanium dioxide nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Polyzos, Georgios; Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; More, Karren Leslie

    2010-01-01

    In situ precipitated titanium dioxide nanoparticles improve the physical properties of polymer composites. Since the pioneering work at Toyota Research Center on exfoliated montmorillonite nanoparticles in a nylon matrix, extensive studies have been performed on polymer nanocomposites in an effort to better integrate organic and inorganic phases. Inorganic fillers, such as silicon and titanium oxides, are widely used because of their remarkable enhancement of the mechanical, electrical, barrier, and flame-retardancy properties of organic polymers. The dispersion and size of the fillers determine the performance of nanocomposites and, despite numerous methods and processing conditions reported in the literature, a universally simple method to scale up the distribution of nanofillers remains a challenge. A significant part of our research involves formulation of novel nanodielectrics that can withstand high electric fields and exhibit superior mechanical performance. Focusing on nanocomposites operating at cryogenic temperatures, our group developed an in situ method for nucleating titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles in polyvinyl alcohol. We also applied this method to a variety of polymer matrices. Here, we present our recent work on a cryogenic resin filled with TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Using a particle-precursor solution from which TiO{sub 2} precipitates, we nucleated nanoparticles within the cryogenic epoxy resin Araldite 5808 (Huntsman Advanced Materials Inc., USA). We fabricated nanocomposite films at low weight percentages ({approx}2.5%) to avoid formation of large aggregates and interfaces. The morphology and dispersion of the in situ synthesized nanoparticles are shown by low- and high-magnification transmission-electron-microscopy (TEM) images. The TiO{sub 2} particles ({le}5nm in diameter) are uniformly nucleated and form evenly distributed nanometer-sized clusters in the polymer matrix. This morphology differs significantly from nanocomposites

  2. Nonthermal processing of orange juice using a pilot-plant scale supercritical carbon dioxide system with a gas-liquid metal contactor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the effect of pilot-plant scale, non-thermal supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) processing on the safety and the quality of orange juice (OJ), SCCO2 processed juice was compared with untreated fresh juice and equivalently thermal processed juice in terms of lethality. SCCO2 processing ...

  3. Model-Based Systems Engineering for Capturing Mission Architecture System Processes with an Application Case Study - Orion Flight Test 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonanne, Kevin H.

    2011-01-01

    Model-based Systems Engineering (MBSE) is an emerging methodology that can be leveraged to enhance many system development processes. MBSE allows for the centralization of an architecture description that would otherwise be stored in various locations and formats, thus simplifying communication among the project stakeholders, inducing commonality in representation, and expediting report generation. This paper outlines the MBSE approach taken to capture the processes of two different, but related, architectures by employing the Systems Modeling Language (SysML) as a standard for architecture description and the modeling tool MagicDraw. The overarching goal of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of MBSE as a means of capturing and designing a mission systems architecture. The first portion of the project focused on capturing the necessary system engineering activities that occur when designing, developing, and deploying a mission systems architecture for a space mission. The second part applies activities from the first to an application problem - the system engineering of the Orion Flight Test 1 (OFT-1) End-to-End Information System (EEIS). By modeling the activities required to create a space mission architecture and then implementing those activities in an application problem, the utility of MBSE as an approach to systems engineering can be demonstrated.

  4. Interstellar propagation and electron capture processes of galactic cosmic ray heavy ions in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miltra, B.; Biswas, S.; Goswami, J. N.

    1995-01-01

    The new information on galactic cosmic rays (GCR) derived from the Spacelab-3 cosmic ray experiment 'Anuradha' shows that at 25-125 MeV/N GCR sub-iron and iron (Z = 21-28) particles consists of a mixture of partially ionized and fully ionized ions. Computation of electron capture and loss cross sections in hydrogen in 1-50 MeV/N energy range are made for Fe, Cr, Ti and Ni. From these it is concluded that: (1) these GCR particles must have captured orbital electrons at energies of about 1-5 MeV/N and (2) these particles are then reaccelerated to 300-500 MeV/N most probably in interstellar medium by collision with SNR shock fronts. Some reacceleration may take place also in heliospheric boundary region. It is suggested that these observations of partially ionized GCR ions of about 100 MeV/N in Spacelab-3 provide a direct evidence of reacceleration of GCR.

  5. Beneficial Use of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yixin

    2014-06-26

    The feasibility of using carbon dioxide as feedstock in precast concrete production is studied. Carbon dioxide reacts with calcium compounds in concrete, producing solid calcium carbonates in binding matrix. Two typical precast products are examined for their capacity to store carbon dioxide during the production. They are concrete blocks and fiber-cement panels. The two products are currently mass produced and cured by steam. Carbon dioxide can be used to replace steam in curing process to accelerate early strength, improve the long-term durability and reduce energy and emission. For a reaction within a 24-hour process window, the theoretical maximum possible carbon uptake in concrete is found to be 29% based on cement mass in the product. To reach the maximum uptake, a special process is developed to promote the reaction efficiency to 60-80% in 4-hour carbon dioxide curing and improve the resistance to freeze-thaw cycling and sulfate ion attack. The process is also optimized to meet the project target of $10/tCO2 in carbon utilization. By the use of self-concentrating absorption technology, high purity CO2 can be produced at a price below $40/t. With low cost CO2 capture and utilization technologies, it is feasible to establish a network for carbon capture and utilization at the vicinity of carbon sources. If all block produces and panel producers in United States could adopt carbon dioxide process in their production in place of steam, carbon utilization in these two markets alone could consume more than 2 Mt CO2/year. This capture and utilization process can be extended to more precast products and will continue for years to come.

  6. TiO2 Processed by pressurized hot solvents as a novel photocatalyst for photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reli, Martin; Kobielusz, Marcin; Matějová, Lenka; Daniš, Stanislav; Macyk, Wojciech; Obalová, Lucie; Kuśtrowski, Piotr; Rokicińska, Anna; Kočí, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    Anatase-brookite TiO2 photocatalysts were prepared by the sol-gel process controlled within reverse micelles and processing by pressurized hot solvents-water/methanol/water (TiO2(M)) and water/ethanol/water (TiO2(E)), as an unconventional alternative to common calcination. The main goal of this work was to prepare anatase-brookite mixtures by processing by two different alcohols (methanol and ethanol) and evaluate the influence of the alcohol on the photocatalytic activity. Prepared photocatalysts were characterized by organic elemental analysis, nitrogen physisorption, XRD, UV-vis, photoelectrochemical and spectroelectrochemical measurements and XPS. The prepared photocatalysts efficiency was tested on the photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide and compared with commercial TiO2 Evonik P25. Both prepared nanocomposites were more efficient towards methane production but Evonik P25 was the most efficient towards hydrogen generated through water splitting. The higher performance of anatase-brookite mixture towards methane production can be explained by (i) a higher photocatalytic activity of brookite than rutile; (ii) a large surface area of anatase-brookite composites enabling better carbon dioxide adsorption; (iii) the photoinduced electron transfer from the brookite conduction band to the anatase conduction band. On the other hand, a higher production of hydrogen in the presence of Evonik P25 is caused by a better charge separation in anatase-rutile than anatase-brookite phase compositions. TiO2(M) appeared more active than TiO2(E) in the photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide due to a lower density of defects created in the crystal lattice.

  7. Neutron Capture Reaction on 112Cd to Study of the s-process Origin of 115Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Takehito; Toh, Yosuke; Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Kimura, Atsushi; Nakamura, Shoji; Harada, Hideo; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Chiba, Satoshi

    The astrophysical origin of 115Sn has remained still an open question. An isomer with a half-life of 14.1 y in 113Cd is a branching point from which a nucleosynthesis flow reaches to a rare isotope 115Sn. The s-process abundance of 115Sn depends on the ratio of the 112Cd(n, γ)113Cdm reaction cross section to the 112Cd(n, γ)113Cdgs reaction cross section. However, the isomer production ratio following the neutron capture reaction has not been measured in an energy region higher than the thermal energy. We have measured γ-ray intensity ratios following neutron capture reactions on 112Cd using the HPGe detectors in conjunction with a time-of-flight method at ANNRI in J-PARC.

  8. Tuning Organic Carbon Dioxide Absorbents for Carbonation and Decarbonation

    PubMed Central

    Rajamanickam, Ramachandran; Kim, Hyungsoo; Park, Ji-Woong

    2015-01-01

    The reaction of carbon dioxide with a mixture of a superbase and alcohol affords a superbase alkylcarbonate salt via a process that can be reversed at elevated temperatures. To utilize the unique chemistry of superbases for carbon capture technology, it is essential to facilitate carbonation and decarbonation at desired temperatures in an easily controllable manner. Here, we demonstrate that the thermal stabilities of the alkylcarbonate salts of superbases in organic solutions can be tuned by adjusting the compositions of hydroxylic solvent and polar aprotic solvent mixtures, thereby enabling the best possible performances to be obtained from the various carbon dioxide capture agents based on these materials. The findings provides valuable insights into the design and optimization of organic carbon dioxide absorbents. PMID:26033537

  9. A Comparison of Carbon Dioxide Sources for Mosquito Capture in Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Light Traps on the Florida Gulf Coast (1).

    PubMed

    Hoel, David F; Dunford, James C; Kline, Daniel L; Irish, Seth R; Weber, Michael; Richardson, Alec G; Doud, Carl W; Wirtz, Robert A

    2015-09-01

    Traditional sources of carbon dioxide (CO₂), dry ice, and compressed gas, were tested against 3 combinations of food-grade reagents known to generate CO₂using a compact, lightweight generator delivery system with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light traps. Three 6 × 6 Latin square trials were completed near the Florida Gulf Coast in the Lower Suwannee Wildlife Refuge during the summer of 2013, collecting a total of 31,632 female mosquitoes. Treatments included dry ice, compressed CO₂gas, a control trap (no CO₂), citric acid + sodium bicarbonate, vinegar + sodium bicarbonate, and yeast + sugar. Decreasing order of trap collections (treatment mean number of mosquitoes per trap night ± standard error) were dry ice 773.5 (± 110.1) > compressed gas 440.7 (± 42.3) > citric acid + sodium bicarbonate 197.6 (± 30.4), yeast + sugar 153.6 (± 27.4) > vinegar + sodium bicarbonate 109.6 (± 16.2) > control 82.4 (± 14.0). A 2-way Kruskal-Wallis analysis by treatment, site, and treatment × site interaction identified significant differences between all treatments. Although dry ice and compressed CO₂gas collected significantly more mosquitoes than other combinations (P < 0.05), use of citric acid and sodium bicarbonate or yeast and sugar greatly outperformed unbaited traps and offer a good alternative to dry ice and compressed gas in areas where these agents are not readily available or are difficult to obtain due to logistical constraints. An inexpensive, portable CO₂generator for use with food-grade reagents is described.

  10. Simulating carbon capture by enhanced weathering with croplands: an overview of key processes highlighting areas of future model development.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Lyla L; Beerling, David J; Quegan, Shaun; Banwart, Steven A

    2017-04-01

    Enhanced weathering (EW) aims to amplify a natural sink for CO2 by incorporating powdered silicate rock with high reactive surface area into agricultural soils. The goal is to achieve rapid dissolution of minerals and release of alkalinity with accompanying dissolution of CO2 into soils and drainage waters. EW could counteract phosphorus limitation and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in tropical soils, and soil acidification, a common agricultural problem studied with numerical process models over several decades. Here, we review the processes leading to soil acidification in croplands and how the soil weathering CO2 sink is represented in models. Mathematical models capturing the dominant processes and human interventions governing cropland soil chemistry and GHG emissions neglect weathering, while most weathering models neglect agricultural processes. We discuss current approaches to modelling EW and highlight several classes of model having the potential to simulate EW in croplands. Finally, we argue for further integration of process knowledge in mathematical models to capture feedbacks affecting both longer-term CO2 consumption and crop growth and yields.

  11. Outstanding field emission properties of wet-processed titanium dioxide coated carbon nanotube based field emission devices

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinzhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei Chen, Xiaohong; Guo, Pingsheng; Piao, Xianqing; Sun, Zhuo; Xu, Peng; Wang, Miao; Li, Jun

    2015-02-16

    Field emission devices using a wet-processed composite cathode of carbon nanotube films coated with titanium dioxide exhibit outstanding field emission characteristics, including ultralow turn on field of 0.383 V μm{sup −1} and threshold field of 0.657 V μm{sup −1} corresponding with a very high field enhancement factor of 20 000, exceptional current stability, and excellent emission uniformity. The improved field emission properties are attributed to the enhanced edge effect simultaneously with the reduced screening effect, and the lowered work function of the composite cathode. In addition, the highly stable electron emission is found due to the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the carbon nanotubes, which prohibits the cathode from the influence of ions and free radical created in the emission process as well as residual oxygen gas in the device. The high-performance solution-processed composite cathode demonstrates great potential application in vacuum electronic devices.

  12. The capture and destruction of chlorinated solvents via electrokinetic pumping: The LASAGNA{trademark} process

    SciTech Connect

    Salvo, J.J.; Ho, S.V.; Shoemaker, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    Remediating soils and groundwater that have been contaminated with chlorinated solvents is a significant challenge for current environmental technology. Soils with a high proportion of fine silts and clays have been especially recalcitrant due to their low permeability. Recently, electrokinetics has shown great promise in gaining access to these contaminated zones that fail to yield with traditional pumping methods. An integrated approach using electrokinetics combined with in situ capture and destruction zones (LASAGNA{sup trademark}) is being developed and field tested by Monsanto, DuPont and GE under the auspices of the EPA`s Remediation Technology Development Forum and with financial support from the Department of Energy. To speed implementation and encourage partnering, royalty-free cross-licensing of the developed technology is available to consortium members for use on their sites.

  13. Groundwater capture processes under a seasonal variation in natural recharge and discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddock, Thomas, III.; Vionnet, Leticia Beatriz

    "Capture" is the increase in recharge and the decrease in discharge that occurs when pumping is imposed on an aquifer system that was in a previous state of approximate dynamic equilibrium. Regional groundwater models are usually used to calculate capture in a two-step procedure. A steady-state solution provides an initial-head configuration, a set of flows through the boundaries for the modeled region, and the initial basis for the capture calculation. The transient solutions provide the total change in flows through the boundaries. A difference between the transient and steady-state solutions renders the capture calculation. When seasonality is a modeling issue, the use of a single initial hydraulic head and a single set of boundary flows leads to miscalculations of capture. Instead, an initial condition for each season should be used. This approach may be accomplished by determining steady oscillatory solutions, which vary through the seasons but repeat from year to year. A regional groundwater model previously developed for a portion of the San Pedro River basin, Arizona, USA, is modified to illustrate the effect that different initial conditions have on transient solutions and on capture calculations. Résumé Les "prélèvements" sont constitués par l'augmentation de la recharge et par la diminution de l'écoulement qui se produit lorsqu'un pompage est imposéà un système aquifère qui était auparavant dans un état proche de l'équilibre dynamique. Les modèles régionaux de nappe sont en général utilisés pour calculer les prélèvements dans une procédure à deux étapes. Une solution en régime permanent donne la configuration piézométrique initiale, un jeu de conditions aux limites pour la région modélisée et les données de base pour le calcul des prélèvements. Les solutions transitoires donnent les modifications globales des conditions aux limites. Lorsque des variations saisonnières sont produites en sortie du modèle, le recours à une

  14. The theory and methodology of capturing and representing the design process and its application to the task of rapid redesign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nii, Kendall M.

    The paradigm under which engineering design is being performed in the Aerospace industry is changing. There is an increased emphasis on a "faster, better, and cheaper" way of doing business. Designers are tasked with developing a better product, in a shorter time, with less money. Engineers are continually trying to improve their products, lower their costs, and reduce their schedules. So at first glance, it might seem difficult if not impossible to perform these three tasks simultaneously and attempt to achieve order of magnitude improvements in each area. Indeed it might well be impossible for an engineer using only traditional tools and techniques. However, there is a new tool, known as design capture, available to the designer. A design capture system, can aid the designer in a variety of ways. One specific use for a design capture system is to aid the designer in performing rapid redesign. This thesis presents a new methodology for a Design Capture System (DCS) which can aid the designer with performing rapid redesign. The Design Capture for Rapid Redesign (DCARRD) method facilitates rapid redesign in three ways: it allows the designer to assess the impact of changing an initial requirement, it allows the designer to assess the impact of changing a decision, and it enhances the ability of the designer to assess the impact of a completely new requirement. The DCARRD method was implemented into an html-based design capture system accessible through a Web browser. This implementation demonstrates the feasibility of the DCARRD method. The most important features of DCARRD are that it is focused an performing rapid redesign, it places the design decisions within the framework of the design process, it is simple to use and implement, and it has the ability to track subsystem baselines. The many complex issues surrounding testing of design tools in general, and DCARRD in particular, are discussed at length. There are a number of complex issues which must be addressed

  15. The carbon dioxide cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, P.B.; Hansen, G.B.; Titus, T.N.

    2005-01-01

    The seasonal CO2 cycle on Mars refers to the exchange of carbon dioxide between dry ice in the seasonal polar caps and gaseous carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This review focuses on breakthroughs in understanding the process involving seasonal carbon dioxide phase changes that have occurred as a result of observations by Mars Global Surveyor. ?? 2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping Process-Based Technology for CO₂ Capture from Post-Combustion Flue Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shiaoguo

    2015-09-30

    A novel Gas Pressurized Stripping (GPS) post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) process has been developed by Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC, CONSOL Energy Inc., Nexant Inc., and Western Kentucky University in this bench-scale project. The GPS-based process presents a unique approach that uses a gas pressurized technology for CO₂ stripping at an elevated pressure to overcome the energy use and other disadvantages associated with the benchmark monoethanolamine (MEA) process. The project was aimed at performing laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to prove its technical feasibility and generate process engineering and scale-up data, and conducting a techno-economic analysis (TEA) to demonstrate its energy use and cost competitiveness over the MEA process. To meet project goals and objectives, a combination of experimental work, process simulation, and technical and economic analysis studies were applied. The project conducted individual unit lab-scale tests for major process components, including a first absorption column, a GPS column, a second absorption column, and a flasher. Computer simulations were carried out to study the GPS column behavior under different operating conditions, to optimize the column design and operation, and to optimize the GPS process for an existing and a new power plant. The vapor-liquid equilibrium data under high loading and high temperature for the selected amines were also measured. The thermal and oxidative stability of the selected solvents were also tested experimentally and presented. A bench-scale column-based unit capable of achieving at least 90% CO₂ capture from a nominal 500 SLPM coal-derived flue gas slipstream was designed and built. This integrated, continuous, skid-mounted GPS system was tested using real flue gas from a coal-fired boiler at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The technical challenges of the GPS technology in stability, corrosion, and foaming of selected solvents, and environmental, health and

  17. How does CO capture process on microporous NaY zeolites? A FTIR and DFT combined study.

    PubMed

    Cairon, O; Guesmi, H

    2011-06-21

    Reliable experimental IR and theoretical approaches, both investigating CO adsorption on NaY faujasites, are supporting that CO capture occurs through the completion of the vacant coordination of Na(+) cations located in the accessible S(II) sites. As a result, carbonyl adsorbed species are formed by the capture of one, two or three CO molecules and are experimentally discernable by their respective IR positions that are down-shifted by an average 11-12 cm(-1) value for each captured CO molecule. DFT analysis is proposed for comparison and reproduces well the observed experimental shift of the ν(CO) positions of the different polycarbonyls of interest. In addition, the effect of Si or Al composition surrounding the SII Na(+) cation is investigated and results suggest that polycarbonyls that are formed might be in connection with the acidic strength of the cationic sites. This combined study completes and improves the understanding of the complex issue of CO adsorption at 80 K widely used as a model to explain how physical adsorption takes place in NaY faujasites working as an efficient industrial adsorbent in gas separation or gas purification processes.

  18. Carbon dioxide-selective membranes and their applications in hydrogen processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jian

    process consisting of a CO2-removal membrane module followed by a conventional low-temperature WGS reactor. A third option is to use methanation after the CO2-removal, one of the most widely used processes for the CO clean-up step. Experimental results showed that CO concentration was reduced to below 10 ppm with all three approaches. In the membrane reactor, a CO concentration of less than 10 ppm and a H 2 concentration of greater than 50% (on the dry basis) were achieved at various flow rates of a simulated autothermal reformate. In the proposed CO2-removal/WGS process, with more than 99.5 % CO2 removed from the synthesis gas, the reversible WGS was shifted forward so that the CO concentration was decreased from 1.2% to less than 10 ppm (dry), which is the requirement for PEMFC. The WGS reactor had a gas hourly space velocity of 7650 h-1 at 150°C and the H2 concentration in the outlet was more than 54.7% (dry). The applications of the synthesized CO2-selective membranes for high-pressure synthesis gas purification were also studied. Synthesis gas is the primary source for hydrogen as well as an intermediate for a broad range of chemicals. The separation of CO2 from synthesis gas is a critical step to obtain high purity hydrogen in many industrial plants, especially refinery plants. We studied the synthesized polymeric CO2 -selective membranes for synthesis gas purification at feed pressures higher than 200 psia and temperatures ranging from 100 to 150°C. The effects of feed pressure, microporous support, temperature, and permeate pressure were investigated using a simulated synthesis gas containing 20% carbon dioxide and 80% hydrogen. The membranes synthesized showed best CO2 permeability and CO2/H2 selectivity at 110°C. At a feed pressure of 220 psia, the CO2 permeability and CO2/H2 selectivity reached 756 Barrers and 42, respectively, whereas at a feed pressure of 440 psia, the CO2 permeability was 391 Barrers and the CO 2/H2 selectivity was about 25.

  19. Neutron Capture Cross Sections of the s-Process Branching Points 147Pm, 171Tm, and 204Tl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Carlos; Domingo-Pardo, Cesar; Lerendegui-Marco, Jorge; Casanovas, Adria; Cortes-Giraldo, Miguel A.; Dressler, Rugard; Halfon, Shlomi; Heinitz, Stephan; Kivel, Niko; Köster, Ulli; Paul, Michael; Quesada-Molina, Jose Manuel; Schumann, Dorothea; Tarifeño-Saldivia, Ariel; Tessler, Moshe; Weissman, Leo

    The neutron capture cross section of several key unstable isotopes acting as branching points in the s-process are crucial for stellar nucleosynthesis studies, but they are very challenging to measure due to the difficult production of sufficient sample material, the high activity of the resulting samples, and the actual (n, γ) measurement, for which high neutron fluxes and effective background rejection capabilities are required. As part of a new program to measure some of these important branching points, radioactive targets of 147Pm, 171Tm, and 204Tl have been produced by irradiation of stable isotopes (146Nd, 170Er, and 203Tl) at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) high flux reactor. After breeding in the reactor and a certain cooling period, the resulting mixed 204Tl/203Tl sample was used directly while 147Pm and 171Tm were radiochemically separated in non-carrier-added quality at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), then prepared as targets. A set of theses samples has been used for time-of-flight measurements at the CERN n_TOF facility using the 19 and 185 m beam lines, during 2014 and 2015. The capture cascades were detected with a set of four C6D6 scintillators, allowing to observe the associated neutron capture resonances. The results presented in this work are the first ever determination of the resonance capture cross sections of 147Pm, 171Tm, and 204Tl. Activation experiments on the same 147Pm and 171Tm targets with a high-intensity quasi-Maxwellian flux of neutrons have been performed using the SARAF accelerator and the Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) in order to extract the corresponding Maxwellian Average Cross Section (MACS). The experimental setups are here described together with the first, preliminary results of the n_TOF measurement.

  20. Novel polymer membrane process for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture from coal-fired syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, Tim

    2011-09-14

    This final report describes work conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE NETL) on development of a novel polymer membrane process for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture from coalfired syngas (award number DE-FE0001124). The work was conducted by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) from September 15, 2009, through December 14, 2011. Tetramer Technologies, LLC (Tetramer) was our subcontract partner on this project. The National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) at Wilsonville, AL, provided access to syngas gasifier test facilities. The main objective of this project was to develop a cost-effective membrane process that could be used in the relatively near-term to capture CO{sub 2} from shifted syngas generated by a coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant. In this project, novel polymeric membranes (designated as Proteus™ membranes) with separation properties superior to conventional polymeric membranes were developed. Hydrogen permeance of up to 800 gpu and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity of >12 was achieved using a simulated syngas mixture at 150°C and 50 psig, which exceeds the original project targets of 200 gpu for hydrogen permeance and 10 for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity. Lab-scale Proteus membrane modules (with a membrane area of 0.13 m{sup 2}) were also developed using scaled-up Proteus membranes and high temperature stable module components identified during this project. A mixed-gas hydrogen permeance of about 160 gpu and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity of >12 was achieved using a simulated syngas mixture at 150°C and 100 psig. We believe that a significant improvement in the membrane and module performance is likely with additional development work. Both Proteus membranes and lab-scale Proteus membrane modules were further evaluated using coal-derived syngas streams at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The results indicate that all module components, including the Proteus membrane, were stable under the field

  1. Effect of fossil fuels on the parameters of CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Tibor; Mizsey, Peter

    2013-08-06

    The carbon dioxide capture is a more and more important issue in the design and operation of boilers and/or power stations because of increasing environmental considerations. Such processes, absorber desorber should be able to cope with flue gases from the use of different fossil primary energy sources, in order to guarantee a flexible, stable, and secure energy supply operation. The changing flue gases have significant influence on the optimal operation of the capture process, that is, where the required heating of the desorber is the minimal. Therefore special considerations are devoted to the proper design and control of such boiler and/or power stations equipped with CO2 capture process.

  2. The effects of ocean acidification and a carbon dioxide capture and storage leak on the early life stages of the marine mussel Perna perna (Linneaus, 1758) and metal bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Szalaj, D; De Orte, M R; Goulding, T A; Medeiros, I D; DelValls, T A; Cesar, A

    2017-01-01

    The study assesses the effects of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) leaks and ocean acidification (OA) on the metal bioavailability and reproduction of the mytilid Perna perna. In laboratory-scale experiments, CCS leakage scenarios (pH 7.0, 6.5, 6.0) and one OA (pH 7.6) scenario were tested using metal-contaminated sediment elutriates and seawater from Santos Bay. The OA treatment did not have an effect on fertilisation, while significant effects were observed in larval-development bioassays where only 16 to 27 % of larva developed normally. In treatments that simulated CO2 leaks, when compared with control, fertilisation success gradually decreased and no larva developed to the D-shaped stage. A fall in pH increased the bioavailability of metals to marine mussels. Larva shell size was significantly affected by both elutriates when compared with seawater; moreover, a significant difference occurred at pH 6.5 between elutriates in the fertilisation bioassay.

  3. Simultaneous recovery of zinc and manganese dioxide from household alkaline batteries through hydrometallurgical processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Cleusa Cristina Bueno Martha; Tenório, Jorge Alberto Soares

    This paper describes the leaching experiments and the electrowinning tests to recover Zn and Mn from spent household alkaline batteries. After the dismantling of the batteries, the black powder was analyzed and found to contain 21 wt.% Zn and 45%wt. Mn. Therefore, it was considered that recovery of these metals would be interesting due to their relatively large amounts in this kind of waste. Batch laboratory experiments were carried out to develop an acid leaching procedure and to determine appropriate leaching conditions to maximize zinc extraction and to study the leaching behavior of Mn. An experimental study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of simultaneous recovery of zinc and particulate manganese dioxide using a laboratory cell. The results from these electrowinning experiments are also presented in this paper.

  4. Review of Quantitative Monitoring Methodologies for Emissions Verification and Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage for California’s Greenhouse Gas Cap-and-Trade and Low-Carbon Fuel Standard Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2014-12-23

    The Cap-and-Trade and Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) programs being administered by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) include Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) as a potential means to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, there is currently no universal standard approach that quantifies GHG emissions reductions for CCS and that is suitable for the quantitative needs of the Cap-and-Trade and LCFS programs. CCS involves emissions related to the capture (e.g., arising from increased energy needed to separate carbon dioxide (CO2) from a flue gas and compress it for transport), transport (e.g., by pipeline), and storage of CO2 (e.g., due to leakage to the atmosphere from geologic CO2 storage sites). In this project, we reviewed and compared monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) protocols for CCS from around the world by focusing on protocols specific to the geologic storage part of CCS. In addition to presenting the review of these protocols, we highlight in this report those storage-related MVA protocols that we believe are particularly appropriate for CCS in California. We find that none of the existing protocols is completely appropriate for California, but various elements of all of them could be adopted and/or augmented to develop a rigorous, defensible, and practical surface leakage MVA protocol for California. The key features of a suitable surface leakage MVA plan for California are that it: (1) informs and validates the leakage risk assessment, (2) specifies use of the most effective monitoring strategies while still being flexible enough to accommodate special or site-specific conditions, (3) quantifies stored CO2, and (4) offers defensible estimates of uncertainty in monitored properties. California’s surface leakage MVA protocol needs to be applicable to the main CO2 storage opportunities (in California and in other states with entities participating in California

  5. Penetrator reliability investigation and design exploration : from conventional design processes to innovative uncertainty-capturing algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Canales, Monica L.; Heaphy, Robert; Gramacy, Robert B.; Taddy, Matt; Chiesa, Michael L.; Thomas, Stephen W.; Swiler, Laura Painton; Hough, Patricia Diane; Lee, Herbert K. H.; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Gray, Genetha Anne

    2006-11-01

    This project focused on research and algorithmic development in optimization under uncertainty (OUU) problems driven by earth penetrator (EP) designs. While taking into account uncertainty, we addressed three challenges in current simulation-based engineering design and analysis processes. The first challenge required leveraging small local samples, already constructed by optimization algorithms, to build effective surrogate models. We used Gaussian Process (GP) models to construct these surrogates. We developed two OUU algorithms using 'local' GPs (OUU-LGP) and one OUU algorithm using 'global' GPs (OUU-GGP) that appear competitive or better than current methods. The second challenge was to develop a methodical design process based on multi-resolution, multi-fidelity models. We developed a Multi-Fidelity Bayesian Auto-regressive process (MF-BAP). The third challenge involved the development of tools that are computational feasible and accessible. We created MATLAB{reg_sign} and initial DAKOTA implementations of our algorithms.

  6. Low cost and compact analytical microsystem for carbon dioxide determination in production processes of wine and beer.

    PubMed

    Calvo-López, Antonio; Ymbern, Oriol; Izquierdo, David; Alonso-Chamarro, Julián

    2016-08-10

    The design, construction and evaluation of a low cost, cyclic olefin copolymer (COC)-based continuous flow microanalyzer, with optical detection, to monitor carbon dioxide in bottled wines and beers as well as in fermentation processes, is presented. The microsystem, constructed by computer numerically controlled (CNC) micromilling and using a multilayer approach, integrates microfluidics, gas-diffusion module and an optical flow-cell in a single polymeric substrate. Its size is slightly bigger than a credit card, exactly 45 × 60 × 4 mm in the microfluidic and diffusion module zone and 22.5 × 40 × 3 mm in the flow-cell zone. The gas-diffusion module is based on a hydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane, which allows the transfer of the carbon dioxide present in the sample to a bromothymol blue (BTB) pH-sensitive acceptor solution, where the color change is measured optically. The detection system consisted of a LED with an emission peak at 607 nm and a photodiode integrated in a printed circuit board (PCB). The obtained analytical features after the optimization of the microfluidic platform and hydrodynamic variables are a linear range from 255 to 10000 mg L(-1) of CO2 and a detection limit of 83 mg L(-1) with a sampling rate of 30 samples h(-1).

  7. ERP evidence of a meaningfulness impact on visual global/local processing: when meaning captures attention.

    PubMed

    Beaucousin, Virginie; Cassotti, Mathieu; Simon, Grégory; Pineau, Arlette; Kostova, Milena; Houdé, Olivier; Poirel, Nicolas

    2011-04-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded to investigate whether the meaningfulness of experimental stimuli impacted performances during global/local visual tasks. Participants were presented with compound stimuli, based on either meaningful letters, meaningful objects, or meaningless non-objects. The ERP recordings displayed typical early components, P1 and N1, evoked by task-related processes that affected global and local processes differently according to the meaningfulness of the stimuli. The effect of meaningfulness of the stimuli during global processing showed that P1 amplitudes were larger in response to objects and non-objects compared to letters, while letters and objects elicited larger N1 amplitudes than non-objects. Second, during local processing, the mean amplitudes of the ERPs recorded for object and letter stimuli were systematically smaller than the amplitudes recorded for non-object stimuli for both P1 and N1 components. In addition, object and letter stimuli elicited comparable mean ERP responses during local processing. These results are discussed in terms of the influences of both attentional and top-down identification processes. Taken together, these findings suggested that looking for meaning is crucial in the perception of visual scenes and that the meaningfulness nature of the stimuli should be taken into account in future studies.

  8. The Weak s-Process in Massive Stars and its Dependence on the Neutron Capture Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatari, M.; Gallino, R.; Heil, M.; Wiescher, M.; Käppeler, F.; Herwig, F.; Bisterzo, S.

    2010-02-01

    The slow neutron capture process in massive stars (weak s process) produces most of the s-process isotopes between iron and strontium. Neutrons are provided by the 22Ne(α,n)25Mg reaction, which is activated at the end of the convective He-burning core and in the subsequent convective C-burning shell. The s-process-rich material in the supernova ejecta carries the signature of these two phases. In the past years, new measurements of neutron capture cross sections of isotopes beyond iron significantly changed the predicted weak s-process distribution. The reason is that the variation of the Maxwellian-averaged cross sections (MACS) is propagated to heavier isotopes along the s path. In the light of these results, we present updated nucleosynthesis calculations for a 25 M sun star of Population I (solar metallicity) in convective He-burning core and convective C-burning shell conditions. In comparison with previous simulations based on the Bao et al. compilation, the new measurement of neutron capture cross sections leads to an increase of s-process yields from nickel up to selenium. The variation of the cross section of one isotope along the s-process path is propagated to heavier isotopes, where the propagation efficiency is higher for low cross sections. New 74Ge, 75As, and 78Se MACS result in a higher production of germanium, arsenic, and selenium, thereby reducing the s-process yields of heavier elements by propagation. Results are reported for the He core and for the C shell. In shell C-burning, the s-process nucleosynthesis is more uncertain than in the He core, due to higher MACS uncertainties at higher temperatures. We also analyze the impact of using the new lower solar abundances for CNO isotopes on the s-process predictions, where CNO is the source of 22Ne, and we show that beyond Zn this is affecting the s-process yields more than nuclear or stellar model uncertainties considered in this paper. In particular, using the new updated initial composition, we

  9. Development of process data capturing, analysis and controlling for thermal spray techniques - SprayTracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelber, C.; Marke, S.; Trommler, U.; Rupprecht, C.; Weis, S.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal spraying processes are becoming increasingly important in high-technology areas, such as automotive engineering and medical technology. The method offers the advantage of a local layer application with different materials and high deposition rates. Challenges in the application of thermal spraying result from the complex interaction of different influencing variables, which can be attributed to the properties of different materials, operating equipment supply, electrical parameters, flow mechanics, plasma physics and automation. In addition, spraying systems are subject to constant wear. Due to the process specification and the high demands on the produced coatings, innovative quality assurance tools are necessary. A central aspect, which has not yet been considered, is the data management in relation to the present measured variables, in particular the spraying system, the handling system, working safety devices and additional measuring sensors. Both the recording of all process-characterizing variables, their linking and evaluation as well as the use of the data for the active process control presuppose a novel, innovative control system (hardware and software) that was to be developed within the scope of the research project. In addition, new measurement methods and sensors are to be developed and qualified in order to improve the process reliability of thermal spraying.

  10. Optimizing the Costs of Solid Sorbent-Based CO2 Capture Process Through Heat Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Sjostrom, Sharon

    2016-03-18

    The focus of this project was the ADAsorb™ CO2 Capture Process, a temperature-swing adsorption process that incorporates a three-stage fluidized bed as the adsorber and a single-stage fluidized bed as the regenerator. ADAsorb™ system was designed, fabricated, and tested under DOE award DEFE0004343. Two amine-based sorbents were evaluated in conjunction with the ADAsorb™ process: “BN”, an ion-exchange resin; and “OJ”, a metal organic framework (MOF) sorbent. Two cross heat exchanger designs were evaluated for use between the adsorber and regenerator: moving bed and fluidized bed. The fluidized bed approach was rejected fairly early in the project because the additional electrical load to power blowers or fans to overcome the pressure drop required for fluidization was estimated to be nominally three times the electrical power that could be generated from the steam saved through the use of the cross heat exchanger. The Energy Research Center at Lehigh University built and utilized a process model of the ADAsorb™ capture process and integrated this model into an existing model of a supercritical PC power plant. The Lehigh models verified that, for the ADAsorb™ system, the largest contributor to parasitic power was lost electrical generation, which was primarily electric power which the host plant could not generate due to the extraction of low pressure (LP) steam for sorbent heating, followed by power for the CO2 compressor and the blower or fan power required to fluidize the adsorber and regenerator. Sorbent characteristics such as the impacts of moisture uptake, optimized adsorption and regeneration temperature, and sensitivity to changes in pressure were also included in the modeling study. Results indicate that sorbents which adsorb more than 1-2% moisture by weight are unlikely to be cost competitive unless they have an extremely high CO2 working capacity that well exceeds 15% by weight. Modeling also revealed

  11. Investigation of model capability in capturing vertical hydrodynamic coastal processes: a case study in the north Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKiver, W. J.; Sannino, G.; Braga, F.; Bellafiore, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we consider a numerical study of hydrodynamics in the coastal zone using two different models, SHYFEM (shallow water hydrodynamic finite element model) and MITgcm (Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model), to assess their capability to capture the main processes. We focus on the north Adriatic Sea during a strong dense water event that occurred at the beginning of 2012. This serves as an interesting test case to examine both the models strengths and weaknesses, while giving an opportunity to understand how these events affect coastal processes, like upwelling and downwelling, and how they interact with estuarine dynamics. Using the models we examine the impact of setup, surface and lateral boundary treatment, resolution and mixing schemes, as well as assessing the importance of nonhydrostatic dynamics in coastal processes. Both models are able to capture the dense water event, though each displays biases in different regions. The models show large differences in the reproduction of surface patterns, identifying the choice of suitable bulk formulas as a central point for the correct simulation of the thermohaline structure of the coastal zone. Moreover, the different approaches in treating lateral freshwater sources affect the vertical coastal stratification. The results indicate the importance of having high horizontal resolution in the coastal zone, specifically in close proximity to river inputs, in order to reproduce the effect of the complex coastal morphology on the hydrodynamics. A lower resolution offshore is acceptable for the reproduction of the dense water event, even if specific vortical structures are missed. Finally, it is found that nonhydrostatic processes are of little importance for the reproduction of dense water formation in the shelf of the north Adriatic Sea.

  12. An overview of biological processes and their potential for CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Goli, Amin; Shamiri, Ahmad; Talaiekhozani, Amirreza; Eshtiaghi, Nicky; Aghamohammadi, Nasrin; Aroua, Mohamed Kheireddine

    2016-12-01

    The extensive amount of available information on global warming suggests that this issue has become prevalent worldwide. Majority of countries have issued laws and policies in response to this concern by requiring their industrial sectors to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, such as CO2. Thus, introducing new and more effective treatment methods, such as biological techniques, is crucial to control the emission of greenhouse gases. Many studies have demonstrated CO2 fixation using photo-bioreactors and raceway ponds, but a comprehensive review is yet to be published on biological CO2 fixation. A comprehensive review of CO2 fixation through biological process is presented in this paper as biological processes are ideal to control both organic and inorganic pollutants. This process can also cover the classification of methods, functional mechanisms, designs, and their operational parameters, which are crucial for efficient CO2 fixation. This review also suggests the bio-trickling filter process as an appropriate approach in CO2 fixation to assist in creating a pollution-free environment. Finally, this paper introduces optimum designs, growth rate models, and CO2 fixation of microalgae, functions, and operations in biological CO2 fixation.

  13. Capturing Knowledge In Order To Optimize The Cutting Process For Polyethylene Pipes Using Knowledge Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, Ionela Magdalena

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge management is a powerful instrument. Areas where knowledge - based modelling can be applied are different from business, industry, government to education area. Companies engage in efforts to restructure the database held based on knowledge management principles as they recognize in it a guarantee of models characterized by the fact that they consist only from relevant and sustainable knowledge that can bring value to the companies. The proposed paper presents a theoretical model of what it means optimizing polyethylene pipes, thus bringing to attention two important engineering fields, the one of the metal cutting process and gas industry, who meet in order to optimize the butt fusion welding process - the polyethylene cutting part - of the polyethylene pipes. All approach is shaped on the principles of knowledge management. The study was made in collaboration with companies operating in the field.

  14. Capture of Tritium Released from Cladding in the Zirconium Recycle Process

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Barry B.; Walker, T. B.; Bruffey, Stephanie H.; DelCul, Guillermo Daniel

    2016-08-31

    This report is issued as the first revision to FCRD-MRWFD-2016-000297. Zirconium may be recovered from the Zircaloy® cladding of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for recycle or to reduce the quantities of high-level waste destined for a geologic repository. Recovery of zirconium using a chlorination process is currently under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The approach is to treat the cladding with chlorine gas to convert the zirconium in the alloy (~98 wt % of the alloy mass) to zirconium tetrachloride. A significant fraction of the tritium (0–96%) produced in nuclear fuel during irradiation may be found in zirconium-based cladding and could be released from the cladding when the solid matrix is destroyed by the chlorination reaction. To prevent uncontrolled release of radioactive tritium to other parts of the plant or to the environment, a method to recover the tritium may be required. The focus of this effort was to (1) identify potential methods for the recovery of tritium from the off-gas of the zirconium recycle process, (2) perform scoping tests on selected recovery methods using non-radioactive gas simulants, and (3) select a process design appropriate for testing on radioactive gas streams generated by the engineering-scale zirconium recycle demonstrations on radioactive used cladding.

  15. Capture of Tritium Released from Cladding in the Zirconium Recycle Process

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Barry B.; Walker, T. B.; Bruffey, S. H.; DelCul, Guillermo Daniel

    2016-08-31

    Zirconium may be recovered from the Zircaloy® cladding of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for recycle or to reduce the quantities of high-level waste destined for a geologic repository. Recovery of zirconium using a chlorination process is currently under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The approach is to treat the cladding with chlorine gas to convert the zirconium in the alloy (~98 wt % of the alloy mass) to zirconium tetrachloride. A significant fraction of the tritium (0–96%) produced in nuclear fuel during irradiation may be found in zirconium-based cladding and could be released from the cladding when the solid matrix is destroyed by the chlorination reaction. To prevent uncontrolled release of radioactive tritium to other parts of the plant or to the environment, a method to recover the tritium may be required. The focus of this effort was to (1) identify potential methods for the recovery of tritium from the off-gas of the zirconium recycle process, (2) perform scoping tests on selected recovery methods using nonradioactive gas simulants, and (3) select a process design appropriate for testing on radioactive gas streams generated by the engineering-scale zirconium recycle demonstrations on radioactive used cladding.

  16. Synapse-specific stabilization of plasticity processes: the synaptic tagging and capture hypothesis revisited 10 years later.

    PubMed

    Barco, Angel; Lopez de Armentia, Mikel; Alarcon, Juan M

    2008-01-01

    A decade ago, the synaptic tagging hypothesis was proposed to explain how newly synthesized plasticity products can be specifically targeted to active synapses. A growing number of studies have validated the seminal findings that gave rise to this model, as well as contributed to unveil and expand the range of mechanisms underlying late-associativity and neuronal computation. Here, we will review what it was learnt during this past decade regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic tagging and synaptic capture. The accumulated experimental evidence has widened the theoretical framework set by the synaptic tagging and capture (STC) model and introduced concepts that were originally considered part of alternative models for explaining synapse-specific long-term potentiation (LTP). As a result, we believe that the STC model, now improved and expanded with these new ideas and concepts, still represents the most compelling hypothesis to explain late-associativity in synapse-specific plasticity processes. We will also discuss the impact of this model in our view of the integrative capability of neurons and associative learning.

  17. Biocatalytic carbon capture via reversible reaction cycle catalyzed by isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shunxiang; Frigo-Vaz, Benjamin; Zhao, Xueyan; Kim, Jungbae; Wang, Ping

    2014-09-12

    The practice of carbon capture and storage (CCS) requires efficient capture and separation of carbon dioxide from its gaseous mixtures such as flue gas, followed by releasing it as a pure gas which can be subsequently compressed and injected into underground storage sites. This has been mostly achieved via reversible thermochemical reactions which are generally energy-intensive. The current work examines a biocatalytic approach for carbon capture using an NADP(H)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) which catalyzes reversibly carboxylation and decarboxylation reactions. Different from chemical carbon capture processes that rely on thermal energy to realize purification of carbon dioxide, the biocatalytic strategy utilizes pH to leverage the reaction equilibrium, thereby realizing energy-efficient carbon capture under ambient conditions. Results showed that over 25 mol of carbon dioxide could be captured and purified from its gas mixture for each gram of ICDH applied for each carboxylation/decarboxylation reaction cycle by varying pH between 6 and 9. This work demonstrates the promising potentials of pH-sensitive biocatalysis as a green-chemistry route for carbon capture.

  18. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction of Bioactive Compounds from Ampelopsis grossedentata Stems: Process Optimization and Antioxidant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuefei; Ying, Le; Sun, Da; Zhang, Shikang; Zhu, Yuejin; Xu, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) extraction of bioactive compounds including flavonoids and phenolics from Ampelopsis grossedentata stems was carried out. Extraction parameters such as pressure, temperature, dynamic time and modifier, were optimized using an orthogonal array design of L9 (34), and antioxidant activities of the extracts were evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay and ferrous ion chelating (FIC) assay. The best conditions obtained for SC-CO2 extraction of flavonoids was 250 bar, 40 °C, 50 min, and with a modifier of methanol/ethanol (1:3, v/v), and that for phenolics extraction was 250 bar, 40 °C, 50 min, and with a modifier of methanol/ethanol (1:1, v/v). Meantime, flavonoids and phenolics were found to be mainly responsible for the DPPH scavenging activity of the extracts, but not for the chelating activity on ferrous ion according to Pearson correlation analysis. Furthermore, several unreported flavonoids such as apigenin, vitexin, luteolin, etc., have been detected in the extracts from A. grossedentata stems. PMID:22072923

  19. A comparison of iodinated trihalomethane formation from chlorine, chlorine dioxide and potassium permanganate oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Yang; Xu, Bin; Hu, Chen-Yan; Lin, Yi-Li; Lin, Lin; Ye, Tao; Tian, Fu-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the formation of iodinated trihalomethanes (I-THMs) from iodide-containing raw waters oxidized by chlorine, chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) and potassium permanganate (KMnO₄) at different oxidant concentrations, reaction times, pHs, initial iodide concentrations and bromide to iodide mass ratios. Among the six investigated I-THMs, iodoform was the major species formed during the oxidation using chlorine, ClO₂ and KMnO₄. When oxidant concentration increased from 0.1 to 3.0 mg/L, the formation of I-THMs increased and then decreased for chlorine and ClO₂, but kept increasing for KMnO₄. As the reaction time went by, I-THM concentration increased to a plateau within 10 h (ClO₂ within only 1 h, especially) for all the three oxidants. I-THM formation gradually increased from pH 3.0 to 9.0 and remained stable at pH values higher than 7.5 for chlorine; however, for ClO₂ and KMnO₄ the highest I-THM formation showed at pH 7.0 and 7.5, respectively. As initial iodide concentration increased from 20 to 800 μg/L, the total amount and species of I-THMs increased for the three oxidants. Iodide contributed to I-THM formation much more significantly than bromide.

  20. Radioactive characterization of the main materials involved in the titanium dioxide production process and their environmental radiological impact.

    PubMed

    Mantero, J; Gazquez, M J; Bolivar, J P; Garcia-Tenorio, R; Vaca, F

    2013-06-01

    A study about the distribution of several radionuclides from the uranium and the thorium series radionuclides along the production process of a typical NORM industry devoted to the production of titanium dioxide has been performed. With this end the activity concentrations in raw materials, final product, co-products, and wastes of the production process have been determined by both gamma-ray and alpha-particle spectrometry. The main raw material used in the studied process (ilmenite) presents activity concentrations of around 300 Bq kg(-1) for Th-series radionuclides and 100 Bq kg(-1) for the U-series ones. These radionuclides in the industrial process are distributed in the different steps of the production process according mostly to the chemical behaviour of each radioelement, following different routes. As an example, most of the radium remains associated with the un-dissolved material waste, with activity concentrations around 3 kBq kg(-1) of (228)Ra and around 1 kBq kg(-1) of (226)Ra, while the final commercial products (TiO2 pigments and co-products) contain negligible amounts of radioactivity. The obtained results have allowed assessing the possible public radiological impact associated with the use of the products and co-products obtained in this type of industry, as well as the environmental radiological impact associated with the solid residues and liquid generated discharges.

  1. Processing of surfactant templated nano-structured silica films using compressed carbon dioxide as interpreted from in situ fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kaustav; Rankin, Stephen E; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Knutson, Barbara L

    2012-09-27

    The local environment and dynamics of compressed carbon dioxide (CO(2)) penetration in surfactant templated silica film synthesis is interpreted from the in situ fluorescence emission spectra of pyrene (Py) and a modified pyrene probe. Pyrene emission in cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) templated silica films is monitored immediately after casting and during processing with gaseous and supercritical (sc) CO(2) (17-172 bar, 45 °C). The solvatochromic emission spectra of pyrene in CTAB templated films suggest CO(2) penetration in both the micelle interface and its interior. An anchored derivative of pyrene, 1-pyrenehexadecanoic acid (C(16)-pyr), is established for probing CPB films, where the pyrene moiety is preferentially oriented toward the micelle interior, thus limiting quenching by the pyridinium headgroup of CPB. CO(2) processing of CPB templated silica films results in an increase in the time scale for probe mobility, suggesting an increased time scale of silica condensation through CO(2) processing. The mobility of C(16)-pyr increases with pressure from gaseous to sc CO(2) processing and persists for over 5 h for sc CO(2) processing at 172 bar and 45 °C compared to about 25 min for the unprocessed film. The delivery of CO(2) soluble solutes to specific regions of surfactant templated mesoporous materials is examined via the nonradiative energy transfer (NRET) between pyrene and CO(2)-solubilized naphthalene.

  2. ADVANCED OXYFUEL BOILERS AND PROCESS HEATERS FOR COST EFFECTIVE CO2 CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bart van Hassel; John Sirman

    2005-07-01

    This annual technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished during the third year of the program, January-December 2004, in the following task areas: Task 1--Conceptual Design, Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluations, Task 3--OTM Development, Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning and Task 5--Program Management. The groundwork was laid for both the membrane materials development and the construction of the required facilities for testing the membrane reliability and performance. It has resulted in the construction of a single tube and multi-tube combustion test facility. Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) principles were applied to the membrane material selection process. The required ceramic powders were ordered and will be evaluated in 2005. Design of experiment techniques (fuel gas mixture design) were applied to the membrane performance evaluation process. The first results indicate that the oxygen flux of the membrane is significantly higher when the porous support is exposed to the fuel gas mixture instead of air. Failures of the oxygen transport membrane tube did not occur during the reporting period which is supporting evidence that our emphasis on design for robustness is yielding the desired result. All work on the project was performed in a safe manner as proven by zero recordable injuries or lost work days.

  3. An Integrated Hydrogen Production-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhicheng Wang

    2007-03-15

    The new technology concept integrates two significant complementary hydrogen production and CO{sub 2}-sequestration approaches that have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Clark Atlanta University. The process can convert biomass into hydrogen and char. Hydrogen can be efficiently used for stationary power and mobile applications, or it can be synthesized into Ammonia which can be used for CO{sub 2}-sequestration, while char can be used for making time-release fertilizers (NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3}) by absorption of CO{sub 2} and other acid gases from exhaust flows. Fertilizers are then used for the growth of biomass back to fields. This project includes bench scale experiments and pilot scale tests. The Combustion and Emission Lab at Clark Atlanta University has conducted the bench scale experiments. The facility used for pilot scale tests was built in Athens, GA. The overall yield from this process is 7 wt% hydrogen and 32 wt% charcoal/activated carbon of feedstock (peanut shell). The value of co-product activated carbon is about $1.1/GJ and this coproduct reduced the selling price of hydrogen. And the selling price of hydrogen is estimated to be $6.95/GJ. The green house experimental results show that the samples added carbon-fertilizers have effectively growth increase of three different types of plants and improvement ability of keeping fertilizer in soil to avoid the fertilizer leaching with water.

  4. Capture and Fusion-Fission Processes in Heavy Ion Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itkis, M. G.; Beghini, S.; Behera, B. R.; Bogatchev, A. A.; Bouchat, V.; Corradi, L.; Dorvaux, O.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Hanappe, F.; Itkis, I. M.; Jandel, M.; Kliman, J.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Krupa, L.; Latina, A.; Lyapin, V. G.; Materna, T.; Montagnoli, G.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Prokhorova, E. V.; Rowley, N.; Rubchenya, V. A.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Scarlassara, F.; Schmitt, C.; Stefanini, A. M.; Stuttge, L.; Szilner, S.; Trotta, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Voskresenski, V. M.

    2005-11-01

    Results of the experiments aimed at the study of fission and quasi-fission processes in the reactions 12C+204Pb, 48Ca+144,154Sm, 168Er, 208Pb, 238U, 244Pu, 248Cm; 58Fe+208Pb, 244Pu, 248Cm, and 64Ni+186W, 242Pu are presented. The choice of the above-mentioned reactions was inspired by the experiments on the production of the isotopes 283112, 289114 and 283116 at Dubna using the same reactions. The 58Fe and 64Ni projectiles were chosen since the corresponding projectile-target combinations lead to the synthesis of even heavier elements. The experiments were carried out at the U-400 accelerator of the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (JINR, Russia), the XTU Tandem accelerator of the National Laboratory of Legnaro (LNL, Italy) and the Accelerator of the Laboratory of University of Jyvaskyla (JYFL, Finland) using the time-of-flight spectrometer of fission fragments CORSET and the neutron multi-detector DEMON. The role of shell effects and the influence of the entrance channel asymmetry and the deformations of colliding nucleus on the mechanism of the fusion-fission and the competitive process of quasi-fission are discussed.

  5. Comparison of Satellite Observations of Nitrogen Dioxide to Surface Monitor Nitrogen Dioxide Concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Mary M.; Pippin, Margaret R.; Pierce, R. Bradley; Neil, Doreen O.; Lingenfelser, Gretchen; Szykman, James J.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide is one of the U. S. EPA s criteria pollutants, and one of the main ingredients needed for the production of ground-level ozone. Both ozone and nitrogen dioxide cause severe public health problems. Existing satellites have begun to produce observational data sets for nitrogen dioxide. Under NASAs Earth Science Applications Program, we examined the relationship between satellite observations and surface monitor observations of this air pollutant to examine if the satellite data can be used to facilitate a more capable and integrated observing network. This report provides a comparison of satellite tropospheric column nitrogen dioxide to surface monitor nitrogen dioxide concentration for the period from September 1996 through August 1997 at more than 300 individual locations in the continental US. We found that the spatial resolution and observation time of the satellite did not capture the variability of this pollutant as measured at ground level. The tools and processes developed to conduct this study will be applied to the analysis of advanced satellite observations. One advanced instrument has significantly better spatial resolution than the measurements studied here and operates with an afternoon overpass time, providing a more representative distribution for once-per-day sampling of this photochemically active atmospheric constituent.

  6. Capturing a failure of an ASIC in-situ, using infrared radiometry and image processing software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz, Ronald P.

    2003-01-01

    Failures in electronic devices can sometimes be tricky to locate-especially if they are buried inside radiation-shielded containers designed to work in outer space. Such was the case with a malfunctioning ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) that was drawing excessive power at a specific temperature during temperature cycle testing. To analyze the failure, infrared radiometry (thermography) was used in combination with image processing software to locate precisely where the power was being dissipated at the moment the failure took place. The IR imaging software was used to make the image of the target and background, appear as unity. As testing proceeded and the failure mode was reached, temperature changes revealed the precise location of the fault. The results gave the design engineers the information they needed to fix the problem. This paper describes the techniques and equipment used to accomplish this failure analysis.

  7. Organoclay dispersion in linear low-density polyethylene and maleated linear low-density polyethylene via supercritical carbon dioxide processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Factor, Matthew John

    Research into polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCN’s) has been ongoing for decades as a result of the property enhancements offered by clay. To fully exploit these property enhancements, organically modified clays (organoclays) are utilized to promote clay delamination by reducing the disparity between the hydrophilicity of the clay and the hydrophobicity of the highly used polyolefin polymer. Since the organic modification of organoclays can degrade at temperatures typical to many polymers during melt-mix processing, this work utilizes the low-temperature processing fluid supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 ) to disperse an organoclay into the highly used polymer LLDPE and ascertains the associated processing conditions for achieving this goal. Investigations into the LLDPE resin size, scCO2 processing time, scCO2 capability and the processing component compatibility were undertaken to better understand the important parameters to achieving organoclay dispersion, in terms of infusion and intercalation/exfoliation behavior. A LLDPE pellet resin showed improved dispersion and obtainable information over that of a granule resin, securing the choice of resin for subsequent experiments. Experiments undertaken with pellet resin exhibited that a 1-hr processing time was insufficient for organoclay infusion into LLDPE, however when infusion occurs, intercalation/exfoliation can be affected by scCO 2. Increasing the compatibility of LLDPE with clay and the processing fluid revealed that the increased compatibility had altered the effect of scCO2. Further analysis with the 93A-infused samples was conducted in order to gain a better understanding of the effect of scCO2 processing, such as the quantity and size of clay particles dispersed and changes to the polymer incurred by processing.

  8. Nanoscaled tin dioxide films processed from organotin-based hybrid materials: an organometallic route toward metal oxide gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Laetitia; Babot, Odile; Saadaoui, Hassan; Fuess, Hartmut; Brötz, Joachim; Gurlo, Aleksander; Arveux, Emmanuel; Klein, Andreas; Toupance, Thierry

    2012-10-01

    Nanocrystalline tin dioxide (SnO2) ultra-thin films were obtained employing a straightforward solution-based route that involves the calcination of bridged polystannoxane films processed by the sol-gel process from bis(triprop-1-ynylstannyl)alkylene and -arylene precursors. These films have been thoroughly characterized by FTIR, contact angle measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force (AFM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopies. Annealing at a high temperature gave 30-35 nm thick cassiterite SnO2 films with a mean crystallite size ranging from 4 to 7 nm depending on the nature of the organic linker in the distannylated compound used as a precursor. In the presence of H2 and CO gases, these layers led to highly sensitive, reversible and reproducible responses. The sensing properties were discussed in regard to the crystallinity and porosity of the sensing body that can be tuned by the nature of the precursor employed. Organometallic chemistry combined with the sol-gel process therefore offers new possibilities toward metal oxide nanostructures for the reproducible and sensitive detection of combustible and toxic gases.Nanocrystalline tin dioxide (SnO2) ultra-thin films were obtained employing a straightforward solution-based route that involves the calcination of bridged polystannoxane films processed by the sol-gel process from bis(triprop-1-ynylstannyl)alkylene and -arylene precursors. These films have been thoroughly characterized by FTIR, contact angle measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force (AFM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopies. Annealing at a high temperature gave 30-35 nm thick cassiterite SnO2 films with a mean crystallite size ranging from 4 to 7 nm depending on the nature of the organic linker in the distannylated compound used as a precursor. In the presence of H2 and CO gases, these layers led to highly sensitive, reversible and reproducible

  9. Process for CO.sub.2 capture using zeolites from high pressure and moderate temperature gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V [Morgantown, WV; Stevens, Robert W [Morgantown, WV

    2012-03-06

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from a gas stream comprised of CO.sub.2 and other gaseous constituents using a zeolite sorbent in a swing-adsorption process, producing a high temperature CO.sub.2 stream at a higher CO.sub.2 pressure than the input gas stream. The method utilizes CO.sub.2 desorption in a CO.sub.2 atmosphere and effectively integrates heat transfers for optimizes overall efficiency. H.sub.2O adsorption does not preclude effective operation of the sorbent. The cycle may be incorporated in an IGCC for efficient pre-combustion CO.sub.2 capture. A particular application operates on shifted syngas at a temperature exceeding 200.degree. C. and produces a dry CO.sub.2 stream at low temperature and high CO.sub.2 pressure, greatly reducing any compression energy requirements which may be subsequently required.

  10. Engineering liposomes of leaf extract of seabuckthorn (SBT) by supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2)-mediated process.

    PubMed

    Ghatnur, Shashidhar M; Sonale, R Swapna; Balaraman, Manohar; Kadimi, Udaya Sankar

    2012-09-01

    Seabuckthorn (SBT; Hipphophae rhamnoides) leaf extract obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO(2)) using ethanol as an entrainer, containing mainly flavanoids as bioactive principles with antioxidant and antibacterial properties, was used for the preparation of liposomes. Liposomes are promising drug carriers with sustained release because they can enhance the membrane penetration of drugs, deliver the entrapped drugs across cell membranes, and improve extract stability and bioavailability. The aim of the present study was to compare the two different methods of liposome production: the Bangham thin-film method and SCCO(2) gas antisolvent method (SCCO(2) GAS) for the incorporation of SBT leaf extract in terms of particle size, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, antioxidant activity, and thermal stability. Liposomes obtained with the thin-film method were multilamellar vesicles with average particle size (3,740 nm), encapsulation efficiency (14.60%), and particle-size range (1.57-6.0 µm), respectively. On the other hand, liposomes by the SCCO(2) GAS method were nanosized (930 nm) with an improved encapsulation efficiency (28.42%) and narrow range of size distribution (0.48-1.07 µm), respectively. Further, the antioxidant activity of leaf extract of SBT was determined by the 2 diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl method and expressed as Trolox equivalents as well as of the intercalated extract in liposomes. The oxidative stability of SBT encapsulated in liposomes was again estimated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Thermal-oxidative decomposition of the samples (i.e., pure liposomes and encapsulated extracts) and the modification of the main transition temperature for the lipid mixture and the splitting of the calorimetric peak in the presence of the antioxidants were also studied by DSC. After encapsulation in liposomes, antioxidant activity proved to be higher than those of the same extracts in pure form.

  11. Drawing as Instrument, Drawings as Evidence: Capturing Mental Processes with Pencil and Paper

    PubMed Central

    Puglionesi, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Researchers in the mind sciences often look to the production and analysis of drawings to reveal the mental processes of their subjects. This essay presents three episodes that trace the emergence of drawing as an instrumental practice in the study of the mind. Between 1880 and 1930, drawings gained currency as a form of scientific evidence – as stable, reproducible signals from a hidden interior. I begin with the use of drawings as data in the child study movement, move to the telepathic transmission of drawings in psychical research and conclude with the development of drawing as an experimental and diagnostic tool for studying neurological impairment. Despite significant shifts in the theoretical and disciplinary organisation of the mind sciences in the early twentieth century, researchers attempted to stabilise the use of subject-generated drawings as evidence by controlling the contexts in which drawings were produced and reproduced, and crafting subjects whose interiority could be effectively circumscribed. While movements such as psychoanalysis and art therapy would embrace the narrative interpretation of patient art, neuropsychology continued to utilise drawings as material traces of cognitive functions. PMID:27292325

  12. Capturing and Processing Soil GHG Fluxes Using the LI-COR LI-8100A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liukang; McDermitt, Dayle; Hupp, Jason; Johnson, Mark; Madsen, Rod

    2015-04-01

    The LI-COR LI-8100A Automated Soil CO2 Flux System is designed to measure soil CO2 efflux using automated chambers and a non-steady state measurement protocol. While CO2 is an important gas in many contexts, it is not the only gas of interest for many research applications. With some simple plumbing modifications, many third party analyzers capable of measuring other trace gases, e.g. N2O, CH4, or 13CO2 etc., can be interfaced with the LI-8100A System, and LI-COR's data processing software (SoilFluxPro™) can be used to compute fluxes for these additional gases. In this paper we describe considerations for selecting an appropriate third party analyzer to interface with the system, how to integrate data into the system, and the procedure used to compute fluxes of additional gases in SoilFluxPro™. A case study is presented to demonstrate methane flux measurements using an Ultra-Portable Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (Ultra-Portable GGA, model 915-0011), manufactured by Los Gatos Research and integrated into the LI-8100A System. Laboratory and field test results show that the soil CO2 efflux based on the time series of CO2 data measured either with the LI-8100A System or with the Ultra-Portable GGA are essentially the same. This suggests that soil GHG fluxes measured with both systems are reliable.

  13. Optical fibre multi-parameter sensing with secure cloud based signal capture and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newe, Thomas; O'Connell, Eoin; Meere, Damien; Yuan, Hongwei; Leen, Gabriel; O'Keeffe, Sinead; Lewis, Elfed

    2016-05-01

    Recent advancements in cloud computing technologies in the context of optical and optical fibre based systems are reported. The proliferation of real time and multi-channel based sensor systems represents significant growth in data volume. This coupled with a growing need for security presents many challenges and presents a huge opportunity for an evolutionary step in the widespread application of these sensing technologies. A tiered infrastructural system approach is adopted that is designed to facilitate the delivery of Optical Fibre-based "SENsing as a Service- SENaaS". Within this infrastructure, novel optical sensing platforms, deployed within different environments, are interfaced with a Cloud-based backbone infrastructure which facilitates the secure collection, storage and analysis of real-time data. Feedback systems, which harness this data to affect a change within the monitored location/environment/condition, are also discussed. The cloud based system presented here can also be used with chemical and physical sensors that require real-time data analysis, processing and feedback.

  14. Phytochemical, sensory attributes and aroma stability of dense phase carbon dioxide processed Hibiscus sabdariffa beverage during storage.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Rodrigues, Milena M; Plaza, Maria L; Azeredo, Alberto; Balaban, Murat O; Marshall, Maurice R

    2012-10-01

    The effect of dense phase carbon dioxide (DPCD) processing (34.5 MPa, 8% CO₂, 6.5 min, and 40 °C) on phytochemical, sensory and aroma compounds of hibiscus beverage was compared to a conventional thermal process (HTST) (75 °C for 15 s) and a control (untreated beverage) during refrigerated storage (4 °C). The overall likeability of the hibiscus beverage for all treatments was not affected by storage up to week 5. DPCD process retained more aroma volatiles as compared to HTST. Aroma profiles in the beverages were mainly composed of alcohols and aldehydes with 1-octen-3-ol, decanal, octanal, 1-hexanol, and nonanal as the compounds with the highest relative percentage peak areas. A loss of only 9% anthocyanins was observed for the DPCD processed hibiscus beverage. Phytochemical profiles in the hibiscus beverage included caffeoylquinic acids, anthocyanins, and flavonols. No major changes in total phenolics and antioxidant capacity occurred during the 14 weeks of storage.

  15. Efficient utilization of greenhouse gas in a gas-to-liquids process combined with carbon dioxide reforming of methane.

    PubMed

    Ha, Kyoung-Su; Bae, Jong Wook; Woo, Kwang-Jae; Jun, Ki-Won

    2010-02-15

    A process model for a gas-to-liquids (GTL) process mainly producing Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthetic oils has been developed to assess the effects of reforming methods, recycle ratio of unreacted syngas mixture on the process efficiency and the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. The reforming unit of our study is composed of both steam reforming of methane (SRM) and carbon dioxide reforming of methane (CDR) to form syngas, which gives composition flexibility, reduction in GHG emission, and higher cost-competitiveness. With recycling, it is found that zero emission of CO(2) from the process can be realized and the required amount of natural gas (NG) can be significantly reduced. This GTL process model has been built by using Aspen Plus software, and it is mainly composed of a feeding unit, a reforming unit, an FT synthesis unit, several separation units and a recycling unit. The composition flexibility of the syngas mixture due to the two different types of reforming reactions raises an issue that in order to attain the optimized feed composition of FT synthesis the amount of flow rate of each component in the fresh feed mixture should be determined considering the effects of the recycle and its split ratio. In the FT synthesis unit, the 15 representative reactions for the chain growth and water gas shift on the cobalt-based catalyst are considered. After FT synthesis, the unreacted syngas mixture is recycled to the reforming unit or the FT synthesis unit or both to enhance process efficiency. The effect of the split ratio, the recycle flow rate to the FT reactor over the recycle flow rate to the reforming unit, on the efficiency of the process was also investigated. This work shows that greater recycle to the reforming unit is less effective than that to the FT synthesis unit from the standpoint of the net heat efficiency of the process, since the reforming reactions are greatly endothermic and greater recycle to the reformer requires more energy.

  16. Full Scale Field Trial of the Low Temperature Mercury Capture Process

    SciTech Connect

    Locke, James; Winschel, Richard

    2012-05-21

    CONSOL Energy Inc., with partial funding from the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory, designed a full-scale installation for a field trial of the Low-Temperature Mercury Control (LTMC) process, which has the ability to reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants by over 90 percent, by cooling flue gas temperatures to approximately 230°F and absorbing the mercury on the native carbon in the fly ash, as was recently demonstrated by CONSOL R&D on a slip-stream pilot plant at the Allegheny Energy Mitchell Station with partial support by DOE. LTMC has the potential to remove over 90 percent of the flue gas mercury at a cost at least an order of magnitude lower (on a $/lb mercury removed basis) than activated carbon injection. The technology is suitable for retrofitting to existing and new plants, and, although it is best suited to bituminous coal-fired plants, it may have some applicability to the full range of coal types. Installation plans were altered and moved from the original project host site, PPL Martins Creek plant, to a second host site at Allegheny Energy's R. Paul Smith plant, before installation actually occurred at the Jamestown (New York) Board of Public Utilities (BPU) Samuel A. Carlson (Carlson) Municipal Generating Station Unit 12, where the LTMC system was operated on a limited basis. At Carlson, over 60% mercury removal was demonstrated by cooling the flue gas to 220-230°F at the ESP inlet via humidification. The host unit ESP operation was unaffected by the humidification and performed satisfactorily at low temperature conditions.

  17. Sulfur Dioxide Designations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This area provides information on the process EPA, the states, and the tribes follow to designate areas as attainment (meeting) or nonattainment (not meeting) the sulfur dioxide air quality standards.

  18. Carbon Dioxide Capture Technology Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Barrasso, John [R-WY

    2009-11-05

    12/08/2009 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy. Hearings held. With printed Hearing: S.Hrg. 111-330. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. Economic and energetic analysis of capturing CO2 from ambient air.

    PubMed

    House, Kurt Zenz; Baclig, Antonio C; Ranjan, Manya; van Nierop, Ernst A; Wilcox, Jennifer; Herzog, Howard J

    2011-12-20

    Capturing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere ("air capture") in an industrial process has been proposed as an option for stabilizing global CO(2) concentrations. Published analyses suggest these air capture systems may cost a few hundred dollars per tonne of CO(2), making it cost competitive with mainstream CO(2) mitigation options like renewable energy, nuclear power, and carbon dioxide capture and storage from large CO(2) emitting point sources. We investigate the thermodynamic efficiencies of commercial separation systems as well as trace gas removal systems to better understand and constrain the energy requirements and costs of these air capture systems. Our empirical analyses of operating commercial processes suggest that the energetic and financial costs of capturing CO(2) from the air are likely to have been underestimated. Specifically, our analysis of existing gas separation systems suggests that, unless air capture significantly outperforms these systems, it is likely to require more than 400 kJ of work per mole of CO(2), requiring it to be powered by CO(2)-neutral power sources in order to be CO(2) negative. We estimate that total system costs of an air capture system will be on the order of $1,000 per tonne of CO(2), based on experience with as-built large-scale trace gas removal systems.

  20. Mechanisms of CO2 Capture into Monoethanolamine Solution with Different CO2 Loading during the Absorption/Desorption Processes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Bihong; Guo, Bingsong; Zhou, Zuoming; Jing, Guohua

    2015-09-01

    Though the mechanism of MEA-CO2 system has been widely studied, there is few literature on the detailed mechanism of CO2 capture into MEA solution with different CO2 loading during absorption/desorption processes. To get a clear picture of the process mechanism, (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to analyze the reaction intermediates under different CO2 loadings and detailed mechanism on CO2 absorption and desorption in MEA was evaluated in this work. The results demonstrated that the CO2 absorption in MEA started with the formation of carbamate according to the zwitterion mechanism, followed by the hydration of CO2 to form HCO3(-)/CO3(2-), and accompanied by the hydrolysis of carbamate. It is interesting to find that the existence of carbamate will be influenced by CO2 loading and that it is rather unstable at high CO2 loading. At low CO2 loading, carbamate is formed fast by the reaction between CO2 and MEA. At high CO2 loading, it is formed by the reaction of CO3(-)/CO3(2-) with MEA, and the formed carbamate can be easily hydrolyzed by H(+). Moreover, CO2 desorption from the CO2-saturated MEA solution was proved to be a reverse process of absorption. Initially, some HCO3(-) were heated to release CO2 and other HCO3(-) were reacted with carbamic acid (MEAH(+)) to form carbamate, and the carbamate was then decomposed to MEA and CO2.

  1. Poly(1,4-phenyleneazine N,N-dioxide): A recyclable material for a solventless laser-imageable resist process

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, T.H.; Larson, C.E.; Hacker, N.P.

    1994-11-01

    Upon heating under vacuum, poly(1,4-phenyleneazine-N,N-dioxide) depolymerizes to give 1,4-dinitrosobenzene which can be condensed onto a suitable substrate. The nature of the condensate is dependent on the substrate temperature. At temperatures below -110{degrees}C the condensate can be monomeric, at about -50{degrees}C it is a mixture of dimer and oligomers, and at -20{degrees}C it is polymeric. Thick and thin films of the polymer can be rapidly prepared by volatilization of 1,4-dinitrosobenzene from the bulk polymer onto a substrate and allowing the collected condensate to warm to room temperature. The resultant films appear to be stable indefinitely at room temperature and atmospheric pressure yet can be selectively removed from the substrate using a focused visible laser beam. After a suitable image-transfer process, the polymer is removed by heating to 100{degrees}C. The laser imaging, deposition, and final removal of polymer are all nondestructive, thermal processes. Thus if a suitable vacuum chamber equipped with a cooling trap is used for this process, the polymer is 100% recyclable. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Nanoscaled tin dioxide films processed from organotin-based hybrid materials: an organometallic route toward metal oxide gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Renard, Laetitia; Babot, Odile; Saadaoui, Hassan; Fuess, Hartmut; Brötz, Joachim; Gurlo, Aleksander; Arveux, Emmanuel; Klein, Andreas; Toupance, Thierry

    2012-11-07

    Nanocrystalline tin dioxide (SnO(2)) ultra-thin films were obtained employing a straightforward solution-based route that involves the calcination of bridged polystannoxane films processed by the sol-gel process from bis(triprop-1-ynylstannyl)alkylene and -arylene precursors. These films have been thoroughly characterized by FTIR, contact angle measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force (AFM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopies. Annealing at a high temperature gave 30-35 nm thick cassiterite SnO(2) films with a mean crystallite size ranging from 4 to 7 nm depending on the nature of the organic linker in the distannylated compound used as a precursor. In the presence of H(2) and CO gases, these layers led to highly sensitive, reversible and reproducible responses. The sensing properties were discussed in regard to the crystallinity and porosity of the sensing body that can be tuned by the nature of the precursor employed. Organometallic chemistry combined with the sol-gel process therefore offers new possibilities toward metal oxide nanostructures for the reproducible and sensitive detection of combustible and toxic gases.

  3. Synthesizing slow-release fertilizers via mechanochemical processing for potentially recycling the waste ferrous sulfate from titanium dioxide production.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuewei; Lei, Zhiwu; Qu, Jun; Li, Zhao; Zhou, Xiaowen; Zhang, Qiwu

    2017-01-15

    The goal of this study is aimed to develop a novel process to recycle the ferrous sulfate, the by-product of titanium dioxide industry. Zinc sulfate was added in the process of milling ferrous sulfate with calcium carbonate (CaCO3). The sulfates were transformed into carbonates to serve as slow-release fertilizers by co-grinding the starting materials of FeSO4·7H2O, ZnSO4·7H2O, and CaCO3 with small amounts of water in a planetary ball mill. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and quantitative measurements of the soluble ratios in water and 2% citric acid solution. It was found that Fe and Zn ions as sulfates were successfully combined with CaCO3 to form the corresponding Fe and Zn carbonates respectively. After milling, the release ratios of Fe and Zn nutrients in distilled water could be controlled at 0.1% and 0.7% respectively. Meanwhile, the release ratios of them in 2% citric acid solution were almost 98% and 100%. Milling speed was the critical parameter to facilitate the transformation reaction. The proposed process, as an easy and economical route, exhibits evident advantages, namely allowing the use of widely available and low-cost CaCO3 as well as industrial wastes of heavy metal sulfates as starting samples to prepare applicable products.

  4. CHARGED-PARTICLE AND NEUTRON-CAPTURE PROCESSES IN THE HIGH-ENTROPY WIND OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Farouqi, K.; Truran, J. W.; Kratz, K.-L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K. E-mail: truran@nova.uchicago.ed E-mail: k-l.Kratz@mpic.d E-mail: F-K.Thielemann@unibas.c

    2010-04-01

    The astrophysical site of the r-process is still uncertain, and a full exploration of the systematics of this process in terms of its dependence on nuclear properties from stability to the neutron drip-line within realistic stellar environments has still to be undertaken. Sufficiently high neutron-to-seed ratios can only be obtained either in very neutron-rich low-entropy environments or moderately neutron-rich high-entropy environments, related to neutron star mergers (or jets of neutron star matter) and the high-entropy wind of core-collapse supernova explosions. As chemical evolution models seem to disfavor neutron star mergers, we focus here on high-entropy environments characterized by entropy S, electron abundance Y{sub e} , and expansion velocity V{sub exp}. We investigate the termination point of charged-particle reactions, and we define a maximum entropy S{sub final} for a given V{sub exp} and Y{sub e} , beyond which the seed production of heavy elements fails due to the very small matter density. We then investigate whether an r-process subsequent to the charged-particle freeze-out can in principle be understood on the basis of the classical approach, which assumes a chemical equilibrium between neutron captures and photodisintegrations, possibly followed by a beta-flow equilibrium. In particular, we illustrate how long such a chemical equilibrium approximation holds, how the freeze-out from such conditions affects the abundance pattern, and which role the late capture of neutrons originating from beta-delayed neutron emission can play. Furthermore, we analyze the impact of nuclear properties from different theoretical mass models on the final abundances after these late freeze-out phases and beta-decays back to stability. As only a superposition of astrophysical conditions can provide a good fit to the solar r-abundances, the question remains how such superpositions are attained, resulting in the apparently robust r-process pattern observed in low

  5. Cryogenic Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-15

    IMPACCT Project: SES is developing a process to capture CO2 from the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants by desublimation - the conversion of a gas to a solid. Capturing CO2 as a solid and delivering it as a liquid avoids the large energy cost of CO2 gas compression. SES’ capture technology facilitates the prudent use of available energy resources. Coal is our most abundant energy resource and is an excellent fuel for baseline power production. SES capture technology can capture 99% of the CO2 emissions in addition to a wide range of other pollutants more efficiently and at lower costs than existing capture technologies. SES’ capture technology can be readily added to our existing energy infrastructure.

  6. Evaluation of mineral-based additives as sorbents for hazardous trace metal capture and immobilization in incineration process

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesh, S.; Fournier, D.J. Jr.; Waterland, L.R.

    1996-12-31

    Considerable interest exists in the use of mineral-based sorbents for capturing and retaining hazardous constituent trace metals in the incineration process. The suitability of six minerals, silica, diatomaceous earth, kaolin, bauxite, alumina and attapulgite clay, as potential sorbents for the capture and immobilization of trace metals was evaluated. The behavior of five trace metals, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead and nickel was tested. The first five minerals constitute a spectrum of alumino-silicate compounds ranging from pure SiO{sub 2} (silica) to pure Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (alumina). The sixth mineral, attapulgite clay, is primarily a magnesium hydroxide-related test programs at the Incineration Research Facility (IRF) as a carrier of metals and organics in blended synthetic waste streams. The objective of this test program was to evaluate the candidate sorbents with respect to: (1) the degree to which they facilitate retention of the trace metals in the sorbent (2) the degree to which they retain trace metals in the sorbent when subjected to TCLP extraction. Bench-scale tests were conducted in the IRF`s thermal treatability unit (TTU). The test matrix was defined by varying: (1) mineral (sorbent) type (2) treatment temperature; treatment temperatures of 540{degrees}, 700{degrees}, and 870{degrees}C were tested (3) chlorine concentration in the feed; 0 and 4 percent by weight chlorine in the feed were tested. Given the preliminary nature of the tests the results must be viewed qualitatively. Nevertheless, overall trends indicate that under specific conditions, varying for each mineral, all of the mineral sorbents showed promise in limiting metal vaporization, and or TCLP leachability. Combining the dual criteria of limiting metal vaporization and reducing leachability, kaolin and attapulgite clay appear to have the greatest promise as potential sorbents. 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation: process mineralogy of feed and products

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Rush, G.E.; Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Collins, W. Keith

    2002-05-01

    Direct mineral carbonation was investigated as a process to convert gaseous CO[2] into a geologically stable final form. The process utilizes a slurry of water, with bicarbonate and salt additions, mixed with a mineral reactant, such as olivine (Mg[2]SiO[4]) or serpentine [Mg[3]Si[2]O[5](OH)[4

  8. Membrane-based systems for carbon capture and hydrogen purification

    SciTech Connect

    Berchtold, Kathryn A

    2010-11-24

    This presentation describes the activities being conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory to develop carbon capture technologies for power systems. This work is aimed at continued development and demonstration of a membrane based pre- and post-combustion carbon capture technology and separation schemes. Our primary work entails the development and demonstration of an innovative membrane technology for pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide that operates over a broad range of conditions relevant to the power industry while meeting the US DOE's Carbon Sequestration Program goals of 90% CO{sub 2} capture at less than a 10% increase in the cost of energy services. Separating and capturing carbon dioxide from mixed gas streams is a first and critical step in carbon sequestration. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic temperatures and pressures as well as be compatible with large gas volumes. Our project team is developing polymer membranes based on polybenzimidazole (PBI) chemistries that can purify hydrogen and capture CO{sub 2} at industrially relevant temperatures. Our primary objectives are to develop and demonstrate polymer-based membrane chemistries, structures, deployment platforms, and sealing technologies that achieve the critical combination of high selectivity, high permeability, chemical stability, and mechanical stability all at elevated temperatures (> 150 C) and packaged in a scalable, economically viable, high area density system amenable to incorporation into an advanced Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) plant for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. Stability requirements are focused on tolerance to the primary synthesis gas components and impurities at various locations in the IGCC process. Since the process stream compositions and conditions (temperature and pressure) vary throughout the IGCC process, the project is focused on the

  9. Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, S

    2007-10-03

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several

  10. Capture of micrococcin biosynthetic intermediates reveals C-terminal processing as an obligatory step for in vivo maturation.

    PubMed

    Bewley, Kathryn D; Bennallack, Philip R; Burlingame, Mark A; Robison, Richard A; Griffitts, Joel S; Miller, Susan M

    2016-11-01

    Thiopeptides, including micrococcins, are a growing family of bioactive natural products that are ribosomally synthesized and heavily modified. Here we use a refactored, modular in vivo system containing the micrococcin P1 (MP1) biosynthetic genes (TclIJKLMNPS) from Macrococcus caseolyticus str 115 in a genetically tractable Bacillus subtilis strain to parse the processing steps of this pathway. By fusing the micrococcin precursor peptide to an affinity tag and coupling it with catalytically defective enzymes, biosynthetic intermediates were easily captured for analysis. We found that two major phases of molecular maturation are separated by a key C-terminal processing step. Phase-I conversion of six Cys residues to thiazoles (TclIJN) is followed by C-terminal oxidative decarboxylation (TclP). This TclP-mediated oxidative decarboxylation is a required step for the peptide to progress to phase II. In phase II, Ser/Thr dehydration (TclKL) and peptide macrocycle formation (TclM) occurs. A C-terminal reductase, TclS, can optionally act on the substrate peptide, yielding MP1, and is shown to act late in the pathway. This comprehensive characterization of the MP1 pathway prepares the way for future engineering efforts.

  11. Capture of micrococcin biosynthetic intermediates reveals C-terminal processing as an obligatory step for in vivo maturation

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Kathryn D.; Bennallack, Philip R.; Burlingame, Mark A.; Robison, Richard A.; Griffitts, Joel S.

    2016-01-01

    Thiopeptides, including micrococcins, are a growing family of bioactive natural products that are ribosomally synthesized and heavily modified. Here we use a refactored, modular in vivo system containing the micrococcin P1 (MP1) biosynthetic genes (TclIJKLMNPS) from Macrococcus caseolyticus str 115 in a genetically tractable Bacillus subtilis strain to parse the processing steps of this pathway. By fusing the micrococcin precursor peptide to an affinity tag and coupling it with catalytically defective enzymes, biosynthetic intermediates were easily captured for analysis. We found that two major phases of molecular maturation are separated by a key C-terminal processing step. Phase-I conversion of six Cys residues to thiazoles (TclIJN) is followed by C-terminal oxidative decarboxylation (TclP). This TclP-mediated oxidative decarboxylation is a required step for the peptide to progress to phase II. In phase II, Ser/Thr dehydration (TclKL) and peptide macrocycle formation (TclM) occurs. A C-terminal reductase, TclS, can optionally act on the substrate peptide, yielding MP1, and is shown to act late in the pathway. This comprehensive characterization of the MP1 pathway prepares the way for future engineering efforts. PMID:27791142

  12. Process for capturing CO2 arising from the calcination of the CaCO3 used in cement manufacture.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, N; Alonso, M; Grasa, G; Abanades, J Carlos

    2008-09-15

    This paper outlines a new CaCO3 calcination method for producing a stream of CO2 (suitable for permanent geological storage after purification and compression). The process is based on the use of very hot CaO particles (T >1000 degrees C) to transfer heat from a circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC) to a calciner (fluidized with CO2 and/or steam). Since the fluidized bed combustor and calciner have separate atmospheres, the CO2 resulting from the decomposition of CaCO3 can be captured, while the CO2 generated in the combustion of the fuel in air is emitted to the atmosphere. We demonstrate that with this system it is possible to reduce the CO2 emissions of a cement plant by around 60%. Furthermore, since the key pieces of equipment are similar to the commercial CFBCs used in power generation plants, it is possible to establish the additional investment required for the system and to estimate the cost per ton of CO2 avoided for this process to be about 19 $/tCO2 avoided.

  13. Process Design for the Biocatalysis of Value-Added Chemicals from Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Eiteman

    2006-07-31

    This report describes results toward developing a process to sequester CO{sub 2} centered on the enzyme pyruvate carboxylase. The process involves the use of bacteria to convert CO{sub 2} and glucose as a co-substrate and generates succinic acid as a commodity chemical product. The phases of research have included strain development and process development. Though we continue to work on one important component of strain development, the research has principally focused on process development. In the previous year we constructed several strains which would serve as templates for the CO{sub 2} sequestration, including the knock-out of genes involved in the formation of undesirable byproducts. This project period the focus has been on the integration of the pyruvate carboxylase gene (pyc) onto the E. coli chromosome. This has proven to be a difficult task because of relatively low expression of the gene and resulting low enzyme activity when only one copy of the gene is present on the chromosome. Several molecular biology techniques have been applied, with some success, to improve the level of protein activity as described herein. Progress in process development has come as a result of conducting numerous fermentation experiments to select optimal conditions for CO{sub 2} sequestration. This process-related research has progressed in four areas. First, we have clarified the range of pH which results in the optimal rate of sequestration. Second, we have determined how the counterion used to control the pH affects the sequestration rate. Third, we have determined how CO{sub 2} gas phase composition impacts sequestration rate. Finally, we have made progress in determining the affect of several potential gaseous impurities on CO{sub 2} sequestration; in particular we have completed a study using NO{sub 2}. Although the results provide significant guidance as to process conditions for CO{sub 2} sequestration and succinate production, in some cases we do not yet understand

  14. A computational study of carbon dioxide adsorption on solid boron.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiao; Wang, Meng; Li, Zhen; Du, Aijun; Searles, Debra J

    2014-07-07

    Capturing and sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) can provide a route to partial mitigation of climate change associated with anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Here we report a comprehensive theoretical study of CO2 adsorption on two phases of boron, α-B12 and γ-B28. The theoretical results demonstrate that the electron deficient boron materials, such as α-B12 and γ-B28, can bond strongly with CO2 due to Lewis acid-base interactions because the electron density is higher on their surfaces. In order to evaluate the capacity of these boron materials for CO2 capture, we also performed calculations with various degrees of CO2 coverage. The computational results indicate CO2 capture on the boron phases is a kinetically and thermodynamically feasible process, and therefore from this perspective these boron materials are predicted to be good candidates for CO2 capture.

  15. Process Design for the Biocatalysis of Value-Added Chemicals from Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Eiteman

    2005-11-01

    This report describes results toward developing a process to sequester CO{sub 2} centered on the enzyme pyruvate carboxylase. The process involves the use of bacteria to convert CO{sub 2} and glucose as a co-substrate and generates succinic acid as a commodity chemical product. The first phase of this research has focused on strain development and on process development. Progress in strain development has been made in three areas. The gene encoding for alcohol dehydrogenase has been ''knocked out'' of the bacteria, and thereby eliminating the synthesis of the by-product ethanol. The gene for glucokinase has been overexpressed in the production strain with the goal of faster utilization of glucose (and hence CO{sub 2}). Efforts have continued toward integrating pyruvate carboxylase gene (pyc) onto the E. coli chromosome. Progress in process development has come in conducting several dozen fermentation experiments to find a defined medium that would be successful for the growth of the bacteria, while permitting a high rate of CO{sub 2} utilization in a subsequent prolonged production phase. Using this defined medium, the strains that continue to be constructed are being compared for CO{sub 2} utilization, so that we may understand the factors that govern the biological sequestration process.

  16. Process Design for the Biocatalysis of Value-Added Chemicals from Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Eiteman

    2007-07-31

    This report describes results toward developing a process to sequester CO{sub 2} centered on the enzymes PEP carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase. The process involves the use of bacteria to convert CO{sub 2} and glucose as a co-substrate and generates succinic acid as a commodity chemical product. The study reports on strain development and process development. In the area of strain development, knockouts in genes which divert carbon from the enzymatic steps involved in CO{sub 2} consumption were completed, and were shown not to affect significantly the rate of CO{sub 2} sequestration and succinic acid generation. Furthermore, the pyc gene encoding for pyruvate carboxylase proved to be unstable when integrated onto the chromosome. In the area of process development, an optimal medium, pH and base counterion were obtained, leading to a sequestration rate as great as 800 mg/Lh. Detailed studies of gas phase composition demonstrated that CO{sub 2} composition has a significant affect on CO{sub 2} sequestration, while the presence of 'toxic' compounds in the gas, including NO{sub 2}, CO and SO{sub 2} did not have a detrimental effect on sequestration. Some results on prolonging the rate of sequestration indicate that enzyme activities decrease with time, suggesting methods to prolong enzyme activity may benefit the overall process.

  17. An application of CAMx process analysis tools: Exploring process contributions to extreme ozone, nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, David-anthony

    The University at Albany Air Quality Forecasting Modeling System (AQFMS) is a state-of-the-art model that generates reliable daily and "day-ahead" air quality forecasts for the Northeastern United States. The three major categories of processes which dictate regional air quality are production from emission sources, horizontal and vertical transport driven by the prevailing meteorology, and chemical transformations. The Advanced Research WRF (ARW) produces meteorological fields. The Sparse Matrix Operator for Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) processes available emission inventories for air quality modeling. The Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extension (CAMx) handles both chemical processes and the integration of ARW-WRF and SMOKE in devising separate quantitative contributions to pollutant concentrations from process categories. An AQFMS forecast, though indicative of the temporal and spatial changes in the ambient condition, does not tell us exactly how and why those changes occurred. High concentrations of criteria pollutants during "extreme" conditions could come about in many ways. Process analysis takes a step back in numerical procedures to showcase the partial contribution of 18 different processes to the predicted concentration. Area and point source make up the two emission source processes. Advection and diffusion through the west, east, south, north, bottom and top boundary make up the twelve horizontal and vertical transport processes. Gas phase and heterogeneous chemistry make up the two chemical transformation processes, with dry and wet deposition making up the two physio-chemical removal processes. A group of model defined "extreme" intra-day periods in a 12km by 12km grid spacing over The New York Botanical Gardens were evaluated for model performance at the surface and characterized by distinctive modes in which the aforementioned processes contribute to SO2, NOx and O3 concentrations in the vertical layers up to the first 4km of the model

  18. Laboratory differential simulation design method of pressure absorbers for carbonization of phenolate solution by carbon dioxide in coal-tar processing

    SciTech Connect

    Linek, V.; Sinkule, J.; Moucha, T.; Rejl, J.F.

    2009-01-15

    A laboratory differential simulation method is used for the design of carbonization columns at coal-tar processing in which phenols are regenerated from phenolate solution by carbon dioxide absorption. The design method is based on integration of local absorption rates of carbon dioxide along the column. The local absorption rates into industrial phenolate mixture are measured in a laboratory model contactor for various compositions of the gas and liquid phases under the conditions that ensure the absorption rates in the laboratory absorber simulate the local rates in the industrial column. On the bases of the calculations, two-step carbonization columns were designed for 30000 t/year of the phenolate solution treatment by carbon dioxide. The absorption proceeds at higher pressure of 500 kPa and temperatures from 50 to 65 C, pure carbon dioxide is used and toluene is added. These conditions have the following favourable effects: (I) significant size reduction of the columns, (ii) it is possible to process more concentrated solutions without danger of silting the columns by crystallization of NaHCO{sub 3} on the packing. (iii) small amount of inert gas is released, (iv) lower alkalinity and better separability of the organic phase (phenols with toluene) from water phase (soda or bicarbonate solution) in separators.

  19. A calcium oxide sorbent process for bulk separation of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Silaban, A.; Narcida, M.; Harrison, D.P.

    1992-02-01

    The expected commercialization of coal gasification technology in the US and world-wide will create a need for advanced gas purification and separation processes capable of operating at higher temperatures and in more hostile environments than is common today. For example, a high-temperature, high-pressure process capable of separating CO{sub 2} from coal-derived gas may find application in purifying synthesis gas for H{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, or CH{sub 3}OH production. High temperature CO{sub 2} removal has the potential for significantly improving the operating efficiency of integrated gasification-molten carbonate fuel cells for electric power generation. This study proved the technical feasibility of a CO{sub 2}-separation process based upon the regenerable noncatalytic gas-solid reaction between CaO and CO{sub 2} to form CACO{sub 3}. Such a process operating at 650{degree}C and 15 atm with 15% CO{sub 2} in the coal gas has the potential for removing in excess of 99% of the CO{sub 2} fed. Selection of a sorbent precursor which, upon calcination, produces high-porosity CaO is important for achieving rapid and complete reaction. The addition of magnesium to the sorbent appears to improve the multicycle durability at a cost of reduced CO{sub 2} capacity per unit mass of sorbent. Reaction conditions, principally calcination and carbonation temperatures, are important factors in multicycle durability. Reaction pressure and CO{sub 2} concentration are important in so far as the initial rapid reaction rate is concerned, but are relatively unimportant in terms of sorbent capacity and durability. Indirect evidence for the simultaneous occurrence of the shift reaction and CO{sub 2}-removal reaction creates the possibility of a direct one-step process for the production of hydrogen from coal-derived gas.

  20. Laser Capture Microdissection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Bonner, Robert F.; Smith, Paul D.; Chuaqui, Rodrigo F.; Zhuang, Zhengping; Goldstein, Seth R.; Weiss, Rhonda A.; Liotta, Lance A.

    1996-11-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) under direct microscopic visualization permits rapid one-step procurement of selected human cell populations from a section of complex, heterogeneous tissue. In this technique, a transparent thermoplastic film (ethylene vinyl acetate polymer) is applied to the surface of the tissue section on a standard glass histopathology slide; a carbon dioxide laser pulse then specifically activates the film above the cells of interest. Strong focal adhesion allows selective procurement of the targeted cells. Multiple examples of LCM transfer and tissue analysis, including polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA and RNA, and enzyme recovery from transferred tissue are demonstrated.

  1. Inhalation of 7.5% carbon dioxide increases threat processing in humans.

    PubMed

    Garner, Matthew; Attwood, Angela; Baldwin, David S; James, Alexandra; Munafò, Marcus R

    2011-07-01

    Inhalation of 7.5% CO(2) increases anxiety and autonomic arousal in humans, and elicits fear behavior in animals. However, it is not known whether CO(2) challenge in humans induces dysfunction in neurocognitive processes that characterize generalized anxiety, notably selective attention to environmental threat. Healthy volunteers completed an emotional antisaccade task in which they looked toward or away from (inhibited) negative and neutral stimuli during inhalation of 7.5% CO(2) and air. CO(2) inhalation increased anxiety, autonomic arousal, and erroneous eye movements toward threat on antisaccade trials. Autonomic response to CO(2) correlated with hypervigilance to threat (speed to initiate prosaccades) and reduced threat inhibition (increased orienting toward and slower orienting away from threat on antisaccade trials) independent of change in mood. Findings extend evidence that CO(2) triggers fear behavior in animals via direct innervation of a distributed fear network that mobilizes the detection of and allocation of processing resources toward environmental threat in humans.

  2. Effects of ozone and sulfur dioxide on processing tomato yields and quality. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, R.F.

    1986-03-01

    The object of the experiment was to study the effects of SO/sub 2/ and/or ozone on tomato vegetative growth, fruit yields, and fruit quality. Two varieties of processing tomatoes, UC-204-B and E-6203, were exposed to four levels of ozone and two levels of SO/sub 2/. Exposure to ambient ozone caused a 20% reduction in vine weights and 27% reduction in weight of red fruit compared to filtered air. Exposure to 0.1 ppm SO/sub 2/ produced 7% fewer vines and approximately 8% less fruit as compared with no SO/sub 2/ exposure. Fruit quality tests indicated that increasing ozone levels reduce soluble solids (Brix), and they reduce viscosity, an important indicator of processing behavior. Exposure to SO/sub 2/ in the concentrations used increased total solids but had no measurable effect on viscosity or consistency.

  3. Plasma enhanced atomic layer batch processing of aluminum doped titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, Wolfgang; Ruhl, Guenther; Gschwandtner, Alexander

    2012-01-15

    Among many promising high-k dielectrics, TiO{sub 2} is an interesting candidate because of its relatively high k value of over 40 and its easy integration into existing semiconductor manufacturing schemes. The most critical issues of TiO{sub 2} are its low electrical stability and its high leakage current density. However, doping TiO{sub 2} with Al has shown to yield significant improvement of layer quality on Ru electrodes [S. K. Kim et al., Adv. Mater. 20, 1429 (2008)]. In this work we investigated if atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al doped TiO{sub 2} is feasible in a batch system. Electrical characterizations were done using common electrode materials like TiN, TaN, or W. Additionally, the effect of plasma enhanced processing in this reactor was studied. For this investigation a production batch ALD furnace has been retrofitted with a plasma source which can be used for post deposition anneals with oxygen radicals as well as for directly plasma enhanced ALD. After evaluation of several Ti precursors a deposition process for AlTiO{sub x} with excellent film thickness and composition uniformity was developed. The effects of post deposition anneals, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interlayers between electrode and TiO{sub 2}, Al doping concentration, plasma enhanced deposition and electrode material type on leakage current density are shown. An optimized AlTiO{sub x} deposition process on TaN electrodes yields to leakage current density of 5 x 10{sup -7} A/cm{sup 2} at 2 V and k values of about 35. Thus, it could be demonstrated that a plasma enhanced batch ALD process for Al doped TiO{sub 2} is feasible with acceptable leakage current density on a standard electrode material.

  4. Processes regulating progressive nitrogen limitation under elevated carbon dioxide: a meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J.; Qi, X.; Souza, L.; Luo, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogen (N) cycle has the potential to regulate climate change through its influence on carbon (C) sequestration. Although extensive researches have been done to explore whether or not progressive N limitation (PNL) occurs under CO2 enrichment, a comprehensive assessment of the processes that regulate PNL is still lacking. Here, we quantitatively synthesized the responses of all major processes and pools in terrestrial N cycle with meta-analysis of CO2 experimental data available in the literature. The results showed that CO2 enrichment significantly increased N sequestration in plant and litter pools but not in soil pool. Thus, the basis of PNL occurrence partially exists. However, CO2 enrichment also significantly increased the N influx via biological N fixation, but decreased the N efflux via leaching. In addition, no general diminished CO2 fertilization effect on plant growth over time was observed. Overall, our analyses suggest that the extra N supply by the increased biological N fixation and decreased leaching may potentially alleviate PNL under elevated CO2 conditions. Moreover, our synthesis showed that CO2 enrichment increased soil ammonium (NH4+) but decreased nitrate (NO3-). The different responses of NH4+ and NO3-, and the consequent biological processes, may result in changes in soil microenvironment, community structures and above-belowground interactions, which could potentially affect the terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and the feedback to climate change.

  5. New candidate for biofuel feedstock beyond terrestrial biomass for thermo-chemical process (pyrolysis/gasification) enhanced by carbon dioxide (CO2).

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Jeon, Young Jae; Yi, Haakrho

    2012-11-01

    The enhanced thermo-chemical process (i.e., pyrolysis/gasification) of various macroalgae using carbon dioxide (CO(2)) as a reaction medium was mainly investigated. The enhanced thermo-chemical process was achieved by expediting the thermal cracking of volatile chemical species derived from the thermal degradation of the macroalgae. This process enables the modification of the end products from the thermo-chemical process and significant reduction of the amount of condensable hydrocarbons (i.e., tar, ∼50%), thereby directly increasing the efficiency of the gasification process.

  6. Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide to formate with Fe-C electrodes in anaerobic sludge digestion process.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zisheng; Zhang, Yaobin; Li, Yang; Zhao, Huimin; Quan, Xie

    2016-12-01

    Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) to useful chemicals is an attractive strategy to cut its emission in atmosphere. However, high overpotential and energy consumption required in the electrochemical reduction are the major barriers of this process. In this study, a new CO2 reduction technique for production of formic acid was proposed from waste activated sludge digestion in a microbial electrosynthesis system (MES) with iron plate and carbon pillar as the electrodes. Compared with other reactors, methane production of the Fe-C MES reactor was slightly lower and CO2 was undetectable. Instead, considerable formate (672.3 mg/L) and H2 (45.8 mL) were produced in this Fe-C MES reactor, but not found in the other reactors. It should be ascribed to the reduction of CO2 and H(+) at cathode. The reduction of H(+) resulted in a weak alkaline pH (9.3), which made the methanogenesis slightly lower in Fe-C MES.

  7. Biodiesel production with continuous supercritical process: non-catalytic transesterification and esterification with or without carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Ting; Lin, Ho-mu; Lee, Ming-Jer

    2013-10-01

    The non-catalytic transesterification of refined sunflower oil with supercritical methanol, in the presence of carbon dioxide, was conducted in a tubular reactor at temperatures from 553.2 to 593.2K and pressures up to 25.0 MPa. The FAME yield can be achieved up to about 0.70 at 593.2 K and 10.0 MPa in 23 min with methanol:oil of 25:1 in molar ratio. The effect of adding CO2 on the FAME yield is insignificant. The kinetic behavior of the non-catalytic esterification and transesterification of oleic acid or waste cooking oil (WCO) with supercritical methanol was also investigated. By using the supercritical process, the presence of free fatty acid (FFA) in WCO gives positive contribution to FAME production. The FAME yield of 0.90 from WCO can be achieved in 13 min at 573.2K. The kinetic data of supercritical transesterification and esterifaication were correlated well with a power-law model.

  8. Effect of food processing organic matter on photocatalytic bactericidal activity of titanium dioxide (TiO2).

    PubMed

    Yemmireddy, Veerachandra K; Hung, Yen-Con

    2015-07-02

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of food processing organic matter on photocatalytic bactericidal activity of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs). Produce and meat processing wash solutions were prepared using romaine lettuce and ground beef samples. Physico-chemical properties such as pH, turbidity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), total phenolics (for produce) and protein (for meat) content of the extracts were determined using standard procedures. The photocatalytic bactericidal activity of TiO2 (1 mg/mL) in suspension with or without organic matter against Escherichia coli O157:H7 (5-strain) was determined over a period of 3h. Increasing the concentration of organic matter (either produce or meat) from 0% to 100% resulted in 85% decrease in TiO2 microbicidal efficacy. 'Turbidity, total phenolics, and protein contents in wash solutions had significant effect on the log reduction. Increasing the total phenolics content in produce washes from 20 to 114 mg/L decreased the log reduction from 2.7 to 0.38 CFU/mL, whereas increasing the protein content in meat washes from 0.12 to 1.61 mg/L decreased the log reduction from and 5.74 to 0.87 CFU/mL. Also, a linear correlation was observed between COD and total phenolics as well as COD and protein contents. While classical disinfection kinetic models failed to predict, an empirical equation in the form of "Y=me(nX)" (where Y is log reduction, X is COD, and m and n are reaction rate constants) predicted the disinfection kinetics of TiO2 in the presence of organic matter (R(2)=94.4). This study successfully identified an empirical model with COD as a predictor variable to predict the bactericidal efficacy of TiO2 when used in food processing environment.

  9. Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO{sub 2} Capture Process: Preliminary Cost Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Brice; Kniep, Jay; Pingjiao, Hao; Baker, Richard; Rochelle, Gary; Chen, Eric; Frailie, Peter; Ding, Junyuan; Zhang, Yue

    2014-03-31

    This report describes a study of capture costs for a hybrid membrane-absorption capture system based on Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR)’s low-pressure membrane contactors and the University of Texas at Austin’s 5 m piperazine (PZ) Advanced Flash Stripper (AFS; 5 m PZ AFS) based CO2 capture system. The report is submitted for NETL review, and may be superseded by a final topical report on this topic that will be submitted to satisfy the Task 2 report requirement of the current project (DE-FE0013118).

  10. Processes regulating progressive nitrogen limitation under elevated carbon dioxide: a meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Junyi; Qi, Xuan; Souza, Lara; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-05-01

    The nitrogen (N) cycle has the potential to regulate climate change through its influence on carbon (C) sequestration. Although extensive research has explored whether or not progressive N limitation (PNL) occurs under CO2 enrichment, a comprehensive assessment of the processes that regulate PNL is still lacking. Here, we quantitatively synthesized the responses of all major processes and pools in the terrestrial N cycle with meta-analysis of CO2 experimental data available in the literature. The results showed that CO2 enrichment significantly increased N sequestration in the plant and litter pools but not in the soil pool, partially supporting one of the basic assumptions in the PNL hypothesis that elevated CO2 results in more N sequestered in organic pools. However, CO2 enrichment significantly increased the N influx via biological N fixation and the loss via N2O emission, but decreased the N efflux via leaching. In addition, no general diminished CO2 fertilization effect on plant growth was observed over time up to the longest experiment of 13 years. Overall, our analyses suggest that the extra N supply by the increased biological N fixation and decreased leaching may potentially alleviate PNL under elevated CO2 conditions in spite of the increases in plant N sequestration and N2O emission. Moreover, our syntheses indicate that CO2 enrichment increases soil ammonium (NH4+) to nitrate (NO3-) ratio. The changed NH4+/NO3- ratio and subsequent biological processes may result in changes in soil microenvironments, above-belowground community structures and associated interactions, which could potentially affect the terrestrial biogeochemical cycles. In addition, our data synthesis suggests that more long-term studies, especially in regions other than temperate ones, are needed for comprehensive assessments of the PNL hypothesis.

  11. Processes regulating progressive nitrogen limitation under elevated carbon dioxide: a meta-analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Liang, Junyi; Qi, Xuan; Souza, Lara; ...

    2016-05-10

    The nitrogen (N) cycle has the potential to regulate climate change through its influence on carbon (C) sequestration. Although extensive research has explored whether or not progressive N limitation (PNL) occurs under CO2 enrichment, a comprehensive assessment of the processes that regulate PNL is still lacking. Here, we quantitatively synthesized the responses of all major processes and pools in the terrestrial N cycle with meta-analysis of CO2 experimental data available in the literature. The results showed that CO2 enrichment significantly increased N sequestration in the plant and litter pools but not in the soil pool, partially supporting one of themore » basic assumptions in the PNL hypothesis that elevated CO2 results in more N sequestered in organic pools. However, CO2 enrichment significantly increased the N influx via biological N fixation and the loss via N2O emission, but decreased the N efflux via leaching. In addition, no general diminished CO2 fertilization effect on plant growth was observed over time up to the longest experiment of 13 years. Overall, our analyses suggest that the extra N supply by the increased biological N fixation and decreased leaching may potentially alleviate PNL under elevated CO2 conditions in spite of the increases in plant N sequestration and N2O emission. Moreover, our syntheses indicate that CO2 enrichment increases soil ammonium (NH4+) to nitrate (NO3−) ratio. The changed NH4+/NO3− ratio and subsequent biological processes may result in changes in soil microenvironments, above-belowground community structures and associated interactions, which could potentially affect the terrestrial biogeochemical cycles. In addition, our data synthesis suggests that more long-term studies, especially in regions other than temperate ones, are needed for comprehensive assessments of the PNL hypothesis.« less

  12. Economic and energetic analysis of capturing CO2 from ambient air

    PubMed Central

    House, Kurt Zenz; Baclig, Antonio C.; Ranjan, Manya; van Nierop, Ernst A.; Wilcox, Jennifer; Herzog, Howard J.

    2011-01-01

    Capturing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere (“air capture”) in an industrial process has been proposed as an option for stabilizing global CO2 concentrations. Published analyses suggest these air capture systems may cost a few hundred dollars per tonne of CO2, making it cost competitive with mainstream CO2 mitigation options like renewable energy, nuclear power, and carbon dioxide capture and storage from large CO2 emitting point sources. We investigate the thermodynamic efficiencies of commercial separation systems as well as trace gas removal systems to better understand and constrain the energy requirements and costs of these air capture systems. Our empirical analyses of operating commercial processes suggest that the energetic and financial costs of capturing CO2 from the air are likely to have been underestimated. Specifically, our analysis of existing gas separation systems suggests that, unless air capture significantly outperforms these systems, it is likely to require more than 400 kJ of work per mole of CO2, requiring it to be powered by CO2-neutral power sources in order to be CO2 negative. We estimate that total system costs of an air capture system will be on the order of $1,000 per tonne of CO2, based on experience with as-built large-scale trace gas removal systems. PMID:22143760

  13. High energy ball milling and supercritical carbon dioxide impregnation as co-processing methods to improve dissolution of tadalafil.

    PubMed

    Krupa, Anna; Descamps, Marc; Willart, Jean-François; Jachowicz, Renata; Danède, Florence

    2016-12-01

    Tadalafil (TD) is a crystalline drug of a high melting point (Tm=299°C) and limited solubility in water (<5μg/mL). These properties may result in reduced and variable bioavailability after oral administration. Since the melting of TD is followed by its decomposition, the drug processing at high temperatures is limited. The aim of the research is, therefore, to improve the dissolution of TD by its co-processing with the hydrophilic polymer Soluplus® (SL) at temperatures below 40°C. In this study, two methods, i.e. high energy ball-milling and supercritical carbon dioxide impregnation (scCO2) are compared, with the aim to predict their suitability for the vitrification of TD. The influence of the amount of SL and the kind of co-processing method on TD thermal properties is analyzed. The results show that only the high energy ball milling process makes it possible to obtain a completely amorphous form of TD, with the characteristic X-ray 'halo' pattern. The intensity of the Bragg peaks diminishes for all the formulations treated with scCO2, but these samples remain crystalline. The MDSC results show that high energy ball milling is capable of forcing the mixing of TD and SL at a molecular level, providing a homogeneous amorphous solid solution. The glass transition temperatures (Tg), determined for the co-milled formulations, range from 79°C to 139°C and they are higher than Tg of pure SL (ca. 70°C) and lower than Tg of pure TD (ca. 149°C). In contrast to the co-milled formulations which are in the form of powder, all the formulations after scCO2 impregnation form a hard residue, sticking to the reaction vessel, which needs to be ground before analysis or further processing. Finally, the dissolution studies show that not only has SL a beneficial effect on the amount of TD dissolved, but also both co-processing methods make the dissolution enhancement of TD possible. After co-processing by scCO2, the amount of TD dissolved increases with the decreasing amount

  14. Reaction Mechanism for m-Xylene Oxidation in the Claus Process by Sulfur Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sourab; Raj, Abhijeet; Al Shoaibi, Ahmed S; Chung, Suk Ho

    2015-09-24

    In the Claus process, the presence of aromatic contaminants such benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX), in the H2S feed stream has a detrimental effect on catalytic reactors, where BTX form soot particles and clog and deactivate the catalysts. Among BTX, xylenes are proven to be most damaging contaminant for catalysts. BTX oxidation in the Claus furnace, before they enter catalyst beds, provides a solution to this problem. A reaction kinetics study on m-xylene oxidation by SO2, an oxidant present in Claus furnace, is presented. The density functional theory is used to study the formation of m-xylene radicals (3-methylbenzyl, 2,6-dimethylphenyl, 2,4-dimethylphenyl, and 3,5-dimethylphenyl) through H-abstraction and their oxidation by SO2. The mechanism begins with SO2 addition on the radicals through an O-atom rather than the S-atom with the release of 180.0-183.1 kJ/mol of reaction energies. This exothermic reaction involves energy barriers in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ/mol for several m-xylene radicals. Thereafter, O-S bond scission takes place to release SO, and the O-atom remaining on aromatics leads to CO formation. Among four m-xylene radicals, the resonantly stabilized 3-methylbenzyl exhibited the lowest SO2 addition and SO elimination rates. The reaction rate constants are provided to facilitate Claus process simulations to find conditions suitable for BTX oxidation.

  15. Molecular level energy and electron transfer processes at nanocrystalline titanium dioxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzad, Fereshteh

    This thesis describes photo-induced molecular electron and energy transfer processes occurring at nanocrystalline semiconductor interfaces. The Introductory Chapter provides background and describes how these materials may be useful for solar energy conversion. In Chapter 2, results describing excitation of Ru(deeb)(bpy)2 2+, bis(2,2'-bipyridine)(2,2'-bipyridine-4,4 '-diethylester)ruthenium(II) hexafluorophosphate, bound to nanocrystalline TiO2 thin films, immersed in an acetonitrile bath are presented. The data indicates that light excitation forms predominately long-lived metal-to-ligand charge-transfer, MLCT, excited states under these conditions. Modeling of the data as a function of irradiance has been accomplished assuming parallel unimolecular and bimolecular excited state deactivation processes. The quantum yield for excited state formation depends on the excitation irradiance, consistent with triplet-triplet annihilation processes that occur with k > 1 x 108 s-1. Chapter 3 extends the work described in Chapter 2 to LiClO4 acetonitrile solutions. Li+ addition results in a red shift in the MLCT absorption and photoluminescence, PL, and a concentration dependent quenching of the PL intensity on TiO2. The Li+ induced spectroscopic changes were found to be reversible by varying the electrolyte composition. A second-order kinetic model quantified charge recombination transients. A model is proposed wherein Li+ ion adsorption stabilizes TiO2 acceptor states resulting in energetically more favorable interfacial electron transfer. The photophysical and photoelectrochemical properties of porous nanocrystalline anatase TiO2 electrodes modified with Ru(deeb)(bpy)2 2+, Os(deeb)(bpy)22+, and mixtures of both are described in Chapters 4 and 5. In regenerative solar cells with 0.5 M LiI/0.05 M I2 acetonitrile electrolyte, both compounds efficiently inject electrons into TiO2 producing monochromatic incident photon-to-current efficiencies (IPCE), IPCE (460 nm) = 0.70 + 0

  16. Bench-scale Development of an Advanced Solid Sorbent-based CO2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Thomas; Kataria, Atish; Soukri, Mustapha; Farmer, Justin; Mobley, Paul; Tanthana, Jak; Wang, Dongxiang; Wang, Xiaoxing; Song, Chunshan

    2015-12-31

    It is increasingly clear that CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) must play a critical role in curbing worldwide CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. Development of these technologies to cost-effectively remove CO2 from coal-fired power plants is very important to mitigating the impact these power plants have within the world’s power generation portfolio. Currently, conventional CO2 capture technologies, such as aqueous-monoethanolamine based solvent systems, are prohibitively expensive and if implemented could result in a 75 to 100% increase in the cost of electricity for consumers worldwide. Solid sorbent CO2 capture processes – such as RTI’s Advanced Solid Sorbent CO2, Capture Process – are promising alternatives to conventional, liquid solvents. Supported amine sorbents – of the nature RTI has developed – are particularly attractive due to their high CO2 loadings, low heat capacities, reduced corrosivity/volatility and the potential to reduce the regeneration energy needed to carry out CO2 capture. Previous work in this area has failed to adequately address various technology challenges such as sorbent stability and regenerability, sorbent scale-up, improved physical strength and attrition-resistance, proper heat management and temperature control, proper solids handling and circulation control, as well as the proper coupling of process engineering advancements that are tailored for a promising sorbent technology. The remaining challenges for these sorbent processes have provided the framework for the project team’s research and development and target for advancing the technology beyond lab- and bench-scale testing. Under a cooperative agreement with the US Department of Energy, and part of NETL’s CO2 Capture Program, RTI has led an effort to address and mitigate the challenges associated with solid sorbent CO2 capture. The overall objective

  17. Fabrication of nanostructured metal oxide films with supercritical carbon dioxide: Processing and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Eunyoung

    Nanostructured metal oxide films have many applications in catalysis, microele