Science.gov

Sample records for dioxide effects research

  1. Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program. Carbon Dioxide Research Progress Report, fiscal year 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlman, R. C.; Gross, T.; Machta, L.; Elliott, W.; MacCracken, M.

    1980-04-01

    Research on the global carbon cycle and the effects of increased carbon dioxide on the global climate system is reported. Environmental and societal effects related to CO/sub 2/ and environmental control technology for CO/sub 2/ are also discussed. Lists of research projects and reports and publications of the Carbon Dioxide and Climate Research Program are included. An expanded CO/sub 2/ monitoring network is providing increased coverage for interpretation of patterns of sources and sinks seasonal variability, and documentation of the global growth of CO/sub 2/. Modeling studies emphasized that knowledge of the transport and mixing of surface ocean waters is important in understanding deep oceanic circulation. Initial studies in the equatorial Pacific are helping quantify estimates of the amount of outgassing CO/sub 2/ from tropical waters. During fiscal year 1979, there was a substantial increase in appreciation of the role of the ocean in controlling not only atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations but also the climatic response to changes in concentration. Model simulations of the effect of doubled CO/sub 2/ concentration carried out with fixed ocean temperatures a situation that is possible during perhaps the next 20 years, showed relatively small summer heating over land areas. On the other hand, simulations in which the oceanic temperatures could come into instantaneous equilibrium with atmospheric conditions continued to show global temperature increases of 3 +- 1.5/sup 0/C, accentuated at high latitudes. To improve understanding of possible regional climate changes, there were increased efforts to reconstruct regional climatic patterns prevailing during past warm periods that might serve as analogs of future climatic conditions. Particular attention was directed to the climates of the United States and other countries bordering the North Atlantic Ocean during the warm period 5000 to 7000 years ago.

  2. Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program: Proceedings of the carbon dioxide and climate research program conference

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, L E

    1980-12-01

    Papers presented at the Carbon Dioxide and Climate Research Program Conference are included in this volume. Topics discussed are: the carbon cycle; modeling the carbon system; climatic response due to increased CO2; climate modeling; the use of paleoclimatic data in understanding climate change; attitudes and implications of CO2; social responses to the CO2 problem; a scenario for atmospheric CO2 to 2025; marine photosynthesis and the global carbon cycle; and the role of tropical forests in the carbon balance of the world. Separate abstracts of nine papers have been prepared for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  3. Carbon dioxide effects research and assessment program. A comprehensive plan. Part I. The global carbon cycle and climatic effects of increasing carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Slade, David H.

    1980-08-01

    Initial plans for research of the carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) and climate issue were prepared in 1978 and were reviewed extensively at that time by federal agencies and members of the scientific community. Since then the plans have been used to guide early phases of the Department of Energy's and the nation's efforts related to this issue. This document represents a revision of the 1978 plan to (a) reflect recent ideas and strategies for carbon cycle research, and (b) expand the scope of research on climatic responses to increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO/sub 2/. The revised plan takes into account a number of investigations already being supported by various agencies, and it attempts to build on or add to existing research where there is a crucial need for information directly related to the CO/sub 2/ issue. It should be recognized that this document is the first section of a comprehensive plan on the overall consequences of increasing concentrations of CO/sub 2/, and includes guidelines for research on the Global Carbon Cycle and Climatic Effects of Increasing CO/sub 2/.

  4. Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program. Environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2//sup -/ induced climate change: a research agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    In adding carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, mankind is unintentionally conducting a great biological and geophysical experiment. This experiment can be expected to increase scientific understanding of ecological systems and of the processes in the ocean and the atmosphere that partially determine world climate. But from the standpoint of governments and peoples, the major problem to be solved is to understand the nature of the impacts on societies of rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/), with the objective of avoiding or ameliorating unfavorable impacts and gaining most benefit from favorable impacts. The research program proposed herein is designed to provide the understanding needed to achieve this objective. It is based on a recognition of the distinctive characteristics of the CO/sub 2/ problem. It is concluded that three kinds of research on the consequences of rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide and possible climatic changes are called for: assessment of risks; research to enhance beneficial effects and lessen harmful ones, where this is possible, and to slow down rates of carbon dioxide emission; and study of potential social and institutional responses to projected climatic changes.

  5. The 35% carbon dioxide test in stress and panic research: overview of effects and integration of findings.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Kristin; Jafarpour, Sepehr; Mofidi, Amirsalar; Rafat, Bijan; Woznica, Andrea

    2012-04-01

    The carbon dioxide test--a vital capacity breath of air containing 35% carbon dioxide (CO(2))--provokes panic attacks in many individuals with panic disorder (PD). It has thus been extensively used as an experimental model of panic and less frequently as a clinical method of provoking symptoms for interoceptive exposure treatment. Recently, stress researchers have suggested another use for the CO(2) test: that of an acute physiological stressor indexing the human stress response. The purpose of this review is to synthesize findings about the effects of the CO(2) test from both the panic and stress literatures in order to advance understanding about this increasingly popular test. Both panic and stress researchers have examined the fleeting effects of the CO(2) test, finding that the test engenders transient breathlessness, dizziness, and minor anxiety in most participants and panic attacks in those with or at risk for PD. Physiological measurements after the test indicate a brief homeostatic disruption in many bodily systems, including increased respiration, systolic blood pressure, and noradrenaline, and decreased heart rate. Most studies indicate increased cortisol. Possible benefits of integrating findings from the panic and stress research lines, given their common use of the CO(2) test, are discussed.

  6. Carbon dioxide research plan. A summary

    SciTech Connect

    Trivelpiece, Alvin W.; Koomanoff, F. A.; Suomi, Verner E.

    1983-11-01

    The Department of Energy is the lead federal agency for research related to atmospheric carbon dioxide. Its responsibility is to sponsor a program of relevant research, and to coordinate this research with that of others. As part of its responsibilities, the Department of Energy has prepared a research plan. The plan documented in this Summary delineated the logic, objectives, organization, background and current status of the research activities. The Summary Plan is based on research subplans in four specific areas: global carbon cycle, climate effects, vegetative response and indirect effects. These subplans have emanated from a series of national and international workshops, conferences, and from technical reports. The plans have been peer reviewed by experts in the relevant scientific fields. Their execution is being coordinated between the responsible federal and international government agencies and the involved scientific community.

  7. Carbon dioxide and climate: Summaries of research in FY 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    Detailed worldwide measurements indicate that the amount of carbon dioxide in the earth's atmosphere has increased about 25 percent during the past 188 years, primarily because of fossil-fuel combustion and deforestation. Carbon dioxide is one of several trace gases that can modify the earth's heat balance by absorbing outgoing radiation from the earth's surface, thereby increasing the amount of heat retained by the atmosphere--the so-called greenhouse effect. Scientific analyses suggest that this increase could substantially affect climate, agriculture, and other human endeavors. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program is aimed at improving the scientific knowledge base to enable researchers to project future atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, to estimate carbon dioxide-induced global and regional climate changes, and to assess the responses of vegetation to higher concentrations of carbon dioxide and changing climate. The Department of Energy is the lead federal agency for research related to atmospheric carbon dioxide. Its responsibility is to sponsor a program of directed research and to coordinate this research with relevant activities of other federal agencies, private concerns, and international institutions. This Program Summary documents the activities and products of the Carbon Dioxide Research (CDR) Program in Fiscal Year 1988. The Summary provides descriptions of all projects funded during the year and a brief overview of the CDR Program's goals, objectives, and organization. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  8. Proceedings: carbon dioxide research conference: carbon dioxide, science and consensus

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Papers presented discussed the carbon cycle climate modelling, the West Antarctic ice sheet, and first detection of climate change. An appendix lists the carbon dioxide research programs of the European Community and of the World Meteorological Organization. A list of delegates is also included.

  9. Effects of carbon dioxide on Penicillium chrysogenum: an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, A.G.; Ho, C.S.

    1988-06-20

    Previous research has shown that dissolved carbon dioxide causes significant changes in submerged penicillin fermentations, such as stunted, swollen hyphae, increased branching, lower growth rates, and lower penicillin productivity. Influent carbon dioxide levels of 5 and 10% were shown through the use of autoradiography to cause an increase in chitin synthesis in submerged cultures of Penicillium chrysogenum. At an influent 5% carbon dioxide level, chitin synthesis is ca. 100% greater in the subapical region of P. chrysogenum hyphae than that of the control, in which there was no influent carbon dioxide. Influent carbon dioxide of 10% caused an increase of 200% in chitin synthesis. It is believed that the cell wall must be plasticized before branching can occur and that high amounts of dissolved carbon dioxide cause the cell to lose control of the plasticizing effect, thus the severe morphological changes occur.

  10. Enhanced research program on the long-range climatic effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide -- A continuation

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, W.M.; Meehl, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    In the past year, the authors have reached several important milestones in the modeling and analysis of increased greenhouse-gas-caused climate change. Some of this work was highlighted in the recent update of the 1992 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report. The milestones are (1) analysis of the ongoing control and transient experiments out to 70 years, (2) development and testing of a new-generation coupled model, (3) analysis of natural variability and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate change, (4) examination of the role of cirrus albedo in global climate sensitivity, (5) participation in various model intercomparisons, and (6) assistance with an exhibit on the greenhouse effect at the Franklin Institute Museum in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Although this latter activity was not part of the planned research, they felt that the contribution to the exhibit would benefit science education).

  11. Thermodynamical effects during carbon dioxide release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. K.; Böttcher, N.; Görke, U.-J.; Kolditz, O.

    2012-04-01

    Pruess [1] investigated the risk of carbon dioxide leakage from shallow storage sites by modeling scenarios. Such a fluid release is associated with mechanical work performed by formation fluid against expansion without taking heat from ambient environment. Understanding of heat related to mechanical work is essential to predict the temperature at the leak. According to the first law of thermodynamics, internal energy of working fluid decreases with an amount which is equivalent to this work hence, working fluid lost its own heat. Such kind of heat loss depends strongly on whether the expansion process is adiabatic or isothermal. Isothermal expansion allows the working fluid to interact thermally with the solid matrix. Adiabatic expansion is an isenthalpic process that takes heat from the working fluid and the ambient environment remains unchanged. This work is part of the CLEAN research project [6]. In this study, thermodynamic effects of mechanical work during eventual carbon dioxide leakage are investigated numerically. In particular, we are interested to detect the temperature at leakage scenarios and its deviation with different thermodynamic processes. Finite element simulation is conducted with a two-dimensional rectangular geometry representing a shallow storage site which bottom was located at -300m below the land surface. A fully saturated porous medium is assumed where the pore space is filled completely with carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide accumulated in the secondary trap at 30 Bar and 24 °C is allowed to leak from top right point of rectangle with atmospheric pressure. With (i) adiabatic and (ii) isothermal compressibility factors, temperature around leakage area has been calculated which show a significant difference. With some simplification, this study detects leak temperature which is very close with [1]. Temporal evaluation at the leaky area shows that the working fluid temperature can be reduced to -20 °C when the leakage scenario is performed

  12. On the psychotropic effects of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Colasanti, Alessandro; Esquivel, Gabriel; Schruers, Koen J; Griez, Eric J

    2012-01-01

    It has been well established that the inhalation of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) can induce in humans an emotion closely replicating spontaneous panic attacks, as defined by current psychiatry nosology. The purpose of this review is to provide a critical summary of the data regarding CO2's psychopharmacological properties and underlying mechanisms. The authors review the literature on the human and animal response for the exposure of exogenous CO2 focusing on five points of interest: 1) the early history of the use of CO2 as an anesthetic and therapeutic agent, 2) the subjective effects of breathing CO2 at different concentrations in humans, 3) the use of CO2 in experimental psychiatric research as an experimental model of panic, 4) the pharmacological modulation of CO2-induced responses, and 5) the putative neurobiological mechanisms underlying the affective state induced by CO2. The authors conclude with an evolutionary-inspired notion that CO2 might act as an agent of a primal emotion serving a homeostatic function, in the control of respiration and acid-base balance.

  13. [Titanium dioxide nanoparticles--biological effects].

    PubMed

    Świdwińska-Gajewska, Anna Maria; Czerczak, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Titanium dioxide occurs as particles of various sizes. Particles of up to 100 nm, corresponding to nanoparticles, and in the size range of 0.1-3 mm are the most frequently used. Titanium dioxide in a bulk form is not classified as dangerous substance, nevertheless nanoparticles may cause adverse health effects. Inhalation exposure to nano-TiO2, causes pulmonary inflammation that may lead to fibrotic and proliferative changes in the lungs. Many studies confirm the genotoxic effect of TiO2, especially in the form of nanoparticles, on mammal and human cells. In rats exposed to TiO2-nanoparticles by inhalation the development of tumors has been observed. However, there is no evidence of additional lung cancer risk or mortality in workers exposed to TiO2 dust. There are some studies demonstrating the adverse effect of TiO2-nanoparticles on fetal development, as well as on reproduction of animals. TiO2 nanoparticles find a still wider application and thus the risk of occupational exposure to this substance increases as well. Considering such alarming data on the biological activity of TiO2 nanoparticles, more attention should be paid to occupational exposure and its health effects. Properties of the nanoparticles, due to their larger surface area and reactivity, differ significantly from the inhalable dust of TiO2, for which the hygiene standards are mandatory in Poland.

  14. Influence of experimental pulmonary emphysema on toxicological effects from inhaled nitrogen dioxide and diesel exhaust. Research report, January 1984-September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Mauderly, J.L.; Bice, D.E.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gillett, N.A.; Henderson, R.F.

    1990-02-01

    The hypothesis tested in the project was that rats with preexisting experimentally-induced pulmonary emphysema were more susceptible than rats with normal lungs to the adverse effects of exposure to NO(sub 2) or diesel exhaust. Rats were exposed by inhalation seven hr/day, five day/wk, for 24 months to NO(sub 2) at 9.5 ppm, or to diesel exhaust at 3.5 mg soot/cu m, or to clean air. Pulmonary emphysema was induced in one-half of the rats by intratracheal instillation of elastase, six weeks before exposures. Nonneoplastic endpoints were evaluated after 12, 18, and 24 months of exposure. Nitrogen dioxide exposure of normal rats caused mild epithelial hyperplasia and inflammation in proximal alveoli. Significant interactions between the influences of emphysema and nitrogen dioxide were demonstrated to be additive for four parameters (out of 61 parameters). Diesel-exhaust exposure of normal rats caused progressive, focal inflammation, and epithelial proliferation. The final soot lung burden was only one-third of that in nonemphysematous lungs.

  15. Master index for the carbon dioxide research state-of-the-art report series

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, M P

    1987-03-01

    Four State of the Art (SOA) reports, ''Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and the Global Carbon Cycle,'' ''Direct Effects of Increasing Carbon Dioxide on Vegetation,'' ''Detecting the Climatic Effects of Increasing Carbon Dioxide,'' and ''Projecting the Climatic Effects of Increasing Carbon Dioxide,'' and two companion reports, ''Characterization of Information Requirements for Studies of CO/sub 2/ Effects: Water Resources, Agriculture, Fisheries, Forests and Human Health'' and ''Glaciers, Ice Sheets, and Sea Level: Effect of a CO/sub 2/-Induced Climatic Change,'' were published by the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Division. Considerable information on atmospheric carbon dioxide and its possible effects on world climate is summarized in these six volumes. Each volume has its own index, but to make the information that is distributed throughout the six volumes more accessible and usable, comprehensive citation and subject indexes have been compiled. The subject indexes of the individual volumes have been edited to provide a uniformity from volume to volume and also to draw distinctions not needed in the separate volumes' indexes. Also, the comprehensive subject index has been formatted in a matrix arrangement to graphically show the distribution of subject treatment from volume to volume. Other aids include cross references between the scientific and common names of the animals and plants referred to, a glossary of special terms used, tables of data and conversion factors related to the data, and explanations of the acronyms and initialisms used in the texts of the six volumes. The executive summaries of the six volumes are collected and reproduced to allow the readers interested in the contents of one volume to rapidly gain information on the contents of the other volumes.

  16. Carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. [and other research projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F. S.

    1974-01-01

    Research projects for the period ending September 15, 1973 are reported as follows: (1) the abundances of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, and the processes by which it is released from carbonate deposits in the earth and then transferred to organic material by photosynthesis; the pathways for movement of carbon and oxygen through the atmosphere; (2) space science computation assistance by PDP computer; the performance characteristics and user instances; (3) OGO-6 data analysis studies of the variations of nighttime ion temperature in the upper atmosphere.

  17. Effects of carbon dioxide on laryngeal receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.W.; Sant'Ambrogio, F.B.; Orani, G.P.; Sant'Ambrogio, G.; Mathew, O.P. )

    1990-02-26

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) either stimulates or inhibits laryngeal receptors in the cat. The aim of this study was to correlate the CO{sub 2} response of laryngeal receptors with their response to other known stimuli (i.e. pressure, movement, cold, water and smoke). Single unit action potentials were recorded from fibers in the superior laryngeal nerve of 5 anesthetized, spontaneously breathing dogs together with CO{sub 2} concentration, esophageal and subglottic pressure. Constant streams of warm, humidified air or 10% CO{sub 2} in O{sub 2} were passed through the functionally isolated upper airway for 60 s. Eight of 13 randomly firing or silent receptors were stimulated by CO{sub 2} (from 0.4{plus minus}0.1 to 1.8{plus minus}0.4 imp.s). These non-respiratory-modulated receptors were more strongly stimulated by solutions lacking Cl{sup {minus}} and/or cigarette smoke. Six of 21 respiratory modulated receptors (responding to pressure and/or laryngeal motion) were either inhibited or stimulated by CO{sub 2}. Our results show that no laryngeal receptor responds only to CO{sub 2}. Silent or randomly active receptors were stimulated most often by CO{sub 2} consistent with the reflex effect of CO{sub 2} in the larynx.

  18. Review of carbon dioxide research staffing and academic support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. B.; Howard, L.; Stevenson, W.; Trice, J.

    1985-04-01

    More than 60 percent of the staff on Carbon Dioxide Research Division (CDRD) projects were university affiliated, and over one third of project scientists and engineers also had university teaching responsibilities. Almost 20 percent of project staff were students. CO2 research is unlikely to affect the general labor market for scientists and engineers because it uses such a small portion of the total pool. On the other hand, anticipated tight labor markets in some disciplines important to CO2 research may make it advantageous for CDRD to expand its support of university faculty, students, and staff to ensure that competent, knowledgeable researchers and managers are available for eventual policy decisions on CO2 issues. Options for academic support that lend themselves readily to the diffuse nature of CO2 research, while providing flexibility in the identification and accomplishment of specific programmatic objectives, include modifying procurement procedures for research contracts to enhance academic involvement, sponsoring summer institutes tailored to specific participants and focused on issues of interest to CDRD, and supporting traveling lecture programs designed to bring information of concern to CDRD to technical and nontechnical audiences.

  19. RESEARCH ON ELECTRIC ARC REDUCTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CARBON DIOXIDE , REDUCTION(CHEMISTRY), ELECTRIC ARCS, CHEMICAL REACTIONS, HEAT OF REACTION, GAS FLOW, OXYGEN, CARBON COMPOUNDS, MONOXIDES, ELECTRODES, LABORATORY EQUIPMENT, HIGH TEMPERATURE, PLASMAS(PHYSICS), ENERGY.

  20. The immunomodulatory effects of titanium dioxide and silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lappas, Courtney M

    2015-11-01

    Due to their characteristic physical, chemical and optical properties, titanium dioxide and silver nanoparticles are attractive tools for use in a wide range of applications. The use of nanoparticles for biological applications is, however, dependent upon their biocompatibility with living cells. Because of the importance of inflammation as a modulator of human health, the safe and efficacious in vivo use of titanium dioxide and silver nanoparticles is inherently linked to a favorable interaction with immune system cells. However, both titanium dioxide and silver nanoparticles have demonstrated potential to exert immunomodulatory and immunotoxic effects. Titanium dioxide and silver nanoparticles are readily internalized by immune system cells, may accumulate in peripheral lymphoid organs, and can influence multiple manifestations of immune cell activity. Although the factors influencing the biocompatibility of titanium dioxide and silver nanoparticles with immune system cells have not been fully elucidated, nanoparticle core composition, size, concentration and the duration of cell exposure seem to be important. Because titanium dioxide and silver nanoparticles are widely utilized in pharmaceutical, commercial and industrial products, it is vital that their effects on human health and immune system function be more thoroughly evaluated.

  1. [Research progress about the relationship between nanoparticles silicon dioxide and lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Dai, Chun; Huang, Yunchao; Zhou, Yongchun

    2014-10-20

    Nano-silicon dioxide widely distributed in plastic, rubber, ceramics, paint, adhesives, and many other fields, and it is the product of coal combustion. A growing evidence shows that nano-silicon dioxide has certain correlation with respiratory system disease. In this paper, we synthesized existing researches of domestic and abroad, summarized the lung toxicity of nanoparticles. This article are reviewed from the physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles silicon dioxide, exposure conditions and environment, and the pathogenic mechanism of nano-silicon dioxide.

  2. The travel-related carbon dioxide emissions of atmospheric researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stohl, A.

    2008-04-01

    Most atmospheric scientists agree that greenhouse gas emissions have already caused significant changes to the global climate system and that these changes will accelerate in the near future. At the same time, atmospheric scientists who - like other scientists - rely on international collaboration and information exchange travel a lot and, thereby, cause substantial emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2). In this paper, the CO2 emissions of the employees working at an atmospheric research institute (the Norwegian Institute for Air Research, NILU) caused by all types of business travel (conference visits, workshops, field campaigns, instrument maintainance, etc.) were calculated for the years 2005-2007. It is estimated that more than 90% of the emissions were caused by air travel, 3% by ground travel and 5% by hotel usage. The travel-related annual emissions were between 1.9 and 2.4 t CO2 per employee or between 3.9 and 5.5 t CO2 per scientist. For comparison, the total annual per capita CO2 emissions are 4.5 t worldwide, 1.2 t for India, 3.8 t for China, 5.9 t for Sweden and 19.1 t for Norway. The travel-related CO2 emissions of a NILU scientist, occurring in 24 days of a year on average, exceed the global average annual per capita emission. Norway's per-capita CO2 emissions are among the highest in the world, mostly because of the emissions from the oil industry. If the emissions per NILU scientist derived in this paper are taken as representative for the average Norwegian researcher, travel by Norwegian scientists would nevertheless account for a substantial 0.2% of Norway's total CO2 emissions. Since most of the travel-related emissions are due to air travel, water vapor emissions, ozone production and contrail formation further increase the relative importance of NILU's travel in terms of radiative forcing.

  3. Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles derived from ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Increased manufacture of TiO2 nano-products has caused concern about the potential toxicity of these products to the environment and in public health. Identification and confirmation of the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles derived from consumer products as opposed to industrial TiO2 NPs warrants examination in exploring the significance of their release and resultant impacts on the environment. To this end we examined the significance of the release of these particles and their toxic effect on the marine diatom algae Thalassiosira pseudonana. Our results indicate that nano-TiO2 sunscreen and toothpaste exhibit more toxicity in comparison to industrial TiO2, and inhibited the growth of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. This inhibition was proportional to the exposure time and concentrations of nano-TiO2. Our findings indicate a significant effect, and therefore further research is warranted in evaluation and assessment of the toxicity of modified nano-TiO2 derived from consumer products and their physicochemical properties. Submit to journal Environmental Science and Pollution Research.

  4. Carbon dioxide effects on fuel alcohol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, D.W.

    1996-10-01

    Carbon dioxide is known to be inhibitory to yeastgrowth, with inhibition becoming appreciable between 1.5 and 2 atm absolute under of the brewing industry. First, the conditions prevailing in an industrial corn to ethanol plant employing relatively small were determined. Second, lab glucose fed batch fermentations under similar conditions and CO{sub 2} pressures of 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5 atm absolute were run. High CO{sub 2} decreased the maximum number of viable cells and increased the death rate. Elevated CO{sub 2} levels also decreased the early growth associated production of glycerol. Translation of these results back to fermentor design and operation issues will be discussed.

  5. Effect of Gadolinium Doping on the Air Oxidation of Uranium Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, Randall D.; Hanson, Brady D.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2004-12-04

    Researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) investigated the effects of gadolinia concentration on the air oxidization of gadolinia-doped uranium dioxide using thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry to determine if such doping could improve uranium dioxide's stability as a nuclear fuel during potential accident scenarios in a nuclear reactor or during long-term disposal. We undertook this study to determine whether the resistance of the uranium dioxide to oxidation to the orthorhombic U3O8 with its attendant crystal expansion could be prevented by addition of gadolinia. Our studies found that gadolinium has little effect on the thermal initiation of the first step of the reported two-step air oxidation of UO2; however, increasing gadolinia content does stabilize the initial tetragonal or cubic product allowing significant oxidation before the second expansive step to U3O8 begins.

  6. The photocatalytic and cytotoxic effects of titanium dioxide particles used in sunscreen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampaul, Ashti

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles are used in sunscreens to reflect UV radiation from the skin. However, titanium dioxide as anatase and rutile crystal forms is a well-known photocatalyst. The nanoparticles are surface coated with inert inorganic oxides such as silica and alumina or organics such as organosilanes or silicone polymers and more recently, have been doped with manganese oxide. These modifications to the titanium dioxide particles are purported to prevent the production of harmful reactive oxygen species. A range of sunscreens was tested with crystal form and modification type identified via XRD, Raman Spectroscopy, XPS and SSNMR. The particle modification and crystal form determined whether the particles were inert or rapidly degraded methylene blue dye, and killed or protected cultured human epithelium cells. Novel solid state Electron Paramagnetic Resonance analysis showed that the greatest amount of superoxide anions was formed during UVA irradiation of the mixed anatase and rutile crystal forms coated with an organosilane. These particles also degraded methylene blue at a similar rate to Degussa P25, a standard uncoated titanium dioxide powder and produced an increase in UVA induced apoptosis of human keratinocytes. Double Stranded Breaks were observed extensively in cells exposed to UVA irradiated mixed anatase and rutile titanium dioxide with organosilane. A new apoptotic-like cell death mechanism may have been recognised during the UVA irradiation of animal and human cells in the presence of titanium dioxide. This research concludes that mixed anatase and rutile crystal forms of titanium dioxide coated with organosilane or dimethicone may not be safe to use in sunscreen lotions. A less harmful alternative for sunscreen formulations is the manganese doped rutile particles or the alumina coated rutile powders, both of which exhibited a protective effect on cultured epithelial cells.

  7. Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program. Workshop on environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    The Workshop was part of a process of elucidating areas of uncertainty where research is needed before meaningful forecasts and sound decisions can be made about the CO/sub 2/ issue. The conferees were divided into five panels dealing with the ocean and the cryosphere: the less managed biosphere; the managed biosphere (chiefly agricultural, forest, and grazing lands); the ways society and its institutions might respond to climate changes; and issues involving the economic and geopolitical consequences of CO/sub 2/ build-up. Also, 28 papers or discussion drafts dealing with a wide variety of topics were contributed to the conference.

  8. EFFECTS OF OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORINE, AND MONOCHLORAMINE ON CRYTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST VIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified Cryptosporiodium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were compareatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlor...

  9. The Health Effects of Chlorine Dioxide as a Disinfectant in Potable Water: A Literature Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Edward J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The use of chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant in water is being considered by the EPA. This article presents a summary of the known published reports concerning health effects of chlorine dioxide on animal and human populations. (Author/MA)

  10. Theoretical research of the carbon dioxide injection process into the rock saturated with ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musakaev, N. G.; Khasanov, M. K.

    2016-10-01

    The results of the theoretical research of the carbon dioxide injection process into the reservoir initially saturated with methane and ice are presented. In the rectilinear-parallel approach the analytical solutions which describe the distributions of temperature and pressure in the reservoir were built. It is shown, that modes with different quantity of the interphase boundaries of the carbon dioxide hydrate formation are possible.

  11. Sulfur dioxide and ozone effects on crops

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, R.G. ); Kress, L. )

    1990-04-01

    In order to determine if exposure to O{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} in combination produce greater-than-additive effects on yields of economically important crops, corn, wheat, soybean, alfalfa, and a mixed forage crop of timothy and red clover were exposed to SO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} using open-top chambers in six separate experiments during three field seasons. In five of the six studies changes in physiology and/or growth were also assessed to help determine short-term responses of the plants to the exposures. Monitoring of several physiological responses of the crops provided a means of assessing short term effects of the SO{sub 2} exposures on the crops and helped in interpretation of the effects on yields. 4 refs., 46 figs., 49 tabs.

  12. Effect of dissolved carbon dioxide on penicillin fermentations: mycelial growth and penicillin production. [Penicillium chrysogenum

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.S.; Smith, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of dissolved carbon dioxide on the specific growth rate and the penicillin production rate of Penicillium chrysogenum was examined experimentally. The dissolved carbon dioxide was found to inhibit the specific growth rate and the penicillin production rate when the aerated submerged penicillin fermentation was exposed to influent gases of 12.6 and 20% carbon dioxide, respectively. Upon exposure to influent gases of 3 and 5% carbon dioxide, no pronounced metabolic inhibition was noted.

  13. [Research on denoising fluorescence signal of sulfur dioxide by Boxcar filter].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Tian; Jian, Xiong; Wang, Hui-Xin; Yan, Bing

    2012-12-01

    The fluorescence detection method is based on the linear relationship between fluorescence intensity emitted by the material and the concentration of material to make a quantitative analysis. When using the fluorescence detection of atmospheric sulfur dioxide and other harmful gases, photodetectors and other optoelectronic components without fluorescence will continue to produce the dark current noise, and the background signal has a direct impact on the measurement results. On the base of analysis Boxcar filtering algorithm, the research used three algorithms of wavelet filtering, EMD filter and Boxcar filter to extract and recover the fluorescence signal drowned in the noise floor. In comparison with the previous two filtering methods, Boxcar filter had a better effect on the suppression of the background noise. It also verified that the number of sampling affects the fluorescence signal to noise ratio improvement.

  14. Responses of Tree Seedlings to a Changing Atmosphere: Effects of Carbon Dioxide, Nitrogen Dioxide, and Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eller, A. S.; Sparks, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    Human activities have caused changes in the chemical composition of the atmosphere: the concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) have increased and are expected to continue increasing in the future. These gases have the potential to alter plant physiological processes, change growth rates, C:N, and carbon storage potential. The responses of tree seedlings to these changes will have a profound impact on the species composition and carbon storage potential of forests in the future. Others have found CO2 tends to increase plant growth and O3 to decrease it. NO2, if assimilated by plants, can be a source of nutrient nitrogen, but is also an oxidant with the potential to damage cell membranes and decrease growth. The objectives of this study were to determine the single and combined effects of CO2, NO2, and O3 on sugar maple, eastern hemlock, and two clones of trembling aspen. The trees were fumigated for two growing seasons with elevated (40ppb) or ambient NO2, elevated (560ppm) or ambient CO2, elevated (100 ppb 5 days/week) or ambient O3, and with or without additional soil nitrate (30 kg ha-1 yr-1) to simulate ecosystems with and without nitrogen limitation. We found that elevated CO2 increased total biomass of both maples and hemlocks. Further, the CO2 growth effect was most striking when combined with elevated O2; elevated CO2 eliminated the growth decrease induced by O3 especially when nitrogen was limited. Elevated NO2 had no effect on maple seedlings, but, similar to CO2, eliminated the decrease in growth under O3 on hemlock seedlings. The two aspen clones differed in their resistance to ozone. The non-resistant clone exhibited growth responses similar to maple. However, the resistant clone did not exhibit a growth response under any gas treatment regardless of soil nitrogen status. The variation in responses among species, within clones of the same species, and between fumigations was large in this study and suggests

  15. Exposure of research personnel to carbon dioxide during euthanasia procedures.

    PubMed

    Amparan, Ashlee A; Djoufack-Momo, Shelly M; Grunden, Beverly; Boivin, Gregory P-

    2014-07-01

    CO₂ is one of the most commonly used euthanasia agents for laboratory animals. Considerable research has gone into the effect of the agent on animals, but little has been done to examine potential human exposure during these procedures. In this study, we examine the CO₂ concentrations to which personnel are exposed while euthanizing rodents with CO₂. To examine the environmental levels of CO₂ generated during euthanasia, we examined several variables including flow rate, inclusion of a cage in the euthanasia chamber, inversion of the euthanasia chamber, chamber size, distance from the euthanasia chamber, and room size. Under all conditions, CO₂ concentrations in the room temporarily increased significantly to 600 to 4000 ppm. The results of this study show that, under several testing scenarios, occupational levels of CO₂ did not exceed governmentally mandated allowable exposure limits during routine rodent euthanasia procedures.

  16. Exposure of Research Personnel to Carbon Dioxide during Euthanasia Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Amparan, Ashlee A; Djoufack-Momo, Shelly M; Grunden, Beverly; Boivin, Gregory P

    2014-01-01

    CO2 is one of the most commonly used euthanasia agents for laboratory animals. Considerable research has gone into the effect of the agent on animals, but little has been done to examine potential human exposure during these procedures. In this study, we examine the CO2 concentrations to which personnel are exposed while euthanizing rodents with CO2. To examine the environmental levels of CO2 generated during euthanasia, we examined several variables including flow rate, inclusion of a cage in the euthanasia chamber, inversion of the euthanasia chamber, chamber size, distance from the euthanasia chamber, and room size. Under all conditions, CO2 concentrations in the room temporarily increased significantly to 600 to 4000 ppm. The results of this study show that, under several testing scenarios, occupational levels of CO2 did not exceed governmentally mandated allowable exposure limits during routine rodent euthanasia procedures. PMID:25199093

  17. Effect of germanium dioxide on growth of Spirulina platensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ji-Xiang

    1996-12-01

    This study on the effect of different concentrations of germanium dioxide (GeO2) on the specific growth rate (SGR), pigment contents, protein content and amino acid composition of Spirulina platensis showed that Ge was not the essential element of this alga; that GeO2 could speed up growth and raise protein content of S. platensis, and could possibly influence the photosynthesis system. The concentration range of GeO2 beneficial to growth of S. platensis is from 5 100mg/l. GeO2 is proposed to be utilized to remove contamination by Chlorella spp. usually occurring in the cultivation of Spirulina.

  18. Hazardous Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Muzammal; Khan, Muzaffar

    2017-01-01

    Although nanoparticles (NPs) have made incredible progress in the field of nanotechnology and biomedical research and their applications are demanded throughout industrial world particularly over the past decades, little is known about the fate of nanoparticles in ecosystem. Concerning the biosafety of nanotechnology, nanotoxicity is going to be the second most priority of nanotechnology that needs to be properly addressed. This review covers the chemical as well as the biological concerns about nanoparticles particularly titanium dioxide (TiO2) NPs and emphasizes the toxicological profile of TiO2 at the molecular level in both in vitro and in vivo systems. In addition, the challenges and future prospects of nanotoxicology are discussed that may provide better understanding and new insights into ongoing and future research in this field. PMID:28373829

  19. Combined effect of sulfur dioxide and cold in exercising asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Linn, W S; Shamoo, D A; Vinet, T G; Spier, C E; Valencia, L M; Anzar, U T; Hackney, J D

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-four asthmatic volunteers were exposed to 0, 0.3, and 0.6 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO2) in purified background air at each of three temperatures--21 degrees, 7 degrees, and -6 degrees C--in a controlled-environment chamber. Relative humidity was approximately 80%. Exposures consisted of 5 min heavy exercise periods plus brief warmup and cooldown periods. Airway resistance, thoracic gas volume, and symptoms were measured immediately before and after exposure. For the group, increasing SO2 concentration and decreasing temperature were associated with statistically significant unfavorable effects on airway resistance and respiratory symptoms, as expected from previous findings. Effects of SO2 and cold usually appeared to combine in an additive or less-than-additive fashion; there was little evidence of synergism. Individuals' response patterns were variable: a few suggested synergism, but others suggested a mitigating effect of cold on the bronchoconstrictive response to SO2.

  20. Corrosive effects of supercritical carbon dioxide and cosolvents on metals

    SciTech Connect

    Russick, E.M.; Poulter, G.A.; Adkins, C.L.J.; Sorensen, N.R.

    1994-06-01

    With the eventual phase-out of chlorofluorocarbons, and restrictive regulations concerning the use of cleaning solvents such as hydrochlorofluorocarbons, and other volatile organic compounds, it is essential to seek new, environmentally acceptable cleaning processes. In the DOE Complex and in industry, an environmentally sound process for precision cleaning of machined metal parts is one of the issues that needs to be addressed. At Sandia, we are investigating the use of supercritical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as an alternative cleaning solvent for this application. Carbon dioxide is nontoxic, recyclable, and relatively inexpensive. Supercritical CO{sub 2} has been demonstrated as a solvent for many nonpolar organic compounds, including hydrocarbon-based machining and lubricating oils. The focus of this work is to investigate any corrosive effects of supercritical CO{sub 2} cleaning on metals. Sample coupons of several common metals were statically exposed to pure supercritical CO{sub 2}, water saturated supercritical CO{sub 2}, and 10 wt % methanol/CO{sub 2} cosolvent at 24,138 kPa (3500 psi) and 323K (50C) for 24 hours. Gravimetric analysis and magnified visual inspection of the coupons were performed before and after the exposure tests. Electron microprobe, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Auger electron surface analyses were done as needed where visual and gravimetric changes in the samples were evident. Results are reported.

  1. Research issues and supporting research of the National Program on Carbon Dioxide, Environment and Society, fiscal year 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    This report outlines and summarizes the research conducted in the United States under the auspices of the CO/sub 2/ program. The Program encompasses six primary categories which, in turn, are divided into 18 research subcategories and 51 research issues. The research program was designed to describe the research which should be conducted regardless of institutional or even national sponsorship. Project descriptions have been collected and classified according to the research issue to which they most directly apply and have been inserted immediately following the applicable issue description. This provides, for the first time, a detailed view of the nation's effort in addressing the carbon dioxide question in FY 1980.

  2. SULFUR DIOXIDE - SULFUR TRIOXIDE REGENERATIVE FUEL CELL RESEARCH

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The thermodynamics and electrolytic characteristics are discussed of an SO2-SO3 regenerative, closed-cycle fuel cell , and summarizes the electrolytic...electrochemical, and phase separation research conducted during a study program to determine the practicability of such a fuel cell . The...experimental results obtained were at such wide variance with the theoretical concept that it became apparent that a fuel cell of this type is not feasible. (Author)

  3. Carbon Dioxide and the Greenhouse Effect. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight and the Subcommittee on Natural Resources, Agriculture Research and Environment of the Committee on Science and Technology, U.S. House of Respresentatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session. (No. 119).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science and Technology.

    Increased levels of carbon dioxide have contributed to the problematic phenomenon known as the greenhouse effect. Evidence has indicated that the rise in carbon dioxide levels could be accurately correlated with a rise in the Earth's mean temperature, a shrinking of the polar icecaps, and a resulting rise in the Earth's mean sea level. The…

  4. The travel-related carbon dioxide emissions of atmospheric researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stohl, A.

    2008-11-01

    Most atmospheric scientists agree that greenhouse gas emissions have already caused significant changes to the global climate system and that these changes will accelerate in the near future. At the same time, atmospheric scientists who like other scientists rely on international collaboration and information exchange travel a lot and, thereby, cause substantial emissions of CO2. In this paper, the CO2 emissions of the employees working at an atmospheric research institute (the Norwegian Institute for Air Research, NILU) caused by all types of business travel (conference visits, workshops, field campaigns, instrument maintainance, etc.) were calculated for the years 2005 2007. It is estimated that more than 90% of the emissions were caused by air travel, 3% by ground travel and 5% by hotel usage. The travel-related annual emissions were between 1.9 and 2.4 t CO2 per employee or between 3.9 and 5.5 t CO2 per scientist. For comparison, the total annual per capita CO2 emissions are 4.5 t worldwide, 1.2 t for India, 3.8 t for China, 5.9 t for Sweden and 19.1 t for Norway. The travel-related CO2 emissions of a NILU scientist, occurring in 24 days of a year on average, exceed the global average annual per capita emission. Norway's per-capita CO2 emissions are among the highest in the world, mostly because of the emissions from the oil industry. If the emissions per NILU scientist derived in this paper are taken as representative for the average Norwegian researcher, travel by Norwegian scientists would nevertheless account for a substantial 0.2% of Norway's total CO2 emissions. Since most of the travel-related emissions are due to air travel, water vapor emissions, ozone production and contrail formation further increase the relative importance of NILU's travel in terms of radiative forcing.

  5. Carbon Dioxide and the Greenhouse Effect: A Problem Evaluation Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Carol A.; Beiswenger, Jane M.

    1993-01-01

    Describes exercises to examine the global carbon cycle. Students are asked to predict consequences of increased carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere and to suggest ways to mitigate problems associated with these higher levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide. A comparison modeling exercise examines some of the variables related to the success…

  6. Carbon Dioxide: Surprising Effects on Decision Making and Neurocognitive Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2013-01-01

    The occupants of modern submarines and the International Space Station (ISS) have much in common as far as their air quality is concerned. Air is polluted by materials offgassing, use of utility compounds, leaks of systems chemicals, and anthropogenic sources. The primary anthropogenic compound of concern to submariners and astronauts has been carbon dioxide (CO2). NASA and the US Navy rely on the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology (NRC-COT) to help formulate exposure levels to CO2 that are thought to be safe for exposures of 3-6 months. NASA calls its limits Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs). Years of experience aboard the ISS and a recent publication on deficits in decision making in ground-based subjects exposed briefly to 0.25% CO2 suggest that exposure levels that have been presumed acceptable to preserve health and performance need to be reevaluated. The current CO2 exposure limits for 3-6 months set by NASA and the UK Navy are 0.7%, and the limit for US submariners is 0.5%, although the NRC-COT recommended a 90-day level of 0.8% as safe a few years ago. NASA has set a 1000-day SMAC at 0.5% for exploration-class missions. Anecdotal experience with ISS operations approaching the current 180-day SMAC of 0.7% suggest that this limit is too high. Temporarily, NASA has limited exposures to 0.5% until further peer-reviewed data become available. In the meantime, a study published last year in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives (Satish U, et al. 2012) demonstrated that complexdecision- making performance is somewhat affected at 0.1% CO2 and becomes "dysfunctional" for at least half of the 9 indices of performance at concentrations approaching 0.25% CO2. The investigators used the Strategic Management Simulation (SMS) method of testing for decisionmaking ability, and the results were so surprising to the investigators that they declared that their findings need to be independently confirmed. NASA has responded to the

  7. Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Wright, Clayton; Iyer, Anand Krishnan V; Wang, Liying; Wu, Nianqiang; Yakisich, Juan S; Rojanasakul, Yon; Azad, Neelam

    2017-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a ubiquitous whitening compound widely used in topical products such as sunscreens, lotions and facial creams. The damaging health effects of TiO2 inhalation has been widely studied in rats, mice and humans showing oxidative stress increase, DNA damage, cell death and inflammatory gene upregulation in lung and throat cells; however, the effects on skin cells from long-term topical use of various products remain largely unknown. In this study, we assessed the effect of specific TiO2 nanoparticles (H2TiO7) on a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). We performed a comparative analysis using three TiO2 particles varying in size (Fine, Ultrafine and H2TiO7) and analyzed their effects on HaCaTs. There is a clear dose-dependent increase in superoxide production, caspase 8 and 9 activity, and apoptosis in HaCaTs after treatment with all three forms of TiO2; however, there is no consistent effect on cell viability and proliferation with either of these TiO2 particles. While there is data suggesting UV exposure can enhance the carcinogenic effects of TiO2, we did not observe any significant effect of UV-C exposure combined with TiO2 treatment on HaCaTs. Furthermore, TiO2-treated cells showed minimal effects on VEGF upregulation and Wnt signaling pathway thereby showing no potential effect on angiogenesis and malignant transformation. Overall, we report here an increase in apoptosis, which may be caspase 8/Fas-dependent, and that the H2TiO7 nanoparticles, despite their smaller particle size, had no significant enhanced effect on HaCaT cells as compared to Fine and Ultrafine forms of TiO2.

  8. Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Clayton; Iyer, Anand Krishnan V.; Wang, Liying; Wu, Nianqiang; Yakisich, Juan S.; Rojanasakul, Yon; Azad, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a ubiquitous whitening compound widely used in topical products such as sunscreens, lotions and facial creams. The damaging health effects of TiO2 inhalation has been widely studied in rats, mice and humans showing oxidative stress increase, DNA damage, cell death and inflammatory gene upregulation in lung and throat cells; however, the effects on skin cells from long-term topical use of various products remain largely unknown. In this study, we assessed the effect of specific TiO2 nanoparticles (H2TiO7) on a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). We performed a comparative analysis using three TiO2 particles varying in size (Fine, Ultrafine and H2TiO7) and analyzed their effects on HaCaTs. There is a clear dose-dependent increase in superoxide production, caspase 8 and 9 activity, and apoptosis in HaCaTs after treatment with all three forms of TiO2; however, there is no consistent effect on cell viability and proliferation with either of these TiO2 particles. While there is data suggesting UV exposure can enhance the carcinogenic effects of TiO2, we did not observe any significant effect of UV-C exposure combined with TiO2 treatment on HaCaTs. Furthermore, TiO2-treated cells showed minimal effects on VEGF upregulation and Wnt signaling pathway thereby showing no potential effect on angiogenesis and malignant transformation. Overall, we report here an increase in apoptosis, which may be caspase 8/Fas-dependent, and that the H2TiO7 nanoparticles, despite their smaller particle size, had no significant enhanced effect on HaCaT cells as compared to Fine and Ultrafine forms of TiO2. PMID:27310834

  9. Carbon dioxide and climate: summaries of research in FY 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    Descriptions are provided for all projects funded by DOE under annual contracts in FY 1985. Each description contains the project's title, 3-year funding history, the contract period over which the funding applies(d), the name(s) of the principal investigator(s), the institution conducting the projects, and the project's objectives, products and approach. Project descriptions are categorized within the report according to each one's emphasis relative to the six principal program area: carbon cycle, climate and first detection, vegetation response, indirect effects, scientific interface, and integration and evaluation.

  10. Effect of oil mists on the irritancy of sulfur dioxide. II. Motor oil.

    PubMed

    Costa, D L; Amdur, M O

    1979-09-01

    This study examines the effect of sub-micrometer aerosols of motor oil on the irritant potency of sulfur dioxide. The increase in pulmonary flow resistance in guinea pigs was used as the bioassay of irritant response. When administered simultaneously, both unused and used motor oil protected against the irritant response to sulfur dioxide. This protective effect was lost when the oils had been previously reacted with sulfur dioxide. The additives used in the motor oil provided an equivalent protection when dissolved in a mineral oil which alone did not protect. Pre-exposure to motor oil did not provide protection. Sulfur dioxide and motor oil given together as a pre-exposure provided protection against further exposure to sulfur dioxide.

  11. Effect of Chlorine Dioxide Gas on Polymeric Packaging Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Permeability, solubility and diffusion coefficients of chlorine dioxide for high-density polyethylene (HDPE), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polystyrene (PS), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), nylon, and multilayer of ethylene viny...

  12. Carbon dioxide effects research and assessment program. Proceedings of the International Meeting on Stable Isotopes in Tree-Ring Research, New Paltz, New York, May 22-25, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Jacoby, G

    1980-12-01

    Information about the past and present concentrations of CO/sub 2/ in the atmosphere and variations in climate can be obtained from measurements of stable isotopes in tree rings; specifically carbon-13, oxygen-18 and deuterium. The analysis of these stable isotopes in tree rings is a relatively new and rapidly developing field. This proceedings volume contains most of the papers presented at the meeting. The first paper gives an overview of the status of carbon-13 research. Papers relating to carbon-13 are in section I and grouped separately from the contributions on carbon-14. Although the meeting was primarily concerned with stable isotopes, all carbon isotopic analysis may be helpful in understanding the carbon-13 record in tree rings. The papers on hydrogen and oxygen isotope studies are in sections II and III respectively. The remaining sections contain papers that consider more than one isotope at a time, general topics related to isotopes, atmospheric changes and tree growth, and methods of isotopic analysis.

  13. Effects of boric acid and borax on titanium dioxide genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Turkez, Hasan

    2008-07-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) is a potential carcinogenic/mutagenic agent although it is used in many areas including medical industries and cosmetics. Boron (as boric acid and borax) has also well-described biological effects and therapeutic benefits. In a previous study, sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and micronuclei (MN) rates were assessed in control and TiO(2)-treated (1, 2, 3, 5, 7.5 and 10 microm) human whole blood cultures. The results showed that the rates of SCE (at 2, 3, 5, 7.5 and 10 microm) and MN (at 5, 7.5 and 10 microm) formation in peripheral lymphocytes were increased significantly by TiO(2) compared with the controls. The present study also investigated the genetic effects of boric acid and borax (2.5, 5 and 10 microm) on cultures with and without TiO(2) addition. No significant increase in SCE and MN frequencies were observed at all concentrations of boron compounds. However, TiO(2)-induced SCE and MN could be reduced significantly by the presence of boric acid and borax. In conclusion, this study indicated for the first time that boric acid and borax led to an increased resistance of DNA to damage induced by TiO(2).

  14. Strain effects on oxygen transport in tetragonal zirconium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Xian-Ming Bai; Yongfeng Zhang; Michael R. Tonks

    2013-11-01

    Temperature accelerated dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the strain effects on oxygen interstitial and vacancy migration in tetragonal zirconium dioxide. At zero external strain, the anisotropic migration mechanisms of oxygen defects are characterized. At non-zero strains, both the crystal structure and defect migration barriers are modified by strain. Under compressive strains, the defect migration barrier increases with the increasing strain for both interstitials and vacancies. The crystal structure transforms from a tetragonal to a nearly cubic fluorite structure. Accordingly, the defect migration becomes nearly isotropic. Under dilative strains, the migration barrier first decreases then increases with increasing strain for both types of defects. The tetragonal phase transforms to a lower symmetry structure that is close to the orthorhombic phase. In turn, the defect migration becomes highly anisotropic. Under both compressive and dilative strains, interstitials respond to strain more strongly than vacancies. At small dilative strains, an oxygen interstitial has comparable diffusivity to a vacancy, suggesting that both types of defects can contribute to oxygen transport, if they are present. Although currently no previous result is available to validate oxygen interstitial diffusion behavior, the trend of strain effects on oxygen vacancy diffusion is in good agreement with available experimental and theoretical studies in the literature.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Effects under Conditions of Raised Environmental Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-26

    the inspiratory muscles might have contributed to the elevated carbon dioxide tensions in the trained underwater swimmer because it was shown that...alveolar carbon dioxide tensions increase linearly with the work- load on the inspiratory muscles (Milic- Emili & Tyler 1962). Lanphier (1963...Submarine Escape Training Tank, U.S. Naval Submarine Base New London, in dives to 90 ft (3.7 ATA) (Sehaefer 1955; Schaefer & Carey 1962). During

  16. Effects of acute hypoxia on cerebrovascular responses to carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Nakahara, Hidehiro; Ueda, Shinya; Okazaki, Kazunobu; Shibasaki, Manabu; Subudhi, Andrew W; Miyamoto, Tadayoshi

    2014-06-01

    In normoxic conditions, a reduction in arterial carbon dioxide tension causes cerebral vasoconstriction, thereby reducing cerebral blood flow and modifying dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA). It is unclear to what extent these effects are altered by acute hypoxia and the associated hypoxic ventilatory response (respiratory chemoreflex). This study tested the hypothesis that acute hypoxia attenuates arterial CO2 tension-mediated regulation of cerebral blood flow to help maintain cerebral O2 homeostasis. Eight subjects performed three randomly assigned respiratory interventions following a resting baseline period, as follows: (1) normoxia (21% O2); (2) hypoxia (12% O2); and (3) hypoxia with wilful restraint of the respiratory chemoreflex. During each intervention, 0, 2.0, 3.5 or 5.0% CO2 was sequentially added (8 min stages) to inspired gas mixtures to assess changes in steady-state cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity and dCA. During normoxia, the addition of CO2 increased internal carotid artery blood flow and middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean), while reducing dCA (change in phase = -0.73 ± 0.22 rad, P = 0.005). During acute hypoxia, internal carotid artery blood flow and MCA Vmean remained unchanged, but cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity (internal carotid artery, P = 0.003; MCA Vmean, P = 0.031) and CO2-mediated effects on dCA (P = 0.008) were attenuated. The effects of hypoxia were not further altered when the respiratory chemoreflex was restrained. These findings support the hypothesis that arterial CO2 tension-mediated effects on the cerebral vasculature are reduced during acute hypoxia. These effects could limit the degree of hypocapnic vasoconstriction and may help to regulate cerebral blood flow and cerebral O2 homeostasis during acute periods of hypoxia.

  17. Effect of nitrogen dioxide on human nasal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, J.L.; Collier, A.M.; Hu, S.C.; Delvin, R.B. )

    1993-09-01

    The nasal epithelium of young adult white men in good health was evaluated by electron microscopy in a condition blind fashion relative to exposures of 2 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO2) or clean air for 4 h. The exposure protocol involved two separate exposures of the same individuals to NO2 or clean air approximately 3 wk apart. We found qualitative and quantitative evidence that luminal border membranes of ciliated cells were ultrastructurally altered in six of seven samples of nasal epithelium obtained following NO2 exposures, although subsequent morphometric statistical analyses were not significant. This alteration was characterized by cilia containing excess matrix in which individual or, more commonly, multiple ciliary axonemes were embedded, and by vesiculations of luminal border ciliary membranes, a pattern less common in clean air-exposed control specimens. Although these patterns were not widespread, their morphology was consistent with findings of previous animal studies involving acute and chronic exposure to NO2. Our findings suggest that adverse effects on mucociliary function in normal humans due to acute exposure to low levels of NO2 are most likely minimal. However, in view of other reports of NO2 exposure in laboratory animals documenting ciliary injury, our observations support a view that similar patterns might appear more prominently with higher NO2 levels and/or more extended exposure intervals.

  18. Tested Demonstrations: Visualization of Buffer Action and the Acidifying Effect of Carbon Dioxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a buffer demonstration which features visualization of the effects of carbon dioxide on pH. Background information, list of materials needed, procedures used, and a discussion of results obtained are included. (JN)

  19. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Carbon Dioxide Flooding by Managing Asphaltene Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, Milind D.

    2002-02-21

    Objectives of this project was to understand asphaltene precipitation in General and carbon dioxide induced precipitation in particular. To this effect, thermodynamic and kinetic experiments with the Rangely crude oil were conducted and thermodynamic and reservoir models were developed.

  20. Irradiation damage effects on helium migration in sintered uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Sabathier, C.; Carlot, G.; Desgardin, P.; Raepsaet, C.; Sauvage, T.; Khodja, H.; Garcia, P.

    2012-02-01

    In this study, the effects of radiation on helium migration are investigated through the analysis of polycrystalline uranium dioxide samples irradiated at fluences up to 5 × 10 15 at. cm -2 with 8 MeV iodine ions. Following irradiation, samples are implanted with 500 keV 3He + ions at fluences in the range of 10 16 at. cm -2. Three nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) techniques are subsequently implemented using the 3He( 2H, 1H) 4He reaction. The influence of temperature using NRA was first studied based upon 3He depth profile changes and the on-line monitoring of helium release. The effect of the sample microstructure was also investigated at the grain scale by performing analyses of the helium spatial distribution with a nuclear microprobe. Neither substantial helium release nor depth profile changes are observed at temperatures below 900 °C in irradiated samples. Following annealing at temperatures above 1000 °C, a substantial proportion of the implanted helium is released from the samples. From this temperature upwards, the two dimensional He cartographies reveal that the gas has been preferentially released in the vicinity of grain boundaries. These results can be interpreted in the light of previous studies in terms of gas precipitation and re-solution. Helium precipitation is enhanced in irradiated samples up to 900 °C because of the presence of irradiation induced defects. At temperatures in excess of 1000 °C, the precipitated helium is partly returned to the matrix hence it is preferentially released in regions adjacent to grain boundaries, which appear to act as defect sinks.

  1. Unsaturated zone carbon dioxide flux, mixing, and isotopic composition at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conaway, C. H.; Thordsen, J. J.; Thomas, B.; Haase, K.; Moreo, M. T.; Walvoord, M. A.; Andraski, B. J.; Stonestrom, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Elevated concentrations of tritium, radiocarbon, and volatile organic compounds at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site, adjacent to a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility, have stimulated research on factors affecting transport of these contaminants. This research includes an examination of unsaturated zone carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes, mixing, and isotopic composition, which can help in understanding these factors. In late April 2015 we collected 76 soil-gas samples in multi-layer foil bags from existing 1.5-m deep tubes, both inside and outside the low-level waste area, as well as from two 110-m-deep multilevel gas-sampling boreholes and a distant background site. These samples were analyzed for carbon dioxide concentration and isotopic composition by direct injection into a cavity ring-down spectrometer. Graphical analysis of results indicates mixing of CO2 characteristic of the root zone (δ13C -18 ‰ VPDB), deep soil gas of the capillary fringe (-20‰), and CO2 produced by microbial respiration of organic matter disposed in the waste area trenches (-28‰). Land-surface boundary conditions are being constrained by the application of a novel non-dispersive infrared sensor and traditional concentration and flux measurements, including discrete CO2 flux data using a gas chamber method to complement continuous data from surface- and tower-based CO2 sensors. These results shed light on radionuclide and VOC mobilization and transport mechanisms from this and similar waste disposal facilities.

  2. Potential climate engineering effectiveness and side effects during a high carbon dioxide-emission scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, David P.; Feng, Ellias Y.; Oschlies, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    The realization that mitigation efforts to reduce carbon dioxide emissions have, until now, been relatively ineffective has led to an increasing interest in climate engineering as a possible means of preventing the potentially catastrophic consequences of climate change. While many studies have addressed the potential effectiveness of individual methods there have been few attempts to compare them. Here we use an Earth system model to compare the effectiveness and side effects of afforestation, artificial ocean upwelling, ocean iron fertilization, ocean alkalinization and solar radiation management during a high carbon dioxide-emission scenario. We find that even when applied continuously and at scales as large as currently deemed possible, all methods are, individually, either relatively ineffective with limited (<8%) warming reductions, or they have potentially severe side effects and cannot be stopped without causing rapid climate change. Our simulations suggest that the potential for these types of climate engineering to make up for failed mitigation may be very limited.

  3. Potential climate engineering effectiveness and side effects during a high carbon dioxide-emission scenario

    PubMed Central

    Keller, David P.; Feng, Ellias Y.; Oschlies, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The realization that mitigation efforts to reduce carbon dioxide emissions have, until now, been relatively ineffective has led to an increasing interest in climate engineering as a possible means of preventing the potentially catastrophic consequences of climate change. While many studies have addressed the potential effectiveness of individual methods there have been few attempts to compare them. Here we use an Earth system model to compare the effectiveness and side effects of afforestation, artificial ocean upwelling, ocean iron fertilization, ocean alkalinization and solar radiation management during a high carbon dioxide-emission scenario. We find that even when applied continuously and at scales as large as currently deemed possible, all methods are, individually, either relatively ineffective with limited (<8%) warming reductions, or they have potentially severe side effects and cannot be stopped without causing rapid climate change. Our simulations suggest that the potential for these types of climate engineering to make up for failed mitigation may be very limited. PMID:24569320

  4. Potential climate engineering effectiveness and side effects during a high carbon dioxide-emission scenario.

    PubMed

    Keller, David P; Feng, Ellias Y; Oschlies, Andreas

    2014-02-25

    The realization that mitigation efforts to reduce carbon dioxide emissions have, until now, been relatively ineffective has led to an increasing interest in climate engineering as a possible means of preventing the potentially catastrophic consequences of climate change. While many studies have addressed the potential effectiveness of individual methods there have been few attempts to compare them. Here we use an Earth system model to compare the effectiveness and side effects of afforestation, artificial ocean upwelling, ocean iron fertilization, ocean alkalinization and solar radiation management during a high carbon dioxide-emission scenario. We find that even when applied continuously and at scales as large as currently deemed possible, all methods are, individually, either relatively ineffective with limited (<8%) warming reductions, or they have potentially severe side effects and cannot be stopped without causing rapid climate change. Our simulations suggest that the potential for these types of climate engineering to make up for failed mitigation may be very limited.

  5. Effect of carbon dioxide on the Oriental cockroach Blatta orientalis.

    PubMed

    Gannon, B; le Patourel, G; Young, R

    2001-03-01

    Exposure to high concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) killed adult and nymphal stages of the oriental cockroach Blatta orientalis L. (Dictyoptera: Blattidae) with LT50 values of 11.5-16.2 h for 60% CO2 in air and 5.7-7.1 h for 100% CO2 at 20 degrees C; corresponding LT50s at 28 degrees C were 2.8-4.6 h for 60% CO2 in air and 2.3-3.6 h for 100% CO2. Complete kill of mobile stages was obtained within 24 h using 60% CO2 at 20 degrees C. Survivors of treatments with 100% CO2 at 28 degrees C remained completely paralysed for up to 3 days post-treatment and took up to 5 days to regain normal movement, but adult females then resumed production of oothecae with no significant loss in fecundity. Oothecae 5 or 30 days after deposition required 60-84 h exposure to 60% CO2 at 20 degrees C to prevent emergence of nymphs but less time using 100% CO2 at 28 degrees C. At 28 degrees C, when adult females were treated with 100% CO2 and 52% r.h. for 6 h (giving 100% mortality) loss of weight was significantly greater than that following treatment with air at 52% r.h. for 6 h (giving no mortality). However, significantly greater weight loss also occurred when they were treated with dried air (< 10% r.h.) for 6 h, also with no mortality. The toxicity of CO2 to mobile stages of the oriental cockroach appeared to result from irreversible effects on the nervous system, rather than from water loss during exposure.

  6. The vitiation effects of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the autoignition characteristics of kerosene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jin-Hu; Wang, Su; Zhang, Sheng-Tao; Yue, Lian-Jie; Fan, Bing-Cheng; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Cui, Ji-Ping

    2014-08-01

    In ground tests of hypersonic scramjet, the high-enthalpy airstream produced by burning hydrocarbon fuels often contains contaminants of water vapor and carbon dioxide. The contaminants may change the ignition characteristics of fuels between ground tests and real flights. In order to properly assess the influence of the contaminants on ignition characteristics of hydrocarbon fuels, the effect of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the ignition delay times of China RP-3 kerosene was studied behind reflected shock waves in a preheated shock tube. Experiments were conducted over a wider temperature range of 800-1 500K, at a pressure of 0.3 MPa, equivalence ratios of 0.5 and 1, and oxygen concentration of 20%. Ignition delay times were determined from the onset of the excited radical OH emission together with the pressure profile. Ignition delay times were measured for four cases: (1) clean gas, (2) gas vitiated with 10% and 20% water vapor in mole, (3) gas vitiated with 10% carbon dioxide in mole, and (4) gas vitiated with 10% water vapor and 10% carbon dioxide, 20% water vapor and 10% carbon dioxide in mole. The results show that carbon dioxide produces an inhibiting effect at temperatures below 1 300 K when ϕ = 0.5, whereas water vapor appears to accelerate the ignition process below a critical temperature of about 1 000 K when ϕ = 0.5. When both water vapor and carbon dioxide exist together, a minor inhibiting effect is observed at ϕ = 0.5, while no effect is found at ϕ = 1.0. The results are also discussed preliminary by considering both the combustion reaction mechanism and the thermophysics properties of the fuel mixtures. The current measurements demonstrate vitiation effects of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the autoignition characteristics of China RP-3 kerosene at air-like O2 concentration. It is important to account for such effects when data are extrapolated from ground testing to real flight conditions.

  7. [Measurements of surface ocean carbon dioxide partial pressure during WOCE]. Summary of research progress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This paper discusses the research progress of the second year of research under ``Measurement of Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure During WOCE`` and proposes to continue measurements of underway pCO{sub 2}. During most of the first year of this grant, our efforts to measure pCO{sub 2} on WOCE WHP legs were frustrated by ship problems. The R/V Knorr, which was originally scheduled to carry out the first work on WHP lines P19 and P16 in the southeastem Pacific during the 1990-91 austral summer, was delayed in the shipyard during her mid-life refit for more than a year. In the interim, the smaller R/V Thomas Washington, was pressed into service to carry out lower-latitude portions of WHP lines P16 and P17 during mid-1991 (TUNES Expedition). We installed and operated our underway chromatographic system on this expedition, even though space and manpower on this smaller vessel were limited and no one from our group would be aboard any of the 3 WHP expedition legs. The results for carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide are shown. A map of the cruise track is shown for each leg, marked with cumulative distance. Following each track is a figure showing the carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide results as a function of distance along this track. The results are plotted as dry-gas mole fractions (in ppm and ppb, respectively) in air and in gas equilibrated with surface seawater at a total pressure equal to the barometric pressure. The air data are plotted as a 10-point running mean, and appear as a roughly horizontal line. The seawater data are plotted as individual points, using a 5-point Gaussian smoother. Equal values Of xCO{sub 2} in air and surface seawater indicate air-sea equilibrium.

  8. The effect of chlorine dioxide on polymeric packaging materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2), with its high oxidizing capacity and broad disinfecting property, is used frequently as a disinfectant in many applications. As a biocide in food applications, it showed a microbial inactivating capacity against many important pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, located ...

  9. Effect of nitrogen dioxide on Swiss albino mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Machado, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC50 values were determined for male Swiss albino mice exposed to different concentrations of nitrogen dioxide in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The LC50 for a 10 minute exposure was about 1000 ppm NO2.

  10. Effect of sulfur dioxide on Swiss albino mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Machado, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC50 values were determined for male Swiss albino mice exposed to different concentrations of sulfur dioxide in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The LC50 for a 30 minute exposure was about 3000 ppm SO2.

  11. Effect of doping on the photocatalytic, electronic and mechanical properties of sol-gel titanium dioxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtoglu, Murat

    Heterogeneous photocatalysis has been an active research area over the last decade as a promising solution for energy generation and environmental problems which has led to promising applications from air and water purification systems, self-cleaning and self-sterilizing surfaces to solar cells and hydrogen production from water dissociation reaction. Titanium dioxide (TiO2), an abundant material with a high photocatalytic efficiency and chemical stability, is undoubtedly the most widely studied and used among all photocatalytic materials. Although titanium dioxide has been used in powder form, its immobilized form (film) is necessary from practical application standpoint. However, there are several shortcomings of titanium dioxide films that need to be addressed to realize a wide range of successful applications: lack of visible light activity, poisoning of the catalytic performance by the substrate and the low surface area compared to powder forms. In addition, mechanical properties of such films have not been investigated thoroughly, which may be critical when abrasion and weathering resistance are necessary. To address each of these issues, a systematic experimental and theoretical investigation of doping titanium dioxide films with a variety of elements were conducted. Utilizing theoretical calculations to filter elements for experimental studies as well as interpretation of the experimental results, several dopant or dopant combinations were found to remedy some of the issues of photocatalytic titanium dioxide films. Doping with 32 metals, nitrogen and 11 metal-nitrogen combinations are investigated theoretically and the results are used as guideline for the experimental studies. Particular attention is given to certain metal dopants such as Cr, V, Mo, Ta and Ga not just because of their relatively modest cost but also their non-toxicity and wide availability of their compatible compounds for sol-gel synthesis. While metal-dopants improved the overall

  12. Effects of fuel and forest conservation on future levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Walker, J C; Kasting, J F

    1992-01-01

    We develop a numerical simulation of the global biogeochemical cycles of carbon that works over time scales extending from years to millions of years. The ocean is represented by warm and cold shallow water reservoirs, a thermocline reservoir, and deep Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific reservoirs. The atmosphere is characterized by a single carbon reservoir and the global biota by a single biomass reservoir. The simulation includes the rock cycle, distinguishing between shelf carbonate and pelagic carbonate precipitation, with distinct lysocline depths in the three deep ocean reservoirs. Dissolution of pelagic carbonates in response to decrease in lysocline depth is included. The simulation is tuned to reproduce the observed radiocarbon record resulting from atomic weapon testing. It is tuned also to reproduce the distribution of dissolved phosphate and total dissolved carbon between the ocean reservoirs as well as the carbon isotope ratios for both 13C and 14C in ocean and atmosphere. The simulation reproduces reasonably well the historical record of carbon dioxide partial pressure as well as the atmospheric isotope ratios for 13C and 14C over the last 200 yr as these have changed in response to fossil fuel burning and land use changes, principally forest clearance. The agreements between observation and calculation involves the assumption of a carbon dioxide fertilization effect in which the rate of production of biomass increases with increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure. At present the fertilization effect of increased carbon dioxide outweighs the effects of forest clearance, so the biota comprises an overall sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide sufficiently large to bring the budget approximately into balance. This simulation is used to examine the future evolution of carbon dioxide and its sensitivity to assumptions about the rate of fossil fuel burning and of forest clearance. Over times extending up to thousands of years, the results are insensitive to the

  13. Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide adsorption on zinc oxide and zirconium hydroxide nanoparticles and the effect on photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jagdeep; Mukherjee, Anupama; Sengupta, Sandip K.; Im, Jisun; Peterson, Gregory W.; Whitten, James E.

    2012-05-01

    Nanoparticulate zinc oxide and micron-size zirconium hydroxide powders have been exposed to sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide by flowing the gases, diluted with nitrogen, over powder samples. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicate strongly bound, chemisorbed SO3 and NO3 surface species. Two pre-treatments of the nanoparticulate ZnO samples prior to gas exposure have been investigated: (1) drying overnight in a vacuum oven and (2) hydrating the samples by placing them overnight in water-saturated air. A dramatic difference in reactivity of ZnO is observed, with approximately two-fold and ten-fold greater uptake of NO2 and SO2, respectively, measured by XPS for the hydrated samples relative to the dried ones. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrates that the greater uptake arises from a morphology change in the case of the hydrated samples. For zirconium hydroxide, no morphology change is observed for hydrated samples, and SO4 (ads), in addition to SO3 (ads), is indicated by XPS. ZnO and Zr(OH)4 both exhibit photoluminescence (PL) spectra, with peak intensities that change dramatically due to hydration and subsequent exposure to SO2 and NO2 gases. Dosing of the powders with these gases effectively reverts the PL spectra to those corresponding to less hydration.

  14. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability

    SciTech Connect

    Korich, D.G.; Mead, J.R.; Madore, M.S.; Sinclair, N.A.; Sterling, C.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water.

  15. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability.

    PubMed Central

    Korich, D G; Mead, J R; Madore, M S; Sinclair, N A; Sterling, C R

    1990-01-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water. PMID:2339894

  16. Effect of organic substituents on the adsorption of carbon dioxide on a metal-organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thu Ha, Nguyen Thi; Lefedova, O. V.; Ha, Nguyen Ngoc

    2017-01-01

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide on the MOF-5 metal-organic framework and modifications of it obtained by replacing the hydrogen atoms in the organic ligands with electron donor (-CH3,-OCH3) or electron acceptor groups (-CN,-NO2) is investigated using the grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) method and density functional theory (DFT). It is shown that the adsorption of carbon dioxide molecules on the structures of metal-organic frameworks is most likely on Zn4O clusters, and that the adsorption of carbon dioxide is of a physical nature. The presence of substituents-CH3,-OCH3,-CN in metal-organic frameworks increases their capacity to adsorb carbon dioxide, while that of nitro groups (-NO2) has the opposite effect.

  17. [Effect of silver/silcon dioxide film on the infrared absorption properties of sodium nitrate].

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhi-Jun; Kong, Xiang-Fei; Guo, Qiang; Yuan, Guang

    2012-12-01

    Silver/silicon dioxide (Ag/SiO2) film, which was used for surface enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy, was made by mixing ammonia solution and SiO2 solution. Surface morphology of thin films was depicted by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrum. The present paper studies the spectroscopy of Ag/SiO2 film during the evaporation of water. Research results show that the anti-symmetric vibration absorption peak of nitrate is the function of solution concentration and the distances. Influence of surface enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy in nitrate absorption peak is via the electromagnetic mechanism and increasing the effective surface area.

  18. Effect of carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide on ICR mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC(50) values were determined for male ICR mice exposed to different concentration of carbon monoxide for 30 min and of nitrogen dioxide for 10 min in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The data indicate that ICR mice are more resistant to these two toxicants than Swiss albino mice. The carbon monoxide LC(50) for a 30-min exposure was about 8,000 ppm for ICR mice compared to 3,570 ppm for Swiss albino mice. The nitrogen dioxide LC(50) for a 10-min exposure was above 2,000 ppm for ICR mice compared to about 1,000 ppm for Swiss albino mice.

  19. Large Scale Research and Demonstration Projects for Geological Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon management is becoming a broad national and international policy response to address climate change issues. Sequestration is believed to be the most direct carbon management strategy for long-term removal of CO2 from the atmosphere, and is likely to be needed for continuation of the fossil fuel-based economy and high standard of living. Sequestration of carbon dioxide in geologic formations is the immediate, low-cost sequestration option. China has had a late start in geological carbon sequestration but has recently had significant investments and rapid developments in terms of basic research and large-scale field demonstrations. I will discuss several Chinese research and demonstration projects, at the scale of 10,000 to 1,000,000 tons per year, as well as scientific and regulatory findings from these projects.

  20. Effects of elevated nitrogen dioxide and carbon dioxide on the growth of Sugar Maple and Hemlock seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eller, A. S.; McGuire, K. L.; Sparks, J. P.

    2005-12-01

    The partial pressure of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the earth's atmosphere has been rising since the industrial revolution and is likely to continue rising due to the burning of fossil fuels. When NO2 enters plant leaves, it can undergo reactions that produce nitrate, which can be a source of nutrient nitrogen for the plant. However, NO2 is also an oxidant with the potential to damage cell membranes and decrease growth. The goals of this study were to examine the effect of NO2 on plant productivity alone and in combination with elevated CO2 under both nitrogen- and non-nitrogen-limiting conditions. To assess these effects, we conducted CO2, NO2, and CO2 + NO2 fumigations of sugar maple and eastern hemlock seedlings in open-topped chambers and measured relative growth rate, specific leaf area, root:shoot, and C:N of the leaves, stems, and roots. Sugar maple growth was reduced by 7% under elevated NO2 when nitrogen was limiting. When nitrogen was not limiting and CO2 was ambient, elevated NO2 caused a 4% decrease in growth and when CO2 was elevated there was no growth effect. Hemlock growth was increased by elevated NO2 regardless of nitrogen status and under both partial pressures of CO2; 3 and 8% increase in growth under ambient and elevated CO2, respectively. These data suggest gaseous reactive nitrogen may augment or decrease the future growth effects of elevated CO2 depending on plant species identity. In addition, perhaps because of differences in nitrogen metabolism and physiology, deciduous and evergreen tree species appear to have different responses to reactive nitrogen fumigation. These results underscore the need for examining the responses of vegetation to mixtures of gases representative of the future atmosphere rather than examining the influence of carbon dioxide alone.

  1. Silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticle toxicity in plants: A review of current research.

    PubMed

    Cox, Ashley; Venkatachalam, P; Sahi, Shivendra; Sharma, Nilesh

    2016-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have become widely used in recent years for many manufacturing and medical processes. Recent literature suggests that many metallic nanomaterials including those of silver (Ag) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) cause significant toxic effects in animal cell culture and animal models, however, toxicity studies using plant species are limited. This review examines current progress in the understanding of the effect of silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticles on plant species. There are many facets to this ongoing environmental problem. This review addresses the effects of NPs on oxidative stress-related gene expression, genotoxicity, seed germination, and root elongation. It is largely accepted that NP exposure results in the cellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to both positive and negative effects on plant growth. However, factors such as NP size, shape, surface coating and concentration vary greatly among studies resulting in conflicting reports of the effect at times. In addition, plant species tend to differ in their reaction to NP exposure, with some showing positive effects of NP augmentation while many others showing detrimental effects. Seed germination studies have shown to be less effective in gauging phytotoxicity, while root elongation studies have shown more promise. Given the large increase in nanomaterial applications in consumer products, agriculture and energy sectors, it is critical to understand their role in the environment and their effects on plant life. A closer look at nanomaterial-driven ecotoxicity is needed. Ecosystem-level studies are required to indicate how these nanomaterials transfer at the critical trophic levels affecting human health and biota.

  2. The effect of an exchanger phase, carbon dioxide, and mineralogy on the rate of geochemical weathering

    SciTech Connect

    Amrhein, C.

    1984-01-01

    The dissolution (weathering) of soil minerals can have an appreciable effect on soil water chemistry. The rate at which mineral dissolution in water approaches equilibrium is dependent upon the type of minerals present, the surface area/solution volume ratio, the ionic composition of the solution, the nature of the exchanger phase of the soil, the temperature and the local partial pressure of carbon dioxide. Geochemical weathering has an important effect on the processes relating to sodic soil reclamation, nutrient availability, soil genesis, management of overburden materials from mining activities, and salt loading to surface and ground waters. Research was conducted to determine, quantitatively, the effects of CO{sub 2} and exchanger phase composition on the kinetics of calcium mineral dissolution. It was found that the presence of exchangeable sodium greatly increased the initial rate of mineral dissolution by acting to keep the soil solution low in Ca{sup 2+} ions. The kinetics of calcite dissolution were controlled by the gas transfer reaction, CO{sub 2}(gas) {yields} CO{sub 2}(ag), at CO{sub 2} levels below .03 atmospheres. A mechanistic kinetic model was proposed that included the CO{sub 2} reaction kinetics and an adsorption/hydration reaction with the calcite surface. In general, mineral weathering was found to rarely obey a diffusion controlled model and was better described by mechanistic kinetics invoking elementary chemical reactions. In addition, it was found that the weathering rate of anorthite (a calcium silicate) was too slow to contribute significant amounts of Ca{sup 2+} ions to the soil solution and the phenomenon of calcite supersaturation commonly found in soil solutions is attributed to carbon dioxide dynamics.

  3. Effects of acid rain and sulfur dioxide on marble dissolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, Paul F.; Reddy, Michael M.; Sherwood, Susan I.

    1994-01-01

    Acid precipitation and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide (SO2) accelerate damage to carbonate-stone monuments and building materials. This study identified and quantified environmental damage to a sample of Vermont marble during storms and their preceding dry periods. Results from field experiments indicated the deposition of SO2 gas to the stone surface during dry periods and a twofold increase in marble dissolution during coincident episodes of low rain rate and decreased rainfall pH. The study is widely applicable to the analysis of carbonate-stone damage at locations affected by acid rain and air pollution.

  4. Effects of acid rain and sulfur dioxide on marble dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, P.F.; Reddy, M.M. ); Sherwood, S.I. )

    1994-01-01

    Acid precipitation and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) accelerate damage to carbonate-stone monuments and building materials. This study identified and quantified environmental damage to a sample of Vermont marble during storms and their preceding dry periods. Results from field experiments indicated the deposition of SO[sub 2] gas to the stone surface during dry periods and a twofold increase in marble dissolution during coincident episodes of low rain rate and decreased rainfall pH. The study is widely applicable to the analysis of carbonate-stone damage at locations affected by acid rain and air pollution.

  5. Effects of Acute Exposures to Carbon Dioxide upon Cognitive Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, V. E.; Scully, R. R.; Alexander, D. J.; Lam, C. W.; Young, M.; Satish, U.; Basner, M.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) originates from human metabolism and typically remains about 10-fold higher in concentration on the International Space Station (ISS) than at the earth's surface. There have been recurring complaints by crew members of episodes of "mental viscosity" adversely affecting their performance, and there is evidence from the ISS that associates CO2 levels with reports of headaches by crewmembers. Consequently, flight rules have been employed to control CO2 below 3 mm Hg, which is well below the existing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentration (SMAC) of 10 mm Hg for 24-hour exposures, and 5.3 mm Hg for exposures of 7 to 180 days. Headaches, while sometime debilitating themselves, are also symptoms that can provide evidence that physiological defense mechanisms have been breached, and there is evidence that CO2 has effects at levels below the threshold for headaches. This concern appears to be substantiated in reports that CO2 at concentrations below 2 mm Hg substantially reduced some cognitive functions that are associated with the ability to make complex decisions in conditions that are characterized by volatility, uncertainty, complexity, ambiguity, and delayed feedback. These are conditions that could be encountered by crews in off-nominal situations or during the first missions beyond low earth orbit. Therefore, we set out to determine if decision-making under volatile, uncertain, confusing and ambiguous circumstances, where feedback is delayed or absent, is correlated with low levels of CO2 during acute exposures (several hours) in crew-like subjects and to determine if additional cognitive domains are sensitive to concentrations of CO2 at, or below, current ISS levels by using a test battery that is currently available onboard ISS. We enrolled 22 volunteers (8 females, 14 males) between the ages of 30-55 (38.8 +/- 7.0) years whose training and professional experience reflect that of the astronaut corps. Subjects were divided among 4 study

  6. Research of fiber carbon dioxide sensing system based laser absorption spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yubin; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Yanfang; Zhao, Yanjie; Wang, Chang; Liu, Tongyu

    2012-02-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the important gas need to be detected in coal mine safety. In the mine limited ventilation environment, Concentration of carbon dioxide directly affects the health of coal miners. Carbon dioxide is also one of important signature Gas in spontaneous combustion forecasting of coal goaf area, it is important to accurately detect concentration of carbon dioxide in coal goaf area. This paper proposed a fiber carbon dioxide online sensing system based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy. The system used laser absorption spectroscopy and optical fiber sensors combined, and a near-infrared wavelength 1608nm fiber-coupled distributed feedback laser (DFB) as a light source and a 7cm length gas cell, to achieve a high sensitivity concentration detection of carbon dioxide gas. The technical specifications of sensing system can basically meet the need of mine safety.

  7. Fabric compatibility and cleaning effectiveness of drycleaning with carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.B.; Laintz, K.E.; Spall, W.D.; bustos, L.; Taylor, C.

    1996-04-01

    Liquid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) offers an environmentally sound replacement solvent to the currently used drycleaning solvent, perchloroethylene (PERC). In addition to the health and safety benefits of a CO{sub 2} based cleaning system, large savings in solvent costs provide an incentive for conversion to the new system. Lower operating costs for the new technology provide further incentive. Experimental studies were conducted using CO{sub 2} in both small scale and pilot scale test systems in order to address fabric compatibility with this alternative cleaning method. Results from these tests show that fabric shrinkage using CO{sub 2} is controlled to the same level as current drycleaning methods. In addition, tests to evaluate the cleaning performance of liquid CO{sub 2} drycleaning were also conducted. These results show the prototype liquid CO{sub 2} cleaning system to be better than PERC at soil removal, and worse than PERC at inorganic salt removal.

  8. Reporting Research Results Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    2010-01-01

    Assessment research is at its best when it packages research results and data so that they can be digested by multiple audiences. Too many assessment researchers spend all their efforts planning and executing the research project with little attention to closing the loop at the end. If assessment findings are not communicated effectively, the…

  9. Effectively Communicating Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Grieger, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    This article is a guide for counseling researchers wishing to communicate the methods and results of their qualitative research to varied audiences. The authors posit that the first step in effectively communicating qualitative research is the development of strong qualitative research skills. To this end, the authors review a process model for…

  10. Environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change. Volume II, Part 14. Research needed to determine the present carbon balance of northern ecosystems and the potential effect of carbon-dioxide-induced climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.C.

    1982-10-01

    Given the potential significance of northern ecosystems to the global carbon budget it is critical to estimate the current carbon balance of these ecosystems as precisely as possible, to improve estimates of the future carbon balance if world climates change, and to assess the range of certainty associated with these estimates. As a first step toward quantifying some of the potential changes, a workshop with tundra and taiga ecologists and soil scientists was held in San Diego in March 1980. The first part of this report summarizes the conclusions of this workshop with regard to the estimate of the current areal extent and carbon content of the circumpolar arctic and the taiga, current rates of carbon accumulation in the peat in the arctic and the taiga, and predicted future carbon accumulation rates based on the present understanding of controlling processes and on the understanding of past climates and vegetation. This report presents a finer resolution of areal extents, standing crops, and production rates than was possible previously because of recent syntheses of data from the International Biological Program and current studies in the northern ecosystems, some of which have not yet been published. This recent information changes most of the earlier estimates of carbon content and affects predictions of the effect of climate change. The second part of this report outlines research needed to fill major gaps in the understanding of the role of northern ecosystems in global climate change.

  11. Effect of thin silicon dioxide layers on resonant frequency in infrared metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Shelton, D J; Peters, D W; Sinclair, M B; Brener, I; Warne, L K; Basilio, L I; Coffey, K R; Boreman, G D

    2010-01-18

    Infrared metamaterials fabricated on semiconductor substrates exhibit a high degree of sensitivity to very thin (as small as 2 nm) layers of low permittivity materials between the metallic elements and the underlying substrate. We have measured the resonant frequencies of split ring resonators and square loops fabricated on Si wafers with silicon dioxide thicknesses ranging from 0 to 10 nm. Resonance features blue shift with increasing silicon dioxide thickness. These effects are explained by the silicon dioxide layer forming a series capacitance to the fringing field across the elements. Resonance coupling to the Si-O vibrational absorption has been observed. Native oxide layers which are normally ignored in numerical simulations of metamaterials must be accounted for to produce accurate predictions.

  12. Methane consumption and carbon dioxide emission in tallgrass prairie: Effects of biomass burning and conversion to agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, C.M.; Striegl, R.G. )

    1993-12-01

    Methane and carbon dioxide in the troposphere have increased substantially in recent years. Soils are the largest terrestrial sink of atmospheric methane and an important source of carbon dioxide. Conversion of natural soils systems to other uses can have a significant impact on global methane and carbon dioxide budgets. This study compares the effects of biomass burning and the conversion of prairie to tilled agriculture on the consumption of atmospheric methane and emission of carbon dioxide by soils in a Kansas tall grass prairie. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Influences of packaging design on antimicrobial effects of gaseous chlorine dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas is an effective surface disinfectant, for it has the ability to reach and inactivate bacterial cells in biofilms which are attached to inaccessible sites on produce surfaces. One of the most promising applications of gaseous ClO2 is to be included in the headspace of foo...

  14. Effects of carbon dioxide and phosphorus supply on potato dry matter allocation and canopy morphology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) generally exhibit a positive growth response to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (CO2) and require high amounts of phosphorus (P) fertilizer. Despite its prominence as a world-wide staple crop, there is little data that quantifies effects of P, and n...

  15. Synergistic effects of exposure to concentrated ambient fine pollution particles and nitrogen dioxide in humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to single pollutants such as ambient particulate matter (PM) is associated with adverse health effects. It is unclear, however, if simultaneous exposure to multiple air pollutants (e.g. PM and ozone or nitrogen dioxide), a more real world scenario, results in non-additiv...

  16. Home interventions are effective at decreasing indoor nitrogen dioxide concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Paulin, L. M.; Diette, G. B.; Scott, M.; McCormack, M. C.; Matsui, E. C.; Curtin-Brosnan, J.; Williams, D. L.; Kidd-Taylor, A.; Shea, M.; Breysse, P. N.; Hansel, N. N.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a by-product of combustion produced by indoor gas appliances such as cooking stoves, is associated with respiratory symptoms in those with obstructive airways disease. We conducted a three-armed randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of interventions aimed at reducing indoor NO2 concentrations in homes with unvented gas stoves: (i) replacement of existing gas stove with electric stove; (ii) installation of ventilation hood over existing gas stove; and (iii) placement of air purifiers with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) and carbon filters. Home inspection and NO2 monitoring were conducted at 1 week pre-intervention and at 1 week and 3 months post-intervention. Stove replacement resulted in a 51% and 42% decrease in median NO2 concentration at 3 months of follow-up in the kitchen and bedroom, respectively (P = 0.01, P = 0.01); air purifier placement resulted in an immediate decrease in median NO2 concentration in the kitchen (27%, P < 0.01) and bedroom (22%, P = 0.02), but at 3 months, a significant reduction was seen only in the kitchen (20%, P = 0.05). NO2 concentrations in the kitchen and bedroom did not significantly change following ventilation hood installation. Replacing unvented gas stoves with electric stoves or placement of air purifiers with HEPA and carbon filters can decrease indoor NO2 concentrations in urban homes. PMID:24329966

  17. Effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide on soil nitrogen cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmockel, Kirsten S.

    Human activities including fossil fuel combustion, deforestation, and land conversion to agriculture have caused the concentration of atmospheric CO2 to increase since the Industrial Revolution. One approach to atmospheric CO2 reduction is sequestration in forest ecosystems. Presently little is known about the overall impact of elevated atmospheric CO2 on net ecosystem carbon storage, particularly in terms of nutrient limitations. In this dissertation I tested the hypothesis that elevated atmospheric CO2 will stimulate soil N availability, supporting long-term CO 2 sequestration in southeastern forests, examined asymbiotic N2 fixation, amino acid assimilation and ecosystem scale N cycling to understand changes in soil N cycling induced by elevated atmospheric CO 2. All research was conducted at the Duke Forest free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment, where atmospheric CO2 concentrations have been maintained at 200 ul l-1 above ambient levels in the 30-m diameter treatment plots since 1996. This body of research indicates that elevated atmospheric CO2 does not stimulate soil N cycling at the decadal time scale. Field measurements of exogenous N inputs via asymbiotic N2 fixing bacteria reveal no CO2 stimulation. Soil moisture was the most important factor controlling field rates of N2 fixation. Changes in endogenous N cycling were evaluated using stable isotope tracer field experiments. Short-term experiments showed that more amino acid N was assimilated by both fine roots and microbes under ambient compared to elevated CO2. This significant treatment effect indicates that soil C limitation was a stronger driver of amino acid cycling than N limitation. Intact amino acid assimilation was comparable to NH4 assimilation and may make a small, but important contribution to plant N uptake in warm-temperate forest ecosystems. Inorganic N cycling was not affected by elevated atmospheric CO2. After two growing seasons, a 15N field tracer experiment showed no effects of

  18. Phototoxic effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on Daphnia magna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Charles M.

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP) are one of the most abundantly utilized nanomaterials in the world. Studies have demonstrated the mechanism of acute toxicity in TiO2-NP to be the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress and mortality in exposed organisms. It has also been demonstrated that the anatase crystalline conformation is capable of catalyzing the cleavage of water molecules to further increase the concentration of ROS in the presence of ultraviolet radiation. This photoenhanced toxicity significantly lowers the toxicity threshold of TiO2-NP to environmentally relevant concentrations (ppb). The goal of this study was to determine whether dietary uptake and accumulation of TiO2-NP in the aquatic filter feeder Daphnia magna resulted in photoenhanced toxicity. D. magna and S. caprincornatum were exposed to aqueous solutions of 20ppm and 200ppm TiO2-NP for 24hrs and then transferred to clean moderately hard water. Samples were taken at various time points, dried, and TiO 2 quantified using ICP-MS. Toxicity assays were run on D. magna using three TiO2-NP (20ppm, 200ppm) exposure protocols and two ultraviolet radiation treatments. The first exposure group was exposed to aqueous solutions of TiO2-NP for the duration of the test. The second exposure group was exposed to TiO2-NP for an hour and then transferred to clean water. The third exposure group was fed S. capricornatum that had been allowed to adsorb TiO2-NP. All samples were then placed in an outdoor UV exposure system and exposed to either full spectrum sunlight (with UV) or filtered sunlight (no UV). Here we show that TiO2 uptake peaked at one hour of exposure likely due to sedimentation of the particles out of suspension, thus decreasing bioavailability for the duration of the test. Interestingly, when D. magna were moved to clean water, aqueous concentrations of TiO2 increase as a result of depuration from the gut tract. Data also suggests these excreted particles

  19. Evaluation of the Effects of Utilizing Carbon Dioxide as a Pulpal Test. Part I. In Vitro Effect on Human Enamel Surface.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-21

    I I A116 0" ARNY INST OF DENTAL RESEARCH WASHINGTON DC F/S 6/5 EVALUATION OF THIE EFFECTS OF UTILIZINS CARBON DIOXIDE AS A PULP --ETC(U)’L * WAY 4 D D...test, thermal chanq(e * 20. AUSTRhACT coue areverse @4 Ift nece.sey .nd identIfy ty bI k. numb e An effective method Pf clini- cal pulp testing, carbon...official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense. II ABSTRACT An effective method of clinical pulp

  20. Effect of the nano-bio interface on the genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and associated cellular responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Raju Yashaswi

    Several toxicological studies have shown that titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2), one of the most widely produced engineered nanoparticles, can induce genotoxicity; however, potential adverse health effects associated with their physicochemical properties are not fully understood. Proteins in a biological medium can adsorb to the surface of the nanoparticle resulting in the formation of a protein corona that can alter the physicochemical properties of the particle. Furthermore, the protein corona may impact the interaction between nanoparticles and cells, referred to as the nano-bio interface, effecting the uptake, distribution, and toxicity of the particles. Despite the potential influence of the composition of the biological medium on the physicochemical properties and genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, the majority of studies have not examined systematically the influence of medium composition on protein corona, genotoxicity, and cellular responses. In this dissertation we tested the overall hypothesis that titanium dioxide nanoparticles in medium that produces the smallest agglomerates would be taken up into cells and induce genotoxicity, and that exposure would initiate the signaling of key mediators of a DNA damage and inflammation response. Three major findings were shown in this study: 1) Protein corona formation on the surface of nano-TiO2 can impact the nano-bio interface and change cellular interaction. 2) Smaller agglomerates of nano-TiO2 are taken up more by cells without inducing cell cycle arrest, thereby allowing induced DNA damage to be processed into micronuclei in BEAS-2B cells. 3) Nano-TiO 2 in medium that facilitates increased cellular interaction induces the upregulation of the ATM-Chk2 DNA damage response (similar to ionizing radiation) and NF-kappaB inflammation pathways. Taken together, our research provides a systematic examination of the physicochemical properties, genotoxicity, and cellular responses induced by

  1. Effect of Chlorine Dioxide Gas on Fungi and Mycotoxins Associated with Sick Building Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S. C.; Wu, C.; Andriychuk, L. A.; Martin, J. M.; Brasel, T. L.; Jumper, C. A.; Straus, D. C.

    2005-01-01

    The growth of indoor molds and their resulting products (e.g., spores and mycotoxins) can present health hazards for human beings. The efficacy of chlorine dioxide gas as a fumigation treatment for inactivating sick building syndrome-related fungi and their mycotoxins was evaluated. Filter papers (15 per organism) featuring growth of Stachybotrys chartarum, Chaetomium globosum, Penicillium chrysogenum, and Cladosporium cladosporioides were placed in gas chambers containing chlorine dioxide gas at either 500 or 1,000 ppm for 24 h. C. globosum was exposed to the gas both as colonies and as ascospores without asci and perithecia. After treatment, all organisms were tested for colony growth using an agar plating technique. Colonies of S. chartarum were also tested for toxicity using a yeast toxicity assay with a high specificity for trichothecene mycotoxins. Results showed that chlorine dioxide gas at both concentrations completely inactivated all organisms except for C. globosum colonies which were inactivated an average of 89%. More than 99% of ascospores of C. globosum were nonculturable. For all ascospore counts, mean test readings were lower than the controls (P < 0.001), indicating that some ascospores may also have been destroyed. Colonies of S. chartarum were still toxic after treatment. These data show that chlorine dioxide gas can be effective to a degree as a fumigant for the inactivation of certain fungal colonies, that the perithecia of C. globosum can play a slightly protective role for the ascospores and that S. chartarum, while affected by the fumigation treatment, still remains toxic. PMID:16151130

  2. Modeling effects of traffic and landscape characteristics on ambient nitrogen dioxide levels in Connecticut

    PubMed Central

    Skene, Katherine J.; Gent, Janneane F.; McKay, Lisa A.; Belanger, Kathleen; Leaderer, Brian P.; Holford, Theodore R.

    2010-01-01

    An integrated exposure model was developed that estimates nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentration at residences using geographic information systems (GIS) and variables derived within residential buffers representing traffic volume and landscape characteristics including land use, population density and elevation. Multiple measurements of NO2 taken outside of 985 residences in Connecticut were used to develop the model. A second set of 120 outdoor NO2 measurements as well as cross-validation were used to validate the model. The model suggests that approximately 67% of the variation in NO2 levels can be explained by: traffic and land use primarily within 2 km of a residence; population density; elevation; and time of year. Potential benefits of this model for health effects research include improved spatial estimations of traffic-related pollutant exposure and reduced need for extensive pollutant measurements. The model, which could be calibrated and applied in areas other than Connecticut, has importance as a tool for exposure estimation in epidemiological studies of traffic-related air pollution. PMID:21076636

  3. The effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on neuroinflammation response in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Grissa, Intissar; Guezguez, Sabrine; Ezzi, Lobna; Chakroun, Sana; Sallem, Amira; Kerkeni, Emna; Elghoul, Jaber; El Mir, Lassaad; Mehdi, Meriem; Cheikh, Hassen Ben; Haouas, Zohra

    2016-10-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely used for their whiteness and opacity in several applications such as food colorants, drug additives, biomedical ceramic, and implanted biomaterials. Research on the neurobiological response to orally administered TiO2 NPs is still limited. In our study, we investigate the effects of anatase TiO2 NPs on the brain of Wistar rats after oral intake. After daily intragastric administration of anatase TiO2 NPs (5-10 nm) at 0, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg body weight (BW) for 60 days, the coefficient of the brain, acethylcholinesterase (AChE) activities, the level of interleukin 6 (IL-6), and the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were assessed to quantify the brain damage. The results showed that high-dose anatase TiO2 NPs could induce a downregulated level of AChE activities and showed an increase in plasmatic IL-6 level as compared to the control group accompanied by a dose-dependent decrease inter-doses, associated to an increase in the cerebral IL-6 level as a response to a local inflammation in brain. Furthermore, we observed elevated levels of immunoreactivity to GFAP in rat cerebral cortex. We concluded that oral intake of anatase TiO2 NPs can induce neuroinflammation and could be neurotoxic and hazardous to health.

  4. Effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhangjian; Wang, Yun; Zhuo, Lin; Chen, Shi; Zhao, Lin; Luan, Xianguo; Wang, Haifang; Jia, Guang

    2015-12-03

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have been widely used in various consumer products, especially food and personal care products. Compared to the well-characterized adverse cardiovascular effect of inhaled ambient ultrafine particles, research on the health response to orally administrated TiO2 NPs is still limited. In our study, we performed an in vivo study in Sprague-Dawley rats to understand the cardiovascular effect of TiO2 NPs after oral intake. After daily gastrointestinal administration of TiO2 NPs at 0, 2, 10, 50 mg/kg for 30 and 90 days, heart rate (HR), blood pressure, blood biochemical parameters and histopathology of cardiac tissues was assessed to quantify cardiovascular damage. Mild and temporary reduction of HR and systolic blood pressure as well as an increase of diastolic blood pressure was observed after daily oral administration of TiO2 NPs for 30 days. Injury of cardiac function was observed after daily oral administration of TiO2 NPs for 90 days as reflected in decreased activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alpha-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (HBDH) and creatine kinase (CK). Increased white blood cells count (WBC) and granulocytes (GRN) in blood as well as increased concentrations of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in the serum indicated inflammatory response initiated by TiO2 NPs exposure. It was hypothesize that cardiac damage and inflammatory response are the possible mechanisms of the adverse cardiovascular effects induced by orally administrated TiO2 NPs. Data from our study suggested that even at low dose of TiO2 NPs can induce adverse cardiovascular effects after 30 days or 90 days of oral exposure, thus warranting concern for the dietary intake of TiO2 NPs for consumers.

  5. Carbon dioxide effects research and assessment program. Environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change: volume II, part I. Response of the West Antarctic ice sheet to CO/sub 2/-induced climatic warming

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, C.

    1982-04-01

    The paper proposes a research plan to deal with the question of what the response of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet would be to a rise in global temperatures caused by an anthropogenic CO/sub 2/ buildup in the atmosphere. The plan is designed to answer the following questions: (1) how fast is the ice mass changing now, and why; (2) how will the boundary conditions that affect the ice sheet respond to an atmospheric temperature change and how are those boundary conditions changing now; (3) what will be the response of the ice sheet to changes in boundary conditions; and (4) what can be learned by analogy with what has happened in the past. (ACR)

  6. Effect of chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite on the dissolution of human pulp tissue – An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sandeep; Sinha, Ramen; Kar, S.K.; Ather, Amber; Limaye, S.N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Organic tissue dissolution is an important property of an irrigant which aids in the success of root canal treatment. Recent studies have advocated the use of Chlorine dioxide as an endodontic irrigant. The aim of this study is to compare the dissolution efficacy of chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite on human pulp tissue. Methods In this study, 2% Sodium hypochlorite, 5% Chlorine dioxide and isotonic saline solution (control) were used. Thirty human pulp tissue specimens were exposed to three test solutions (n = 10) for 30 min following which the loss of weight was compared from the original weight by using a digital analytical balance. Results Sodium hypochlorite was more efficient in dissolving human pulp tissue when compared to Chlorine dioxide. Isotonic saline solution failed to dissolve any of the specimens. Conclusion 5% Chlorine dioxide is capable of dissolving human pulp tissue but sodium hypochlorite was more effective. PMID:24532904

  7. Effect of atmospheric distortion of carbon dioxide laser radar waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachelmyer, Alan L.; Knowlden, Robert E.; Keicher, William E.

    1987-01-01

    The combined effects of absorption and dispersion can significantly degrade the resolution of lidar. These effects are presently calculated for the case of a lidar used to ascertain the exact range to a satellite in earth orbit, demonstrating CO2 absorption effects in both the lower and upper atmosphere. The principal effect is noted to be the increase of lidar range sidelobes to unacceptable levels; range resolution is degraded to a lesser extent. These results pertain to any lidars employing short, 0.5-5.0 nanosec duration pulses to obtain high resolution.

  8. Projecting the climatic effects of increasing carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, M C; Luther, F M

    1985-12-01

    This report presents the current knowns, unknowns, and uncertainties regarding the projected climate changes that might occur as a result of an increasing atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. Further, the volume describes what research is required to estimate the magnitude and rate of a CO/sub 2/-induced clamate change with regional and seasonal resolution. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (ACR)

  9. Detecting the climatic effects of increasing carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, M C; Luther, F M

    1985-12-01

    This report documents what is known about detecting the CO2-induced changes in climate, and describes the uncertainties and unknowns associated with this monitoring and analysis effort. The various approaches for detecting CO2-induced climate changes are discussed first, followed by a review of applications of these strategies to the various climatic variables that are expected to be changing. Recommendations are presented for research and analysis activities. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (ACR)

  10. Sulfur dioxide effects on petunia pollen germination and seed set

    SciTech Connect

    Linskens, H.F.; van Megen, Y.; Pfahler, P.L.; Wilcox, M.

    1985-05-01

    Information pertaining to SO/sub 2/ effects on sexual reproduction is extremely limited even though this complex process is critical especially in annual species. This study reports the SO/sub 2/ effect on both in vitro and in vivo pollen germination characteristics and in vivo seed set in Petunia hybrida Vilm.

  11. The combined effects of elevated carbon dioxide and ozone on crop systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Heagle, A.S.; Shafer, S.R.; Heck, W.W. |

    1994-12-31

    Concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and ozone (O{sub 3}) in the troposphere have risen in the last century due to industrialization. Current levels of tropospheric O{sub 3} suppress growth of crops and other plants, and O{sub 3} concentrations may continue to rise with changes in global climate. On the other hand, projected increases in atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the next 50 to 100 years are expected to cause significant increases in growth of most species. Since elevated concentrations of these gases will co-occur, it is important to understand their joint action. Until recently, however, the combined effects of O{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} have received little attention. Most publications on combined CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} effects have described experiments conducted in greenhouse or controlled-environment facilities. To date, data on responses of agricultural species to the combined gases have come from experiments with radish, tomato, white clover, tobacco, or wheat. In most cases, CO{sub 2} stimulated and O{sub 3} suppressed growth of the plant tissues studied, and CO{sub 2} usually attenuated development of O{sub 3}-induced visible injury. Some data have indicated a tendency for CO{sub 2}, in concentrations up to double the current ambient level, to attenuate effects of O{sub 3} on growth, but statistical analyses of such data often have not supported such a conclusion. In this paper, the results of a recent field experiment with soybean are reported, and the results are compared to other similar research with elevated atmospheric concentrations of both O{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}.

  12. Antimicrobial polymers - The antibacterial effect of photoactivated nano titanium dioxide polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppmann, T.; Yatsenko, S.; Leonhardt, S.; Krampe, E.; Radovanovic, I.; Bastian, M.; Wintermantel, E.

    2014-05-01

    To obtain a polymer with antimicrobial properties for medical and sanitary applications nanoscale titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles have been incorporated into a medical grade polypropylene (PP) matrix with various filler contents (0 wt %, 2 wt %, 10 wt % and 15 wt %). The standard application of TiO2 for antimicrobial efficacy is to deposit a thin TiO2 coating on the surface. In contrast to the common way of applying a coating, TiO2 particles were applied into the bulk polymer. With this design we want to ensure antimicrobial properties even after application of impact effects that could lead to surface defects. The filler material (Aeroxide® TiO2 P25, Evonik) was applied via melt compounding and the compounding parameters were optimized with respect to nanoscale titanium dioxide. In a next step the effect of UV-irradiation on the compounds concerning their photocatalytic activity, which is related to the titanium dioxide amount, was investigated. The photocatalytic effect of TiO2-PP-composites was analyzed by contact angle measurement, by methylene blue testing and by evaluation of inactivation potential for Escherichia coli (E.coli) bacteria. The dependence of antimicrobial activity on the filler content was evaluated, and on the basis of different titanium dioxide fractions adequate amounts of additives within the compounds were discussed. Specimens displayed a higher photocatalytic and also antimicrobial activity and lower contact angles with increasing titania content. The results suggest that the presence of titania embedded in the PP matrix leads to a surface change and a photocatalytic effect with bacteria killing result.

  13. Antimicrobial polymers - The antibacterial effect of photoactivated nano titanium dioxide polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Huppmann, T. Leonhardt, S. E-mail: erhard.krampe@tum.de; Krampe, E. E-mail: erhard.krampe@tum.de; Wintermantel, E.; Yatsenko, S. Radovanovic, I. E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de; Bastian, M. E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de

    2014-05-15

    To obtain a polymer with antimicrobial properties for medical and sanitary applications nanoscale titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) particles have been incorporated into a medical grade polypropylene (PP) matrix with various filler contents (0 wt %, 2 wt %, 10 wt % and 15 wt %). The standard application of TiO{sub 2} for antimicrobial efficacy is to deposit a thin TiO{sub 2} coating on the surface. In contrast to the common way of applying a coating, TiO{sub 2} particles were applied into the bulk polymer. With this design we want to ensure antimicrobial properties even after application of impact effects that could lead to surface defects. The filler material (Aeroxide® TiO{sub 2} P25, Evonik) was applied via melt compounding and the compounding parameters were optimized with respect to nanoscale titanium dioxide. In a next step the effect of UV-irradiation on the compounds concerning their photocatalytic activity, which is related to the titanium dioxide amount, was investigated. The photocatalytic effect of TiO{sub 2}-PP-composites was analyzed by contact angle measurement, by methylene blue testing and by evaluation of inactivation potential for Escherichia coli (E.coli) bacteria. The dependence of antimicrobial activity on the filler content was evaluated, and on the basis of different titanium dioxide fractions adequate amounts of additives within the compounds were discussed. Specimens displayed a higher photocatalytic and also antimicrobial activity and lower contact angles with increasing titania content. The results suggest that the presence of titania embedded in the PP matrix leads to a surface change and a photocatalytic effect with bacteria killing result.

  14. Ternary effects on the gas exchange of isotopologues of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, Graham D; Cernusak, Lucas A

    2012-07-01

    The ternary effects of transpiration rate on the rate of assimilation of carbon dioxide through stomata, and on the calculation of the intercellular concentration of carbon dioxide, are now included in standard gas exchange studies. However, the equations for carbon isotope discrimination and for the exchange of oxygen isotopologues of carbon dioxide ignore ternary effects. Here we introduce equations to take them into account. The ternary effect is greatest when the leaf-to-air vapour mole fraction difference is greatest, and its impact is greatest on parameters derived by difference, such as the mesophyll resistance to CO(2) assimilation, r(m) . We show that the mesophyll resistance to CO(2) assimilation has been underestimated in the past. The impact is also large when there is a large difference in isotopic composition between the CO(2) inside the leaf and that in the air. We show that this partially reconciles estimates of the oxygen isotopic composition of CO(2) in the chloroplast and mitochondria in the light and in the dark, with values close to equilibrium with the estimated oxygen isotopic composition of water at the sites of evaporation within the leaf.

  15. Ordering effects of conjugate thermal fields in simulations of molecular liquids: Carbon dioxide and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, Harro R.; Kusalik, Peter G.

    2016-10-01

    As shown previously, it is possible to apply configurational and kinetic thermostats simultaneously in order to induce a steady thermal flux in molecular dynamics simulations of many-particle systems. This flux appears to promote motion along potential gradients and can be utilized to enhance the sampling of ordered arrangements, i.e., it can facilitate the formation of a critical nucleus. Here we demonstrate that the same approach can be applied to molecular systems, and report a significant enhancement of the homogeneous crystal nucleation of a carbon dioxide (EPM2 model) system. Quantitative ordering effects and reduction of the particle mobilities were observed in water (TIP4P-2005 model) and carbon dioxide systems. The enhancement of the crystal nucleation of carbon dioxide was achieved with relatively small conjugate thermal fields. The effect is many orders of magnitude bigger at milder supercooling, where the forward flux sampling method was employed, than at a lower temperature that enabled brute force simulations of nucleation events. The behaviour exhibited implies that the effective free energy barrier of nucleation must have been reduced by the conjugate thermal field in line with our interpretation of previous results for atomic systems.

  16. Effect of carbon dioxide on the utilization of brain capillary reserve and flow

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, H.; Dribben, J.; Kissen, I.; Gerlock, T.; Weiss, H.R. )

    1989-12-01

    This study investigated effects of increased arterial carbon dioxide on the brain capillary perfusion pattern. Conscious rats were exposed to a 0%, 8% or 12% CO{sub 2} in air gas mixture. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, arterial blood gases and pH were recorded, and either regional cerebral blood flow or the percent of capillary volume/mm3 or number/mm2 perfused were determined in cortical, hypothalamic, pontine or medullary regions of the brain. Arterial PCO{sub 2} increased from 37 +/- 1 in control to 74 +/- 1 torr in the high CO{sub 2} group. A position linear relationship was found between cerebral blood flow and arterial PCO{sub 2} in all examined regions. Approximately half of the capillaries in the examined regions were perfused under normocapnic conditions. Increasing arterial PCO{sub 2} had no effect on the percent of the capillary bed perfused in the cortex or hypothalamus. However, there was a significant linear relationship between carbon dioxide tension and the percent of the microvasculature perfused in the hindbrain. The percent of capillaries/mm2 perfused increased significantly in the medulla (to 60 +/- 5%) and pons (70 +/- 4%) with 12% CO{sub 2} in air. These data suggest that carbon dioxide may have differential effects on diffusion distances affecting the hindbrain to a greater extent than the forebrain.

  17. Evaluation of cellular effects of silicon dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masanori; Nishio, Keiko; Kato, Haruhisa; Endoh, Shigehisa; Fujita, Katsuhide; Nakamura, Ayako; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2014-03-01

    Silica nanoparticles (nSiO2s) are an important type of manufactured nanoparticles. Although there are some reports about the cytotoxicity of nSiO2, the association between physical and chemical properties of nSiO2s and their cellular effects is still unclear. In this study, we examined the correlation between the physiochemical properties and cellular effects of three kinds of amorphous nSiO2s; sub-micro-scale amorphous SiO2, and micro-scale amorphous and crystalline SiO2 particles. The SiO2 particles were dispersed in culture medium and applied to HaCaT human keratinocytes and A549 human lung carcinoma cells. nSiO2s showed stronger protein adsorption than larger SiO2 particles. Moreover, the cellular effects of SiO2 particles were independent of the particle size and crystalline phase. The extent of cell membrane damage and intracellular ROS levels were different among nSiO2s. Upon exposure to nSiO2s, some cells released lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), whereas another nSiO2 did not induce LDH release. nSiO2s caused a slight increase in intracellular ROS levels. These cellular effects were independent of the specific surface area and primary particle size of the nSiO2s. Additionally, association of solubility and protein adsorption ability of nSiO2 to its cellular effects seemed to be small. Taken together, our data suggest that nSiO2s do not exert potent cytotoxic effects on cells in culture, especially compared to the effects of micro-scale SiO2 particles. Further studies are needed to address the role of surface properties of nSiO2s on cellular processes and cytotoxicity.

  18. EFFECT OF SULFUR DIOXIDE ON THE FORMATION MECHANISM OF POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZODIOXIN AND DIBENZOFURAN IN MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of sulfur dioxide on the formation mechanism of polychlorinated dibenzodioxin (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDF) in the postcombustion, downstream region (500-300 °C) of a municipal waste combustor (MWC) was investigated. Laboratory experiments simulating t...

  19. Effect of humic acid source on humic acid adsorption onto titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Erhayem, Mohamed; Sohn, Mary

    2014-02-01

    In many studies, different humic acid (HA) sources are used interchangeably to evaluate the effect of organic matter on geochemical processes in the environment. This research looks more specifically at the effect of HA source on HA adsorption onto nano-TiO2 and how HA adsorption affects the fate and transport of nano-TiO2. In this study, six humic acids (HAs) were studied which were derived from soils (SLHA), or from sediments (SDHA) all originating from the state of Florida. Humic acid adsorption onto titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) and the sedimentation of HA-coated and uncoated nano-TiO2 were monitored by Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy. Synchronous scan fluorescence (SSF) spectroscopy was used to complement the study of HA adsorption onto nano-TiO2. Phosphate buffer was found to reduce the amount of HA adsorbed onto nano-TiO2 relative to solutions of NaCl of the same pH and ionic strength. Adsorption constant values (Kads) for HAs varied in the order SLHA>FSDHA (freshwater sedimentary HA)>ESDHA (estuarine sedimentary HA). SSF results suggested that the more highly conjugated fractions of HA, which are more prevalent in SLHAs versus SDHAs, were preferentially adsorbed. In order to better understand the relationship between adsorption and aggregation, sedimentation studies were conducted and it was found that the percentage of nano-TiO2 sedimentation was preferentially enhanced in the order of the presence of SLHA>FSDHA>ESDHA. The extent of nano-TiO2 sedimentation was decreased with increasing HA concentration. TEM imaging of nano-TiO2 confirmed that nano-TiO2 was aggregated in the presence of HAs. The findings in this study suggest that HAs from different sources influence the fate and transport of nano-TiO2 in the environment differently.

  20. Core-hole effect on XANES and electronic structure of minor actinide dioxides with fluorite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Chikashi; Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Nakada, Masami; Akabori, Mitsuo; Hirata, Masaru; Kaji, Yoshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    The authors investigated theoretically core-hole effects on X-ray absorption near-edge structures (XANES) of Np and Am LIII in neptunium dioxide (NpO2) and americium dioxide (AmO2) with CaF2-type crystal lattices using the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FP-LAPW) method. The peak creation mechanism of XANES was shown by examining the electronic structures of these oxides, which indicated that core-hole screening was more marked for AmO2 than for NpO2 because of the difference in the charge transfer between these oxides. Furthermore, the results of charge density analysis suggested that the white line was assigned to the quasi-bound state composed of the localized Np d or Am d components and O components, and that the tail structure was created as a result of delocalized standing waves between the Np or Am atoms.

  1. Theoretical Study of Sodium Effect on the Gasification of Carbonaceous Materials with Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Lucas A; Garza, Jorge; Espinal, Juan F

    2015-12-24

    The effect of sodium on the thermodynamics and kinetics of carbon gasification with carbon dioxide was studied by using quantum chemistry methods. Specifically, in the density functional context, two exchange-correlation functionals were used: B3LYP and M06. Some results obtained by these exchange-correlation functionals were contrasted with those obtained by the CCSD(T) method. It was found that density functional theory gives similar conclusions with respect to the coupled-cluster method. As one important conclusion we can mention that the thermodynamics of carbon monoxide desorption is not favored by the sodium presence. However, the presence of this metal induces: (a) an easier formation of one semiquinone group, (b) the dissociation of carbon dioxide, and

  2. Solar cycle effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, B.L.; Rust, B.W.

    1983-01-01

    The authors present a causal time-series model for the Mauna Loa atmospheric CO2 record which supersedes a mathematical model consisting of four effects represented by exponential and sine functions. One effect is a 142-month oscillation which trails the sunspot numbers by exactly a quarter-cycle. This suggests that solar activity affects the rate of change in the atmospheric CO2 abundance. The new model replaces the mathematical functions with four measured time series representing proposed physical causes and reduces the number of adjustable parameters from 13 to 5 with no significant deterioration in the fit. The authors present evidence that solar activity affects the CO2 abundance through variations in ocean temperature or circulation.

  3. Gate effects on DNA translocation through silicon dioxide nanopore.

    PubMed

    Yen, Pei-chun; Wang, Chung-hsuan; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chou, Y C

    2012-03-01

    The effects of gate voltage on the translocation of DNA molecules through a nanopore are studied. A twenty-fold increase in the translocation time is observed with a positive gate voltage applied, without changing too much of the ionic current. The amplitude of the current blockage by the DNA molecules was reduced by roughly the same factor. At the same time, the number of the blocking events decreases significantly. The applied gate voltage also modulates the scatter plot of the amplitude of the current blockage against the dwell time. The observations are consistent with the recent theoretical results.

  4. Direct effects of increasing carbon dioxide on vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, B R; Cure, J D

    1985-12-01

    CO/sub 2/ is an essential environmental resource. It is required as a raw material of the orderly development of all green plants. As the availability of CO/sub 2/ increases, perhaps reaching two or three times the concentration prevailing in preindustrial times, plants and all other organisms dependent on them for food will be affected. Humans are releasing a gaseous fertilizer into the global atmosphere in quantities sufficient to affect all life. This volume considers the direct effects of global CO/sub 2/ fertilization on plants and thus on all other life. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  5. Effects of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide on bacterial growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, R. L.; Mckay, C. P.

    1983-01-01

    While it is generally thought that the bactericidal effects of NO and NO2 derive from their reaction with water to form nitrous and nitric acids (Shank et al., 1962), this appears to be true only at high concentrations. The data presented here suggest that at low NO and NO2 concentrations, acids are not present in high enough concentrations to act as toxic agents. Reference is made to a study by Grant et al. (1979), which found that exposing acid forest soil to 1 ppm of NO2 did not cause the soil pH to drop. The results presented here show that at low concentrations of NO and NO2, the NO is bacteriostatic for some organisms and not for others, whereas NO2 may protect some bacteria from the inhibitory effects of NO. Since it has been shown that bacteria can divide while airborne (Dimmick et al., 1979), the present results suggest that NO at the low concentrations found in the atmosphere can select for resistant bacteria in the air and affect the viable airborne bacterial population.

  6. Steric effects and preferential interactions in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Saquing, C.D.; Lucien, F.P.; Foster, N.R

    1998-10-01

    Solubility data are presented for a mixture of o-hydroxybenzoic acid (o-HBA) and m-HBA in supercritical CO{sub 2} doped with 3.5 mol% methanol. The data were measured at 318 and 328 K and for pressures in the range of 101--201 bar. Some new data for the solubility of pure m-HBA in methanol-doped supercritical CO{sub 2} are also presented. The solubilities of the HBA isomers are enhanced considerably with the addition of methanol to supercritical CO{sub 2}. However, the solubility enhancement is strongly affected by the spatial arrangement of their functional groups (steric effect). There appears to be preferential interaction between the solutes and the cosolvent in the quaternary system, and this phenomenon is consistent with thermodynamic modeling of the system.

  7. Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2011-11-01

    -sized calcite on the outside surface of cement, which resulted in the decrease in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. Cement carbonation and pore structure change are significantly dependent on pressure and temperature conditions as well as the phase of CO{sub 2}, which controls the balance between precipitation and dissolution in cement matrix. Geochemical modeling result suggests that ratio of solid (cement)-to-solution (carbonated water) has a significant effect on cement carbonation, thus the cement-CO{sub 2} reaction experiment needs to be conducted under realistic conditions representing the in-situ wellbore environment of carbon sequestration field site. Total porosity and air permeability for a duplicate cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 measured after oven-drying by Core Laboratories using Boyle's Law technique and steady-state method were 31% and 0.576 mD. A novel method to measure the effective liquid permeability of a cement column using X-ray micro-tomography images after injection of pressurized KI (potassium iodide) is under development by PNNL. Preliminary results indicate the permeability of a cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 is 4-8 mD. PNNL will apply the method to understand the effective permeability change of Portland cement by CO{sub 2}(g) reaction under a variety of pressure and temperature conditions to develop a more reliable well-bore leakage risk model.

  8. Hepatic effects of inhaled plutonium dioxide in beagles

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.; Buschbom, R.L.; Dagle, G.E.

    1995-10-01

    The effects of inhaled {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} deposited in the liver of dogs were studied in beagles exposed to initial lung depositions ranging from 5.7 to 2979.7 Bq/g lung. Approximately 20% of the initial lung deposition was translocated to the liver by 1500 days after exposure. Life-span observations revealed that the liver contained 40% of the final body burden of plutonium, second only to the skeleton. Elevated serum liver enzyme activities were observed in dogs with final liver depositions of {ge}0.4 Bq/g, cumulative dose to the liver of {ge}0.18 Gy and annual dose rate {ge}0.02 Gy/year. Enzyme elevations were seen at one dose level lower than that in which bone or lung tumors were observed. Linear regression analysis revealed strong to moderate correlation between cumulative dose and dose rate and time to observed increases in liver enzyme activities. Liver tumors were late occurring neoplasms observed at lower exposure levels where life span was not shortened by lung and bone tumors. 22 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Hematological effects of inhaled plutonium dioxide in beagles

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.; Buschbom, R.L.; Park, J.F.

    1995-07-01

    A life-span study indicated that plutonium activity in the thoracic lymph nodes is a contributor to development of lymphopenia in beagles exposed to {sup 239}PuO{sub 2}. Significant lymphopenia was found in 67 (58%) beagles given a single nose-only exposure to {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} to result in mean initial lung depositions ranging from 0.69 to 213.3 kBq. Lymphoid atrophy and sclerosis of the thoracic lymph nodes and lymphopenia were observed in exposure-level groups with initial lung depositions {ge}2.5 kBq. Those dogs with final plutonium concentrations in the thoracic lymph nodes {ge}0.4 kBq/g and dose rates {ge}0.01 Gy/day developed lymphopenia. Marked differences existed between chronically lymphopenic dogs and intermittently lymphopenic dogs with regard to initial lung deposition, time to lymphopenic events and absolute lymphocyte concentrations. Linear regression analysis revealed moderate correlation between reduction in lymphocyte values and initial lung deposition, in both magnitude and time of appearance after exposure. Cumulative dose and dose rate appeared to act together to produce initial effects on lymphocyte populations, while dose rate alone appeared to be responsible for the maintenance and subsequent cycles of lymphopenia seen over the life span. No primary tumors were associated with the thoracic lymph nodes in this study, although 70% of the lymphopenic dogs developed lung tumors. 28 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles in sunscreens: focus on their safety and effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Smijs, Threes G; Pavel, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Sunscreens are used to provide protection against adverse effects of ultraviolet (UV)B (290–320 nm) and UVA (320–400 nm) radiation. According to the United States Food and Drug Administration, the protection factor against UVA should be at least one-third of the overall sun protection factor. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) minerals are frequently employed in sunscreens as inorganic physical sun blockers. As TiO2 is more effective in UVB and ZnO in the UVA range, the combination of these particles assures a broad-band UV protection. However, to solve the cosmetic drawback of these opaque sunscreens, microsized TiO2 and ZnO have been increasingly replaced by TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) (<100 nm). This review focuses on significant effects on the UV attenuation of sunscreens when microsized TiO2 and ZnO particles are replaced by NPs and evaluates physicochemical aspects that affect effectiveness and safety of NP sunscreens. With the use of TiO2 and ZnO NPs, the undesired opaqueness disappears but the required balance between UVA and UVB protection can be altered. Utilization of mixtures of micro- and nanosized ZnO dispersions and nanosized TiO2 particles may improve this situation. Skin exposure to NP-containing sunscreens leads to incorporation of TiO2 and ZnO NPs in the stratum corneum, which can alter specific NP attenuation properties due to particle–particle, particle–skin, and skin–particle–light physicochemical interactions. Both sunscreen NPs induce (photo)cyto- and genotoxicity and have been sporadically observed in viable skin layers especially in case of long-term exposures and ZnO. Photocatalytic effects, the highest for anatase TiO2, cannot be completely prevented by coating of the particles, but silica-based coatings are most effective. Caution should still be exercised when new sunscreens are developed and research that includes sunscreen NP stabilization, chronic exposures, and reduction of NPs’ free-radical production

  11. Effects of porous films on the light reflectivity of pigmentary titanium dioxide particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yong; Qiao, Bing; Wang, Tig-Jie; Gao, Han; Yu, Keyi

    2016-11-01

    The light reflectivity of the film-coated titanium dioxide particles (TiO2) as a function of the film refractive index was derived and calculated using a plane film model. For the refractive index in the range of 1.00-2.15, the lower the film refractive index is, the higher is the light reflectivity of the film. It is inferred that the lower apparent refractive index of the porous film resulted in the higher reflectivity of light, i.e., the higher hiding power of the titanium dioxide particles. A dense film coating on TiO2 particles with different types of oxides, i.e., SiO2, Al2O3, MgO, ZnO, ZrO2, TiO2, corresponding to different refractive indices of the film from 1.46 to 2.50, was achieved, and the effects of refractive index on the hiding power from the model prediction were confirmed. Porous film coating of TiO2 particles was achieved by adding the organic template agent triethanolamine (TEA). The hiding power of the coated TiO2 particles was increased from 88.3 to 90.8 by adding the TEA template to the film coating (5-20 wt%). In other words, the amount of titanium dioxide needed was reduced by approximately 10% without a change in the hiding power. It is concluded that the film structure coated on TiO2 particle surface affects the light reflectivity significantly, namely, the porous film exhibits excellent performance for pigmentary titanium dioxide particles with high hiding power.

  12. Carbon dioxide is largely responsible for the acute inflammatory effects of tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Laurent; Guais, Adeline; Chaumet-Riffaud, Philippe; Grévillot, Georges; Sasco, Annie J; Molina, Thierry Jo; Mohammad, Abolhassani

    2010-06-01

    Tobacco smoking is responsible for a vast array of diseases, particularly chronic bronchitis and lung cancer. It is still unclear which constituent(s) of the smoke is responsible for its toxicity. The authors decided to focus on carbon dioxide, since its level of concentration in mainstream cigarette smoke is about 200 times higher than in the atmosphere. The authors previously demonstrated that inhalation of carbon dioxide concentrations above 5% has a deleterious effect on lungs. In this study, the authors assessed the inflammatory potential of carbon dioxide contained in cigarette smoke. Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke containing a high or reduced CO(2) level by filtration through a potassium hydroxyde solution. The inflammatory response was evaluated by histological analysis, protein phosphatase 2 A (PP2A) and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation, and proinflammatory cytokine secretion measurements. The data show that the toxicity of cigarette smoke may be largely due to its high level of CO(2). Pulmonary injuries consequent to tobacco smoke inhalation observed by histology were greatly diminished when CO(2) was removed. Cigarette smoke exposure causes an inflammatory response characterized by PP2A and NF-kappaB activation followed by proinflammatory cytokine secretion. This inflammatory response was reduced when the cigarette smoke was filtered through a potassium hydroxide column, and reestablished when CO(2) was injected downstream from the filtration column.Given that there is an extensive literature linking a chronic inflammatory response to the major smoking-related diseases, these data suggest that carbon dioxide may play a key role in the causation of these diseases by tobacco smoking.

  13. Effect of Elevated Carbon Dioxide on Nutritional Quality of Tomato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Yorio, N. C.; Berry, W. L.

    1997-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cvs. Red Robin (RR) and Reimann Philipp (RP) were grown hydroponically for 105 d with a 12 h photoperiod, 26 C/22 C thermoperiod, and 500 micromol/ sq m/s PPF at either 400, 1200, 5000, or 10,000 micromol/mol (0.04, 0.12, 0.50, 1.00 kPa) CO2. Harvested fruits were analyzed for proximate composition, total dietary fiber, nitrate, and elemental composition. No trends were apparent with regard to CO2 effects on proximate composition, with fruit from all treatments and both cultivars averiging 18.9 % protein, 3.6 % fat, 10.2 % ash, and 67.2 % carbohydrate. In comparison, average values for field-grown fruit are 16.6 % protein, 3.8 % fat, 8.1 % ash, and 71.5 % carbohydrate (Duke and Atchely, 1986). Total dietary fiber was highest at 10,000 micromol/mol (28.4 % and 22.6 % for RR and RP) and lowest at 1000 micromol/mol (18.2 % and 15.9 % for RR and RP), but showed no overall trend in response to CO2. Nitrate values ranged from 0.19 % to 0.35 % and showed no trend with regard to CO2. K, Mg, and P concentrations showed no trend in response to CO2, but Ca levels increased from 198 and 956 ppm in RR and RP at 400 micromol/mol, to 2537 and 2825 ppm at 10,000 micromol/mol. This increase in Ca caused an increase in fruit Ca/P ratios from 0.07 and 0.37 for RR and RP at 400 micromol/molto 0.99 and 1.23 for RR and RP at 10,000 micromol/mol suggesting that more dietary Ca should be available from high CO2-grown fruit.

  14. Toxicological effects of chlorine dioxide, chlorite and chlorate.

    PubMed Central

    Couri, D; Abdel-Rahman, M S; Bull, R J

    1982-01-01

    Review of the available literature obtained from both acute and chronic experiments utilizing rats, mice and chickens treated with ClO2, ClO2- and ClO3-in drinking water has demonstrated alterations in hematologic parameters in all species tested. The effects were usually dose related and marked changes occurred only at the higher dosages (up to 1000 mg/l.). In chronic studies, rats have been given ClO2 at doses of up to 1000 mg/l., and NaClO2 or NaClO3 at up to 100 mg/l., in their drinking water for one year. Treatment groups receiving ClO2, ClO2- or ClO3- showed alterations in erythrocyte morphology and osmotic fragility; at higher dosages mild hemolytic anemia occurred. An examination of blood glutathione content and RBC enzymes involving glutathione formation showed a dose-related diminution of glutathione in chlorine compound treated groups. The higher oxidative capacity of the chlorine compounds resulting in the decreased erythrocytic glutathione might well be the principal biochemical event leading to the other hematological alterations. More recent data show that ClO2, ClO2- and ClO3- alter the incorporation of 3H-thymidine into the nuclei of various organs of the rat. These data suggest the possibility of increased turnover cells of the gastrointestinal mucosa and inhibited DNA synthesis in several organs. In the latter category, most concern revolves around whether or not the apparent depression of DNA synthesis in the testes is associated with depressed spermatogenesis and reproductive toxicity in the male rat. PMID:6759107

  15. Effects of sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide on mercury oxidation and reduction under homogeneous conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yongxin Zhao; Michael D. Mann; Edwin S. Olson; John H. Pavlish; Grant E. Dunham

    2006-05-15

    This paper is particularly related to elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation and divalent mercury (Hg{sup 2+} reduction under simulated flue gas conditions in the presence of nitric oxide (NO) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). As a powerful oxidant and chlorinating reagent, Cl{sub 2} has the potential for Hg oxidation. However, the detailed mechanism for the interactions, especially among chlorine (Cl)-containing species, SO{sub 2}, NO, as well as H{sub 2}O, remains ambiguous. Research described in this paper therefore focused on the impacts of SO{sub 2} and NO on Hg{sup 0} oxidation and Hg{sup 2+} reduction with the intent of unraveling unrecognized interactions among Cl species, SO{sub 2}, and NO most importantly in the presence of H{sub 2}O. The experimental results demonstrated that SO{sub 2} and NO had pronounced inhibitory effects on Hg{sup 0} oxidation at high temperatures when H{sub 2}O was also present in the gas blend. Such a demonstration was further confirmed by the reduction of Hg{sup 2+} back into its elemental form. Data revealed that SO{sub 2} and NO were capable of promoting homogeneous reduction of Hg{sup 2+} to Hg{sup 0} with H{sub 2}O being present. However, the above inhibition or promotion disappeared under homogeneous conditions when H{sub 2}O was removed from the gas blend. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Effects of 7.5% carbon dioxide (CO2) inhalation and ethnicity on face memory

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, Angela S.; Catling, Jon C.; Kwong, Alex S.F.; Munafò, Marcus R.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to accurately verify facial identity has important forensic implications, but this ability is fallible. Research suggests that anxiety at the time of encoding can impair subsequent recall, but no studies have investigated the effects of anxiety at the time of recall in an experimental paradigm. This study addresses this gap using the carbon dioxide (CO2) model of anxiety induction. Thirty participants completed two inhalations: one of 7.5% CO2-enriched air and one of medical air (i.e., placebo). Prior to each inhalation, participants were presented with 16 facial images (50% own-ethnicity, 50% other-ethnicity). During the inhalation they were required to identify which faces had been seen before from a set of 32 images (16 seen-before and 16 novel images). Identification accuracy was lower during CO2 inhalation compared to air (F[1,29] = 5.5, p = .026, ηp2 = .16), and false alarm rate was higher for other-ethnicity faces compared to own-ethnicity faces (F[1,29] = 11.3, p = .002, ηp2 = .28). There was no evidence of gas by ethnicity interactions for accuracy or false alarms (ps > .34). Ratings of decision confidence did not differ by gas condition, suggesting that participants were unaware of differences in performance. These findings suggest that anxiety, at the point of recognition, impairs facial identification accuracy. This has substantial implications for eyewitness memory situations, and suggests that efforts should be made to attenuate the anxiety in these situations in order to improve the validity of identification. PMID:25890273

  17. The effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on antioxidant gene expression in tilapia ( Oreochromis niloticus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela-Valencia, Ruth; Gómez-Ortiz, Nikte; Oskam, Gerko; de Coss, Romeo; Rubio-Piña, Jorge; del Río-García, Marcela; Albores-Medina, Arnulfo; Zapata-Perez, Omar

    2014-04-01

    The reactivity of nanoparticles (NPs) in biological systems is well recognized, but there are huge gaps in our understanding of NP toxicity in fish, despite a number of recent ecotoxicity studies. Therefore, the aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of titanium dioxide NPs (TiO2-NPs) on antioxidant gene expression in the tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. First, different sizes, shapes, and phases of TiO2-NPs were synthesized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Fish were injected intraperitoneally with different concentrations (0.1, 1.0, 10.0 mg/L), sizes (7, 14, and 21 nm), and phases (anatase and rutile) of TiO2-NPs, and sacrificed 3, 6, 12, and 24 h after injection, when their livers were removed. Total RNA was extracted, and expression of the catalase ( CAT), glutathione- S-transferase ( GST), and superoxide dismutase ( SOD) genes was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that injection of 1.0 mg/L TiO2-NPs induced an initial mild increase in CAT, GST, and SOD gene expression in tilapia, after which transcript levels decreased. Fish injected with 7 and 14 nm TiO2-NPs showed an increase in antioxidant transcript levels 6 h after treatment. Finally, the rutile form generated stronger induction of the GST gene than anatase TiO2-NPs during the first 6 h after injection, which suggests that exposure to rutile causes higher levels of reactive oxygen species to be produced.

  18. Effect of elevated carbon dioxide on nutritional quality of tomato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Yorio, N. C.; Berry, W. L.

    1997-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cvs. Red Robin (RR) and Reimann Philipp (RP) were grown hydroponically for 105 d with a 12 h photoperiod, 26 degC/22 degC thermoperiod, and 500 mumol.m^-2 .s^-1 PPF at either 400, 1200, 5000, or 10,000 mumol.mol^-1 (0.04, 0.12, 0.50, 1.00 kPa) CO_2. Harvested fruits were analyzed for proximate composition, total dietary fiber, nitrate, and elemental composition. No trends were apparent with regard to CO_2 effects on proximate composition, with fruit from all treatments and both cultivars averaging 18.9 % protein, 3.6 % fat, 10.2 % ash, and 67.2 % carbohydrate. In comparison, average values for field-grown fruit are 16.6 % protein, 3.8 % fat, 8.1 % ash, and 71.5 % carbohydrate (Duke and Atchely, 1986). Total dietary fiber was highest at 10,000 mumol.mol^-1 (28.4 % and 22.6 % for RR and RP) and lowest at 1000 mumol.mol^-1 (18.2 % and 15.9 % for RR and RP), but showed no overall trend in response to CO_2. Nitrate values ranged from 0.19 % to 0.35 % and showed no trend with regard to CO_2. K, Mg, and P concentrations showed no trend in response to CO_2, but Ca levels increased from 198 and 956 ppm in RR and RP at 400 mumol.mol^-1, to 2537 and 2825 ppm at 10,000 mumol.mol^-1. This increase in Ca caused an increase in fruit Ca/P ratios from 0.07 and 0.37 for RR and RP at 400 mumol.mol^-1 to 0.99 and 1.23 for RR and RP at 10,000 mumol.mol^-1, suggesting that more dietary Ca should be available from high CO_2-grown fruit.

  19. Carbon Dioxide - Our Common "Enemy"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Macatangay, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    Health effects of brief and prolonged exposure to carbon dioxide continue to be a concern for those of us who manage this pollutant in closed volumes, such as in spacecraft and submarines. In both examples, considerable resources are required to scrub the atmosphere to levels that are considered totally safe for maintenance of crew health and performance. Defining safe levels is not a simple task because of many confounding factors, including: lack of a robust database on human exposures, suspected significant variations in individual susceptibility, variations in the endpoints used to assess potentially adverse effects, the added effects of stress, and the fluid shifts associated with micro-gravity (astronauts only). In 2007 the National Research Council proposed revised Continuous Exposure Guidelines (CEGLs) and Emergency Exposure Guidelines (EEGLs) to the U.S. Navy. Similarly, in 2008 the NASA Toxicology Group, in cooperation with another subcommittee of the National Research Council, revised Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs). In addition, a 1000-day exposure limit was set for long-duration spaceflights to celestial bodies. Herein we examine the rationale for the levels proposed to the U.S. Navy and compare this rationale with the one used by NASA to set its limits. We include a critical review of previous studies on the effects of exposure to carbon dioxide and attempt to dissect out the challenges associated with setting fully-defensible limits. We also describe recent experiences with management of carbon dioxide aboard the International Space Station with 13 persons aboard. This includes the tandem operations of the Russian Vozduk and the U.S. Carbon Dioxide Removal System. A third removal system is present while the station is docked to the Shuttle spacecraft, so our experience includes the lithium hydroxide system aboard Shuttle for the removal of carbon dioxide. We discuss strategies for highly-efficient, regenerable removal of carbon

  20. Titanium dioxide nanotube membranes for solar energy conversion: effect of deep and shallow dopants.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuchen; Nagpal, Prashant

    2017-04-12

    Nanostructured titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been intensively investigated as a material of choice for solar energy conversion in photocatalytic, photoelectrochemical, photovoltaic, and other photosensitized devices for converting light into chemical feedstocks or electricity. Towards management of light absorption in TiO2, while the nanotubular structure improves light absorption and simultaneous charge transfer to mitigate problems due to the indirect bandgap of the semiconductor, typically dopants are used to improve light absorption of incident solar irradiation in the wide bandgap of TiO2. While these dopants can be critical to the success of these solar energy conversion devices, their effect on photophysical and photoelectrochemical properties and detailed photokinetics are relatively under-studied. Here, we show the effect of deep and shallow metal dopants on the kinetics of photogenerated charged carriers in TiO2 and the resulting effect on photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical processes using these nanotube membranes. We performed a detailed optical, electronic, voltammetry and electrochemical impedance study to understand the effect of shallow and deep metal dopants (using undoped and niobium- and copper-doped TiO2 nanotubes) on light absorption, charge transport and charge transfer processes. Using wireless photocatalytic methylene blue degradation and carbon dioxide reduction, and wired photoelectrochemical device measurements, we elucidate the effect of different dopants on solar-to-fuel conversion efficiency and simultaneously describe the photokinetics using a model, to help design better energy conversion devices.

  1. Important electromigration effects of carbon dioxide in capillary electrophoresis at high pH.

    PubMed

    Malá, Zdena; Gebauer, Petr; Boček, Petr

    2011-06-01

    This paper deals with unwanted effects of carbonate in capillary zone electrophoretic analyses of anions in alkaline BGEs with indirect UV absorption and conductivity detection. Computer simulations and experimental study of selected model systems have shown that carbon dioxide absorbed from air into BGEs and samples induce important electrophoretic effects like formation of new additional zones and/or boundaries that may further induce strong and pronounced temporary changes in the migration of analytes. Examples are reduction of the pH of alkaline BGEs around pH 11 by up to 1 unit or formation of a pronounced detectable carbon dioxide peak comparable with peaks of analytes at 1 mM level. The higher the pH of the BGE, the stronger these effects and the broader their spectrum, involving (i) changes of effective mobilities and selectivity due to changes in pH of the BGE, (ii) occurrence of additional system zones appearing in form of peaks, dips or more complex disturbances in the detection signal, (iii) temporary interactions with the sample components and subsequent modification of the separation process and of its result. This paper reveals all these effects and brings the knowledge necessary to prevent problems with qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the analysis results.

  2. Carbon dioxide and climate. [Appendix includes names and addresses of the Principal Investigators for the research projects funded in FY1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Global climate change is a serious environmental concern, and the US has developed An Action Agenda'' to deal with it. At the heart of the US effort is the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), which has been developed by the Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences (CEES) of the Federal Coordinating Council for Sciences, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET). The USGCRP will provide the scientific basis for sound policy making on the climate-change issue. The DOE contribution to the USGCRP is the Carbon Dioxide Research Program, which now places particular emphasis on the rapid improvement of the capability to predict global and regional climate change. DOE's Carbon Dioxide Research Program has been addressing the carbon dioxide-climate change connection for more than twelve years and has provided a solid scientific foundation for the USGCRP. The expansion of the DOE effort reflects the increased attention that the Department has placed on the issue and is reflected in the National Energy Strategy (NES) that was released in 1991. This Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1991 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments. The Environmental Sciences Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research supports a Carbon Dioxide Research Program to determine the scientific linkage between the rise of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, especially carbon dioxide, and climate and vegetation change. One facet is the Core CO{sub 2} Program, a pioneering program that DOE established more than 10 years ago to understand and predict the ways that fossil-fuel burning could affect atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration, global climate, and the Earth's biosphere. Major research areas are: global carbon cycle; climate detection and models of climate change; vegetation research; resource analysis; and, information and integration.

  3. Effect of azelastine on sulphur dioxide induced impairment of ciliary motility in airway epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Tamaoki, J; Chiyotani, A; Sakai, N; Takeyama, K; Konno, K

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--The effect of azelastine on airway mucociliary transport function was studied by measuring ciliary motility of human bronchial epithelium in vitro with a photoelectric method. METHOD--Bronchial epithelial cells were obtained by fibreoptic bronchoscopy, mounted in a Rose chamber, and perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution. The preparations were placed on a microscope stage equipped with an illuminator, and the variations of light intensity caused by ciliary beating were detected by a photometer. RESULTS--The addition of azelastine to the perfusate increased ciliary beat frequency (CBF) in a dose dependent manner without ciliary discoordination. The mean (SE) maximal increase from the baseline value and the concentration required to produce a half maximal effect were 27.0 (4.2)% and 9.2 x 10(-6) mol/l, respectively. Exposure of the cells to the perfusate containing 3 ppm sulphur dioxide rapidly decreased CBF by 59.2 (5.0)%, and was accompanied by a reduction in intracellular cyclic AMP levels from 38.1 (4.3) to 10.1 (2.4) pmol/mg protein. This effect was prevented by pretreatment of cells with azelastine in a dose dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS--Azelastine not only stimulates ciliary motility of airway epithelium and hence mucociliary transport function, but may also protect against sulphur dioxide induced ciliary dysfunction, probably by inhibiting intracellular cyclic AMP loss. PMID:8322244

  4. Possible greenhouse effects of tetrafluoromethane and carbon dioxide emitted from aluminum production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Ralph E.

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF 4) is an extremely stable gas which strongly absorbs infrared radiation at ˜ 8 μm, and therefore is capable of influencing the greenhouse effect. No natural sources have been identified, and the major anthropogenic source appears to be the electrolytic smelting of alumina to produce aluminum. Measurements of CF 4 concentrations in the atmosphere are reviewed, and these are combined with aluminum production rates to provide an estimate of 1.3-3.6 kg of CF 4 emitted per ton of aluminum produced for the period up to ˜ 1985. Aluminum production also requires large amounts of electrical energy, leading to the emission of as much as 22 tons of carbon dioxide per ton of aluminum due to fossil fuel combustion in power plants. The present day contribution of hydroelectric power reduces this figure to about 14 tons of carbon dioxide per ton of aluminum. An estimate of the relative radiative trapping of CF 4 and CO 2 emitted in aluminum production during this same period (1900-1985) indicates that the effect of CF 4 is about one-third that of the CO 2 formed by aluminum production. However, the emission of fluorocarbons from modem aluminum electrolysis cells is much lower than previous estimates indicate, and this factor is considered in estimating potential long-term global warming effects of CF 4 and CO 2 from aluminum production. Possible processes leading to removal of CF 4 from the atmosphere are described.

  5. Research of materials for porous matrices in sol-gel systems based on silicon dioxide and metallic oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraeva, E. V.; Bobkov, A. A.; Maximov, A. I.; Moshnikov, V. A.; Nalimova, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    In this study silicon dioxide - stannic oxide and silicon dioxide - zinc nanomaterials oxide were obtained through sol-gel technology. The results of nitrogen thermal desorption measurements, atomic force microscopy measurements and particle sizes measurements are discussed.

  6. The effects of low level chlorination and chlorine dioxide on biofouling control in a once-through service water system

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, W.E. Jr.

    1995-06-01

    Continuous chlorination has been successfully used for the control of Corbicula at a nuclear power plant located on the Chattahoochee River in southeastern Alabama, since 1986. The purpose of this study was to investigate further minimization of chlorine usage and determine if chlorine dioxide is a feasible alternative. Four continuous biocide treatments were evaluated for macro and microfouling control effectiveness, operational feasibility, and environmental acceptability. One semi-continuous chlorination treatment was also evaluated for macrofouling control effectiveness. Higher treatment residuals were possible with chlorine dioxide than with chlorination due to the river discharge limitations. At the levels tested, continuous chlorine dioxide was significantly more effective in providing both macro and microfouling control. Semi-continuous chlorination was just as effective as continuous chlorination for controlling macrofouling. The Corbicula treatment programs that were tested should all provide sufficient control for zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide was not as cost effective as chlorination for providing macrofouling control. The semi-continuous treatment save 50% on chemical usage and will allow for the simultaneous treatment of two service water systems. Chlorite levels produced during the chlorine dioxide treatments were found to be environmentally acceptable. Levels of trihalomethanes in the chlorinated service water were less than the maximum levels allowed in drinking water.

  7. Further studies on the effect of nitrogen dioxide on mast cells: The effect of the metabolite, nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimaki, Hidekazu ); Ozawa, Masashi ); Bissonnette, E.; Befus, A.D. )

    1993-05-01

    To evaluate the relationship between atmospheric nitrogen dioxide exposure and the development of allergic diseases, the effects of nitrite as a chemical product of inhaled nitrogen dioxide on mast cell functions were investigated. We have studied nitride-induced histamine release from two functionally distinct mast cell populations, namely peritoneal mast cells (PMC) and intestinal mucosal mast cells (IMMC) of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis-infected rats. High concentrations of nitrite alone (10, 20, and 50 mM) induced histamine release from IMMC, but not from PMC. Moreover, histamine release from PMC and IMMC stimulated with sensitizing antigen was significantly enhanced by pretreatment with 50 mM nitrite or nitrate. No differences in histamine release from nitrite-treated and control PMC were seen below 1 mM. To investigate the effect of nitrite on tumor cell cytotoxic activity, PMC were incubated with various concentrations of nitrite. Pretreatment with 5 and 50 mM nitrite markedly depressed tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[alpha]-dependent natural cytotoxicity of PMC for the tumor target WEHI-164. Thus, high concentrations of nitrite enhanced mast cell histamine release, but depressed TNF-[alpha]-dependent cytotoxicity. However, low concentrations of nitrite (<1 mM) that would normally be produced by short-term atmospheric exposure to nitrogen dioxide may have no significant effects on mast cell functions. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Short run effects of a price on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. electric generators.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Adam; Blumsack, Seth A; Apt, Jay; Lave, Lester B; Morgan, M Granger

    2008-05-01

    The price of delivered electricity will rise if generators have to pay for carbon dioxide emissions through an implicit or explicit mechanism. There are two main effects that a substantial price on CO2 emissions would have in the short run (before the generation fleet changes significantly). First, consumers would react to increased price by buying less, described by their price elasticity of demand. Second, a price on CO2 emissions would change the order in which existing generators are economically dispatched, depending on their carbon dioxide emissions and marginal fuel prices. Both the price increase and dispatch changes depend on the mix of generation technologies and fuels in the region available for dispatch, although the consumer response to higher prices is the dominant effect. We estimate that the instantaneous imposition of a price of $35 per metric ton on CO2 emissions would lead to a 10% reduction in CO2 emissions in PJM and MISO at a price elasticity of -0.1. Reductions in ERCOT would be about one-third as large. Thus, a price on CO2 emissions that has been shown in earlier workto stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO2 reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale.

  9. Titanium dioxide-based carbon monoxide gas sensors: Effects of crystallinity and chemistry on sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeley, Zachary Mark

    Among metal-oxide gas sensors which change electrical resistive properties upon exposure to target gasses, titanium dioxide (TiO2) has received attention for its sensitivity and stability during high temperature (>500°C) operation. However, due to the sensing mechanism sensitivity, selectivity, and stability remain as critical deficiencies to be resolved before these sensors reach commercial use. In this study, TiO2 thick films of approximately 30mum and thin films of approximately 1mum thick were fabricated to assess the influence of their material properties on gas sensing mechanism. Increased calcination temperature of TiO2 thick films led to grain growth, reduction in specific surface area, and particle-particle necking. These properties are known to degrade sensitivity; however the measured carbon monoxide (CO) gas response improved with increasing calcination temperature up to 800°C. It was concluded that the sensing improvement was due to increased crystallinity within the films. Sensing properties of TiO2 thin films of were also dependent on crystallization, however; due to the smaller volume of material, they reached optimized crystallization at lower temperatures of 650°C, compared to 800°C for thick films. Incorporation of tungsten (W) and nickel (Ni) ions into the films created donor and acceptor defect sites, respectively, within the electronic band gap of TiO2. The additional n-type defects in W-doped TiO 2 improved n-type CO response, while p-type defects in Ni-doped TiO 2 converted the gas response to p-type. Chemistry of thin films had a more significant impact on the electrical properties and gas response than did microstructure or crystallinity. Doped films could be calcined at higher temperatures and yet remain highly sensitive to CO. Thin films with p-n bi-layer structure were fabricated to determine the influence of a p-n junction on gas sensing properties. No effect of the junction was observed and the sensing response neared the average

  10. Thermally driven analog of the Barkhausen effect at the metal-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Huber-Rodriguez, Benjamin; Ji, Heng; Chen, Chih-Wei; Kwang, Siu Yi; Hardy, Will J.; Morosan, Emilia; Natelson, Douglas

    2014-09-29

    The physics of the metal-insulator transition (MIT) in vanadium dioxide remains a subject of intense interest. Because of the complicating effects of elastic strain on the phase transition, there is interest in comparatively strain-free means of examining VO{sub 2} material properties. We report contact-free, low-strain studies of the MIT through an inductive bridge approach sensitive to the magnetic response of VO{sub 2} powder. Rather than observing the expected step-like change in susceptibility at the transition, we argue that the measured response is dominated by an analog of the Barkhausen effect, due to the extremely sharp jump in the magnetic response of each grain as a function of time as the material is cycled across the phase boundary. This effect suggests that future measurements could access the dynamics of this and similar phase transitions.

  11. Effects of histamine and antihistamines on the kinetics of carbon dioxide in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.C.; Chambers, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of chlorpheniramine (an H1 histamine inhibitor) and metiamide (an H2 inhibitor) on response to 14C pulse-labeling of carbon dioxide in the rat in the presence and absence of histamine. Neither chlorpheniramine nor metiamide alone had any effect upon the gastric venous/arterial ratio (VG/A) or the peripheral venous/arterial ratio (Vp/A). As in the case with no drug present, Vp/A rose with time following pulse-labeling to a value of 1.15-1.20. The presence of a preexisting steady-state infusion of histamine caused no changes in the ratios in the presence or absence of the inhibitors. The inhibitors did completely abolish the oscillations of both VG/A and Vp/A caused by initiation of histamine infusion coincident with the pulse-labeling. The results suggest that the histamine effects are largely mediated through H1 receptors.

  12. Thermally driven analog of the Barkhausen effect at the metal-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber-Rodriguez, Benjamin; Kwang, Siu Yi; Hardy, Will J.; Ji, Heng; Chen, Chih-Wei; Morosan, Emilia; Natelson, Douglas

    2014-09-01

    The physics of the metal-insulator transition (MIT) in vanadium dioxide remains a subject of intense interest. Because of the complicating effects of elastic strain on the phase transition, there is interest in comparatively strain-free means of examining VO2 material properties. We report contact-free, low-strain studies of the MIT through an inductive bridge approach sensitive to the magnetic response of VO2 powder. Rather than observing the expected step-like change in susceptibility at the transition, we argue that the measured response is dominated by an analog of the Barkhausen effect, due to the extremely sharp jump in the magnetic response of each grain as a function of time as the material is cycled across the phase boundary. This effect suggests that future measurements could access the dynamics of this and similar phase transitions.

  13. Bisphosphine dioxides

    DOEpatents

    Moloy, K.G.

    1990-02-20

    A process is described for the production of organic bisphosphine dioxides from organic bisphosphonates. The organic bisphosphonate is reacted with a Grignard reagent to give relatively high yields of the organic bisphosphine dioxide.

  14. Bisphosphine dioxides

    DOEpatents

    Moloy, Kenneth G.

    1990-01-01

    A process for the production of organic bisphosphine dioxides from organic bisphosphonates. The organic bisphosphonate is reacted with a Grignard reagent to give relatively high yields of the organic bisphosphine dioxide.

  15. The antibacterial effects of silver, titanium dioxide and silica dioxide nanoparticles compared to the dental disinfectant chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans using a suite of bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Besinis, Alexandros; De Peralta, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Metal-containing nanomaterials have the potential to be used in dentistry for infection control, but little is known about their antibacterial properties. This study investigated the toxicity of silver (Ag), titanium dioxide and silica nanoparticles (NPs) against the oral pathogenic species of Streptococcus mutans, compared to the routine disinfectant, chlorhexidine. The bacteria were assessed using the minimum inhibitory concentration assay for growth, fluorescent staining for live/dead cells, and measurements of lactate. All the assays showed that Ag NPs had the strongest antibacterial activity of the NPs tested, with bacterial growth also being 25-fold lower than that in chlorhexidine. The survival rate of bacteria under the effect of 100 mg l−1 Ag NPs in the media was 2% compared to 60% with chlorhexidine, while the lactate concentration was 0.6 and 4.0 mM, respectively. Silica and titanium dioxide NPs had limited effects. Dialysis experiments showed negligible silver dissolution. Overall, Ag NPs were the best disinfectant and performed better than chlorhexidine. Improvements to the MIC assay are suggested. PMID:23092443

  16. Study on the Effect of Different Amount of Titanium Dioxide Nano-Powder to the Nano-Structured Titanium Dioxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, M. K.; Rusop, M.

    2009-06-01

    Nanostructured Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) thin film with additional various amount of TiO2 nanopowder has been successfully prepared using sol-gel spin coating method. The amounts of TiO2 nanopowders are varied at 0.02 g, 0.04 g, 0.06 g, 0.08 g, 0.10 g and 0.12 g, respectively. The effects of different amount of Titanium Dioxide nanopowder to the structural, electrical and optical properties have been studied. The effects of different amount of nano-powder TiO2 were characterized using X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD), 2-point probe I-V measurement and UV-Vis-NIR Spectrophotometer. For electrical properties, O.1 g of TiO2 nanopowder gives the lowest sheet resistance among other nanostructured TiO2 thin film. As for XRD data, all thin films are in crystalline anatase form which can observe at 2θ degree 25.6° for [101]. As the amount TiO2 nanopowder increased at 0.10 g and 0.12 g, new crystalline anatase phase can be observed at 2θ degree 48.6° for [200]. All TiO2 thin films also exhibited optical transmittance over 69% with wavelength range from 200 nm to 1000 nm.

  17. The antibacterial effects of silver, titanium dioxide and silica dioxide nanoparticles compared to the dental disinfectant chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans using a suite of bioassays.

    PubMed

    Besinis, Alexandros; De Peralta, Tracy; Handy, Richard D

    2014-02-01

    Metal-containing nanomaterials have the potential to be used in dentistry for infection control, but little is known about their antibacterial properties. This study investigated the toxicity of silver (Ag), titanium dioxide and silica nanoparticles (NPs) against the oral pathogenic species of Streptococcus mutans, compared to the routine disinfectant, chlorhexidine. The bacteria were assessed using the minimum inhibitory concentration assay for growth, fluorescent staining for live/dead cells, and measurements of lactate. All the assays showed that Ag NPs had the strongest antibacterial activity of the NPs tested, with bacterial growth also being 25-fold lower than that in chlorhexidine. The survival rate of bacteria under the effect of 100 mg l(-1) Ag NPs in the media was 2% compared to 60% with chlorhexidine, while the lactate concentration was 0.6 and 4.0 mM, respectively. Silica and titanium dioxide NPs had limited effects. Dialysis experiments showed negligible silver dissolution. Overall, Ag NPs were the best disinfectant and performed better than chlorhexidine. Improvements to the MIC assay are suggested.

  18. Responses of susceptible subpopulations to nitrogen dioxide. Research report, June 1983-January 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, P.E.; Utell, M.J.

    1989-02-01

    Symptom responses and changes in pulmonary function were investigated in people with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exposed to 0.3 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) for four hours. Nonrespiratory-impaired (normal) subjects of comparable ages constituted the control groups. All exposures included periods of exercise and pulmonary function measurements. No significant symptomatic or physiological responses to NO{sub 2} could be detected in either the young or elderly control group. The asthmatic group did not manifest significant reductions in lung function after exposure to 0.3 ppm NO{sub 2}, compared to their preexposure baseline data or to their responses after a comparable four-hour exposure to air. During light exercise, subjects with COPD were progressively responsive to 0.3 ppm NO{sub 2}. Subgroup analyses within the asthmatic, COPD, and elderly normal subject groups and intergroup comparisons yielded significant findings and associations.

  19. The effect of plutonium dioxide water surface coverage on the generation of hydrogen and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Veirs, Douglas K.; Berg, John M.; Crowder, Mark L.

    2012-06-20

    The conditions for the production of oxygen during radiolysis of water adsorbed onto plutonium dioxide powder are discussed. Studies in the literature investigating the radiolysis of water show that both oxygen and hydrogen can be generated from water adsorbed on high-purity plutonium dioxide powder. These studies indicate that there is a threshold in the amount of water below which oxygen is not generated. The threshold is associated with the number of monolayers of adsorbed water and is shown to occur at approximately two monolayers of molecularly adsorbed water. Material in equilibrium with 50% relative humidity (RH) will be at the threshold for oxygen generation. Using two monolayers of molecularly adsorbed water as the threshold for oxygen production, the total pressure under various conditions is calculated assuming stoichiometric production of hydrogen and oxygen. The specific surface area of the oxide has a strong effect on the final partial pressure. The specific surface areas resulting in the highest pressures within a 3013 container are evaluated. The potential for oxygen generation is mitigated by reduced relative humidity, and hence moisture adsorption, at the oxide surface which occurs if the oxide is warmer than the ambient air. The potential for oxygen generation approaches zero as the temperature difference between the ambient air and the material approaches 6 C.

  20. Cationic Effect on the Electrochemical Characteristics of the Hydrothermally Grown Manganese Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernardou, D.; Kazas, A.; Apostolopoulou, M.; Katsarakis, N.; Koudoumas, E.

    2017-04-01

    Hydrothermal growth of manganese dioxide (MnO2) nanostructures was carried out on indium tin dioxide glass substrates at 95°C for 24 h to study the effect of cations such as K+, Li+, and Na+ on their properties. It was observed that presence of cations affected the MnO2 phase and morphology: amorphous MnO2 (no cations) showed columnar-like structure, ɛ-MnO2 (K+) presented nanowires, α-MnO2 (Na+) was composed of agglomerates of spherical nanoparticles, while β-MnO2 (Li+) consisted of spherical aggregates of nanoparticles. The different electrochemical performance depending on the structure is expected to be useful for application in Li-ion batteries. As-grown ɛ-MnO2 exhibited lower charge resistance and higher ionic diffusion rate, providing the electrode with enhanced specific discharge capacity of 910 mAh g-1 and capacity retention of 98% after 500 scans. Hence, K+ can support tunnel structures and stabilize the structure compared with the smaller cations Na+ and Li+.

  1. The effect of phosphorus on the formation of tungsten dioxide: A novel morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Hegedus, E.; Neugebauer, J.

    1999-02-19

    The industrial production of tungsten is based on the hydrogen reduction of tungsten oxides, ammonium paratungstate (APT) or ammonium tungsten oxide bronze (ATOB). Hydrogen reduction is applied when high purity tungsten is required and when the addition of other elements or compounds (dopants) is desired for modification of the properties of the metal powder. The first stage of the reduction is finished when WO{sub 2} is formed and it seems that the efficient incorporation of the additives starts mainly at this reduction step. The study reported here was undertaken to investigate the effect of phosphorus dope on the morphology of the intermediate tungsten dioxide and analyze its influence on the grain size of the final tungsten metal powder. The authors observed star shaped morphology of WO{sub 2}, a structure which has not been describe in the literature. Contrary to the well-known cauliflower shaped tungsten dioxide, these starlets are not pseudomorphic to the initial ATOB particles; they grow separately and have a great influence on the grain size of the final metal powder.

  2. Calculation of the transport properties of carbon dioxide. II. Thermal conductivity and thermomagnetic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Steffen; Bich, Eckard; Vogel, Eckhard; Dickinson, Alan S.; Vesovic, Velisa

    2004-05-01

    The transport properties of pure carbon dioxide have been calculated from the intermolecular potential using the classical trajectory method. Results are reported in the dilute-gas limit for thermal conductivity and thermomagnetic coefficients for temperatures ranging from 200 K to 1000 K. Three recent carbon dioxide potential energy hypersurfaces have been investigated. Since thermal conductivity is influenced by vibrational degrees of freedom, not included in the rigid-rotor classical trajectory calculation, a correction for vibration has also been employed. The calculations indicate that the second-order thermal conductivity corrections due to the angular momentum polarization (<2%) and velocity polarization (<1%) are both small. Thermal conductivity values calculated using the potential energy hypersurface by Bukowski et al. (1999) are in good agreement with the available experimental data. They underestimate the best experimental data at room temperature by 1% and in the range up to 470 K by 1%-3%, depending on the data source. Outside this range the calculated values, we believe, may be more reliable than the currently available experimental data. Our results are consistent with measurements of the thermomagnetic effect at 300 K only when the vibrational degrees of freedom are considered fully. This excellent agreement for these properties indicates that particularly the potential surface of Bukowski et al. provides a realistic description of the anisotropy of the surface.

  3. A spin label study of the effects of asbestos, quartz, and titanium dioxide dusts on the bovine erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Leyko, W; Gendek, E

    1985-04-01

    The effects of five UICC asbestos samples, titanium dioxide, and quartz on the bovine red cell membrane have been studied in erythrocyte ghosts by the spin labelling technique. Analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of two sulphydryl reactive spin labels and one fatty acid spin label in red cell ghosts showed modifications in membrane protein after asbestos treatment but no alterations in membrane lipids. In experiments with quartz no membrane changes were noted but titanium dioxide altered the proteins bound with the protein reactive spin label used in the present study. The possible mechanism for these effects is discussed.

  4. Influence of experimental pulmonary emphysema on the toxicological effects from inhaled nitrogen dioxide and diesel exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Mauderly, J.L.; Bice, D.E.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gillett, N.A.; Henderson, R.F.; Pickrell, J.A.; Wolff, R.K. )

    1989-10-01

    This project examined the influence of preexisting, experimentally induced pulmonary emphysema on the adverse health effects in rats of chronic inhalation exposure to either nitrogen dioxide or automotive diesel-engine exhaust. Previous reports indicated that humans with chronic lung disease were among those most severely affected by episodic exposures to high concentrations of airborne toxicants. There were no previous reports comparing the effects of chronic inhalation exposure to components of automotive emissions in emphysematous and normal animals. The hypothesis tested in this project was that rats with preexisting pulmonary emphysema were more susceptible than rats with normal lungs to the adverse effects of the toxicant exposures. Young adult rats were housed continuously in inhalation exposure chambers and exposed seven hours per day, five days per week, for 24 months to nitrogen dioxide at 9.5 parts per million (ppm)2, or to diesel exhaust at 3.5 mg soot/m3, or to clean air as control animals. These concentrations were selected to produce mild, but distinct, effects in rats with normal lungs. Pulmonary emphysema was induced in one-half of the rats by intratracheal instillation of the proteolytic enzyme elastase six weeks before the toxicant exposures began. Health effects were evaluated after 12, 18, and 24 months of exposure. The measurements included respiratory function, clearance of inhaled radiolabeled particles, pulmonary immune responses to instilled antigen, biochemistry and cytology of airway fluid, total lung collagen, histopathology, lung morphometry, and lung burdens of diesel soot. The significance of influences of emphysema and toxicant exposure, and interactions between influences of the two treatments, were evaluated by analysis of variance.

  5. The conditioning of dyspneic suffocation fear. Effects of carbon dioxide concentration on behavioral freezing and analgesia.

    PubMed

    Mongeluzi, Donna L; Rosellini, Robert A; Ley, Ronald; Caldarone, Barbara J; Stock, Howard S

    2003-10-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that a single exposure to 100% carbon dioxide (CO2) can serve as an effective unconditioned stimulus (US) in a Pavlovian aversive-context conditioning paradigm in rats. Although the US exposure parameters employed in the initial studies were sufficient for producing a context-specific enhancement of behavioral freezing and analgesia, it had yet to be determined whether variations of these CO2 conditioning procedures would produce other conditioning effects. Thus, the purpose of the following experiment was to investigate the intensity of the US on the conditioned response (CR). The findings confirm that variations in CO2 concentrations produce changes in the CR that are consistent with principles of Pavlovian conditioning. The findings lend additional support to the tenability of a dyspneic suffocation fear theory of panic disorder, a theory that postulates that at least one type of panic attack could be a consequence of Pavlovian conditioning.

  6. Rebound effect of IMT properties by different doping form in Si-doped vanadium dioxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuefei; Wu, Zhiming; Liu, Zhijun; Ji, Chunhui; Huang, Zehua; Su, Yuanjie; Gou, Jun; Wang, Jun; Jiang, Yadong

    2016-09-01

    Vanadium dioxide is a promising material for THz modulations due to its remarkable insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) properties. Silicon-doped VO2 films, exhibiting excellent IMT properties with giant modulation amplitude and tunable phase transition temperature, greatly adapt in this area. In this paper, we report on a rebound effect of the IMT in Si-doped VO2 films. As the silicon dopants are increasingly introduced into VO2 films, the IMT is first tuned to lower temperature and then is anomalously shifted to higher temperature. This rebound effect is confirmed by crystal structure, valence concentration, and surface morphology. We attribute this rebound behavior to the interstitial and substitutive doping of Si atoms. Due to their distinct impactions on the crystallite, IMT properties of the VO2 films are depressed initially and recovered later.

  7. Effects of surface-active organic matter on carbon dioxide nucleation in atmospheric wet aerosols: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, Vangelis; Charalambous, Fevronia; Panagiotou, Fostira; Nearchou, Irene

    2014-11-21

    Organic matter (OM) uptake in cloud droplets produces water-soluble secondary organic aerosols (SOA) via aqueous chemistry. These play a significant role in aerosol properties. We report the effects of OM uptake in wet aerosols, in terms of the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Carbon dioxide has been implicated in the natural rainwater as well as seawater acidity. Variability of the cloud and raindrop pH is assumed in space and time, as regional emissions, local human activities and geophysical characteristics differ. Rain scavenging of inorganic SOx, NOx and NH3 plays a major role in rain acidity in terms of acid-base activity, however carbon dioxide solubility also remains a key parameter. Based on the MD simulations we propose that the presence of surface-active OM promotes the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation in wet aerosols, even at low temperatures, strongly decreasing carbon dioxide solubility. A discussion is made on the role of OM in controlling the pH of a cloud or raindrop, as a consequence, without involving OM ionization equilibrium. The results are compared with experimental and computational studies in the literature.

  8. Nitrogen, tillage, and crop rotation effects on carbon dioxide and methane fluxes from irrigated cropping systems.

    PubMed

    Alluvione, Francesco; Halvorson, Ardell D; Del Grosso, Stephen J

    2009-01-01

    Long-term effects of tillage intensity, N fertilization, and crop rotation on carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and methane (CH(4)) flux from semiarid irrigated soils are poorly understood. We evaluated effects of: (i) tillage intensity [no-till (NT) and conventional moldboard plow tillage (CT)] in a continuous corn rotation; (ii) N fertilization levels [0-246 kg N ha(-1) for corn (Zea mays L.); 0 and 56 kg N ha(-1) for dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.); 0 and 112 kg N ha(-1) for barley (Hordeum distichon L.)]; and (iii) crop rotation under NT soil management [corn-barley (NT-CB); continuous corn (NT-CC); corn-dry bean (NT-CDb)] on CO(2) and CH(4) flux from a clay loam soil. Carbon dioxide and CH(4) fluxes were monitored one to three times per week using vented nonsteady state closed chambers. No-till reduced (14%) growing season (154 d) cumulative CO(2) emissions relative to CT (NT: 2.08 Mg CO(2)-C ha(-1); CT: 2.41 Mg CO(2)-C ha(-1)), while N fertilization had no effect. Significantly lower (18%) growing season CO(2) fluxes were found in NT-CDb than NT-CC and NT-CB (11.4, 13.2 and 13.9 kg CO(2)-C ha(-1)d(-1) respectively). Growing season CH(4) emissions were higher in NT (20.2 g CH(4) ha(-1)) than in CT (1.2 g CH(4) ha(-1)). Nitrogen fertilization and cropping rotation did not affect CH(4) flux. Implementation of NT for 7 yr with no N fertilization was not adequate for restoring the CH(4) oxidation capacity of this clay loam soil relative to CT plowed and fertilized soil.

  9. Effect of Ethanol, Sulfur Dioxide and Glucose on the Growth of Wine Spoilage Yeasts Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Mahesh; Oro, Inês; Ferreira-Dias, Suzana; Malfeito-Ferreira, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to study the effect of three factors, sulfur dioxide, ethanol and glucose, on the growth of wine spoilage yeast species, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomycodes ludwigii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Seventeen central composite rotatable design (CCRD) trials were designed for each test yeast using realistic concentrations of the factors (variables) in premium red wine. Polynomial regression equations were fitted to experimental data points, and the growth inhibitory conditions of these three variables were determined. The overall results showed Sa. ludwigii as the most resistant species growing under high ethanol/free sulfur dioxide concentrations, i.e., 15% (v/v)/20 mg L-1, 14% (v/v)/32 mg L-1 and 12.5% (v/v)/40 mg L-1, whereas other yeasts did not survive under the same levels of ethanol/free sulfur dioxide concentrations. The inhibitory effect of ethanol was primarily observed during longer incubation periods, compared with sulfur dioxide, which showed an immediate effect. In some CCRD trials, Sa. ludwigii and S. cerevisiae showed growth recovery after a short death period under the exposure of 20–32 mg L-1 sulfur dioxide in the presence of 11% (v/v) or more ethanol. However, Sc. pombe and Z. bailii did not show such growth recovery under similar conditions. Up to 10 g L-1 of glucose did not prevent cell death under the sulfur dioxide or ethanol stress. This observation demonstrates that the sugar levels commonly used in wine to sweeten the mouthfeel do not increase wine susceptibility to spoilage yeasts, contrary to the anecdotal evidence. PMID:26107389

  10. Effect of Ethanol, Sulfur Dioxide and Glucose on the Growth of Wine Spoilage Yeasts Using Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Mahesh; Oro, Inês; Ferreira-Dias, Suzana; Malfeito-Ferreira, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to study the effect of three factors, sulfur dioxide, ethanol and glucose, on the growth of wine spoilage yeast species, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomycodes ludwigii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Seventeen central composite rotatable design (CCRD) trials were designed for each test yeast using realistic concentrations of the factors (variables) in premium red wine. Polynomial regression equations were fitted to experimental data points, and the growth inhibitory conditions of these three variables were determined. The overall results showed Sa. ludwigii as the most resistant species growing under high ethanol/free sulfur dioxide concentrations, i.e., 15% (v/v)/20 mg L-1, 14% (v/v)/32 mg L-1 and 12.5% (v/v)/40 mg L-1, whereas other yeasts did not survive under the same levels of ethanol/free sulfur dioxide concentrations. The inhibitory effect of ethanol was primarily observed during longer incubation periods, compared with sulfur dioxide, which showed an immediate effect. In some CCRD trials, Sa. ludwigii and S. cerevisiae showed growth recovery after a short death period under the exposure of 20-32 mg L-1 sulfur dioxide in the presence of 11% (v/v) or more ethanol. However, Sc. pombe and Z. bailii did not show such growth recovery under similar conditions. Up to 10 g L-1 of glucose did not prevent cell death under the sulfur dioxide or ethanol stress. This observation demonstrates that the sugar levels commonly used in wine to sweeten the mouthfeel do not increase wine susceptibility to spoilage yeasts, contrary to the anecdotal evidence.

  11. Effects of two abiotic factors and their interaction on Soil Carbon Dioxide flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Agata; Armstrong, Alona; Gristina, Luciano; Quinton, John

    2010-05-01

    Soils release more carbon per annum than current global anthropogenic emissions (Luo and Zhou, 2006). Soils emit carbon dioxide through mineralization and decomposition of organic matter and respiration of roots and soil organism (Houghton 2007) Evaluation of the effects of abiotic factors on microbial activity is of major importance in the context of mitigation greenhouse gases emissions. One of the key greenhouse gases is carbon dioxide (CO2) and previous studies demonstrate that soil CO2 emission is significantly affected by temperature and soil water content. There are a limited number of studies that examine the impact of bulk density and soil surface characteristics as a result of exposure to rain on CO2 emission, however, none examine their relative importance. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of soil compaction and exposure of the soil surface to rainfall and their interaction on CO2 release. We conducted a factorial soil core experiment with three different bulk densities (1.1 g cm-3, 1.3 g cm-3, 1.5 g cm-3) and three difference exposures to rainfall (no rain, 30 minutes and 90 minutes of rainfall). Water was poured on to the cores not exposed to rain and those exposed for 30 minutes through a gauze to ensure all cores received the same volume of water. Immediately the rainfall treatments the soil cores were incubated and soil CO2 efflux and water content were measured 1, 2, 5, 6, 9, and 10 days after the start of the incubation. The results indicate soil CO2 emissions and rate changes significantly through time and with different bulk densities and rain exposures. The relationship between rain exposure and CO2 is positive: CO2 emission was 53% and 42% greater for the 90 min and 30 min rainfall exposure, respectively, compared to those not exposed to rain. Bulk density exhibited a negative relationship with CO2 emission: soil compacted to a bulk density of 1.1 g cm-3 emitted 32% more CO2 than soil compacted to 1.5 g cm-3. Furthermore we found

  12. Radiation effects on the foaming of atactic polypropylene with supercritical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenguang; Zhe, Xing; Zhang, Mingxing; Wang, Mouhua; Wu, Guozhong

    2017-02-01

    Atactic polypropylene (PP) samples with melt flow indices (MFI) of 7.0 g/10 min were irradiated and then foamed with supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). A detailed investigation was carried out to understand the effect of radiation on the scCO2 foaming of polypropylene. Variations in the molecular weight, branching degree, crystallinity, and melting and crystallization temperatures of irradiated PP were investigated. The cell diameter, cell density, volume expansion ratio and foaming rate were analyzed in detail under different conditions. It was found that the cell structure of PP foam became more uniform and the foaming temperature window increased to 10 °C. This compares favorably to the 4 °C observed with pristine atactic PP. The best cell morphology was observed at a dose of 30 kGy. The corresponding average diameter and cell density were 16.4 μ m and 5.7×107 cells/cm3, respectively.

  13. Effects of microstructure and nonstoichiometry on electrical properties of vanadium dioxide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusano, Eiji; Theil, Jeremy A.

    1989-01-01

    Voided growth structures of sputter-deposited films affect strongly their optical and electrical properties. Vanadium dioxide is an interesting material to study effects of film microstructure and nonstoichiometry on electrical properties because its phase transition makes it possible to investigate electrical behavior both in a semiconducting phase and in a metallic phase. Vanadium oxide films were deposited with different vanadium oxygen ratios for substrate temperatures between 250 and 550 C by dc reactive magnetron sputtering. The resistivity ratios between a semiconducting phase and a metallic phase are limited to 1000 order by voided boundaries and oxygen vacancies. The voided boundaries are defined by columnar structure and agglomerated grain growth. The results emphasize the necessity of a combination of deposition to obtain the film with a favorable structure and postdeposition annealing to control the film stoichiometry.

  14. Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in human gastric epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Monica Catarina; Costa, Carla; Silva, Susana; Costa, Solange; Dhawan, Alok; Oliveira, Paula A; Teixeira, João P

    2014-02-01

    Manufacturing or using nanomaterials may result in exposure of workers to nanoparticles. Potential routes of exposure include skin, lung and gastrointestinal tract. The lack of health-based standards for nanomaterials combined with their increasing use in many different workplaces and products emphasize the need for a reliable temporary risk assessment tool. Therefore, the aim of this work was to explore the effects of different doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on human gastric epithelial cells in vitro. We analyzed proliferation by MTT assay, apoptosis by Tunel, migration by injury assay, oxidative stress by determining GSH/GSSG ratio and DNA damage by Comet assay on nanoparticle-treated AGS human gastric epithelial cell line in comparison to controls. We show and discuss the tumor-like phenotypes of nanoparticles-exposed AGS cells in vitro, as increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis. Our results demonstrate for the first time that nanoparticles induce tumor-like phenotypes in human gastric epithelial cells.

  15. The impact of sulfur dioxide on plant sexual reproduction: in vivo and in vitro effects compared

    SciTech Connect

    DuBay, D.T.; Murdy, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    In Lepidium virginicum L., exposure of pollen to 0.6 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) for 4 h reduced pollen germination in vitro 94% from the control, whereas exposure to 0.6 ppm SO/sub 2/ for 2, 4, and 8 h during flowering reduced pollen germination in vivo 50% from the control, but did not affect seed set.An interaction between SO/sub 2/ and water may have caused the inhibition of pollen germination in a liquid culture medium, as well as on the moist surface of an intact stigma. However, the results suggest that the use of pollen germination and pollen tube elongation in vitro to asses the direct effects of SO/sub 2/ on plant sexual reproduction in vivo is not valid.

  16. Review of the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's health effects and exposure assessment documents on nitrogen dioxide. Report of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-09

    At the request of the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee conducted a review on the potential health hazards associated with exposure to 0.1 to 1.0 ppm nitrogen dioxide generated by unvented indoor combustion sources. The committee concluded that: (1) repeated peak exposures at concentrations of 0.3 ppm of nitrogen dioxide may cause health effects in some individuals; (2) the population groups that appear most sensitive to nitrogen dioxide exposure include children, chronic bronchitics, asthmatics, and individuals with emphysema; and (3) the most direct evidence regarding lung damage associated with nitrogen dioxide is obtained from animal studies.

  17. Effect of Same-day Sequential Exposure to Nitrogen Dioxide and Ozone on Cardiac and Ventilatory Function in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the cardiac and ventilatory effects of sequential exposure to nitrogen dioxide and then ozone. The data show that mice exposed to both gases have increased arrhythmia and breathing changes not observed in the other groups. Although the mechanisms underlying ai...

  18. The effect of photochemical dissociation on downwind chlorine dioxide plume concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Michalowicz, R.; Alp, E.

    1997-12-31

    The pulp and paper industry handles toxic gases which may present an inherent hazard to the safety of the general public in the surrounding area. One such toxic gas that may pose a hazard is chlorine dioxide. Spills of chlorine dioxide solution result in the gassing off of toxic clouds of chlorine dioxide. Under daytime dry conditions, chlorine dioxide decomposes photolytically to form chlorine and oxygen and intermediates, chlorine trioxide and chlorine hexoxide. Air dispersion modeling of chlorine dioxide releases which does not properly account for its photochemical decomposition will lead to overly conservative hazard zone estimates. Under these conditions, risk control measures and emergency response evacuation zones based on such estimates will be unnecessarily expensive, perhaps prohibitive. This paper investigates the photolytic rate of dissociation of chlorine dioxide under various atmospheric conditions. It was found that modeling based on the decomposition of chlorine dioxide gas, resulted in downwind distances to TLV-Short Term Exposure Limits which are considerably shorter than modeling based on chlorine dioxide dispersion with no decomposition.

  19. Food contact surfaces coated with nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide: effect on Listeria monocytogenes survival under different light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, D.; Teixeira, P.; Tavares, C. J.; Azeredo, J.

    2013-04-01

    Improvement of food safety is a very important issue, and is on the basis of production and application of new/modified food contact surfaces. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and, more recently, nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide (N-TiO2) coatings are among the possible forms to enhance food contact surfaces performance in terms of higher hygiene and easier sanitation. In this context, the present work aimed at evaluating the bactericidal activity of an N-TiO2 coating on glass and stainless steel under two different sources of visible light - fluorescent and incandescent - and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Listeria monocytogenes was chosen as representative of major foodborne pathogens and its survival was tested on N-TiO2 coated coupons. In terms of survival percentage, good results were obtained after exposure of coated surfaces to all light types since, apart from the value obtained after exposing glass to fluorescent light (56.3%), survival rates were always below 50%. However, no effective disinfection was obtained, given that for a disinfectant or sanitizing agent to be claimed as effective it needs to be able to promote at least a 3-log reduction of the microbial load, which was not observed for any of the experimental conditions assessed. Even so, UV irradiation was the most successful on eliminating cells on coated surfaces, since the amount of bacteria was reduced to 1.49 × 106 CFU/ml on glass and 2.37 × 107 on stainless steel. In contrast, both visible light sources had only slightly decreased the amount of viable cells, which remained in the range of 8 log CFU/ml. Hence, although some bactericidal effect was accomplished under visible light, UV was the most effective light source on promoting photocatalytic reactions on N-TiO2 coated coupons and none of the experimental conditions have reached a satisfactory disinfection level. Thus, this surface coating needs further research and improvement in order to become truly effective against foodborne pathogens and

  20. The combined toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and bisphenol A on zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jun; Lin, Bencheng; Hu, Chuanlu; Zhang, Huashan; Lin, Zhiqing; Xi, Zhuge

    2014-08-01

    Environmental pollutants co-exist and exhibit interaction effects that are different from those associated with a single pollutant. As one of the more commonly manufactured nanomaterials, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) are most likely to bind to other contaminants in water. In this paper, we aimed to study the combined toxicological effects of TiO2-NPs and bisphenol A (BPA) on organism. First, in vitro adsorption experiments were conducted to determine the adsorptive interaction between TiO2-NPs and BPA. Second, zebrafish embryo toxicity tests were performed to monitor for changes in the toxicological effects associated with the two chemicals. The study results demonstrated that adsorptive interactions exist between the two chemicals and increased toxicity effects which included an advanced toxicological effect time, decreased survival, increased morphological abnormalities, and delayed embryo hatching. Also, we suggest that the mode of combined action has a synergistic effect. Based on this, we postulate that concomitant exposure to TiO2-NPs and BPA increased BPA bioavailability and uptake into cells and organisms. Further studies are required to understand the mechanisms of interactions of this mixture.

  1. The combined toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and bisphenol A on zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Environmental pollutants co-exist and exhibit interaction effects that are different from those associated with a single pollutant. As one of the more commonly manufactured nanomaterials, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) are most likely to bind to other contaminants in water. In this paper, we aimed to study the combined toxicological effects of TiO2-NPs and bisphenol A (BPA) on organism. First, in vitro adsorption experiments were conducted to determine the adsorptive interaction between TiO2-NPs and BPA. Second, zebrafish embryo toxicity tests were performed to monitor for changes in the toxicological effects associated with the two chemicals. The study results demonstrated that adsorptive interactions exist between the two chemicals and increased toxicity effects which included an advanced toxicological effect time, decreased survival, increased morphological abnormalities, and delayed embryo hatching. Also, we suggest that the mode of combined action has a synergistic effect. Based on this, we postulate that concomitant exposure to TiO2-NPs and BPA increased BPA bioavailability and uptake into cells and organisms. Further studies are required to understand the mechanisms of interactions of this mixture. PMID:25177222

  2. Interspecific differences in the effects of sulfur dioxide on angiosperm sexual reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    DuBay, D.T.

    1981-01-01

    The major objective of this study was to test the potential direct effects of SO/sub 2/ on sexual reproduction in several plant species with different reproductive structures and processes. In marked contrast to the sensitivity to SO/sub 2/ reported by other investigators for pollen germination and pollen tube growth in vitro, and recorded for Lepidium virginicum in this study, 4 of 5 species tested were tolerant with respect to fruit and seed set after exposure to 0.6 ppm SO/sub 2/ for 8 hours during flowering. Seed set in the one sensitive species, Geranium carolinianum, was reduced 40% from the control after exposure to SO/sub 2/, but only when relative humidity (RH) was at or above 90%. The effect of SO/sub 2/ on Lepidium pollen germination in vitro was greater than the effect of SO/sub 2/ on sexual reproduction in vivo. Sulfur dioxide reduced pollen germination in vitro 94% from the control. The same concentration of SO/sub 2/, at 90% Rh, reduced pollen germination in vivo 50% from the control, but had no effect on seed set. Predictions of effects of SO/sub 2/ on reproduction in vivo based on effects of SO/sub 2/ on pollen germination and pollen tube growth in vitro are not valid.

  3. Research status on the sequestration of carbon dioxide by direct aqueous mineral carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Nilsen, David N.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Rush, Gilbert E.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

    2001-01-01

    Direct aqueous mineral carbonation has been investigated as a process to convert gaseous CO2 into a geologically stable, solid final form. The process utilizes a solution of distilled water, or sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), sodium chloride (NaCl), and water, mixed with a mineral reactant, such as olivine (Mg2SiO4) or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. Carbon dioxide is dissolved into this slurry, by diffusion through the surface and gas dispersion within the aqueous phase. The process includes dissolution of the mineral and precipitation of magnesium carbonate (MgCO3) in a single unit operation. Mineral reactivity has been increased by pretreatment of the minerals. Thermal activation of serpentine can be achieved by heat pretreatment at 630 C. Carbonation of the thermally activated serpentine, using the bicarbonate-bearing solution, at T=155 C, PCO2=185 atm, and 15% solids, achieved 78% stoichiometric conversion of the silicate to the carbonate in 30 minutes. Recent studies have investigated mechanical activation as an alternative to thermal treatment. The addition of a high intensity attrition grinding step to the size reduction circuit successfully activated both serpentine and olivine. Over 80% stoichiometric conversion of the mechanically activated olivine was achieved in 60 minutes, using the bicarbonate solution at T=185 C, PCO2=150 atm, and 15% solids. Significant carbonation of the mechanically activated minerals, at up to 66% stoichiometric conversion, has also been achieved at ambient temperature (25 C) and PCO2 ={approx}10 atm.

  4. Effects of increasing seawater carbon dioxide concentrations on chain formation of the diatom Asterionellopsis glacialis.

    PubMed

    Barcelos e Ramos, Joana; Schulz, Kai Georg; Brownlee, Colin; Sett, Scarlett; Azevedo, Eduardo Brito

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms can occur as single cells or as chain-forming aggregates. These two strategies affect buoyancy, predator evasion, light absorption and nutrient uptake. Adjacent cells in chains establish connections through various processes that determine strength and flexibility of the bonds, and at distinct cellular locations defining colony structure. Chain length has been found to vary with temperature and nutrient availability as well as being positively correlated with growth rate. However, the potential effect of enhanced carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and consequent changes in seawater carbonate chemistry on chain formation is virtually unknown. Here we report on experiments with semi-continuous cultures of the freshly isolated diatom Asterionellopsis glacialis grown under increasing CO2 levels ranging from 320 to 3400 µatm. We show that the number of cells comprising a chain, and therefore chain length, increases with rising CO2 concentrations. We also demonstrate that while cell division rate changes with CO2 concentrations, carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cellular quotas vary proportionally, evident by unchanged organic matter ratios. Finally, beyond the optimum CO2 concentration for growth, carbon allocation changes from cellular storage to increased exudation of dissolved organic carbon. The observed structural adjustment in colony size could enable growth at high CO2 levels, since longer, spiral-shaped chains are likely to create microclimates with higher pH during the light period. Moreover increased chain length of Asterionellopsis glacialis may influence buoyancy and, consequently, affect competitive fitness as well as sinking rates. This would potentially impact the delicate balance between the microbial loop and export of organic matter, with consequences for atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  5. Bactericidal effects and mechanisms of visible light-responsive titanium dioxide photocatalysts on pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Liou, Je-Wen; Chang, Hsin-Hou

    2012-08-01

    This review focuses on the antibacterial activities of visible light-responsive titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) photocatalysts. These photocatalysts have a range of applications including disinfection, air and water cleaning, deodorization, and pollution and environmental control. Titanium dioxide is a chemically stable and inert material, and can continuously exert antimicrobial effects when illuminated. The energy source could be solar light; therefore, TiO(2) photocatalysts are also useful in remote areas where electricity is insufficient. However, because of its large band gap for excitation, only biohazardous ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation can excite TiO(2), which limits its application in the living environment. To extend its application, impurity doping, through metal coating and controlled calcination, has successfully modified the substrates of TiO(2) to expand its absorption wavelengths to the visible light region. Previous studies have investigated the antibacterial abilities of visible light-responsive photocatalysts using the model bacteria Escherichia coli and human pathogens. The modified TiO(2) photocatalysts significantly reduced the numbers of surviving bacterial cells in response to visible light illumination. They also significantly reduced the activity of bacterial endospores; reducing their toxicity while retaining their germinating abilities. It is suggested that the photocatalytic killing mechanism initially damages the surfaces weak points of the bacterial cells, before totally breakage of the cell membranes. The internal bacterial components then leak from the cells through the damaged sites. Finally, the photocatalytic reaction oxidizes the cell debris. In summary, visible light-responsive TiO(2) photocatalysts are more convenient than the traditional UV light-responsive TiO(2) photocatalysts because they do not require harmful UV light irradiation to function. These photocatalysts, thus, provide a promising and feasible approach for

  6. Carbon dioxide and climate: The effects of water transport in radiative-convective models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, John R.; Reck, Ruth A.

    1981-12-01

    Considerable attention is being focused on the possible climatic effects resulting from increases in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. In calculating CO2 influence on the thermal structure of the atmosphere, the role of clouds is critically important. Not only are the cloud properties, such as amount, numbers of clouds, altitudes, and optical properties important but also whether or not these properties are fixed or coupled to model temperatures. The transport of water vapor determines whether or not a region has clouds, the cloud properites, and the water vapor profiles appropriate for clear and cloudy skies. Results are presented of the change in surface temperature with changes in carbon dioxide content for two radiative-convective models with three different cloud coverages. We used (1) the Manabe-Wetherald radiative-convective model in which three clouds with fixed pressures, thicknesses, and optical properties and a single water vapor profile are inputed and (2) the Hummel-Kuhn model, which couples radiative heating, convection, and water vapor transport in order to calculate locations and thicknesses. The Hummel-Kuhn model yields temperature increases for doubled CO2 larger than the Manabe-Wetherald model for various assumed total cloud cover amounts. For assumed standard cloud cover amounts the Hummel-Kuhn estimate is 20% larger than the Manabe-Wetherald estimate. For reduced and enhanced cloud cover amounts the Hummel-Kuhn estimates are 37% and 17% larger, respectively. The calculated cloud locations and thicknesses did not change in the calculations; therefore the increased sensitivity in the Hummel-Kuhn model is due to the larger water vapor amounts in the Hummel-Kuhn model and the added infrared absorption by the water vapor dimer.

  7. Effect of silicon dioxide on expression of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase mRNA and protein.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ai; Song, Shanshan; Wang, Danlin; Peng, Wei; Tian, Lin

    2009-07-01

    Silicon dioxide induces acute injury and chronic pulmonary fibrosis. International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) listed it as a human carcinogen in 1996. However, the molecular mechanisms to induce cancer are not understood yet. The content of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP) mRNA and protein in Hela cells treated with concentrations of silicon dioxide up to 400microg/ml was determined by real-time fluorogenetic quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) and immunofluorescence assay, respectively. MTT assay was used to determine cell viability. The results showed that viability at 400microg/ml silica was significantly decreased but not at lower concentrations. The protein content of gamma-H2AX in silica-treated group was significantly higher than the controls. The PARP mRNA and protein levels were significantly reduced with a dose response manner from the lowest silicon dioxide level. Our findings suggested that silicon dioxide increased the expression of gamma-H2AX and inhibited the expression of PARP mRNA and protein in Hela cells.

  8. Effects of carbon dioxide on growth of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum, its ability to produce neurotoxin, and its transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Artin, Ingrid; Mason, David R; Pin, Carmen; Schelin, Jenny; Peck, Michael W; Holst, Elisabet; Rådström, Peter; Carter, Andrew T

    2010-02-01

    The antimicrobial gas carbon dioxide is frequently used in modified atmosphere packaging. In the present study, the effects of CO2 (10 to 70%, vol/vol) on gene expression (measured using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and a whole-genome DNA microarray) and neurotoxin formation (measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]) by proteolytic Clostridium botulinum type A1 strain ATCC 3502 were studied during the growth cycle. Interestingly, in marked contrast to the situation with nonproteolytic C. botulinum types B and E, CO2 had little effect on any of these parameters. At all CO2 concentrations, relative expression of neurotoxin cluster genes peaked in the transition between exponential and stationary phases, with evidence of a second rise in expression in late stationary phase. Microarray analysis enabled identification of coding sequences whose expression profiles matched those of the neurotoxin cluster. Further research is needed to determine whether these are connected to neurotoxin formation or are merely growth phase associated.

  9. The effect of doping titanium dioxide nanoparticles on phase transformation, photocatalytic activity and anti-bacterial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzby, Scott Edward

    Nanosized titanium dioxide has a variety of important applications in everyday life including a photocatalyst for pollution remediation, photovoltaic devices, sunscreen, etc. This study focuses on the various properties of titanium dioxide nanoparticles doped with various cation and anion species. Samples were produced by various methods including metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), plasma assisted metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (PA-MOCVD) and sol-gel. Numerous techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron microscopy both scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) were used for physical characterization. Photocatalytic properties were determined by the oxidation of methylene blue dye and 2-chlorophenol in water as well as gaseous formic acid with results analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and ultra violet - visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS). For the purpose of enhancement of the photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, the effect of anion doping and the anatase-rutile phase ratio were studied. Although anatase, rutile and mixed crystallite phases all show some degree of activity in photocatalytic reactions, these results show that anatase is better suited for the degradation of organic compounds in an aqueous medium any advantage in photocatalytic activity gained through the enhancement in optical response from the smaller band gap by addition of rutile was overcome by the negatives associated with the rutile phase. Furthermore substitutional nitrogen doping showed significant improvement in UV photocatalysis as well as allowing for visible light activation of the catalyst. Further studies on the phase transitions in titanium dioxide nanoparticles were carried out by synthesizing various cation doped samples by sol-gel. Analysis of the phases by XRD showed an inverse relationship between dopant size and rutile percentage

  10. The effects of 7.5% carbon dioxide inhalation on task performance in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Diaper, Alison; Nutt, David J; Munafò, Marcus R; White, Joanna L; Farmer, Eric W; Bailey, Jayne E

    2012-04-01

    Studies have shown that anxiety can positively or negatively affect performance with respect to focusing of attention or distractibility, subjective workload and effort (Humphreys and Revelle, 1984). The inhalation of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is associated with physiological and psychological effects of anxiety (Bailey et al., 2005) but its effects on performance have rarely been reported. The studies reported here looked at the effects of CO(2) inhalation on physiological and subjective measures and performance on two tasks. Eight healthy male participants completed a tracking task with a reaction time component, and 12 healthy participants (six male) completed a complex target identification task. Tasks were performed during 20-min inhalations of 7.5% CO(2)/21% O(2)/71.5% N(2) mixture or medical air. Continuous heart rate and blood pressure measures were taken, in addition to subjective measures of mood and workload. In comparison with air, CO(2) increased heart rate and blood pressure, increased subjective scores of panic, anxiety, fear, and tension, and reduced subjective scores of relaxation and happiness. Attention was focussed when inhaling CO(2) during the simple task, and central demand was greater when inhaling CO(2) during the complex task. Therefore, inhalation of 7.5% CO(2) produces effects on task performance which are consistent with anxiety.

  11. [Effects of silver and silicon dioxide nanopowders on the development of herpesvirus infection in vitro].

    PubMed

    Sopova, E A; Baranov, V I; Gankovskaia, O A; Lavrov, V F; Zverev, V V

    2010-01-01

    Estimation of the potential ability of nanoparticles (NP) to affect human health has generated a need for developing rapid, sensitive, and efficient laboratory tests of the toxicity of nanomaterials. The purpose of the investigation was to study the cytotoxic effect of NP of silver (Ag) and silicon dioxide (SiO2). The transplantable Vero cells treated with NP at different concentrations were used as target cells. Some experiments examined the combined effects of nanopowders and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) on Vero cell viability and the direct effect of NP on the reproductive potential of HSV-2 in the culture. SiO2 NPs at concentrations of 1.0 to 0.1 mg/ml were found to cause a marked cytotoxic effect that was in the complete destruction of the cell monolayer. Ag HPs were more toxic than silicon nanopowders and induced a complete degradation of the cell monolayer at substantially lower concentrations. The results of the study formed the basis for the development of a rapid (24-48-hour), reliable, and efficient test for the toxicity of nanomaterials, by using the cultured cells in the laboratory setting. It was also shown that silicon NPs did not noticeably affect the reproductive potential of HSV-2 while nano silver suppressed the capacity of HSV-2 for multiplication, by significantly reducing viral progeny titer in the cell culture.

  12. Ameliorative effect of Allolobophora caliginosa extract on hepatotoxicity induced by silicon dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Shimaa A; Soliman, Amel M; Marzouk, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the possible ameliorative effect of earthworm (Allolobophora caliginosa) extract (EE) against silicon dioxide nanoparticles (SiNPs)-induced liver injury in male albino rats. The effectiveness of EE was compared with silymarin as a standard hepatoprotective drug. The present work demonstrates the antioxidant activity of EE by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assay. Administration of SiNPs, for 15 consecutive days, caused changes in most of the biochemical parameters, namely, serum aminotransferase enzymes activities (alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase), alkaline phosphatase activity, total protein, total and direct bilirubin level, malondialdehyde, glutathione reduced, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase. In addition, administration of SiNPs induced changes in liver tissue architecture. Administration of EE, for subsequent 30 days, to SiNPs exposure demonstrated significant ameliorative effects on nearly all the studied parameters, and such effects were compatible with those of silymarin. In addition, the administration of EE repairs, to some extent, the abnormal architecture of the liver tissue induced by SiNPs.

  13. Effects of impurity doping and finite temperature in titanium dioxide: A First-principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yuta; Saito, Susumu

    2012-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most important materials for application to photocatalysts while it is a highly polymorphic material. Therefore, understanding of its fundamental physical properties is essential for improvements of its photocatalytic properties. From this point of view, we study the effects of nitrogen doping and the thermodynamic stability of various TiO2 phases in the framework of the density-functional theory. We use the supercells with various dopant concentrations to reveal the nitrogen-doping effects on the energetics and the electronic properties [1]. It is found that the nitrogen doping into both rutile and anatase phases significantly reduces the minimum photo-excitation energies. On the other hand, it is suggested that the dopants tend to cluster in the TiO2 lattice. This clustering might cancel the above-mentioned doping effects on the photo-excitation energies. Next, we consider the finite-temperature effects by introducing phonons to investigate the thermodynamic phase stability. We compare the free energies of rutile, anatase, brookite, and TiO2-II phases. We will also discuss the importance of treatment of semicore states in generating Ti pseudopotentials.[4pt] [1] Y. Aoki and S. Saito, J. Phys: Conf. Ser. 302, 012034 (2011) .

  14. [Effects of fungicide chlorothalonil on soil nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions].

    PubMed

    Lang, Man; Cai, Zu-cong

    2008-12-01

    A 14 d incubation test at 60% WHC and 25 degrees C was conducted to study the effects of fungicide chlorothalonil at its application rates of 0, 5.5 mg x kg(-1) (field application rate, FR), 110 mg x kg(-1) (20FR) and 220 mg x kg(-1) (40FR) on the nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from acidic, neutral, and alkaline soils. The results indicated that the effects of chlorothalonil on the two gases emissions depended on its application rate and soil type. Comparing with no chlorothalonil application, the chlorothalonil at 20FR and 40FR inhibited the N2O emission from acid soil significantly, while that at FR, 20FR and 40FR stimulated the N2O emission from neutral soil, with the strongest effect at FR. Higher application rates (20FR and 40FR) of chlorothalonil inhibited the N2O emission from alkaline soil at the early stage of incubation, but stimulated it at late incubation stage. Chlorothalonil at FR had no obvious effects on the CO2 emission from test soils, but that at 20FR and 40FR promoted the CO2 emission from acid soil while inhibited it from neutral and alkaline soils significantly.

  15. Toxic effects of the interaction of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with chemicals or physical factors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kui; Lin, Xialu; Zhao, Jinshun

    2013-01-01

    Due to their chemical stability and nonallergic, nonirritant, and ultraviolet protective properties, titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in industries such as electronics, optics, and material sciences, as well as architecture, medicine, and pharmacology. However, increasing concerns have been raised in regards to its ecotoxicity and toxicity on the aquatic environment as well as to humans. Although insights have been gained into the effects of TiO2 NPs on susceptible biological systems, there is still much ground to be covered, particularly in respect of our knowledge of the effects of the interaction of TiO2 NPs with other chemicals or physical factors. Studies suggest that interactions of TiO2 NPs with other chemicals or physical factors may result in an increase in toxicity or adverse effects. This review highlights recent progress in the study of the interactive effects of TiO2 NPs with other chemicals or physical factors. PMID:23901269

  16. Effect of Aloe vera, chlorine dioxide, and chlorhexidine mouth rinses on plaque and gingivitis: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Yeturu, Sravan Kumar; Acharya, Shashidhar; Urala, Arun Sreenivas; Pentapati, Kalyana Chakravarthy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of Aloe vera, chlorine dioxide, and chlorhexidine mouth rinses on plaque and gingivitis in orthodontic treatment. Materials and methods A randomized single-center, single-blind, parallel group, controlled trial was conducted among 90 subjects undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. The subjects were randomly divided into one of the three study groups (Aloe vera, chlorhexidine, chlorine dioxide). Plaque and gingivitis were assessed using modified Silness and Loe Plaque Index and Gingival Index at baseline and at follow-up after 15 days. Paired t-test and ANOVA with post hoc Dunnett test were used. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results A total of 85 participants completed the study; among them, 40 were male and 45 were female. There was significant reduction in mean plaque and gingival scores in all the 3 groups at follow-up when compared to baseline. A significantly higher reduction (plaque and gingival scores) was found in chlorhexidine when compared with the Aloe vera group. However, no significant difference was seen between chlorhexidine and chlorine dioxide with respect to mean reduction in plaque and gingival scores. Conclusion Chlorine dioxide can be a suitable and economical alternative for chlorhexidine. Further long-term studies are recommended for evaluating their effectiveness. PMID:26937371

  17. Sulfur Dioxide and Nitrogen Dioxide Adsorption on Zinc Oxide and Zirconium Hydroxide Nanoparticles and the Effect on Photoluminescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    decrease in the visible emission peak. Norberg and Gamelin [19] studied the effect of adsorbates on the PL of colloidal ZnO nanocrystals. These authors...photochemical dissolution of MO and MFe2O4 (M = Ni, Co, Zn), J. Solid State Chem. 181 (2008) 2350–2358. [19] N.S. Norberg , D.R. Gamelin, Influence of surface

  18. The effect of transcutaneous application of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) on skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Oe, Keisuke; Ueha, Takeshi; Sakai, Yoshitada; Niikura, Takahiro; Lee, Sang Yang; Koh, Akihiro; Hasegawa, Takumi; Tanaka, Masaya; Miwa, Masahiko; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields} PGC-1{alpha} is up-regulated as a result of exercise such as mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle fiber-type switching, and up-regulation of VEGF. {yields} We demonstrated transcutaneous application of CO{sub 2} up-regulated the gene expression of PGC-1{alpha}, SIRT1 and VEGF, and instance of muscle fiber switching. {yields} Transcutaneous application of CO{sub 2} may cause similar effect to aerobic exercise in skeletal muscle. -- Abstract: In Europe, carbon dioxide therapy has been used for cardiac disease and skin problems for a long time. However there have been few reports investigating the effects of carbon dioxide therapy on skeletal muscle. Peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1{alpha}) is up-regulated as a result of exercise and mediates known responses to exercise, such as mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle fiber-type switching, and neovascularization via up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It is also known that silent mating type information regulation 2 homologs 1 (SIRT1) enhances PGC-1{alpha}-mediated muscle fiber-type switching. Previously, we demonstrated transcutaneous application of CO{sub 2} increased blood flow and a partial increase of O{sub 2} pressure in the local tissue known as the Bohr effect. In this study, we transcutaneously applied CO{sub 2} to the lower limbs of rats, and investigated the effect on the fast muscle, tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. The transcutaneous CO{sub 2} application caused: (1) the gene expression of PGC-1{alpha}, silent mating type information regulation 2 homologs 1 (SIRT1) and VEGF, and increased the number of mitochondria, as proven by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, (2) muscle fiber switching in the TA muscle, as proven by isolation of myosin heavy chain and ATPase staining. Our results suggest the transcutaneous application of CO{sub 2} may have therapeutic potential for muscular strength recovery resulting from disuse

  19. Modeling the effects of light, carbon dioxide, and temperature on the growth of potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yandell, B. S.; Najar, A.; Wheeler, R.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1988-01-01

    This study examined the effects of light, temperature and carbon dioxide on the growth of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) in a controlled environment in order to ascertain the best growing conditions for potato in life support systems in space. 'Norland' and 'Russet Burbank' were grown in 6-L pots of peat-vermiculite for 56 d in growth chambers at the University of Wisconsin Biotron. Environmental factor levels included continuous light (24-h photoperiod) at 250, 400, and 550 micromoles m-2 s-1 PPF; constant temperature at 16, 20, and 24 degrees C; and CO2 at approximately 400, 1000, and 1600 microliters L-1. Separate effects analysis and ridge analysis provided a means to examine the effects of individual environmental factors and to determine combinations of factors that are expected to give the best increases in yields over the central design point. The response surface of Norland indicated that tuber yields were highest with moderately low temperature (18.7 degrees C), low CO2 (400 microliters L-1) and high light (550 micromoles m-2 s-1 PPF). These conditions also favored shorter stem growth. Russet Burbank tuber yields were highest at moderately low temperature (17.5 degrees C), high CO2 (1600 microliters L-1) and medium analyses will be used to project the most efficient conditions for growth of potatoes in closed ecological life support systems (CELSS) in space colonies.

  20. Efficient and Hysteresis-Free Field Effect Modulation of Ambipolarly Doped Vanadium Dioxide Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xingyue; Yang, Yiming; Hou, Yasen; Travaglini, Henry C.; Hellwig, Luke; Hihath, Sahar; van Benthem, Klaus; Lee, Kathleen; Liu, Weifeng; Yu, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The subpicosecond metal-insulator phase transition in vanadium dioxide (VO2 ) has attracted extensive attention with potential applications in ultrafast Mott transistors, which are based on electric-field-induced phase transition. However, the development of VO2 -based transistors lags behind, owing to inefficient and hysteretic gate modulation. Here we report ambipolar doping and strong field effects free of hysteresis in single-crystal VO2 nanowires synthesized via catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition. The ambipolarly doped VO2 nanowires are achieved by controlling the oxygen vacancy density during the synthesis and show strong gate effects because of their relatively low doping level. Both the doping type of the nanowires and the band-bending direction at the metal-insulator domain walls are reversibly switched by electrochemical gating, as revealed by scanning photocurrent microscopy. Furthermore, we eliminate the hysteresis in gate sweep via a hybrid gating method, which combines the merits of liquid-ionic and solid gating. The capability of efficient field effect modulation of ambipolar conduction and band alignment offers opportunities on understanding the phase transition mechanism and enables electronic applications based on VO2 .

  1. Effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide on human rotavirus infectivity and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bin; Jin, Min; Yang, Dong; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Zhaoli; Shen, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xinwei; Qiu, Zhigang; Wang, Jingfeng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Junwen

    2013-06-15

    Despite the health risks posed by waterborne human rotavirus (HRV), little information is available concerning the effectiveness of chlorine or chlorine dioxide (ClO2), two common disinfectants of public water sources, against HRV and their effects on its genome remain poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of chlorine and ClO2 on purified HRV by using cell culture and RT-PCR to assess virus infectivity and genetic integrity, respectively. The disinfection efficacy of ClO2 was found to be higher than that of chlorine. According to the efficiency factor Hom model, Ct value (mg/L min) ranges required for a 4-log reduction of HRV at 20 °C by chlorine and ClO2 were 5.55-5.59 and 1.21-2.47 mg/L min, respectively. Detection of the 11 HRV genome segments revealed that damage to the 1227-2354 bp of the VP4 gene was associated with the disappearance of viral infectivity by chlorine. However, no complete accordance between culturing and RT-PCR assays was observed after treatment of HRV with ClO2. These results collectively indicate that the current practice of chlorine disinfection may be inadequate to manage the risk of waterborne HRV infection, and offer the potential to monitor the infectivity of HRV adapting PCR-based protocols in chlorine disinfection.

  2. Effects of Carbon Dioxide Aerosols on the Viability of Escherichia coli during Biofilm Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Renu; Monnappa, Ajay K.; Hong, Seongkyeol; Mitchell, Robert J.; Jang, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    A periodic jet of carbon dioxide (CO2) aerosols is a very quick and effective mechanical technique to remove biofilms from various substrate surfaces. However, the impact of the aerosols on the viability of bacteria during treatment has never been evaluated. In this study, the effects of high-speed CO2 aerosols, a mixture of solid and gaseous CO2, on bacteria viability was studied. It was found that when CO2 aerosols were used to disperse biofilms of Escherichia coli, they led to a significant loss of viability, with approximately 50% of the dispersed bacteria killed in the process. By comparison, 75.6% of the biofilm-associated bacteria were viable when gently dispersed using Proteinase K and DNase I. Indirect proof that the aerosols are damaging the bacteria was found using a recombinant E. coli expressing the cyan fluorescent protein, as nearly half of the fluorescence was found in the supernatant after CO2 aerosol treatment, while the rest was associated with the bacterial pellet. In comparison, the supernatant fluorescence was only 9% when the enzymes were used to disperse the biofilm. As such, these CO2 aerosols not only remove biofilm-associated bacteria effectively but also significantly impact their viability by disrupting membrane integrity. PMID:26345492

  3. Effect of trap design, chemical lure, carbon dioxide release rate, and source of carbon dioxide on efficacy of bed bug monitors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narinderpal; Wang, Changlu; Cooper, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Bed bugs, (Cimex lectularius L.), are difficult to find because of their nocturnal and secretive behavior. In recent years, a number of monitors containing carbon dioxide (CO2), chemical lures, heat, or both, to attract bed bugs have been developed for detecting bed bugs. Ineffective trap design, lack of attraction of chemical lures, high cost of the CO2 delivery system, or insufficient CO release rates are some factors that limited the wide adoption of these monitors. To develop an affordable and effective monitor, we conducted a series of laboratory and field tests. Specifically, we tested a new pitfall trap design, a chemical lure mixture, different CO2 release rates, and a sugar and yeast mixture as CO2 source. Results show the new pitfall trap design was significantly more effective than Climbup insect interceptor, the most effective passive monitor available in the market for bed bugs. The experimental chemical lure mixture increased Climbup insect interceptor catch by 2.2 times. Results exhibit a distinct positive relationship between the CO2 release rates and bed bug trap catches. There were no significant differences between CO2 derived from cylinders and CO2 generated from sugar and yeast mixture in their attractiveness to bed bugs. The findings suggest an effective and affordable monitor can be made incorporating the new pitfall trap design, a sugar and yeast mixture, and a chemical lure.

  4. Ozone and carbon dioxide effects on spider mites in white clover and peanut

    SciTech Connect

    Heagle, A.S.; Brandenburg, R.L.; Burns, J.C.; Miller, J.E.

    1994-11-01

    Effects of O{sub 3} and/or elevated CO{sub 2} on two-spotted spider mites (Tetranychus urticae Koch) grown on an O{sub 3}-sensitive and an O{sub 3}-resistant clone of white clover (Trifolium repens L.) were measured in greenhouse and field experiments. Peanut (Arachis hypogeae L.) {open_quote}NC-9{close_quote} was used in one greenhouse study with O{sub 3}. In field studies, O{sub 3} treatments were charcoal filtered air (CF), nonfiltered air (NF), and two NF treatments with O{sub 3} added for 12 h d{sup {minus}1} at proportions of {approx} 1.25 and 1.50 times the ambient O{sub 3} concentration. In greenhouse studies, constant amounts of O{sub 3} were added to CF for 6 h d{sup {minus}1} to achieve mean concentrations ranging from 5 to 100 nL L{sup {minus}1}. For the greenhouse O{sub 3} x CO{sub 2} experiment, CO{sub 2} concentrations were ambient and approximately twice-ambient for 24 h d{sup {minus}1}. Plants were exposed to O{sub 3} and/or CO{sub 2} for {approx} 7 d before infestation with mites; daily exposures continued for 14 to 28 d to allow reproduction for at least two generations. Leaves were sampled to count eggs, larvae, nymphs, and adults. Ozone caused more chlorosis and necrosis on the O{sub 3}-sensitive clover clone (NC-S) than on the O{sub 3}-resistant clone (NC-R). Carbon dioxide enrichment increased shoot growth of both clones by {approx}33%. Statistical analyses indicated significant O{sub 3} effects in some experiments and nonsignificant O{sub 3} effects in others. A trend toward increased mite populations with increased O{sub 3} occurred, however, on NC-S in all trials. No consistent trends occurred with NC-R. With peanut, a significant linear increase in mite population occurred with increased O{sub 3}. Carbon dioxide enrichment increased the rate of population increase on both clover clones, but more so on NC-R. 47 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. [Evaluation of health effect among occupational population exposed to nano-titanium dioxide: a cross-sectional study].

    PubMed

    Xu, H D; Zhou, J W; Tang, S C; Kong, F L; Li, X W; Shen, Z L; Yan, L; Chen, Z J; Zhao, L; Jia, G; Zhang, J

    2016-11-06

    Objective: To characterize the health effects of nano-titanium dioxide exposure in an occupational cohort. Methods: Eighty-five male employees of a nano-titanium dioxide manufacturing enterprise in Shandong Province were evaluated in September 2014. Forty-four were exposed to nano-titanium dioxide (exposure group), and 41 were not exposed to nano-titanium dioxide (control group). We collected employees' basic information, smoking and drinking history, previous medical history, family history, and occupational history. Differences in blood pressure, hematological parameters, and blood biochemistry between the two groups were analyzed and compared. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to investigate the effect of nano-titanium dioxide exposure on blood pressure, hematological parameters, and blood biochemistry indices after controlling for age, smoking, drinking, and body mass index (BMI). Twenty-five employees from the exposure group and 25 employees from the control group were selected at random for measurement of genetic damage by cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Poisson regression analysis was used to investigate the effect of nano-titanium dioxide exposure on micronucleus frequency or micronucleus cell frequency after controlling for age, smoking, drinking, and BMI. Results: The median (P25-P75) surface area concentration of particles deposited in the tracheobronchial region, the surface area concentration of particles deposited in the alveolar region, and particle number concentration in the exposure group were 35.35(24.31-57.42) μ m(2)/cm(3), 173.09(116.27-270.72) μ m(2)/cm(3), and 40 244.00 (17 803.50-78 679.00) /cm(3), respectively. These values were significantly higher than those in the control group 33.90 (27.44-43.29) μm(2)/cm(3), 150.50(125.82-192.87)μm(2)/cm(3), and 18 721.00 (12 721.00-51 898.50)/cm(3), respectively. Z values were 15.47, 15.96, and 14.54, respectively (P<0.001 for all three values). Multiple linear regression analysis

  6. Effect of cerium dioxide, titanium dioxide, silver, and gold nanoparticles on the activity of microbial communities intended in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    García, Ana; Delgado, Lucía; Torà, Josep A; Casals, Eudald; González, Edgar; Puntes, Víctor; Font, Xavier; Carrera, Julián; Sánchez, Antoni

    2012-01-15

    Growth in production and use of nanoparticles (NPs) will result increased concentrations of these in industrial and urban wastewaters and, consequently, in wastewater-treatment facilities. The effect of this increase on the performance of the wastewater-treatment process has not been studied systematically and including all the microbial communities involved in wastewater treatment. The present work investigates, by using respiration tests and biogas-production analysis, the inhibitory effect of four different commonly used metal oxide (CeO(2) and TiO(2)) and zero-valent metal (Ag and Au) nanoparticles on the activity of the most important microbial communities present in a modern wastewater-treatment plant. Specifically, the actions of ordinary heterotrophic organisms, ammonia oxidizing bacteria, and thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic bacteria were tested in the presence and absence of the nanoparticles. In general, CeO(2) nanoparticles caused the greatest inhibition in biogas production (nearly 100%) and a strong inhibitory action of other biomasses; Ag nanoparticles caused an intermediate inhibition in biogas production (within 33-50%) and a slight inhibition in the action of other biomasses, and Au and TiO(2) nanoparticles caused only slight or no inhibition for all tested biomasses.

  7. Nano-silicon dioxide mitigates the adverse effects of salt stress on Cucurbita pepo L.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Manzer H; Al-Whaibi, Mohamed H; Faisal, Mohammad; Al Sahli, Abdulaziz A

    2014-11-01

    Research into nanotechnology, an emerging science, has advanced in almost all fields of technology. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of nano-silicon dioxide (nano-SiO2 ) in plant resistance to salt stress through improvement of the antioxidant system of squash (Cucurbita pepo L. cv. white bush marrow). Seeds treated with NaCl showed reduced germination percentage, vigor, length, and fresh and dry weights of the roots and shoots. However, nano-SiO2 improved seed germination and growth characteristics by reducing malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide levels as well as electrolyte leakage. In addition, application of nano-SiO2 reduced chlorophyll degradation and enhanced the net photosynthetic rate (Pn ), stomatal conductance (gs ), transpiration rate, and water use efficiency. The increase in plant germination and growth characteristics through application of nano-SiO2 might reflect a reduction in oxidative damage as a result of the expression of antioxidant enzymes, such as catalase, peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and ascorbate peroxidase. These results indicate that nano-SiO2 may improve defense mechanisms of plants against salt stress toxicity by augmenting the Pn , gs , transpiration rate, water use efficiency, total chlorophyll, proline, and carbonic anhydrase activity in the leaves of plants.

  8. Effect of natural organic matter on the photo-induced toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wormington, Alexis M; Coral, Jason; Alloy, Matthew M; Damarè, Carmen L; Mansfield, Charles M; Klaine, Stephen J; Bisesi, Joseph H; Roberts, Aaron P

    2016-12-07

    Nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) is the most widely used form of nanoparticles in commercial industry and comes in 2 main configurations: rutile and anatase. Rutile TiO2 is used in ultraviolet (UV) screening applications, whereas anatase TiO2 crystals have a surface defect that makes them photoreactive. There are numerous reports in the literature of photo-induced toxicity to aquatic organisms following coexposure to anatase nano-TiO2 and UV. All natural freshwater contains varying amounts of natural organic matter (NOM), which can drive UV attenuation and quench reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aquatic ecosystems. The present research examined how NOM alters the photo-induced toxicity of anatase nano-TiO2 . Daphnia magna neonates were coexposed to NOM and photoexcited anatase nano-TiO2 for 48 h. Natural organic matter concentrations as low as 4 mg/L reduced anatase nano-TiO2 toxicity by nearly 100%. These concentrations of NOM attenuated UV by <10% in the exposure system. However, ROS production measured using a fluorescence assay was significantly reduced in a NOM concentration--dependent manner. Taken together, these data suggest that NOM reduces anatase nano-TiO2 toxicity via an ROS quenching mechanism and not by attenuation of UV. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;9999:1-6. © 2016 SETAC.

  9. Potential effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on coastal wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the atmosphere has steadily increased from 280 parts per million (ppm) in preindustrial times to 381 ppm today and is predicted by some models to double within the next century. Some of the important pathways whereby changes in atmospheric CO2 may impact coastal wetlands include changes in temperature, rainfall, and hurricane intensity (fig. 1). Increases in CO2 can contribute to global warming, which may (1) accelerate sea-level rise through melting of polar ice fields and steric expansion of oceans, (2) alter rainfall patterns and salinity regimes, and (3) change the intensity and frequency of tropical storms and hurricanes. Sea-level rise combined with changes in storm activity may affect erosion and sedimentation rates and patterns in coastal wetlands and maintenance of soil elevations.Feedback loops between plant growth and hydroedaphic conditions also contribute to maintenance of marsh elevations through accumulation of organic matter. Although increasing CO2 concentration may contribute to global warming and climate changes, it may also have a direct impact on plant growth and development by stimulating photosynthesis or improving water use efficiency. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey are examining responses of wetland plants to elevated CO2 concentration and other factors. This research will lead to a better understanding of future changes in marsh species composition, successional rates and patterns, ecological functioning, and vulnerability to sea-level rise and other global change factors.

  10. Optimizing the photocatalytic properties and the synergistic effects of graphene and nano titanium dioxide immobilized on cotton fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Loghman; Yazdanshenas, Mohammad Esmail; Khajavi, Ramin; Rashidi, Abosaeed; Mirjalili, Mohammad

    2015-03-01

    A new facile route based on cotton fabric coated with graphene/titanium dioxide nanocomposite is reported to produce photo-active cellulose textiles. A thin layer of graphene oxide has been produced on cotton fabrics by a dip-dry process. The graphene oxide-coated cotton fabrics were then immersed in titanium trichloride aqueous solution to yield a fabric coated with graphene/titanium dioxide nanocomposite. The photo-activity efficiency of the coated fabrics was tested by degradation of methylene blue in aqueous solution under UV and sunlight irradiations. To obtain the optimum condition, the response surface methodology (RSM) through the central composite design was applied and the role of both graphene oxide and titanium trichloride concentrations on photo-activity efficiency was investigated. The physicochemical properties of the prepared samples has been characterized by a series of techniques, including Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of the application of graphene/titanium dioxide nanocomposite on the physical properties of the cotton fabric, such as tensile strength, bending rigidity and crease recovery angle has been analyzed. Other characteristics of treated fabrics such as antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxicity were also investigated. Cotton fabric coated with optimum concentrations of graphene oxide and titanium trichloride obtained significant photo-activity efficiency under UV and sunlight irradiations. Moreover, the graphene/titanium dioxide nanocomposite coated cotton samples proved low toxicity and possessed excellent antibacterial and antifungal activities.

  11. Effect of hydrogen and carbon dioxide on carboxylic acids patterns in mixed culture fermentation.

    PubMed

    Arslan, D; Steinbusch, K J J; Diels, L; De Wever, H; Buisman, C J N; Hamelers, H V M

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the carboxylate spectrum from mixed culture fermentation of three organic waste streams after supplying 2 bar hydrogen and carbon dioxide or a mixture of these two gases to the headspace. Under any modified headspace, propionate production was ceased and butyrate, caproate and the total carboxylate concentrations were higher than in the reactors with N(2) headspace (control). Production of one major compound was achieved under hydrogen and carbon dioxide mixed headspace after 4 weeks of incubation. Both the highest acetate concentration (17.4 g COD/l) and the highest fraction (87%) were observed in reactors with mixed hydrogen and carbon dioxide headspace independent of the substrate used. In the control reactor, acetate made up maximum 67% of the total products. For other products, the highest concentration and fraction were seldom observed together. Selective butyrate production reaching a 75% fraction was found under the carbon dioxide headspace on the carbohydrate rich waste.

  12. Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Aerosols: Effects of Large Increases on Global Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Mathematical models indicate increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide causes an increase in surface temperature at a decreasing rate, and the rate of temperature decrease caused by increasing aerosols increases with aerosol concentration. (AL)

  13. Effects of dispersed aggregates of carbon and titanium dioxide engineered nanoparticles on rainbow trout hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kevin V; Farkas, Julia; Farmen, Eivind; Christian, Paul; Langford, Katherine; Wu, Quinglan; Tollefsen, Knut-Erik

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress responses of selected engineered carbon and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanomaterials to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) primary hepatocytes. The engineered nanomaterials tested were C(60) fullerenes, multiwall nanotubes (MWNT), single-wall nanotubes (SWNT) (functionalized and nonfunctionalized), and TiO2 of 5 and 200 nm in size. Characterization of these materials showed that they were typically present in solution as agglomerates. The engineered nanoparticle agglomerates were cytotoxic at nominal concentrations of >3 mg/L, and certain MWNT and SWNT produced significant intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production as well as cytotoxicity. Analyses of the MWNT responsible for ROS production and cytotoxicity for selected transition metals demonstrated the presence of residual cobalt (Co), which was not present in the nonreactive/non-bioactive MWNT. Cobalt alone was not able to induce the observed effects in hepatocyte cells; however, coexposure with MWNT resulted in an increase in cytotoxicity. Data suggest that trace metals often associated with commercial nanotubes are responsible for the observed biological effects. In addition, other mechanisms, such as the proposed facilitated transport (e.g., Trojan horse) type mechanism of uptake, may provoke an increased response compared to aqueous exposures of trace metals in the absence of carbon nanoparticles.

  14. Effective inactivation of Candida albicans biofilms by using supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyong Seok; Yang, Jungwoo; Choi, Hee Jung; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-09-01

    Present sterilization methods for biofilms in medical devices have limitations. Therefore, an alternative sterilization method using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) was tested on Candida albicans biofilms. The effect of varying pressure, temperature, and treatment time on the inactivation of C. albicans spores in suspensions and in biofilms was examined. The parameters such as treatment time, pressure, and temperature that led to the complete inactivation of C. albicans biofilms ranged 5-20 min, 100-200 bar, and 35-45 °C, respectively. Notably, treatment of SC-CO2 at either 100 bar and 40 °C or 200 bar and 30 °C induced complete inactivation of spores within 5 min. Furthermore, it was found that wet biofilms (0.4 %, w/w) had higher sensitivity to SC-CO2 than dried biofilms. Finally, spore inactivation was confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. In this study, the use of a low-temperature SC-CO2 sterilization method was proven to be effective in fungal biofilm inactivation, and the moisture content of biofilms was revealed to be the key factor for biofilm inactivation.

  15. Carbon dioxide emissions from Deccan volcanism and a K/T boundary greenhouse effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, Ken; Rampino, Michael R.

    1990-08-01

    A greenhouse warming caused by increased emissions of carbon dioxide from the Deccan Traps volcanism has been suggested as the cause of the terminal Cretaceous extinctions on land and in the sea. Total eruptive and noneruptive CO2 output by the Deccan eruptions (from 6 to 20 x 10 to the 16th moles) over a period of several hundred thousand years is estimated based on best estimates of the CO2 weight fraction of the original basalts and basaltic melts, the fraction of CO2 degassed, and the volume of the Deccan Traps eruptions. Results of a model designed to estimate the effects of increased CO2 on climate and ocean chemistry suggest that increases in atmospheric pCO2 due to Deccan Traps CO2 emissions would have been less than 75 ppm, leading to a predicted global warming of less than 1 C over several hundred thousand years. It is concluded that the direct climate effects of CO2 emissions from the Deccan eruptions would have been too weak to be an important factor in the end-Cretaceous mass extinctions.

  16. Effects of oral administration of titanium dioxide fine-sized particles on plasma glucose in mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ning; Hu, Hailong; Guo, Qian; Jin, Sanli; Wang, Changlin; Oh, Yuri; Feng, Yujie; Wu, Qiong

    2015-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is an authorized additive used as a food colorant, is composed of nano-sized particles (NP) and fine-sized particles (FP). Previous study reported that oral administration of TiO2 NPs triggers an increase in plasma glucose of mice. However, no previous studies have focused on toxic effects of TiO2 FPs on plasma glucose homeostasis following oral administration. In the current study, mice were orally administered TiO2 FPs greater than 100 nm in size (64 mg/kg body weight per day), and effects on plasma glucose levels examined. Our results showed that titanium levels was not changed in mouse blood, livers and pancreases after mice were orally administered TiO2 FPs. Biochemical analyzes showed that plasma glucose and ROS levels were not affected by TiO2 FPs. Histopathological results showed that TiO2 FPs did not induce pathology changes in organs, especially plasma glucose homeostasis regulation organs, such as pancreas and liver. Western blotting showed that oral administration of TiO2 FPs did not induce insulin resistance (IR) in mouse liver. These results showed that, TiO2 FPs cannot be absorbed via oral administration and affect plasma glucose levels in mice.

  17. In situ effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on community structure of freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Boris; Milošević, Djuradj; Piperac, Milica Stojković; Savić, Ana

    2016-06-01

    For the first time in the current literature, the effect of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on the community structure of macroinvertebrates has been investigated in situ. Macroinvertebrates were exposed for 100 days to an environmentally relevant concentration of TiO2 nanoparticles, 25 mg kg(-1) in sediment. Czekanowski's index was 0.61, meaning 39% of the macroinvertebrate community structure was affected by the TiO2 treatment. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) visualized the qualitative and quantitative variability of macroinvertebrates at the community level among all samples. A distance-based permutational multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) revealed the significant effect of TiO2 on the macroinvertebrate community structure. The indicator value analysis showed that the relative frequency and abundance of Planorbarius corneus and Radix labiata were significantly lower in the TiO2 treatment than in the control. Meanwhile, Ceratopogonidae, showed a significantly higher relative frequency and abundance in the TiO2 treatment than in the control.

  18. Effects of nano-sized silicon dioxide on the structures and activities of three functional proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Wang, Shi-Long; Gao, Hong-Wen

    2010-08-15

    Nanomaterials are finding increasing use in industrial production and daily life. However, human exposure to them may cause health risks. Nano-SiO(2) was selected as a representative nanomaterial and its potential effects were investigated in terms of its interactions with cytochrome c (cyt c), deoxyribonuclease (DNase II) and hemoglobin (Hb). The interactions accorded with Langmuir isothermal adsorption; the saturation binding numbers for cyt c, DNase II and Hb were 42+/-5, 24+/-2 and 1.1+/-0.1 micromol/g nano-SiO(2) particle at pH 7.4, respectively, and the corresponding stability constants were 6.15 x 105, 1.79 x 106 and 2.6 x 107 M(-1). On the basis of the binding constants and of zeta-potential fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) measurements and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), it was found that the three functional proteins can bridge nano-SiO(2) particles via charge attraction and hydrogen bonding and aggregate them into coralloid forms. The interactions also changed the secondary structures of the proteins and inhibited their static and dynamic activities. It may reasonably be deduced that exposure to nano-size silicon dioxide particles e.g. as drug carriers may have an unfavorable effect on human health by inactivating functional proteins.

  19. Effects of carbon dioxide on bacterial growth parameters in milk as measured by conductivity.

    PubMed

    Martin, J D; Werner, B G; Hotchkiss, J H

    2003-06-01

    Inhibition of bacterial growth by dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) has been well established in many foods including dairy foods. However, the effects of dissolved CO2 on specific growth parameters such as length of lag phase, time to maximum growth rate, and numbers of organisms at the stationary phase have not been quantified for organisms of concern in milk. The effect of dissolved CO2 concentrations of 0.6 to 61.4 mM on specific bacterial growth parameters in raw or single organism inoculated sterile milk was determined at 15 degrees C by conductance. Commingled raw or sterile milks were amended to a final concentration of 0.5 mg/ml each of urea and arginine HCl. Sterile milks were inoculated singly with one of six different microorganisms to a final concentration of approximately 10(2) to 10(3) cfu/ml; raw milk was adjusted to a final indigenous bacterial population of approximately 10(3) cfu/ml. Conductivity of the milk was recorded every 60 s over 4 to 5 d in a circulating apparatus at 15 degrees C. Conductivity values were fit to Gompertz equations and growth parameters calculated. Conductance correlated with plate counts and was satisfactory for monitoring microbial growth. Data fit the Gompertz equation with high correlation (R2 = 0.96 to 1.00). In all cases, dissolved CO2 significantly inhibited growth of raw milk bacteria, influencing lag, exponential, and stationary growth phases as well as all tested monocultures.

  20. Effects of suspended titanium dioxide nanoparticles on cake layer formation in submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lijie; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xia, Siqing; Jiang, Wei; Ye, Biao; Xu, Xiaoyin; Gu, Zaoli; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Huu-Hao; Meng, Xiangzhou; Fan, Jinhong; Zhao, Jianfu

    2014-01-01

    Effects of the suspended titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs, 50 mg/L) on the cake layer formation in a submerged MBR were systematically investigated. With nanometer sizes, TiO2 NPs were found to aggravate membrane pore blocking but postpone cake layer fouling. TiO2 NPs showed obvious effects on the structure and the distribution of the organic and the inorganic compounds in cake layer. Concentrations of fatty acids and cholesterol in the cake layer increased due to the acute response of bacteria to the toxicity of TiO2 NPs. Line-analysis and dot map of energy-dispersive X-ray were also carried out. Since TiO2 NPs inhibited the interactions between the inorganic and the organic compounds, the inorganic compounds (especially SiO2) were prevented from depositing onto the membrane surface. Thus, the postponed cake layer fouling was due to the changing features of the complexes on the membrane surface caused by TiO2 NPs.

  1. Carbon dioxide emissions from Deccan volcanism and a K/T boundary greenhouse effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldeira, Ken; Rampino, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    A greenhouse warming caused by increased emissions of carbon dioxide from the Deccan Traps volcanism has been suggested as the cause of the terminal Cretaceous extinctions on land and in the sea. Total eruptive and noneruptive CO2 output by the Deccan eruptions (from 6 to 20 x 10 to the 16th moles) over a period of several hundred thousand years is estimated based on best estimates of the CO2 weight fraction of the original basalts and basaltic melts, the fraction of CO2 degassed, and the volume of the Deccan Traps eruptions. Results of a model designed to estimate the effects of increased CO2 on climate and ocean chemistry suggest that increases in atmospheric pCO2 due to Deccan Traps CO2 emissions would have been less than 75 ppm, leading to a predicted global warming of less than 1 C over several hundred thousand years. It is concluded that the direct climate effects of CO2 emissions from the Deccan eruptions would have been too weak to be an important factor in the end-Cretaceous mass extinctions.

  2. Effects of alprazolam and clonidine on carbon dioxide-induced increases in anxiety rating in healthy human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, S.W.; Krystal, J.H.; Heninger, G.R.; Charney, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    In order to investigate possible neurobiologic mechanisms underlying carbon dioxide-induced anxiety, the effects of oral alprazolam 0.75 mg and intravenous clonidine 2 mcg/kg on CO/sub 2/-induced increases in ratings of subjective anxiety, pulse rate, and ventilation were measured in healthy human subjects. Pretreatment with alprazolam but not with clonidine significantly reduced the CO/sub 2/-induced increases in ratings of anxiety. Neither drug altered CO/sub 2/-induced increases in pulse rate or ventilatory responses. Clonidine did produce potent sedative and hypotensive effects. The behavioral data suggest that the mechanisms through which CO/sub 2/ induces anxiety-like effects involve neural systems regulated by benzodiazepine receptors and, secondly, that they appear not to require normal functioning of noradrenergic systems. Carbon dioxide may provide a useful model system for identification of new drugs with anxiolytic properties.

  3. Effects of light sources and visible light-activated titanium dioxide photocatalyst on bleaching.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Yuji; Otsuki, Masayuki; Ogisu, Shinichiro; Kishikawa, Ryuzo; Tagami, Junji; Ikeda, Masaomi; Kurata, Hiroshi; Cho, Takahiro

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate, using methylene blue (MB), the effects of various light sources on the bleaching action of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) with two titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) photocatalysts - an ultraviolet light-activated TiO(2) photocatalyst (UVTiO(2)) versus a visible light-activated TiO(2) photocatalyst (VL-TiO(2)). Five experimental solutions (VL-TiO(2)+H(2)O(2), UV-TiO(2)+H(2)O(2), H(2)O(2), VL-TiO(2), UV-TiO(2)) were prepared by mixing varying concentrations of H(2)O(2 )and/or TiO(2 )photocatalyst with MB solution. For H(2)O(2)-containing solutions (VL-TiO(2)+H(2)O(2), UV-TiO(2)+H(2)O(2), and H(2)O(2)), the concentration of H(2)O(2) was adjusted to 3.5%. For the four different light sources, low- and high-intensity halogen lamps and blue LED LCUs were used. All the experimental solutions were irradiated by each of the light sources for 7 minutes, and the absorbance at 660 nm was measured every 30 seconds to determine the concentration of MB as an indicator of the bleaching effect. On the interaction between the effects of light source and bleaching treatment, the high-intensity halogen with VL-TiO(2)+H(2)O(2) caused the most significant reduction in MB concentration. On the effect of light sources, the halogen lamps resulted in a greater bleaching effect than the blue LED LCUs.

  4. Response of vegetation to carbon dioxide - effect of elevated levels of CO{sub 2} on winter wheat under two moisture regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, U.N.; Burnett, R.B.; Kanemasu, E.T.; Kirkham, M.B.

    1987-12-31

    This report deals with the second-year (1985-86) findings of an on going experiment with winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) at different carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels and under two moisture regimes. The results for the first year are given in the U.S. Department of Energy, Carbon Dioxide Research Division Response of Vegetation to Carbon Dioxide. The purpose of the second year`s experiment was to verify the results of 1984-85. However, based on the performance and the results of 1984-85 experiments, a few modifications were made.

  5. Effects of ozone and nitrogen dioxide on drinking and eating behaviors in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Umezu, T.; Suzuki, A.K.; Miura, T.; Koizumi, A. )

    1993-04-01

    Male ICR mice were exposed continuously to ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) for 7 days to examine the effects on drinking and eating behaviors. Ozone at 0.1 ppm did not affect drinking and eating activities, whereas drinking activity decreased in a concentration-dependent manner to 47.7, 12.8, and 3.0% of the control value with 2-day exposures to 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 ppm O3, respectively, and eating activity decreased to 35.2 and 8.7% of the control value at 0.4 and 0.8 ppm O3, respectively. Body weight also decreased markedly by 2.0, 4.6, and 7.5 g at 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 ppm O3, respectively. These decrements reached a maximum on the second day of exposure. However, alterations in drinking and eating activities and body weight were transient, leading to recovery during the continuous O3 exposures. The recovery processes were dependent on the concentrations of O3. Nitrogen dioxide at 4 ppm did not affect drinking and eating activities, whereas drinking activity decreased in a concentration-dependent manner to 56.8, 8.3, and 18.7% of the control value with 2-day exposures to 6, 8, and 12 ppm NO2, respectively, and eating activity decreased markedly to 21.8 and 16.4% at 8 and 12 ppm NO2, respectively. Body weight also decreased by 2.5, 5.5, and 6.1 g at 6, 8, and 12 ppm NO2, respectively. These decrements reached a maximum on the second day of exposure. As in the O3 exposures, the decrements in drinking and eating activities and body weight were transient and recovered during the continuous exposures to NO2 depending on the concentrations of NO2. Drinking and eating activities and body weights of mice that had been previously exposed to 12 ppm NO2 for 7 days did not show changes when the mice were exposed to 0.4 ppm O3 9 days after NO2 exposure. The present study demonstrates that photochemical oxidants suppress drinking and eating behaviors in mice and that they recover thereafter under the continuous exposure conditions.

  6. Summer Ice and Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukla, G.; Gavin, J.

    1981-10-01

    The extent of Antarctic pack ice in the summer, as charted from satellite imagery, decreased by 2.5 million square kilometers between 1973 and 1980. The U.S. Navy and Russian atlases and whaling and research ship reports from the 1930's indicate that summer ice conditions earlier in this century were heavier than the current average. Surface air temperatures along the seasonally shifting belt of melting snow between 55 degrees and 80 degrees N during spring and summer were higher in 1974 to 1978 than in 1934 to 1938. The observed departures in the two hemispheres qualitatively agree with the predicted impact of an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide. However, since it is not known to what extent the changes in snow and ice cover and in temperature can be explained by the natural variability of the climate system or by other processes unrelated to carbon dioxide, a cause-and-effect relation cannot yet be established.

  7. The Effects of Nitrogen Enrichment and a Simulated Rainfall Event on Soil Carbon Dioxide Efflux in an Annual California Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. P.; Strong, A. L.; Chiariello, N.; Field, C. B.

    2013-12-01

    Soils contain the largest pool of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems and play a critical role in the global carbon cycle. Previous studies have shown that enhanced precipitation (projected by climate models) and human activities (such as increased fertilizer use) may alter this cycle by enhancing soil microbial activity, although effects are often variable. Soils in semi-arid grasslands play a vital role in the global carbon cycle and may be responsive to environmental perturbations. Previous studies have demonstrated that wet-up treatments positively influence soil carbon dioxide efflux rates, which are otherwise low during dry summers. A preliminary study performed in a semi-arid annual grassland has shown that long-term nitrogen enrichment (equivalent to 70kg N per hectare) positively influences soil carbon dioxide efflux during peak biomass in the wet season. However, the combined effect and seasonal dynamics of these environmental changes is poorly understood. In order to assess this interaction, we explore the short-term response of soil carbon dioxide efflux rates in a semi-arid grassland to a combination of long-term nitrogen enrichment and a simulated 20-mm rainfall event in the Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment (JRCGE), a long-term, multi-factorial experiment in a semi-arid annual grassland located in the foothills of the Santa Cruz mountains in central California. We measured soil carbon dioxide efflux rates from pre-installed soil respiration collars for forty-eight hours after a simulated rainfall event (20mm) during the dry season in late July 2013. Both the enhanced and non-enhanced nitrogen treatments had an immediate pronounced response to the wet-up stimulation in which efflux rates increased by an average of more than six-fold. In contrast with previous studies of soil carbon dioxide efflux at JRGCE during the wet season in which N enrichment elevated efflux rates relative to controls, however, the soil carbon dioxide efflux rates in response

  8. Chemical and morphological effects on the electrochemical properties of carbon aerogels and ruthenium dioxide/carbon aerogel nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John Martin

    The development of high performance electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors has been an active area of research over the past ten years due to the demand for high power portable energy storage devices. One class of material which has shown promising capacitive characteristics in aqueous electrolytes is carbon aerogels. These unique materials exhibit low resistivity, high surface area, and a controllable open microstructure. In this work, the interrelationships between the electrochemical characteristics of the carbon aerogel materials in sulfuric acid electrolytes and the chemical and physical nature of the aerogels have been identified. Specifically, this study examines the influence of surface chemistry and microstructure on the voltammetric response of the carbon aerogel electrodes. Carbon aerogels exhibit a specific capacitance greater than 80 F/g in 1.0 M Hsb2SOsb4. This value is is dependent upon the specific surface area of each sample but is relatively independent of the bulk density of the aerogel. The density of the material does, however, influence the charging time of the electrode due to distributed capacitance effects. The surface of the carbon aerogels can be electrochemically activated to supplement the double-layer charging of the surface with a pseudocapacitive charge storage mechanism at redox-active surface functionalities. A second aspect of this work addresses improving the capacitance of the carbon aerogel materials by chemically modifying the surface of the aerogels. Hydrous ruthenium dioxide, which has shown exceptional pseudocapacitance ({>} 750\\ F/g)sp3, was deposited onto the surface of the carbon aerogel materials by two approaches: chemical vapor impregnation and electrodeposition. Ruthenium metal loadings of greater than 50 wt.% could be achieved using chemical vapor impregnation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed 20A metal particles uniformly distributed on the large interior surface of the aerogels. These

  9. Retrospective on CDIAC's Activities in U.S.-China Research on the Greenhouse Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Boden, T.A.; Cushman, R.M.; Farrell, M.P.; Jones, S.B.; Kaiser, D.P.; Kanciruk, P.; Mitchell, E.E.; Nelson, T.R.; Sepanski, R.J.

    1999-06-10

    This paper summarizes the accomplishments of the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center under a joint research program on the greenhouse effect conducted by the US and the People's Republic of China. The focus is on efforts in the areas of computing systems; data quality assurance, documentation, and publication; data analysis; data exchange and distribution; project summary and bibliography publication; and visitor exchange.

  10. System study of the utilization of space for carbon dioxide research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, P. E.; Vranka, R.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives included: compiling and selecting the Scientific Data Requirements (SDRs) pertinent to the CO2 Research Program that have the potential to be more successfully achieved by utilizing space-based sensor systems; assessment of potential space technology in monitoring those parameters which may be important first indicators of climate change due to increasing atmospheric CO2, including the behavior of the West Antarctic ice sheet; and determine the potential of space technology for monitoring those parameters to improve understanding of the coupling between CO2 and cloud cover.

  11. Percutaneous carbon dioxide mist treatment has protective effects in experimental myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takehiro; Yamazaki, Takanori; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Shiota, Masayuki; Shimada, Kenei; Miura, Katsuyuki; Iwao, Hiroshi; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Izumi, Yasukatsu

    2015-04-01

    Percutaneous treatment with carbon dioxide (CO2) mist, CO2 gas dissolved in water, contributes to improved cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI). In this study, we investigated the effects of repeated pretreatment with CO2 mist on cardiac dysfunction after MI. The CO2 mist was generated by a dry mist production unit. The whole body of rats below the axilla was wrapped in a polyethylene bag, which was sealed and filled with the CO2 mist in the draft cabinet for 30 min daily for 7 days. MI was induced by ligation of the coronary artery in untreated (UT), CO2 gas-pretreated (CG), and CO2 mist-pretreated (CM) rats. The infarct size and the increase in oxidative stress due to MI were significantly smaller in the CM rats than in the UT rats. Furthermore, the expression of inflammation-related genes, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and fibrosis-related genes, such as transforming growth factor-β1, was significantly suppressed in the CM rats. The CM rats had a better left ventricular ejection fraction than the UT rats 7 days after MI. These parameters in the CG rats were the same as in the UT group. Thus, CO2 mist preparative treatment may be potentially useful for the reduction of MI.

  12. Effect of carbon dioxide and ammonium removal on pH changes in polishing ponds.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, P F F; van Haandel, A; Lettinga, G

    2002-01-01

    If nutrient removal is to be obtained in ponds treating sewage, the pH must be raised so that ammonia can desorb and phosphates can precipitate. In this paper it is shown that the pH increase in ponds can be predicted quantitatively from simple stoichiometry, taking into consideration physical and biological carbon dioxide removal, ammonia stripping and calcium carbonate precipitation. Biological CO2 removal by photosynthesis is identified as the main process to effect pH increase in ponds. The rate of pH increase and consequently the required retention time depend on the net rate of CO2 consumption, the extent of ammonium stripping, the characteristics of the influent (alkalinity and pH) as well as factors concerning the environment (temperature) and dimensions (depth) of the pond. A high pH (range 9 to 10) can be obtained in about 5 days if digested sewage is used (low organic material concentration), climate conditions are favourable and the pond is shallow (< 0.5 m deep).

  13. Fire, hurricane and carbon dioxide: effects on net primary production of a subtropical woodland.

    PubMed

    Hungate, Bruce A; Day, Frank P; Dijkstra, Paul; Duval, Benjamin D; Hinkle, C Ross; Langley, J Adam; Megonigal, J Patrick; Stiling, Peter; Johnson, Dale W; Drake, Bert G

    2013-11-01

    Disturbance affects most terrestrial ecosystems and has the potential to shape their responses to chronic environmental change. Scrub-oak vegetation regenerating from fire disturbance in subtropical Florida was exposed to experimentally elevated carbon dioxide (CO₂) concentration (+350 μl l(-1)) using open-top chambers for 11 yr, punctuated by hurricane disturbance in year 8. Here, we report the effects of elevated CO₂ on aboveground and belowground net primary productivity (NPP) and nitrogen (N) cycling during this experiment. The stimulation of NPP and N uptake by elevated CO₂ peaked within 2 yr after disturbance by fire and hurricane, when soil nutrient availability was high. The stimulation subsequently declined and disappeared, coincident with low soil nutrient availability and with a CO₂ -induced reduction in the N concentration of oak stems. These findings show that strong growth responses to elevated CO₂ can be transient, are consistent with a progressively limited response to elevated CO₂ interrupted by disturbance, and illustrate the importance of biogeochemical responses to extreme events in modulating ecosystem responses to global environmental change.

  14. Immunomodulatory effects in the spleen-injured mice following exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sang, Xuezi; Fei, Min; Sheng, Lei; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Yu, Xiaohong; Hong, Jie; Ze, Yuguan; Gui, Suxin; Sun, Qingqing; Ze, Xiao; Wang, Ling; Hong, Fashui

    2014-10-01

    Immune injuries following the exposure of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO₂ NPs) have been greatly concerned along with the TiO₂ NPs are widely used in pharmacology and daily life. However, very little is known about the immunomodulatory mechanisms in the spleen-injured mice due to TiO₂ NPs exposure. In this study, mice were continuously exposed to 2.5, 5, or 10 TiO₂ NPs mg kg(-1) body weight for 90 days with intragastric administration to investigate the immunomodulatory mechanisms in the spleen. The findings showed that TiO₂ NPs exposure resulted in significant increases in spleen and thymus indices, and titanium accumulation, in turn led to histopathological changes and splenocyte apoptosis. Furthermore, the exposure of TiO₂ NPs could significantly increase the levels of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, MIP-2, Eotaxin, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interferon-γ, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, interleukin-13, interferon-γ-inducible protein-10, migration inhibitory factor, CD69, major histocompatibility complex, protein tyrosine phosphatase, protein tyrosine kinase 1, basic fibroblast growth factor, Fasl, and GzmB expression, whereas markedly decrease the levels of NKG2D, NKp46, 2B4 expression involved in immune responses, lymphocyte healing and apoptosis. These findings would better understand toxicological effects induced by TiO₂ NPs exposure.

  15. Effect of Non-ionic Surfactants and Its Role in K Intercalation in Electrolytic Manganese Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Avijit; Tripathy, B. C.; Subbaiah, T.; Meyrick, D.; Ionescu, Mihail; Minakshi, Manickam

    2014-09-01

    The effect of non-ionic surface active agents (surfactants) Triton X-100 (TX-100) and Tween-20 (Tw-20) and their role in potassium intercalation in electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) produced from manganese cake has been investigated. Electrosynthesis of MnO2 in the absence or presence of surfactant was carried out from acidic MnSO4 solution obtained from manganese cake under optimized conditions. A range of characterization techniques, including field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Rutherford back scattering (RBS), and BET surface area/porosity studies, was carried out to determine the structural and chemical characteristics of the EMD. Galvanostatic (discharge) and potentiostatic (cyclic voltammetric) studies were employed to evaluate the suitability of EMD in combination with KOH electrolyte for alkaline battery applications. The presence of surfactant played an important role in modifying the physicochemical properties of the EMD by increasing the surface area of the material and hence, enhancing its electrochemical performance. The TEM and RBS analyses of the discharged EMD (γ-MnO2) material showed clear evidence of potassium intercalation or at least the formation of a film on the MnO2 surface. The extent of intercalation was greater for EMD deposited in the presence of TX-100. Discharged MnO2 showed products of Mn2+ intermediates such as MnOOH and Mn3O4.

  16. Effects of Thickness on the Metal-Insulator Transition in Free-Standing Vanadium Dioxide Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Fadlelmula, Mustafa M; Sürmeli, Engin C; Ramezani, Mehdi; Kasırga, T Serkan

    2017-03-08

    Controlling solid state phase transitions via external stimuli offers rich physics along with possibilities of unparalleled applications in electronics and optics. The well-known metal-insulator transition (MIT) in vanadium dioxide (VO2) is one instance of such phase transitions emerging from strong electronic correlations. Inducing the MIT using electric field has been investigated extensively for the applications in electrical and ultrafast optical switching. However, as the Thomas-Fermi screening length is very short, for considerable alteration in the material's properties with electric field induced MIT, crystals below 10 nm are needed. So far, the only way to achieve thin crystals of VO2 has been via epitaxial growth techniques. Yet, stress due to lattice mismatch as well as interdiffusion with the substrate complicate the studies. Here, we show that free-standing vapor-phase grown crystals of VO2 can be milled down to the desired thickness using argon ion-beam milling without compromising their electronic and structural properties. Among our results, we show that even below 4 nm thickness the MIT persists and the transition temperature is lowered in two-terminal devices as the crystal gets thinner. The findings in this Letter can be applied to similar strongly correlated materials to study quantum confinement effects.

  17. Electron beam induced synthesis of uranium dioxide nanoparticles: Effect of solvent composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, M. C.; Keny, S. J.; Naik, D. B.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of various compositions of solvents was investigated on the electron beam induced synthesis of uranium dioxide, UO2 nanoparticles. The synthesis was carried out at different pHs from 2 to 7 in the aqueous solutions containing 10 mM uranyl nitrate and 10% 2-propanol. The formation of UO2 nanoparticles was found to occur only in the pH range from 2.5 to 3.7. Experiments were also carried out in the aqueous solutions containing various other alcohols (10% v/v) such as methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol or tert-butanol as well as in solutions containing 10 mM sodium formate at pH 3.4. The formation of UO2 nanoparticles in the aqueous solutions was found to occur only in the presence of ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol or 1-butanol. It is therefore confirmed that the electron beam induced synthesis of UO2 nanoparticles strongly depends on the solvent compositions as well as the pH of the medium.

  18. Effect of chlorine dioxide on cyanobacterial cell integrity, toxin degradation and disinfection by-product formation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiqing; Shao, Yisheng; Gao, Naiyun; Li, Lei; Deng, Jing; Zhu, Mingqiu; Zhu, Shumin

    2014-06-01

    Bench scale tests were conducted to study the effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) oxidation on cell integrity, toxin degradation and disinfection by-product formation of Microcystis aeruginosa. The simulated cyanobacterial suspension was prepared at a concentration of 1.0×10(6)cells/mL and the cell integrity was measured with flow cytometry. Results indicated that ClO2 can inhibit the photosynthetic capacity of M. aeruginosa cells and almost no integral cells were left after oxidation at a ClO2 dose of 1.0mg/L. The total toxin was degraded more rapidly with the ClO2 dosage increasing from 0.1mg/L to 1.0mg/L. Moreover, the damage on cell structure after oxidation resulted in released intracellular organic matter, which contributed to the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) as disinfection by-products. Therefore, the use of ClO2 as an oxidant for treating algal-rich water should be carefully considered.

  19. Effect of light units on tooth bleaching with visible-light activating titanium dioxide photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Ayaka; Otsuki, Masayuki; Sadr, Alireza; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different light sources on the efficiency of an office bleaching agent containing visible-light activating titanium dioxide photocatalyst (VL-TiO(2)) using an artificial discoloration tooth model. Extracted bovine teeth were stained by black tea. The CIE L*a*b* values were measured before and after nine consecutive treatments by the VL-TiO(2)-containing bleaching agent (TiON in Office, GC, Tokyo, Japan). A halogen light unit (CB; CoBee, GC) or an LED unit (G-light, GC) with two modes (blue and violet: GL-BV, blue: GL-B) were used to activate the bleaching agent in three groups (n=8). Brightness (ΔL) and color difference (ΔE) increased as bleaching repeated in all groups. Two-way ANOVA showed that both number of treatments and light sources significantly affected ΔE (p<0.05). GL-BV showed better bleaching effect than GL-B. In measurement of irradiation spectra, CB showed a wide spectrum (380-530 nm), GL-B had a sharp peak at 470 nm and GL-BV showed an additional peak at 405 nm. It was concluded that the light source influenced the efficiency of the tooth bleaching with VL-TiO(2).

  20. Sulfur dioxide and ammonium sulfate effects on pulmonary function and bronchial reactivity in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Kulle, T J; Sauder, L R; Shanty, F; Kerr, H D; Farrell, B P; Miller, W R; Milman, J H

    1984-03-01

    The effect of exposures to 1 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO2) and 500 micrograms/m3 respirable ammonium sulfate [(NH4)2SO4] was studied in 20 nonsmoking subjects to determine if a response can be measured at these atmospheric levels and if the response is additive or synergistic. Four-hour separate and combined exposures were employed. Each subject acted as his or her own control and performed two light-to-moderate exercise stints (612 kg-m/min) for 15 minutes on each day's confinement in the environmental chamber. Pulmonary function tests (body plethysmography and spirometry) and bronchial reactivity to methacholine were performed to assess the response of these exposures. No significant changes in pulmonary function or bronchial reactivity were observed in the individual exposures [(NH4)2SO4 or SO2], the combined exposure [(NH4)2SO4 and SO2], or 24 hours post-exposure. This study design and the observed results did not demonstrate any readily apparent risk to healthy subjects with these exposures. Since no significant changes were measured, it was not possible to conclude if these two pollutants in combination produce an additive or synergistic response.

  1. Molecular dynamics study of the bulk temperature effect on primary radiation damage in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Sabathier, C.; Wiktor, J.; Maillard, S.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of bulk temperature on the primary damage induced by a displacement cascade was investigated in uranium dioxide using classical molecular dynamics simulations. In this study, the Morelon potentials were used to model the middle-range interactions between the atoms that constitute the host matrix during the radiation events. Cascades were initiated by accelerating a uranium primary knock-on atom at 10keV inside a perfect UO2 lattice at a temperature between 700K and 1800K , a range which comprises in-pile temperatures of oxide fuels in light water reactors in standard operating conditions. Cascade overlap sequences were also simulated at 700K and 1400K in order to study the radiation damage accumulation in the oxide fuel. This study reveals the maximum damage level which the material can accommodate for decreases with the temperature. Furthermore the direct formation of vacancy clusters under irradiation is considerably slowed down above 1000K , notably during cascade overlap sequences.

  2. Effects of 7.5% carbon dioxide inhalation on anxiety and mood in cigarette smokers.

    PubMed

    Attwood, Angela S; Ataya, Alia F; Bailey, Jayne E; Lightman, Stafford L; Munafò, Marcus R

    2014-08-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with elevated risk of anxiety and mood disorder. Using the 7.5% carbon dioxide (CO2) inhalation model of anxiety induction, we examined the effects of smoking status and abstinence from smoking on anxiety responses. Physiological and subjective responses to CO2 and medical air were compared in smokers and non-smokers (Experiment One) and in overnight abstinent and non-abstinent smokers (Experiment Two). CO2 induced greater increases in blood pressure in non-smokers compared with smokers (ps < 0.043), and greater increases in anxiety (p = 0.005) and negative affect (p = 0.054) in non-abstinent compared with abstinent smokers. CO2 increased physiological and subjective indices of anxiety. There were differences across smoking groups indicating that the CO2 inhalation model is a useful tool for examining the relationship between smoking and anxiety. The findings suggested that both acute smoking and acute abstinence may protect against anxious responding. Further investigation is needed in long-term heavy smokers.

  3. Effect of the cascade energy on defect production in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Garcia, P.; Van Brutzel, L.; Dorado, B.; Maillard, S.

    2011-07-01

    The primary damage induced by a displacement cascade in a pure uranium dioxide matrix was investigated using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Cascades were initiated by accelerating a uranium primary knock-on atom (PKA) to a kinetic energy ranging from 1 keV to 80 keV inside a perfect UO2 lattice at low temperature (300 K and 700 K). There is little effect of temperature in the temperature range studied. Following the cascade event, the damage level, defined as the total number of defects irrespective of whether they form clusters or not, is proportional to the initial kinetic energy of the PKA, in agreement with the literature relating to other materials. The linear dependence of damage upon initial PKA energy results from the formation of subcascades at high energy and constitutes a simple law which can be applied to any material and used in order to extrapolate molecular dynamics results to high energy PKAs. The nature of irradiation induced defects has also been studied as a function of the cascade energy.

  4. Effect of Sprayed Solution Volume on Physical Properties of Titanium Dioxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naffouti, Wafa; Ben Nasr, Tarek; Briot, Olivier; Kamoun-Turki, Najoua

    2015-10-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films were deposited on glass substrates by spray pyrolysis technique from different solution volumes. We studied the effect of sprayed solution volume on the structural, morphological and optical properties of TiO2 films. X-ray diffraction studies revealed the presence of an anatase phase with a tetragonal structure with (101) preferred orientation. The best crystallinity was obtained in the case of a sprayed solution volume of 60 ml. Also, this film had a lower average surface roughness (RMS) as measured by atomic force microscopy. Transmission and reflection optical analysis showed interference phenomena indicating a smooth reflecting surface of the film. An indirect band gap of about 3.46 eV was found, indicating a potential use of these films in solar cell devices. Based on the optical measurements, the film thickness was determined by the envelope method, which was in agreement with the scanning electron microscopy result. Wemple-Di Domenico single oscillator and Spitzer-Fan models were used to study the optical constants of the films grown from different sprayed solution volumes. Photoluminescence emission intensity was found to increase with increasing film crystallinity, and the spectra showed ultraviolet and visible emissions corresponding to intrinsic emission and trap levels within the band gap, respectively.

  5. Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles on Red Clover and Its Rhizobial Symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Janine; Okupnik, Annette; Gogos, Alexander; Knauer, Katja; Bucheli, Thomas D.; van der Heijden, Marcel G. A.; Widmer, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are in consideration to be used in plant protection products. Before these products can be placed on the market, ecotoxicological tests have to be performed. In this study, the nitrogen fixing bacterium Rhizobium trifolii and red clover were exposed to two TiO2 NPs, i.e., P25, E171 and a non-nanomaterial TiO2. Growth of both organisms individually and their symbiotic root nodulation were investigated in liquid and hydroponic systems. While 23 and 18 mg l-1 of E171 and non-nanomaterial TiO2 decreased the growth rate of R. trifolii by 43 and 23% respectively, P25 did not cause effects. Shoot length of red clover decreased between 41 and 62% for all tested TiO2 NPs. In 21% of the TiO2 NP treated plants, no nodules were found. At high concentrations certain TiO2 NPs impaired R. trifolii as well as red clover growth and their symbiosis in the hydroponic systems. PMID:27171465

  6. Effect of Surface Treated Silicon Dioxide Nanoparticles on Some Mechanical Properties of Maxillofacial Silicone Elastomer

    PubMed Central

    Zayed, Sara M.; Alshimy, Ahmad M.; Fahmy, Amal E.

    2014-01-01

    Current materials used for maxillofacial prostheses are far from ideal and there is a need for novel improved materials which mimic as close as possible the natural behavior of facial soft tissues. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of adding different concentrations of surface treated silicon dioxide nanoparticles (SiO2) on clinically important mechanical properties of a maxillofacial silicone elastomer. 147 specimens of the silicone elastomer were prepared and divided into seven groups (n = 21). One control group was prepared without nanoparticles and six study groups with different concentrations of nanoparticles, from 0.5% to 3% by weight. Specimens were tested for tear strength (ASTM D624), tensile strength (ASTM D412), percent elongation, and shore A hardness. SEM was used to assess the dispersion of nano-SiO2 within the elastomer matrix. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Scheffe test (α = 0.05). Results revealed significant improvement in all mechanical properties tested, as the concentration of the nanoparticles increased. This was supported by the results of the SEM. Hence, it can be concluded that the incorporation of surface treated SiO2 nanoparticles at concentration of 3% enhanced the overall mechanical properties of A-2186 silicone elastomer. PMID:25574170

  7. Sulfur Dioxide Emissions and Market Effects under the Clean Air Act Acid Rain Program.

    PubMed

    Zipper, Carl E; Gilroy, Leonard

    1998-09-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) established a national program to control sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from electricity generation. CAAA90's market-based approach includes trading and banking of Soumissions allowances. We analyzed data describing electric utility SO2 emissions in 1995, the first year of the program's Phase I, and market effects over the 1990-1995 period. Fuel switching and flue-gas desulfurization were the dominant means used in 1995 by targeted generators to reduce emissions to 51% of 1990 levels. Flue-gas desulfur-ization costs, emissions allowance prices, low-sulfur coal prices, and average sulfur contents of coals shipped to electric utilities declined over the 1990-1995 period. Projections indicate that 13-15 million allowances will have been banked during the program's Phase I, which ends in 1999, a quantity expected to last through the first decade of the program's stricter Phase II controls. In 1995, both allowance prices and SO2 emissions were below pre-CAAA90 expectations. The reduction of SO2 emissions beyond pre-CAAA90 expectations, combined with lower-than-expected allowance prices and declining compliance costs, can be viewed as a success for market-based environmental controls.

  8. Carbon dioxide insertion into diamines: a computational study of solvent effects.

    PubMed

    Eger, Wilhelm A; Genest, Alexander; Rieger, Bernhard; Rösch, Notker

    2012-10-01

    We studied computationally, on the model compound ethylenediamine, the insertion of carbon dioxide into diamines, yielding cyclic urea compounds. Two mechanisms were elaborated, depending on the value of the dielectric constant (DC) of the solvent. Accordingly, reaction mixtures with a high DC lead to carbamates, whereas lower DC values result in the preferred product cyclic urea. Additives behaving as "proton shuttles" act as catalysts, significantly reducing the activation barriers of insertion and ring closure to surmountable values. CO(2) insertion into diamines may also occur by autocatalysis, even without further additives, but under less favorable conditions, for example, lower yields. Amine reagents are most efficient at proton shuttling, followed by alcohols. The activation barrier of the rate-limiting step is lowered in a reaction mixture with higher values of DC, up to a critical value ε(cr) ≈ 18. Hence, in a suitably optimized reaction mixture, ring closure is suggested to occur under milder conditions than those previously applied experimentally. The two roles of the additive, that is, acting as proton shuttling agent and adjusting the effective DC of the reaction mixture, do not have to be assigned to a single compound, possibly affording a handle on process optimization.

  9. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Penetration into the Skin and Effects on HaCaT Cells.

    PubMed

    Crosera, Matteo; Prodi, Andrea; Mauro, Marcella; Pelin, Marco; Florio, Chiara; Bellomo, Francesca; Adami, Gianpiero; Apostoli, Pietro; De Palma, Giuseppe; Bovenzi, Massimo; Campanini, Marco; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2015-08-07

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) suspensions (concentration 1.0 g/L) in synthetic sweat solution were applied on Franz cells for 24 h using intact and needle-abraded human skin. Titanium content into skin and receiving phases was determined. Cytotoxicity (MTT, AlamarBlue(®) and propidium iodide, PI, uptake assays) was evaluated on HaCat keratinocytes after 24 h, 48 h, and seven days of exposure. After 24 h of exposure, no titanium was detectable in receiving solutions for both intact and damaged skin. Titanium was found in the epidermal layer after 24 h of exposure (0.47 ± 0.33 μg/cm(2)) while in the dermal layer, the concentration was below the limit of detection. Damaged skin, in its whole, has shown a similar concentration (0.53 ± 0.26 μg/cm(2)). Cytotoxicity studies on HaCaT cells demonstrated that TiO2NPs induced cytotoxic effects only at very high concentrations, reducing cell viability after seven days of exposure with EC50s of 8.8 × 10(-4) M (MTT assay), 3.8 × 10(-5) M (AlamarBlue(®) assay), and 7.6 × 10(-4) M (PI uptake, index of a necrotic cell death). Our study demonstrated that TiO2NPs cannot permeate intact and damaged skin and can be found only in the stratum corneum and epidermis. Moreover, the low cytotoxic effect observed on human HaCaT keratinocytes suggests that these nano-compounds have a potential toxic effect at the skin level only after long-term exposure.

  10. In vivo and in vitro toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassinari, Roberta; La Rocca, Cinzia; Stecca, Laura; Tait, Sabrina; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Iosi, Francesca; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Martinelli, Andrea; Maranghi, Francesca

    2015-06-01

    In European Union, titanium dioxide (TiO2) as bulk material is a food additive (E171) and - as nanoparticle (NP) - is used as a white pigment in several products (e.g. food, cosmetics, drugs). E171 contains approximately 36% of particles less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and TiO2 NP exposure is estimated fairly below 2.5 mg/person/day. The gastrointestinal tract is a route of entry for NPs, thus representing a potential target of effects. In in vivo study, the effects of TiO2 NP in adult rat small intestine have been evaluated by oral administration of 0 (CTRL), 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day - relevant to human dietary intake. Detailed quali/quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on CTRL and treated rat samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on small intestine. An in vitro study on Caco-2 cells was also used in order to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects directly on enterocytes through the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Suspensions of TiO2 NPs for in vitro and in vivo study were characterized by EM. Histomorphometrical data showed treatment-related changes of villus height and widths in male rats. Significantly different from CTRL decreased LDH levels in the medium were detected in vitro at 24h with 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µg/cm2 levels of TiO2 NPs. SEM analysis showed no damaged areas. Overall the results showed that enterocytes may represent a target of TiO2 NP toxicity by direct exposure both in vivo and in vitro models.

  11. In vivo and in vitro toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Tassinari, Roberta; La Rocca, Cinzia; Tait, Sabrina; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Iosi, Francesca; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Martinelli, Andrea; Maranghi, Francesca; Stecca, Laura

    2015-06-23

    In European Union, titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) as bulk material is a food additive (E171) and - as nanoparticle (NP) - is used as a white pigment in several products (e.g. food, cosmetics, drugs). E171 contains approximately 36% of particles less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and TiO{sub 2} NP exposure is estimated fairly below 2.5 mg/person/day. The gastrointestinal tract is a route of entry for NPs, thus representing a potential target of effects. In in vivo study, the effects of TiO{sub 2} NP in adult rat small intestine have been evaluated by oral administration of 0 (CTRL), 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day - relevant to human dietary intake. Detailed quali/quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on CTRL and treated rat samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on small intestine. An in vitro study on Caco-2 cells was also used in order to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects directly on enterocytes through the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Suspensions of TiO{sub 2} NPs for in vitro and in vivo study were characterized by EM. Histomorphometrical data showed treatment-related changes of villus height and widths in male rats. Significantly different from CTRL decreased LDH levels in the medium were detected in vitro at 24h with 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µg/cm{sup 2} levels of TiO{sub 2} NPs. SEM analysis showed no damaged areas. Overall the results showed that enterocytes may represent a target of TiO{sub 2} NP toxicity by direct exposure both in vivo and in vitro models.

  12. Effect of glycyrrhizic acid on titanium dioxide nanoparticles-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Orazizadeh, Mahmoud; Fakhredini, Fereshtesadat; Mansouri, Esrafil; Khorsandi, Layasadat

    2014-09-05

    Many recent studies demonstrate that most nanoparticles (NPs) have an adverse or toxic action on liver. The aim of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA) against hepatic injury induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles (NTiO2) in rats. Thirty-two Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups. NTiO2-intoxicated rats received 300 mg/kg of NTiO2 for 14 days by gavage method. Protection group pretreated with GA for 7 days before NTiO2 administration. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were detected as biomarkers in the blood to indicate hepatic injury. Product of lipid peroxidation (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were evaluated for oxidative stress in hepatic injury. Light microscopy for histopathological studies and TUNEL assay was also done. Administration of NTiO2 induced a significant elevation in plasma AST, ALT and ALP. In the liver, NTiO2 increased oxidative stress through the increase in lipid peroxidation and decrease in SOD and GPx enzymes. Histopathological studies showed that treatment with NTiO2 caused liver damage including centrilobular necrosis, which was accompanied by congestion and accumulation of inflammatory cells. Apoptotic index was also significantly increased in this group. Pretreatment of GA significantly decreased ALT, AST and ALP, attenuated the histopathology of hepatic injury, decreased apoptotic index, ameliorated oxidative stress in hepatic tissue, and increased the activities of SOD and GPx. These findings indicate that GA effectively protects against NTiO2-induced hepatotoxicity. GA has a potent protective effect against the NPs induced hepatotoxicity and might be clinically useful.

  13. Effects of carbon dioxide on juveniles of the freshwater mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea [Unionidae])

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Diane L.; Bartsch, Michelle; Fredricks, Kim; Bartsch, Lynn; Schleis, Sue M.; Lee, Sheldon

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has shown promise as a tool to control movements of invasive Asian carp, but its effects on native freshwater biota have not been well studied. The authors evaluated lethal and sublethal responses of juvenile fatmucket (Lampsilis siliquoidea) mussels to CO2 at levels (43–269 mg/L, mean concentration) that bracket concentrations effective for deterring carp movement. The 28-d lethal concentration to 50% of the mussels was 87.0 mg/L (95% confidence interval [CI] 78.4–95.9) and at 16-d postexposure, 76.0 mg/L (95% CI 62.9–90.3). A proportional hazards regression model predicted that juveniles could not survive CO2 concentrations >160 mg/L for more than 2 wk or >100 mg/L CO2 for more than 30 d. Mean shell growth was significantly lower for mussels that survived CO2 treatments. Growth during the postexposure period did not differ among treatments, indicating recovery of the mussels. Also, CO2 caused shell pitting and erosion. Behavioral effects of CO2 included movement of mussels to the substrate surface and narcotization at the highest concentrations. Mussels in the 110 mg/L mean CO2treatment had the most movements in the first 3 d of exposure. If CO2 is infused continuously as a fish deterrent, concentrations <76 mg/L are recommended to prevent juvenile mussel mortality and shell damage. Mussels may survive and recover from brief exposure to higher concentrations.

  14. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Penetration into the Skin and Effects on HaCaT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Crosera, Matteo; Prodi, Andrea; Mauro, Marcella; Pelin, Marco; Florio, Chiara; Bellomo, Francesca; Adami, Gianpiero; Apostoli, Pietro; De Palma, Giuseppe; Bovenzi, Massimo; Campanini, Marco; Larese Filon, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) suspensions (concentration 1.0 g/L) in synthetic sweat solution were applied on Franz cells for 24 h using intact and needle-abraded human skin. Titanium content into skin and receiving phases was determined. Cytotoxicity (MTT, AlamarBlue® and propidium iodide, PI, uptake assays) was evaluated on HaCat keratinocytes after 24 h, 48 h, and seven days of exposure. After 24 h of exposure, no titanium was detectable in receiving solutions for both intact and damaged skin. Titanium was found in the epidermal layer after 24 h of exposure (0.47 ± 0.33 μg/cm2) while in the dermal layer, the concentration was below the limit of detection. Damaged skin, in its whole, has shown a similar concentration (0.53 ± 0.26 μg/cm2). Cytotoxicity studies on HaCaT cells demonstrated that TiO2NPs induced cytotoxic effects only at very high concentrations, reducing cell viability after seven days of exposure with EC50s of 8.8 × 10−4 M (MTT assay), 3.8 × 10−5 M (AlamarBlue® assay), and 7.6 × 10−4 M (PI uptake, index of a necrotic cell death). Our study demonstrated that TiO2NPs cannot permeate intact and damaged skin and can be found only in the stratum corneum and epidermis. Moreover, the low cytotoxic effect observed on human HaCaT keratinocytes suggests that these nano-compounds have a potential toxic effect at the skin level only after long-term exposure. PMID:26262634

  15. Effects of ozone and sulfur dioxide on phyllosphere fungi from three tree species.

    PubMed

    Fenn, M E; Dunn, P H; Durall, D M

    1989-02-01

    Short-term effects of ozone (O(3)) on phyllosphere fungi were studied by examining fungal populations from leaves of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum (Lindl.) Buchholz) and California black oak (Quercus kelloggii Newb.). Chronic effects of both O(3) and sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) were studied by isolating fungi from leaves of mature Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis L.) trees. In this chronic-exposure experiment, mature orange trees were fumigated in open-top chambers at the University of California, Riverside, for 4 years with filtered air, ambient air plus filtered air (1:1), ambient air, or filtered air plus SO(2) at 9.3 parts per hundred million. Populations of Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissler and Cladosporium cladosporioides (Fres.) de Vries, two of the four most common fungi isolated from orange leaves, were significantly reduced by chronic exposure to ambient air. In the short-term experiments, seedlings of giant sequoia or California black oak were fumigated in open-top chambers in Sequoia National Park for 9 to 11 weeks with filtered air, ambient air, or ambient air plus O(3). These short-term fumigations did not significantly affect the numbers of phyllosphere fungi. Exposure of Valencia orange trees to SO(2) at 9.3 parts per hundred million for 4 years reduced the number of phyllosphere fungi isolated by 75% compared with the number from the filtered-air treatment and reduced the Simpson diversity index value from 3.3 to 2.5. A significant chamber effect was evident since leaves of giant sequoia and California black oak located outside of chambers had more phyllosphere fungi than did seedlings within chambers. Results suggest that chronic exposure to ambient ozone or SO(2) in polluted areas can affect phyllosphere fungal communities, while short-term exposures may not significantly disturb phyllosphere fungi.

  16. Effects of Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide on Phyllosphere Fungi from Three Tree Species

    PubMed Central

    Fenn, Mark E.; Dunn, Paul H.; Durall, Daniel M.

    1989-01-01

    Short-term effects of ozone (O3) on phyllosphere fungi were studied by examining fungal populations from leaves of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum (Lindl.) Buchholz) and California black oak (Quercus kelloggii Newb.). Chronic effects of both O3 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) were studied by isolating fungi from leaves of mature Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis L.) trees. In this chronic-exposure experiment, mature orange trees were fumigated in open-top chambers at the University of California, Riverside, for 4 years with filtered air, ambient air plus filtered air (1:1), ambient air, or filtered air plus SO2 at 9.3 parts per hundred million. Populations of Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissler and Cladosporium cladosporioides (Fres.) de Vries, two of the four most common fungi isolated from orange leaves, were significantly reduced by chronic exposure to ambient air. In the short-term experiments, seedlings of giant sequoia or California black oak were fumigated in open-top chambers in Sequoia National Park for 9 to 11 weeks with filtered air, ambient air, or ambient air plus O3. These short-term fumigations did not significantly affect the numbers of phyllosphere fungi. Exposure of Valencia orange trees to SO2 at 9.3 parts per hundred million for 4 years reduced the number of phyllosphere fungi isolated by 75% compared with the number from the filtered-air treatment and reduced the Simpson diversity index value from 3.3 to 2.5. A significant chamber effect was evident since leaves of giant sequoia and California black oak located outside of chambers had more phyllosphere fungi than did seedlings within chambers. Results suggest that chronic exposure to ambient ozone or SO2 in polluted areas can affect phyllosphere fungal communities, while short-term exposures may not significantly disturb phyllosphere fungi. PMID:16347849

  17. Effects of carbon dioxide on juveniles of the freshwater mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea [Unionidae]).

    PubMed

    Waller, Diane L; Bartsch, Michelle R; Fredricks, Kim T; Bartsch, Lynn A; Schleis, Susan M; Lee, Sheldon H

    2017-03-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2 ) has shown promise as a tool to control movements of invasive Asian carp, but its effects on native freshwater biota have not been well studied. The authors evaluated lethal and sublethal responses of juvenile fatmucket (Lampsilis siliquoidea) mussels to CO2 at levels (43-269 mg/L, mean concentration) that bracket concentrations effective for deterring carp movement. The 28-d lethal concentration to 50% of the mussels was 87.0 mg/L (95% confidence interval [CI] 78.4-95.9) and at 16-d postexposure, 76.0 mg/L (95% CI 62.9-90.3). A proportional hazards regression model predicted that juveniles could not survive CO2 concentrations >160 mg/L for more than 2 wk or >100 mg/L CO2 for more than 30 d. Mean shell growth was significantly lower for mussels that survived CO2 treatments. Growth during the postexposure period did not differ among treatments, indicating recovery of the mussels. Also, CO2 caused shell pitting and erosion. Behavioral effects of CO2 included movement of mussels to the substrate surface and narcotization at the highest concentrations. Mussels in the 110 mg/L mean CO2 treatment had the most movements in the first 3 d of exposure. If CO2 is infused continuously as a fish deterrent, concentrations <76 mg/L are recommended to prevent juvenile mussel mortality and shell damage. Mussels may survive and recover from brief exposure to higher concentrations. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:671-681. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  18. The Ginkgo biloba Extract Reverses the Renal Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Reynoso-Andeola, Irma Guadalupe; Jaramillo-Juárez, Fernando; Martínez-Ruvalcaba, Haydée; Posadas del Rio, Francisco A.

    2016-01-01

    The Ginkgo biloba extract (GbE) is a commercial product used as a nutraceutic herbal remedy in Europe and US. It contains 27% of the polyphenols isorhamnetin, kaempferol, and quercetin, as antioxidants. We used male adult Wistar rats (200–300 g), divided into four groups: control group (treated with 5.0 mg/kg of sodium chloride, intravenous), titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) group (5.0 mg/kg, intravenous), GbE group (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), and GbE + TiO2-NPs group (treated 24 h before with 10 mg/kg of GbE, intraperitoneal), followed, 24 h later, by 5.0 mg/kg of TiO2-NPs intravenously. The statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test for grouped data with ANOVA posttest. The GbE protected renal cells against the effects of TiO2-NPs because it reversed the increased activity of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase and the enzymatic activity of dipeptidylaminopeptidase IV at all times tested (0–5, 5–24, 24–48, and 48–72 h). Also it reversed the glucosuria, hypernatriuria, and urine osmolarity at three times tested (5–24, 24–48, and 48–72). Thus, we conclude that GbE has a beneficial activity in the cytoplasmic membranes of brush border cells on the renal tubules, against the adverse effects that can be produced by some xenobiotics in this case the TiO2-NPs, in experimental rats. PMID:27042354

  19. The vasorelaxant effect and its mechanisms of sodium bisulfite as a sulfur dioxide donor.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ziqiang; Yang, Zhenhua; Li, Junling; Zhang, Quanxi

    2012-10-01

    To study the biological role of bisulfite on vascular contractility and its underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms, to explore whether bisulfite can be used as a sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) donor in the biological experiments, the vasorelaxant effects of sodium bisulfite and sodium sulfite on isolated rat thoracic aortic rings were compared; and the signal transduction pathways and the ion channels involved in the vascular effects of bisulfite were investigated. The results show that: (1) Sodium bisulfite relaxed rat thoracic aortic rings in a concentration-dependent manner (from 100 to 4000 μM); however, sodium sulfite at 500 and 1000 μM caused vasoconstriction, and only at higher concentrations (from 2000 to 4000 μM) it caused vasorelaxation in a concentration-dependent manner. (2) The vasorelaxation caused by the bisulfite at low concentrations (≤500 μM) was endothelium-dependent, but at high concentrations (≥1000 μM) it was endothelium-independent. (3) The vasorelaxation by the bisulfite at the low concentrations was partially mediated by the cGMP pathway and the vasorelaxation was related to big-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channel, but not due to prostaglandin, protein kinase C (PKC) and cAMP pathways. (4) The vasorelaxation by the bisulfite at high concentrations was partially inhibited by tetraethylammonium (TEA) and glibenclamide, suggesting that the vasorelaxation was related to ATP-sensitive K(+) channel (K(ATP)) and L-type calcium-channel. These results led to the conclusion that bisulfite (HSO(3)(-)) might be a vasoactive factor and sodium bisulfite can be used as a SO(2) donor for the study of SO(2) biology.

  20. Effect of pressure on f-electron delocalization and oxidation in actinide dioxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, L.; Szotek, Z.; Temmerman, W. M.; Stocks, G. M.; Svane, A.

    2014-08-01

    Using first principles calculations, we have investigated f-electron delocalization and oxidation in the actinide dioxides under pressure. Whilst UO2 is found on the verge of an insulator to metal transition at the equilibrium volume, increasingly larger pressures are required to delocalize f-electrons in NpO2, PuO2, and AmO2, respectively 49, 112, and 191 GPa. Compared to this broad range of pressures, the experimentally observed structural transitions, in all four dioxides, occur between 30 and 40 GPa, which leads us to conclude that the associated volume collapse is not due to f-electron delocalization. In contrast, oxidation of the dioxides is found to be linked to the degree of f-electron localization, but it emerges that for naturally occurring pressures (<10 GPa), higher oxides only exist for UO2.

  1. Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestinal mucosa in rats.

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G E; Erokhina, M V; Abramchuk, S S; Shaitan, K V; Raspopov, R V; Smirnova, V V; Vasilevskaya, L S; Gmoshinski, I V; Kirpichnikov, M P; Tutelyan, V A

    2012-12-01

    Penetration of titanium dioxide nanoparticles into enterocytes after their administration into isolated loop of rat small intestine was shown in vivo by transmission electron microscopy. Using electron diffraction, titanium dioxide nanoparticles were identified in the apical regions of the cells under plasma membranes and in deeper parts of the cytoplasm as solitary objects or small aggregations. Water dispersions of nanoparticles (3-h exposure to high concentrations) caused no appreciable morphological changes in enterocyte ultrastructure. A 28-day subacute intragastric administration of water dispersion of nanoparticles to rats led to titanium accumulation in the liver, their level was significantly higher than in the control group, which was shown by mass spectrometry with inductive-bound plasma. These data indicated the possibility of penetration of titanium dioxide nanoparticles through the gastrointestinal barrier under near-physiological conditions.

  2. Basic Engineering Research for D and D of R Reactor Storage Pond Sludge: Electrokinetics, Carbon Dioxide Extraction, and Supercritical Water Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Matthews; David A. Bruce,; Thomas A. Davis; Mark C. Thies; John W. Weidner; Ralph E. White

    2002-04-01

    Large quantities of mixed low level waste (MLLW) that fall under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) exist and will continue to be generated during D and D operations at DOE sites across the country. The standard process for destruction of MLLW is incineration, which has an uncertain future. The extraction and destruction of PCBs from MLLW was the subject of this research Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) with carbon dioxide with 5% ethanol as cosolvent and Supercritical Waster Oxidation (SCWO) were the processes studied in depth. The solid matrix for experimental extraction studies was Toxi-dry, a commonly used absorbent made from plant material. PCB surrogates were 1.2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB) and 2-chlorobiphenyl (2CBP). Extraction pressures of 2,000 and 4,000 psi and temperatures of 40 and 80 C were studied. Higher extraction efficiencies were observed with cosolvent and at high temperature, but pressure little effect. SCWO treatment of the treatment of the PCB surrogates resulted in their destruction below detection limits.

  3. Short communication: Effects of dairy calf hutch elevation on heat reduction, carbon dioxide concentration, air circulation, and respiratory rates.

    PubMed

    Moore, D A; Duprau, J L; Wenz, J R

    2012-07-01

    Heat stress affects dairy calf welfare and can result in morbidity, mortality, and lower weight gain. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the effects of elevating the back of plastic calf hutches on measures of ventilation and heat stress. A total of 15 calves housed in individual hutches were enrolled, with each calf hutch serving as its own control. Heat, humidity, carbon dioxide, and wind speed were measured inside each hutch and the observations were compared with external measurements over two 24-h periods; 1 period without and 1 with hutch elevation. Respiratory rates were measured in the morning and afternoon as an indicator of the degree of heat stress experienced by calves with and without elevation of the hutch. When the hutch was elevated, internal hutch temperatures were cooler than external temperatures, hutch carbon dioxide levels were lower and respiratory rates were lower, particularly comparing the afternoon observation periods.

  4. A research needs assessment for the capture, utilization and disposal of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel-fired power plants. Volume 2, Topical reports: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This study, identifies and assesses system approaches in order to prioritize research needs for the capture and non-atmospheric sequestering of a significant portion of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emitted from fossil fuel-fired electric power plants (US power plants presently produce about 7% of the world`s CO{sub 2} emissions). The study considers capture technologies applicable either to existing plants or to those that optimistically might be demonstrated on a commercial scale over the next twenty years. The research needs that have high priority in establishing the technical, environmental, and economic feasibility of large-scale capture and disposal of CO{sub 2} from electric power plants are:(1) survey and assess the capacity, cost, and location of potential depleted gas and oil wells that are suitable CO{sub 2} repositories (with the cooperation of the oil and gas industry); (2) conduct research on the feasibility of ocean disposal, with objectives of determining the cost, residence time, and environmental effects for different methods of CO{sub 2} injection; (3) perform an in-depth survey of knowledge concerning the feasibility of using deep, confined aquifers for disposal and, if feasible, identify potential disposal locations (with the cooperation of the oil and gas industry); (4) evaluate, on a common basis, system and design alternatives for integration of CO{sub 2} capture systems with emerging and advanced technologies for power generation; and prepare a conceptual design, an analysis of barrier issues, and a preliminary cost estimate for pipeline networks necessary to transport a significant portion of the CO{sub 2} to potentially feasible disposal locations.

  5. Conceptualizing Effectiveness in Disability Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bruin, Catriona L.

    2017-01-01

    Policies promoting evidence-based practice in education typically endorse evaluations of the effectiveness of teaching strategies through specific experimental research designs and methods. A number of researchers have critiqued this approach to evaluation as narrow and called for greater methodological sophistication. This paper discusses the…

  6. Effects of concurrent intravenous morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride on end-tidal carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Respiratory depression, a potentially fatal side-effect of opioid-overdose, may be reversed by timely administration of an opioid antagonist, such as naloxone or naltrexone. Tampering with a formulation of morphine sulfate and sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride extended release capsules (MS-sNT) releases both the opioid morphine and the antagonist naltrexone. A study in recreational opioid-users indicated that morphine and naltrexone injected in the 25:1 ratio (duplicating the ratio of the formulation) found MS-sNT reduced morphine-induced euphoric effects vs intravenous (IV) morphine alone. In the same study, the effects of morphine + naltrexone on end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2), a measure of respiratory-depression, were evaluated and these data are reported here. Methods Single-center, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study. Non-dependent male opioid users were randomized to receive single IV doses of placebo, 30 mg morphine alone, and 30 mg morphine + 1.2 mg naltrexone. EtCO2 was measured by noninvasive capnography. Results Significant differences in EtCO2 least-squares means across all treatments for maximal effect (Emax) and area under the effect curve (AUE0-2, AUE0-8, AUE0-24) were detected (all p ≤ 0.0011). EtCO2 Emax values for morphine + naltrexone were significantly reduced vs morphine alone (42.9 mm Hg vs 47.1 mm Hg, p < 0.0001) and were not significantly different vs placebo (41.9 mm Hg). Median time to reach maximal effect (TEmax) was delayed for morphine + naltrexone vs morphine alone (5.0 h vs 1.0 h). Conclusions Results provide preliminary evidence that the naltrexone:morphine ratio within MS-sNT is sufficient to significantly reduce EtCO2 when administered intravenously to non-dependent male recreational opioid-users. Further studies with multiple measures of respiratory-function are warranted to determine if risk of respiratory depression is also reduced by naltrexone in the tampered formulation. PMID:22420453

  7. Bleaching effect of a 405-nm diode laser irradiation used with titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, K.; Kato, J.; Nakazawa, T.; Hirai, Y.

    2007-09-01

    A 405-nm diode laser has recently been developed for soft tissue problems in dentistry. A new in-office bleaching agent consisting of a titanium dioxide photocatalyst and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide has proven to react well with light irradiated at a wavelength of around 400 nm. In this study, we evaluated the bleaching efficacy of a newly developed 405-nm diode laser on bovine teeth treated with a bleaching agent composed of titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide. Sixteen bovine incisors were randomly divided into two groups: Group A, irradiated by the 405-nm diode laser at 200 mW; Group B, irradiated by the 405-nm diode laser at 400 mW. The bleaching agent with titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide was applied to bovine enamel and irradiated for 1 min. The specimens were then washed and dried, and the same procedure was repeated nine more times. After irradiation, we assessed the effects of bleaching on the enamel by measuring the color of the specimens with a spectrophotometer and examining the enamel surfaces with a scanning electron microscope. L* rose to a high score, reaching a significantly higher post-treatment level in comparison to pretreatment. In a comparison of the color difference (Δ E) between Group A and Group B, the specimens in Group B showed significantly higher values after 10 min of irradiation for the post-treatment. No remarkable differences in the enamel surface morphology were found between the unbleached and bleached enamel. The use of a 405-nm diode laser in combination with a bleaching agent of titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide may be an effective method for bleaching teeth without the risk of tooth damage.

  8. Effects of carbon dioxide sequestration on California margin deep-sea foraminiferal assemblages

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, Erin R.; Kennett, James P.; Hill, Tessa M.; Barry, James P.

    2009-09-01

    Abstract Deep-sea sequestration of CO2 is being considered as a possible mitigation tool to decrease atmospheric CO2 concentrations and its associated negative effects. This study investigated potential effects of liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) injection on deep-sea foraminiferal assemblages. Foraminifera are ideal for this ecological impact investigation because of differing test composition (calcareous and non-calcareous) and thickness, and diverse epifaunal and infaunal depth preferences. The experiment was conducted on August-September 2003, at 3600 m off the coast of Monterey Bay, California, aboard the R/V Western Flyer using the ROV Tiburon. The pH of the site was monitored throughout the experiment. Sediment push-cores were collected (both from the experimental and control sites) and stained to distinguish live (stained) from dead (unstained) individuals. Effects of CO2 injection on assemblages have been tracked both vertically (to 10 cm depth below sea floor) and horizontally (up to 10 m from CO2 injection sites), as well as between live and dead individuals. Within corrals (containing the injected CO2) and their underlying sediments, severe pH changes (near 4.0 units) were recorded. This compares with a record of small average reductions in ocean pH (-0.05 units) combined with large episodic excursions (-1.7 units) over the experimental area due to the injection of CO2. Exposure to this gradient of low pH caused increased mortality and dissolution of calcareous forms within corrals, as far as 5 m from the injection site, and to at least 10 cm depth in the sediments. This experiment revealed several major effects of CO2 injection on foraminiferal assemblages in surficial sediments: 1) total number of foraminifera in a sample decreases; 2) foraminiferal species richness decreases in both stained and unstained specimens; and 3) relative percentage of stained (live) forms in the remaining tests increases. Down-core trends (to 10 cm below sea floor) have revealed

  9. Effects of food composition on the inactivation of foodborne microorganisms by chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Vandekinderen, I; Devlieghere, F; Van Camp, J; Kerkaert, B; Cucu, T; Ragaert, P; De Bruyne, J; De Meulenaer, B

    2009-05-31

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a strong oxidizing agent that can be applied in solution as well as in the gaseous state. It has bactericidal, fungicidal and viricidal properties. Several food-related microorganisms, including Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, yeasts, mould spores and Bacillus cereus spores were tested for their susceptibility to 0.08 mg/L gaseous ClO2 during 1 min at a relative humidity of 90%. In this screening, the resistance of the different groups of microorganisms towards gaseous ClO2 generally increased in the order Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, yeasts and mould spores and Bacillus cereus spores. With this treatment, reductions of microbial numbers between 0.1 and 3.5 log cfu/cm2 could be achieved. The effects of the food components starch, fat, protein and NaCl on the antimicrobial activity of gaseous ClO2 were also evaluated. Soluble starch, corn oil, butter, whey protein isolate and NaCl were added in incremental concentrations to portions of an agar medium. Then, plates of the supplemented agars were inoculated with Leuconostoc mesenteroïdes at numbers of 4 log cfu/cm2 and subsequently treated with ClO2. Both soluble starch and NaCl did not have an effect on the antimicrobial efficiency of ClO2. However, butter, corn oil or whey protein in the agar almost eliminated the antimicrobial effect of ClO2. In corn oil-water emulsions treated with gaseous ClO2 the peroxide value increased significantly, indicating the formation of primary oxidation products. Similarly, a treatment with ClO2 increased the protein carbonyl content and induced the transformation of SH-groups to -S-S-groups in whey protein. The findings suggest that gaseous ClO2 will be a highly effective decontaminating agent for carbohydrate-rich foods, but that it would be less effective for the decontamination of high-protein and fatty foods.

  10. Silver-titanium dioxide nanocomposites as effective antimicrobial and antibiofilm agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lungu, Magdalena; Gavriliu, Ştefania; Enescu, Elena; Ion, Ioana; Brătulescu, Alexandra; Mihăescu, Grigore; Măruţescu, Luminiţa; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Ag-TiO2 nanocomposites were successfully developed from colloidal suspensions containing 750 or 1,500 ppm silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) deposited on 5 % (w/v) titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) by a chemical reduction approach. The nanocomposites were characterized by diffuse reflectance UV-Vis spectroscopy (DRS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). DRS spectra showed an absorption band in visible region with maximum absorbance peaks at 452 and 444 nm attributed to AgNPs plasmon peaks, indicating the formation of small spherical or quasi-spherical Ag nanocrystals in nanocomposites. TEM and SEM analysis proved a nearly spherical morphology of particles (15-30 ± 5 nm average size in diameter). EDX analysis revealed the presence of Ti, O, and Ag in both nanocomposite powders having 1.37 or 2.34 wt% Ag content. DLS analysis yielded a bimodal particle size distribution in a narrow range (31.3 ± 0.5 or 23.4 ± 0.4 nm average particle diameter) and a good polydispersity (0.247 or 0.293 polydispersity index). The nanocomposites were screened for their in vitro antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive ( Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative ( Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacterial and fungal ( Candida albicans) reference and clinical strains, in planktonic and adherent state, by qualitative and quantitative assays. The antibacterial activity increased with the increasing AgNPs content, being more intensive for Gram-positive bacteria. Both Ag-TiO2 nanocomposites exhibited a high antibiofilm activity. The obtained results recommend the use of the developed nanocomposites as antimicrobial and antibiofilm agents in practical applications without UV irradiation. The most effective agent proved to be the one with 2.34 wt% AgNPs content.

  11. Glucosinolate breakdown products as insect fumigants and their effect on carbon dioxide emission of insects

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Rong; Peterson, Chris J; Coats, Joel R

    2002-01-01

    Background Glucosinolate breakdown products are volatile, therefore good candidates for insect fumigants. However, although they are insecticidal, the mode of action of such natural products is not clear. We studied the insecticidal effect of these compounds as fumigants, and monitored the production of carbon dioxide by the insects as a probe to the understanding of their mode of action. Results The fumigation 24-h LC50 against the house fly (Musca domestica L.) of allyl thiocyanate, allyl isothiocyanate, allyl cyanide, and l-cyano-2-hydroxy-3-butene was 0.1, 0.13, 3.66, and 6.2 μg cm-3, respectively; they were 0.55, 1.57, 2.8, and > 19.60 μg cm-3, respectively, against the lesser grain borer (Rhyzopertha dominica Fabricius). The fumigation toxicity of some of the glucosinolate products was very close to or better than that of the commercial insect fumigants such as chloropicrin (LC50: 0.08 and 1.3 μg cm-3 against M. domestica and R. dominica, respectively) and dichlorovos (LC50: < 0.02 and 0.29 μg cm-3 against M. domestica and R. dominica, respectively) in our laboratory tests. Significantly increased CO2 expiration was found in insects exposed to the vapor of allyl isothiocyanate, allyl thiocyanate and allyl isocyanate. Allyl isothiocyanate was also found to increase the CO2 expiration of the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana L.). Conclusions Glucosinolate breakdown products have potential as biodegradable and safe insect fumigants. They may act on the insect respiratory system in their mode of action. PMID:11914158

  12. Effect of sucralfate on total carbon dioxide concentration in horses subjected to a simulated race test.

    PubMed

    Caltabilota, T J; Milizio, J G; Malone, S; Kenney, J D; McKeever, K H

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that sucralfate, a gastric ulcer medication, would alter plasma concentrations of total carbon dioxide (tCO2), lactate (LA), sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), chloride (Cl-) and total protein (TP), as well as calculated plasma strong ion difference (SID) and packed cell volume (PCV) in horses subjected to a simulated race test (SRT). Six unfit Standardbred mares (approximately 520 kg, 9-18 years) were used in a randomized crossover design with the investigators blinded to the treatment given. The horses were assigned to either a control (40-50 mL apple sauce administered orally (PO)) or a sucralfate (20 mg/kg bodyweight dissolved in 40-50 mL apple sauce administered PO) group. Each horse completed a series of SRTs during which blood samples were taken via jugular venipuncture at five sampling intervals (prior to receiving treatment, prior to SRT, immediately following exercise, and at 60 and 90 min post-SRT). During the SRTs, each horse ran on a treadmill fixed on a 6% grade for 2 min at a warm-up speed (4 m/s) and then for 2 min at a velocity predetermined to produce VO2max. Each horse then walked at 4 m/s for 2 min to complete the SRT. Plasma tCO2, electrolytes, LA, and blood PCV and TP were analysed at all intervals. No differences (P>0.05) were detected between control and sucralfate for any of the measured variables. There were differences (P<0.05) in tCO2, SID, PCV, TP, LA and electrolyte concentrations relative to sampling time. However, these differences were attributable to the physiological pressures associated with acute exercise and were not an effect of the medication. It was concluded that sucralfate did not alter plasma tCO2 concentration in this study.

  13. Trends and effectiveness of emission control of sulfur dioxide in China: a satellite perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Wang, S.; Martin, R. V.; He, K.; Richter, A.; Krotkov, N. A.; Philip, S.; Wang, T.

    2011-12-01

    The combination of two satellite instruments (OMI and SCIAMACHY) provides high quality space-borne measurements for the trend analysis of sulfur dioxide (SO2) column density. An improved product of SO2 retrievals from these two satellites was derived with the consistent local air mass factor (AMF) algorithm which converts the line-of-sight 'slant' columns to vertical columns for the period of 2003-2010. The local AMF was calculated using altitude-dependent scattering weights computed from a radiative transfer model (LIDORT) with state-of-art a priori parameters, weighted by relative vertical SO2 profiles (shape factor) determined locally with a global atmospheric chemical model (GEOS-Chem). The derived vertical columns and modeled vertical SO2 profiles were compared to measurements from aircraft campaigns in China. Trends of the long-term SO2 columns showed discrepancies between different regions in China: SO2 columns increased fast during 2003-2007 and then decreased by ~30% in 2010 in North China Plain; continuous increase of SO2 columns were found in Southwest of China with only a slight decrease in 2008 due to the global economic recession. The trends of SO2 columns were further compared to a unit-based power plant emission inventory to evaluate the effectiveness of power plant SO2 emission reductions related to the wide-spread installations of flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) devices since 2005 in China. The combinations of NO2 and SO2 measurements were used to examine the operation and efficiency of the FGD devices in power plants.

  14. Biological effect of food additive titanium dioxide nanoparticles on intestine: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Song, Zheng-Mei; Chen, Ni; Liu, Jia-Hui; Tang, Huan; Deng, Xiaoyong; Xi, Wen-Song; Han, Kai; Cao, Aoneng; Liu, Yuanfang; Wang, Haifang

    2015-10-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely found in food-related consumer products. Understanding the effect of TiO2 NPs on the intestinal barrier and absorption is essential and vital for the safety assessment of orally administrated TiO2 NPs. In this study, the cytotoxicity and translocation of two native TiO2 NPs, and these two TiO2 NPs pretreated with the digestion simulation fluid or bovine serum albumin were investigated in undifferentiated Caco-2 cells, differentiated Caco-2 cells and Caco-2 monolayer. TiO2 NPs with a concentration less than 200 µg ml(-1) did not induce any toxicity in differentiated cells and Caco-2 monolayer after 24 h exposure. However, TiO2 NPs pretreated with digestion simulation fluids at 200 µg ml(-1) inhibited the growth of undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Undifferentiated Caco-2 cells swallowed native TiO2 NPs easily, but not pretreated NPs, implying the protein coating on NPs impeded the cellular uptake. Compared with undifferentiated cells, differentiated ones possessed much lower uptake ability of these TiO2 NPs. Similarly, the traverse of TiO2 NPs through the Caco-2 monolayer was also negligible. Therefore, we infer the possibility of TiO2 NPs traversing through the intestine of animal or human after oral intake is quite low. This study provides valuable information for the risk assessment of TiO2 NPs in food.

  15. Failure of ozone and nitrogen dioxide to enhance lung tumor development in hamsters. Research report, January 1989-March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.; Breider, M.A.; Schuller, H.M.

    1993-09-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that ozone and nitrogen dioxide modulate the development of respiratory tract tumors, in particular neuroendocrine cell tumors, in Syrian golden hamsters. The animals received subcutaneous injections of the carcinogen N-diethylnitrosamine (20 mg/kg) twice a week while being exposed continuously to an atmosphere of 0.8 parts per million (ppm) of ozone or 15 ppm nitrogen dioxide. Animals were killed 16 weeks or 24 to 32 weeks after the beginning of the treatment. For positive controls, animals were treated with N-diethylnitrosamine and exposed to 65% oxygen. Ozone delayed the incidence of tumors in the lung periphery. Ozone also seemed to mitigate development of hepatoxic lesions mediated by N-diethylnitrosamine. The role of ozone and nitrogen dioxide as possible additional risks in the pathogenesis of lung cancer in animals continues to remain uncertain.

  16. Interactive effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide and ultraviolet-B radiation on cotton growth and physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, K. Raja; Koti, S.; Zhao, Duli; Kakani, Vijaya Gopal; Gao, Wei

    2003-11-01

    Increasing surface UV-B radiation (UV-B) and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration [(CO2)] are two major issues of climate change and agriculture. Although numerous studies have evaluated elevated UV-B or (CO2) effects on crop growth, development and yield, little is known about the interactive effects of these two factors on cotton. The objective of this study was to determine the combined effects of elevated (CO2) and UV-B radiation on cotton growth and physiology under controlled environmental conditions. The four treatments imposed were control [360 μmol (CO2) mol-1 and 8 kJ m-2 d-1 UV-B], +CO2 [720 μmol (CO2) mol-1 and 8 kJ m-2 d-1 UV-B], +UV-B [360 μmol (CO2) mol-1 and 16 kJ m-2 d-1 UV-B] and +CO2+UV-B [720 μmol (CO2) mol-1 and 16 kJ m-2 d-1 UV-B]. Treatments were imposed from emergence through three weeks after the first flower stage. Plants grown in +CO2 showed greater plant height, leaf thickness, leaf area, leaf and canopy photosynthesis (PN) and total biomass compared to the control, and fruit biomass was not affected by +CO2 conditions. On the other hand, plants grown in +UV-B treatment exhibited slower growth as reflected by reduced plant height, shorter internodes and branch lengths, and total biomass due to smaller leaf areas and less lower leaf PN. The +UV-B treatment also altered the leaf morphology and significantly reduced flower and petal lengths and petal area. Reduction in fruit production under both +UV-B and +CO2+UV-B treatments was due to reduced photosynthesis and alterations in reproductive development. The results also showed interactive effects of UV-B on cotton leaf PN, phenolics, wax content and some physiological parameters measured. Thus, a failure to increase cotton fruit production with +CO2 and +CO2+UV-B suggests that breeding UV-B radiation-tolerant cultivars is important in both the present and future solar UV-B radiation environments.

  17. The Effects of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration on Deep-sea Foraminifera in two California Margin Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, Erin R

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT Deep-sea sequestration of CO2 is being considered as a possible mitigation tool to decrease atmospheric CO2 concentrations and its associated negative effects. This study is the first to investigate potential effects of liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) injection on deep-sea foraminiferal assemblages. Foraminifera are ideal for this ecological impact investigation because of differing test composition (calcareous and non-calcareous) and thickness, and diverse epifaunal and infaunal depth preferences. The experiment was conducted August-September 2003, at 3600m off the coast of Monterey Bay, California, aboard the R/V Western Flyer using the ROV Tiburon. The pH of the site was monitored throughout the experiment by Seabird CTDs. Sediment push-cores were collected (both from the experimental and control sites) and stained to distinguish live (stained) from dead (unstained) individuals. Effects of CO2 injection on assemblages have been tracked both vertically (to 10cm depth below sea floor) and horizontally (up to 10m from CO2 injection sites), as well as between live and dead individuals. Within the corrals and underlying sediments severe pH changes (to near 4.0) were seen while over the experimental area small average reductions in ocean pH (-0.05 units) and large episodic excursions (-1.7 units) were measured resulting from CO2 injection. Exposure to this gradient of low pH caused increased mortality and dissolution of calcareous forms within corrals, as far as 5m from the injection site, and to at least 10cm depth in the sediments. This experiment revealed several major effects of CO2 injection on foraminiferal assemblages in surficial sediments: 1) total number of foraminifera in a sample decreases; 2) foraminiferal species richness decreases in both stained and unstained specimens; and 3) percentage of stained (live) forms increases. Down-core trends (to 10cm below sea floor) have revealed: 1) percent agglutinated forms decline and calcareous forms increase

  18. Direct reduction of carbon dioxide to formate in high-gas-capacity ionic liquids at post-transition-metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Watkins, John D; Bocarsly, Andrew B

    2014-01-01

    As an approach to combat the increasing emissions of carbon dioxide in the last 50 years, the sequestration of carbon dioxide gas in ionic liquids has become an attractive research area. Ionic liquids can be made that possess incredibly high molar absorption and specificity characteristics for carbon dioxide. Their high carbon dioxide solubility and specificity combined with their high inherent electrical conductivity also creates an ideal medium for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide. Herein, a lesser studied ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoroacetate, was used as both an effective carbon dioxide capture material and subsequently as an electrochemical matrix with water for the direct reduction of carbon dioxide into formate at indium, tin, and lead electrodes in good yield (ca. 3 mg h(-1) cm(-2)).

  19. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Carbon Dioxide Flooding by Managing Asphaltene Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, Milind D.

    2002-02-21

    This project was undertaken to understand fundamental aspects of carbon dioxide (CO2) induced asphaltene precipitation. Oil and asphaltene samples from the Rangely field in Colorado were used for most of the project. The project consisted of pure component and high-pressure, thermodynamic experiments, thermodynamic modeling, kinetic experiments and modeling, targeted corefloods and compositional modeling.

  20. Carbonate effects on hexavalent uranium removal from water by nanocrystalline titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Wazne, Mahmoud; Meng, Xiaoguang; Korfiatis, George P; Christodoulatos, Christos

    2006-08-10

    A novel nanocrystalline titanium dioxide was used to treat depleted uranium (DU)-contaminated water under neutral and alkaline conditions. The novel material had a total surface area of 329 m(2)/g, total surface site density of 11.0 sites/nm(2), total pore volume of 0.415 cm(3)/g and crystallite size of 6.0 nm. It was used in batch tests to remove U(VI) from synthetic solutions and contaminated water. However, the capacity of the nanocrystalline titanium dioxide to remove U(VI) from water decreased in the presence of inorganic carbonate at pH > 6.0. Adsorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and surface charge measurements were used to investigate the causes of the reduced capacity. The surface charge and the FTIR measurements suggested that the adsorbed U(VI) species was not complexed with carbonate at neutral pH values. The decreased capacity of titanium dioxide to remove U(VI) from water in the presence of carbonate at neutral to alkaline pH values was attributed to the aqueous complexation of U(VI) by inorganic carbonate. The nanocrystalline titanium dioxide had four times the capacity of commercially available titanium dixoide (Degussa P-25) to adsorb U(VI) from water at pH 6 and total inorganic carbonate concentration of 0.01 M. Consequently, the novel material was used to treat DU-contaminated water at a Department of Defense (DOD) site.

  1. Effect of Coating and Packaging Materials on Photocatalytic and Antimicrobial Activities of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food safety or foodborne pathogen contamination is a major concern in food industry. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a photocatalyst and can inactivate a wide spectrum of microorganisms under UV illumination. There is significant interest in the development of TiO2-coated or –incorporated food packaging ...

  2. New packaging design for fresh produce with effective distribution of antimicrobial gaseous chlorine dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the last decade, the potential use of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as an antimicrobial agent for vapor-phase decontamination to extend the shelf-life of fresh produce has been widely studied. Most of the works focused on the dose of gaseous ClO2 for particular food product and/or specific microorganis...

  3. A comparison of the bleaching effectiveness of chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide on dental composite.

    PubMed

    Agnihotry, Anirudha; Gill, Karanjot S; Singhal, Deepak; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Dash, Sambit; Pedrazzi, Vinicius

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to verify if composites could be bleached using chlorine dioxide as compared with hydrogen peroxide. 3M ESPE Filtek Z350 Universal Restorative discs were prepared (n=40), with dimensions 5 mm diameter x 2 mm thickness. The discs were divided into 4 groups of 10 discs each. Color assessment was performed by CIEDE2000. The discs were stained with coffee, tea, wine and distilled water (control) solutions for 14 days, 5 hours daily. Color assessment was repeated on stained discs and followed by bleaching of 5 discs from each group using chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide in-office systems. Finally, a last color assessment was performed and compared statistically. DE2000 after bleaching was very close to baseline for both the bleaching agents, although chlorine dioxide showed better results than hydrogen peroxide. After staining, there was a clinically significant discoloration (∆E2000≥3.43) for the tea, coffee and wine groups, and discoloration (∆E2000) was seen more in the wine group as compared to tea and coffee. Overall, the control group (distilled water) had the least color change in the three intervals. After bleaching, the color in all specimens returned close to the baseline. The color differences between bleaching and baseline were less than 3.43 for all groups. The obtained results show that chlorine dioxide is slightly superior to hydrogen peroxide in the bleaching of composites, while maintaining the shade of the composite close to the baseline.

  4. Effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide on insect herbivores and their host plants. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    The goal was to examine and confirm the observation that leaf eting insects feed at higher rates on plants grown under elevated carbon dioxide regimes. Results confirm and refine the preliminary observation. Subsequent experiments are designd to examine the basis for the increased feeding and examine the generality by testing another plant/herbivore system. (ACR)

  5. Studies on air pollution: Effects of nitrogen dioxide on airway caliber and reactivity in asthmatic subjects; effects of nitrogen dioxide on lung lymphocytes and macrophage products in healthy subjects; nasal and bronchial effects of sulfur dioxide in asthmatic subjects. Final report, 26 June 1987-26 November 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Boushey, H.A.; Rubinstein, I.; Bigby, B.G.

    1988-12-13

    The investigators performed three studies of the effects of NO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 2/ on airway function in human subjects. In 9 exercising asthmatic subjects, a 30-min exposure to 0.3 ppm nitrogen dioxide did not alter specific airway resistance, maximal expiratory flow, or the slope of phase III on the single breath test of nitrogen distribution and had no effect on airway hyperresponsiveness to sulfur dioxide. In the second study, repeated exposure of 5 healthy subjects to nitrogen dioxide was associated neither with any significant change in pulmonary function nor in the levels of secretory product of lung macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Analysis of the numbers and types of lymphocytes in venous blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed no change apart from a small, possibly artifactual increase in natural killer cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after NO/sub 2/ exposure. The third study examined whether brief exposures to moderately high concentrations of SO/sub 2/ caused acute increases in nasal symptoms and nasal resistance in 8 subjects with a history of both asthma and allergic rhinitis and with demonstrable bronchial hyperreactivity to SO/sub 2/.

  6. Importance of network density of nanotube: Effect on nitrogen dioxide gas sensing by solid state resistive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Prabhash; Grachyova, D. V.; Moskalenko, A. S.; Shcherbak, M. A.; Pavelyev, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    Dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is an established fact, however, its effect on toxic gas sensing for the development of solid state resistive sensor was not well reported. In this report, the dispersion quality of SWCNTs has been investigated and improved, and this well-dispersed SWCNTs network was used for sensor fabrication to monitor nitrogen dioxide gas. Ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopic studies shows the strength of SWNTs dispersion and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging provides the morphological properties of the sensor device. In this gas sensor device, two sets of resistive type sensors were fabricated that consisting of a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) using dielectrophoresis technique with different SWCNTs network density. With low-density SWCNTs networks, this fabricated sensor exhibits a high response for nitrogen dioxide sensing. The sensing of nitrogen dioxide is mainly due to charge transfer from absorbed molecules to sidewalls of nanotube and tube-tube screening acting a major role for the transport properties of charge carriers.

  7. Effect of fire on soil-atmosphere exchange of methane and carbon dioxide in Canadian boreal forest sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Roger A.; Zepp, Richard G.; Tarr, Matthew A.; Miller, William L.; Stocks, Brian J.

    1997-12-01

    During the spring and summer of 1994 we monitored soil-atmosphere exchanges of methane and carbon dioxide at upland sites in the Canadian boreal forest near the northern study area (NSA) of the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS). The effects of fire on methane and carbon dioxide exchange in black spruce stands developed on clay soils were evaluated by measuring fluxes with dark chambers in unburned stands and stands burned in 1994, 1992, and 1987. Similar measurements were made in jack pine stands developed on sandy soils, one unburned and the other burned in 1989. All of the sites were net sinks of atmospheric methane with median fluxes ranging from -0.3 to -1.4 mg CH4-C m-2 d-1. Median fluxes of carbon dioxide from the forest floor to the atmosphere ranged between 1 and 2 g C m-2 d-1. Both ecosystem characteristics (e.g., soil and vegetation type) and burning history (time since burn and fire intensity) appear to have some effect on atmospheric methane consumption and carbon dioxide emission by these forest soils. In general, the jack pine sites were stronger methane sinks and had lower carbon dioxide emissions than the black spruce sites. After a few years of recovery, the burned sites tended to be slightly stronger methane sinks than unburned controls. Our results suggest that soil CO2 effluxes from upland black spruce stands may not be immediately impacted by fire, possibly maintained at preburn levels by microbial decomposition of labile compounds released as a result of the fire. By 2 years postfire there appears to be a significant reduction in soil CO2 flux, due to the loss of tree root and moss respiration and possibly to the depletion of fire-related labile compounds. The observed recovery of soil respiration rates to preburn levels by 7 years postburn is probably due to the respiration of regrowing vegetation and the combined effects of elevated soil temperatures (about 4° to 5°C warmer than unburned sites) and improved litter quality on soil

  8. Effects of carbon dioxide hydration kinetics and evaporative convection on pH profile development during interfacial mass transfer of ammonia and carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Sommer, Sven G.; Petersen, Valdemar; Markfoged, Rikke

    2016-09-01

    Interfacial mass transfer of NH_3 and CO_2 are important in processes as diverse as NH_3 emission from animal manure and gas scrubbing for removal of carbon dioxide. Predicting transfer rates is complicated by bidirectional interactions between solution pH and emission rates, which may be affected by physical, chemical, and biological processes. We studied the effects of CO_2 hydration kinetics and evaporative convection on the development of pH profiles in solutions undergoing simultaneous emission of NH_3 and CO_2 . Profiles of pH were measured at a 0.1 mm resolution over 15 h, and interpreted using a reaction-transport model. Under high humidity, surface pH increased quickly (>0.2 units in 8 min) and an increase gradually extended to deeper depths. An increase in CO_2 hydration and carbonic acid dehydration rates by addition of carbonic anhydrase increased the elevation of surface pH and the depth to which an increase extended, due to an increase in CO_2 emission. Results show that unless carbonic anhydrase is present, the equilibrium approach typically used for modeling interfacial transport of CO_2 and NH_3 will be inaccurate. Evaporation and resulting convection greatly increased mass transfer rates below an apparent surface film about 1 mm thick. Emission or absorption of CO_2 can produce steep gradients in pH over small distances (<0.5 to >20 mm) in systems with and without convective mixing, and the resulting surface pH, in turn, strongly affects NH_3 transfer. Both convection and the rate of hydration/dehydration reactions are likely to affect pH profile development and rates of NH_3 and CO_2 transfer in many systems. Accurately predicting mass transfer rates for these systems will require an understanding of these processes in the systems.

  9. Sub-lethal effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the physiology and reproduction of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ramsden, C S; Henry, T B; Handy, R D

    2013-01-15

    There are limited data on the sub-lethal physiological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO(2) NPs) in adult fishes, and the consequences of TiO(2) NP exposure on reproductive success are also unclear. This study aimed to examine the sub-lethal effects of a 14-d aqueous TiO(2) (TiO(2) NP, 0.1 or 1.0 mg l(-1); TiO(2) bulk, 1.0 mg l(-1)) exposure on the physiology and reproductive health of zebrafish. After the 14-d exposure, fish were examined for haematology, whole body electrolyte and trace metal profiles, biochemistry, and histopathology. Then, during a 21-d post exposure recovery period, effects of the TiO(2) exposure on reproductive success were evaluated. Whole body Ti concentrations increased significantly in fish exposed to both the 1.0 mg l(-1) TiO(2) NP and bulk TiO(2) compared to controls, but concentrations returned to control levels by the end of the recovery period. No change in erythrocyte counts were observed, but there was a two-fold decline in leukocyte counts in all TiO(2) treatment groups relative to time-matched controls. Whole body electrolyte and trace metal profiles were not affected by exposure to TiO(2), and there were no changes in Na(+)K(+)-ATPase activity in brain, gill or liver tissues. Total glutathione (GSH) levels in brain, gill and liver tissues were higher in fish exposed to TiO(2) NP (both 0.1 and 1.0 mg l(-1)) compared to bulk TiO(2) and control fish. Histological examination of gill, liver, brain and gonad tissues showed little evidence of treatment-related morphological change. At the end of the 14-d exposure adult zebrafish were able to reproduce; however, the cumulative number of viable embryos produced was lower in fish exposed to 1.0 mg l(-1) TiO(2) (both NP and bulk) by the end of the 21-d recovery period. Overall, this study showed limited toxicity of bulk or nano scale TiO(2) during the exposure; however reproduction was affected in both bulk and NP 1.0 mg l(-1) groups.

  10. Photosensitization and the photocurrent switching effect in nanocrystalline titanium dioxide functionalized with iron(II) complexes: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Macyk, Wojciech; Stochel, Grazyna; Szaciłowski, Konrad

    2007-01-01

    Selected iron(II) complexes (ferrocene, ferrocenylboronic acid, hexacyanoferrate(II)) have been used as photosensitizers of titanium dioxide. Various types of electronic interactions between the surface complex and the semiconducting support are reflected in different yields of photocurrent generated upon visible-light irradiation and different efficiencies of the photosensitization effect. The studied systems, showing the photocurrent switching upon changes of electrode potential and energy of photons (the PEPS effect), are good models of simple photoelectrochemical logic devices. The mechanism of photosensitization and photocurrent switching is discussed with respect to the type of surface-complex-support interaction. Quantum-mechanical calculations support the proposed mechanisms.

  11. Carbon dioxide analysers: accuracy, alarm limits and effects of interfering gases.

    PubMed

    Lauber, R; Seeberger, B; Zbinden, A M

    1995-07-01

    Six mainstream and twelve sidestream infrared carbon dioxide (CO2) analysers were tested for accuracy of the CO2 display value, alarm activation and the effects of nitrous oxide (N2O), oxygen (O2) and water vapour according to the ISO Draft International Standard (DIS)#9918. Mainstream analysers (M-type): Novametrix Capnogard 1265; Hewlett Packard HP M1166A (CO2-module HP M1016A); Datascope Passport; Marquette Tramscope 12; Nellcor Ultra Cap N-6000; Hellige Vicom-sm SMU 611/612 ETC. Sidestream analysers: Brüel & Kjaer Type 1304; Datex Capnomac II; Marquette MGA-AS; Datascope Multinex; Ohmeda 4700 OxiCap (all type S1: respiratory cycles not demanded); Biochem BCI 9000; Bruker BCI 9100; Dräger Capnodig and PM 8020; Criticare Poet II; Hellige Vicom-sm SMU 611/612 A-GAS (all type S2: respiratory cycles demanded). The investigations were performed with premixed test gases (2.5, 5, 10 vol%, error < or = 1% rel.). Humidification (37 degrees C) of gases were generated by a Dräger Aquapor. Respiratory cycles were simulated by manually activated valves. All monitors complied with the tolerated accuracy bias in CO2 reading (< or = 12% or 4 mmHg of actual test gas value) for wet and dry test gases at all concentrations, except that the Marquette MGA-AS exceeded this accuracy limit with wet gases at 5 and 10 vol% CO2. Water condensed in the metal airway adapter of the HP M1166A at 37 degrees C gas temperature but not at 30 degrees C. The Servomex 2500 (nonclinical reference monitor), Passport (M-type), Multinex (S1-type) and Poet II (S2-type) showed the least bias for dry and wet gases. Nitrous oxide and O2 had practically no effect on the Capnodig and the errors in the others were max. 3.4 mmHg, still within the tolerated bias in the DIS (same as above). The difference between the display reading at alarm activation and the set point was in all monitors (except in the Capnodig: bias 1.75 mmHg at 5 vol% CO2) below the tolerated limit of the DIS (difference < or = 0.2 vol

  12. Effects of carbon dioxide variations in the unsaturated zone on water chemistry in a glacial-outwash aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    The research site at Otis Air Base, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, has been developed for hydrogeological and geochemical studies of sewage-effluent contaminated groundwater since 1982. Research of hydrologic properties, transport, and chemical and biological processes is ongoing, but the origin of background water chemistry has not been determined. The principal geochemical process giving rise to the observed background water chemistry is CO2-controlled hydrolysis of Na feldspar. Geochemical modeling demonstrated that CO2 sources could vary over the project area. Analyses of unsaturated zone gases showed variations in CO2 which were dependent on land use and vegetative cover in the area of groundwater recharge. Measurements of CO2 in unsaturated-zone gases showed that concentrations of total inorganic C in recharge water should range from about 0.035 to 1.0 mmoles/L in the vicinity of Otis Air Base. Flux of CO2 from the unsaturated zone varied for a principal land uses, ranging from 86 gC/m2/yr for low vegetated areas to 1630 gC/m2/yr for a golf course. Carbon dioxide flux from woodlands was 220 gC/m2/yr, lower than reported fluxes of 500 to 600 gC/m2/yr for woodlands in a similar climate. Carbon dioxide flux from grassy areas was 540 gC/m2/yr, higher than reported fluxes of 230 to 490 gC/m2/yr for grasslands in a similar climate.

  13. Effects of carbon dioxide on peak mode isotachophoresis: simultaneous preconcentration and separation.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Tarun K; Santiago, Juan G

    2009-05-21

    We present a method that achieves simultaneous preconcentration and separation of analytes using peak-mode isotachophoresis with a single step injection in simple, off-the-shelf microchannels or capillaries. We leverage ions resulting from dissolved atmospheric carbon dioxide to weakly disrupt isotachophoretic preconcentration and induce separation of analyte species. We experimentally study the region between the leading and trailing electrolytes, and individually identify the carbonate and carbamate zones that result from the hydration and carbamation reaction of dissolved atmospheric carbon dioxide, respectively. The width of these zones and the gradient regions between them grow with time and create an electric field gradient that causes analytes to separate. Using this assay, we achieve focusing and separation of a 25 bp DNA ladder in a straight, 34 microm wide microchannel in a single loading step. As a demonstration of the fractionation capabilities of the assay, we show simultaneous preconcentration and separation of a DNA ladder from two proteins, GFP and allophycocyanin.

  14. Effect of hydroxytyrosol on quality of sulfur dioxide-free red wine.

    PubMed

    Raposo, R; Ruiz-Moreno, M J; Garde-Cerdán, T; Puertas, B; Moreno-Rojas, J M; Gonzalo-Diago, A; Guerrero, R F; Ortiz, V; Cantos-Villar, E

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the feasibility of two commercial products enriched in hydroxytyrosol (HT) as alternative to sulfur dioxide in Syrah red wines was evaluated. The HT enriched products came from synthesis and from olive waste. Wines treated with HT were compared with wines treated with sulfur dioxide at two winemaking stages: bottling and after 6 months of storage in bottle. Minor differences were found in enological parameters and volatile composition (esters, alcohols and acids). Significant differences were observed in color related parameters and sensory analysis. HT wines improved color parameters as well as scents and tasting at bottling. However, after 6 months of storage in bottle HT wines were more oxidized than SO2 wines. The olfactometry profile of HT wines supported sensory analysis. HT wines showed new odorant zones from both the added product and oxidation.

  15. Effects of Water Vapor on the Data Quality of the Stable Oxygen Isotopic Ratio of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C. U.; White, J. W.; Vaughn, B.; Tans, P. P.; Pardo, L.

    2007-12-01

    The stable oxygen isotopic ratio of carbon dioxide can potentially track fundamental indicators of environmental change such as the balance between photosynthesis and respiration on regional to global scales. The Stable Isotope Laboratory (SIL) at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR), University of Colorado at Boulder, has measured the stable isotopes of atmospheric carbon dioxide from more than 60 NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) air flask-sampling sites since the early 1990s. If air is sampled without drying, oxygen can exchange between carbon dioxide and water in the flasks, entirely masking the desired signal. An attempt to investigate how water vapor is affecting the δ18O signal is accomplished by comparing the SIL measurements with specific humidity, calculated from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) global integrated surface hourly temperature and dew point database, at the time of sampling. Analysis of sites where samples have been collected initially without drying, and subsequently with a drying kit, in conjunction with the humidity data, has led to several conclusions. Samples that initially appear isotopically unaltered, in that their δ18O values are within the expected range, are being subtly influenced by the water vapor in the air. At Bermuda and other tropical to semi-tropical sites, the 'wet' sampling values have a seasonal cycle that is strongly anti-correlated to the specific humidity, while the 'dry' values have a seasonal cycle that is shifted earlier than the specific humidity cycle by 1-2 months. The latter phasing is expected given the seasonal phasing between climate over the ocean and land, while the former is consistent with a small, but measurable isotope exchange in the flasks. In addition, we note that there is a strong (r > 0.96) correlation between the average specific humidity and the percent of rejected samples for 'wet' sampling. This presents an opportunity for determining a threshold of

  16. Toxic Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles and Titanium Dioxide Bulk Salt in the Liver and Blood of Male Sprague-Dawley Rats Assessed by Different Assays.

    PubMed

    Shakeel, Muhammad; Jabeen, Farhat; Qureshi, Naureen Aziz; Fakhr-E-Alam, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the toxic effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2) bulk salt as well as its nanoparticles (NPs) in anatase phase with mean crystallite size of 36.15 nm in male Sprague-Dawley rats by subcutaneous injections at four different dose levels of either control (0), 50, 100 or 150 mg/kg of body weight (BW) of rat for 28 days on alternate days. Animal mortality, haematology, micronucleus assay, liver histology and activities of liver tissue damage markers like, alkaline phosphate (ALP), alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), as well as oxidative stress indicators like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were investigated. The study revealed significant differences (P < 0.05) among control and experimental groups in all the haematological parameters at the end of experiment. Significantly elevated levels (P < 0.05) of ALT, AST and ALP were found for the group treated with TiO2 NPs at the dose of 150 mg/kg of body weight as compared to control. TiO2 and TiO2 NPs caused dose-dependent genotoxicity in the blood cells of the treated rat as revealed by micronuclei test. The highest frequency of micronuclei was observed in rats treated with NPs at the dose of 150 mg/kg BW which was significantly different (P < 0.001) from all other experimental groups after 28 days of exposure. Similarly, all the treatments showed dose-dependent oxidative stress in the treated rats. However, the significantly high decline in the activities of CAT, SOD, and GST as well as elevation in malondialdehyde and GSH was observed in the group receiving NPs at the rate of 150 mg/kg BW. TiO2 also caused histological alterations in the liver. The study revealed that higher dose of TiO2 NPs exerted significantly harmful effects on liver and blood as compared to its lower doses as well as from all other doses of their bulk counterparts.

  17. Biochar and earthworm effects on soil nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions.

    PubMed

    Augustenborg, Cara A; Hepp, Simone; Kammann, Claudia; Hagan, David; Schmidt, Olaf; Müller, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Biochar is the product of pyrolysis produced from feedstock of biological origin. Due to its aromatic structure and long residence time, biochar may enable long-term carbon sequestration. At the same time, biochar has the potential to improve soil fertility and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from soils. However, the effect of biochar application on GHG fluxes from soil must be investigated before recommendations for field-scale biochar application can be made. A laboratory experiment was designed to measure carbon dioxide (CO) and nitrous oxide (NO) emissions from two Irish soils with the addition of two different biochars, along with endogeic (soil-feeding) earthworms and ammonium sulfate, to assist in the overall evaluation of biochar as a GHG-mitigation tool. A significant reduction in NO emissions was observed from both low and high organic matter soils when biochars were applied at rates of 4% (w/w). Earthworms significantly increased NO fluxes in low and high organic matter soils more than 12.6-fold and 7.8-fold, respectively. The large increase in soil NO emissions in the presence of earthworms was significantly reduced by the addition of both biochars. biochar reduced the large earthworm emissions by 91 and 95% in the low organic matter soil and by 56 and 61% in the high organic matter soil (with and without N fertilization), respectively. With peanut hull biochar, the earthworm emissions reduction was 80 and 70% in the low organic matter soil, and only 20 and 10% in the high organic matter soil (with and without N fertilization), respectively. In high organic matter soil, both biochars reduced CO efflux in the absence of earthworms. However, soil CO efflux increased when peanut hull biochar was applied in the presence of earthworms. This study demonstrated that biochar can potentially reduce earthworm-enhanced soil NO and CO emissions. Hence, biochar application combined with endogeic earthworm activity did not reveal unknown risks for GHG emissions

  18. Effects of sulfur dioxide on resistance to bacterial infection in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Azoulay-Dupuis, E.; Bouley, G.; Blayo, M.C.

    1982-12-01

    Continuous exposure to approximately a 10-ppm concentration of sulfur dioxide for periods of up to 3 weeks reduced the resistance of female mice to infection by aerosol inoculation with Klebsiella pneumoniae. The mortality rate rose and survival time shortened in SO/sub 2/-exposed animals compared to controls. Insofar as these results can be extrapolated to humans, the SO/sub 2/ concentration used in this work is only found on certain industrial premises.

  19. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Carbon Dioxide Flooding by Managing Asphaltene Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, M.D.

    2001-01-12

    The objective of this project was to identify conditions at which carbon dioxide induced precipitation occurred in crude oils. Establishing compositions of the relevant liquid and solid phases was planned. Other goals of the project were to determine if precipitation occurred in cores and to implement thermodynamic and compositional models to examine the phenomenon. Exploring kinetics of precipitation was also one of the project goals. Crude oil from the Rangely Field (eastern Colorado) was used as a prototype.

  20. Biological Effects of Short, High-Level Exposure to Gases: Sulfur Dioxide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    This project was one of four under the same contract; the others covered were ammonia, carbon monoxide, and the nitrogen oxides. I! V It. KEY WORDS...biologic responses to short, high-level exposures to four gases (ammonia, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and the nitrogen oxides) that may be...associated with certain Army weapons systems and troop field training activities . Thisreport analyzes and synthesizes the available literature on possible

  1. Cerebral perfusion during canine hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass: effect of arterial carbon dioxide tension.

    PubMed

    Johnston, W E; Vinten-Johansen, J; DeWitt, D S; O'Steen, W K; Stump, D A; Prough, D S

    1991-09-01

    Cerebral blood flow (radioactive microspheres), intracranial pressure (subdural bolt), and retinal histopathology were examined in 20 dogs undergoing 150 minutes of hypothermic (28 degrees C) cardiopulmonary bypass to compare alpha-stat (arterial carbon dioxide tension, 40 +/- 1 mm Hg; n = 10) and pH-stat (arterial carbon dioxide tension, 61 +/- 1 mm Hg; n = 10) techniques of arterial carbon dioxide tension management. Pump flow (80 mL.kg-1.min-1), mean aortic pressure (78 +/- 2 mm Hg), and hemoglobin level (87 +/- 3 g/L [8.7 +/- 0.3 g/dL]) were maintained constant. During bypass, intracranial pressure progressively increased in the alpha-stat group from 6.0 +/- 1.0 to 13.9 +/- 1.8 mm Hg (p less than 0.05) and in the pH-stat group from 7.7 +/- 1.1 to 14.7 +/- 1.4 mm Hg (p less than 0.05), although there was no evidence of loss of intracranial compliance or intracranial edema formation as assessed by brain water content. With cooling, cerebral blood flow decreased by 56% to 62% in the alpha-stat group (p less than 0.05) and by 48% to 56% in the pH-stat group (p less than 0.05). However, 30 minutes after rewarming to 37 degrees C, cerebral blood flow in both groups failed to increase and remained significantly depressed compared with baseline values. Both groups showed similar amounts of ischemic retinal damage, with degeneration of bipolar cells found in the inner nuclear layer in 67% of animals. We conclude that, independent of the arterial carbon dioxide tension management technique, (1) cerebral perfusion decreased comparably during prolonged hypothermic bypass, (2) intracranial pressure increases progressively, (3) ischemic damage to retinal cells occurs despite maintenance of aortic pressure and flow, and (4) a significant reduction in cerebral perfusion persists after rewarming.

  2. Methane and carbon dioxide dynamics in wetland mesocosms: effects of hydrology and soils.

    PubMed

    Altor, Anne E; Mitsch, William J

    2008-07-01

    Methane and carbon dioxide fluxes in created and restored wetlands, and the influence of hydrology and soils on these fluxes, have not been extensively documented. Minimizing methane fluxes while maximizing productivity is a relevant goal for wetland restoration and creation projects. In this study we used replicated wetland mesocosms to investigate relationships between contrasting hydrologic and soil conditions, and methane and carbon dioxide fluxes in emergent marsh systems. Hydrologic treatments consisted of an intermittent flooding regime vs. continuously inundated conditions, and soil treatments utilized hydric vs. non-hydric soils. Diurnal patterns of methane flux were examined to shed light on the relationship between emergent macrophytes and methane emissions for comparison with vegetation-methane relationships reported from natural wetlands. Microbially available organic carbon content was significantly greater in hydric soils than nonhydric soils, despite similar organic matter contents in the contrasting soil types. Mesocosms with hydric soils exhibited the greatest rates of methane flux regardless of hydrology, but intermittent inundation of hydric soils produced significantly lower methane fluxes than continuous inundatation of hydric soils. Methane fluxes were not affected significantly by hydrologic regime in mesocosms containing non-hydric soils. There were no diurnal differences in methane flux, and carbon dioxide and methane fluxes were not significantly correlated. The highest rates of CO2 uptake occurred in the continuously inundated treatment with non-hydric soils, and there were no significant differences in nighttime respiration rates between the treatments. Implications for hydrologic design of created and restored wetlands are discussed.

  3. Nitrogen dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrogen dioxide ; CASRN 10102 - 44 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  4. Chlorine dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 00 / 007 TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND CHLORITE ( CAS Nos . 10049 - 04 - 4 and 7758 - 19 - 2 ) In Support of Summary Information on the ( IRIS ) Integrated Risk Information System September 2000 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This docu

  5. Effect of carbon dioxide enrichment on health-promoting compounds and organoleptic properties of tomato fruits grown in greenhouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiming; Liu, Lihong; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Yongsong; Wang, Qiaomei

    2014-06-15

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment on the main health-promoting compounds and organoleptic characteristics of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruits grown in greenhouse. The contents of health-promoting compounds, including lycopene, β-carotene, and ascorbic acid, as well as the flavour, indicated by sugars, titrable acidity, and sugar/acid ratio, were markedly increased in CO2 enrichment fruits. Furthermore, CO2 enrichment significantly enhanced other organoleptic characteristics, including colour, firmness, aroma, and sensory attributes in tomato fruits. The results indicated that CO2 enrichment has potential in promoting the nutritional value and organoleptic characteristics of tomatoes.

  6. Effects of light irradiation on bleaching by a 3.5% hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suemori, T.; Kato, J.; Nakazawa, T.; Akashi, G.; Igarashi, A.; Hirai, Y.; Kumagai, Y.; Kurata, H.

    2008-05-01

    A low-concentration hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide as a photocatalyst has attracted attention as a safe office bleaching agent. In this study, the influence of different kinds of light on the bleaching effect of this agent was examined. The bleaching agent was applied to hematoporphyrin-stained paper strips that were then irradiated with a 405-nm diode laser (800 mW/cm2), a halogen lamp (720 mW/cm2), or an LED (835 mW/cm2) for 5 minutes. The color was measured spectrophotometrically before treatment and every 30 seconds thereafter, and the effects of bleaching on the strip were assessed using the CIE 1976 L* a* b* color coordinate system. Of the three different irradiation conditions, 405-nm laser irradiation gave the strongest bleaching effect with 3.5% hydrogen peroxide containing titanium dioxide. The laser provides strong irradiance at 405 nm, which corresponds to the absorption range of the bleaching agent, and consequently the largest effect was obtained.

  7. Advances in Teacher Effectiveness Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brophy, Jere E.

    2010-01-01

    Classroom research on process-outcome relationships had burgeoned in recent years, revealing notable methodological advances and sensible, replicated findings. The studies of the early 1970s supporting direct instruction as particularly effective for producing achievement in basic skills in the early grades have been replicated and extended to…

  8. Effects of pulses of elevated carbon dioxide concentration on stomatal conductance and photosynthesis in wheat and rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Free air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) systems typically expose plants to pulses of carbon dioxide concentrations considerably above the control set-point, in addition to increasing the mean concentration. The importance of such pulses of higher carbon dioxide concentrations to plant function is...

  9. Stunning pigs with nitrogen and carbon dioxide mixtures: effects on animal welfare and meat quality.

    PubMed

    Llonch, P; Rodríguez, P; Gispert, M; Dalmau, A; Manteca, X; Velarde, A

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of exposure to the gas mixtures of 70% nitrogen (N2) and 30% carbon dioxide (CO2; 70N30C), 80% N2 and 20% CO2 (80N20C) and 85% N2 and 15% CO2 (85N15C) on aversion, stunning effectiveness and carcass, as well as meat quality in pigs, and to compare them with the commercial stunning of 90% CO2 (90C). A total of 68 female pigs were divided into four groups and stunned with one of the gas mixtures. During the exposure to the gas, behavioural variables (retreat attempts, escape attempts, gasping, loss of balance, muscular excitation and vocalizations) were recorded, and at the end of the stunning, corneal reflex and rhythmic breathing were assessed. After slaughter, meat quality parameters such as pH at 45 min post mortem (pH45) and at 24 h post mortem (pHu), electrical conductivity, drip loss and colour, in the Longissimus thoracis (LT) and Semimembranosus (SM) muscles were measured, and the presence of ecchymosis on the hams was noted. The PROC MIXED and the PROC GENMOD of SAS® were used to analyse the parametric and binomial variables, respectively. The 'gas mixture' was always considered a fixed effect and the 'live weight' as a covariate. To assess the correlation between meat quality and behaviour measures, PROC CORR was used. Pigs exposed to 90C showed a higher percentage of escape attempts and gasping, a lower percentage of vocalization and shorter muscular excitation phase than pigs exposed to the other N2 and CO2 mixtures (P < 0.05). After stunning, no pig exposed to 90C showed corneal reflex or rhythmic breathing, whereas 85% and 92% of the animals exposed to N2 and CO2 mixtures showed corneal reflex and rhythmic breathing, respectively. Animals stunned with 80N20C and 85N15C had a lower pH45 (P < 0.01) than animals exposed to 90C. Electrical conductivity in the SM muscle was lower (P < 0.001) in 90C and 70N30C pigs than in 80N20C and 85N15C pigs, whereas in LT, it was lower (P < 0.05) in 90C pigs than in 85N15C

  10. Environmental carbon dioxide control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onischak, M.; Baker, B.; Gidaspow, D.

    1974-01-01

    A study of environmental carbon dioxide control for NASA EVA missions found solid potassium carbonate to be an effective regenerable absorbent in maintaining low carbon dioxide levels. The supported sorbent was capable of repeated regeneration below 150 C without appreciable degradation. Optimum structures in the form of thin pliable sheets of carbonate, inert support and binder were developed. Interpretation of a new solid-gas pore closing model helped predict the optimum sorbent and analysis of individual sorbent sheet performance in a thin rectangular channel sorber can predict packed bed performance.

  11. Developing Effective Undergraduate Research Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Michael; Ilie, Carolina C.

    2011-03-01

    Undergraduate research is a valuable educational tool for students pursuing a degree in physics, but these experiences can become problematic and ineffective if not handled properly. Undergraduate research should be planned as an immersive learning experience in which the student has the opportunity to develop his/her skills in accordance with their interests. Effective undergraduate research experiences are marked by clear, measurable objectives and frequent student-professor collaboration. These objectives should reflect the long and short-term goals of the individual undergraduates, with a heightened focus on developing research skills for future use. 1. Seymour, E., Hunter, A.-B., Laursen, S. L. and DeAntoni, T. (2004), ``Establishing the benefits of research experiences for undergraduates in the sciences: First findings from a three-year study''. Science Education, 88: 493--534. 2. Behar-Horenstein, Linda S., Johnson, Melissa L. ``Enticing Students to Enter Into Undergraduate Research: The Instrumentality of an Undergraduate Course.'' Journal of College Science Teaching 39.3 (2010): 62-70.

  12. Designing Effective Undergraduate Research Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severson, S.

    2010-12-01

    I present a model for designing student research internships that is informed by the best practices of the Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) Professional Development Program. The dual strands of the CfAO education program include: the preparation of early-career scientists and engineers in effective teaching; and changing the learning experiences of students (e.g., undergraduate interns) through inquiry-based "teaching laboratories." This paper will focus on the carry-over of these ideas into the design of laboratory research internships such as the CfAO Mainland internship program as well as NSF REU (Research Experiences for Undergraduates) and senior-thesis or "capstone" research programs. Key ideas in maximizing student learning outcomes and generating productive research during internships include: defining explicit content, scientific process, and attitudinal goals for the project; assessment of student prior knowledge and experience, then following up with formative assessment throughout the project; setting reasonable goals with timetables and addressing motivation; and giving students ownership of the research by implementing aspects of the inquiry process within the internship.

  13. Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles on the Synthesis of Fibroin in Silkworm (Bombyx mori).

    PubMed

    Ni, Min; Li, FanChi; Tian, JiangHai; Hu, JingSheng; Zhang, Hua; Xu, KaiZun; Wang, BinBin; Li, YangYang; Shen, WeiDe; Li, Bing

    2015-08-01

    Silkworm (Bombyx mori) is an economically important insect, and its silk production capacity largely depends on its ability to synthesize fibroin. While breeding of B. mori varieties has been a key strategy to improve silk production, little improvement of B. mori silk production has been achieved to date. As a result, the development of sericulture economy has not progressed well, pointing to the need of new ways for improvement of B. mori silk production. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), a food additive widely used for livestock, have been shown to promote animal growth and increase the protein synthesis in animals. However, no studies on effect of TiO2 NPs on fibroin synthesis in B. mori have been available. In this study, the differential expression profiles of genes and proteins in the silk gland of B. mori fed without or with TiO2 NPs (5 μg ml(-1)) were analyzed and compared using digital gene expression (DGE), reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), semi-qPCR, and Western blot analysis. The effects of TiO2 NPs feeding on the activity of proteases in the midgut and the synthesis and transportation of amino acids in hemolymph were also investigated. DGE analyses showed that among a total of 4,741 genes detected, 306 genes were differentially expressed after the TiO2 NPs feeding, of which 137 genes were upregulated whereas 169 genes were downregulated. 106 genes were shown to be involved in fibroin synthesis, of which 97 genes, including those encoding cuticular protein glycine-rich 10, serine protease inhibitor 28, aspartate aminotransferase, lysyl-tRNA synthetase, and splicing factor arginine/serine-rich 6, and silk gland factor-1 (SGF-1), were upregulated with the maximum induction of 8.52-folds, whereas nine genes, including those encoding aspartylglucosaminidase, the cathepsin L in Tribolium castaneum, and similar to SPRY domain-containing SOCS box protein 3, were downregulated with the maximum reduction of 8

  14. Media Effects: Theory and Research.

    PubMed

    Valkenburg, Patti M; Peter, Jochen; Walther, Joseph B

    2016-01-01

    This review analyzes trends and commonalities among prominent theories of media effects. On the basis of exemplary meta-analyses of media effects and bibliometric studies of well-cited theories, we identify and discuss five features of media effects theories as well as their empirical support. Each of these features specifies the conditions under which media may produce effects on certain types of individuals. Our review ends with a discussion of media effects in newer media environments. This includes theories of computer-mediated communication, the development of which appears to share a similar pattern of reformulation from unidirectional, receiver-oriented views, to theories that recognize the transactional nature of communication. We conclude by outlining challenges and promising avenues for future research.

  15. Bench Remarks: Carbon Dioxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent, Henry A.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the properties of carbon dioxide in its solid "dry ice" stage. Suggests several demonstrations and experiments that use dry ice to illustrate Avogadro's Law, Boyle's Law, Kinetic-Molecular Theory, and the effects of dry ice in basic solution, in limewater, and in acetone. (TW)

  16. Effect of water on the carbon dioxide absorption by 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Stevanovic, Stéphane; Podgoršek, Ajda; Pádua, Agilio A H; Costa Gomes, Margarida F

    2012-12-13

    The absorption of carbon dioxide by the pure ionic liquids 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C(1)C(2)Im][OAc]) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C(1)C(4)Im][OAc]) was studied experimentally from 303 to 343 K. As expected, the mole fraction of absorbed carbon dioxide is high (0.16 at 303 K and 5.5 kPa and 0.19 at 303 and 9.6 KPa for [C(1)C(2)Im][OAc] and [C(1)C(4)Im][OAc], respectively), does not obey Henry's law, and is compatible with the chemisorption of the gas by the liquid. Evidence of a chemical reaction between the gas and the liquid was found both by NMR and by molecular simulation. In the presence of water, the properties of the liquid absorber significantly change, especially the viscosity that decreases by as much as 25% (to 78 mPa s) and 30% (to 262 mPa s) in the presence of 0.2 mol fraction of water for [C(1)C(2)Im][OAc] and [C(1)C(2)Im][OAc] at 303 K, respectively. The absorption of carbon dioxide decreases when the water concentration increases: a decrease of 83% in CO(2) absorption is found for [C(1)C(4)Im][OAc] with 0.6 mol fraction of water at 303 K. It is proved in this work, by combining experimental data with molecular simulation, that the presence of water not only renders the chemical reaction between the gas and the ionic liquid less favorable but also lowers the (physical) solubility of the gas as it competes by the same solvation sites of the ionic liquid. The lowering of the viscosity of the liquid absorbent largely compensates these apparent drawbacks and the mixtures of [C(1)C(2)Im][OAc] and [C(1)C(2)Im][OAc] with water seem promising to be used for carbon dioxide capture.

  17. Effect of carbon dioxide injection on production of wood cement composites from waste medium density fiberboard (MDF).

    PubMed

    Qi, H; Cooper, P A; Wan, H

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of recycling waste medium density fiberboard (MDF) into wood-cement composites was evaluated. Both new fibers and recycled steam exploded MDF fibers had poor compatibility with cement if no treatment was applied, due to interference of the hydration process by the water soluble components of the fiber. However, this issue was resolved when a rapid hardening process with carbon dioxide injection was adopted. It appears that the rapid carbonation allowed the board to develop considerable strength before the adverse effects of the wood extractives could take effect. After 3-5 min of carbon dioxide injection, the composites reached 22-27% of total carbonation and developed 50-70% of their final (28-day) strength. Composites containing recycled MDF fibers had slightly lower splitting tensile strength and lower tensile toughness properties than those containing new fibers especially at a high fiber/cement ratio. Composites containing recycled MDF fibers also showed lower values of water absorption. Unlike composites cured conventionally, composites cured under CO(2) injection developed higher strength and toughness with increased fiber content. Incorporation of recycled MDF fibers into wood cement composites with CO(2) injection during the production stage presents a viable option for recycling of this difficult to manage waste material.

  18. Chlorine Diffusion in Uranium Dioxide: Thermal Effects versus Radiation Enhanced Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Pipon, Yves; Moncoffre, Nathalie; Bererd, Nicolas; Jaffrezic, Henri; Raimbault, Louis; Scheidegger, Andre M.; Carlot, Gaelle

    2007-07-01

    Chlorine is present as an impurity in the UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel. {sup 35}Cl is activated into {sup 36}Cl by thermal neutron capture. In case of interim storage or deep geological disposal of the spent fuel, this isotope is known to be able to contribute significantly to the instant release fraction because of its mobile behavior and its long half life (around 300000 years). It is therefore important to understand its migration behavior within the fuel rod. During reactor operation, chlorine diffusion can be due to thermally activated processes or can be favoured by irradiation defects induced by fission fragments or alpha decay. In order to decouple both phenomena, we performed two distinct experiments to study the effects of thermal annealing on the behaviour of chlorine on one hand and the effects of the irradiation with fission products on the other hand. During in reactor processes, part of the {sup 36}Cl may be displaced from its original position, due to recoil or to collisions with fission products. In order to study the behavior of the displaced chlorine, {sup 37}Cl has been implanted into sintered depleted UO{sub 2} pellets (mean grain size around 18 {mu}m). The spatial distribution of the implanted and pristine chlorine has been analyzed by SIMS before and after treatment. Thermal annealing of {sup 37}Cl implanted UO{sub 2} pellets (implantation fluence of 10{sup 13} ions.cm{sup -2}) show that it is mobile from temperatures as low as 1273 K (E{sub a}=4.3 eV). The irradiation with fission products (Iodine, E=63.5 MeV) performed at 300 and 510 K, shows that the diffusion of chlorine is enhanced and that a thermally activated contribution is preserved (E{sub a}=0.1 eV). The diffusion coefficients measured at 1473 K and under fission product irradiation at 510 K are similar (D = 3.10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}.s{sup -1}). Considering in first approximation that the diffusion length L can be expressed as a function of the diffusion coefficient D and time t by : L

  19. Systemic effects of geoengineering by terrestrial carbon dioxide removal on carbon related planetary boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, Vera; Donges, Jonathan; Lucht, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    The planetary boundaries framework as proposed by Rockström et al. (2009) provides guidelines for ecological boundaries, the transgression of which is likely to result in a shift of Earth system functioning away from the relatively stable Holocene state. As the climate change boundary is already close to be transgressed, several geoengineering (GE) methods are discussed, aiming at a reduction of atmospheric carbon concentrations to control the Earth's energy balance. One of the proposed GE methods is carbon extraction from the atmosphere via biological carbon sequestration. In case mitigation efforts fail to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions, this form of GE could act as potential measure to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. We here study the possible influences of human interactions in the Earth system on carbon related planetary boundaries in the form of geoengineering (terrestrial carbon dioxide removal). We use a conceptual model specifically designed to investigate fundamental carbon feedbacks between land, ocean and atmosphere (Anderies et al., 2013) and modify it to include an additional geoengineering component. With that we analyze the existence and stability of a safe operating space for humanity, which is here conceptualized in three of the 9 proposed dimensions, namely climate change, ocean acidification and land-use. References: J. M. Anderies et al., The topology of non-linear global carbon dynamics: from tipping points to planetary boundaries. Environ. Res. Lett., 8(4):044048 (2013) J. Rockström et al., A safe operating space for humanity. Nature 461 (7263), 472-475 (2009)

  20. Dissolved carbon dioxide flotation: an effective way for phase separation in emulsification microextraction method.

    PubMed

    Molaei, Saeideh; Saleh, Abolfazl; Ghoulipour, Vanik; Seidi, Shahram

    2015-04-03

    Dissolved carbon dioxide flotation after emulsification microextraction (DCF-EME) technique coupled with gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD) was introduced for preconcentration and determination of six organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in seawater samples. DCF-EME method is based on the rapid and simple phase separation of low density organic solvent from the aqueous phase via introducing of a saturated NaHCO3 solution (9.6% w/v) into the acidified sample solution (0.1M of HCl) containing analytes. Thanks to the in situ generation of carbon dioxide (CO2) bobbles intensified by ultrasound radiation, the dispersed extraction solvent was collected to the surface of the aqueous sample and then was narrowed to the capillary part of a special home-made extraction cell for facile retrieving. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection were at the range of 2.6-9.2 ng L(-1) and preconcentration factors were varied between 271 and 307 for different OCPs. The applicability of the developed method was evaluated by the extraction and determination of the target analytes from Caspian seawater samples.

  1. Effects of Growth Temperature on Epitaxial Thin Films of Vanadium Dioxide Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, Joyeeta; HaglundJr., Richard F; Payzant, E Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Stoichiometric vanadium dioxide in all of its bulk, thin film and nanostructured forms exhibits an insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) accompanied by structural change, induced by various physical and chemical stimuli such as temperature, ultrashort light pulses, electric field, doping or strain. In these applications, the optical qualities of the films are of paramount importance, but are often highly variable depending on fabrication procedure. We have grown epitaxial films of vanadium dioxide on c-plane (0001) of sapphire using two different procedures involving room temperature growth followed by annealing and direct high temperature growth. Strain at the interface of the substrate and the film due to growth at different temperatures leads to significant differences in morphologies and phase transition characteristics. We present a comparative study of the morphologies and switching characteristics of the two films and conclude that contrary to conventional wisdom, the room-temperature grown films have smoother, more continuous morphologies and better switching performance. Our observation is supported by theoretical and experimental studies of epitaxial growth of semiconductors.

  2. Effect of metaproterenol sulfate on mild asthmatics' response to sulfur dioxide exposure and exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Linn, W.S.; Avol, E.L.; Shamoo, D.A.; Peng, R.C.; Spier, C.E.; Smith, M.N.; Hackney, J.D.

    1988-11-01

    Twenty asthmatic volunteers, most with mild disease, underwent dose-response studies with sulfur dioxide (SO2) under three pretreatment conditions: (1) drug (metaproterenol sulfate in aerosolized saline solution), (2) placebo (aerosolized saline only), and (3) no pretreatment. Sulfur dioxide exposure concentrations were 0.0, 0.3, and 0.6 ppm. Experimental conditions were presented in random order at 1-wk intervals. Exposures lasted 10 min with heavy continuous exercise. Lung function was measured at baseline, after pretreatment (immediately pre-exposure), immediately post-exposure, and during a 2-hr follow-up. Subjects could elect to take bronchodilators during follow-up. Symptoms were monitored before, during, and for 1 wk after exposure. With no pretreatment, subjects exhibited typical exercise-induced bronchospasm at 0.0 ppm, slightly increased responses at 0.3 ppm, and more marked increases at 0.6 ppm. Seven subjects took bronchodilator after 0.6-ppm exposures, compared to 2 at lower concentrations. Within 30 min post-exposure, most subjects' symptoms and lung function had returned to near pre-exposure levels. A similar sequence was observed when subjects received placebo. Drug pretreatment improved lung function relative to baseline, prevented bronchoconstrictive responses at 0.0 and 0.3 ppm, and greatly mitigated responses at 0.6 ppm. Thus, typical bronchodilator usage by asthmatics is likely to reduce their response to ambient SO2 pollution.

  3. The synergistic effect of Escherichia coli inactivation by sequential disinfection with low level chlorine dioxide followed by free chlorine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wu; Yang, Dong; Zhu, Sui-Yi; Chen, Bo-Yan; Huo, Ming-Xin; Li, Jun-Wen

    2012-12-01

    To the best of our knowledge, there was little information available on pathogen removal using low level disinfectant followed by free chlorine in sequential disinfection (SD). This study investigated Escherichia coli inactivation by four types of disinfection: single step disinfection (SSD), SD, traditional sequential disinfection (TSD) and mixed disinfectant disinfection (MDD). Results indicated that SD had higher ability to inactivate E. coli than the others, indicating there was a positive synergistic effect on chlorine disinfection by prior dosing with a low level of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)). The ONPG assay suggested that the permeability of cell wall rather than the viability of E. coli were changed under 0.02 mg/l ClO(2) treatment. The coexistence of residual ClO(2) and free chlorine also plays an active synergistic effect. Additionally, temperature had a positive effect on E. coli inactivation in SD, while inactivation was reduced in alkaline compared to neutral and acidic conditions.

  4. Seasonal effects of sulfur dioxide on the physiology and morphology of Pinus ponderosa seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Houpis, J.L.J.

    1989-01-01

    A two-year study was conducted to examine the ecophysiological effects of fumigating Pinus ponderosa with three levels Of SO{sub 2}, while at the same time subjecting the plants to one of three levels of water stress. In this study, it was found that over the course of two years, the two stresses, whether alone or in combination resulted in decreases in all physiological and growth variables. These variables were chlorophyll a and b, chlorophyll a/b ratio, carotenoids, stomatal and internal conductance, seasonal and environmental photosynthetic response surfaces, growth rates, and annual morphological measurements. The research also demonstrated how stress alters carbon allocation patterns, and the CO{sub 2} budget. In order to assess the damage of the various stresses, an index to plant health was developed. In all four research sections (physiology, pigmentation, translocation, and growth and morphology), increases in water stress increasingly moderated the detrimental effect of SO{sub 2}. Increasing water stress diminished the effect of SO{sub 2}, and increasing SO{sub 2} diminished the effect of water stress. The decreased effect of SO{sub 2} due to increasing water stress was due to decreasing stomatal conductance and leaf metabolism (by restricting the influx of SO{sub 2} into the leaves, thus indirectly reducing the possibility of SO{sub 2} toxicity). Also, the levels of SO{sub 2} did not have an effect on seedling growth or physiology until several months of exposure, or when sufficient accumulated internal dose had occurred. This indicates that results from studies involving short-term exposures are questionable.

  5. RESEARCH NEEDS FOR EFFECTIVE WATERSHED PLANNING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Watershed research has historically focused on physical and biological processes, stressor-response, and effects research, providing valuable understanding of the effects of human activity and natural disturbances on watershed ecosystems. Continued research to support watershed ...

  6. The marginal effects of the price for carbon dioxide: quantifying the effects on the market for electric generation in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Kury, Theodore J.; Harrington, Julie

    2010-05-15

    Greater emphasis on public policy aimed at internalizing the societal cost of carbon dioxide emissions leads to more questions about the economic impacts of that policy. In cooperation with the State of Florida's Department of Environmental Protection, the authors have constructed a model to simulate the dispatch of electric generating units to serve electric load in the state - and obtained some counterintuitive results. (author)

  7. Variations in Alveolar Partial Pressure for Carbon Dioxide and Oxygen Have Additive Not Synergistic Acute Effects on Human Pulmonary Vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Quentin P. P.; Formenti, Federico; Talbot, Nick P.; Lunn, Daniel; Robbins, Peter A.; Dorrington, Keith L.

    2013-01-01

    The human pulmonary vasculature constricts in response to hypercapnia and hypoxia, with important consequences for homeostasis and adaptation. One function of these responses is to direct blood flow away from poorly-ventilated regions of the lung. In humans it is not known whether the stimuli of hypercapnia and hypoxia constrict the pulmonary blood vessels independently of each other or whether they act synergistically, such that the combination of hypercapnia and hypoxia is more effective than the sum of the responses to each stimulus on its own. We independently controlled the alveolar partial pressures of carbon dioxide (Paco2) and oxygen (Pao2) to examine their possible interaction on human pulmonary vasoconstriction. Nine volunteers each experienced sixteen possible combinations of four levels of Paco2 (+6, +1, −4 and −9 mmHg, relative to baseline) with four levels of Pao2 (175, 100, 75 and 50 mmHg). During each of these sixteen protocols Doppler echocardiography was used to evaluate cardiac output and systolic tricuspid pressure gradient, an index of pulmonary vasoconstriction. The degree of constriction varied linearly with both Paco2 and the calculated haemoglobin oxygen desaturation (1-So2). Mixed effects modelling delivered coefficients defining the interdependence of cardiac output, systolic tricuspid pressure gradient, ventilation, Paco2 and So2. No interaction was observed in the effects on pulmonary vasoconstriction of carbon dioxide and oxygen (p>0.64). Direct effects of the alveolar gases on systolic tricuspid pressure gradient greatly exceeded indirect effects arising from concurrent changes in cardiac output. PMID:23935847

  8. The effects of exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles during lactation period on learning and memory of rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Mohammadipour, Abbas; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Fazel, Alireza; Haghir, Hossein; Rafatpanah, Houshang; Pourganji, Masoume; Bideskan, Alireza Ebrahimzadeh

    2016-02-01

    Nanoscale titanium dioxide (TiO2), which is massively produced and widely used in living environment, seems to have a potential risk on human health. The central nervous system (CNS) is the potential susceptible target of nanoparticles, but the studies on this aspect are limited so far. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles during lactation period on learning and memory of offspring. Lactating Wistar rats were exposed to TiO2 nanoparticles (100 mg/kg; gavage) for 21 days. The Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests showed that the exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles could significantly impair the memory and learning in the offspring. Therefore, the application of TiO2 nanoparticles and the effects of their exposure, especially during developmental period on human brain should be cautious.

  9. Effect of oxygen defects on thermal conductivity of thorium-cerium dioxide solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muta, Hiroaki; Kado, Hirohisa; Ohishi, Yuji; Kurosaki, Ken; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of thorium-cerium dioxide solid solutions has been measured and analyzed using the relaxation time approximation. Despite the presence of oxygen defects, the partially reduced Th0.8Ce0.2O1.97 exhibited higher thermal conductivity than the stoichiometric one, Th0.8Ce0.2O2.00, showing the same tendency as that previously reported for Th0.7Pu0.3O2-δ. The increase in thermal conductivity with the oxygen defects can be explained by assuming that cerium ions have an average ionic radius of the ionic radii of Ce3+ and Ce4+ in the description of phonon-impurity scattering. This result indicates that the small reduction of (Th,Pu)O2-δ fuel increases the thermal conductivity, especially at high temperatures.

  10. Effect of nanostructured graphene oxide on electrochemical activity of its composite with polyaniline titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binh Phan, Thi; Thanh Luong, Thi; Mai, Thi Xuan; Thanh Thuy Mai, Thi; Tot Pham, Thi

    2016-03-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) significantly affects the electrochemical activity of its composite with polyanline titanium dioxide (TiO2). In this work various composites with different GO contents have been successfully synthesized by chemical method to compare not only their material properties but also electrochemical characteristics with each other. The results of an electrochemical impedance study showed that their electrochemical property has been improved due to the presence of GO in a composite matrix. The galvanodynamic polarization explained that among them the composite with GO/Ani ratio in the range of 1-14 exhibits a better performance compared to the other due to yielding a higher current desity (280 μA cm-2). The TEM and SEM images which presented the fibres of a composite bundle with the presence of PANi and TiO2 were examined by IR-spectra and x-ray diffraction, respectively.

  11. Effect of cross-link density on carbon dioxide separation in polydimtheylsiloxane-norbornene membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tao; Niu, Zhenbin; Hu, Xunxiang; Gmernicki, Kevin R.; Cheng, Shiwang; Fan, Fei; Johnson, Joseph C.; Hong, Eunice K.; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Jiang, De-en; Long, Brian K.; Mays, Jimmy; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-10-01

    Here, the development of high-performance materials for carbon dioxide separation and capture will significantly contribute to a solution for climate change. Herein, (bicycloheptenyl)ethylterminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMSPNB) membranes with varied cross-link densities were synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization. The developed polymer membranes show higher permeability and better selectivity than those of conventional cross-linked PDMS membrane. The achieved performance (CO2 permeability ≈ 6800 Barrer; CO2/N2 selectivity ≈ 14) is very promising for practical applications. The key to achieving this high performance is the use of an in situ cross-linking method for difunctional PDMS macromonomers, which provides lightly cross-linked membranes. By combining positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and gas solubility measurements, key parameters necessary for achieving excellent performance have been elucidated.

  12. Effect of cross-link density on carbon dioxide separation in polydimtheylsiloxane-norbornene membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Hong, Tao; Niu, Zhenbin; Hu, Xunxiang; ...

    2015-10-01

    Here, the development of high-performance materials for carbon dioxide separation and capture will significantly contribute to a solution for climate change. Herein, (bicycloheptenyl)ethylterminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMSPNB) membranes with varied cross-link densities were synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization. The developed polymer membranes show higher permeability and better selectivity than those of conventional cross-linked PDMS membrane. The achieved performance (CO2 permeability ≈ 6800 Barrer; CO2/N2 selectivity ≈ 14) is very promising for practical applications. The key to achieving this high performance is the use of an in situ cross-linking method for difunctional PDMS macromonomers, which provides lightly cross-linked membranes. By combining positron annihilationmore » lifetime spectroscopy, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and gas solubility measurements, key parameters necessary for achieving excellent performance have been elucidated.« less

  13. Effect of the substrate on the insulator-metal transition of vanadium dioxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, György J.; Bürger, Danilo; Skorupa, Ilona; Reuther, Helfried; Heller, René; Schmidt, Heidemarie

    2011-03-01

    Single-phase vanadium dioxide films grown on (0001) sapphire and (001) silicon substrates show a very different insulator-metal electronic transition. A detailed description of the growth mechanisms and the substrate-film interaction is given, and the characteristics of the electronic transition are described by the morphology and grain boundary structure. (Tri-)epitaxy-stabilized columnar growth of VO2 takes place on the sapphire substrate, whereas on silicon the expected Zone II growth is identified. We have found that in the case of the Si substrate the reasons for the broader hysteresis and the lower switching amplitude are the formation of an amorphous insulating VOx (x > 2.6) phase coexisting with VO2 and the high vanadium vacancy concentration of the VO2. These phenomena are the result of the excess oxygen during the growth and the interaction between the silicon substrate and the growing film.

  14. Effect of Cross-Link Density on Carbon Dioxide Separation in Polydimethylsiloxane-Norbornene Membranes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tao; Niu, Zhenbin; Hu, Xunxiang; Gmernicki, Kevin; Cheng, Shiwang; Fan, Fei; Johnson, J Casey; Hong, Eunice; Mahurin, Shannon; Jiang, De-en; Long, Brian; Mays, Jimmy; Sokolov, Alexei; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-11-01

    The development of high-performance materials for carbon dioxide separation and capture will significantly contribute to a solution for climate change. Herein, (bicycloheptenyl)ethyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMSPNB) membranes with varied cross-link densities were synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization. The developed polymer membranes show higher permeability and better selectivity than those of conventional cross-linked PDMS membrane. The achieved performance (CO2 permeability≈6800 Barrer; CO2 /N2 selectivity≈14) is very promising for practical applications. The key to achieving this high performance is the use of an in situ cross-linking method for difunctional PDMS macromonomers, which provides lightly cross-linked membranes. By combining positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and gas solubility measurements, key parameters necessary for achieving excellent performance have been elucidated.

  15. Effect of nitrogen dioxide and ozone on the risk of dying in patients with severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sunyer, J; Basagana, X; Belmonte, J; Anto, J

    2002-01-01

    Background: A study was performed to assess the acute association between air pollution, pollen and spores, and mortality in a population based cohort of subjects with asthma recruited from emergency room admissions for an asthma exacerbation using a case crossover design. Methods: Patients in Barcelona aged over 14 years who died during the period 1985–95 who had visited the emergency department of one of the four largest hospitals in the city for asthma during 1985–9 were included in the study (a total of 467 men and 611 women). Deaths were identified by record linkage of the cohort individuals with the Catalonia mortality registry. Causes of death were based on the underlying cause on the death certificate. Air pollution, pollen and spore levels were measured at the city monitoring stations which provide an average for the entire city. Results: Nitrogen dioxide was associated with mortality for all causes of death (adjusted odds ratio (OR) for an increase of the interquartile range = 1.50, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09 to 2.64) in asthmatic patients with more than one emergency room admission for asthma. The association was particularly strong for respiratory causes (OR 1.63, 95% CI 0.93 to 2.86). Ozone also increased the risk of death in asthmatic patients (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.09 to 3.30) during spring and summer. The association with particles, pollen, and spores was not significant, and no interactions between air pollutants and pollen and spores were found. Conclusion: Nitrogen dioxide and ozone may exacerbate severe asthma and even cause death among asthmatic subjects. PMID:12149528

  16. Discussion of Refrigeration Cycle Using Carbon Dioxide as Refrigerant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Amin; Sun, Miming; Li, Jie; Yin, Gang; Cheng, Keyong; Zhen, Bing; Sun, Ying

    Nowadays, the problem of the environment goes worse, it urges people to research and study new energy-saving and environment-friendly refrigerants, such as carbon dioxide, at present, people do research on carbon dioxide at home and abroad. This paper introduces the property of carbon dioxide as a refrigerant, sums up and analyses carbon dioxide refrigeration cycles, and points out the development and research direction in the future.

  17. The negative inotropic effects of gaseous sulfur dioxide and its derivatives in the isolated perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanxi; Meng, Ziqiang

    2012-03-01

    Epidemiological investigations have revealed that sulfur dioxide (SO(2) ) exposure is linked to cardiovascular diseases. The present study was designed to investigate the negative inotropic effects of gaseous SO(2) and its derivatives in the isolated perfused rat heart and the possible mechanisms involved in their effects. The results showed that both SO(2) and SO(2) derivatives elicited a negative inotropic effect in a dose-dependent manner, and SO(2) produced a higher negative effect than SO(2) derivatives. The mechanism of SO(2) -induced negative inotropic effects at low concentrations was different from that at high concentrations. At low concentrations, the mechanism of SO(2) -induced negative inotropic effects might occur through promoting the activities of protein kinase C (PKC), cycloxygenase, and cGMP, while the mechanism of SO(2) derivatives-induced effects might be related to the opening of ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP) ) channel and the inhibition of Ca(2+) influx via L-type calcium-channel. At high concentrations, the mechanisms of SO(2) and SO(2) derivatives-induced negative inotropic effects were similar, which might be related to the K(ATP) channel and L-type calcium-channel as well as the possible alterations in PKC, cycloxygenase, and cGMP. Further work is needed to determine the relative contribution of each pathway in SO(2) -mediated inotropic effect.

  18. Response of marine and freshwater algae to nitric acid and elevated carbon dioxide levels simulating environmental effects of bolide impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boston, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    One of the intriguing facets of the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction is the apparently selective pattern of mortality amongst taxa. Some groups of organisms were severely affected and some remained relatively unscathed as they went through the K/T boundary. While there is argument concerning the exact interpretation of the fossil record, one of the best documented extinctions at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary is that of the calcareous nannoplankton. These organisms include coccolithic algae and foraminiferans. Attempts to explain their decline at the K/T boundary center around chemistry which could affect their calcium carbonate shells while leaving their silica-shelled cousins less affected or unaffected. Two environmental consequences of an extraterrestrial body impact which were suggested are the production of large quantities of nitrogen oxides generated by the shock heating of the atmosphere and the possible rise in CO2 from the dissolution of CaCO3 shells. Both of these phenomena would acidify the upper layers of the oceans and bodies of freshwater not otherwise buffered. The effects of nitric acid, carbon dioxide, or both factors on the growth and reproduction of calcareous marine coccoliths and non-calcareous marine and freshwater species of algae were considered. These experiments demonstrate that nitric acid and carbon dioxide have significant effects on important aspects of the physiology and reproduction of modern algae representative of extinct taxa thought to have suffered significant declines at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. Furthermore, calcareous species showed more marked effects than siliceous species and marine species tested were more sensitive than freshwater species.

  19. Simulation of carbon dioxide absorption by sodium hydroxide solution in a packed bed and studying the effect of operating parameters on absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdanbakhsh, Farzad; Soltani Goharrizi, Ata'ollah; Hashemipour Rafsanjani, Hassan

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: In this study. simulation of carbon dioxide absorption by Sodium Hydroxide solution in a packed bed has been investigated. At first, mass and energy balances were applied around a differential height of the bed. So, the governing equations were obtained. Surface renewal theory by Danckwerts was used to represent the mass transfer operation Finally, by changing the operating parameters like solvent temperature, inlet gas composition pressure and height of the bed, the effect of these parameters on the absorption and the composition of carbon dioxide in exit stream have been investigated. (authors)

  20. Regulatory Effects of Elevated Carbon Dioxide on Growth and Biochemical Responses to Ozone Stress in Chinese Pine (Pinus tabulaeformis Carr.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhouli; Chen, Wei; He, Xingyuan; Fu, Shilei; Lu, Tao

    2016-12-01

    This study examined whether carbon dioxide (CO2) might alleviate ozone (O3) injury to the dominant coniferous forest species of northern China, Pinus tabulaeformis Carr. After 90 days O3 exposure, biomass and net photosynthetic rate (Pn) decreased significantly by 24.44 % and 42.89 % compared with the control. A significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) was shown, suggesting cell membrane damage and oxidative stress. However, the positive responses of biomass dry weight, antioxidative enzymes and soluble sugar contents under elevated CO2 alone and the combination of elevated CO2 and O3 were observed, indicating that CO2 could ameliorate O3-induced injury. The study provided increasing evidence that moderately elevated CO2 levels may have a beneficial effect on the forest ecosystem to respond to global climate change.

  1. Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on α-synuclein aggregation and the ubiquitin-proteasome system in dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Xie, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons (PC12 cells) were treated with different doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs), to investigate their effects on α-Synuclein (α-Syn) aggregation and their mechanism of action. Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining were performed. Exposure to TiO2-NPs increased α-Syn expression (p < 0.05) and induced dose-dependent α-Syn aggregation. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine partially inhibited α-Syn expression induced by a 200 μg/ml dose of TiO2-NPs. TiO2-NPs reduced the expressions of parkin and ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase protein, and were associated with oxidative stress in PC12 cells. Dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system also contributed to α-Syn aggregation. The potentially neurotoxic TiO2-NPs may cause Parkinson's disease.

  2. The effects of carbon dioxide inhalation of plasma MHPG, plasma hormones respiratory rate, and behavior in the Rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Krystal, J.H.; Woods, S.W.; Levesque, M.; Heninger, C.; Heninger, G.R. )

    1989-01-01

    The effects of inhalation of air and 3 concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) on plasma levels of the norepinephrine metabolite, MHPG, plasma hormones, and behavioral activation were assessed in eight chair-adapted Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). In comparison to air, inhalation of 5%, 7.5% and 10% CO{sub 2} for 180 minutes produced significant dose-dependent increases in respiratory rate, plasma MHPG, cortisol, growth hormone and prolactin. CO{sub 2} at the 7.5% concentration produced peak changes in behavior at 15, growth hormone at 30, and cortisol and MHPG at 180 minutes without producing changes in prolactin. The lack of previously reported CO{sub 2} induced changes in MHPG, growth hormone and prolactin in humans exposed to 7.5% CO{sub 2} for only 15 minutes, may therefore relate to the relatively short duration of CO{sub 2} exposure.

  3. Measuring the Spectral Expression of Carbon Dioxide in the Solar Reflected Spectrum with AVIRIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is a low-concentration, but important, component of the Earth's atmosphere. This gas absorbs electromagnetic radiation (EMR) in several regions of the spectrum. Absorption of energy by carbon dioxide adds heat to the atmosphere. In the world today, the burning of fossil fuels and other anthropogenic processes adds carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Other natural processes in the Earth's system both add and remove carbon dioxide. Overall, measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide at selected sites around the globe show an increased carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere. A figure shows the measured carbon dioxide from Mauna Loa, Hawaii, from 1958 to 2000. Overall, the concentration has increased from 315 to 365 ppm at this site over this period. (There is also a yearly cycle to the concentration that is timed with and hypothesized to be related to the vegetation growing season in the Northern Hemisphere.) The overall expected effect of this increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide is trapping of heat in the atmosphere and global warming. While this overall relationship between carbon dioxide and global warming seems straightforward, many of the specific details relating to regional and local sources and sinks and gradients of carbon dioxide are not well understood. A remote sensing capability to measure carbon dioxide could provide important inputs for scientific research to better understand the distribution and change in atmospheric carbon dioxide at detailed spatial and temporal levels. In pursuit of this remote sensing of carbon dioxide objective, this paper analyzes the expression of carbon dioxide in the spectral range measured by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imagery Spectrometer (AVIRIS). Based on these analyses, a spectral-fitting algorithm that uses AVIRIS measured spectra and MODTRAN radiative-transfer code modeled spectra to derive total column carbon dioxide abundance has been developed. This algorithm has been applied to an AVIRIS

  4. Effect of forage to concentrate ratio in dairy cow diets on emission of methane, carbon dioxide and ammonia, lactation performance and manure excretion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Holstein cows housed in a modified tie-stall barn were used to determine the effect of feeding diets with different forage to concentrate ratios (F:C) on performance and emission of methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2) and manure ammonia-nitrogen (NH3-N). Eight multiparous cows (means ± standard devi...

  5. Carbon Dioxide Effects on Soil-Chemical Weathering: Laboratory Column Studies with Saprolite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, N.; Richter, D. D.

    2001-12-01

    Column leaching experiments have evaluated effects of sulfuric, nitric, and hydrochloric acids on chemical weathering in soils and rocks. In contrast, research to investigate effects of carbonic acid on chemical weathering is notably absent. Given that rising aboveground CO2 may increase photosynthesis and may enhance soil respiration, elevated soil CO2 and carbonic acid may enhance cation leaching via a combination of cation exchange and mineral dissolution. Column leaching studies were conducted using deep soil materials of the southern Piedmont (Enon, Tarrus, and Cecil series soils). Deionized water equilibrated with CO2 (at 1, 10, and 100%) was used as eluent and soluble products from exchangeable and mineral-bound sources were estimated. Results demonstrated that elevated CO2 accelerated cation release by both cation exchange and mineral dissolution. Highest cation release rates were from the Enon C horizon, a smectite-rich material from diabase with 23cmol(+)/kg ECEC and 98% base saturation. Lowest releases were from the Cecil Cr horizon, a kaolin-micaceous material derived from granitic gneiss with 1.2cmol(+)/kg ECEC and 40% B.S. Cation exchange was the predominant source of cations released, although mineral dissolution occurred in all three soils in response to elevated CO2. Remarkably, upto 35% of the cations released by the Cecil Cr horizon was attributed to weathering dissolution, probably from micaceous minerals.

  6. Effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the bioavailability, metabolism, and toxicity of pentachlorophenol in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qi; Shi, Xiongjie; Zhang, Liping; Wang, Qiangwei; Wang, Xianfeng; Guo, Yongyong; Zhou, Bingsheng

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (n-TiO2) on the bioavailability, metabolism, and toxicity of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in fish. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos or larvae (2-h post-fertilization) were exposed to PCP (0, 3, 10, and 30 μg/L) alone or in combination with n-TiO2 (0.1mg/L) until 6 days post-fertilization. Results showed that n-TiO2 treatment alone did not induce lipid peroxidation, DNA damage, as well as the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the larvae. As compared with PCP treatment, the co-exposure of PCP and n-TiO2 enhanced the induction of ROS generation, eventually leading to lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 gene transcriptions were significantly upregulated in both PCP treatment alone and in combination with n-TiO2. Chemical analysis and histological examination showed that n-TiO2 adsorb PCP, and n-TiO2 are taken up by developing zebrafish larvae; however, PCP content was not enhanced in the presence of n-TiO2, but the metabolism of PCP to tetrachlorohydroquinone was enhanced in larvae. The results indicate that n-TiO2 enhanced the metabolism of PCP and caused oxidative damage and developmental toxicity, suggesting that NPs can influence the fate and toxicity of associated organic pollutants in the aquatic environment.

  7. Effect of antecedent growth conditions on sensitivity of Escherichia coli to chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, J D; Matin, A; Roberts, P V

    1982-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to inactivation by antibacterial agents that is induced by the growth environment was studied. Escherichia coli was grown in batch culture and in a chemostat, and the following parameters were varied: type of substrate, growth rate, temperature, and cell density during growth. Low doses (0.75 mg/liter) of chlorine dioxide were used to inactivate the cultures. The results demonstrated that populations grown under conditions that more closely approximated natural aquatic environments were more resistant than those grown under commonly employed batch culture conditions. In particular, bacteria grown at submaximal rates were more resistant than their counterparts grown at mumax. The most resistant populations encountered in this study were those grown at D values of 0.02 h-1 and 0.06 h-1 at 25 degrees C. Growth at 15 degrees C led to greater resistance than did growth at 37 degrees C. The conditions that produced relatively resistant phenotypes were much closer to those found in most natural environments than are the typical conditions of batch culture methods. The importance of major physiological changes that can be induced by the antecedent growth environment is discussed in light of the possible modes of action of several disinfectants. PMID:6756305

  8. Effect of surfactants on the interfacial tension and emulsion formation between water and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, S.R.P. da; Harrison, K.L.; Johnston, K.P.

    1999-01-19

    The lowering of the interfacial tension ({gamma}) between water and carbon dioxide by various classes of surfactants is reported and used to interpret complementary measurements of the capacity, stability, and average drop size of water-in-CO{sub 2} emulsions. {gamma} is lowered from {approximately}20 to {approximately}2 mN/m for the best poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide) (PPO-b-PEO-b-PPO) and PeO-b-PPO-b-PEO Pluronic triblock copolymers, 1.4 mN/m for a poly(butylene oxide)-b-PEO copolymer, 0.8 mN/m for a perfluoropolyether (PEPE) ammonium carboxylate and 0.2 mN/m for PDMS{sub 24}-g-EO{sub 22}. The hydrophilic-CO{sub 2}-philic balance (HCB) of the triblock Pluronic and PDMS-g-PEO-PPO surfactants is characterized by the CO{sub 2}-to-water distribution coefficient and V-shaped plots of log {gamma} vs wt % EO. A minimum in {gamma} is observed for the optimum HCB. As the CO{sub 2}-philicity of the surfactant tail is increased, the molecular weight of the hydrophilic segment increases for an optimum HCB. The stronger interactions on both sides of the interface lead to a lower {gamma}. Consequently, more water was emulsified for the PDMS-based copolymers than either the PPO- or PBO-based copolymers.

  9. Effects of Carbonization Parameters of Moso-Bamboo-Based Porous Charcoal on Capturing Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Jhan, Jhih-Wei; Cheng, Yi-Ming; Cheng, Hau-Hsein

    2014-01-01

    This study experimentally analyzed the carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of Moso-bamboo- (Phyllostachys edulis-) based porous charcoal. The porous charcoal was prepared at various carbonization temperatures and ground into powders with 60, 100, and 170 meshes, respectively. In order to understand the adsorption characteristics of porous charcoal, its fundamental properties, namely, charcoal yield, ash content, pH value, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, iodine number, pore volume, and powder size, were analyzed. The results show that when the carbonization temperature was increased, the charcoal yield decreased and the pH value increased. Moreover, the bamboo carbonized at a temperature of 1000°C for 2 h had the highest iodine sorption value and BET surface area. In the experiments, charcoal powders prepared at various carbonization temperatures were used to adsorb 1.854% CO2 for 120 h. The results show that the bamboo charcoal carbonized at 1000°C and ground with a 170 mesh had the best adsorption capacity, significantly decreasing the CO2 concentration to 0.836%. At room temperature and atmospheric pressure, the Moso-bamboo-based porous charcoal exhibited much better CO2 adsorption capacity compared to that of commercially available 350-mesh activated carbon. PMID:25225639

  10. Effect of carbon dioxide laser treatment on lesion progression in an intraoral model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Featherstone, John D. B.; Fried, Daniel; Gansky, Stuart A.; Stookey, George K.; Dunipace, Ann J.

    2001-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that pretreatment of dental enamel by specific carbon dioxide laser conditions inhibited subsequent progression of caries-like lesions in vitro. The aim of the present study was to use an intra-oral model to determine whether similar inhibition is observed in the human mouth. A cross over study with 23 subjects and three regimens was used. Pre-formed varies-like lesions were made in extracted human enamel and exposed intra-orally in partial dentures in each subject to A) placebo dentifrice and no laser treatment, B) placebo dentifrice following laser pretreatment, or C) sodium fluoride dentifrice and no laser treatment during each of three study periods. Samples were assessed by micro radiography to compare the mineral loss before and after each treatment and drive a net change in mineral value. Overall P was not significantly different form L but both P and L were different from F. For those subjects who demineralized in P, L and F were significantly better than P, with L showing an 84 percent inhibition of further demineralization, but no enhancement of demineralization.

  11. Effects of carbonization parameters of Moso-bamboo-based porous charcoal on capturing carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei-Hsing; Jhan, Jhih-Wei; Cheng, Yi-Ming; Cheng, Hau-Hsein

    2014-01-01

    This study experimentally analyzed the carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of Moso-bamboo- (Phyllostachys edulis-) based porous charcoal. The porous charcoal was prepared at various carbonization temperatures and ground into powders with 60, 100, and 170 meshes, respectively. In order to understand the adsorption characteristics of porous charcoal, its fundamental properties, namely, charcoal yield, ash content, pH value, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, iodine number, pore volume, and powder size, were analyzed. The results show that when the carbonization temperature was increased, the charcoal yield decreased and the pH value increased. Moreover, the bamboo carbonized at a temperature of 1000(°)C for 2 h had the highest iodine sorption value and BET surface area. In the experiments, charcoal powders prepared at various carbonization temperatures were used to adsorb 1.854% CO2 for 120 h. The results show that the bamboo charcoal carbonized at 1000(°)C and ground with a 170 mesh had the best adsorpt on capacity, significantly decreasing the CO2 concentration to 0.836%. At room temperature and atmospheric pressure, the Moso-bamboo-based porous charcoal exhibited much better CO2 adsorption capacity compared to that of commercially available 350-mesh activated carbon.

  12. Cancer Therapeutic Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Are Associated with Oxidative Stress and Cytokine Induction.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Rina; Luo, Yi; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Fujii, Kiyomu; Ohmori, Hitoshi; Kuniyasu, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are considered to influence the inflammatory process; however, the precise mechanism and the significance in tumors are still not clear. In this study, when CT26 and LL2 mouse cancer cells were treated with 6-nm anatase titanium dioxide NPs (TDNPs) without ultraviolet irradiation, oxidative stress and induction of inflammatory cytokines were observed. Oxidative stress was further increased by disease-associated conditions such as high glucose concentrations and hypoxia. Inhaled or orally administered TDNPs generated granulomatous lesions in the lungs and colon of the rodent models tested, with increased oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were also found in cancer cells treated with gold or carbon black NPs. Treatment of CT26 cells with 10- to 70-nm rutile TDNPs showed that smaller NPs produced more oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines than larger ones did. To avoid diffusion of TDNPs and to minimize toxicity, 10-nm TDNPs were suspended in a collagen gel inserted into a subcutaneous tumor in a CT26 mouse. A single TDNP treatment via this method inhibited tumor growth in a size- and dose-dependent manner, and resulted in lower levels of urinary 8-OHdG when compared to systemically administered TDNPs. These findings suggest that TDNPs might be useful for the local treatment of tumors.

  13. Effect of microgravity on stress ethylene and carbon dioxide production in sweet clover (Melilotus alba L.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallegos, Gregory L.; Odom, William R.; Guikema, James A.

    1995-01-01

    The study of higher plant growth and development in the microgravity (micro-g) environment continues to be a challenge. This is in part a result of the available flight qualified hardware with restrictive closed gas environments. This point is underscored by considering that gas exchange of seedlings grown in microgravity may be further limited owing to a thicker layer of water wicked onto the roots and to the absence of convective mixing. We hypothesized that seedlings grown under such conditions will experience greater hypoxia in microgravity than at Earth gravity, and thus produce greater stress ethylene. We compared flight and ground samples of sweet clover seedlings grown in the Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA) during STS-57 and found them to contain extremely high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) and stress ethylene. There were time dependent increases for both gases, and seedling growth was greatly inhibited. We repeated these experiments aboard STS-60 using modified chambers which increased, by fifty fold, the air available to the developing seedlings. Sweet clover seed germination and subsequent seedling growth to eight days within the FPA modified with a gas permeable membrane is not compromised by the microgravity environment.

  14. Effect of relative humidity and additives on the reaction of sulfur dioxide with calcium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Alsop, R.N.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of process variables and additives on the reaction rate of Ca(OH)/sub 2/ with SO/sub 2/ at conditions similar to these encountered in the bag filters used to collect solids following flue gas desulfurization by spray drying. The effect of Ca(OH)/sub 2/ loading, temperature, relative humidity, and inlet SO/sub 2/ concentration were investigated. Of these variables, relative humidity showed the greatest impact on the reaction rate. The effect of small amounts of additives were also investigated. Of the additives tried (buffer acids, organic deliquescents, and inorganic deliquescents) deliquescent salts were the only additives that improved reactivity. A shrinking core model with zero order kinetics in SO/sub 2/ was used to model experimental data. An empirical correlation was included in the model to account for shape and surface roughness of the Ca(OH)/sub 2/ particles. The diffusion coefficient of the SO/sub 2/ through the product layer was found to increase linearly with relative humidity, and the kinetic rate constant increases exponentially with relative humidity. With a few exceptions the model was able to predict the experimental data within the margin of experimental error (+/- 10%). At high relative humidity and/or high SO/sub 2/ concentration, reaction kinetics control the overall reaction rate, while at low relative humidity and/or low SO/sub 2/ concentration, SO/sub 2/ diffusion through the product layer controls the rate. The reaction solids were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, powder x-ray diffraction, Coulter counter size distribution BET (N/sub 2/) surface area, energy dispersive spectrometry, and differential scanning calorimetry.

  15. Effect of Carbon Dioxide on the Twinkling Artifact in Ultrasound Imaging of Kidney Stones: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Simon, Julianna C; Wang, Yak-Nam; Cunitz, Bryan W; Thiel, Jeffrey; Starr, Frank; Liu, Ziyue; Bailey, Michael R

    2017-05-01

    Bone demineralization, dehydration and stasis put astronauts at increased risk of forming kidney stones in space. The color-Doppler ultrasound "twinkling artifact," which highlights kidney stones with color, can make stones readily detectable with ultrasound; however, our previous results suggest twinkling is caused by microbubbles on the stone surface which could be affected by the elevated levels of carbon dioxide found on space vehicles. Four pigs were implanted with kidney stones and imaged with ultrasound while the anesthetic carrier gas oscillated between oxygen and air containing 0.8% carbon dioxide. On exposure of the pigs to 0.8% carbon dioxide, twinkling was significantly reduced after 9-25 min and recovered when the carrier gas returned to oxygen. These trends repeated when pigs were again exposed to 0.8% carbon dioxide followed by oxygen. The reduction of twinkling caused by exposure to elevated carbon dioxide may make kidney stone detection with twinkling difficult in current space vehicles.

  16. Chlorine dioxide and hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.P. . Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology)

    1989-05-01

    Because it has little or no tendency to generate carcinogenic trihalomethanes such as chloroform, chlorine dioxide is an attractive alternative to chlorine for drinking water disinfection. There are, however, concerns about its acute toxicity, and the toxic effects of its by-products, chlorite and chlorate. The human experience with chlorine dioxide in both controlled, prospective studies and in actual use situations in community water supplies have as yet failed to reveal adverse health effects. The EPA has recommended standards of 0.06 mg/L for chlorine dioxide and standards of 0.007 mg/L for chlorite and chlorate in drinking water. Among groups who may be at special risk from oxychlorines in drinking water are patients who must undergro chronic extracorporeal hemodialysis. Although even units for home hemodialysis are supposed to be equipped with devices which effectively remove oxychlorines, there is a always a possibility of operator error or equipment failure. When the equipment is adequately maintained, it is likely that dialysis patients will have more intensive exposures from drinking water than from dialysis fluids despite the much larger volumes of water that are involved in dialysis. This paper discusses a hemodialysis and the standards and effects of oxychlorines. 90 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Combination of super chilling and high carbon dioxide concentration techniques most effectively to preserve freshness of shell eggs during long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, T; Ariizumi, M; Shigematsu, Y; Kobayashi, H; Hasegawa, M; Watanabe, K

    2010-01-01

    This study was made to examine the combined effects of stored temperature and carbon dioxide atmosphere on shell egg quality. The shell eggs were packed into polyethylene terephthalate/polyethylene (PET/PE) pouches and stored at 0 degrees C (super chilling), 10 degrees C, and 20 degrees C, respectively for 90 d. The atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration was controlled to obtain the 3 concentration levels of high (about 2.0%), medium (about 0.5%), and low (below 0.01%). Changes in Haugh unit (HU) values, weakening of vitelline membranes, and generation of volatiles were analyzed to evaluate the freshness of shell eggs. Results showed that, compared with the other combinations, the technique of super chilling and high carbon dioxide concentration enabled shell eggs to be most effectively stored for 90 d, based on estimations of the statistical significances of differences in HU values, and on maintaining the initial HU values during storage. In addition, the storage of shell eggs using this combination technique was found to significantly prevent the weakening of the vitelline membrane based on the estimations of numbers of eggs without vitelline membrane breakage when eggs broke, and significantly lowered the incidence of hexanal in the yolk from exposure to the gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analyses of volatiles. Thus, these results confirmed that the combination of super chilling and high carbon dioxide concentration was the most effective technique for preserving shell eggs during a long term of 90 d compared with other combination techniques.

  18. Process-Product Research: A Cornerstone in Educational Effectiveness Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creemers, Bert; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    2015-01-01

    This article links the contribution of process-product studies in developing the theoretical framework of educational effectiveness by pointing out the importance of teacher behavior in the classroom. The role that Jere Brophy played in this evolving research is described within the various phases of teacher effectiveness research. Process-product…

  19. Effective Teaching of Reading: Research and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, James V., Ed.

    Distilling and interpreting past and current research on the effective teaching of reading is the focus of this volume. The titles and authors are as follows: "Research in Effective Teaching: An Overview of Its Development" (William H. Rupley, Beth S. Wise, and John W. Logan); "Process-Product Research on Effective Teaching: A Primer for a…

  20. Carbon dioxide and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

  1. Molecular effects of fractional carbon dioxide laser resurfacing on photodamaged human skin.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Michael J; Cohen, Marc; Hokugo, Akishige; Keller, Gregory S

    2010-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the sequential changes in protein expression that play a role in the clinically beneficial results seen with fractional carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser resurfacing of the face and neck. Methods Nine healthy volunteers were recruited for participation from the senior author's facial plastic surgery practice. After informed consent was obtained, each volunteer underwent a 2-mm punch biopsy from a discrete area of infra-auricular neck skin prior to laser treatment. Patients then immediately underwent laser resurfacing of photodamaged face and neck skin at a minimal dose (30 W for 0.1 second) with the Pixel Perfect fractional CO(2) laser. On completion of the treatment, another biopsy specimen was taken adjacent to the first site. Additional biopsy specimens were subsequently taken from adjacent skin at 2 of 3 time points (day 7, day 14, or day 21). RNA was extracted from the specimens, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and protein microarray analysis were performed. Comparisons were then made between time points using pairwise comparison testing. Results We found statistically significant changes in the gene expression of several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The data demonstrate a consistent up-regulation of MMPs 1, 3, 9, and 13, all of which have been previously reported for fully ablative CO(2) laser resurfacing. There was also a statistically significant increase in MMP-10 and MMP-11 levels in this data set. Conclusion This study suggests that the molecular mechanisms of action are similar for both fractional and fully ablative CO(2) laser resurfacing.

  2. Effect of variation in argon content of calibration gases on determination of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Min, Deullae; Kang, Namgoo; Moon, Dong Min; Lee, Jin Bok; Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Jin Seog

    2009-12-15

    Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is a greenhouse gas that makes by far the largest contribution to the global warming of the Earth's atmosphere. For the measurements of atmospheric CO(2) a non-dispersive infrared analyzer (NDIR) and gas chromatography are conventionally being used. We explored whether and to what degree argon content can influence the determination of atmospheric CO(2) using the comparison of CO(2) concentrations between the sample gas mixtures with varying Ar amounts at 0 and 18.6 mmol mol(-1) and the calibration gas mixtures with Ar at 8.4, 9.1, and 9.3 mmol mol(-1). We newly discovered that variation of Ar content in calibration gas mixtures could undermine accuracy for precise and accurate determination of atmospheric CO(2) in background air. The differences in CO(2) concentration due to the variation of Ar content in the calibration gas mixtures were negligible (<+/-0.03 micromol mol(-1)) for NDIR systems whereas they noticeably increased (<+/-1.09 micromol mol(-1)) especially for the modified GC systems to enhance instrumental sensitivity. We found that the thermal mass flow controller is the main source of the differences although such differences appeared only in the presence of a flow restrictor in GC systems. For reliable monitoring of real atmospheric CO(2) samples, one should use calibration gas mixtures that contain Ar content close to the level (9.332 mmol mol(-1)) in the ambient air as possible. Practical guidelines were highlighted relating to selection of appropriate analytical approaches for the accurate and precise measurements of atmospheric CO(2). In addition, theoretical implications from the findings were addressed.

  3. Formulation effects on the release of silica dioxide nanoparticles from paint debris to water.

    PubMed

    Zuin, Stefano; Massari, Andrea; Ferrari, Arlen; Golanski, Luana

    2014-04-01

    Waterborne paints with integrated nanoparticles have been recently introduced into the market as nanoparticles offer improved or novel functionalities to paints. However, the release of nanoparticles during the life cycle of nano-enhanced paint has only been studied to a very limited extent. The paint composition could determine in what quantities and forms the nanoparticles are released. In this work, paint formulations containing the same amount of silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanoparticles but differing in the pigment volume concentration (PVC) and in amount and type of binder and pigment, were studied through leaching test to investigate the influence of these parameters on release of Si from paint. The results indicate greater release of Si, about 1.7 wt.% of the SiO2 nanoparticles in the paint, for paint formulated with higher PVC value (63%), suggesting that the PVC is a crucial factor for release of SiO2 nanoparticles from paints. This hypothesis was also based on the fact that agglomerates of SiO2 nanoparticles were only found in leachates from paint with higher PVC. A paint sample with the higher amount of binder and less calcite filler exhibited a lower release of Si among the paints with a low PVC value (35%), and no SiO2 particles were detected in leachates collected from this paint. This could be due to the fact that a high portion of binder forms a suitable matrix to hold the SiO2 ENPs in paint. The paint sample in which the amount of calcite was partially substituted with TiO2 pigment did not show an important reduction on Si release. Our work suggests that paint debris containing SiO2 nanoparticles may release a limited amount of Si into the environment, and that by adjusting the properties of the binder in combination with common pigments it is possible to reduce the release of SiO2 nanoparticles.

  4. Supraoptimal carbon dioxide effects on growth of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Siegriest, L. M.; Sager, J. C.; Knott, W. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    In tightly closed environments used for human life support in space, carbon dioxide (CO2) partial pressures can reach 500 to 1000 Pa, which may be supraoptimal or toxic to plants used for life support. To study this, soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr. cvs. McCall and Pixie] were grown for 90 days at 50, 100, 200, and 500 Pa partial pressure CO2 (500, 1000, 2000, and 5000 ppm). Plants were grown using recirculating nutrient film technique with a 12-h photoperiod, a 26 degrees C/20 degrees C thermoperiod, and approximately 300 micromoles m-2 s-1 photosynthetic photon flux (PPF). Seed yield and total biomass were greatest at 100 Pa for cv. McCall, suggesting that higher CO2 levels were supraoptimal. Seed yield and total biomass for cv. Pixie showed little difference between CO2 treatments. Average stomatal conductance of upper canopy leaves at 50 Pa CO2 approximately 500 Pa > 200 Pa > 100 Pa. Total water use over 90 d for both cultivars (combined on one recirculating system) equalled 822 kg water for 100 Pa CO2, 845 kg for 50 Pa, 879 kg for 200 Pa, and 1194 kg for 500 Pa. Water use efficiences for both cultivars combined equalled 3.03 (g biomass kg-1 water) for 100 Pa CO2, 2.54 g kg-1 for 200 Pa, 2.42 g kg-1 for 50 Pa, and 1.91 g kg-1 for 500 Pa. The increased stomatal conductance and stand water use at the highest CO2 level (500 Pa) were unexpected and pose interesting considerations for managing plants in a tightly closed system where CO2 concentrations may reach high levels.

  5. [Research of the essential oil of Plumeria rubra var. actifolia from Laos by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xin-Yu; Cui, Long-Hai; Zhou, Xin-Xin; Wu, Yan; Ge, Fa-Huan

    2011-05-01

    The orthogonal test and the supercritical carbon dioxide fluid extraction were used for optimizing the extraction of the essential oil from Plumeria rubra var. actifolia for the first time. Compared with the steam distillation, the optimal operation parameter of extraction was as follows: extraction pressure 25 MPa, extraction temperature 45 degrees C; separator I pressure 12 MPa, separator I temperature 55 degrees C; separator II pressure 6 MPa, separator II temperature 30 degrees C. Under this condition the yield of the essential oil was 5.8927%. The components were separated and identified by GC-MS. 53 components of Plumeria rubra var. actifolia measured by SFE method were identified and determined by normalization method. The main components were 1, 6, 10-dodecatrien-3-ol, 3, 7, 11-trimethyl, benzoic acid, 2-hydroxy-, phenylmethyl ester, 1, 2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis(2-methylpropyl) ester,etc.. 1, 2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis (2-methylpropyl) este. took up 66.11% of the total amount, and there was much difference of the results from SD method.

  6. Protective effects of thymoquinone and avenanthramides on titanium dioxide nanoparticles induced toxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Hassanein, Khaled M A; El-Amir, Yasmin O

    2017-01-01

    The protective effect of thymoquinone (TQ), the major active ingredient of Nigella sativa seeds, and avenanthramides (AVA) enriched extract of oats on titanium dioxide naonparticles (TiO2 NPs) induced toxicity and oxidative stress in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats was investigated. Sixty rats were divided into 6 equal groups. The first, second, third, fourth and fifth groups received TiO2 NPs, TiO2 NPs and TQ, TiO2 NPs and AVA, TQ only, or AVA only for 6 weeks. The sixth group served as the control. Exposure to TiO2 NPs resulted in increased liver enzyme markers, oxidative stress indices, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and DNA damage. Histopathological alterations were also observed in the liver, brain, lung, kidney, heart and testes. Co-administration of TQ and AVA with TiO2 NPs decreased the level of liver enzymes, oxidative stress, TNF-α and DNA damage. Furthermore, TQ and AVA increased the total antioxidant and glutathione (GSH) levels. In conclusion, TiO2 NPs induce hazardous effects in different organs and are closely related to oxidative stress. TQ and AVA have antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effect against the detrimental effect of TiO2 NPs.

  7. Assessing the effect of different natural dissolved organic matters on the cytotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with bacteria.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaojia; McAlliser, Donee'; Aker, Winfred G; Hwang, Huey-Min

    2016-10-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are among the most widely manufactured nanomaterials on a global scale. However, prudent and vigilant surveillance, incumbent upon the scientific community with the advent of new technologies, has revealed potentially undesirable effects of TiO2 NPs on biological systems and the natural environment during their application and discharge. Such effects are likely best evaluated by first assessing the fate of the TiO2 NPs in natural environments. In this study, the effects of terrestrial humic acid (HA) and tannic acid (TA), two major members of the collective: dissolved organic matter (DOM), on the cytotoxicity of TiO2 NPs to Escherichia coli were investigated in the presence and absence of natural sunlight. Qualitative (transmission electron microscopy (TEM)) and quantitative (LC50) analyses were employed in this study. In addition, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the form of OH was further assessed-as HA or TA increased the production of ROS decreased. The inhibition of bacterial viability in the light treatment groups, with respective treatment organics at concentrations of 10 ppm, was less in TA than in terrestrial HA. SAS was used to analyze the treatment effect of individual factors of light irradiation, DOM, and concentration of TiO2 NPs.

  8. Carbon Dioxide Selective Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes: The Effect of Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Luebke, D.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Myers, C.R.; Pennline, H.W.

    2008-04-01

    The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) is widely viewed as a promising technology for the large scale production of energy in a carbon constrained world. These cycles, which include gasification, contaminant removal, water-gas shift, CO2 capture and compression, and combustion of the reduced-carbon fuel gas in a turbine, often have significant efficiency advantages over conventional combustion technologies. A CO2 selective membrane capable of maintaining performance at conditions approaching those of low temperature water-gas shift (260oC) could facilitate the production of carbon-neutral energy by simultaneously driving the shift reaction to completion and concentrating CO2 for sequestration. Supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) have been previously evaluated for this application and determined to be physically and chemically stable to temperatures in excess of 300oC. These membranes were based on ionic liquids which interacted physically with CO2 and diminished considerably in selectivity at higher temperatures. To alleviate this problem, the original ionic liquids were replaced with ionic liquids able to form chemical complexes with CO2. These complexing ionic liquid membranes have a local maximum in selectivity which is observed at increasing temperatures for more stable complexes. Efforts are currently underway to develop ionic liquids with selectivity maxima at temperatures greater than 75oC, the best result to date, but other practical concerns must also be addressed if the membrane is to be realistically expected to function under water-gas shift conditions. A CO2 selective membrane must function not only at high temperature, but also in the presence of all the reactants and contaminants likely to be present in coal-derived fuel gas, including water, CO, and H2S. A study has been undertaken which examines the effects of each of these gases on both complexing and physically interacting supported liquid membranes. In a joint project

  9. Assessing the effect of elevated carbon dioxide on soil carbon: a comparison of four meta-analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    Hungate, B. A.; van Groenigen, K.; Six, J.; Jastrow, J. D.; Luo, Y.; de Graaff, M.; van Kessel, C.; Osenberg, C. W.

    2009-08-01

    Soil is the largest reservoir of organic carbon (C) in the terrestrial biosphere and soil C has a relatively long mean residence time. Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations generally increase plant growth and C input to soil, suggesting that soil might help mitigate atmospheric CO{sub 2} rise and global warming. But to what extent mitigation will occur is unclear. The large size of the soil C pool not only makes it a potential buffer against rising atmospheric CO{sub 2}, but also makes it difficult to measure changes amid the existing background. Meta-analysis is one tool that can overcome the limited power of single studies. Four recent meta-analyses addressed this issue but reached somewhat different conclusions about the effect of elevated CO{sub 2} on soil C accumulation, especially regarding the role of nitrogen (N) inputs. Here, we assess the extent of differences between these conclusions and propose a new analysis of the data. The four meta-analyses included different studies, derived different effect size estimates from common studies, used different weighting functions and metrics of effect size, and used different approaches to address nonindependence of effect sizes. Although all factors influenced the mean effect size estimates and subsequent inferences, the approach to independence had the largest influence. We recommend that meta-analysts critically assess and report choices about effect size metrics and weighting functions, and criteria for study selection and independence. Such decisions need to be justified carefully because they affect the basis for inference. Our new analysis, with a combined data set, confirms that the effect of elevated CO{sub 2} on net soil C accumulation increases with the addition of N fertilizers. Although the effect at low N inputs was not significant, statistical power to detect biogeochemically important effect sizes at low N is limited, even with meta-analysis, suggesting the continued need for

  10. Training and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, Marte

    2013-05-31

    Colorado School of Mines conducted research and training in the development and validation of an advanced CO{sub 2} GS (Geological Sequestration) probabilistic simulation and risk assessment model. CO{sub 2} GS simulation and risk assessment is used to develop advanced numerical simulation models of the subsurface to forecast CO2 behavior and transport; optimize site operational practices; ensure site safety; and refine site monitoring, verification, and accounting efforts. As simulation models are refined with new data, the uncertainty surrounding the identified risks decrease, thereby providing more accurate risk assessment. The models considered the full coupling of multiple physical processes (geomechanical and fluid flow) and describe the effects of stochastic hydro-mechanical (H-M) parameters on the modeling of CO{sub 2} flow and transport in fractured porous rocks. Graduate students were involved in the development and validation of the model that can be used to predict the fate, movement, and storage of CO{sub 2} in subsurface formations, and to evaluate the risk of potential leakage to the atmosphere and underground aquifers. The main major contributions from the project include the development of: 1) an improved procedure to rigorously couple the simulations of hydro-thermomechanical (H-M) processes involved in CO{sub 2} GS; 2) models for the hydro-mechanical behavior of fractured porous rocks with random fracture patterns; and 3) probabilistic methods to account for the effects of stochastic fluid flow and geomechanical properties on flow, transport, storage and leakage associated with CO{sub 2} GS. The research project provided the means to educate and train graduate students in the science and technology of CO{sub 2} GS, with a focus on geologic storage. Specifically, the training included the investigation of an advanced CO{sub 2} GS simulation and risk assessment model that can be used to predict the fate, movement, and storage of CO{sub 2} in

  11. Effect of nitrogen dioxide exposure on susceptibility to influenza A virus infection in healthy adults

    SciTech Connect

    Goings, S.A.; Kulle, T.J.; Bascom, R.; Sauder, L.R.; Green, D.J.; Hebel, J.R.; Clements, M.L.

    1989-05-01

    The effect of NO/sub 2/ exposure and human susceptibility to respiratory virus infection was investigated in a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind trial conducted in an environmentally controlled research chamber over 3 yr. Healthy, nonsmoking, young adult volunteers who were seronegative to influenza A/Korea/82 (H/sub 3/N/sub 2/) virus were randomly assigned to breathe either filtered clean air (control group) or NO/sub 2/ for 2 h/day for 3 consecutive days. The NO/sub 2/ concentrations were 2 ppm (Year 1), 3 ppm (Year 2), and 1 or 2 ppm (Year 3). Live, attenuated cold-adapted (ca) influenza A/Korea/82 reassortant virus was administered intranasally to all subjects immediately after the second exposure. Only one of the 152 volunteers had any symptoms; this person had a low grade fever. Pulmonary function measurements and nonspecific airway reactivity to methacholine were unchanged after NO/sub 2/ exposure, virus infection, or both. Infection was determined by virus recovery, a fourfold or greater increase in serum or nasal wash influenza-specific antibody titers, or both. The infection rates of the groups were 12/21 (2 ppm NO/sub 2/) versus 15/23 (clean air) in Year 1, 17/22 (3 ppm NO/sub 2/) versus 15/21 (clean air) in Year 2, and 20/22 (2 ppm) and 20/22 (1 ppm) versus 15/21 (clean air) in Year 3. Each group exposed to 1 or 2 ppm NO2 in the last year became infected more often (91%) than did the control group (71%), but the differences were not statistically significant.

  12. Carbon dioxide and climate. January, 1970-May, 1981 (Citations from Pollution Abstracts). Report for January 1970-May 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    This retrospective bibliography contains citations concerning studies, research, observations, and analyses of the effects or impacts of natural and anthropogenic perturbations or changes in the global carbon dioxide system. A wide variety of carbon dioxide sources and impact mechanisms are considered. Much of the research involves mathematical modeling aimed at forecasting weather modification, climatic change, and biological impacts. (Contains 48 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  13. Effect of Zirconium Dioxide Nanoparticles on Glutathione Peroxidase Enzyme in PC12 and N2a Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Asadpour, Elham; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Boroushaki, Mohammad Taher

    2014-01-01

    Today, special attention is paid to the use of zirconium dioxide nanoparticle (nano-ZrO2), a neutral bioceramic metal, particularly for drug and gene delivery in medicine. However, there are some reports implying that use of nano-ZrO2 is associated with cytotoxic effects like inhibiting the cell proliferation, DNA damage and apoptosis. In the present study, we examined whether nano-ZrO2 alters cell viability and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in two neuronal cell lines. The PC12 and N2a cells were cultured in the absence or presence of varying concentrations (31.25-2000 µg/mL) of nano-ZrO2 for 12, 24 or 48 h. The cell viability was evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay and GPx activity was determined by quantifying the rate of oxidation of the reduced glutathione to the oxidized glutathione. Nano-ZrO2 caused a significant reduction in cell viability and GPx activity after 12, 24 and 48 h, as compared with control group. These effects were concentration dependent and started from 250 µg/mL. The present study demonstrated that nano-ZrO2, at concentrations of > 250 µg/mL, has antiproliferative effects via reducing the cell defense mechanism against oxidative stress. PMID:25587301

  14. Activation Effect of Fullerene C60 on the Carbon Dioxide Absorption Performance of Amine-Rich Polypropylenimine Dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Enrico; Barron, Andrew R

    2015-08-24

    Converting amine-rich compounds into highly effective carbon dioxide (CO2 ) sorbents requires a better understanding and control of their properties. The reaction of fullerene C60 with polyethyleneimine converts the polymer into a high-performance CO2 sorbent. In this study, experimental evidence is reported for the activation effect of C60 on the amine moieties of the polymer. To do so, polypropylenimine (PPI) dendrimers that allowed for a systematic comparison of molecular composition and CO2 absorption were used. The addition of C60 to PPI to form PPI-C60 results in a reduction of the energy barrier of CO2 absorption, but also in a parallel decrease in the frequency of successful collisions between CO2 and PPI-C60 due to a possible disruption of the hydrogen-bonding network of amino groups and bound water in PPI. This finding supports the existence of a non-affinity "repulsive" effect between hydrophobic C60 and hydrophilic amines that forces them to be actively exposed to CO2.

  15. Effect of pipe corrosion scales on chlorine dioxide consumption in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Stout, Janet E; Yu, Victor L; Vidic, Radisav

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies showed that temperature and total organic carbon in drinking water would cause chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) loss in a water distribution system and affect the efficiency of ClO(2) for Legionella control. However, among the various causes of ClO(2) loss in a drinking water distribution system, the loss of disinfectant due to the reaction with corrosion scales has not been studied in detail. In this study, the corrosion scales from a galvanized iron pipe and a copper pipe that have been in service for more than 10 years were characterized by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The impact of these corrosion scale materials on ClO(2) decay was investigated in de-ionized water at 25 and 45 degrees C in a batch reactor with floating glass cover. ClO(2) decay was also investigated in a specially designed reactor made from the iron and copper pipes to obtain more realistic reaction rate data. Goethite (alpha-FeOOH) and magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) were identified as the main components of iron corrosion scale. Cuprite (Cu(2)O) was identified as the major component of copper corrosion scale. The reaction rate of ClO(2) with both iron and copper oxides followed a first-order kinetics. First-order decay rate constants for ClO(2) reactions with iron corrosion scales obtained from the used service pipe and in the iron pipe reactor itself ranged from 0.025 to 0.083 min(-1). The decay rate constant for ClO(2) with Cu(2)O powder and in the copper pipe reactor was much smaller and it ranged from 0.0052 to 0.0062 min(-1). Based on these results, it can be concluded that the corrosion scale will cause much more significant ClO(2) loss in corroded iron pipes of the distribution system than the total organic carbon that may be present in finished water.

  16. Effects of posture on carbon dioxide responsiveness in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, M; Hida, W; Chonan, T; Okabe, S; Miki, H; Taguchi, O; Kikuchi, Y; Takishima, T

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--It is well known that upper airway resistance increases with postural change from a sitting to supine position in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). It is not known, however, how the postural change affects the ventilatory and occlusion pressure response to hypercapnia in patients with OSA when awake. METHODS--The responses of minute ventilation (VE) and mouth pressure 0.1 seconds after the onset of occluded inspiration (P0.1) to progressive hypercapnia (delta VE/delta PCO2, delta P0.1/delta PCO2) both in sitting and supine positions were measured in 20 patients with OSA. The ratio of the two (delta VE/delta P0.1) was obtained as an index of breathing efficiency. The postural changes in response to carbon dioxide (CO2) after uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) were also compared in seven patients with OSA. RESULTS--There were no significant changes in the resting values of end tidal PCO2, P0.1, or VE between the two positions. During CO2 rebreathing, delta VE/delta PCO2 did not differ between the two positions, but delta P0.1/delta PCO2 was significantly higher in the supine than in the sitting position (supine, mean 0.67 (SE 0.09) cm H2O/mm Hg; sitting, mean 0.57 (SE 0.08) cm H2O/mm Hg), and delta VE/delta P0.1 decreased significantly from the sitting to the supine position (sitting, 4.6 (0.4) l/min/cm H2O; supine, 3.9 (0.4) l/min/cm H2O). In seven patients with OSA who underwent UPPP, delta VE/delta P0.1 improved significantly in the supine position and postural change in delta VE/delta P0.1 was eliminated. CONCLUSIONS--These results suggest that in patients with OSA the inspiratory drive in the supine position increases to maintain the same level of ventilation as in the sitting position, and that the postural change from sitting to supine reduces breathing efficiency. Load compensation mechanisms of patients with OSA appear to be intact while awake in response to the rise in upper airway resistance. PMID:8322243

  17. Research: measuring the Brexit effect.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-12-07

    Several months after the seismic European Union referendum result, many in the nursing research community continue to fear the future. 'I was shocked by the outcome,' says RCN Research Society professional adviser Ann McMahon. 'My assumption is that the research community as a whole wanted to remain. It's beginning to get quite real for people now. There is concern about what might happen.'

  18. Experience Effect in E-Learning Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bing; Xu, WenXia; Ge, Jun

    This study is a productivity review on the literature gleaned from SSCI, SCIE databases concerning experience in E-Learning research. The result indicates that the number of literature productions on experience effect in ELearning research is still growing from 2005. The main research development country is Croatia, and from the analysis of the publication year, the number of papers is increasing to the peaking in 2010. And the main source title is British Journal of Educational Technology. In addition the subject area concentrated on Education & Educational Research. Moreover the research focuses on are mainly survey research and empirical research, in order to explore experience effect in E-Learning research. Also the limitations and future research of these research were discussed, so that the direction for further research work can be exploited

  19. The Effects of Storm Events on Carbon Dioxide Exchange in Southern Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, R. F.; Ostrander, C. E.; Chung, M.; Paquay, F.; de Gelleke, L.; Akiba, M.; Fagan, K. E.; de Carlo, E. H.; MacKenzie, F. T.; McManus, M. A.; Sabine, C. L.; Feely, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of local climatic variability on the biogeochemistry of southern Kaneohe Bay, Oahu. Intense or prolonged rainfall over the bay and its watershed generate pulses of nutrient- and sediment-rich freshwater that subsequently induce phytoplankton blooms and impact carbon cycling. Variable land-based inputs, boundary layer dynamics, as well as changes in water circulation patterns make it difficult to classify coastal waters solely as CO2 sinks or sources on annual time scales. This issue has been examined by various research groups, which have produced contradictory results, and has gained complexity owing to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations due to anthropogenic input. High frequency surface water data collection was carried out from instruments on our Coral Reef Instrumented Monitoring and CO2 Platform (CRIMP-CO2), which was first deployed in November, 2005. In addition, water column properties throughout the South bay were investigated through synoptic sampling. The "La Niña" event that occurred since the deployment of the buoy represented one of the wettest winter seasons in the area over the past 30 years. The results from the sampling of the major rainfall events during this period have been examined and contrasted, including one which lasted for over 40 days causing floods, triggering periodic sewage spills, and leading to highly turbid plumes extending far out into the South bay. Phytoplankton blooms and a drawdown of CO2 occurred following each of the major storm events, with pCO2 minima of approximately 228 to 280 μatm, causing the South bay waters to switch from being a net source to a net sink of atmospheric CO2. Wind speed, along with the extent of the CO2 drawdown, was found to be the major control on the magnitude of this sink. Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations cause a greater difference between air and water pCO2 during the blooms, when bay water pCO2 is relatively low

  20. The Effect of Additional Dead Space on Respiratory Exchange Ratio and Carbon Dioxide Production Due to Training

    PubMed Central

    Smolka, Lukasz; Borkowski, Jacek; Zaton, Marek

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of implementing additional respiratory dead space during cycloergometry-based aerobic training. The primary outcome measures were respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2). Two groups of young healthy males: Experimental (Exp, n = 15) and Control (Con, n = 15), participated in this study. The training consisted of 12 sessions, performed twice a week for 6 weeks. A single training session consisted of continuous, constant-rate exercise on a cycle ergometer at 60% of VO2max which was maintained for 30 minutes. Subjects in Exp group were breathing through additional respiratory dead space (1200ml), while subjects in Con group were breathing without additional dead space. Pre-test and two post-training incremental exercise tests were performed for the detection of gas exchange variables. In all training sessions, pCO2 was higher and blood pH was lower in the Exp group (p < 0.001) ensuring respiratory acidosis. A 12-session training program resulted in significant increase in performance time in both groups (from 17”29 ± 1”31 to 18”47 ± 1”37 in Exp; p=0.02 and from 17”20 ± 1”18 to 18”45 ± 1”44 in Con; p = 0.02), but has not revealed a significant difference in RER and VCO2 in both post-training tests, performed at rest and during submaximal workload. We interpret the lack of difference in post-training values of RER and VCO2 between groups as an absence of inhibition in glycolysis and glycogenolysis during exercise with additional dead space. Key Points The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of implementing additional respiratory dead space during cycloergometry-based aerobic training on respiratory exchange ratio and carbon dioxide production. In all training sessions, respiratory acidosis was gained by experimental group only. No significant difference in RER and VCO2 between experimental and control group due to the trainings. The lack of

  1. The effect of additional dead space on respiratory exchange ratio and carbon dioxide production due to training.

    PubMed

    Smolka, Lukasz; Borkowski, Jacek; Zaton, Marek

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of implementing additional respiratory dead space during cycloergometry-based aerobic training. The primary outcome measures were respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2). Two groups of young healthy males: Experimental (Exp, n = 15) and Control (Con, n = 15), participated in this study. The training consisted of 12 sessions, performed twice a week for 6 weeks. A single training session consisted of continuous, constant-rate exercise on a cycle ergometer at 60% of VO2max which was maintained for 30 minutes. Subjects in Exp group were breathing through additional respiratory dead space (1200ml), while subjects in Con group were breathing without additional dead space. Pre-test and two post-training incremental exercise tests were performed for the detection of gas exchange variables. In all training sessions, pCO2 was higher and blood pH was lower in the Exp group (p < 0.001) ensuring respiratory acidosis. A 12-session training program resulted in significant increase in performance time in both groups (from 17"29 ± 1"31 to 18"47 ± 1"37 in Exp; p=0.02 and from 17"20 ± 1"18 to 18"45 ± 1"44 in Con; p = 0.02), but has not revealed a significant difference in RER and VCO2 in both post-training tests, performed at rest and during submaximal workload. We interpret the lack of difference in post-training values of RER and VCO2 between groups as an absence of inhibition in glycolysis and glycogenolysis during exercise with additional dead space. Key PointsThe purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of implementing additional respiratory dead space during cycloergometry-based aerobic training on respiratory exchange ratio and carbon dioxide production.In all training sessions, respiratory acidosis was gained by experimental group only.No significant difference in RER and VCO2 between experimental and control group due to the trainings.The lack of difference in post

  2. Forced degradation studies, and effect of surfactants and titanium dioxide on the photostability of paliperidone by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Marothu, V K; Nellutla, A; Gorrepati, M; Majeti, S; Mamidala, S K

    2015-07-01

    Forced degradation study of paliperidone under hydrolytic, oxidative, thermal and photolytic stress conditions was conducted using HPLC. The drug was found to be labile under hydrolytic, oxidative and photolytic stress conditions; whereas, it was stable under dry heat stress conditions. Effect of anionic, cationic and non-ionic surfactants applied to the concentration exceeding critical micellar concentration on the photostability of paliperidone was also studied by exposing the samples to sunlight for 72h. Major degradation of the drug was found in presence of cationic and non-ionic surfactants. Effect of titanium dioxide on the photo-degradation of paliperidone in solution state was also studied and it was found that 53% of the drug was degraded after 72h of exposure to sunlight. A common degradation peak was observed in oxidative and TiO2 photocatalysed samples. This peak may be due to the generation of N-oxide of paliperidone. The same degradation peak was also observed in all other photostability samples. Chromatographic separation of drug and its degradation products was achieved on an Alltima C8 (250mm×4.6mm, 5μm) analytical column, using a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile-ammonium acetate buffer with 0.2% triethylamine (pH 3.5; 20mM) (60:40, v/v) at a flow rate of 1mL/min. Quantification was performed with UV detection at 280nm. The method was validated as per ICH guidelines.

  3. Synthesis of titanium dioxide by ultrasound assisted sol-gel technique: effect of calcination and sonication time.

    PubMed

    Pinjari, D V; Prasad, Krishnamurthy; Gogate, P R; Mhaske, S T; Pandit, A B

    2015-03-01

    Nanostructured titanium dioxide has been synthesized using both conventional and ultrasound assisted sol-gel technique with an objective of understanding the role of cavitational effects in the synthesis process. The experiments were conducted at a constant calcination temperature of 750 °C and the calcination time was varied from 30 min to 3 h to study the effect of calcination time on the properties of the synthesized TiO₂. The TiO₂ specimens were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The influence of the sonication time on the phase transformation process from anatase to rutile and also on the crystallite size and percentage crystallinity of the synthesized TiO₂ has also been investigated. It was observed that 100% phase transformation occurred after 3 h of calcination for the ultrasound assisted sol-gel synthesized TiO₂. The study on the phase transformation via variation of sonication time yielded interesting results. It was observed that as the sonication time increased, an initial increase in the rutile content is obtained and beyond optimum sonication time, the rutile content decreased. In general, the ultrasound assisted process results in synthesis of TiO₂ material with higher rutile content as compared to the conventional sol-gel process.

  4. Effect of supercritical carbon dioxide pasteurization on natural microbiota, texture, and microstructure of fresh-cut coconut.

    PubMed

    Ferrentino, Giovanna; Balzan, Sara; Dorigato, Andrea; Pegoretti, Alessandro; Spilimbergo, Sara

    2012-05-01

    The objective of the present study was the evaluation of the effectiveness of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) as a nonthermal technology for the pasteurization of fresh-cut coconut, as an example of ready-to-eat and minimally processed food. First, the inactivation kinetics of microbiota on coconut were determined using SC-CO(2) treatments (pressures at 8 and 12 MPa, temperatures from 24 to 45 °C, treatment times from 5 to 60 min). Second, the effects of SC-CO(2) on the hardness and microstructure of fresh-cut coconut processed at the optimal conditions for microbial reduction were investigated. SC-CO(2) treatment of 15 min at 45 °C and 12 MPa induced 4 log CFU/g reductions of mesophilic microorganisms, lactic acid bacteria, total coliforms, and yeasts and molds. The hardness of coconut was not affected by the treatment but the samples developed an irregular and disorderly microstructure. Results suggested the potential of SC-CO(2) in preserving fresh-cut fruits and ready-to-eat products.

  5. Three-terminal field effect switches probing the electrically triggered Metal-Insulator Transition in Vanadium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Gokul; Ko, Changhyun; Ruzmetov, Dmitry; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2010-03-01

    Electrostatic control of the Metal-Insulator Transition (MIT) in correlated oxides is valuable, both as a probe of the nature of the phase transition, as well as being a critical aspect of novel switching devices based on Mott insulators. Of much recent interest among this class of materials, is vanadium dioxide (VO2), a correlated semiconductor which exhibits a thermally induced MIT close to room temperature, and has also been shown to undergo an ultra-fast switching of conductivity by optical and electrical means. Among many of the experiments demonstrating an electrically triggered transition, however, the attendant phenomenon of Joule heating in the current channel raises questions about the triggering mechanism. To carefully address this issue, we explore the fabrication of three terminal field-effect devices, in which the resistance of a VO2 based channel may be modulated by a gate electric field in the absence of any significant current induced heating. In this talk we present details of the fabrication, the technical challenges involved in implementing them, and results of gated I-V measurements performed on these devices along with our interpretation of the observed effects.

  6. Effects of aqueous chlorine dioxide treatment on nutritional components and shelf-life of mulberry fruit (Morus alba L.).

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhao; Zhu, Chuanhe; Han, Ziqiang

    2011-06-01

    Effects of aqueous chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) treatment on nutritional components and shelf-life of mulberry fruit (Morus alba L.) were investigated. Mulberry fruit were immersed into 20, 60, and 80 mg/l ClO(2) solutions for 5, 10, and 15 min, respectively. Mulberries were then rinsed with potable tap water for 1 min and stored at -1°C for 14 d. ClO(2) treatment was effective in retention of flavonoid, ascorbic acid, reducing sugar, and titratable acid. ClO(2) concentration and treatment time were significant factors affecting ClO(2) treatment. The shelf-life of the samples treated by 60 mg/l ClO(2) for 15 min was extended to 14 d compared to 8 d for the control. No ClO(2), ClO(2)(-), or ClO(3)(-) residues were detected in samples treated by 60 mg/l ClO(2) for 15 min. These results indicated that ClO(2) treatment was a promising approach to preserve mulberry fruit with no significant risks of chemical residues.

  7. Matrix effects in nilotinib formulations with pH-responsive polymer produced by carbon dioxide-mediated precipitation.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Stefano; Brisander, Magnus; Haglöf, Jakob; Sjövall, Peter; Andersson, Per; Østergaard, Jesper; Malmsten, Martin

    2015-10-15

    Factors determining the pH-controlled dissolution kinetics of nilotinib formulations with the pH-titrable polymer hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate, obtained by carbon dioxide-mediated precipitation, were mechanistically examined in acid and neutral environment. The matrix effect, modulating the drug dissolution, was characterized with a battery of physicochemical methodologies, including ToF-SIMS for surface composition, SAXS/WAXS and modulated DSC for crystallization characterization, and simultaneous UV-imaging and Raman spectroscopy for monitoring the dissolution process in detail. The hybrid particle formulations investigated consisted of amorphous nilotinib embedded in a polymer matrix in single continuous phase, displaying extended retained amorphicity also under wet conditions. It was demonstrated by Raman and FTIR spectroscopy that the efficient drug dispersion and amorphization in the polymer matrix were mediated by hydrogen bonding between the drug and the phthalate groups on the polymer. Simultaneous Raman and UV-imaging studies of the effect of drug load on the swelling and dissolution of the polymer matrix revealed that high nilotinib load prevented matrix swelling on passage from acid to neutral pH, thereby preventing re-precipitation and re-crystallization of incorporated nilotinib. These findings provide a mechanistic foundation of formulation development of nilotinib and other protein kinase inhibitors, which are now witnessing an intense therapeutic and industrial attention due to the difficulty in formulating these compounds so that efficient oral bioavailability is reached.

  8. Lateral positioning of the stable ventilated very-low-birth-weight infant. Effect on transcutaneous oxygen and carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Bozynski, M E; Naglie, R A; Nicks, J J; Burpee, B; Johnson, R V

    1988-02-01

    Eighteen stable very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) mechanically ventilated infants with chronic lung disease were studied to examine the effects of right and left lateral positioning in contrast to supine positioning on transcutaneous (tc) oxygen (tcPO2) and carbon dioxide measurements (tcPCO2). The neonates were studied at a median postnatal age of 31 days (range, 17 to 57 days) and had median birth weights and gestational ages of 975 g (range, 570 to 1360 g) and 27.5 weeks (range, 24 to 30 weeks), respectively. Median fraction of inspiratory oxygen was 0.32 (range, 0.23 to 0.40). The sequence of study positions was randomly determined. Sleep state as well as tcPO2 and tcPCO2 were recorded every 30 s for five minutes. A significant difference in mean tcPO2 or tcPCO2 was not detected for any of the positions. Lateral positioning may facilitate the development of midline behavior in VLBW infants. Care givers are often reluctant to position infants in side lying, however, because of concerns that ventilation or oxygenation might be compromised. We conclude that placing the stable VLBW mechanically ventilated infant in a side-lying position has no deleterious effects on oxygenation and ventilation, as measured by tcPO2 and tcPCO2, and therefore should be encouraged.

  9. Enhanced visible light activity of nano-titanium dioxide doped with multiple ions: Effect of crystal defects

    SciTech Connect

    Jaimy, Kanakkanmavudi B.; Ghosh, Swapankumar; Gopakumar Warrier, Krishna

    2012-12-15

    Titanium dioxide photocatalysts co-doped with iron(III) and lanthanum(III) have been prepared through a modified sol-gel method. Doping with Fe{sup 3+} resulted in a relatively lower anatase to rutile phase transformation temperature, while La{sup 3+} addition reduced the crystal growth and thus retarded the phase transformation of titania nanoparticles. The presence of Fe{sup 3+} ions shifted the absorption profile of titania to the longer wavelength side of the spectrum and enhanced the visible light activity. On the other hand, La{sup 3+} addition improved the optical absorption of titania nanoparticles. Both the dopants improved the life time of excitons by proper transferring and trapping of photoexcited charges. In the present work, considerable enhancement in photocatalytic activity under visible light was achieved through synergistic effect of optimum concentrations of the two dopants and associated crystal defects. - Graphical abstract: Photocatalytic activity studies indicate a synergistic effect of dopants and crystal defects leading to an enhanced photochemical activity. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An aqueous sol-gel synthesis of Fe{sup 3+} and La{sup 3+} co-doped TiO{sub 2} is being reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical and microstructural properties of titania were modified by co-doping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced activity of titania by the crystal defects is being reported.

  10. Adsorption of carbon dioxide, methane, and their mixtures in porous carbons: effect of surface chemistry, water content, and pore disorder.

    PubMed

    Billemont, Pierre; Coasne, Benoit; De Weireld, Guy

    2013-03-12

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide, methane, and their mixtures in nanoporous carbons in the presence of water is studied using experiments and molecular simulations. Both the experimental and numerical samples contain polar groups that account for their partially hydrophilicity. For small amounts of adsorbed water, although the shape of the adsorption isotherms remain similar, both the molecular simulations and experiments show a slight decrease in the CO2 and CH4 adsorption amounts. For large amounts of adsorbed water, the experimental data suggest the formation of methane or carbon dioxide clathrates in agreement with previous work. In contrast, the molecular simulations do not account for the formation of such clathrates. Another important difference between the simulated and experimental data concerns the number of water molecules that desorb upon increasing the pressure of carbon dioxide and methane. Although the experimental data indicate that water remains adsorbed upon carbon dioxide and methane adsorption, the molecular simulations suggest that 40 to 75% of the initial amount of adsorbed water desorbs with carbon dioxide or methane pressure. Such discrepancies show that differences between the simulated and experimental samples are crucial to account for the rich phase behavior of confined water-gas systems. Our simulations for carbon dioxide-methane coadsorption in the presence of water suggest that the pore filling is not affected by the presence of water and that adsorbed solution theory can be applied for pressures as high as 15 MPa.

  11. Route-dependent systemic and local immune effects following exposure to solutions prepared from titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Auttachoat, Wimolnut; McLoughlin, Colleen E; White, Kimber L; Smith, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) is a white pigment widely used in foods, sunscreens, and other cosmetic products. However, it remains unclear whether exposure to nano-TiO2 results in immunosuppressive effects or induces a contact hypersensitivity response. To address these data gaps, studies were conducted with the hypothesis that nano-TiO2 exposure could alter immune responses. After 28 days of oral gavage, nano-TiO2 (1.25-250 mg/kg in 0.5% methylcellulose) produced no significant effects on innate, humoral, or cell-mediated immune functions in female B6C3F1 mice. Furthermore, there were no effects on the weights of selected organs (spleen, thymus, liver, lung, and kidneys with adrenals). Following dermal exposure on the ears for 3 days, nano-TiO2 (2.5-10% w/v in 4:1 acetone:olive oil) did not affect auricular lymph node cell proliferation, although an irritancy response was observed following treatment with 5% and 10% nano-TiO2. Dermal sensitization (2.5-10%) on the back and subsequent challenge (10%) on the right ear with nano-TiO2 produced no significant effects on percentage ear swelling in the Mouse Ear Swelling Test (MEST). However, when nano-TiO2 was injected subcutaneously along the mid-line on top of the head at 125-250 mg/kg (in 0.5% methylcellulose), significant increases in auricular lymph node cell proliferation resulted. These results demonstrate that immune effects of nano-TiO2 exposure are route-of-exposure dependent, and they suggest that irritancy and/or potential hypersensitivity responses may occur following parenteral exposure or dermal administration of nano-TiO2 to compromised skin.

  12. Effect of redox conditions on bacterial and fungal biomass and carbon dioxide production in Louisiana coastal swamp forest sediment.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong Cheol; DeLaune, Ronald D

    2010-08-01

    Fungal and bacterial carbon dioxide (CO2) production/emission was determined under a range of redox conditions in sediment from a Louisiana swamp forest used for wastewater treatment. Sediment was incubated in microcosms at 6 Eh levels (-200, -100, 0, +100, +250 and +400 mV) covering the anaerobic range found in wetland soil and sediment. Carbon dioxide production was determined by the substrate-induced respiration (SIR) inhibition method. Cycloheximide (C15H23NO4) was used as the fungal inhibitor and streptomycin (C21H39N7O12) as the bacterial inhibitor. Under moderately reducing conditions (Eh > +250 mV), fungi contributed more than bacteria to the CO2 production. Under highly reducing conditions (Eh < or = 0 mV), bacteria contributed more than fungi to the total CO2 production. The fungi/bacteria (F/B) ratios varied between 0.71-1.16 for microbial biomass C, and 0.54-0.94 for microbial biomass N. Under moderately reducing conditions (Eh > or = +100 mV), the F/B ratios for microbial biomass C and N were higher than that for highly reducing conditions (Eh < or = 0 mV). In moderately reducing conditions (Eh > or = +100 mV), the C/N microbial biomass ratio for fungi (C/N: 13.54-14.26) was slightly higher than for bacteria (C/N: 9.61-12.07). Under highly reducing redox conditions (Eh < or = 0 mV), the C/N microbial biomass ratio for fungi (C/N: 10.79-12.41) was higher than for bacteria (C/N: 8.21-9.14). For bacteria and fungi, the C/N microbial biomass ratios under moderately reducing conditions were higher than that in highly reducing conditions. Fungal CO2 production from swamp forest could be of greater ecological significance under moderately reducing sediment conditions contributing to the greenhouse effect (GHE) and the global warming potential (GWP). However, increases in coastal submergence associated with global sea level rise and resultant decrease in sediment redox potential from increased flooding would likely shift CO2 production to bacteria rather than

  13. Engineered nanoparticles of titanium dioxide (TIO2): Uptake and biological effects in a sea bass cell line.

    PubMed

    Picchietti, S; Bernini, C; Stocchi, V; Taddei, A R; Meschini, R; Fausto, A M; Rocco, L; Buonocore, F; Cervia, D; Scapigliati, G

    2017-02-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology there has been a corresponding increase in the application of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) in various consumer and industrial products, consequently their potential health hazards and environmental effects are considered an aspect of great concern. In the present study, in order to assess the impact of TiO2-NPs in the marine environment, the biological effects of TiO2-NPs on a sea bass cell line (DLEC) were investigated. Cells were exposed for 24 h to different concentrations of TiO2-NPs (1, 8, 40, 200 and 1000 μg/ml) or co-exposed with CdCl2 (Cd). The effects of UV light irradiation were also investigated in cells treated with TiO2-NPs and/or Cd. The internalization of TiO2-NPs and the morphological cell modifications induced by the treatments were examined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, this latter coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for particle element detection. In addition, the effects of controlled exposures were studied evaluating the cytotoxicity, the DNA damage and the expression of inflammatory genes. Our study indicates that TiO2-NPs were localized on the cell surface mainly as agglomerates revealed by EDS analysis and that they were uptaken by the cells inducing morphological changes. Photoactivation of TiO2-NPs and/or co-exposure with Cd affects ATP levels and it contributes to induce acute cellular toxicity in DLEC cells dependent on Ti concentration. The inflammatory potential and the DNA damage, this latter displayed through a caspase-3 independent apoptotic process, were also demonstrated. Overall our data suggest that the interaction of TiO2-NPs with marine water contaminants, such as cadmium, and the UV irradiation, may be an additional threat to marine organisms.

  14. Effects of elevated carbon dioxide and ozone on the phytochemistry of aspen and performance of an herbivore.

    PubMed

    Kopper, Brian J; Lindroth, Richard L

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the independent and interactive effects of CO(2), O(3), and plant genotype on the foliar quality of a deciduous tree and the performance of a herbivorous insect. Two trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michaux) genotypes differing in response to CO(2) and O(3) were grown at the Aspen FACE (Free Air CO(2) Enrichment) site located in northern Wisconsin, USA. Trees were exposed to one of four atmospheric treatments: ambient air (control), elevated carbon dioxide (+CO(2); 560 microl/l), elevated ozone (+O(3); ambient x1.5), and elevated CO(2)+O(3). We measured the effects of CO(2) and O(3) on aspen phytochemistry and on performance of forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria Hübner) larvae. CO(2) and O(3) treatments influenced foliar quality for both genotypes, with the most notable effects being that elevated CO(2) reduced nitrogen and increased tremulacin levels, whereas elevated O(3) increased early season nitrogen and reduced tremulacin levels, relative to controls. With respect to insects, the +CO(2) treatment had little or no effect on larval performance. Larval performance improved in the +O(3) treatment, but this response was negated by the addition of elevated CO(2) (i.e., +CO(2)+O(3) treatment). We conclude that tent caterpillars will have the greatest impact on aspen under current CO(2) and high O(3) levels, due to increases in insect performance and decreases in tree growth, whereas tent caterpillars will have the least impact on aspen under high CO(2) and low O(3) levels, due to moderate changes in insect performance and increases in tree growth.

  15. Field-Effect Modulation of Ambipolar Doping and Domain Wall Band Alignment in P-type Vanadium Dioxide Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yasen; Peng, Xingyue; Yang, Yiming; Yu, Dong

    The sub-picosecond metal-insulator phase transition in vanadium dioxide (VO2) has attracted extensive attention with potential applications in ultrafast Mott transistors. However, the development of VO2-based transistors lags behind, owing to the lack of an efficient and hysteresis-free electrostatic doping control. Here we report the first synthesis of p-type single crystalline VO2nanowires via catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition. The p-type doping was unambiguously confirmed by both solid and electrochemical gating methods, and further evidenced by the scanning photocurrent microscopic measurements. Interestingly, we observed that the photocurrent spot polarity at the metal-insulator domain walls was reversibly switched by electrochemical gating, which indicates a band bending flipping. Furthermore, we eliminated the common hysteresis in gate sweep and greatly shortened the transistor response time via a hybrid gating method, which combines the merits of liquid ionic and solid gating. The capability of efficient field effect modulation of ambipolar conduction and band alignment offers new opportunities on understanding the phase transition mechanism and enables novel electronic applications based on VO2.

  16. The effect of acidity of electrolyte on the porosity and the nanostructure morphology of electrolytic manganese dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelkhani, H.

    2012-06-01

    The effects of acidity of electrolyte (pH) on the hysteresis behavior, the specific surface area, and nanostructure morphology of electrolytic manganese dioxides (EMDs) have been studied by using the Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images analysis. EMD samples are electrodeposited at a variable pH (6 to 1) and many fixed pH (2, 3, 4, 5, and 6). Results indicate that pH play key roles in the characteristics of EMD. The samples obtained at low pH (2 and 3) show multi-branched morphology and represent a H4 hysteresis loop. At pH 4 and 5, a uniform and dense structure of MnO2 is obtained without hysteresis behavior. The sample electrodeposited at pH 6 shows a regular reticulate, that its adsorption-desorption isotherm show hysteresis behavior. By electrodeposition at a variable pH, the sample shows a cauliflower-like and multi-branched form. From the viewpoint of classification of isotherm, pH strongly affects on Type of isotherm. The results show that γ-MnO2 is as main-product of electrodeposition and α-MnO2 and β-MnO2 were obtained as side-product at low and high pH, respectively.

  17. The Effects of Experimental Conditions on the Refractive Index and Density of Low-Temperature Ices: Solid Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Moore, M. H.; Gerakines, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first study on the effects of the deposition technique on the measurements of the visible refractive index and the density of a low-temperature ice using solid carbon dioxide (CO2) at 14-70 K as an example. While our measurements generally agree with previous studies that show a dependence of index and density on temperature below 50 K, we also find that the measured values depend on the method used to create each sample. Below 50 K, we find that the refractive index varied by as much as 4% and the density by as much as 16% at a single temperature depending on the deposition method. We also show that the Lorentz-Lorenz approximation is valid for solid CO2 across the full 14-70 K temperature range, regardless of the deposition method used. Since the refractive index and density are important in calculations of optical constants and infrared (IR) band strengths of materials, our results suggest that the deposition method must be considered in cases where nvis and ? are not measured in the same experimental setup where the IR spectral measurements are made.

  18. Comparison of electronarcosis and carbon dioxide sedation effects on travel time in adult Chinook and Coho Salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keep, Shane G; Allen, M. Brady; Zendt, Joseph S

    2015-01-01

    The immobilization of fish during handling is crucial in avoiding injury to fish and is thought to reduce handling stress. Chemical sedatives have been a primary choice for fish immobilization. However, most chemical sedatives accumulate in tissues, and often food fishes must be held until accumulations degrade to levels safe for human consumption. Historically, there have been few options for nonchemical sedation. Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been widely used for decades as a sedative, and while it does not require a degradation period, it does have drawbacks. The use of electronarcosis is another nonchemical option that does not require degradation time. However, little is known about the latent and delayed effects on migration rates of adult salmonids that have been immobilized with electricity. We compared the travel times of adult Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and Coho Salmon O. kisutch through a fishway at river kilometer (rkm) 4, and to rkm 16 and rkm 32 after being immobilized with either CO2 or electronarcosis. Travel times of fish treated with either CO2 or electronarcosis were similar within species. Because of the nearly instantaneous induction of and recovery from electronarcosis, we recommend it as an alternative to CO2 for handling large adult salmonids.

  19. Effects of sulfur dioxide concentration on organic acids and β-carotene in dried apricots during storage.

    PubMed

    Salur-Can, Ayşenur; Türkyılmaz, Meltem; Özkan, Mehmet

    2017-04-15

    The effects of various sulfur dioxide (SO2) concentrations (0, 451, 832, 1594, 2112 and 3241mg/kg) on the profiles and contents of organic acids (OAs) and β-carotene in sulfured dried apricots (SDAs) were investigated during storage at 4, 20 and 30°C for 379days. In all samples, four OAs [malic acid (MA), citric acid (CA), succinic acid (SA) and oxalic acid (OXA)] were identified. SA (13.9-31.8g/kgdw) was the major OA in SDAs containing SO2 at lower than 1594mgSO2/kg, while MA (11.7-11.7g/kgdw) was the major OA in SDAs containing SO2 at higher than 1594mgSO2/kg. As SO2 concentration increased, CA and OXA contents increased whereas MA contents decreased. Moreover, the highest stabilities of β-carotene, MA and SO2 were determined in SDAs containing 1594mgSO2/kg at 4°C. Therefore, we suggest using 1594mgSO2/kg and storing SDAs at 4°C to protect OAs and β-carotene.

  20. The effects of different types of nano-silicon dioxide additives on the properties of sludge ash mortar.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huan-Lin; Chang, Wei-Che; Lin, Deng-Fong

    2009-04-01

    To improve the drawbacks caused by the sludge ash replacement in mortar, the previous studies have shown that the early strength and durability of sludge ash/cement mortar are improved by adding nano-silicon dioxide (nano-SiO2) to mortar. In this article, three types of nano-SiO2--SS, HS, and SP (manufacturer code names)--were applied to sludge ash/cement mixture to make paste or mortar specimens. The object is to further extend the recycle of the sludge ash by determining the better type of nano-SiO2 additive to improve properties of sludge ash/ cement paste or mortar. The cement was replaced by 0, 10, 20, and 30% of sludge ash, and 0 and 2% of nano-SiO2 additives were added to the sludge ash paste or mortar specimens. Tests such as setting time, compressive strength, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, and thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis were performed in this study. Test results show that nano-SiO2 additives can not only effectively increase the hydration product (calcium silicate hydrate [C-S-H] gel), but also make the crystal structure denser. Among the three types of nano-SiO2 additive, the SS type can best improve the properties of sludge ash/cement paste or mortar, followed by the SP and HS types.

  1. Effect of cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide concentration on structure, morphology and carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of calcium hydroxide based sorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlaing, Nwe Ni; Vignesh, K.; Sreekantan, Srimala; Pung, Swee-Yong; Hinode, Hirofumi; Kurniawan, Winarto; Othman, Radzali; Thant, Aye Aye; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman; Salim, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) has been proposed as an important material for industrial, architectural, and environmental applications. In this study, calcium acetate was used as a precursor and cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) was used as a surfactant to synthesize Ca(OH)2 based adsorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. The effect of CTAB concentration (0.2-0.8 M) on the structure, morphology and CO2 adsorption performance of Ca(OH)2 was studied in detail. The synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), BET surfaced area and thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) techniques. The phase purity, crystallite size, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and CO2 adsorption performance of Ca(OH)2 precursor adsorbents were significantly increased when the concentration of CTAB was increased. XRD results showed that pure Ca(OH)2 phase was obtained at the CTAB concentration of 0.8 M. TGA results exhibited that 0.8 M of CTAB-assisted Ca(OH)2 precursor adsorbent possessed a residual carbonation conversion of ∼56% after 10 cycles.

  2. Extraction of lycopene from tomato skin with supercritical carbon dioxide: effect of operating conditions and solubility analysis.

    PubMed

    Topal, Ummihan; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu; Hayakawa, Kiro

    2006-07-26

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) extraction of lycopene from waste tomato skins was investigated. The experiments were carried out at pressures and temperatures ranging from 20 to 50 MPa and 313 to 373 K, respectively, without any modifiers. The flow rate of CO2 was maintained at 2.5 mL/min for 330 min extraction time. Solvent flow rate effect was examined for CO2 flow rates from 1.5 to 4.5 mL/min. The extracts were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and UV-visible spectroscopy. The results showed that with optimized operating conditions, the maximum yield of lycopene (1.18 mg of lycopene/g of sample) was obtained at 40 MPa, 373 K, and 2.5 mL of CO2/min. Chromatographic analysis indicated that lycopene was extracted from tomato skin with negligible degradation at the optimum conditions and the amount extracted represented more than 94% of the total carotenoid content of the sample. The solubility of lycopene was modeled by use of the Chrastil equation.

  3. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CO-EXPOSURE TO FINE PARTICLES AND NITROGEN DIOXIDE IN HEALTHY YOUNG ADULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with adverse health effects. It is unclear if co-exposure to NO2, a common pollutant gas, potentiates the PM effects. Healthy young volunteers were recruited and exposed to either filtered air (FA), NO2 (0.5 ppm), concentrated Cha...

  4. Elevated pressure of carbon dioxide affects growth of thermophilic Petrotoga sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakoczy, Jana; Gniese, Claudia; Schippers, Axel; Schlömann, Michael; Krüger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is considered a promising new technology which reduces carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere and thereby decelerates global warming. During CCS, carbon dioxide is captured from emission sources (e.g. fossil fuel power plants or other industries), pressurised, and finally stored in deep geological formations, such as former gas or oil reservoirs as well as saline aquifers. However, with CCS being a very young technology, there are a number of unknown factors that need to be investigated before declaring CCS as being safe. Our research investigates the effect of high carbon dioxide concentrations and pressures on an indigenous microorganism that colonises a potential storage site. Growth experiments were conducted using the thermophilic thiosulphate-reducing bacterium Petrotoga sp., isolated from formation water of the gas reservoir Schneeren (Lower Saxony, Germany), situated in the Northern German Plain. Growth (OD600) was monitored over one growth cycle (10 days) at different carbon dioxide concentrations (50%, 100%, and 150% in the gas phase), and was compared to control cultures grown with 20% carbon dioxide. An additional growth experiment was performed over a period of 145 days with repeated subcultivation steps in order to detect long-term effects of carbon dioxide. Cultivation over 10 days at 50% and 100% carbon dioxide slightly reduced cell growth. In contrast, long-term cultivation at 150% carbon dioxide reduced cell growth and finally led to cell death. This suggested a more pronounced effect of carbon dioxide at prolonged cultivation and stresses the need for a closer consideration of long-term effects. Experiments with supercritical carbon dioxide at 100 bar completely inhibited growth of freshly inoculated cultures and also caused a rapid decrease of growth of a pre-grown culture. This demonstrated that supercritical carbon dioxide had a sterilising effect on cells. This effect was not observed in control cultures

  5. The effect of regional groundwater on carbon dioxide and methane emissions from a lowland rainforest stream in Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oviedo-Vargas, Diana; Genereux, David P.; Dierick, Diego; Oberbauer, Steven F.

    2015-12-01

    In the tropical rainforest at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica, regional bedrock groundwater high in dissolved carbon discharges into some streams and wetlands, with the potential for multiple cascading effects on ecosystem carbon pools and fluxes. We investigated carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) degassing from two streams at La Selva: the Arboleda, where approximately one third of the streamflow is from regional groundwater, and the Taconazo, fed exclusively by local groundwater recharged within the catchment. The regional groundwater inflow to the Arboleda had no measurable effect on stream gas exchange velocity, dissolved CH4 concentration, or CH4 emissions but significantly increased stream CO2 concentration and degassing. CO2 evasion from the reach of the Arboleda receiving regional groundwater (lower Arboleda) averaged 5.5 mol C m-2 d-1, ~7.5 times higher than the average (0.7 mol C m-2 d-1) from the stream reaches with no regional groundwater inflow (the Taconazo and upper Arboleda). Carbon emissions from both streams were dominated by CO2; CH4 accounted for only 0.06-1.70% of the total (average of both streams: 5 × 10-3 mol C m-2 d-1). Annual stream degassing fluxes normalized by watershed area were 48 and 299 g C m-2 for the Taconazo and Arboleda, respectively. CO2 degassing from the Arboleda is a significant carbon flux, similar in magnitude to the average net ecosystem exchange estimated by eddy covariance. Examining the effects of catchment connections to underlying hydrogeological systems can help avoid overestimation of ecosystem respiration and advance our understanding of carbon source/sink status and overall terrestrial ecosystem carbon budgets.

  6. Effect of different-sized colloids on the transport and deposition of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in quartz sand.

    PubMed

    Cai, Li; Peng, Shengnan; Wu, Dan; Tong, Meiping

    2016-01-01

    Colloids (non-biological and biological) with different sizes are ubiquitous in natural environment. The investigations regarding the influence of different-sized colloids on the transport and deposition behaviors of engineered-nanoparticles in porous media yet are still largely lacking. This study investigated the effects of different-sized non-biological and biological colloids on the transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) in quartz sand under both electrostatically favorable and unfavorable conditions. Fluorescent carboxylate-modified polystyrene latex microspheres (CML) with sizes of 0.2-2 μm were utilized as model non-biological colloids, while Gram-negative Escherichia coli (∼ 1 μm) and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis (∼ 2 μm) were employed as model biological colloids. Under the examined solution conditions, both breakthrough curves and retained profiles of nTiO2 with different-sized CML particles/bacteria were similar as those without colloids under favorable conditions, indicating that the copresence of model colloids in suspensions had negligible effects on the transport and deposition of nTiO2 under favorable conditions. In contrast, higher breakthrough curves and lower retained profiles of nTiO2 with CML particles/bacteria relative to those without copresent colloids were observed under unfavorable conditions. Clearly, the copresence of model colloids increased the transport and decreased the deposition of nTiO2 in quartz sand under unfavorable conditions (solution conditions examined in present study). Both competition of deposition sites on quartz sand surfaces and the enhanced stability/dispersion of nTiO2 induced by copresent colloids were found to be responsible for the increased nTiO2 transport with colloids under unfavorable conditions. Moreover, the smallest colloids had the highest coverage on sand surface and most significant dispersion effect on nTiO2, resulting in the greatest nTiO2 transport.

  7. Overview of Nitrogen Dioxide Effects on the Lung with Emphasis on Military Relevance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    NO, exposures for humans Concentration (ppm) Time (mini ] 10 30 25 10 50 5 K_ oaility Codes Avail and I or Dist Special - - .. . k :.-y 178 M, A...multiplied by the exposure duration is equal to a constant (C x T= K ) -- throughout the dose- 182 M.A. Mayorga / 1]xucology 89 ( 1994) 175-192 response curve...Animals used in NO 2 models include mice, rats, hamsters, rabbits, dogs, sheep, monkeys and humans (The National Research Council, 1977: Januszkiewicz et

  8. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-01-07

    New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 °C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture.

  9. Competitive displacement alters top-down effects on carbon dioxide concentrations in a freshwater ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Trisha B; Hammill, Edd; Srivastava, Diane S; Richardson, John S

    2014-05-01

    Climate change and invasive species have the potential to alter species diversity, creating novel species interactions. Interspecific competition and facilitation between predators may either enhance or dampen trophic cascades, ultimately influencing total predator effects on communities and biogeochemical cycling of ecosystems. However, previous studies have only investigated the effects of a single predator species on CO2 flux of aquatic ecosystems. In this study, we measured and compared the individual and joint effects of predatory damselfly larvae and diving beetles on total prey biomass, leaf litter processing, and dissolved CO2 concentrations of experimental bromeliad ecosystems. Damselfly larvae created strong trophic cascades that reduced CO2 concentrations by ~46% relative to no-predator treatments. Conversely, the effects of diving beetles on prey biomass, leaf litter processing, and dissolved CO2 were not statistically different to no-predator treatments. Relative to multiplicative null models, the presence of damselfly larvae and diving beetles together resulted in antagonistic relations that eliminated trophic cascades and top-down influences on CO2 concentrations. Furthermore, we showed that the antagonistic interactions between predators occurred due to a tactile response that culminated in competitive displacement of damselfly larvae. Our results demonstrate that predator identity and predator-predator interactions can influence CO2 concentrations of an aquatic ecosystem. We suggest that predator effects on CO2 fluxes may depend on the particular predator species removed or added to the ecosystem and their interactions with other predators.

  10. Effect of calcium cation on lipid vesicle deposition on silicon dioxide surface under various thermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Xu, Fan; Yuan, Bing; Ren, Chunlai; Jiang, Zhongying; Ma, Yuqiang

    2012-01-01

    Calcium cation (Ca(2+)) is a key element to the cell membrane functions. Its effects on liquid crystal vesicle deposition have already been learnt. In this study, it is found that Ca(2+) can also influence the gel vesicle deposition by controlling the vesicle rupture and fusion on SiO(2) at temperatures lower than the main transition temperature. Particular analyses were given to the vesicle-SiO(2) and inter-vesicle attractions that are originated from the Ca(2+) bridging effect. It is concluded that the aggregate condition of vesicles should be taken into consideration when dealing with vesicle deposition on a solid substrate.

  11. Effect of food processing organic matter on photocatalytic bactericidal activity of titanium dioxide (TiO2).

    PubMed

    Yemmireddy, Veerachandra K; Hung, Yen-Con

    2015-07-02

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of food processing organic matter on photocatalytic bactericidal activity of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs). Produce and meat processing wash solutions were prepared using romaine lettuce and ground beef samples. Physico-chemical properties such as pH, turbidity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), total phenolics (for produce) and protein (for meat) content of the extracts were determined using standard procedures. The photocatalytic bactericidal activity of TiO2 (1 mg/mL) in suspension with or without organic matter against Escherichia coli O157:H7 (5-strain) was determined over a period of 3h. Increasing the concentration of organic matter (either produce or meat) from 0% to 100% resulted in 85% decrease in TiO2 microbicidal efficacy. 'Turbidity, total phenolics, and protein contents in wash solutions had significant effect on the log reduction. Increasing the total phenolics content in produce washes from 20 to 114 mg/L decreased the log reduction from 2.7 to 0.38 CFU/mL, whereas increasing the protein content in meat washes from 0.12 to 1.61 mg/L decreased the log reduction from and 5.74 to 0.87 CFU/mL. Also, a linear correlation was observed between COD and total phenolics as well as COD and protein contents. While classical disinfection kinetic models failed to predict, an empirical equation in the form of "Y=me(nX)" (where Y is log reduction, X is COD, and m and n are reaction rate constants) predicted the disinfection kinetics of TiO2 in the presence of organic matter (R(2)=94.4). This study successfully identified an empirical model with COD as a predictor variable to predict the bactericidal efficacy of TiO2 when used in food processing environment.

  12. Effects of manure and cultivation on carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide emissions from a corn field under Mediterranean conditions.

    PubMed

    Heller, Hadar; Bar-Tal, Asher; Tamir, Guy; Bloom, Paul; Venterea, Rodney T; Chen, Dong; Zhang, Yi; Clapp, C Edward; Fine, Pinchas

    2010-01-01

    The use of organic residues as soil additives is increasing, but, depending on their composition and application methods, these organic amendments can stimulate the emissions of CO(2) and N(2)O. The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of management practices in irrigated sweet corn (Zea mays L.) on CO(2) and N(2)O emissions and to relate emissions to environmental factors. In a 3-yr study, corn residues (CR) and pasteurized chicken manure (PCM) were used as soil amendments compared with no residue (NR) under three management practices: shallow tillage (ST) and no tillage (NT) under consecutive corn crops and ST without crop. Tillage significantly increased (P < 0.05) CO(2) and N(2)O fluxes in residue-amended plots and in NR plots. Carbon dioxide and N(2)O fluxes were correlated with soil NH(4) concentrations and with days since tillage and days since seeding. Fluxes of CO(2) were correlated with soil water content, whereas N(2)O fluxes had higher correlation with air temperature. Annual CO(2) emissions were higher with PCM than with CR and NR (9.7, 2.9, and 2.3 Mg C ha(-1), respectively). Fluxes of N(2)O were 34.4, 0.94, and 0.77 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) with PCM, CR, and NR, respectively. Annual amounts of CO(2)-C and N(2)O-N emissions from the PCM treatments were 64 and 3% of the applied C and N, respectively. Regardless of cultivation practices, elevated N(2)O emissions were recorded in the PCM treatment. These emissions could negate some of the beneficial effects of PCM on soil properties.

  13. Effective School Research from Japanese Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuroda, Kazuo

    Over the past 25 years, much educational research in the United States has focused on effective schools. This paper presents findings of a study that examined the characteristics of Japanese education, which is often considered effective by American researchers. It compares features of the Japanese education system to characteristics of effective…

  14. The Effect of Carbon Dioxide (CO 2) Ice Cloud Condensation on the Habitable Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincowski, Andrew; Meadows, Victoria; Robinson, Tyler D.; Crisp, David

    2016-10-01

    The currently accepted outer limit of the habitable zone (OHZ) is defined by the "maximum greenhouse" limit, where Rayleigh scattering from additional CO2 gas overwhelms greenhouse warming. However, this long-standing definition neglects the radiative effects of CO2 clouds (Kopparapu, 2013); this omission was justified based on studies using the two-stream approximation, which found CO2 clouds to be highly likely to produce a net warming. However, recent comparisons of the radiative effect of CO2 clouds using both a two-stream and multi-stream radiative transfer model (Kitzmann et al, 2013; Kitzmann, 2016) found that the warming effect was reduced when the more sophisticated multi-stream models were used. In many cases CO2 clouds caused a cooling effect, meaning that their impact on climate could not be neglected when calculating the outer edge of the habitable zone. To better understand the impact of CO2 ice clouds on the OHZ, we have integrated CO2 cloud condensation into a versatile 1-D climate model for terrestrial planets (Robinson et al, 2012) that uses the validated multi-stream SMART radiative transfer code (Meadows & Crisp, 1996; Crisp, 1997) with a simple microphysical model. We present preliminary results on the habitable zone with self-consistent CO2 clouds for a range of atmospheric masses, compositions and host star spectra, and the subsequent effect on surface temperature. In particular, we evaluate the habitable zone for TRAPPIST-1d (Gillon et al, 2016) with a variety of atmospheric compositions and masses. We present reflectance and transit spectra of these cold terrestrial planets. We identify any consequences for the OHZ in general and TRAPPIST-1d in particular. This more comprehensive treatment of the OHZ could impact our understanding of the distribution of habitable planets in the universe, and provide better constraints for statistical target selection techniques, such as the habitability index (Barnes et al, 2015), for missions like JWST

  15. Simulating interactive effects of symbiotic nitrogen fixation, carbon dioxide elevation, and climatic change on legume growth.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mei; Gao, Q; Shaffer, M J

    2002-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms of interaction between the symbiotic nitrogen-fixation process and main physiological processes, such as assimilation, nutrient allocation, and structural growth, as well as effects of nitrogen fixation on plant responses to global change, are important and still open to more investigation. Appropriate models have not been adequately developed. A dynamic ecophysiological model was developed in this study for a legume plant [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] growing in northern China. The model synthesized symbiotic nitrogen fixation and the main physiological processes under variable atmospheric CO2 concentration and climatic conditions, and emphasized the interactive effects of these processes on seasonal biomass dynamics of the plant. Experimental measurements of ecophysiological quantities obtained in a CO2 enrichment experiment on soybean plants, were used to parameterize and validate the model. The results indicated that the model simulated the experiments with reasonable accuracy. The R2 values between simulations and observations are 0.94, 0.95, and 0.86 for total biomass, green biomass, and nodule biomass, respectively. The simulations for various combinations of atmospheric CO2 concentration, precipitation, and temperature, with or without nitrogen fixation, showed that increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration, precipitation, and efficiency of nitrogen fixation all have positive effects on biomass accumulation. On the other hand, an increased temperature induced lower rates of biomass accumulation under semi-arid conditions. In general, factors with positive effects on plant growth tended to promote each other in the simulation range, except the relationship between CO2 concentration and climatic factors. Because of the enhanced water use efficiency with a higher CO2 concentration, more significant effects of CO2 concentration were associated with a worse (dryer and warmer in this study) climate.

  16. Stability of nano-sized titanium dioxide in an aqueous environment: effects of pH, dissolved organic matter and divalent cations.

    PubMed

    Yang, X N; Cui, F Y

    2013-01-01

    Nano-sized titanium dioxide in the aquatic environment has a potential impact on the environment and human health. In this study, the impact of pH value, dissolved organic matter (DOM) and divalent cations (Ca(2+)) on the stability of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) in an aqueous environment was investigated in batch tests. The results showed that the particle size of nano-TiO2 was not sensitive to pH value but was inversely proportional to zeta potential. The nano-TiO2 becomes more stable with surface zeta potential, accompanied by small particle size and high dispersion. In the presence of DOM, the particle size was smaller and the stability of nano-TiO2 could be enhanced. This might be a synergistic effect of the ligand exchange and electrostatic force. Particle size increased with the addition of Ca(2+) and the stability decreased.

  17. Nitrogen dioxide detection

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Agnew, Stephen F.; Christensen, William H.

    1993-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting the presence of gaseous nitrogen dioxide and determining the amount of gas which is present. Though polystyrene is normally an insulator, it becomes electrically conductive in the presence of nitrogen dioxide. Conductance or resistance of a polystyrene sensing element is related to the concentration of nitrogen dioxide at the sensing element.

  18. Effects of ozone and sulfur dioxide on processing tomato yields and quality. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, R.F.

    1986-03-01

    The object of the experiment was to study the effects of SO/sub 2/ and/or ozone on tomato vegetative growth, fruit yields, and fruit quality. Two varieties of processing tomatoes, UC-204-B and E-6203, were exposed to four levels of ozone and two levels of SO/sub 2/. Exposure to ambient ozone caused a 20% reduction in vine weights and 27% reduction in weight of red fruit compared to filtered air. Exposure to 0.1 ppm SO/sub 2/ produced 7% fewer vines and approximately 8% less fruit as compared with no SO/sub 2/ exposure. Fruit quality tests indicated that increasing ozone levels reduce soluble solids (Brix), and they reduce viscosity, an important indicator of processing behavior. Exposure to SO/sub 2/ in the concentrations used increased total solids but had no measurable effect on viscosity or consistency.

  19. Effects of microstructural constraints on the transport of fission products in uranium dioxide at low burnups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Harn Chyi; Rudman, Karin; Krishnan, Kapil; McDonald, Robert; Dickerson, Patricia; Gong, Bowen; Peralta, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Diffusion of fission gases in UO2 is studied at low burnups, before bubble growth and coalescence along grain boundaries (GBs) become dominant, using a 3-D finite element model that incorporates actual UO2 microstructures. Grain boundary diffusivities are assigned based on crystallography with lattice and GB diffusion coupled with temperature to account for temperature gradients. Heterogeneity of GB properties and connectivity can induce regions where concentration is locally higher than without GB diffusion. These regions are produced by "bottlenecks" in the GB network because of lack of connectivity among high diffusivity GBs due to crystallographic constraints, and they can lead to localized swelling. Effective diffusivities were calculated assuming a uniform distribution of high diffusivity among GBs. Results indicate an increase over the bulk diffusivity with a clear grain size effect and that connectivity and properties of different GBs become important factors on the variability of fission product concentration at the microscale.

  20. Effect of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration on the protein composition of cereal grain.

    PubMed

    Wroblewitz, Stefanie; Hüther, Liane; Manderscheid, Remy; Weigel, Hans-Joachim; Wätzig, Hermann; Dänicke, Sven

    2014-07-16

    The present study investigates effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration on protein composition of maize, wheat, and barley grain, especially on the fractions prolamins and glutelins. Cereals were grown at different atmospheric CO2 concentrations to simulate future climate conditions. Influences of two nitrogen fertilization levels were studied for wheat and barley. Enriched CO2 caused an increase of globulin and B-hordein of barley. In maize, the content of globulin, α-zein, and LMW polymers decreased, whereas total glutelin, zein, δ-zein, and HMW polymers rose. Different N supplies resulted in variations of barley subfractions and wheat globulin. Other environmental influences showed effects on the content of nearly all fractions and subfractions. Variations in starch-protein bodies caused by different CO2 treatments could be visualized by scanning electron microscopy. In conclusion, climate change would have impacts on structural composition of proteins and, consequently, on the nutritional value of cereals.

  1. Monomethylhydrazine degradation and its effect on carbon dioxide evolution and microbial populations in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, L.T.; Street, J.J.

    1988-09-01

    Monomethylhydrazine (MMH), along with hydrazine and 1,1-dimethylhydrazine are the main components of hydrazine fuels. Information on the fate of MMH in soil and its overall effect on soil microbial activity is not known, though MMH is known to be toxic to a number of soil bacteria. Despite the fact that axenic bacterial cultures are inhibited by the three hydrazines, Ou and Street reported that soil respiration, and total bacterial and fungal populations in soil, were not inhibited by hydrazine at concentrations of 100 ..mu..g/g and lower. Even at 500 ..mu..g/g, only total bacterial populations in soil were inhibited by the presence of hydrazine. They also reported that hydrazine rapidly disappeared in soil. The authors initiated this study to investigate the effect of MMH on soil microbial activity and on degradation of the chemical in soil.

  2. Evaluation of Doped Phthalocyanines and a Chemically-Sensitive Field Effect Transistor for Detecting Nitrogen Dioxide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-04

    consisted of quarter-inch diameter 316 stainless steel tubing (Williams Co., Roselawn, OH), and the wiring harness consisted of 12 RG-58A/U coaxial cables ...and 56 solid, 22-AWG wires . 4-32 The coaxial cables are used to transmit the microsensor’s signals such as the driven-gate signal, the floating-gate... electron beam , charge may accumulate. The charge accumulation consequently alters the electron scattering. The effect can produce brighter images with

  3. Effect of Structure and Surface State of Nanocrystalline Tin Dioxide on its Gas Sensing Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovodok, E.; Ivanovskaya, M.; Kotsikau, D.; Azarko, I.; Kormosh, V.; Alyaksev, I.

    2013-05-01

    An effect of particle size, concentration of structural defects and the presence of sulfite and sulfate groups on the response of thick-film SnO2 sensors to CH4 and CO was revealed. Particle size and the presence of SO-groups were found to be main parameters determining the sensitivity of SnO2-based sensors to CH4, while structural defects of SnO2 layers are essential for CO detection.

  4. Chemical vapour deposition of thermochromic vanadium dioxide thin films for energy efficient glazing

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Michael E.A.; Binions, Russell

    2014-06-01

    Vanadium dioxide is a thermochromic material that undergoes a semiconductor to metal transitions at a critical temperature of 68 °C. This phase change from a low temperature monoclinic structure to a higher temperature rutile structure is accompanied by a marked change in infrared reflectivity and change in resistivity. This ability to have a temperature-modulated film that can limit solar heat gain makes vanadium dioxide an ideal candidate for thermochromic energy efficient glazing. In this review we detail the current challenges to such glazing becoming a commercial reality and describe the key chemical vapour deposition technologies being employed in the latest research. - Graphical abstract: Schematic demonstration of the effect of thermochromic glazing on solar radiation (red arrow represents IR radiation, black arrow represents all other solar radiation). - Highlights: • Vanadium dioxide thin films for energy efficient glazing. • Reviews chemical vapour deposition techniques. • Latest results for thin film deposition for vanadium dioxide.

  5. The Effect of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles on Keratinocyte Cell (KC) and Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC-13)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chienhsiu; Simon, Marcia; Jurukovski, Vladimir; Lee, Wilson; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2009-03-01

    We have studied the effects of TiO2 nanoparticles on cell keratinocyte and SCC (Squamous Cell Carcinoma) cells. We found that the concentration of particles required to adversely affect the cells was many times higher for keratinocyte than SCC cells. Confocal microscope shows that the particles in keratinocyte culture are sequestered in membranes between the cell colonies. The particles penetrated into the cells in the case of the SCC cells. TEM images revealed very few particles in the keratinocyte, many more particles were observed sequestered in vacuole of the SCC cells. These results indicate that the keratinocyte layer behaves very different from the fibroblast layers which are much more sensate to TiO2 nanoparticle damage and may suggest a protection mechanism of the dermal tissue. The effect of UV exposure in the presence of DNA was also investigated. We found that adsorbed proteins, as well as grafted polymer provided a measure of protection against free radical formation. The effects of low level UV exposure when the particles are near in-vitro cell culture will be presented.

  6. Aqueous chlorine dioxide treatment of horticultural produce: Effects on microbial safety and produce quality - A review.

    PubMed

    Praeger, Ulrike; Herppich, Werner B; Hassenberg, Karin

    2016-05-19

    Microbial load on fresh fruit and vegetables causes decay and losses after harvest and may lead to foodborne illness in case of contamination with human pathogens on raw consumed produces. Washing with tap water only marginally reduces microorganisms attached to produce surfaces. Chlorine is widely used for decontamination on fresh horticultural produces. However, due to harmful by-products and the questionable efficacy it has become increasingly challenged. During the last 20 years, the interest to study ClO2 treatments as an alternative sanitation agent for industrially prepared fresh produce has largely increased. For a wide range of commodities, the application of gaseous ClO2 has meanwhile been investigated. In addition, since several years, the interest in aqueous ClO2 treatments has further risen because of the better manageability in postharvest processing lines compared to gaseous application. This article critically evaluated the effects of postharvest application of aqueous ClO2, either alone or in combination with other treatments, on microbial loads for various horticultural produces. In laboratory investigations, application of aqueous ClO2 at concentrations between 3 and 100 ppm effectively reduced counts of natural or inoculated microorganisms (bacteria, yeasts and mold) in the range of 1 and 5 log. However, various effects of ClO2 treatments on produce quality have been described. These mainly comprise implication on sensory and visual attributes. In this context, there is increasing focus on the potential impacts of aqueous ClO2 on relevant nutritional components of produces such as organic acids or phenolic substances.

  7. Effect of sulphur dioxide exposure on chlorophyll content and nitrogenase activity of Vicia faba L. plants

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, S.B.; Agrawal, M. )

    1991-11-01

    The annual average concentrations of SO{sub 2} around Obra thermal power plant and nonpolluted sites in India were reported as 0.06, and 0.007 ppm, respectively. However, daily average concentrations in areas close to the emission source may be as large as 0.34 ppm. Therefore, in the present investigation an attempt has been made to determine the potential effects of such episodic and exceptionally high intermittent concentrations of SO{sub 2} on total chlorophyll content and nitrogenase activity of Vicia faba (broad bean) plants.

  8. Evaluation of the effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on cultured Rana catesbeiana tailfin tissue.

    PubMed

    Hammond, S Austin; Carew, Amanda C; Helbing, Caren C

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs), materials that have one dimension less than 100 nm, are used in manufacturing, health, and food products, and consumer products including cosmetics, clothing, and household appliances. Their utility to industry is derived from their high surface-area-to-volume ratios and physico-chemical properties distinct from their bulk counterparts, but the near-certainty that NPs will be released into the environment raises the possibility that they could present health risks to humans and wildlife. The thyroid hormones (THs), thyroxine, and 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3), are involved in development and metabolism in vertebrates including humans and frogs. Many of the processes of anuran metamorphosis are analogous to human post-embryonic development and disruption of TH action can have drastic effects. These shared features make the metamorphosis of anurans an excellent model for screening for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). We used the cultured tailfin (C-fin) assay to examine the exposure effects of 0.1-10 nM (~8-800 ng/L) of three types of ~20 nm TiO2 NPs (P25, M212, M262) and micron-sized TiO2 (μ TiO2) ±10 nM T3. The actual Ti levels were 40.9-64.7% of the nominal value. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) was used to measure the relative amounts of mRNA transcripts encoding TH-responsive THs receptors (thra and thrb) and Rana larval keratin type I (rlk1), as well as the cellular stress-responsive heat shock protein 30 kDa (hsp30), superoxide dismutase (sod), and catalase (cat). The levels of the TH-responsive transcripts were largely unaffected by any form of TiO2. Some significant effects on stress-related transcripts were observed upon exposure to micron-sized TiO2, P25, and M212 while no effect was observed with M262 exposure. Therefore, the risk of adversely affecting amphibian tissue by disrupting TH-signaling or inducing cellular stress is low for these compounds relative to other previously-tested NPs.

  9. Evaluation of the effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on cultured Rana catesbeiana tailfin tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. Austin; Carew, Amanda C.; Helbing, Caren C.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs), materials that have one dimension less than 100 nm, are used in manufacturing, health, and food products, and consumer products including cosmetics, clothing, and household appliances. Their utility to industry is derived from their high surface-area-to-volume ratios and physico-chemical properties distinct from their bulk counterparts, but the near-certainty that NPs will be released into the environment raises the possibility that they could present health risks to humans and wildlife. The thyroid hormones (THs), thyroxine, and 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine (T3), are involved in development and metabolism in vertebrates including humans and frogs. Many of the processes of anuran metamorphosis are analogous to human post-embryonic development and disruption of TH action can have drastic effects. These shared features make the metamorphosis of anurans an excellent model for screening for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). We used the cultured tailfin (C-fin) assay to examine the exposure effects of 0.1–10 nM (~8–800 ng/L) of three types of ~20 nm TiO2 NPs (P25, M212, M262) and micron-sized TiO2 (μ TiO2) ±10 nM T3. The actual Ti levels were 40.9–64.7% of the nominal value. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) was used to measure the relative amounts of mRNA transcripts encoding TH-responsive THs receptors (thra and thrb) and Rana larval keratin type I (rlk1), as well as the cellular stress-responsive heat shock protein 30 kDa (hsp30), superoxide dismutase (sod), and catalase (cat). The levels of the TH-responsive transcripts were largely unaffected by any form of TiO2. Some significant effects on stress-related transcripts were observed upon exposure to micron-sized TiO2, P25, and M212 while no effect was observed with M262 exposure. Therefore, the risk of adversely affecting amphibian tissue by disrupting TH-signaling or inducing cellular stress is low for these compounds relative to other previously-tested NPs. PMID

  10. A research needs assessment for the capture, utilization and disposal of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel-fired power plants. Volume 1, Executive summary: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This study identifies and assesses system approaches in order to prioritize research needs for the capture and non-atmospheric sequestering of a significant portion of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emitted from fossil fuel-fired electric power plants (US power plants presently produce about 7% of the world`s CO{sub 2} emissions). The study considers capture technologies applicable either to existing plants or to those that optimistically might be demonstrated on a commercial scale over the next twenty years. Specific conclusions are as follows: (1) To implement CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration on a national scale will decrease power plant net efficiencies and significantly increase the cost of electricity. To make responsible societal decisions, accurate and consistent economic and environmental analysis of all alternatives for atmospheric CO{sub 2} mitigation are required. (2) Commercial CO{sub 2} capture technology, though expensive and energy intensive, exists today. (3) The most promising approach to more economical CO{sub 2} capture is to develop power plant systems that facilitate efficient CO{sub 2} capture. (4) While CO{sub 2} disposal in depleted oil and gas reservoirs is feasible today, the ability to dispose of large quantities Of CO{sub 2} is highly uncertain because of both technical and institutional issues. Disposal into the deep ocean or confined aquifers offers the potential for large quantity disposal, but there are technical, safety, liability, and environmental issues to resolve. Therefore, the highest priority research should focus on establishing the feasibility of large scale disposal options.

  11. Effects of a mouthwash with chlorine dioxide on oral malodor and salivary bacteria: a randomized placebo-controlled 7-day trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous research has shown the oxidizing properties and microbiological efficacies of chlorine dioxide (ClO2). Its clinical efficacies on oral malodor have been evaluated and reported only in short duration trials, moreover, no clinical studies have investigated its microbiological efficacies on periodontal and malodorous bacteria. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the inhibitory effects of a mouthwash containing ClO2 used for 7 days on morning oral malodor and on salivary periodontal and malodorous bacteria. Methods/Design A randomized, double blind, crossover, placebo-controlled trial was conducted among 15 healthy male volunteers, who were divided into 2 groups. Subjects were instructed to rinse with the experimental mouthwash containing ClO2 or the placebo mouthwash, without ClO2, twice per day for 7 days. After a one week washout period, each group then used the opposite mouthwash for 7 days. At baseline and after 7 days, oral malodor was evaluated with Organoleptic measurement (OM), and analyzed the concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methyl mercaptan (CH3SH) and dimethyl sulfide ((CH3)2S), the main VSCs of human oral malodor, were assessed by gas chromatography (GC). Clinical outcome variables included plaque and gingival indices, and tongue coating index. The samples of saliva were microbiologically investigated. Quantitative and qualitative analyses were performed using the polymerase chain reaction-Invader method. Results and Discussion The baseline oral condition in healthy subjects in the 2 groups did not differ significantly. After rinsing with the mouthwash containing ClO2 for 7 days, morning bad breath decreased as measured by the OM and reduced the concentrations of H2S, CH3SH and (CH3)2S measured by GC, were found. Moreover ClO2 mouthwash used over a 7-day period appeared effective in reducing plaque, tongue coating accumulation and the counts of Fusobacterium nucleatum in saliva. Future research is needed to examine long

  12. Effect of organic matter on cyanide removal by illuminated titanium dioxide or zinc oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Effect of different type of organic compounds (humic acid, oxalate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, nitrilotriacetic acid, phenol) on the photocatalytic removal of cyanide with TiO2 or ZnO was studied in this work with variation of the solution pH, contact time, initial cyanide concentration and type of organic compounds. Photocatalytic oxidation efficiency of cyanide with TiO2 was greatly affected by the solution pH. It increased as the solution pH decreased. Also maximum removal of cyanide by ZnO was observed near at neutral pH because of the reduced photocatalytic activity of ZnO at exceedingly low and high pH values originated from either acidic/photochemical corrosion of the catalyst and/or surface passivation with Zn(OH)2. Removal efficiency of cyanide greatly decreased in the presence of humic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, nitrilotriacetic acid compared to that without presence of organic compound because of the competitive oxidation as well as surface blocking by relatively large organic compounds. The oxidation pattern of cyanide was better described by first-order kinetic model. Finally photocatalytic reaction with TiO2 or ZnO can be effectively applied to treat synthetic wastewater contaminated with cyanide. PMID:24499704

  13. Effects of polydopamine functionalized titanium dioxide nanotubes on endothelial cell and smooth muscle cell.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Si; Luo, Rifang; Wang, Xin; Tang, Linlin; Wu, Jian; Wang, Jin; Huang, Runbo; Sun, Hong; Huang, Nan

    2014-04-01

    Previous investigations have demonstrated that TiO2 nanotubes (NTs) with particular structure cues could control the behavior of different types of cells, including endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Besides, polydopamine (PDA) modified surfaces were reported to be beneficial to increase the proliferation and viability of ECs and meanwhile could inhibit the proliferation of SMCs. The TiO2 nanotubes (NTs) were functionalized with polydopamine (PDA) (PDA/NTs) to study the synergetic effect of both nanotopography (NTs) and chemical cues (PDA) of TiO2 nanotubes on the regulation of cellular behavior of ECs and SMCs. The PDA-modified TiO2 nanotubes were subjected to field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and water contact angle (WCA) analysis. In vitro cell culture tests confirmed that, comparing with flat titanium (Ti) and TiO2 nanotubes, PDA/NTs surface synergistically promoted ECs attachment, proliferation, migration and release of nitric oxide (NO). Meanwhile, the PDA/NTs performed well in reducing SMCs adhesion and proliferation. This novel approach might provide a new platform to investigate the synergistic effect of local chemistry and topography, as well as the applications for the development of titanium-based implants for enhanced endothelialization.

  14. Synergistic effect of titanium dioxide nanocrystal/reduced graphene oxide hybrid on enhancement of microbial electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Long; Qiao, Yan; Wu, Xiao-Shuai; Ma, Cai-Xia; Li, Xin; Li, Chang Ming

    2015-02-01

    A small sized TiO2 nanocrystal (˜10 nm)/reduced graphene oxide (TiO2/rGO) hybrid is synthesized through a sol-gel process for hybrid TiO2/GO followed by solvothermal reduction of GO to rGO and is further used as a microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode. The strong synergistic effect from a large surface area produced by uniformly deposited TiO2 nanocrystals, good hydrophilicity of TiO2 nanocrystals and superior conductivity of rGO leads to significantly improved electrocatalysis. In particular, a direct electrochemistry is realized by generating endogenous flavins from a large amount of microbes grown on the highly biocompatible TiO2 nanocrystals to mediate fast electron transfer between microbes and conductive rGO for a high performance anode. The TiO2/rGO hybrid anode delivers a maximum power density of 3169 mW m-2 in Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 MFC, which is much large than that of the conventional carbon cloth anode and reported TiO2/carbon hybrid anode, thus offering great potential for practical applications of MFC. This work is for the first time to report that the synergistic effect from tailoring the physical structure to achieve small sized TiO2 nanocrystals while rationally designing chemistry to introduce highly conductive rGO and superior biocompatible TiO2 is able to significantly boost the MFC performance.

  15. Effect of elevated carbon dioxide concentration on carbon assimilation under fluctuating light.

    PubMed

    Holišová, Petra; Zitová, Martina; Klem, Karel; Urban, Otmar

    2012-01-01

    Natural fluctuations in light intensity may significantly affect the amount of CO assimilated by plants and ecosystems. Little is known, however, about the interactive effect of dynamic light conditions and atmospheric CO concentrations. The hypothesis that elevated CO concentration (EC; 700 μmol CO mol) increases photosynthetic efficiency in dynamic light environments as compared to ambient CO concentration (AC; 385 μmol CO mol) was tested. Sun leaves of European beech ( L.) and current-year shoots of Norway spruce [ (L). Karst.] were exposed to five dynamic light regimes (LRs) occurring within forest canopies due to variable cloud cover or self-shading of leaves and to a steady-state LR. The LRs differed in the time course of incident irradiance, whereas the overall duration (600 s) and total amount of radiation (35.88 mmol photons m) were the same in all LRs. The EC treatment enhanced the amount of CO assimilated under all LRs tested. While the stimulation was only 37 to 50% in beech, it was 52 to 85% in spruce. The hypothesis that photosynthetic efficiency is stimulated by EC was confirmed in LRs when the leaves were pre-exposed to low light intensity and photosynthetic induction was required. By contrast, only a minor effect of EC treatment was found on the rate of induction loss and postillumination CO fixation in both species studied.

  16. The effectiveness of net negative carbon dioxide emissions in reversing anthropogenic climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarska, Katarzyna B.; Zickfeld, Kirsten

    2015-09-01

    Artificial removal of CO2 from the atmosphere (also referred to as negative emissions) has been proposed as a means to restore the climate system to a desirable state, should the impacts of climate change become ‘dangerous’. Here we explore whether negative emissions are indeed effective in reversing climate change on human timescales, given the potentially counteracting effect of natural carbon sinks and the inertia of the climate system. We designed a range of CO2 emission scenarios, which follow a gradual transition to a zero-carbon energy system and entail implementation of various amounts of net-negative emissions at technologically plausible rates. These scenarios are used to force an Earth System Model of intermediate complexity. Results suggest that while it is possible to revert to a desired level of warming (e.g. 2 °C above pre-industrial) after different levels of overshoot, thermosteric sea level rise is not reversible for at least several centuries, even under assumption of large amounts of negative CO2 emissions. During the net-negative emission phase, artificial CO2 removal is opposed by CO2 outgassing from natural carbon sinks, with the efficiency of CO2 removal—here defined as the drop in atmospheric CO2 per unit negative emission—decreasing with the total amount of negative emissions.

  17. Adverse effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on human dermal fibroblasts and how to protect cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhi; Lee, Wilson; Slutsky, Lenny; Clark, Richard A F; Pernodet, Nadine; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2009-04-01

    The effects of exposure of human dermal fibroblasts to rutile and anatase TiO(2) nanoparticles are reported. These particles can impair cell function, with the latter being more potent at producing damage. The exposure to nanoparticles decreases cell area, cell proliferation, mobility, and ability to contract collagen. Individual particles are shown to penetrate easily through the cell membrane in the absence of endocytosis, while some endocytosis is observed for larger particle clusters. Once inside, the particles are sequestered in vesicles, which continue to fill up with increasing incubation time till they rupture. Particles coated with a dense grafted polymer brush are also tested, and, using flow cytometry, are shown to prevent adherence to the cell membrane and hence penetration of the cell, which effectively decreases reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and protects cells, even in the absence of light exposure. Considering the broad applications of these nanoparticles in personal health care products, the functionalized polymer coating can potentially play an important role in protecting cells and tissue from damage.

  18. Carbon Dioxide in the Aortic Arch: Coronary Effects and Implications in a Swine Study

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, William C. Porter, Thomas R.; Culp, William C.; Vonk, Brian N.

    2003-04-15

    Purpose: CO{sub 2} angiography is considered dangerous in the aortic arch where bubbles may cause critical cerebral and cardiac ischemia. We investigated CO{sub 2}distribution, physiologic effects in the heart, methods of detection and treatments. Methods: Eight pigs had CO{sub 2}and iodinated contrast arch angiograms in supine and both lateral decubitus positions. An electrocardiogram, physiologic data and cardiac ultrasound were obtained. Therapies included precordial thumps and rolls to lateral decubitus positions. Results: Supine high descending aorta CO{sub 2} injections floated retrograde up the arch during diastole and preferentially filled the right coronary artery (RCA): mean score 3.5 (of 4), in nominate artery 2.4, left coronary artery 1.2; n = 17; p = 0.0001. Aortic root injections preferentially filled the RCA when the animal was supine, left coronary in the right decubitus position, and showed a diffuse pattern in the left decubitus position. Right decubitus rolls filled both coronaries causing several lethal arrhythmias. Precordialthumps successfully cleared CO{sub 2}. Ultrasound is a sensitive detector of myocardial CO{sub 2}. Conclusion: Arch distribution of CO{sub 2} primarily involves the RCA. Diagnostic ultrasound detects cardiac CO{sub 2} well. Precordial thumps are an effective treatment.

  19. Iron Oxide and Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Effects on Plant Performance and Root Associated Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Burke, David J.; Pietrasiak, Nicole; Situ, Shu F.; Abenojar, Eric C.; Porche, Mya; Kraj, Pawel; Lakliang, Yutthana; Samia, Anna Cristina S.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of positively and negatively charged Fe3O4 and TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) on the growth of soybean plants (Glycine max.) and their root associated soil microbes. Soybean plants were grown in a greenhouse for six weeks after application of different amounts of NPs, and plant growth and nutrient content were examined. Roots were analyzed for colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and nodule-forming nitrogen fixing bacteria using DNA-based techniques. We found that plant growth was significantly lower with the application of TiO2 as compared to Fe3O4 NPs. The leaf carbon was also marginally significant lower in plants treated with TiO2 NPs; however, leaf phosphorus was reduced in plants treated with Fe3O4. We found no effects of NP type, concentration, or charge on the community structure of either rhizobia or AM fungi colonizing plant roots. However, the charge of the Fe3O4 NPs affected both colonization of the root system by rhizobia as well as leaf phosphorus content. Our results indicate that the type of NP can affect plant growth and nutrient content in an agriculturally important crop species, and that the charge of these particles influences the colonization of the root system by nitrogen-fixing bacteria. PMID:26445042

  20. Effect of titanium dioxide crystalline structure on the photocatalytic production of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Chiarello, Gian Luca; Di Paola, Agatino; Palmisano, Leonardo; Selli, Elena

    2011-03-02

    The effect of the crystalline phase of TiO(2) (anatase, rutile and brookite) on its photocatalytic activity in hydrogen production from methanol-water vapours has been investigated by testing a series of both home-made and commercial TiO(2) photocatalysts, either bare or surface-modified by deposition of a fixed amount, i.e. 1 wt%, of platinum as co-catalyst. For all of the TiO(2) samples the rate of hydrogen production increased by one order of magnitude upon Pt deposition, because of the ability of Pt to enhance the separation of photoproduced electron-hole pairs. Under irradiation in the 350-450 nm wavelength range, brookite and anatase showed similar photoactivities, both superior to that of rutile. By contrast, rutile, possessing a narrower band gap, was active also under visible light (λ > 400 nm), whereas no hydrogen evolution was observed with anatase and brookite under such conditions. Surface area proved to be a key parameter, strongly influencing photoactivity. However, as the particle size became ultra-small, the semiconductor absorption edge was blue-shifted because of size quantisation effects, with a consequent decrease in hydrogen production rate due to the smaller portion of incident photons absorbed by the photocatalyst.

  1. Single breath diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide: effects of adjustment for inspired volume dead space, carbon dioxide, hemoglobin and carboxyhemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Viegi, G; Baldi, S; Begliomini, E; Ferdeghini, E M; Pistelli, F

    1998-01-01

    In order to assess the additive effects of taking into account dead space volume (VD), carbon dioxide, hemoglobin (Hb) and carboxyhemoglobin on computation of single breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCOsb), we sequentially applied all the corrections recommended by the 1987 American Thoracic Society (ATS) document on DLCOsb standardization. We used data from 739 men (333 nonsmokers and 406 current smokers) and 475 women (403 nonsmokers and 72 current smokers) who underwent measurement of DLCOsb in the decade 1985-1994 at the Lung Function Laboratory of our institute. With respect to the unadjusted DLCOsb value, significant small differences were found for all the corrected formulas, ranging from -0.18 to 1.48 ml/min/mm Hg in men and from -0.24 to 1.57 ml/min/mm Hg in women. After computing the percent change of DLCOsb [(unadjusted-adjusted value) x 100/unadjusted value], we observed that the correction for VD caused an underestimation of DLCOsb of about 5.8% in men and 7.7% in women. However, when all the corrections were considered, these figures decreased to about 0.9% in males and 2.9% in females. Regarding specifically the correction for Hb, the adjusted value was slightly lower in men, while it was some-what higher in women, with respect to the unadjusted DLCOsb. In conclusion, the corrections suggested by ATS in the computation of DLCOsb, when considered altogether, seem to account for a limited proportion of test variability in usual clinical conditions, especially in males.

  2. Synergistic effect of chlorine dioxide and drying treatments for inactivating Escherichia coli O157:H7 on radish seeds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoikyung; Kim, Haeyoung; Bang, Jihyun; Beuchat, Larry R; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2010-07-01

    Studies were done to determine whether calcium hypochlorite (Ca(OCl)(2)) and chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) treatment followed by drying had a synergistic killing effect on microorganisms on radish seeds intended for sprout production. Uninoculated radish seeds and seeds inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 were treated with water, Ca(OCl)(2) (free chlorine concentrations of 50 or 200 microg/ml), or ClO(2) (50 or 200 microg/ml) for 5 min and subsequently dried at 25 degrees C for up to 24 h. Populations of total aerobic bacteria (TAB), molds and yeasts (MY), and E. coli O157:H7 on the seeds treated with Ca(OCl)(2) were not significantly different (P = 0.05) than populations on seeds treated with ClO(2) at the same concentrations. However, populations of microorganisms on seeds treated with ClO(2) decreased more rapidly during drying. Treatment with ClO(2) (200 microg/ml) followed by drying caused reductions in TAB, MY, and E. coli O157:H7 of 3.1, 2.0, and 3.8 log CFU/g, respectively. When seeds were treated with water, Ca(OCl)(2) (50 or 200 microg/ml), and ClO(2) (50 microg/ml) and subsequently dried, reductions in TAB, MY, and E. coli O157:H7 were 0.2 to 2.0, 0.4 to 2.0, and 1.4 to 2.2 log CFU/g, respectively. Results indicate that inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 on radish seeds is greater after treatment with ClO(2) followed by drying than after treatment with Ca(OCl)(2) followed by drying, thus providing a synergistic treatment combination for reducing the safety risk associated with sprouts produced from these seeds.

  3. Chemical effects of carbon dioxide sequestration in the Upper Morrow Sandstone in the Farnsworth, Texas, hydrocarbon unit

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmmed, Bulbul; Appold, Martin S.; Fan, Tianguang; McPherson, Brian J. O. L.; Grigg, Reid B.; White, Mark D.

    2016-03-01

    Numerical geochemical modeling was used to study the effects on pore-water composition and mineralogy from carbon dioxide (CO2) injection into the Pennsylvanian Morrow B Sandstone in the Farnsworth Unit in northern Texas to evaluate its potential for long-term CO2 sequestration. Speciation modeling showed the present Morrow B formation water to be supersaturated with respect to an assemblage of zeolite, clay, carbonate, mica, and aluminum hydroxide minerals and quartz. The principal accessory minerals in the Morrow B, feldspars and chlorite, were predicted to dissolve. A reaction-path model in which CO2 was progressively added up to its solubility limit into the Morrow B formation water showed a decrease in pH from its initial value of 7 to approximately 4.1 to 4.2, accompanied by the precipitation of small amounts of quartz, diaspore, and witherite. As the resultant CO2-charged fluid reacted with more of the Morrow B mineral matrix, the model predicted a rise in pH, reaching a maximum of 5.1 to 5.2 at a water–rock ratio of 10:1. At a higher water–rock ratio of 100:1, the pH rose to only 4.6 to 4.7. Diaspore, quartz, and nontronite precipitated consistently regardless of the water–rock ratio, but the carbonate minerals siderite, witherite, dolomite, and calcite precipitated at higher pH values only. As a result, CO2 sequestration by mineral trapping was predicted to be important only at low water–rock ratios, accounting for a maximum of 2% of the added CO2 at the lowest water–rock ratio investigated of 10:1, which corresponds to a small porosity increase of approximately 0.14% to 0.15%.

  4. Effects of prenatal exposure to surface-coated nanosized titanium dioxide (UV-Titan). A study in mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Engineered nanoparticles are smaller than 100 nm and designed to improve or achieve new physico-chemical properties. Consequently, also toxicological properties may change compared to the parent compound. We examined developmental and neurobehavioral effects following maternal exposure to a nanoparticulate UV-filter (UV-titan L181). Methods Time-mated mice (C57BL/6BomTac) were exposed by inhalation 1h/day to 42 mg/m3 aerosolized powder (1.7·106 n/cm3; peak-size: 97 nm) on gestation days 8-18. Endpoints included: maternal lung inflammation; gestational and litter parameters; offspring neurofunction and fertility. Physicochemical particle properties were determined to provide information on specific exposure and deposition. Results Particles consisted of mainly elongated rutile titanium dioxide (TiO2) with an average crystallite size of 21 nm, modified with Al, Si and Zr, and coated with polyalcohols. In exposed adult mice, 38 mg Ti/kg was detected in the lungs on day 5 and differential cell counts of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed lung inflammation 5 and 26-27 days following exposure termination, relative to control mice. As young adults, prenatally exposed offspring tended to avoid the central zone of the open field and exposed female offspring displayed enhanced prepulse inhibition. Cognitive function was unaffected (Morris water maze test). Conclusion Inhalation exposure to nano-sized UV Titan dusts induced long term lung inflammation in time-mated adult female mice. Gestationally exposed offspring displayed moderate neurobehavioral alterations. The results are discussed in the light of the observed particle size distribution in the exposure atmosphere and the potential pathways by which nanoparticles may impart changes in fetal development. PMID:20546558

  5. The comparative effects of sevoflurane versus isoflurane on cerebrovascular carbon dioxide reactivity in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kadoi, Yuji; Takahashi, Ken-Ichiro; Saito, Shigeru; Goto, Fumio

    2006-07-01

    The use of volatile anesthetics has been reported to alter cerebrovascular carbon dioxide (CO2) reactivity. We examined the comparative effects of sevoflurane versus isoflurane on cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity in 40 patients with diabetes mellitus. Anesthesia was maintained with either 1.0 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration of sevoflurane or 1.0 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration of isoflurane in 33% oxygen and 67% nitrous oxide. A 2.5-MHz pulsed transcranial Doppler probe was attached to the patient's head at the right temporal window for continuous measurement of mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery. After establishing baseline middle cerebral artery velocity values and cardiovascular hemodynamics, we increased end-tidal CO2 by decreasing ventilatory frequency by 2-5 breaths/min and repeated the measurements. These were then used to calculate absolute and relative CO2 reactivity. Absolute CO2 reactivity was less in insulin-treated patients with either sevoflurane or isoflurane compared with those patients on oral antidiabetic drugs or dietary therapy (sevoflurane group: diet = 2.6 +/- 0.6; oral antidiabetic drug = 2.5 +/- 0.8; insulin = 1.6 +/- 0.8*; isoflurane group: diet = 3.3 +/- i0.7; oral antidiabetic drug = 3.4 +/- 0.7; insulin = 1.9 +/- 0.7* cm.s(-1).mm Hg(-1); *P < 0.05, respectively). Relative CO2 reactivity showed a similar pattern in the diet-controlled and oral antidiabetic groups, absolute and relative CO2 reactivities were lower with sevoflurane versus isoflurane. Hence, we conclude that cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity in insulin-dependent patients is impaired under both sevoflurane and isoflurane anesthesia.

  6. Removal of titanium dioxide nanoparticles by coagulation: effects of coagulants, typical ions, alkalinity and natural organic matters.

    PubMed

    Wang, H T; Ye, Y Y; Qi, J; Li, F T; Tang, Y L

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of removing titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) from water by coagulation, as well as to find the optimal coagulant and experimental conditions for TiO2 NP removal, four types of coagulant were adopted: polyferric sulfate (PFS), ferric chloride (FeCl3), polyaluminum chloride (PACl), and alum (Al2(SO4)3). It was found that the removal of TiO2 NPs by coagulation was affected by ionic strength, alkalinity, as well as types and dosages of coagulants. PFS and FeCl3 achieved much higher removal efficiency of TiO2 NPs than PACl and Al2(SO4)3 did. For 30 mg/L TiO2 NPs, a dosage of 0.3 mM PFS (as Fe) achieved 84% removal after coagulation followed by 30 min settlement. Optimal ionic strength (0.1 M NaCl or 0.03 M CaCl2) is of vital importance for the performance of PFS. Na2SO4 is unfavorable for the performance of PFS. Optimal alkalinity (0.01-0.03 M NaHCO3) is necessary for FeCl3 to remove TiO2 NPs. Natural organic matter, as represented by humic acid (HA) up to 11 mg/L, reduces the removal of TiO2 NPs by coagulation. These findings indicate that coagulation is a good option for the removal of TiO2 NPs from water, and more attention should be paid to the effects of water quality when using coagulation to remove TiO2 NPs from aqueous matrices. This provides a possible solution to alleviate the potential hazard caused by TiO2 NPs.

  7. The effect of heterogeneity identifying the leakage of carbon dioxide in a shallow aquifer: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, S. W.; Lee, S. H.; Jeon, W. T.; Joo, Y. J.; Lee, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage into the shallow aquifer is one of the main concerns at a CO2 sequestration site. Various hydrogeochemical parameters have been suggested to determine the leakage (i.e., pH, EC, Alkalinity, Ca and δ13C). For the practical point of view, direct and continuous measurement of the dissolved CO2 concentration at the proper location can be the most useful strategy for the CO2 leakage detection in a shallow aquifer. In order to enhance possibility of identifying leaked CO2, monitoring location should be determined with regard to the shallow aquifer heterogeneity. In this study, a series of experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of heterogeneity on the dissolved CO2 concentrations. A 2-D sand tank of homogeneous medium sands including a single heterogeneity layer was designed. Two NDIR CO2 sensors, modified for continuous measuring in aquatic system, were installed above and below the single heterogeneous layer (clay, fine and medium sand lenses). Also, temperature and water contents were measured continuously at a same position. Bromocresol purple which is one of the acid-base indicator was used to visualize CO2 migration. During the gas phase CO2 injection at the bottom of the sand tank, dissolved CO2 in the water is continuously measured. In the results, significant differences of concentrations were observed due to the presence of heterogeneity layer, even the locations were close. These results suggested that monitoring location should be determined considering vertical heterogeneity of shallow aquifer at a CO2 leakage site.

  8. Effect of Surface Treatment with Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser on Bond Strength between Cement Resin and Zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Kasraei, Shahin; Atefat, Mohammad; Beheshti, Maryam; Safavi, Nassimeh; Mojtahedi, Maryam; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Since it is not possible to form an adequate micromechanical bond between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using common surface treatment techniques, laser pretreatment has been suggested for zirconia ceramic surfaces. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser treatment on shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic. Methods: In this in vitro study thirty discs of zirconia with a diameter of 6 mm and a thickness of 2 mm were randomly divided into two groups of 15. In the test group the zirconia disc surfaces were irradiated by CO2 laser with an output power of 3 W and energy density of 265.39 j/cm2. Composite resin discs were fabricated by plastic molds, measuring 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness and were cemented on zirconia disk surfaces with Panavia F2.0 resin cement (Kuraray Co. Ltd, Osaka, Japan). Shear bond strength was measured by a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The fracture type was assessed under a stereomicroscope at ×40. Surface morphologies of two specimens of the test group were evaluated under SEM before and after laser pretreatment. Data was analyzed by paired t-test (p value < 0.05). Results: The mean SBS values of the laser and control groups were 12.12 ± 3.02 and 5.97 ± 1.14 MPa, respectively. Surface treatment with CO2 laser significantly increased SBS between resin cement and zirconia ceramic (p value = 0.001). Conclusion: Under the limitations of this study, surface treatment with CO2 laser increased the SBS between resin cement and the zirconia ceramic. PMID:25653809

  9. Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Effects of Photocatalysis Using Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Are Strongly Potentiated by Addition of Potassium Iodide

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Choi, Hwanjun; Kushida, Yu; Bhayana, Brijesh; Wang, Yuguang

    2016-01-01

    Photocatalysis describes the excitation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (a wide-band gap semiconductor) by UVA light to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can destroy many organic molecules. This photocatalysis process is used for environmental remediation, while antimicrobial photocatalysis can kill many classes of microorganisms and can be used to sterilize water and surfaces and possibly to treat infections. Here we show that addition of the nontoxic inorganic salt potassium iodide to TiO2 (P25) excited by UVA potentiated the killing of Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, and fungi by up to 6 logs. The microbial killing depended on the concentration of TiO2, the fluence of UVA light, and the concentration of KI (the best effect was at 100 mM). There was formation of long-lived antimicrobial species (probably hypoiodite and iodine) in the reaction mixture (detected by adding bacteria after light), but short-lived antibacterial reactive species (bacteria present during light) produced more killing. Fluorescent probes for ROS (hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen) were quenched by iodide. Tri-iodide (which has a peak at 350 nm and a blue product with starch) was produced by TiO2-UVA-KI but was much reduced when methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) cells were also present. The model tyrosine substrate N-acetyl tyrosine ethyl ester was iodinated in a light dose-dependent manner. We conclude that UVA-excited TiO2 in the presence of iodide produces reactive iodine intermediates during illumination that kill microbial cells and long-lived oxidized iodine products that kill after light has ended. PMID:27381399

  10. Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Effects of Photocatalysis Using Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Are Strongly Potentiated by Addition of Potassium Iodide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Choi, Hwanjun; Kushida, Yu; Bhayana, Brijesh; Wang, Yuguang; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    Photocatalysis describes the excitation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (a wide-band gap semiconductor) by UVA light to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can destroy many organic molecules. This photocatalysis process is used for environmental remediation, while antimicrobial photocatalysis can kill many classes of microorganisms and can be used to sterilize water and surfaces and possibly to treat infections. Here we show that addition of the nontoxic inorganic salt potassium iodide to TiO2 (P25) excited by UVA potentiated the killing of Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, and fungi by up to 6 logs. The microbial killing depended on the concentration of TiO2, the fluence of UVA light, and the concentration of KI (the best effect was at 100 mM). There was formation of long-lived antimicrobial species (probably hypoiodite and iodine) in the reaction mixture (detected by adding bacteria after light), but short-lived antibacterial reactive species (bacteria present during light) produced more killing. Fluorescent probes for ROS (hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen) were quenched by iodide. Tri-iodide (which has a peak at 350 nm and a blue product with starch) was produced by TiO2-UVA-KI but was much reduced when methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) cells were also present. The model tyrosine substrate N-acetyl tyrosine ethyl ester was iodinated in a light dose-dependent manner. We conclude that UVA-excited TiO2 in the presence of iodide produces reactive iodine intermediates during illumination that kill microbial cells and long-lived oxidized iodine products that kill after light has ended.

  11. Quantitative modeling of total ionizing dose reliability effects in device silicon dioxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowsey, Nicole L.

    The electrical breakdown of oxides and oxide/semiconductor interfaces is one of the main reasons for device failure in integrated circuits, especially devices under high-stress conditions. One high-stress environment of interest is the space environment. All electronics are vulnerable to ionizing radiation; any high-energy particle that passes through an insulating layer will deposit unwanted charge there, causing shifts in device characteristics. Designing electronics for use in space can be a challenge, because much more energetic radiation exits in space than on Earth, as there is no atmosphere in space to collide with, and thereby reduce the energy of, energetic particles. Although oxide charging due to ionizing radiation creates well-known changes in device characteristics, or total ionizing dose effects, it is still poorly-understood exactly how these changes come about. There are many theories that draw upon a large body of both experimental work and, more recently, quantum-mechanical first principles calculations at the molecular level. This work uses FLOODS, a 3D object-oriented device simulator with multi-physics capability, to investigate these theories, by simulating oxide degradation in realistic device geometries, and comparing the subsequent degradation in device characteristics to experimental measurements. The charge trapping and defect-modulated transport models developed and implemented here have resulted in the first quantitative account of the enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity effect, and are applicable in a comprehensive range of hydrogen environments. Measurements show that devices exposed to ionizing radiation at high dose rates exhibit less degradation that those exposed at low dose rates. Furthermore, the observed trend differs depending on the amount of hydrogen available before, during, and after irradiation. It is therefore important to understand and take into account the effects of dose rate and hydrogen when developing accelerated

  12. Carbon dioxide effects on potato growth under different photoperiods and irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Tibbitts, Theodore W.; Fitzpatrick, Ann H.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of atmospheric CO2 concentration, photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), and the length of the photoperiod on the tuber yield were investigated for three potato cultivars (Norland, Russet Burbank, and Denali), by growing these cultivars for 90 days in atmospheres containing 350 or 1000 micromol/mol CO2, at photoperiods of 12- or 24-hr, and at PPFs of 400 or 800 micromol/sq m per sec. Air temperatures and relative humidity were kept at 16 C and 70 percent, respectively. It was found that the tuber yield of Denali potatoes showed the greatest increase (21 percent) in response to increased CO2 across all irradiance treatments, while the tuber yields of Russet and Norland were increased 18 and 9 percent, respectively. Greater plant growth from CO2 enrichment was observed under lower PPF and the shorter (12 hr) photoperiod.

  13. Effects of electrode distance and nature of electrolyte on the diameter of titanium dioxide nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, S. Mohamed, N. M. Singh, B. S. M.; Abbasi, S. H.

    2015-07-22

    The titanium nanotubes were synthesized using viscous electrolytes consisting of ethylene glycol and non-viscous electrolytes consisting of aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid. Sodium fluoride and ammonium fluoride were utilized as the source of fluorine ions. The samples were then characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). Their morphologies were investigated under different anodic potentials and various electrolyte compositions. It was found out that nanotubes can be obtained in fluoride ions and morphology is dependent on various parameters like anodic potential, time, electrolyte composition and the effects by varying the distance between the electrodes on the morphology was also investigated. It was found that by altering the distance between the electrodes, change in the diameter and the porosity was observed.

  14. Effect of elevated carbon dioxide on shoal familiarity and metabolism in a coral reef fish

    PubMed Central

    Nadler, Lauren E.; Killen, Shaun S.; McCormick, Mark I.; Watson, Sue-Ann; Munday, Philip L.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 is expected to more than double by the end of the century. The resulting changes in ocean chemistry will affect the behaviour, sensory systems and physiology of a range of fish species. Although a number of past studies have examined effects of CO2 in gregarious fishes, most have assessed individuals in social isolation, which can alter individual behaviour and metabolism in social species. Within social groups, a learned familiarity can develop following a prolonged period of interaction between individuals, with fishes preferentially associating with familiar conspecifics because of benefits such as improved social learning and greater foraging opportunities. However, social recognition occurs through detection of shoal-mate cues; hence, it may be disrupted by near-future CO2 conditions. In the present study, we examined the influence of elevated CO2 on shoal familiarity and the metabolic benefits of group living in the gregarious damselfish species the blue-green puller (Chromis viridis). Shoals were acclimated to one of three nominal CO2 treatments: control (450 µatm), mid-CO2 (750 µatm) or high-CO2 (1000 µatm). After a 4–7 day acclimation period, familiarity was examined using a choice test, in which individuals were given the choice to associate with familiar shoal-mates or unfamiliar conspecifics. In control conditions, individuals preferentially associated with familiar shoal-mates. However, this association was lost in both elevated-CO2 treatments. Elevated CO2 did not impact the calming effect of shoaling on metabolism, as measured using an intermittent-flow respirometry methodology for social species following a 17–20 day acclimation period to CO2 treatment. In all CO2 treatments, individuals exhibited a significantly lower metabolic rate when measured in a shoal vs. alone, highlighting the complexity of shoal dynamics and the processes that influence the benefits of shoaling. PMID:27933164

  15. Effects of carbon dioxide on the physiology and biochemistry of photosynthesis in soybean

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, W.J. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    In three consecutive years (1982, 1984, and 1985) soybeans (Glycine max L. Merr. cv Bragg) were grown from seed to maturity in six outdoor environmentally controlled plant growth chambers under natural solar irradiance. The CO/sub 2/ concentrations inside the chambers were controlled to various levels during these studies. Both field and laboratory measurement were made to investigate the effects of CO/sub 2/ concentration on photosynthesis. Emphasis was placed on the response to CO/sub 2/ of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and RuBP carboxylase (RuBPCase), the substrate and enzyme of the carbon fixation reaction in soybean. Following growth at 330 (atmospheric concentration) or 660 ..mu..l CO/sub 2/ I/sup -1/, leaflet photosynthetic rates were always greater for the elevated CO/sub 2/ grown plants when measured over a wide range of CO/sub 2/ concentrations. Evaporative cooling kept leaf temperatures from reaching the higher air temperatures during studies on temperature effects on soybean grown at atmospheric and twice atmospheric concentrations of CO/sub 2/. Although air temperatures were increased by approximately 5 and 10/sup 0/C, leaf temperatures were usually not increased more than approximately 2.5 and 4.5/sup 0/C, respectively. Increasing growth CO/sub 2/ concentrations (from 160 to 990 ..mu..l CO/sub 2/ I/sup -1/) resulted in decreasing RuBPCase activities and RuBP levels, when both were expressed on a chlorophyll basis. At the higher CO/sub 2/ concentrations, the concentration of RuBP appeared to approach the concentration of RuBPCase active sites.

  16. Effects of silver and cerium dioxide micro- and nano-sized particles on Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Gaiser, Birgit K; Biswas, Anamika; Rosenkranz, Philipp; Jepson, Mark A; Lead, Jamie R; Stone, Vicki; Tyler, Charles R; Fernandes, Teresa F

    2011-05-01

    Acute (96 h) and chronic (21 d) exposures of Daphnia magna neonates were carried out with nano- and micro-sized Ag and CeO(2) particles to assess the influence of both material and size of particles on mortality and moulting. Mortality rates for silver in the acute exposures were: AgNP, 56.7 ± 23.3% at 0.1 mg L(-1) and 100 ± 20% at 1 mg L(-1), and micro-Ag, 13.3 ± 6.7% at 0.1 mg L(-1) and 80 ± 20% at 1 mg L(-1). CeO(2) was not acutely toxic at concentrations up to 10 mg L(-1). Mortality for Ag over 21d at concentrations of up to 0.05 mg L(-1) was low, while mortality of 30% was observed for 0.001 mg L(-1) of nano-Ag. CeO(2), with the exception of the 10 mg L(-1) of nano-CeO(2) (100% mortality by day 7), was non-toxic. Inhibition of moulting and growth in the acute study occurred at toxic concentrations (Ag particles), and at 10 mg L(-1) of nano-CeO(2). The chronic study revealed reduced moulting at 0.001 mg L(-1) of nano-Ag and 0.01 and 0.05 mg L(-1) of both sizes of Ag, but there was no impact on D. magna size, and no effects of CeO(2). The toxicity of nano-CeO(2) may be attributed to reduced feeding and physical interference with the daphnids' carapace, resulting in reduced swimming ability. Our results suggest that Ag NPs in particular have the potential to be harmful to aquatic invertebrates after release into the environment, whereas CeO(2) particles appear to cause little adverse effects, and only at environmentally irrelevant concentrations.

  17. Effects of elevated carbon dioxide concentration on growth and N2 fixation of young Robinia pseudoacacia.

    PubMed

    Feng, Z; Dyckmans, J; Flessa, H

    2004-03-01

    Effects of elevated CO2 concentration ([CO2]) on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) uptake and N source partitioning (N2 fixation versus mineral soil N uptake) of 1-year-old Robinia pseudoacacia were determined in a dual 13C and 15N continuous labeling experiment. Seedlings were grown for 16 weeks in ambient (350 ppm) or elevated [CO2] (700 ppm) with 15NH4 15NO3 as the only mineral nitrogen source. Elevated [CO2] increased the fraction of new C in total C, but it did not alter C partitioning among plant compartments. Elevated [CO2] also increased the fraction of new N in total N and this was coupled with a shift in N source partitioning toward N2 fixation. Soil N uptake was unaffected by elevated [CO2], whereas N2 fixation was markedly increased by the elevated [CO2] treatment, mainly because of increased specific fixation (mg N mg(-1) nodule). As a result of increased N2 fixation, the C/N ratio of tree biomass tended to decrease in the elevated [CO2] treatment. Partitioning of N uptake among plant compartments was unaffected by elevated [CO2]. Total dry mass of root nodules doubled in response to elevated [CO2], but this effect was not significant because of the great variability of root nodule formation. Our results show that, in the N2-fixing R. pseudoacacia, increased C uptake in response to increased [CO2] is matched by increased N2 fixation, indicating that enhanced growth in elevated [CO2] might not be restricted by N limitations.

  18. ASSOCIATION OF INDOOR NITROGEN DIOXIDE WITH RESPIRATORY SYSMPTOMS IN CHILDREN: THE EFFECT OF MEASUREMENT ERROR CORRECTION WITH MULTIPLE SURROGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1991, Neas et al. reported that indoor nitrogen dioxide (N02), a by-product of high-temperature combustion, was significantly associated with lower respiratory symptoms among a cohort of 1159 white children ages 7-11 years in six US cities studied from 1983-1988. For each 15 p...

  19. Effects of chlorine or chlorine dioxide during immersion chilling on recovery of bacteria from broiler carcasses and chiller water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to determine the microbiological impact of immersion chilling broiler carcasses with chlorine or chlorine dioxide. Eviscerated, pre-chill commercial broiler carcasses were cut into left and right halves along the keel bone, and each half was rinsed (HCR) in 100 mL of 0.1% pept...

  20. Effect of chlorine dioxide gas on physical, thermal, mechanical, and barrier properties of p[olymeric packaging materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the first part of our study we determined permeability, diffusion, and solubility coefficients of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2) through the following packaging material: biaxial-oriented polypropylene (BOPP); polyethylene terephthalate (PET); poly lactic acid (PLA); multilayer structure of ethy...

  1. Effect of Treatment Media on the Agglomeration of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles: Impact on Genotoxicity, Cellular Interaction, and Cell Cycle

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT The widespread use of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in consumer products increases the probability of exposure to humans and the environment. Although TiO2 nanoparticles have been shown to induce DNA damage (comet assay) and chromosome damage (micronucleus ass...

  2. The effects of carbon dioxide on performance and histopathology of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in water recirculation aquaculture systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic exposure to elevated levels of dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) has been linked to reduced growth, physiological disturbances and negative health outcomes in intensively reared fish. Although pumping to a degassing tower can lower concentrations of dissolved CO2 in water recirculation aquacult...

  3. The effect of chlorine dioxide and chitosan/essential oil coatings on the safety and quality of fresh blueberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberries are high-value fruit with strong antioxidant capacity and other health-promoting benefits. Controlled release chlorine dioxide (ClO2) or chitosan coating plus different essential oils were applied to fresh blueberries to preserve their quality and safety during postharvest storage. In vi...

  4. Ocean Acidification: Investigation and Presentation of the Effects of Elevated Carbon Dioxide Levels on Seawater Chemistry and Calcareous Organisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buth, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Ocean acidification refers to the process by which seawater absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, producing aqueous carbonic acid. Acidic conditions increase the solubility of calcium carbonate, threatening corals and other calcareous organisms that depend on it for protective structures. The global nature of ocean acidification and the…

  5. Effects of Material Properties on Sedimentation and Aggregation of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles of Anatase and Rutile in the Aqueous Phase

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigated the sedimentation and aggregation kinetics of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles with varying material properties (i.e., crystallinity, morphology, and chemical compositions). Used in the study were various types of commercially available TiO2 nanoparti...

  6. Photosynthetic photon flux density, carbon dioxide concentration, and vapor pressure deficit effects on photosynthesis in cacao seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao) is a shade plant, native to the under-story of the evergreen rain forest of the Amazon basin and adapted to low levels of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD). The influence of PPFD, leaf to air water vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and external carbon dioxide concentration...

  7. Drought effect on methane, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide dynamics along boreal forest-mire ecotone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ťupek, Boris; Minkkinen, Kari; Vesala, Timo; Kolari, Pasi; Starr, Mike; Alm, Jukka; Pumpanen, Jukka; Berninger, Frank; Laine, Jukka; Nikinmaa, Eero

    2013-04-01

    The effect of drought on CH4, N2O and CO2 dynamics of boreal forest and mires has been seldom observed in a continuum between xeric and wet habitats. Such a continuum includes a transitional zone between forests and mires which is frequently exposed to large soil moisture differences, but generally overlooked due to a relatively narrow extent. Although, it's known that CH4, N2O and CO2 dynamics are sensitive to soil moisture. We evaluated spatiotemporal effects of drought on CH4, N2O and CO2 dynamics in continuum of nine distinct forest/mire types. Soils changed from well-drained podzols to poorly-drained histosols and ground water raised downslope from the depth of 10 m in upland forests to 0.1 m in mires. Meteorological conditions, forest floor respiration, methane, and nitrous oxide flux data were collected during growing season of exceptionally wet (2004), intermediate (2005), and exceptionally dry (2006) year. The CH4, N2O and CO2 fluxes were studied by chamber methods. The seasonal median forest floor CH4, N2O, and CO2 dark fluxes between forest/mire types and between rainy, intermediate, and dry years varied from -0.07 to 1.68 mgCH4 m2 h-1, from 1.5 to 24.65 μgN2O m2 h-1, and from 0.26 to 0.76 gCO2 m2 h-1. The CH4 oxidation in upland forest and transitional types was similar between wet and dry years, though the CH4 production of mires was reduced in dry year. Probably due to low nitrification potential, larger soil water differences between years 2005 and 2006 did not seem to trigger corresponding changes in small N2O fluxes. The forest floor dark CO2 efflux during drought was in comparison to wetter periods significantly reduced in upland forest and transitional types, but stayed similar or even increased in mires. In the carbon rich soil of forest/mire transitions mainly soil CO2 efflux were sensitive to short term fluctuations between water level drawdown and water saturation, whereas CH4 and N2O fluxes changed minimally.

  8. Tillage, cropping sequence, and nitrogen fertilization effects on dryland soil carbon dioxide emission and carbon content.

    PubMed

    Sainju, Upendra M; Jabro, Jalal D; Caesar-Tonthat, Thecan

    2010-01-01

    Management practices are needed to reduce dryland soil CO(2) emissions and to increase C sequestration. We evaluated the effects of tillage and cropping sequence combinations and N fertilization on dryland crop biomass (stems + leaves) and soil surface CO(2) flux and C content (0- to 120-cm depth) in a Williams loam from May to October, 2006 to 2008, in eastern Montana. Treatments were no-tilled continuous malt barley (Hordeum vulgaris L.) (NTCB), no-tilled malt barley-pea (Pisum sativum L.) (NTB-P), no-tilled malt barley-fallow (NTB-F), and conventional-tilled malt barley-fallow (CTB-F), each with 0 and 80 kg N ha(-1). Measurements were made both in Phase I (malt barley in NTCB, pea in NTB-P, and fallow in NTB-F and CTB-F) and Phase II (malt barley in all sequences) of each cropping sequence in every year. Crop biomass varied among years, was greater in the barley than in the pea phase of the NTB-P treatment, and greater in NTCB and NTB-P than in NTB-F and CTB-F in 2 out of 3 yr. Similarly, biomass was greater with 80 than with 0 kg N ha(-1) in 1 out of 3 yr. Soil CO(2) flux increased from 8 mg C m(-2) h(-1) in early May to 239 mg C m(-2) h(-1) in mid-June as temperature increased and then declined to 3 mg C m(-2) h(-1) in September-October. Fluxes peaked immediately following substantial precipitation (>10 mm), especially in NTCB and NTB-P. Cumulative CO(2) flux from May to October was greater in 2006 and 2007 than in 2008, greater in cropping than in fallow phases, and greater in NTCB than in NTB-F. Tillage did not influence crop biomass and CO(2) flux but N fertilization had a variable effect on the flux in 2008. Similarly, soil total C content was not influenced by treatments. Annual cropping increased CO(2) flux compared with crop-fallow probably by increasing crop residue returns to soils and root and rhizosphere respiration. Inclusion of peas in the rotation with malt barley in the no-till system, which have been known to reduce N fertilization rates and

  9. Effects of Kindergarten Scheduling: A Summary of Research. Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickers, Patrick M.

    Intended for principals, teachers, parents, and others, this research brief traces the historical development of the kindergarten in the United States, summarizes recent reviews of the kindergarten scheduling literature, and presents the findings of nearly 50 studies conducted to assess the relative effects of kindergarten scheduling on student…

  10. Betavoltaic effect in titanium dioxide nanotube arrays under build-in potential difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Ranbin; San, Haisheng; Liu, Guohua; Wang, Kaiying

    2015-05-01

    We report the fabrication of sandwich-type metal/TiO2 nanotube (TNT) array/metal structures as well as their betavoltaic effects under build-in voltage through contact potential difference. The sandwiched structure is integrated by immobilized TNT arrays on Ti foil with radioisotope 63Ni planar source on Ni substrate (Ni-63Ni/TNT array/Ti). Under irradiation of the 63Ni source with activity of 8 mCi, the structure (TNT diameter ∼ 130 nm, length ∼ 11 μm) presents optimum energy conversion efficiency of 7.30% with open-circuit voltage of 1.54 V and short-circuit current of 12.43 nA. The TNT arrays exhibit a highly potential for developing betavoltaic batteries due to its wide band gap and nanotube array configuration. The TNT-betavoltaic concept offers a facile solution for micro/nano electronics with high efficiency and long life-time instead of conventional planar junction-type batteries.

  11. Internal rotation effects in the pulsed jet rotational spectrum of the trifluoromethane carbon dioxide dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafin, Michal M.; Peebles, Rebecca A.; Peebles, Sean A.

    2008-07-01

    The rotational spectrum of the normal isotopic species of the HCF 3-CO 2 weakly bound complex has been measured by Fourier-transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy. All transitions are split into A and E states by internal rotation of the trifluoromethane subunit. A global fit of these states gives rotational constants that are consistent with a structure predicted by an MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) ab initio calculation in which the axes of the monomers are coplanar, with the hydrogen atom of the trifluoromethane angled toward one of the oxygen atoms of the CO 2. Measured dipole moment components ( μa = 0.431(6) D, μb = 0, μc = 1.436(6) D, μtotal = 1.499(6) D) confirm the ab initio prediction of an ac plane of symmetry; however, the very near-prolate nature of the complex ( κ = -0.997), combined with the relatively high barrier to internal rotation (˜30 cm -1) leads to asymmetry splittings and internal rotation splittings of similar magnitude, resulting in the observation of dipole forbidden b-type E-state transitions in addition to the expected a- and c-type lines. Although this effect has been observed previously in several monomer spectra, this appears to be one of few examples for a weakly bound complex.

  12. Effect of Dopants on the Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Ceria Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Meijun; Tumuluri, Uma; Wu, Zili; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-01

    High-surface-area nanosized CeO2 and M-doped CeO2 (M=Cu, La, Zr, and Mg) prepared by a surfactant-templated method were tested for CO2 adsorption. Cu, La, and Zr are doped into the lattice of CeO2, whereas Mg is dispersed on the CeO2 surface. The doping of Cu and La into CeO2 leads to an increase of the CO2 adsorption capacity, whereas the doping of Zr has little or no effect. The addition of Mg causes a decrease of the CO2 adsorption capacity at a low Mg content and a gradual increase at a higher content. The CO2 adsorption capacity follows the sequence Cu-CeO2 >La-CeO2 >Zr-CeO2 ≈CeO2 >Mg-CeO2 at low dopant contents, in line with the relative amount of defect sites in the samples. It is the defect sites on the surface, not in the bulk of CeO2, modified by the dopants that play the vital role in CO2 chemisorption. The role of surface oxygen vacancies is further supported by an in situ IR spectroscopic study of the surface chemistry during CO2 adsorption on the doped CeO2.

  13. The effect of elevated carbon dioxide on a Sierra-Nevadan dominant species: Pinus ponderosa

    SciTech Connect

    Pushnik, J.C.; Demaree, R.S.; Flory, W.B.; Bauer, S.M.; Houpis, J.L.J.; Anderson, P.D.

    1995-01-01

    The impact of increasing atmospheric C0{sub 2} has not been fully evaluated on western coniferous forest species. Two year old seedlings of Pinusponderosa were grown in environmentally controlled chambers under increased C0{sub 2} conditions for 6 months. These trees exhibit morphological, physiological, and biochemical alterations when compared to our controls. Analysis of whole plant biomass distribution has shown no significant effect to the root to shoot ratios, however needles subjected to elevated C0{sub 2} exhibited an increased overall specific needle mass and a decreased total needle area. Morphological changes at the needle level included decreased mesophyll to vascular tissue 91 ratio and variations in starch storage in chloroplasts. The elevated CO{sub 2} increased internal CO{sub 2} concentrations and assimilation of carbon. Biochemical assays revealed that ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase specific activities increased on per unit area basis with C0{sub 2} treatment levels. Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) activities exhibited an increase of 55% in the 700 uL L{sup {minus}1} treatment. These results indicate that the sink-source relationships of these trees have shifted carbon allocation toward above ground growth, possibly due to transport limitations.

  14. Effect of organics on the photodeposition of copper in titanium dioxide aqueous suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, N.S.; Lancaster, A.N.; Noble, R.D.; Koval, C.A.

    1995-11-01

    Semiconductor photoelectrochemistry has been explored in many processes including organic destruction and metal removal in aqueous waste streams. The effect of the organic hole scavenger on copper photodeposition at TiO{sub 2} was investigated as a function of organic concentration and pH. Copper photodeposition was observed in solutions containing sodium formate, sodium oxalate, citric acid, disodium-EDTA, methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, 2-propanol, n-butanol, propiolic acid, isobutyric acid, chloroacetic acid, or DL-lysine monochloride. No copper photodeposition was observed in solutions containing sodium acetate, sodium propionate, sodium butyrate, tert-butyl alcohol, acetone, salicylic acid, ethyl acetate, dichloroacetic acid, trichloroacetic acid, malonic acid, succinic acid, methyl propionate, acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, crotonic acid, phenol, vinyl acetate, chloroform, trichloroethylene, dichloroethane, triethylamine, ethylenediamine, or methylhydroquinone. For solutions containing organics in which copper photodeposition did not occur, addition of small amounts of sodium formate resulted in photodeposition of the copper. The rates of copper photodeposition and subsequent oxidation of the photoreduced copper with oxygen were dependent on the organic hole scavenger. Powder X-ray diffraction was used in an attempt to determine the reduced copper species formed on the TiO{sub 2}.

  15. Deodorisation effect of diamond-like carbon/titanium dioxide multilayer thin films deposited onto polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeki, K.; Hirakuri, K. K.; Masuzawa, T.

    2011-04-01

    Many types of plastic containers have been used for the storage of food. In the present study, diamond-like carbon (DLC)/titanium oxide (TiO2) multilayer thin films were deposited on polypropylene (PP) to prevent flavour retention and to remove flavour in plastic containers. For the flavour removal test, two types of multilayer films were prepared, DLC/TiO2 films and DLC/TiO2/DLC films. The residual gas concentration of acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric compounds in bottle including the DLC/TiO2-coated and the DLC/TiO2/DLC-coated PP plates were measured after UV radiation, and the amount of adsorbed compounds to the plates was determined. The percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric with the DLC/TiO2 coated plates were 0.8%, 65.2% and 75.0% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. For the DLC/TiO2/DLC film, the percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene and turmeric decreased to 34.9%, 76.0% and 85.3% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. The DLC/TiO2/DLC film had a photocatalytic effect even though the TiO2 film was covered with the DLC film.

  16. Effect of Grain Boundaries on Krypton Segregation Behavior in Irradiated Uranium Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Valderrama, Billy; He, Lingfeng; Henderson, Hunter B.; Pakarinen, Janne; Jaques, Brian; Gan, Jian; Butt, Darryl P.; Allen, Todd R.; Manuel, Michele V.

    2014-11-01

    Fission products, such as krypton (Kr), are known to be insoluble within UO2, segregating towards grain boundaries, eventually leading to a lowering of the thermal conductivity and fuel swelling. Recent computational studies have identified that differences in grain boundary structure have a significant effect on the segregation behavior of fission products. However, experimental work supporting these simulations is lacking. Atom probe tomography was used to measure the Kr distribution across grain boundaries in UO2. Polycrystalline depleted-UO2 samples was irradiated with 0.7 and 1.8 MeV Kr-ions and annealed to 1000ºC, 1300ºC, and 1600°C for 1 hour to produce a Kr-bubble dominated microstructure. The results of this work indicate a strong dependence of Kr concentration as a function of grain boundary structure. Temperature also influences grain boundary chemistry with greater Kr concentration evident at higher temperatures, resulting in a reduced Kr concentration in the bulk. While Kr migration is active at elevated temperatures, no changes in grain size or texture were observed in the irradiated UO2 samples.

  17. Effect of Dopants on the Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Ceria Surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Meijun; Tumuluri, Uma; Wu, Zili; ...

    2015-09-25

    Here, high-surface-area nanosized CeO2 and M-doped CeO2 (M=Cu, La, Zr, and Mg) prepared by a surfactant-templated method were tested for CO2 adsorption. Cu, La, and Zr are doped into the lattice of CeO2, whereas Mg is dispersed on the CeO2 surface. The doping of Cu and La into CeO2 leads to an increase of the CO2 adsorption capacity, whereas the doping of Zr has little or no effect. The addition of Mg causes a decrease of the CO2 adsorption capacity at a low Mg content and a gradual increase at a higher content. The CO2 adsorption capacity follows the sequencemore » Cu-CeO2>La-CeO2>Zr-CeO2≈CeO2>Mg-CeO2 at low dopant contents, in line with the relative amount of defect sites in the samples. It is the defect sites on the surface, not in the bulk of CeO2, modified by the dopants that play the vital role in CO2 chemisorption. Lastly, the role of surface oxygen vacancies is further supported by an in situ IR spectroscopic study of the surface chemistry during CO2 adsorption on the doped CeO2.« less

  18. Effect of natural organic matter on cerium dioxide nanoparticles settling in model fresh water.

    PubMed

    Quik, Joris T K; Lynch, Iseult; Van Hoecke, Karen; Miermans, Cornelis J H; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C; Janssen, Colin R; Dawson, Kenneth A; Stuart, Martien A Cohen; Van De Meent, Dik

    2010-10-01

    The ecological risk assessment of chemicals including nanoparticles is based on the determination of adverse effects on organisms and on the environmental concentrations to which biota are exposed. The aim of this work was to better understand the behavior of nanoparticles in the environment, with the ultimate goal of predicting future exposure concentrations in water. We measured the concentrations and particle size distributions of CeO(2) nanoparticles in algae growth medium and deionized water in the presence of various concentrations and two types of natural organic matter (NOM). The presence of natural organic matter stabilizes the CeO(2) nanoparticles in suspension. In presence of NOM, up to 88% of the initially added CeO(2) nanoparticles remained suspended in deionized water and 41% in algae growth medium after 12d of settling. The adsorbed organic matter decreases the zeta potential from about -15 mV to -55 mV. This reduces aggregation by increased electrostatic repulsion. The particle diameter, pH, electric conductivity and NOM content shows significant correlation with the fraction of CeO(2) nanoparticles remaining in suspension.

  19. The effects of enriched carbon dioxide atmospheres on plant--insect herbivore interactions.

    PubMed

    Fajer, E D; Bowers, M D; Bazzaz, F A

    1989-03-03

    Little is known about the effects of enriched CO(2) atmospheres, which may exist in the next century, on natural plant-insect herbivore interactions. Larvae of a specialist insect herbivore, Junonia coenia (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae), were reared on one of its host plants, Plantago lanceolata (Plantaginaceae), grown in either current low (350 parts per million) or high (700 ppm) CO(2) environments. Those larvae raised on high-CO(2) foliage grew more slowly and experienced greater mortality, especially in early instars, than those raised on low-CO(2) foliage. Poor larval performance on high-CO(2) foliage was probably due to the reduced foliar water and nitrogen concentrations of those plants and not to changes in the concentration of the defensive compounds, iridoid glycosides. Adult pupal weight and female fecundity were not affected by the CO(2) environment of the host plant. These results indicate that interactions between plants and herbivorous insects will be modified under the predicted CO(2) conditions of the 21st century.

  20. SEPARATING PROTOACTINIUM WITH MANGANESE DIOXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1958-04-22

    The preparation of U/sup 235/ and an improved method for isolating Pa/ sup 233/ from foreign products present in neutronirradiated thorium is described. The method comprises forming a solution of neutron-irradiated thorium together with a manganous salt, then adding potassium permanganate to precipitate the manganese as manganese dioxide whereby protoactinium is carried down with the nnanganese dioxide dissolving the precipitate, adding a soluble zirconium salt, and adding phosphate ion to precipitate zirconium phosphate whereby protoactinium is then carried down with the zirconium phosphate to effect a further concentration.

  1. Silicon dioxide with a silicon interfacial layer as an insulating gate for highly stable indium phosphide metal-insulator-semiconductor field effect transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, V. J.; Shokrani, M.

    1991-01-01

    A novel gate insulator consisting of silicon dioxide (SiO2) with a thin silicon (Si) interfacial layer has been investigated for high-power microwave indium phosphide (InP) metal-insulator-semiconductor field effect transistors (MISFETs). The role of the silicon interfacial layer on the chemical nature of the SiO2/Si/InP interface was studied by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicated that the silicon interfacial layer reacted with the native oxide at the InP surface, thus producing silicon dioxide, while reducing the native oxide which has been shown to be responsible for the instabilities in InP MISFETs. While a 1.2-V hysteresis was present in the capacitance-voltage (C-V) curve of the MIS capacitors with silicon dioxide, less than 0.1 V hysteresis was observed in the C-V curve of the capacitors with the silicon interfacial layer incorporated in the insulator. InP MISFETs fabricated with the silicon dioxide in combination with the silicon interfacial layer exhibited excellent stability with drain current drift of less than 3 percent in 10,000 sec, as compared to 15-18 percent drift in 10,000 sec for devices without the silicon interfacial layer. High-power microwave InP MISFETs with Si/SiO2 gate insulators resulted in an output power density of 1.75 W/mm gate width at 9.7 GHz, with an associated power gain of 2.5 dB and 24 percent power added efficiency.

  2. Effect of sulfur dioxide on pulmonary macrophage endocytosis at rest and during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Skornik, W.A.; Brain, J.D. )

    1990-09-01

    Inhaled SO2 may cause damage by injuring upper airways. To what extent can SO2 also alter pulmonary macrophage function in the parenchyma and what is the impact of exercise We studied the effect of SO2 on pulmonary macrophage endocytosis in resting and in exercising animals by measuring the rates of macrophage endocytosis in situ for 1 h of a test particle of insoluble radioactive colloidal gold (198Au), 1, 24, or 48 h after inhalation exposure to SO2. Resting hamsters exposed for 4 h to 50 ppm SO2 had no significant reduction in macrophage endocytosis compared with air-breathing control hamsters. However, if hamsters were exposed to the same concentration of SO2 while continuously running (40 min at 0.9 km/h), macrophage endocytosis was significantly reduced 1 h after exposure even though the exposure time was only one-sixth as long. Twenty-four hours later, the percentage of gold ingested by pulmonary macrophages remained significantly depressed. By 48 h, the rate had returned to control values. Exercise alone did not affect endocytosis. Hamsters exposed to 50 ppm SO2, with or without exercise, also showed significant reductions in the number of lavaged macrophages. This decrease was greatest and most persistent in the SO2 plus exercise group. These data indicate that even when animals are exposed to water-soluble gases, which are normally removed by the upper airways, exercise can potentiate damage to more peripheral components of the pulmonary defense system such as the macrophage.

  3. Biochar and hydrochar effects on greenhouse gas (carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane) fluxes from soils.

    PubMed

    Kammann, Claudia; Ratering, Stefan; Eckhard, Christian; Müller, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    With a growing world population and global warming, we are challenged to increase food production while reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. We studied the effects of biochar (BC) and hydrochar (HC) produced via pyrolysis or hydrothermal carbonization, respectively, on GHG fluxes in three laboratory incubation studies. In the first experiment, ryegrass was grown in sandy loam mixed with equal amounts of a nitrogen-rich peanut hull BC, compost, BC+compost, double compost, or no addition (control); wetting-drying cycles and N fertilization were applied. Biochar with or without compost significantly reduced NO emissions and did not change the CH uptake, whereas ryegrass yield was significantly increased. In the second experiment, 0% (control) or 8% (w/w) of BC (peanut hull, maize, wood chip, or charcoal) or 8% HC (beet chips or bark) was mixed into a soil and incubated at 65% water-holding capacity (WHC) for 140 d. Treatments included simulated plowing and N fertilization. All BCs reduced NO emissions by ∼60%. Hydrochars reduced NO emissions only initially but significantly increased them after N fertilization to 302% (HC-beet) and 155% (HC-bark) of the control emissions, respectively. Large HC-associated CO emissions suggested that microbial activity was stimulated and that HC was less stable than BC. In the third experiment, nutrient-rich peanut hull BC addition and incubation over 1.5 yr at high WHCs did not promote NO emissions. However, NO emissions were significantly increased with BC after NHNO addition. In conclusion, BC reduced NO emissions and improved the GHG-to-yield ratio under field-relevant conditions. However, the risk of increased NO emissions with HC addition must be carefully evaluated.

  4. Effect of Dopants on the Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Ceria Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Meijun; Tumuluri, Uma; Wu, Zili; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-25

    Here, high-surface-area nanosized CeO2 and M-doped CeO2 (M=Cu, La, Zr, and Mg) prepared by a surfactant-templated method were tested for CO2 adsorption. Cu, La, and Zr are doped into the lattice of CeO2, whereas Mg is dispersed on the CeO2 surface. The doping of Cu and La into CeO2 leads to an increase of the CO2 adsorption capacity, whereas the doping of Zr has little or no effect. The addition of Mg causes a decrease of the CO2 adsorption capacity at a low Mg content and a gradual increase at a higher content. The CO2 adsorption capacity follows the sequence Cu-CeO2>La-CeO2>Zr-CeO2≈CeO2>Mg-CeO2 at low dopant contents, in line with the relative amount of defect sites in the samples. It is the defect sites on the surface, not in the bulk of CeO2, modified by the dopants that play the vital role in CO2 chemisorption. Lastly, the role of surface oxygen vacancies is further supported by an in situ IR spectroscopic study of the surface chemistry during CO2 adsorption on the doped CeO2.

  5. Nitrogen nutrition and temporal effects of enhanced carbon dioxide on soybean growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessey, J. K.; Henry, L. T.; Raper, C. D. Jr

    1990-01-01

    Plants grown on porous media at elevated CO2 levels generally have low concentrations of tissue N and often appear to require increased levels of external N to maximize growth response. This study determines if soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr. Ransom'] grown hydroponically at elevated CO2 requires increases in external NO3- concentrations beyond levels that are optimal at ambient CO2 to maintain tissue N concentrations and maximize the growth response. This study also investigates temporal influences of elevated CO2 on growth responses by soybean. Plants were grown vegetatively for 34 d in hydroponic culture at atmospheric CO2 concentrations of 400, 650, and 900 microliters L-1 and during the final 18 d at NO3- concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mM in the culture solution. At 650 and 900 microliters L-1 CO2, plants had maximum increases of 31 and 45% in dry weight during the experimental period. Plant growth at 900 microliters L-1 CO2 was stimulated earlier than at 650 microliters L-1. During the final 18 d of the experiment, the relative growth rates (RGR) of plants grown at elevated CO2 declined. Elevated CO2 caused increases in total N and total NO3(-)-N content and leaf area but not leaf number. Enhancing CO2 levels also caused a decrease in root:shoot ratios. Stomatal resistance increased by 2.1- and 2.8-fold for plants at the 650 and 900 microliters L-1 CO2, respectively. Nitrate level in the culture solutions had no effect on growth or on C:N ratios of tissues, nor did increases in CO2 levels cause a decrease in N concentration of plant tissues. Hence, increases in NO3- concentration of the hydroponic solution were not necessary to maintain the N status of the plants or to maximize the growth response to elevated CO2.

  6. The Domino Effects of Federal Research Funding.

    PubMed

    Lanahan, Lauren; Graddy-Reed, Alexandra; Feldman, Maryann P

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which federal investment in research crowds out or decreases incentives for investment from other funding sources remains an open question. Scholarship on research funding has focused on the relationship between federal and industry or, more comprehensively, non-federal funding without disentangling the other sources of research support that include nonprofit organizations and state and local governments. This paper extends our understanding of academic research support by considering the relationships between federal and non-federal funding sources provided by the National Science Foundation Higher Education Research and Development Survey. We examine whether federal research investment serves as a complement or substitute for state and local government, nonprofit, and industry research investment using the population of research-active academic science fields at U.S. doctoral granting institutions. We use a system of two equations that instruments with prior levels of both federal and non-federal funding sources and accounts for time-invariant academic institution-field effects through first differencing. We estimate that a 1% increase in federal research funding is associated with a 0.411% increase in nonprofit research funding, a 0.217% increase in state and local research funding, and a 0.468% increase in industry research funding, respectively. Results indicate that federal funding plays a fundamental role in inducing complementary investments from other funding sources, with impacts varying across academic division, research capacity, and institutional control.

  7. The Domino Effects of Federal Research Funding

    PubMed Central

    Graddy-Reed, Alexandra; Feldman, Maryann P.

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which federal investment in research crowds out or decreases incentives for investment from other funding sources remains an open question. Scholarship on research funding has focused on the relationship between federal and industry or, more comprehensively, non-federal funding without disentangling the other sources of research support that include nonprofit organizations and state and local governments. This paper extends our understanding of academic research support by considering the relationships between federal and non-federal funding sources provided by the National Science Foundation Higher Education Research and Development Survey. We examine whether federal research investment serves as a complement or substitute for state and local government, nonprofit, and industry research investment using the population of research-active academic science fields at U.S. doctoral granting institutions. We use a system of two equations that instruments with prior levels of both federal and non-federal funding sources and accounts for time-invariant academic institution-field effects through first differencing. We estimate that a 1% increase in federal research funding is associated with a 0.411% increase in nonprofit research funding, a 0.217% increase in state and local research funding, and a 0.468% increase in industry research funding, respectively. Results indicate that federal funding plays a fundamental role in inducing complementary investments from other funding sources, with impacts varying across academic division, research capacity, and institutional control. PMID:27327509

  8. Titanium dioxide-coated carbon nanotube network filter for rapid and effective arsenic sorption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Zuo, Kuichang; Vecitis, Chad D

    2014-12-02

    In this study, a TiO2-coated carbon nanotube (CNT) network filter was prepared via a simple filtration–steam hydrolysis method and evaluated with respect to aqueous arsenic removal. The TiO2 coating was 5.5 ± 2.7 nm thick, completely covered the CNT network surface, and had a specific surface area of 196 m(2) g(–1), which was ∼2-fold greater than that of the CNT network. The TiO2–CNT As sorption kinetics increased with both increasing flow rate and cell potential, with increasing flow rate having a significantly stronger effect. At 6 mL min(–1) in the absence of potential and in recirculation mode, the first-order As sorption rate constants were 4.3 and 4.4 s(–1) for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The TiO2–CNT electro-assisted equilibrium sorption capacities at a cell potential of 2 V for effluent [As] = 10 ppb in single-pass mode were 1.8 and 1.3 mg g(–1) for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The enhanced TiO2–CNT filter As sorption kinetics and capacity result from increased mass transport due to internal convection and pore radius range, improved sorption site accessibility due to porosity and TiO2 dispersion, and reduced TiO2 negative surface charge due to anodic capacitance. Groundwater samples containing 44 ppb As were treated by single-pass filtration, and 12,500 bed volumes (residence time of 4.5 s; 127 L m(–2) h(–1); 5.8 mg m(–2) h(–1)) were filtered prior to the effluent As level reaching >10 ppb. A spent TiO2 filter was successfully regenerated by 5 mM NaOH for both As(III) and As(V).

  9. The effect of humic acid on the aggregation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles under different pH and ionic strengths.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Miao; Wang, Hongtao; Keller, Arturo A; Wang, Tao; Li, Fengting

    2014-07-15

    With the increasingly widespread use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), the particles' environmental impacts have attracted concern, making it necessary to understand the fate and transport of TiO2 NPs in aqueous media. In this study, we investigated TiO2 NP aggregation caused by the effects of humic acid (HA), ionic strength (IS) and different pH using dynamic light scattering (DLS) to monitor the size distribution of the TiO2 NPs continuously. It was determined that HA can influence the stability of TiO2 NPs through charge neutralization, steric hindrance and bridging effects. In the absence of IS, aggregation was promoted by adding HA only when the pH (pH=4) is less than the point of zero charge for the TiO2 NPs (pHPZC≈6) because HA reduces the zeta potential of the TiO2 NPs via charge neutralization. At pH=4 and when the concentration of HA is 94.5 μg/L, the zeta potential of TiO2 NPs is close to zero, and they reach an aggregation maximum. A higher concentration of HA results in more negatively charged TiO2 NP surfaces, which hinder their aggregation. When the pH is 5.8, HA enhances the negative zeta potential of the TiO2 NPs and increases their stability via electrostatic repulsion and steric hindrance. When the pH (pH=8) is greater than pHpzc, the zeta potential of the TiO2 NPs is high (~40 mV), and it barely changes with increasing HA concentration. Thus, the TiO2 NPs are notably stable, and their size does not grow at pH8. The increase in the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) of TiO2 NPs indicated that there is steric hindrance after the addition of HA. HA can enhance the coagulation of TiO2 NPs, primarily due to bridging effect. These findings are useful in understanding the size change of TiO2 NPs, as well as the removal of TiO2 NPs and HA from aqueous media.

  10. Stabilization of nanosized titanium dioxide by cyclodextrin polymers and its photocatalytic effect on the degradation of wastewater pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Agócs, Tamás Zoltán; Puskás, István; Varga, Erzsébet; Molnár, Mónika

    2016-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are considered highly competitive water treatment technologies for the removal of organic pollutants. Among AOP techniques, photocatalysis has recently been the most widely studied. Our aims were to investigate how the dispersion of nanosized titanium dioxide (nanoTiO2) applied in photodegradation-based procedures can be stabilized with cyclodextrins in order to obtain a new, more efficient photocatalyst for the purification of waters polluted by xenobiotics applying UV irradiation. During our work, on the one hand, we studied the behavior and stability of nanoTiO2 in cyclodextrin solutions. On the other hand, we used various monomer and polymer cyclodextrin derivatives, and assessed the options for nanoTiO2 stabilization in the presence of various salts and tap water on the basis of turbidity tests. The physical stability of nanoTiO2 dispersions is diminished in the presence of the salts found in tap water (and occurring also in surface waters and ground water) and they are precipitated immediately. This colloidal instability can be improved by cyclodextrin derivatives. Based on the results of our studies we have selected carboxymethyl β-cyclodextrin polymer (CMBCD-P) for stabilization of nanoTiO2 dispersions. The photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue and ibuprofen as model organic pollutants in various media (distilled water, NaCl solution and tap water) has been studied using nanoTiO2 as catalyst stabilized by CMBCD-P. CMBCD-P itself showed a catalytic effect on the UV degradation of methylene blue. In addition to enhancing the colloid stability of nanoTiO2 CMBCD-P showed also synergistic effects in catalyzing the photodecomposition process of the dye. On the other hand, ibuprofen as a model pharmaceutical, a pollutant of emerging concern (EP), was protected by CMBCD-P against the photocatalytic degradation showing that inclusion complex formation can result in opposite effects depending on the structure of the host

  11. Comparative effectiveness research: Policy context, methods development and research infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Tunis, Sean R; Benner, Joshua; McClellan, Mark

    2010-08-30

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) has received substantial attention as a potential approach for improving health outcomes while lowering costs of care, and for improving the relevance and quality of clinical and health services research. The Institute of Medicine defines CER as 'the conduct and synthesis of systematic research comparing different interventions and strategies to prevent, diagnose, treat, and monitor health conditions. The purpose of this research is to inform patients, providers, and decision-makers, responding to their expressed needs, about which interventions are most effective for which patients under specific circumstances.' Improving the methods and infrastructure for CER will require sustained attention to the following issues: (1) Meaningful involvement of patients, consumers, clinicians, payers, and policymakers in key phases of CER study design and implementation; (2) Development of methodological 'best practices' for the design of CER studies that reflect decision-maker needs and balance internal validity with relevance, feasibility and timeliness; and (3) Improvements in research infrastructure to enhance the validity and efficiency with which CER studies are implemented. The approach to addressing each of these issues should be informed by the understanding that the primary purpose of CER is to help health care decision makers make informed clinical and health policy decisions.

  12. Drought effects on soil carbon dioxide production in two ecosystems in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Straaten, Oliver

    2010-05-01

    Drought response on soil CO2 production dynamics were examined in two tropical ecosystems in central Sulawesi, Indonesia. Large-scale throughfall displacement roofs were built in a cacao (Theobroma cacao) / Gliricidia sepium agroforestry plantation (560 m.a.s.l.) and in a sub-montane tropical rainforest (1050 m.a.s.l.) to simulate drought conditions. At each site, ecosystem drought responses from three roof plots were compared to three undisturbed control plots. Soil CO2 production was measured spatially at the soil surface and vertically within the soil profile to 2.5 m depth every two weeks. 1. The cacao / Gliricidia ecosystem exhibited a mild drought response. Here, soil CO2 production decreased by 13% in comparison to the control plots during the 13 month induced drought. The mild drought response is attributed to two reasons. First, soil CO2 efflux exhibited an inverse parabolic relationship with soil moisture (R2 = 0.32): soil CO2 efflux peaked at intermediate moisture conditions, but was low when soil conditions became dry (in the induced drought plots), and when the soil became water saturated (in the control plots). This means that respiration differences between control and roof plots may have been masked when soil moisture conditions were saturated in the control and concurrently dry in roof plots. Secondly, the shallow rooted cacao understory grown next to the deeper rooted Gliricidia overstory created a favourable set of site conditions that enabled the ecosystem to mitigate serious drought stress. The experiment had a CO2 neutral effect overall: emissions were initially reduced during the induced drought period but rebounded and surpassed the control during the five month rewetting phase, thus compensating for earlier declines. 2. In contrast, the sub-montane tropical rainforest experienced a severe decrease in soil CO2 production. Here, soil CO2 efflux decreased by an average of 39% in comparison to the control during the 24 month induced drought

  13. Effects of High Carbon Dioxide Soil-Gas Concentrations and Emission Rates From Mammoth Mountain, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, C. D.; Evans, W. C.

    2006-12-01

    High concentrations (90 vol %) of carbon dioxide (CO2) are present in shallow soils, and CO2 is emitted to the atmosphere at high rates (1,000 g/d/m2), in several locations around Mammoth Mountain. The CO2 emissions have been diffuse and at ambient temperature. CO2 in the soil has killed most of the coniferous forest in five areas totaling 35 ha around the north, west, and south sides of the mountain at altitudes between 2,600 and 3,000 m. Part of the CO2 has dissolved in ground water, causing acidic conditions and severely corroding steel casings in several wells. The high CO2 emission rates are implicated in the deaths of four people in the past eight years. During winter, a large quantity of CO2 is sequestered in the snow pack on parts of the mountain, posing potential dangers for winter recreation. One U.S. Forest Service campground has been closed and safety plans have been implemented by the local ski resort. Mammoth Mountain is a dormant Quaternary volcanic center, but overlies an area that has been affected by periods of magmatic unrest during the past two decades. Hypocenters of long-period earthquakes indicate that basaltic intrusions reach depths as shallow as 20 to 15 km, from which CO2 has exsolved during decompression and (or) crystallization of these intrusions. CO2 moves to the land surface along fracture zones associated with faults and possibly geologic contacts. The magmatic source of CO2 is confirmed by ¦Ä13C = -3 to -5 PDB, a lack of 14C, and 3He/4He = 4 to 5 R/RA. The present-day high CO2 soil-gas concentrations and emission rates were first documented in 1994; however, anecdotal information and low 14C in post-1989 tree rings suggest that an abrupt increase in both concentrations and emission rates probably began in 1990, following a 6-month period of seismic swarm activity beneath the mountain. Emissions in an area on the south flank of the mountain have been the focus of CO2 monitoring and have shown no indications of abatement between

  14. Mitigation of carbon dioxide by oleaginous microalgae for lipids and pigments production: Effect of light illumination and carbon dioxide feeding strategies.

    PubMed

    Thawechai, Tipawan; Cheirsilp, Benjamas; Louhasakul, Yasmi; Boonsawang, Piyarat; Prasertsan, Poonsuk

    2016-11-01

    Oleaginous microalgae Nannochloropsis sp. was selected as potential strain for CO2 mitigation into lipids and pigments. The synergistic effects of light intensity and photoperiod were evaluated to provide the adequate light energy for this strain. The saturation light intensity was 60μmol·photon·m(-2)s(-1). With full illumination, the biomass obtained was 0.850±0.16g·L(-1) with a lipid content of 44.7±1.2%. The pigments content increased with increasing light energy supply. Three main operating factors including initial cell concentration, CO2 content and gas flow rate were optimized through Response Surface Methodology. The feedings with low CO2 content at high gas flow rate gave the maximum biomass but with low lipid content. After optimization, the biomass and lipid production were increased up to 1.30±0.103g·L(-1) and 0.515±0.010g·L(-1), respectively. The CO2 fixation rate was as high as 0.729±0.04g·L(-1)d(-1). The fatty acids of Nannochloropsis sp. lipids were mainly C16-C18 indicating its potential use as biodiesel feedstocks.

  15. Determination of the effects of sulfur dioxide on recovery systems for CO/sub 2/. Final report, 1977-1980

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    The present study was initiated to investigate the problems associated with recovery of CO/sub 2/ from flue gases for enhanced oil recovery. In particular,