Science.gov

Sample records for dioxide water energy

  1. Energy, Water, and Carbon Dioxide Exchange of a Riparian Mesquite Stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, E. A.; Scott, R. L.; Shuttleworth, W. J.

    2001-12-01

    Rapid population growth in semi-arid regions of the southwestern United States is increasing the demand for groundwater as a source of drinking water. However, vulnerable riparian corridors are often linked to these aquifers, as in the case of the San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona. In such basins, effective management of water resources requires accurate measurements of water fluxes, including the evapotranspiration from the vegetation in the riparian corridor. The riparian vegetation along the San Pedro River typically consists of a narrow strip of phreatophytes such as cottonwood (Populus fremontii) and willow (Salix goodingii), and a wider forest of mesquite (Prosopis velutina) which populates the lower river terrace. This paper describes a study in which energy, water, and carbon dioxide fluxes were measured over an open-canopy mesquite forest with an understory of sacaton bunchgrass (Sporobolus wrightii) and several annual species. Measurements were routinely made throughout the growing season in 2001 at a height of 14 m using eddy covariance techniques, and are used to provide an estimate of the seasonal water use of this riparian mesquite stand.

  2. Performance evaluation of carbon dioxide-alkanolamine- water system by equation of state/excess Gibbs energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleman, H.; Maulud, A. S.; Man, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Numerous thermodynamic techniques have been applied to correlate carbon dioxide- alkanolamine-water systems, with varying accuracy and complexity. With advent of high pressure carbon dioxide absorption in industry, the development of high pressure thermodynamic models have became an exigency. Equation of state/excess Gibbs energy models promises a substantial improvement in this field. Many researchers have shown application of these models to high pressure vapour liquid equilibria of said system with good correlation. However, no study shows the range of application of these models in presence of other competitive techniques. Therefore, this study quantitatively describes the range of application of equation of state/excess Gibbs energy models to carbon dioxide-alkanolamine systems. The model uses Linear Combination of Vidal and Michelsen mixing rule for correlation of carbon dioxide absorption in single aqueous monoethanolamine, diethanolamine and methyldiethanolamine mixtures. The results show that correlation of equation of state/excess Gibbs energy models show a transient change at carbon dioxide loadings of 0.8. Therefore, these models are applicable to the above mentioned system for carbon dioxide loadings beyond 0.8 mol/mol and higher. The observations are similar in behaviour for all tested alkanolamines and are therefore generalized for the system.

  3. Solubility prediction of carbon dioxide in water by an iterative equation of state/excess Gibbs energy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleman, H.; Maulud, A. S.; Man, Z.

    2016-06-01

    The solubility of carbon dioxide in water has been predicted extensively by various models, owing to their vast applications in process industry. Henry's law has been widely utilized for solubility prediction with good results at low pressure. However, the law shows large deviations at high pressure, even when adjusted to pressure correction and improved conditions. Contrarily, equations of state/excess Gibbs energy models are a promising addition to thermodynamic models for prediction at high pressure non-ideal equilibria. These models can efficiently predict solubilities at high pressures, even when the experimental solubilities are not corroborated. Hence, these models work iteratively, utilizing the mathematical redundancy of local composition excess Gibbs energy models. In this study, an iterative form of Linear Combination of Vidal and Michelsen (LCVM) mixing rule has been used for prediction of carbon dioxide solubility in water, in conjunction with UNIFAC and translated modified Peng- Robinson equation of state. The proposed model, termed iterative LCVM (i-LCVM), predicts carbon dioxide solubility in water for a wide range of temperature (273 to 453 K) and pressure (101.3 to 7380 kPa). The i-LCVM shows good agreement with experimental values and predicts better than Henry's law (53% improvement).

  4. The Water, Energy, and Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Simulation Model (WECSsim). A user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Gutierrez, Karen A.; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Borns, David James; McNemar, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The Water, Energy, and Carbon Sequestration Simulation Model (WECSsim) is a national dynamic simulation model that calculates and assesses capturing, transporting, and storing CO2 in deep saline formations from all coal and natural gas-fired power plants in the U.S. An overarching capability of WECSsim is to also account for simultaneous CO2 injection and water extraction within the same geological saline formation. Extracting, treating, and using these saline waters to cool the power plant is one way to develop more value from using saline formations as CO2 storage locations. WECSsim allows for both one-to-one comparisons of a single power plant to a single saline formation along with the ability to develop a national CO2 storage supply curve and related national assessments for these formations. This report summarizes the scope, structure, and methodology of WECSsim along with a few key results. Developing WECSsim from a small scoping study to the full national-scale modeling effort took approximately 5 years. This report represents the culmination of that effort. The key findings from the WECSsim model indicate the U.S. has several decades' worth of storage for CO2 in saline formations when managed appropriately. Competition for subsurface storage capacity, intrastate flows of CO2 and water, and a supportive regulatory environment all play a key role as to the performance and cost profile across the range from a single power plant to all coal and natural gas-based plants' ability to store CO2. The overall system's cost to capture, transport, and store CO2 for the national assessment range from $74 to $208 / tonne stored ($96 to 272 / tonne avoided) for the first 25 to 50% of the 1126 power plants to between $1,585 to well beyond $2,000 / tonne stored ($2,040 to well beyond $2,000 / tonne avoided) for the remaining 75 to 100% of the plants. The latter range, while extremely

  5. Influence of Water Vapors and Hydrogen on the Energy Band Bending in the SnO2 Microcrystals of Polycrystalline Tin Dioxide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaman, V. I.; Almaev, A. V.; Sevast'yanov, E. Yu.; Maksimova, N. K.

    2015-06-01

    The results of studying the dependence of the energy band bending at the interface of contacting SnO2 microcrystals in the polycrystalline tin dioxide film on the humidity level of clean air and hydrogen concentration in the gas mixture of clean air + H2 are presented. The experimental results showed that the bending of energy bands in SnO2 is decreased under exposure to the water vapors and molecular hydrogen. The presence of two types of the adsorption centers for water molecules on the surface of SnO2 is found. It is shown that at the absolute humidity of the gas mixture above 12 g/m3, the H2O and H2 molecules are adsorbed on the same centers, whose surface density is of 1012 сm-2 at a concentration of donor impurity in SnO2 equal to 1018 сm-3.

  6. FLUXNET: A New Tool to Study the Temporal and Spatial Variability of Ecosystem-Scale Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Flux Densities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldocchi, Dennis; Falge, Eva; Gu, Lianhong; Olson, Richard; Hollinger, David; Running, Steve; Anthoni, Peter; Bernhofer, Ch.; Davis, Kenneth; Evans, Robert; Fuentes, Jose; Goldstein, Allen; Katul, Gabriel; Law, Beverly; Lee, Xuhui; Malhi, Yadvinder; Meyers, Tilden; Munger, William; Oechel, Walt; Paw, K. T.; Pilegaard, Kim; Schmid, H. P.; Valentini, Riccardo; Verma, Shashi; Vesala, Timo; Wilson, Kell; Wofsy, Steve

    2001-11-01

    FLUXNET is a global network of micrometeorological flux measurement sites that measure the exchanges of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy between the biosphere and atmosphere. At present over 140 sites are operating on a long-term and continuous basis. Vegetation under study includes temperate conifer and broadleaved (deciduous and evergreen) forests, tropical and boreal forests, crops, grasslands, chaparral, wetlands, and tundra. Sites exist on five continents and their latitudinal distribution ranges from 70°N to 30°S. FLUXNET has several primary functions. First, it provides infrastructure for compiling, archiving, and distributing carbon, water, and energy flux measurement, and meteorological, plant, and soil data to the science community. (Data and site information are available online at the FLUXNET www-eosdis.ornl.gov/FLUXNET/.) Second, the project supports calibration and flux intercomparison activities. This activity ensures that data from the regional networks are intercomparable. And third, FLUXNET supports the synthesis, discussion, and communication of ideas and data by supporting project scientists, workshops, and visiting scientists. The overarching goal is to provide information for validating computations of net primary productivity, evaporation, and energy absorption that are being generated by sensors mounted on the NASA Terra satellite. Data being compiled by FLUXNET are being used to quantify and compare magnitudes and dynamics of annual ecosystem carbon and water balances, to quantify the response of stand-scale carbon dioxide and water vapor flux densities to controlling biotic and abiotic factors, and to validate a hierarchy of soil-plant-atmosphere trace gas exchange models. Findings so far include 1) net CO2 exchange of temperate broadleaved forests increases by about 5.7 g C m-2 day-1 for each additional day that the growing season is extended; 2) the sensitivity of net ecosystem CO2 exchange to sunlight doubles if the sky is

  7. Solubility of Carbon Dioxide in Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Pat; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an activity measuring the amount of dissolved carbon dioxide in carbonated water at different temperatures. The amount of carbon dioxide is measured by the amount of dilute ammonia solution needed to produce a pH indicator color change. (PR)

  8. Solubility of Carbon Dioxide in Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Pat; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an activity measuring the amount of dissolved carbon dioxide in carbonated water at different temperatures. The amount of carbon dioxide is measured by the amount of dilute ammonia solution needed to produce a pH indicator color change. (PR)

  9. Assessing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Energy Use at a University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddell, William; Bhatia, Krishan Kumar; Parisi, Matthew; Foote, Jessica; Imperatore, John, III

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess the carbon dioxide emissions associated with electric, HVAC, and hot water use from a US university. Design/methodology/approach: First, the total on-campus electrical, natural gas and oil consumption for an entire year was assessed. For each category of energy use, the carbon associated with…

  10. Assessing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Energy Use at a University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddell, William; Bhatia, Krishan Kumar; Parisi, Matthew; Foote, Jessica; Imperatore, John, III

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess the carbon dioxide emissions associated with electric, HVAC, and hot water use from a US university. Design/methodology/approach: First, the total on-campus electrical, natural gas and oil consumption for an entire year was assessed. For each category of energy use, the carbon associated with…

  11. Water and Carbon Dioxide Adsorption at Olivine Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2013-11-14

    Plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to simulate water and carbon dioxide adsorption at the (010) surface of five olivine minerals, namely, forsterite (Mg2SiO4), calcio-olivine (Ca2SiO4), tephroite (Mn2SiO4), fayalite (Fe2SiO4), and Co-olivine (Co2SiO4). Adsorption energies per water molecule obtained from energy minimizations varied from -78 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -128 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine at sub-monolayer coverage and became less exothermic as coverage increased. In contrast, carbon dioxide adsorption energies at sub-monolayer coverage ranged from -20 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -59 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine. Therefore, the DFT calculations show a strong driving force for carbon dioxide displacement by water at the surface of all olivine minerals in a competitive adsorption scenario. Additionally, adsorption energies for both water and carbon dioxide were found to be more exothermic for the alkaline-earth (AE) olivines than for the transition-metal (TM) olivines and to not correlate with the solvation enthalpies of the corresponding divalent cations. However, a correlation was obtained with the charge of the surface divalent cation indicating that the more ionic character of the AE cations in the olivine structure relative to the TM cations leads to greater interactions with adsorbed water and carbon dioxide molecules at the surface and thus more exothermic adsorption energies for the AE olivines. For calcio-olivine, which exhibits the highest divalent cation charge of the five olivines, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations showed that this effect leads both water and carbon dioxide to react with the surface and form hydroxyl groups and a carbonate-like species, respectively.

  12. Actinide Dioxides in Water: Interactions at the Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Vitaly; Shvareva, Tatiana Y.; Hayun, Shmuel; Asta, Mark; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2011-12-15

    A comprehensive understanding of chemical interactions between water and actinide dioxide surfaces is critical for safe operation and storage of nuclear fuels. Despite substantial previous research, understanding the nature of these interactions remains incomplete. In this work, we combine accurate calorimetric measurements with first-principles computational studies to characterize surface energies and adsorption enthalpies of water on two fluorite-structured compounds, ThO₂ and CeO₂, that are relevant for understanding the behavior of water on actinide oxide surfaces more generally. We determine coverage-dependent adsorption enthalpies and demonstrate a mixed molecular and dissociative structure for the first hydration layer. The results show a correlation between the magnitude of the anhydrous surface energy and the water adsorption enthalpy. Further, they suggest a structural model featuring one adsorbed water molecule per one surface cation on the most stable facet that is expected to be a common structural signature of water adsorbed on actinide dioxide compounds.

  13. Collisional energy transfer from excited nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, K.O.

    1991-05-01

    The radiative lifetimes of gaseous nitrogen dioxide excited by pulsed, tunable dye laser radiation are determined for excitation wavelengths ranging from 400 to 750 nm. When the data are expressed in the form of zero-pressure radiative rate constants (k{sub 0}/s{sup {minus}1}), they fit a linear equation with respect to excitation energy. This fit predicts a radiative lifetime of 64 {mu}s for 400 nm excitation and 102 {mu}s at 750 nm. The effects of pressure, observation delay time, and wavelength range of the fluorescence detection apparatus are determined for both radiative lifetime and quenching constant. Dispersed fluorescence spectra from excited nitrogen dioxide are analyzed into three-parameter functions that approximate the corresponding excited state population distributions. Energy transfer from nitrogen dioxide excited at 532 nm and colliding with thirteen buffer gases is studied by this population deconvolution method. The energy removal rate constants increase in the order Ne < Ar < Kr < Xe < He < CO < N{sub 2} < O{sub 2} < NO < NO{sub 2} < CO{sub 2} < SF{sub 6} < SO{sub 2}. The energy transfer rate constant is strongly correlated with the number of degrees of freedom of the buffer molecule and with low vibrational frequencies of the buffer molecule. Population deconvolution from excited nitrogen dioxide fluorescence spectra is again employed to find energy removal rate constants for the NO {sub 2}{sup *}-NO{sub 2} collisions, excited by dye laser at 475.34, 435.04, and 400.00 nm. The energy transfer rate constant increases with decreasing excitation wavelength. The energy removal rate constant between 400 and 532 nm excitation increases as the (3.6 {plus minus} 0.4) power of the excitation photon energy. 76 refs., 67 figs., 16 tabs.

  14. Renewable and high efficient syngas production from carbon dioxide and water through solar energy assisted electrolysis in eutectic molten salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hongjun; Liu, Yue; Ji, Deqiang; Li, Zhida; Yi, Guanlin; Yuan, Dandan; Wang, Baohui; Zhang, Zhonghai; Wang, Peng

    2017-09-01

    Over-reliance on non-renewable fossil fuel leads to steadily increasing concentration of atmospheric CO2, which has been implicated as a critical factor contributing to global warming. The efficient conversion of CO2 into useful product is highly sought after both in academic and industry. Herein, a novel conversion strategy is proposed to one-step transform CO2/H2O into syngas (CO/H2) in molten salt with electrolysis method. All the energy consumption in this system are contributed from sustainable energy sources: concentrated solar light heats molten salt and solar cell supplies electricity for electrolysis. The eutectic Li0.85Na0.61K0.54CO3/nLiOH molten electrolyte is rationally designed with low melting point (<450 °C). The synthesized syngas contains very desirable content of H2 and CO, with tuneable molar ratios (H2/CO) from 0.6 to 7.8, and with an efficient faradaic efficiency of ∼94.5%. The synthesis of syngas from CO2 with renewable energy at a such low electrolytic temperature not only alleviates heat loss, mitigates system corrosion, and heightens operational safety, but also decreases the generation of methane, thus increases the yield of syngas, which is a remarkable technological breakthrough and this work thus represents a stride in sustainable conversion of CO2 to value-added product.

  15. Can hydrate form in carbon dioxide from dissolved water?

    PubMed

    Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Kivelæ, Pilvi-Helina; Bauman, Jordan

    2013-02-14

    Transport of carbon dioxide in offshore pipelines involves high pressures and low temperatures, which may lead to formation of hydrate from the residual dissolved water and carbon dioxide. While thermodynamics is able to tell us whether the hydrate phase will be stable, the question of whether its formation will actually occur under given pipeline conditions does not have a straightforward answer. In this work, we have made use of water properties obtained from molecular simulations to examine the thermodynamics of hydrate formation from water dissolved in carbon dioxide. This paper proposes a method that allows estimation of absolute thermodynamic properties and thus makes it possible to compare free energy changes due to several possible phase transitions and determine the most probable transition. This information can be used directly to choose the optimum hydrate prevention strategy. We have found that hydrate formation from a carbon dioxide solution will be thermodynamically viable at water concentration exceeding a certain level; a conclusion also supported by several previous studies. We have also extended the quantitative analysis of the thermodynamics and the kinetics of formation through a modified version of phase field theory (PFT). The work presents the way to obtain parameters required for the practical implementation of the PFT in the case of hydrate formation, as well as outlines the estimation of thermodynamic properties for systems unable to reach true equilibrium.

  16. Array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization

    DOEpatents

    Qiu, Xiaofeng; Parans Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chi, Miaofang; Ivanov, Ilia N; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2014-12-30

    An array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization includes a plurality of nanotubes, each nanotube including an outer layer coaxial with an inner layer, where the inner layer comprises p-type titanium dioxide and the outer layer comprises n-type titanium dioxide. An interface between the inner layer and the outer layer defines a p-n junction.

  17. The nature of carbon dioxide waters in Snaefellsnes, western Iceland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnorsson, S.; Barnes, I.

    1983-01-01

    Over 20 occurrences of thermal and non-thermal waters rich in carbon dioxide are known in the Snaefellsnes Peninsula of western Iceland. On the basis of the thermal, chemical and isotopic characteristics of these waters, and hydrological considerations, it is concluded that they represent meteoric waters which have seeped to variable depths into the bedrock. Ascending carbon dioxide gas originating from intrusions or the mantle mixes with the meteoric waters to produce carbon dioxide waters: at considerable depth in the case of the thermal carbon dioxide waters but close to the surface in the case of cold carbon dioxide waters. The occurrence of carbon dioxide waters cannot be regarded as evidence for underground geothermal reservoirs. ?? 1983.

  18. Low Energy, Low Emissions: Sulfur Dioxide; Nitrogen Oxides, and Carbon Dioxide in Western Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcamo, Joseph; De Vries, Bert

    1992-01-01

    Links proposed low-energy scenarios for different Western European countries with the amount of pollutants that may result from these scenarios. Sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and carbon dioxide emissions are calculated for the 10 countries for which low-energy scenarios are available, resulting in reductions of 54%, 37%, and 40%, respectively.…

  19. Low Energy, Low Emissions: Sulfur Dioxide; Nitrogen Oxides, and Carbon Dioxide in Western Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcamo, Joseph; De Vries, Bert

    1992-01-01

    Links proposed low-energy scenarios for different Western European countries with the amount of pollutants that may result from these scenarios. Sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and carbon dioxide emissions are calculated for the 10 countries for which low-energy scenarios are available, resulting in reductions of 54%, 37%, and 40%, respectively.…

  20. Carbon dioxide and water vapor high temperature electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isenberg, Arnold O.; Verostko, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    The design, fabrication, breadboard testing, and the data base obtained for solid oxide electrolysis systems that have applications for planetary manned missions and habitats are reviewed. The breadboard tested contains sixteen tubular cells in a closely packed bundle for the electrolysis of carbon dioxide and water vapor. The discussion covers energy requirements, volume, weight, and operational characteristics related to the measurement of the reactant and product gas compositions, temperature distribution along the electrolyzer tubular cells and through the bundle, and thermal energy losses. The reliability of individual cell performance in the bundle configuration is assessed.

  1. Global carbon dioxide emissions from inland waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raymond, Peter A.; Hartmann, Jens; Lauerwald, Ronny; Sobek, Sebastian; McDonald, Cory P.; Hoover, Mark; Butman, David; Striegl, Robert G.; Mayorga, Emilio; Humborg, Christoph; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Durr, Hans H.; Meybeck, Michel; Ciais, Philippe; Guth, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) transfer from inland waters to the atmosphere, known as CO2 evasion, is a component of the global carbon cycle. Global estimates of CO2 evasion have been hampered, however, by the lack of a framework for estimating the inland water surface area and gas transfer velocity and by the absence of a global CO2 database. Here we report regional variations in global inland water surface area, dissolved CO2 and gas transfer velocity. We obtain global CO2 evasion rates of 1.8   petagrams of carbon (Pg C) per year from streams and rivers and 0.32  Pg C yr−1 from lakes and reservoirs, where the upper and lower limits are respectively the 5th and 95th confidence interval percentiles. The resulting global evasion rate of 2.1 Pg C yr−1 is higher than previous estimates owing to a larger stream and river evasion rate. Our analysis predicts global hotspots in stream and river evasion, with about 70 per cent of the flux occurring over just 20 per cent of the land surface. The source of inland water CO2 is still not known with certainty and new studies are needed to research the mechanisms controlling CO2 evasion globally.

  2. Global carbon dioxide emissions from inland waters.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Peter A; Hartmann, Jens; Lauerwald, Ronny; Sobek, Sebastian; McDonald, Cory; Hoover, Mark; Butman, David; Striegl, Robert; Mayorga, Emilio; Humborg, Christoph; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Dürr, Hans; Meybeck, Michel; Ciais, Philippe; Guth, Peter

    2013-11-21

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) transfer from inland waters to the atmosphere, known as CO2 evasion, is a component of the global carbon cycle. Global estimates of CO2 evasion have been hampered, however, by the lack of a framework for estimating the inland water surface area and gas transfer velocity and by the absence of a global CO2 database. Here we report regional variations in global inland water surface area, dissolved CO2 and gas transfer velocity. We obtain global CO2 evasion rates of 1.8(+0.25)(-0.25)  petagrams of carbon (Pg C) per year from streams and rivers and 0.32(+0.52)(-0.26)  Pg C yr(-1) from lakes and reservoirs, where the upper and lower limits are respectively the 5th and 95th confidence interval percentiles. The resulting global evasion rate of 2.1 Pg C yr(-1) is higher than previous estimates owing to a larger stream and river evasion rate. Our analysis predicts global hotspots in stream and river evasion, with about 70 per cent of the flux occurring over just 20 per cent of the land surface. The source of inland water CO2 is still not known with certainty and new studies are needed to research the mechanisms controlling CO2 evasion globally.

  3. Modeling sulfur dioxide absorption by fine water spray

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng-Hsiung Huang

    2005-07-01

    A novel theoretical model was developed to determine the removal efficiency of sulfur dioxide using fine water spray. The droplet pH, diameter, S(IV) concentration, sulfur dioxide concentration, and liquid-to-gas ratio are found to influence the absorption of sulfur dioxide by the fine water spray. The results demonstrate that the absorption of sulfur dioxide by the fine water spray increases as the droplet diameter falls. The concentration gradient between the interface of the gaseous and liquid phases causes the absorption of sulfur dioxide by the droplets to increase as the initial S(IV) concentration decreases or the sulfur dioxide concentration increases. The results indicate that the performance of the fine water spray in removing sulfur dioxide is generally improved by reducing the droplet diameter or the initial S(IV) concentration, or by increasing the sulfur dioxide concentration, the droplet pH or the liquid-to-gas ratio. The proposed model reveals the parameters that should be controlled in using a fine water spray device and a method for improving its performance in removing sulfur dioxide.

  4. Internal energy distributions from nitrogen dioxide fluorescence. 2. Collisional energy transfer from excited nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, K.O. Jr.; Johnston, H.S. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1993-09-30

    We follow the collisional deactivation of laser-excited nitrogen dioxide through its dispersed fluorescence. The energy acceptor gases are NO[sub 2] at four excitation energies ranging from 18828 to 24989 cm[sup [minus]1] and five monatomic gases, four diatomic gases, and three polyatomic gases with 18828-cm[sup [minus]1] excitation energy. The nominal products are the shapes of the internal energy distributions, which are obtained and plotted for several representative cases. From these distributions, the first three moments of the internal energy distributions are derived as a function of molecular collisions and tabulated as (i) the average internal energy, (ii) energy spread, and (iii) skewness. These quantities are plotted against c(M)t, the product of buffer gas concentration c(M) and delay time after laser excitation t(0.5-2 [mu]s), which is a quantity proportional to number of collisions. The negative slope of average energy vs c(M)t is the macroscopic energy-transfer rate constant, k[sub [epsilon

  5. Microbial Electrosynthesis: Feeding Microbes Electricity To Convert Carbon Dioxide and Water to Multicarbon Extracellular Organic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, Kelly P.; Woodard, Trevor L.; Franks, Ashley E.; Summers, Zarath M.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of providing the acetogenic microorganism Sporomusa ovata with electrons delivered directly to the cells with a graphite electrode for the reduction of carbon dioxide to organic compounds was investigated. Biofilms of S. ovata growing on graphite cathode surfaces consumed electrons with the reduction of carbon dioxide to acetate and small amounts of 2-oxobutyrate. Electrons appearing in these products accounted for over 85% of the electrons consumed. These results demonstrate that microbial production of multicarbon organic compounds from carbon dioxide and water with electricity as the energy source is feasible. PMID:20714445

  6. Microbial electrosynthesis: feeding microbes electricity to convert carbon dioxide and water to multicarbon extracellular organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Kelly P; Woodard, Trevor L; Franks, Ashley E; Summers, Zarath M; Lovley, Derek R

    2010-05-25

    The possibility of providing the acetogenic microorganism Sporomusa ovata with electrons delivered directly to the cells with a graphite electrode for the reduction of carbon dioxide to organic compounds was investigated. Biofilms of S. ovata growing on graphite cathode surfaces consumed electrons with the reduction of carbon dioxide to acetate and small amounts of 2-oxobutyrate. Electrons appearing in these products accounted for over 85% of the electrons consumed. These results demonstrate that microbial production of multicarbon organic compounds from carbon dioxide and water with electricity as the energy source is feasible.

  7. Slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Viani, Brian

    2013-01-29

    A slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures includes the steps of dissolving the gas mixture and carbon dioxide in water providing a gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture; adding a porous solid media to the gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture forming a slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media; heating the slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media producing steam; and cooling the steam to produce purified water and carbon dioxide.

  8. Photoacoustic Signals in Methylene Blue Solutions in Water/Glycerol Mixture Containing Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvekov, A. A.; Nurmukhametov, D. R.; Korzh, M. G.; Kalenskii, A. V.; Aduev, B. P.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we investigated the features of photoacoustic phenomena induced by the second harmonic of YAG:Nd3+ laser pulses (532 nm) in a methylene blue solution in a water/glycerol (1:1) mixture containing titanium dioxide nanoparticles as the light-scattering component. Using stationary spectroscopy, it was found that the dimerization degree of methylene blue is substantially lower in this solvent than in water. The dependencies of the signal amplitude normalized to the pulse energy density and of the effective signal rise constant on the methylene blue and titanium dioxide nanoparticle concentrations were obtained. It is shown that the signal rise constant depends linearly on the concentration of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, while the amplitude is almost independent. A method is suggested for simultaneous photoacoustic determination of concentrations of both components. For testing samples, the uncertainty of the determination of the components concentration is less than 5% for methylene blue and less than 37% for titanium dioxide.

  9. Energy-Water Nexus

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, W.

    2010-07-26

    Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) energy and water are interconnected; (2) new energy sources will place increased demands on water supplies; (3) existing energy sources will be subjected to increasing restrictions on their water use; and (4) integrated decision support tools will need to be developed to help policy makers decide which policies and advanced technologies can address these issues.

  10. U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    The United States has a diverse energy landscape that is reflected in differences in state-level emissions profiles. Since 2005, energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions fell in 48 states (including the District of Columbia) and rose in 3 states. EIA's latest analysis of state-level energy-related CO2 emissions includes data in both absolute and per capita terms, including details by fuel and by sector.

  11. Ground water and energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    This national workshop on ground water and energy was conceived by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Assessments. Generally, OEA needed to know what data are available on ground water, what information is still needed, and how DOE can best utilize what has already been learned. The workshop focussed on three areas: (1) ground water supply; (2) conflicts and barriers to ground water use; and (3) alternatives or solutions to the various issues relating to ground water. (ACR)

  12. Saving Water Saves Energy

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-06-15

    Hot water use in households, for showers and baths as wellas for washing clothes and dishes, is a major driver of household energyconsumption. Other household uses of water (such as irrigatinglandscaping) require additional energy in other sectors to transport andtreat the water before use, and to treat wastewater. In California, 19percent of total electricity for all sectors combined and 32 percent ofnatural gas consumption is related to water. There is a criticalinterdependence between energy and water systems: thermal power plantsrequire cooling water, and water pumping and treatment require energy.Energy efficiency can be increased by a number of means, includingmore-efficient appliances (e.g., clothes washers or dishwashers that useless total water and less heated water), water-conserving plumbingfixtures and fittings (e.g., showerheads, faucets, toilets) and changesin consumer behavior (e.g., lower temperature set points for storagewater heaters, shorter showers). Water- and energy-conserving activitiescan help offset the stress imposed on limited water (and energy) suppliesfrom increasing population in some areas, particularly in drought years,or increased consumption (e.g., some new shower systems) as a result ofincreased wealth. This paper explores the connections between householdwater use and energy, and suggests options for increased efficiencies inboth individual technologies and systems. Studies indicate that urbanwater use can be reduced cost-effectively by up to 30 percent withcommercially available products. The energy savings associated with watersavings may represent a large additional and largely untappedcost-effective opportunity.

  13. Flue gas carbon dioxide sequestration during water softening with ion-exchange fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Greenleaf, J.E.; SenGupta, A.K.

    2009-06-15

    This study examines the use of ion-exchange fibers (IX fibers) to permanently sequester carbon dioxide present in flue gas into an aqueous phase as calcium or magnesium alkalinity while concurrently softening hard water. The only process inputs besides carbon dioxide (or flue gas) are snowmelt (or rainwater); no other chemicals are required for the regeneration of the IX fibers. Importantly, the process is not energy intensive and carbon dioxide does not need to be compressed to excessive pressures (>150 psi) for efficient use. Sources of carbon dioxide do not require concentration and, therefore, the use of raw flue gas (similar to 17% CO{sub 2}) is feasible with the rate of sequestration governed only by the partial pressure of carbon dioxide. While valid for flue gas obtained from any combustion process (e.g., coal, oil, natural gas, etc.), emissions from oil or gas combustion may be more appropriate for use in the described process due to the absence of mercury and particulates. It should also be noted that the presence of sulfur dioxide in flue gas would not adversely affect the process and may even enhance regeneration efficiency. The only product of the proposed process is an environmentally benign regenerant stream containing calcium and/or magnesium alkalinity. The unique property of IX fibers that makes the proposed process both environmentally sustainable and economically feasible is amenability to efficient regeneration with carbon dioxide and harvested snowmelt. Low intraparticle diffusional resistance is the underlying reason why IX fibers are amenable to efficient regeneration using snowmelt sparged with carbon dioxide; 95% calcium recovery was attained at a CO{sub 2} partial pressure of 6.8 atm. The energy balance for a typical electric utility shows that up to 1% of carbon dioxide emitted during combustion would be sequestered in the softening process.

  14. Regeneration of oxygen from carbon dioxide and water.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissbart, J.; Smart, W. H.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    In a closed ecological system it is necessary to reclaim most of the oxygen required for breathing from respired carbon dioxide and the remainder from waste water. One of the advanced physicochemical systems being developed for generating oxygen in manned spacecraft is the solid electrolyte-electrolysis system. The solid electrolyte system consists of two basic units, an electrolyzer and a carbon monoxide disproportionator. The electrolyzer can reclaim oxygen from both carbon dioxide and water. Electrolyzer preparation and assembly are discussed together with questions of reactor design and electrolyzer performance data.

  15. Regeneration of oxygen from carbon dioxide and water.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissbart, J.; Smart, W. H.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    In a closed ecological system it is necessary to reclaim most of the oxygen required for breathing from respired carbon dioxide and the remainder from waste water. One of the advanced physicochemical systems being developed for generating oxygen in manned spacecraft is the solid electrolyte-electrolysis system. The solid electrolyte system consists of two basic units, an electrolyzer and a carbon monoxide disproportionator. The electrolyzer can reclaim oxygen from both carbon dioxide and water. Electrolyzer preparation and assembly are discussed together with questions of reactor design and electrolyzer performance data.

  16. The water-energy nexus: an earth science perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, Richard W.; Alley, William M.; Engle, Mark A.; McMahon, Peter B.; Bales, Jerad D.

    2015-01-01

    Relevant earth science issues analyzed and discussed herein include freshwater availability; water use; ecosystems health; assessment of saline water resources; assessment of fossil-fuel, uranium, and geothermal resources; subsurface injection of wastewater and carbon dioxide and related induced seismicity; climate change and its effect on water availability and energy production; byproducts and waste streams of energy development; emerging energy-development technologies; and energy for water treatment and delivery.

  17. Molecular Simulations of Carbon Dioxide and Water: Cation Solvation and Wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criscenti, L. J.; Bracco, J.; Cygan, R. T.

    2010-12-01

    Proposed carbon dioxide sequestration scenarios in sedimentary basins require investigation into the interaction between supercritical carbon dioxide, brines, and the mineral phases found in the basin and overlying caprock. Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can be used to investigate some of these interactions such as the partitioning of metal cations between aqueous solutions and supercritical carbon dioxide, and the relative wettability of basin and caprock minerals with different fluid phases including water, carbon dioxide, and oil. Initial research has lead to the development of a new flexible carbon dioxide force field that successfully reproduces the vibrational properties of carbon dioxide, and a methodology for extracting contact angle information from large-scale MD simulations. Molecular simulations were performed to compare the solvation of alkali and alkaline metal cations in water and liquid carbon dioxide at 300K, using a flexible simple point charge (SPC) model for water and the new carbon dioxide force field. Solvation energies for Na+, Cs+, Mg2+, and Ba2+ are larger in water than in carbon dioxide, suggesting that these cations will partition preferentially into water. In both solutions, the solvation energy for the cations decreases with ion size and increases with ion charge. However, changes in solvation energy with increasing ionic radii are smaller in carbon dioxide than in water. Therefore, the overall partitioning of cations into carbon dioxide is predicted to increase with ion size. Molecular dynamics simulations are also useful to examine the relative wettability of minerals with different fluid phases. Large-scale MD simulations involving between 100,000 and 200,000 atoms have been conducted to establish a dynamic equilibrium between a drop of liquid water, water vapor, and kaolinite surfaces. The water drops consisted of at least 1700 molecules. Simulations were performed for five nanoseconds. The contact angle calculated

  18. Study of redox reactions to split water and carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifin, Darwin

    The development of carbon-neutral, environmentally-sustainable energy carrier is a technological imperative necessary to mitigate the impact of anthropogenic carbon dioxide on earth's climate. One compelling approach rapidly gaining international attention is the conversion of solar energy into renewable fuels, such as H2 or CO, via a two-step thermochemical cycle driven by concentrated solar power. In accordance with the increased interest in this process, there is a need to better understand the gas splitting chemistry on the metal oxide intermediates encountered in such solar-driven processes. Here we measured the H2 and CO production rates during oxidation by H2O and CO2 in a stagnation flow reactor. Redox cycles were performed over various metal oxide chemistries such as hercynite and ceria based materials that are thermally reduced by laser irradiation. In addition to cycle capacity evaluation, reaction kinetics intrinsic to the materials were extracted using a model-based analytical approach to account for the effects of mixing and dispersion in the reactor. Investigation of the "hercynite chemistry" with raman spectroscopy verifies that, at the surface, the cycle proceeds by stabilizing the reduced and oxidized moieties in two different compounds, which allows the thermal reduction reaction to occur to a greater extent at a temperature 150 °C lower than a similarly prepared CoFe2O4-coated m-ZrO2. Investigation of the ceria cycle shows that the water splitting reaction, in the range of 750 - 950 °C and 20 - 40 vol.% H2O, can best be described by a first-order kinetic model with low apparent activation energy (29 kJ/mol). The carbon dioxide splitting reaction, in the range of 650 - 875 °C and 10 - 40 vol.% CO2, is a more complex surface-mediated phenomena that is controlled by a temperature-dependent surface site blocking mechanism involving adsorbed carbon. Moreover, we find that lattice substitution of ceria with zirconium can increase H2 production by

  19. Energy and Water Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valek, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    Energy efficiency isn't just a good idea; it's a necessity, both for cost reasons and to meet federal regulatory requirements. First, rising energy unit costs continue to erode NASA's mission budget. NASA spent roughly $156M on facility energy in FY 2007. Although that represents less than one per cent of NASA's overall annual budget, the upward trend in energy costs concerns the agency. While NASA reduced consumption 13%, energy unit costs have risen 63%. Energy cost increases counteract the effects of energy conservation, which results in NASA buying less yet spending more. The second factor is federal energy legislation. The National Energy Conservation Policy Act, as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Executive Order (EO) 13423 (January, 2007), and the Energy Independence and Security Act (December, 2007), mandates energy/water conservation goals for all federal agencies, including NASA. There are also reporting requirements associated with this legislation. The Energy/Water Management Task was created to support NASA Headquarters Environmental Management Division (HO EMD) in meeting these requirements. With assistance from TEERM, HQ EMD compiled and submitted the NASA Annual Report to the Department of Energy FY 2007. The report contains information on how NASA is meeting federally mandated energy and water management goals. TEERM monitored input for timeliness, errors, and conformity to the new energy/water reporting guidelines and helped compile the information into the final report. TEERM also assists NASA Energy/Water Management with proposal and award calls, updates to the energy/water management database, and facilitating communication within the energy/water management community. TEERM is also supporting NASA and the Interagency Working Group (IWG) on Hydrogen and Fuel Cells. Established shortly after the President announced the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative in 2003, this IWG serves as the mechanism for collaboration among the Federal agencies

  20. Utilization of sulphur dioxide for energy production

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.W.

    1988-07-12

    A process for effecting the continous desulphurization of gases containing sulphur oxides and producing steam is described comprising the steps of: transmitting gases having sulphur oxides to catalytic converter means, communicating the sulphur trioxide rich flue gas to first heat exchanging means in order to convert steam to superheated steam and cool the sulphur trioxide rich flue gas, returning a sulphur trioxide rich flue gas to the catalytic converter means in order to convert further the flue gas to sulphur trioxide rich flue gas, transmitting the sulphur trioxide rich flue gas to a fluidized bed reactor and providing a calcium containing reactant to the reactor; transmitting a heated medium from the reactor to steam drum means for providing saturated steam to second heat exchanging means, withdrawing the reaction product of the reactant and sulphur oxides, transmitting a desulphurized exit gas of the reactor through the second heat exchanging means, in a nonrecirculating manner, in order to convert water to steam, communicating the exit gas to third heat exchanging means for further extraction of heat therefrom, and transmitting the desulphurized exit gas to an exit.

  1. Carbon Dioxide and Vegetation Water Use

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, J.T.; Peterson, A.G.; Hoylman, A.M.; Luo, Y.; Sims, D.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Coleman, J.S.; Ross, P.D.; Cheng, W.

    1996-12-01

    Evapo-transpiration from vegetation, as well as patterns of precipitation are expected to change as the concentration of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere continues to rise (f). Water modulates the rates of many biogeochemical processes, and it has been estimated that water directly limits plant productivity over two-thirds of the earth's land surface (2). Water quality and availability are increasingly important practical issues as demands by both agricultural and urban users continue to increase. In a recent Perspective article (3) Farquhar stated that transpiration (water loss) from terrestrial vegetation will decline by 40 to 50% as the CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere approaches twice present levels. He suggested that ''the impending saving of water would be a welcome result of the rising atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration.'' We can confirm that large reductions in transpiration are expected by terrestrial physiological ecologists. Examining 35 recent articles that discussed the issue of water use while synthesizing research on ecosystem impacts of doubling atmospheric CO{sub 2} (including reviews and crop/natural ecosystem models), we found that 31 articles suggest that reductions in water use of between 25 and 50% are to be expected.

  2. Energy and Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harte, John; El-Gasseir, Mohamed

    1978-01-01

    The water consumption requirements for a variety of energy options are presented, and comparative judgments drawn. Attention is focused on problems resulting from synthetic, gaseous, and liquid fuel production. Scenarios describing possible future levels of coal and electricity use are analyzed. They point to the importance of water supply…

  3. Energy and Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harte, John; El-Gasseir, Mohamed

    1978-01-01

    The water consumption requirements for a variety of energy options are presented, and comparative judgments drawn. Attention is focused on problems resulting from synthetic, gaseous, and liquid fuel production. Scenarios describing possible future levels of coal and electricity use are analyzed. They point to the importance of water supply…

  4. Carbon dioxide modified subcritical water chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fogwill, Michael O; Thurbide, Kevin B

    2008-07-18

    A novel method of increasing the elution strength in subcritical water chromatography (SWC) by adding CO2 to the water mobile phase is presented. Since the polarity of water reduces dramatically with increasing temperature, this property is used in SWC to create an isocratic mobile phase with tunable elutropic strength in reversed-phase separations. Unfortunately, thermal stability of the stationary phase dictates the upper temperature limit and therefore also the minimum available mobile phase polarity. As a result SWC is often not very effective at eluting non-polar analytes. However, when CO2 is blended into subcritical water, a considerable reduction in mobile phase polarity results and improves such separations. For example, in conventional SWC 1-octanol is not observed to elute from a PRP-1 column after several hours at the maximum column temperature of 200 degrees C. In contrast to this, when CO2 is present at 180atm (1atm=101325Pa) in the mobile phase, 1-octanol elutes with good peak shape in less than 4min at only 100 degrees C. The technique is applied to the separation of a variety of analytes which have previously been challenging or even not possible to analyze by conventional SWC. Further, the ability to use temperature and composition programming with the blended CO2/water mobile phase in SWC is also presented and discussed. Overall, the developed method considerably extends the range of non-polar analytes amenable to SWC analysis, while maintaining the beneficial conventional SWC features of flame ionization detection and environmental compatibility.

  5. Combined carbon dioxide/water solid oxide electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacomini, Christine Schroeder

    Solid oxide electrolysis of a mixture of water and carbon dioxide has many applications in space exploration. It can be implemented in propellant production systems that use Martian resources or in closed-loop life support systems to cleanse the atmosphere of facilities in extraterrestrial bases and of cabin spacecrafts. This work endeavors to quantify the performance of combined water and carbon dioxide electrolysis, referred to as "combined electrolysis", and to understand how it works so that the technology can be best applied. First, to thoroughly motivate the research, system modeling is presented that demonstrates the competitiveness of the technology in terms of electrolysis power requirements and consequential system mass savings. Second, to demonstrate and quantify the performance of the technology, experimental results are presented. Electrolysis cells were constructed with 8% by mol yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes, 50/50 by weight platinum/yttria-stabilized zirconia electrodes and chromium-alloy or alumina manifolds and tubing. Performance and gas chromatograph data from electrolysis of many different gas mixtures, including water, carbon dioxide, and a combined mixture of both, are presented. Third, to explain observations made during experiments and theorize about the phenomena governing combined electrolysis, data analyses and thermodynamic modeling are applied. Conclusions are presented regarding the transient response of combined electrolysis, the relative performance of it to that of other mixtures, how its performance depends on the water to carbon dioxide ratio, its effect on cell health, and its preference to water versus carbon dioxide. Procedures are also derived for predicting the composition of combined electrolysis exhaust for a given oxygen production rate, humidity content, and inlet flow rate. The influence of the two cell materials proves to be significant. However, in both cases it is proven that combined electrolysis does not

  6. Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsions for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, David; Golomb, Dan; Shi, Guang; Shih, Cherry; Lewczuk, Rob; Miksch, Joshua; Manmode, Rahul; Mulagapati, Srihariraju; Malepati, Chetankurmar

    2011-09-30

    This project involves the use of an innovative new invention Particle Stabilized Emulsions (PSEs) of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water and Water-in-Carbon Dioxide for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. The EOR emulsion would be injected into a semi-depleted oil reservoir such as Dover 33 in Otsego County, Michigan. It is expected that the emulsion would dislocate the stranded heavy crude oil from the rock granule surfaces, reduce its viscosity, and increase its mobility. The advancing emulsion front should provide viscosity control which drives the reduced-viscosity oil toward the production wells. The make-up of the emulsion would be subsequently changed so it interacts with the surrounding rock minerals in order to enhance mineralization, thereby providing permanent sequestration of the injected CO{sub 2}. In Phase 1 of the project, the following tasks were accomplished: 1. Perform laboratory scale (mL/min) refinements on existing procedures for producing liquid carbon dioxide-in-water (C/W) and water-in-liquid carbon dioxide (W/C) emulsion stabilized by hydrophilic and hydrophobic fine particles, respectively, using a Kenics-type static mixer. 2. Design and cost evaluate scaled up (gal/min) C/W and W/C emulsification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 at the Otsego County semi-depleted oil field. 3. Design the modifications necessary to the present CO{sub 2} flooding system at Otsego County for emulsion injection. 4. Design monitoring and verification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 for measuring potential leakage of CO{sub 2} after emulsion injection. 5. Design production protocol to assess enhanced oil recovery with emulsion injection compared to present recovery with neat CO{sub 2} flooding. 6. Obtain Federal and State permits for emulsion injection. Initial research focused on creating particle stabilized emulsions with the smallest possible globule size so that the emulsion can penetrate even low-permeability crude

  7. Carbon dioxide, water vapor and sensible heat fluxes over a tallgrass prairie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Shashi B.; Kim, Joon; Clement, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Fluxes of CO2, water vapor and sensible heat were measured in a grassland ecosystem near Manhattan, Kansas, employing the eddy correlation technique. The vegetation at this site is dominated by big bluestem ( Andropogon gerardii), switchgrass ( Panicum virgatum), and indiangrass ( Sorghastrum nutans). Diurnal patterns of the energy budget components and CO2 fluxes are evaluated on a few selected days. Influence of high atmospheric evaporative demand and low availability of soil water are examined on (a) energy partitioning, and (b) the magnitudes and patterns of atmospheric carbon dioxide exchange.

  8. Density functional treatment of water-carbon dioxide van der Waals complex

    SciTech Connect

    Abashkin, Y.; Mele, F.; Russo, N.; Toscano, M.

    1994-12-31

    LCGTO-LSD and LCGTO-NLSD methods have been tested for the study of water-carbon dioxide weakly bound binary complex. Different local and nonlocal exchange-correlation energy functionals and many grid radial points have been used. Results show that both nonlocal corrections and a large number of radial points in the grid are mandatory for well reproducing then experimental data. 19 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. The Health Effects of Chlorine Dioxide as a Disinfectant in Potable Water: A Literature Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Edward J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The use of chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant in water is being considered by the EPA. This article presents a summary of the known published reports concerning health effects of chlorine dioxide on animal and human populations. (Author/MA)

  10. The Health Effects of Chlorine Dioxide as a Disinfectant in Potable Water: A Literature Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Edward J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The use of chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant in water is being considered by the EPA. This article presents a summary of the known published reports concerning health effects of chlorine dioxide on animal and human populations. (Author/MA)

  11. Polarizability calculations on water, hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, S.; Adams, S.; Rein, R.

    1973-01-01

    A semiclassical model of damped oscillators is used as a basis for the calculation of the dispersion of the refractive index, polarizability, and dielectric permeability in water, hydrogen, and oxygen in liquid and gaseous states, and in gaseous carbon dioxide. The absorption coefficient and the imaginary part of the refractive index are also calculated at corresponding wavelengths. A good agreement is obtained between the observed and calculated values of refractive indices, and between those of absorption coefficients in the region of absorption bands. The calculated values of oscillator strengths and damping factors are also discussed. The value of the polarizability of liquid water was about 2.8 times that of previous calculations.

  12. Polarizability calculations on water, hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, S.; Adams, S.; Rein, R.

    1973-01-01

    A semiclassical model of damped oscillators is used as a basis for the calculation of the dispersion of the refractive index, polarizability, and dielectric permeability in water, hydrogen, and oxygen in liquid and gaseous states, and in gaseous carbon dioxide. The absorption coefficient and the imaginary part of the refractive index are also calculated at corresponding wavelengths. A good agreement is obtained between the observed and calculated values of refractive indices, and between those of absorption coefficients in the region of absorption bands. The calculated values of oscillator strengths and damping factors are also discussed. The value of the polarizability of liquid water was about 2.8 times that of previous calculations.

  13. Alkali metal carbon dioxide electrochemical system for energy storage and/or conversion of carbon dioxide to oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, Norman H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An alkali metal, such as lithium, is the anodic reactant; carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide is the cathodic reactant; and carbonate of the alkali metal is the electrolyte in an electrochemical cell for the storage and delivery of electrical energy. Additionally, alkali metal-carbon dioxide battery systems include a plurality of such electrochemical cells. Gold is a preferred catalyst for reducing the carbon dioxide at the cathode. The fuel cell of the invention produces electrochemical energy through the use of an anodic reactant which is extremely energetic and light, and a cathodic reactant which can be extracted from its environment and therefore exacts no transportation penalty. The invention is, therefore, especially useful in extraterrestrial environments.

  14. Alkali metal carbon dioxide electrochemical system for energy storage and/or conversion of carbon dioxide to oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Norman H.

    1993-05-01

    An alkali metal, such as lithium, is the anodic reactant; carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide is the cathodic reactant; and carbonate of the alkali metal is the electrolyte in an electrochemical cell for the storage and delivery of electrical energy. Additionally, alkali metal-carbon dioxide battery systems include a plurality of such electrochemical cells. Gold is a preferred catalyst for reducing the carbon dioxide at the cathode. The fuel cell of the invention produces electrochemical energy through the use of an anodic reactant which is extremely energetic and light, and a cathodic reactant which can be extracted from its environment and therefore exacts no transportation penalty. The invention is, therefore, especially useful in extraterrestrial environments.

  15. Alkali metal carbon dioxide electrochemical system for energy storage and/or conversion of carbon dioxide to oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Norman H.

    1991-09-01

    An alkali metal, such as lithium, is the anodic reactant, carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide is the cathodic reactant, and carbonate of the alkali metal is the electrolyte in an electrochemical cell for the storage and delivery of electrical energy. Additionally, alkali metal-carbon dioxide battery systems include a plurality of such electrochemical cells. Gold is a preferred catalyst for reducing the carbon dioxide at the cathode. The fuel cell of the invention produces electrochemical energy through the use of an anodic reactant which is extremely energetic and light, and a cathodic reactant which can be extracted from its environment and therefore exacts no transportation penalty. The invention is therefore especially useful in extraterrestrial environments.

  16. Gaseous, chlorine-free chlorine dioxide for drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, G.; Rosenblatt, A.

    1996-11-01

    The benefits of applying chlorine dioxide (ClO{sub 2}) for the oxidative treatment of drinking water are well established. Chlorine dioxide treated finished water typically has substantially lower trihalomethane (THM) levels because ClO{sub 2} will not form chlorinated organic species as a by-product of disinfection. The THMs that are formed are probably due to chlorine from the generator or chlorine used to maintain a post-disinfection residual. An emerging regulatory issue concerning the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) is causing the water industry to set standards for the generation and delivery of ClO{sub 2}. The Federal Register (11 February 1994) contains language developed to limit the production of the unwanted inorganic by-products chlorite (ClO{sub 2}{sup -}), chlorate (ClO{sub 3}{sup -}), and bromate (BrO{sub 3}{sup -}) ions by requiring utilities to maintain high (95%) generation efficiencies and by limiting the amount of excess Cl{sub 2} that can be used during the generation process. The efficiency and excess Cl{sub 2} regulations may be problematic for utilities that over-chlorinate to attain chlorine dioxide high yields. Many utilities will have to decide either to reduce the amount of Cl{sub 2} used to react with sodium chlorite (NaClO{sub 2}), thereby increasing the ClO{sub 2}{sup -} residual in finished water, or over-chlorinate to increase yields and surpass the excess Cl{sub 2} limits.

  17. Reaction of plutonium dioxide with water: formation and properties of PuO(2+x)

    PubMed

    Haschke; Allen; Morales

    2000-01-14

    Results show that PuO(2+x), a high-composition (x dioxide with water and by water-catalyzed reaction of dioxide with oxygen. The PuO(2) + H(2)O reaction rate is 0.27 nanomoles per meter squared per hour at 25 degrees C; the activation energy at 25 degrees to 350 degrees C is 39 kilojoules per mole. Slow kinetics and a low lattice parameter-composition dependence for fluorite-related PuO(2+x) are consistent with a failure to observe the phase in earlier studies. Perplexing aspects of plutonium oxide chemistry can now be explained.

  18. Carbon dioxide and energy fluxes over a large shallow lake in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaosong

    2017-04-01

    The turbulent exchange of carbon dioxide and energy between water and atmosphere over lakes differ from those over vegetated surfaces due to high heat capacity of water and different water ecological environment. For a shallow lake, the underlying surface generally changes between water covered and land covered with water level fluctuation, which significantly influences carbon dioxide and energy fluxes. Continuous measurement of the carbon dioxide (CO2), latent (LE) and sensible (H) heat fluxes was made using the eddy covariance method over the Poyang Lake, the largest fresh lake in China, from August 2013 to December 2015. Results indicated that the surface energy budget has a strong seasonal pattern, with peaks in LE and H observed in early August and September. There was 10 days delay between the net radiation and the latent heat flux. More net radiation (Rn) was allocated to the LE rather than H through the year, with monthly mean LE/Rn of 0.65 and H/Rn of 0.11, which caused Bowen ratio was 0.15 in water-covered period, lower than that in land-covered period. The water heat storage experienced shifting from heat storage to heat release, with maximum heat storage in July and maximum heat release in September. The water heat advection was account for 4% to 10% of Rn and peaked in June. The annual evaporation is 875 mm, 893 mm and 1019 mm in 2013 (from August 2013 to July 2014), 2014 and 2015, which was account for approximately 57% of precipitation in the three years. The large lake acted as a CO2 source in inundating period and a CO2 sink in exposure period. The energy fluxes were controlled by environmental factors with timescale dependence. On daily scale, the LE and H were highly correlated with product of wind speed and vapor pressure deficit (UVPD) or wind speed (U) in the water-covered period, and with Rn in the land-covered period. Monthly LE, H and annual H were controlled by Rn, while annual LE was primarily dependent on water depth. Annual CO2 budget

  19. Water wave energy transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Lamberti, J.

    1980-01-22

    A water wave energy transducer for converting the motion of a water wave into a controlled mechanical movement such as rotational motion suitable for actuating an electrical generator is disclosed. The transducer comprises a float member floatingly moored in a water body having waves and/or tidal movement, such as a seashore. A power gear is rotatably mounted in a swing block on the float with a power shaft extending from the power gear to laterally spaced drive bevel gears mounted for rotation with the power gear. These drive bevel gears are coupled to a transmission on the float comprising one-way drive clutches transmitting rotational energy to the drive shaft of a generator or the like to provide rotational energy on both up and down movement of the float. A rack is pivotally anchored in the water body, extends up through the float and is slideable with respect to the power gear of the swing block, so that movement of the float with respect to the rack will provide rotation of the power gear.

  20. Titanium Dioxide Volatility in High Temperature Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, QynhGiao N.

    2008-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) containing materials are of high interest to the aerospace industry due to its high temperature capability, strength, and light weight. As with most metals an exterior oxide layer naturally exists in environments that contain oxygen (i.e. air). At high temperatures, water vapor plays a key role in the volatility of materials including oxide surfaces. This study will evaluate cold pressed titanium dioxide (TiO2) powder pellets at a temperature range of 1400 C - 1200 C in water containing environments to determine the volatile hydroxyl species using the transpiration method. The water content ranged from 0-76 mole% and the oxygen content range was 0-100 mole % during the 20-250 hour exposure times. Preliminary results indicate that oxygen is not a key contributor at these temperatures and the following reaction is the primary volatile equation for all three temperatures: TiO2 (s) + H2O (g) = TiO(OH)2 (g).

  1. Sunlight + Water = Tomorrow's Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Anne Katherine

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production (BISfuel), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE: energy. The mission of BISfuel is to construct a complete system for solar-powered production of hydrogen fuel via water splitting; design principles are drawn from the fundamental concepts that underlie photosynthetic energy conversion.

  2. Very Low Energy Electron Scattering from Ozone and Chlorine Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulley, R. J.; Field, T. A.; Steer, W. A.; Mason, N. J.; Ziesel, J. P.; Lunt, S. L.; Field, D.

    1998-10-01

    Total cross-sections are reported for the scattering of electrons from ozone (O_3) and chlorine dioxide (OClO) for energies in the range of 9 meV to 10 eV. The measurements were made in transmission experiments using a synchrotron photoionization apparatus with an energy resolution in the incident electron beam of ~ 3.5 meV (FWHM). The cross section for O3 shows strong rotational scattering at low energy, through the presence of the permanent dipole moment of O_3. Superposed on this strong scattering signal, there is evidence of a weak structure around 50 meV associated with dissociative attachment. A shape resonance, known from earlier work at ~ 4 meV, is also observed. Electron scattering from OClO is dominated by rotationally inelastic scattering decreasing from a peak at essentially zero eV to an energy of 40 meV, where p-wave attachment becomes more important, peaking at 50--60 meV and extending to several hundred meV.

  3. Water cycle dynamic increases resilience of vegetation under higher atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemordant, L. A.; Gentine, P.; Stéfanon, M.; Drobinski, P. J.; Fatichi, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plant stomata couple the energy, water and carbon cycles. Photosynthesis requires stomata to open to take up carbon dioxide. In the process water vapor is released as transpiration. As atmospheric CO2 concentration rises, for the same amount of CO2 uptake, less water vapor is transpired, translating into higher water use efficiency. Reduced water vapor losses will increase soil water storage if the leaf area coverage remains similar. This will in turn alter the surface energy partitioning: more heat will be dissipated as sensible heat flux, resulting in possibly higher surface temperatures. In contrast with this common hypothesis, our study shows that the water saved during the growing season by increased WUE can be mobilized by the vegetation and help reduce the maximum temperature of mid-latitude heat waves. The large scale meteorological conditions of 2003 are the basis of four regional model simulations coupling an atmospheric model to a surface model. We performed two simulations with respectively 2003 (CTL) and 2100 (FUT) atmospheric CO2 applied to both the atmospheric and surface models. A third (RAD) and a fourth (FER) simulations are run with 2100 CO2 concentration applied to respectively the atmospheric model only and the surface model only. RAD investigates the impact of the radiative forcing, and FER the response to vegetation CO2 fertilization. Our results show that the water saved through higher water use efficiency during the growing season enabled by higher atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations helps the vegetation to cope during severe heat and dryness conditions in the summer of mid-latitude climate. These results demonstrate that consideration of the vegetation carbon cycle is essential to model the seasonal water cycle dynamic and land-atmosphere interactions, and enhance the accuracy of the model outputs especially for extreme events. They also have important implications for the future of agriculture, water resources management, ecosystems

  4. Carbon dioxide and energy fluxes over a small boreal lake in Southern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammarella, Ivan; Nordbo, Annika; Rannik, Üllar; Haapanala, Sami; Levula, Janne; Laakso, Heikki; Ojala, Anne; Peltola, Olli; Heiskanen, Jouni; Pumpanen, Jukka; Vesala, Timo

    2015-07-01

    Dynamics of carbon dioxide and energy exchange over a small boreal lake were investigated. Flux measurements have been carried out by the eddy covariance technique during two open-water periods (June-October) at Lake Kuivajärvi in Finland. Sensible heat (H) flux peaked in the early morning, and upward sensible heat flux at night results in unstable stratification over the lake. Minimum H was measured in the late afternoon, often resulting in adiabatic conditions or slightly stable stratification over the lake. The latent heat flux (LE) showed a different pattern, peaking in the afternoon and having a minimum at night. High correlation (r2 = 0.75) between H and water-air temperature difference multiplied by wind speed (U) was found, while LE strongly correlated with the water vapor pressure deficit multiplied by U (r2 = 0.78). Monthly average values of energy balance closure ranged between 70 and 99%. The lake acted as net source of carbon dioxide, and the measured flux (FCO2) averaged over the two open-water periods (0.7 µmol m-2 s-1) was up to 3 times higher than those reported in other studies. Furthermore, it was found that during period of high wind speed (>3 m s-1) shear-induced water turbulence controls the water-air gas transfer efficiency. However, under calm nighttime conditions, FCO2 was poorly correlated with the difference between the water and the equilibrium CO2 concentrations multiplied by U. Nighttime cooling of surface water enhances the gas transfer efficiency through buoyancy-driven turbulent mixing, and simple wind speed-based transfer velocity models strongly underestimate FCO2.

  5. Recycling Carbon Dioxide into Sustainable Hydrocarbon Fuels: Electrolysis of Carbon Dioxide and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Christopher Ronald

    Great quantities of hydrocarbon fuels will be needed for the foreseeable future, even if electricity based energy carriers begin to partially replace liquid hydrocarbons in the transportation sector. Fossil fuels and biomass are the most common feedstocks for production of hydrocarbon fuels. However, using renewable or nuclear energy, carbon dioxide and water can be recycled into sustainable hydrocarbon fuels in non-biological processes which remove oxygen from CO2 and H2O (the reverse of fuel combustion). Capture of CO2 from the atmosphere would enable a closed-loop carbon-neutral fuel cycle. The purpose of this work was to develop critical components of a system that recycles CO2 into liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The concept is examined at several scales, beginning with a broad scope analysis of large-scale sustainable energy systems and ultimately studying electrolysis of CO 2 and H2O in high temperature solid oxide cells as the heart of the energy conversion, in the form of three experimental studies. The contributions of these studies include discoveries about electrochemistry and materials that could significantly improve the overall energy use and economics of the CO2-to-fuels system. The broad scale study begins by assessing the sustainability and practicality of the various energy carriers that could replace petroleum-derived hydrocarbon fuels, including other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and storage of electricity on-board vehicles in batteries, ultracapacitors, and flywheels. Any energy carrier can store the energy of any energy source. This sets the context for CO2 recycling -- sustainable energy sources like solar and wind power can be used to provide the most energy-dense, convenient fuels which can be readily used in the existing infrastructure. The many ways to recycle CO2 into hydrocarbons, based on thermolysis, thermochemical loops, electrolysis, and photoelectrolysis of CO2 and/or H 2O, are critically reviewed. A process based on high temperature co

  6. Impacts of water quality on chlorine and chlorine dioxide efficacy in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, Benoit; Desjardins, Raymond; Mysore, Chandra; Prévost, Michele

    2005-05-01

    The impact of disinfection efficacy in natural waters was evaluated by performing disinfection assays using four untreated surface waters of various qualities and ultra-pure buffered waters as a baseline condition for comparison. Bacillus subtilis spores were spiked in these waters and disinfection assays were conducted at 22 degrees C using either free chlorine or chlorine dioxide. Assays using indigenous aerobic spores were also completed. The inactivation kinetics in natural and ultra-pure buffered waters were not statistically different (at p = 0.05) while using free chlorine, as long as disinfectant decay was taken into account. Filtering natural waters through a 0.45 microm did not improve the sporicidal efficacy of chlorine. For three out of the four waters tested, the efficacy of chlorine dioxide was greater in natural waters compared to that observed in ultra-pure buffered waters. Such results are consistent with previous observations using ultra-pure waters supplemented with NOM-extract from the Suwannee River. Similar to free chlorine results, the impact of filtration (0.45 microm) on the efficacy of chlorine dioxide was not statistically significant.

  7. Investigation on Stability and Optical Properties of Titanium Dioxide and Aluminum Oxide Water-Based Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Kin Yuen; Najwa, Z. A.; Ku Ahmad, K. Z.; Ong, Hwai Chyuan

    2017-05-01

    Water is regarded as a poor absorber of solar energy. This affects the efficiency of solar thermal systems. The addition of nanoparticles to heat transfer fluids used in solar thermal systems can enhance their optical properties. These new-generation heat transfer fluids are known as nanofluids. The present study investigates the stability and optical properties of three nanofluids, including aluminum oxide (13 nm and <50 nm) and titanium dioxide (21 nm) nanofluids. The stability of the nanofluids was observed through a photo-capturing method and zeta potential measurements. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer was used to measure the absorbance and transmittance of the prepared nanofluids. The effect of factors such as type of particle, type of surfactant, and pH of the solution on the optical properties of the nanofluids was also investigated. We found that the titanium dioxide nanofluid had better optical properties but lower stability compared to aluminum oxide nanofluids.

  8. Decarb/Desal: Separation of Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas with Simultaneous Fresh Water Production

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, R; Bourcier, W

    2009-10-21

    If fossil fuels continue to be a major part of the world's energy supply, effective means must be developed to deal with the carbon emissions. Geologic sequestration of supercritical CO{sub 2} is expected to play a major role in mitigating this problem. Separating carbon dioxide from other gases is the most costly aspect of schemes for geologic sequestration. That cost is driven by the complexity and energy intensity of current chemical-stripping methods for separating carbon dioxide. Our experience in water treatment technology indicated that an entirely new approach could be developed, taking advantage of water's propensity to separate gases that ionize in water (like CO{sub 2}) from those that do not (like N{sub 2}). Even though water-based systems might not have the extreme selectivity of chemicals like substituted amines used in industrial systems today, they have the potential to tolerate NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulates while also producing clean drinking water as a valuable byproduct. Lower capital cost, broader range of applicability, environmental friendliness, and revenue from a second product stream give this approach the potential to significantly expand the worldwide application of carbon separation for geologic sequestration. Here we report results for separation of CO{sub 2} from flue gas by two methods that simultaneously separate carbon dioxide and fresh water: ionic pumping of carbonate ions dissolved in water, and thermal distillation. The ion pumping method dramatically increases dissolved carbonate ion in solution and hence the overlying vapor pressure of CO{sub 2} gas, allowing its removal as a pure gas. We have used two common water treatment methods to drive the ion pumping approach, reverse osmosis and electrodialysis to produce pure CO{sub 2}. This novel approach to increasing the concentration of the extracted gas permits new approaches to treating flue gas, because the slightly basic water used as the extraction medium is

  9. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Produced in Water-in-oil Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yasushige; Okastu, Yasuhiro; Tsujimoto, Yuki

    2001-06-01

    Titanium dioxide (titania) particles were prepared by a water-in-oil emulsion system, and studied for the photodecomposition property of methylene blue. Microemulsion (ME) consisted of water, cyclohexane or octane, and surfactant, such as polyoxyethylene (10) octylphenyl ether (TX-100), polyoxyethylene lauryl ether, or bis (2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate. Titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) was dropped into the ME solution and then titania particles were formed by the hydrolysis reaction between TTIP in the organic solvent and the water in the core of ME. It was found that ME could be classified to the reversed micelle (RM) region and the swelling reversed micelle (SM) region according to the water content. The water droplets in RM were almost monodispersed, where the water content was small. On the other hand, the water droplets in SM had a size distribution, although most of the water molecules associated with surfactant molecules. The size of the particles prepared in the RM region was smaller than the ME size. In contrast, the size of the particles formed in the SM region was larger than the ME size, and coagulation of the particles was observed within a few hours. The smallest diameter of the particles was 2 nm in the system of cyclohexane with TX-100 surfactant when the molar ratio of water to surfactant was 2. Titania particles prepared in this condition were collected as amorphous powder, and converted to anatase phase at less than 500 K, which is lower than the ordinal phase transition temperature. These anatase phase titania particles only showed a significant photodecomposition of methylene blue by illumination with a Xenon lamp.

  10. Ground water and energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    In view of complex environmental/energy decisions, the Environmental Impacts Division of the Office of Technology Impacts develops analytical methods for conducting policy analyses supporting decision making. The methods development process often begins with a workshop of leading experts and specialists in the relevant disciplines and issue areas; workshop findings are subsequently utilized by OTI to form a more solid foundation for viable policies. The National Workshop on Ground Water and Energy Production was envisioned as a tool through which OTI could obtain insights, information, and methods (on environmental, economical, physical, political, legal, and social issues) to use in its analyses, models, and assessments. To accomplish this, the Workshop comprised both plenary sessions and individual working groups. The former provided opportunities for all participants to explore issues from a broad perspective, whereas the latter enabled participants to focus on the three following areas: ground water supply; conflicts and barriers to its use; and alternatives or solutions to the various issues. This report summarizes information and insights gained by the Office of Technology Impacts during the course of the Workshop. The Key Findings section summarizes the most important facts discovered during the Workshop. The three general topics that follow (Supply, Conflicts and Barriers, and Alternatives) are those described in the Core Issues statements. The statements are reflective of the recommendations and analyses prepared by the several working groups.

  11. Partition Coefficients of Organics between Water and Carbon Dioxide Revisited: Correlation with Solute Molecular Descriptors and Solvent Cohesive Properties.

    PubMed

    Roth, Michal

    2016-12-06

    High-pressure phase behavior of systems containing water, carbon dioxide and organics has been important in several environment- and energy-related fields including carbon capture and storage, CO2 sequestration and CO2-assisted enhanced oil recovery. Here, partition coefficients (K-factors) of organic solutes between water and supercritical carbon dioxide have been correlated with extended linear solvation energy relationships (LSERs). In addition to the Abraham molecular descriptors of the solutes, the explanatory variables also include the logarithm of solute vapor pressure, the solubility parameters of carbon dioxide and water, and the internal pressure of water. This is the first attempt to include also the properties of water as explanatory variables in LSER correlations of K-factor data in CO2-water-organic systems. Increasing values of the solute hydrogen bond acidity, the solute hydrogen bond basicity, the solute dipolarity/polarizability, the internal pressure of water and the solubility parameter of water all tend to reduce the K-factor, that is, to favor the solute partitioning to the water-rich phase. On the contrary, increasing values of the solute characteristic volume, the solute vapor pressure and the solubility parameter of CO2 tend to raise the K-factor, that is, to favor the solute partitioning to the CO2-rich phase.

  12. Wind/water energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulkovich, J.

    1979-01-01

    Device will convert wind, water, tidal or wave energy into electrical or mechanical energy. Is comprised of windmill-like paddles or blades synchronously geared to orient themselves to wind direction for optimum energy extraction.

  13. Wind/water energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulkovich, J.

    1979-01-01

    Device will convert wind, water, tidal or wave energy into electrical or mechanical energy. Is comprised of windmill-like paddles or blades synchronously geared to orient themselves to wind direction for optimum energy extraction.

  14. Review of global energy and carbon dioxide projections

    SciTech Connect

    Keepin, B.

    1986-01-01

    The concentration of carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) in the Earth's atmosphere has risen steadily over the last century, giving rise to the widely publicized ''greenhouse effect,'' believed to be responsible for a gradual warming trend in the Earth's climate. In addition to CO/sub 2/, recent studies have revealed increasing atmospheric concentrations of other ''greenhouse'' gases (e.g. methane, nitrous oxide, and chlorofluorocarbons) that may well exacerbate this warming trend considerably. While the sources of these latest gases have not yet been clearly identified, emissions of CO/sub 2/ into the atmosphere are known to come from anthropogenic sources, primarily the combustion of fossil fuels. Thus an important component in the investigation of future global warming is an understanding of future carbon emissions, which in turn requires a study of future energy developments, particularly fossil fuel consumption. Various attempts have recently been made to project the global energy future and corresponding CO/sub 2/ emissions several decades ahead. This paper provides a critical review of some of these efforts.

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drinking water treatment plants are currently using alternative disinfectants to treat drinking water, with ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine being the most popular. However, compared to chlorine, which has been much more widely studied, there is little information abo...

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drinking water treatment plants are currently using alternative disinfectants to treat drinking water, with ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine being the most popular. However, compared to chlorine, which has been much more widely studied, there is little information abo...

  17. Geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide - an energy resource perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Burruss; Sean T. Brennan

    2003-03-15

    Most energy used to meet human needs is derived from the combustion of fossil fuels (natural gas, oil, and coal), which releases carbon to the atmosphere, primarily as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2}, a greenhouse gas, is increasing, raising concerns that solar heat will be trapped and the average surficial temperature of the Earth will rise in response. Global warming studies predict that climate changes resulting from increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} will adversely affect life on Earth. In the 200 years since the industrial revolution, the world's population has grown from about 800 million to over 6 billion people and the CO{sub 2} content of the atmosphere has risen from about 280 to about 360 parts per million by volume, a 30 percent increase. International concern about potential global climate change has spurred discussions about limiting the amount of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases released to the atmosphere. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  18. Oxidation of pharmaceuticals during water treatment with chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Huber, Marc M; Korhonen, Susanna; Ternes, Thomas A; von Gunten, Urs

    2005-09-01

    The potential of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) for the oxidation of pharmaceuticals during water treatment was assessed by determining second-order rate constants for the reaction with selected environmentally relevant pharmaceuticals. Out of 9 pharmaceuticals only the 4 following compounds showed an appreciable reactivity with ClO2 (in brackets apparent second-order rate constants at pH 7 and T = 20 degrees C): the sulfonamide antibiotic sulfamethoxazole (6.7 x 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)), the macrolide antibiotic roxithromycin (2.2 x 10(2) M(-1) s(-1)), the estrogen 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (approximately 2 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)), and the antiphlogistic diclofenac (1.05 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)). Experiments performed using natural water showed that ClO2 also reacted fast with other sulfonamides and macrolides, the natural hormones estrone and 17beta-estradiol as well as 3 pyrazolone derivatives (phenazone, propylphenazone, and dimethylaminophenazone). However, many compounds in the study were ClO2 refractive. Experiments with lake water and groundwater that were partly performed at microgram/L to nanogram/L levels proved that the rate constants determined in pure water could be applied to predict the oxidation of pharmaceuticals in natural waters. Compared to ozone, ClO2 reacted more slowly and with fewer compounds. However, it reacted faster with the investigated compounds than chlorine. Overall, the results indicate that ClO2 will only be effective to oxidize certain compound classes such as the investigated classes of sulfonamide and macrolide antibiotics, and estrogens.

  19. Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in energy-intensive industries in key developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian

    1999-09-01

    The industrial sector is the most important end-use sector in developing countries in terms of energy use and was responsible for 50% of primary energy use and 53% of associated carbon dioxide emissions in 1995 (Price et al., 1999). The industrial sector is extremely diverse, encompassing the extraction of natural resources, conversion of these resources into raw materials, and manufacture of finished products. Five energy-intensive industrial subsectors account for the bulk of industrial energy use and related carbon dioxide emissions: iron and steel, chemicals, petroleum refining, pulp and paper, and cement. In this paper, we focus on the steel and cement sectors in Brazil, China, India, and Mexico.1 We review historical trends, noting that China became the world's largest producer of cement in 1985 and of steel in 1996. We discuss trends that influence energy consumption, such as the amount of additives in cement (illustrated through the clinker/cement ratio), the share of electric arc furnaces, and the level of adoption of continuous casting. To gauge the potential for improvement in production of steel and cement in these countries, we calculate a ''best practice'' intensity based on use of international best practice technology to produce the mix of products manufactured in each country in 1995. We show that Brazil has the lowest potential for improvement in both sectors. In contrast, there is significant potential for improvement in Mexico, India, and especially China, where adoption of best practice technologies could reduce energy use and carbon dioxide emissions from steel production by 50% and cement production by 37%. We conclude by comparing the identified potential for energy efficiency improvement and carbon dioxide emissions reduction in these key developing countries to that of the U.S. This comparison raises interesting questions related to efforts to improve energy efficiency in developing countries, such as: what is the appropriate role of

  20. Finite Element Modeling of Water/Steam and Carbon Dioxide Heat and Fluid Transportation in Geothermal Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Xing, H.; Zhang, H.

    2009-12-01

    Geothermal energy exploitation and carbon dioxide geosequestration are both attractive topics in renewable clean energy for an environmental society. The enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) have been raised both laboratorially and practically, which employ CO2 instead of water as a heat transmission medium. Our research focuses on numerical simulation of groundwater and carbon dioxide dominated geothermal reservoirs and gives a numerical procedure of coupled heat and fluid flow problems with phase changing by means of finite element method. A few of numerical models are carried out to simulate the drainage of a water/vapor dominated reservoir with CO2 injection. The phase changing of water and CO2 are both monitored as volume saturation or mass fraction, which gives a dynamic concept of the multiphase fluid circulation of CO2-EGS system.

  1. Separations Technology for Clean Water and Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, Gordon D

    2012-06-22

    Providing clean water and energy for about nine billion people on the earth by midcentury is a daunting challenge. Major investments in efficiency of energy and water use and deployment of all economical energy sources will be needed. Separations technology has an important role to play in producing both clean energy and water. Some examples are carbon dioxide capture and sequestration from fossil energy power plants and advanced nuclear fuel cycle scemes. Membrane separations systems are under development to improve the economics of carbon capture that would be required at a huge scale. For nuclear fuel cycles, only the PUREX liquid-liquid extraction process has been deployed on a large scale to recover uranium and plutonium from used fuel. Most current R and D on separations technology for used nuclear fuel focuses on ehhancements to a PUREX-type plant to recover the minor actinides (neptunium, americiu, and curium) and more efficiently disposition the fission products. Are there more efficient routes to recycle the actinides on the horizon? Some new approaches and barriers to development will be briefly reviewed.

  2. Ordering effects of conjugate thermal fields in simulations of molecular liquids: Carbon dioxide and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, Harro R.; Kusalik, Peter G.

    2016-10-01

    As shown previously, it is possible to apply configurational and kinetic thermostats simultaneously in order to induce a steady thermal flux in molecular dynamics simulations of many-particle systems. This flux appears to promote motion along potential gradients and can be utilized to enhance the sampling of ordered arrangements, i.e., it can facilitate the formation of a critical nucleus. Here we demonstrate that the same approach can be applied to molecular systems, and report a significant enhancement of the homogeneous crystal nucleation of a carbon dioxide (EPM2 model) system. Quantitative ordering effects and reduction of the particle mobilities were observed in water (TIP4P-2005 model) and carbon dioxide systems. The enhancement of the crystal nucleation of carbon dioxide was achieved with relatively small conjugate thermal fields. The effect is many orders of magnitude bigger at milder supercooling, where the forward flux sampling method was employed, than at a lower temperature that enabled brute force simulations of nucleation events. The behaviour exhibited implies that the effective free energy barrier of nucleation must have been reduced by the conjugate thermal field in line with our interpretation of previous results for atomic systems.

  3. Solubility and Speciation in the Water-Carbon Dioxide System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, E.; Bollengier, O.; Brown, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The fluid-fluid miscibility surface of the water-carbon dioxide system contains broad regions (in pressure-composition space) exhibiting gradual variations in the temperature of miscibility; this is as expected. However, there is additionally a line of pressure, extending from roughly 2 GPa and 20 mole% CO2 to 6 GPa and 40 mole%, above which the temperature necessary to complete miscibility falls precipitously. This line, which closely approximates a hard limit, is hypothesized to demark a shift in speciation of dissolved CO2. In the same region of pressure the equilibrium limits of a new solid phase, composed of both water and CO2, have been determined. This new phase, the IR and Raman spectra of which led Wang et al.* to ascribe it to carbonic acid, has an observed associated aqueous form which must, in addition to the well-known bicarbonate and carbonate ions, affect the miscibilities of the system. Since zones of rapid subduction are expected to experience the regions of temperatures and pressures at which these equilibria are observed to shift, the chemical nature of these fluids is expected to undergo significant changes during the subduction process. * Wang H., Zeuschner J., Eremets M., Troyan I. and Willams J. (2016) Sci. Rep. 6, 19902-1-8

  4. Percolation in concentrated water-in-carbon dioxide microemulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.T. Jr.; Bhargava, P.; Johnston, K.P.

    2000-05-11

    The phase behavior and electrical conductivity of water-in-carbon dioxide (W/C) microemulsions are reported over a range of temperatures (5--65 C), pressures (100--450 bar), and droplet volume fractions ({phi} = 0.0347-0.483) at a constant water-to-surfactant molar ratio (W{sub o}) of 12.5. A {phi} of 0.483 is a 5-fold increase over those reported previously. A critical point is observed at a droplet volume fraction of approximately 0.12, at which the single-phase microemulsion splits into two microemulsion phases of similar volume upon lowering the pressure (upper critical solution pressure). At low temperatures, a lower critical solution pressure is also observed upon increasing the pressure. Both of the critical solution pressures result from an increase in the attractive interdroplet interactions; consequently, pressure has little effect on the conductivity in the one-phase region. The conductivity increases nearly 3 orders of magnitude with changes in the droplet concentration or temperature. Scaling analysis of the conductivity data supports a dynamic percolation model, whereby the attractive interdroplet interactions form clusters of discrete droplets with rapid charge transport.

  5. Ab initio potential energy surface for the carbon dioxide molecule pair and thermophysical properties of dilute carbon dioxide gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, Robert

    2014-10-01

    A four-dimensional intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) for two rigid carbon dioxide molecules was determined from quantum-chemical ab initio calculations. Interaction energies for 1229 CO2-CO2 configurations were computed at the CCSD(T) level of theory using basis sets up to aug-cc-pVQZ supplemented with bond functions. An analytical site-site potential function with seven sites per CO2 molecule was fitted to the interaction energies. The PES was validated by calculating the second virial coefficient as well as viscosity and thermal conductivity in the dilute-gas limit.

  6. Energy implications of bottled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleick, P. H.; Cooley, H. S.

    2009-01-01

    As bottled water use continues to expand around the world, there is growing interest in the environmental, economical, and social implications of that use, including concerns about waste generation, proper use of groundwater, hydrologic effects on local surface and groundwater, economic costs, and more. A key concern is how much energy is required to produce and use bottled water. This paper estimates the energy footprint required for various phases of bottled water production, transportation, and use. We do not develop a single comprehensive life-cycle energy estimate because of differences among water sources, bottling processes, transportation costs, and other factors, but we quantify key energy inputs necessary for site-specific assessments. We also apply these inputs to three site-specific examples of the energy required from production to the point of use: local bottled water produced and used in Los Angeles, water bottled in the South Pacific and shipped by cargo ship to Los Angeles, and water bottled in France and shipped in various ways to Los Angeles. For water transported short distances, the energy requirements of bottled water are dominated by the energy used to produce the plastic bottles. Long-distance transport, however, can lead to energy costs comparable to, or even larger than, those of producing the bottle. All other energy costs—for processing, bottling, sealing, labeling, and refrigeration—are far smaller than those for the production of the bottle and transportation. These data can be used to generate specific estimates for different sources, treatments, and delivery options.

  7. [Study on pipe material's influence on chlorine dioxide drinking water disinfection].

    PubMed

    He, Tao; Yue, Yinling; Ling, Bo; Zhang, Lan

    2010-09-01

    To study the pipe material's influence on chlorine dioxide drinking water disinfection. 0.8 mg/L chlorine dioxide solution was injected into 5 kinds of pipes respectively, PPR, PVC-U, Steel with Zinc coating, copper and PE pipes. Dipped free from light for 48 hours and the concentrations of chlorine dioxide, chlorite and chlorate were tested from samples taken from each kind of pipe at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours respectively. Chlorine dioxides decay rates in the water dipping the pipes increase as the dipping time increases and the decay of chlorine dioxide mainly occurs within 6 hours after the dipping. But for different pipe, the influence of decay differs. The consumption of chlorine dioxide of the metal pipes is more than that of the plastic pipes. And with 2 hours after the dipping experiment begins, the concentrations of the chlorite of the copper pipe and of the steel with zinc coating pipe increase quickly and reach the maximum concentration. But then the chlorite concentration decreases greatly. After dipped 24 hours, the chlorite in the water in the pipe can not be detected. For other plastic piples, all the chlorite concentrations in the dipping water increase as the dipping time increase. Compared with the start of the dipping experiment, the chlorate concentration in the dipping water of each pipe has no obvious change. The material of the water transportation pipe does have influence on chlorine dioxide drinking water disinfection.

  8. Transporting carbon dioxide recovered from fossil-energy cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, R. D.; Molburg, J. C.; Brockmeier, J. F.

    2000-07-24

    Transportation of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) for enhanced oil recovery is a mature technology, with operating experience dating from the mid-1980s. Because of this maturity, recent sequestration studies for the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory have been able to incorporate transportation into overall energy-cycle economics with reasonable certainty. For these studies, two different coal-fueled plants are considered; the first collects CO{sub 2} from a 456-MW integrated coal gasification combined-cycle plant, while the second employs a 353-MW pulverized-coal boiler plant retrofitted for flue-gas recycling (Doctor et al. 1999; MacDonald and Palkes 1999). The pulverized-coal plant fires a mixture of coal in a 33% O{sub 2} atmosphere, the bulk of the inert gas being made up to CO{sub 2} to the greatest extent practical. If one power plant with one pipe feeds one sequestration reservoir, projected costs for a 500-km delivery pipeline are problematic, because when supplying one reservoir both plant availability issues and useful pipeline life heavily influence capital recovery costs. The transportation system proposed here refines the sequestration scheme into a network of three distinctive pipelines: (1) 80-km collection pipelines for a 330-MW pulverized-coal power plant with 100% CO{sub 2} recovery; (2) a main CO{sub 2} transportation trunk of 320 km that aggregates the CO{sub 2} from four such plants; and (3) an 80-km distribution network. A 25-year life is assumed for the first two segments, but only half that for the distribution to the reservoir. Projected costs for a 500-km delivery pipeline, assuming an infrastructure, are $7.82/tonne ($17.22/10{sup 3} Nm{sub 3} CO{sub 2} or $0.49/10{sup 3} scf CO{sub 2}), a savings of nearly 60% with respect to base-case estimates with no infrastructure. These costs are consistent only with conditioned CO{sub 2} having low oxygen and sulfur content; they do not include CO{sub 2} recovery, drying

  9. Low-energy electron-stimulated chemical reactions of CO in water ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, S.; Beniya, A.; Mukai, K.; Yamashita, Y.; Yoshinobu, J.

    2004-04-01

    We investigated low-energy electron-stimulated chemical reactions between CO and water molecules in low-temperature ice using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. Carbon dioxide, the formyl radical, formaldehyde, and methanol were produced by electron irradiation of the water/CO/water layered ice. The electron energy threshold and temperature dependence for the chemical reactions were investigated to elucidate the reaction mechanisms.

  10. Liquid-solid transition of water confined in nanoporous titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Wang, Qiang; Sun, Gang; Li, Chenxi; Hu, Lin

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we performed differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments to investigate the phase transition temperature and the molar enthalpy of the absorbed water confined in porous titanium dioxide. The porous titanium dioxide with three different pore size distribution and different filling fraction of the absorbed water were examined. We found that both the pore size of the examined samples and the filling fraction of the absorbed water affected the water’s phase transition temperature and its molar enthalpy.

  11. Condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhausts of rocket engines: 1. Heterogeneous condensation of combustion products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platov, Yu. V.; Semenov, A. I.; Filippov, B. V.

    2014-01-01

    Condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhausts of rocket engines during last stages of Proton, Molniya, and Start launchers operating in the upper atmospheric with different types of fuels is considered. Particle heating is taken into account with emission of latent heat of condensation and energy loss due to radiation and heat exchange with combustion products. Using the solution of the heat balance and condensed particle mass equations, the temporal change in the temperature and thickness of the condensate layer is obtained. Practically, no condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhaust of a Start launcher occurs. In plumes of Proton and Molniya launchers, the condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide can start at distances of 120-170 m and 450-650 m from the engine nozzle, respectively. In the course of condensation, the thickness of the "water" layer on particles can exceed 100 Å, and the thickness of carbon dioxide can exceed 60 Å.

  12. Carbon Dioxide in Exoplanetary Atmospheres: Rarely Dominant Compared to Carbon Monoxide and Water in Hot, Hydrogen-dominated Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Kevin; Lyons, James R.

    2016-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the abundance of carbon dioxide in exoplanetary atmospheres in hot, hydrogen-dominated atmospheres. We construct novel analytical models of systems in chemical equilibrium that include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, water, methane and acetylene and relate the equilibrium constants of the chemical reactions to temperature and pressure via the tabulated Gibbs free energies. We prove that such chemical systems may be described by a quintic equation for the mixing ratio of methane. By examining the abundances of these molecules across a broad range of temperatures (spanning equilibrium temperatures from 600 to 2500 K), pressures (via temperature-pressure profiles that explore albedo and opacity variations) and carbon-to-oxygen ratios, we conclude that carbon dioxide is subdominant compared to carbon monoxide and water. Atmospheric mixing does not alter this conclusion if carbon dioxide is subdominant everywhere in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide may attain comparable abundances if the metallicity is greatly enhanced, but this property is negated by temperatures above 1000 K. For hydrogen-dominated atmospheres, our generic result has the implication that retrieval studies may wish to set the subdominance of carbon dioxide as a prior of the calculation and not let its abundance completely roam free as a fitting parameter, because it directly affects the inferred value of the carbon-to-oxygen ratio and may produce unphysical conclusions. We discuss the relevance of these implications for the hot Jupiter WASP-12b and suggest that some of the previous results are chemically impossible. The relative abundance of carbon dioxide to acetylene is potentially a sensitive diagnostic of the carbon-to-oxygen ratio.

  13. Carbon dioxide and water adsorption on highly epitaxial Delafossite CuFeO2 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, S.; Joshi, T.; Borisov, P.; Sarabia, M.; Lederman, D.; Cabrera, A. L.

    2015-03-01

    Thermal programmed desorption (TPD) of CO2 and H2O from a 200 nm thick CuFeO2 Delafossite surface was performed in a standard UHV chamber, The CuFeO2 thin film grown using Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) over an Al2O3 (0001) substrate with controlled O2 atmosphere resulted with highly epitaxial crystal structure. The adsorption/desorption of CO2 and H2O process was also monitored with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). Our results revealed that carbon dioxide interacts with CuFeO2 forming Fe carbonates compounds on its surface. Hydroxides were also formed on the surface due to water presence. Using TPD data, Arrhenius plots for CO2 and water desorption were done and activation energy for desorption was obtained. Funds FONDECyT 1130372; Thanks to P. Ferrari.

  14. Bio-based products from solar energy and carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Producing bio-based products directly from CO₂ and solar energy is a desirable alternative to the conventional biorefining that relies on biomass feedstocks. The production paradigm is based on an artificial photosynthetic system that converts sunlight to electricity and H₂ via water electrolysis. An autotrophic H₂-oxidizing bacterium fixes CO₂ in dark conditions. The assimilated CO₂ is stored in bacterial cells as polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), from which a range of products can be derived. Compared with natural photosynthesis of a fast-growing cyanobacterium, the artificial photosynthetic system has much higher energy efficiency and productivity of bio-based products. The new technology looks promising because of possible cost reduction in feedstock, equipment, and operation.

  15. Influence of drinking water treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and chlorite/chlorate formation.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Gialdini, Francesca; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Disinfection is the last treatment stage of a Drinking Water Treatment Plant (DWTP) and is carried out to maintain a residual concentration of disinfectant in the water distribution system. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a widely used chemical employed for this purpose. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of several treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and on chlorite and chlorate formation in the final oxidation/disinfection stage. A number of tests was performed at laboratory scale employing water samples collected from the DWTP of Cremona (Italy). The following processes were studied: oxidation with potassium permanganate, chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite, coagulation/flocculation with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate, filtration and adsorption onto activated carbon. The results showed that the chlorine dioxide demand is high if sodium hypochlorite or potassium permanganate are employed in pre-oxidation. On the other hand, chlorine dioxide leads to the highest production of chlorite and chlorate. The coagulation/flocculation process after pre-oxidation shows that chlorine dioxide demand decreases if potassium permanganate is employed as an oxidant, both with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate. Therefore, the combination of these processes leads to a lower production of chlorite and chlorate. Aluminum sulfate is preferable in terms of the chlorine dioxide demand reduction and minimization of the chlorite and chlorate formation. Activated carbon is the most effective solution as it reduced the chlorine dioxide consumption by about 50% and the DBP formation by about 20-40%.

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FORMED AT HIGH BROMIDE LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids, and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Chlorine dioxide is a popular alternative, with over 500 dri...

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FORMED AT HIGH BROMIDE LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids, and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Chlorine dioxide is a popular alternative, with over 500 dri...

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently popular alternatives to ...

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND CHLORAMINE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Chlorine dioxide and chloramine are two popular alternative disinfectants, with...

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND CHLORAMINE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Chlorine dioxide and chloramine are two popular alternative disinfectants, with...

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently popular alternatives to ...

  2. Energy technology perspectives: conservation, carbon dioxide reduction and production from alternative sources

    SciTech Connect

    N. Neelameggham; R. Reddy; C. Belt; E. Vidal

    2009-01-15

    The book contains 13 papers from the symposium on carbon dioxide reduction metallurgy 2009 and 14 papers from the symposium TMS 2009 annual and exhibition: Energy conservation in metals extraction and materials processing II. Papers include: Recent developments in carbon dioxide capture materials and process for energy industry; Reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in steel industry based on LCA methodology; Enhanced energy efficiency and emission reduction through oxy-fuel technology in the metals industry; Mechanism and application of catalytic combustion of pulverized coal; and Oxyfuel-energy efficient melting.

  3. Performance improvements in commercial heat pump water heaters using carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, C. D.; Elbel, S.; Petersen, M.; Hrnjak, P. S.

    2011-09-15

    Although heat pump water heaters are today widely accepted in Japan, where energy costs are high and government incentives for their use exist, acceptance of such a product in the U.S. has been slow. This trend is slowly changing with the introduction of heat pump water heaters into the residential market, but remains in the commercial sector. Barriers to heat pump water heater acceptance in the commercial market have historically been performance, reliability and first/operating costs. The use of carbon dioxide (R744) as the refrigerant in such a system can improve performance for relatively small increase in initial cost and make this technology more appealing. What makes R744 an excellent candidate for use in heat pump water heaters is not only the wide range of ambient temperatures within which it can operate, but also the excellent ability to match water to refrigerant temperatures on the high side, resulting in very high exit water temperatures of up to 82ºC (180ºF), as required by sanitary codes in the U.S.(Food Code, 2005), in a single pass, temperatures that are much more difficult to reach with other refrigerants. This can be especially attractive in applications where this water is used for the purpose of sanitation. While reliability has also been of concern historically, dramatic improvements have been made over the last several years through research done in the automotive industry and commercialization of R744 technology in residential water heating mainly in Japan. This paper presents the performance results from the development of an R744 commercial heat pump water heater of approximately 35kW and a comparison to a baseline R134a unit of the same capacity and footprint. In addition, recommendations are made for further improvements of the R744 system which could result in possible energy savings of up to 20%.

  4. The vitiation effects of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the autoignition characteristics of kerosene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jin-Hu; Wang, Su; Zhang, Sheng-Tao; Yue, Lian-Jie; Fan, Bing-Cheng; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Cui, Ji-Ping

    2014-08-01

    In ground tests of hypersonic scramjet, the high-enthalpy airstream produced by burning hydrocarbon fuels often contains contaminants of water vapor and carbon dioxide. The contaminants may change the ignition characteristics of fuels between ground tests and real flights. In order to properly assess the influence of the contaminants on ignition characteristics of hydrocarbon fuels, the effect of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the ignition delay times of China RP-3 kerosene was studied behind reflected shock waves in a preheated shock tube. Experiments were conducted over a wider temperature range of 800-1 500K, at a pressure of 0.3 MPa, equivalence ratios of 0.5 and 1, and oxygen concentration of 20%. Ignition delay times were determined from the onset of the excited radical OH emission together with the pressure profile. Ignition delay times were measured for four cases: (1) clean gas, (2) gas vitiated with 10% and 20% water vapor in mole, (3) gas vitiated with 10% carbon dioxide in mole, and (4) gas vitiated with 10% water vapor and 10% carbon dioxide, 20% water vapor and 10% carbon dioxide in mole. The results show that carbon dioxide produces an inhibiting effect at temperatures below 1 300 K when ϕ = 0.5, whereas water vapor appears to accelerate the ignition process below a critical temperature of about 1 000 K when ϕ = 0.5. When both water vapor and carbon dioxide exist together, a minor inhibiting effect is observed at ϕ = 0.5, while no effect is found at ϕ = 1.0. The results are also discussed preliminary by considering both the combustion reaction mechanism and the thermophysics properties of the fuel mixtures. The current measurements demonstrate vitiation effects of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the autoignition characteristics of China RP-3 kerosene at air-like O2 concentration. It is important to account for such effects when data are extrapolated from ground testing to real flight conditions.

  5. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, which uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. Unconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low reso...

  6. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfectant byproducts (DNPS) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, that uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. nconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low-resolu...

  7. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfectant byproducts (DNPS) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, that uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. nconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low-resolu...

  8. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, which uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. Unconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low reso...

  9. Chemical vapour deposition of thermochromic vanadium dioxide thin films for energy efficient glazing

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Michael E.A.; Binions, Russell

    2014-06-01

    Vanadium dioxide is a thermochromic material that undergoes a semiconductor to metal transitions at a critical temperature of 68 °C. This phase change from a low temperature monoclinic structure to a higher temperature rutile structure is accompanied by a marked change in infrared reflectivity and change in resistivity. This ability to have a temperature-modulated film that can limit solar heat gain makes vanadium dioxide an ideal candidate for thermochromic energy efficient glazing. In this review we detail the current challenges to such glazing becoming a commercial reality and describe the key chemical vapour deposition technologies being employed in the latest research. - Graphical abstract: Schematic demonstration of the effect of thermochromic glazing on solar radiation (red arrow represents IR radiation, black arrow represents all other solar radiation). - Highlights: • Vanadium dioxide thin films for energy efficient glazing. • Reviews chemical vapour deposition techniques. • Latest results for thin film deposition for vanadium dioxide.

  10. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing

    EIA Publications

    2006-01-01

    Based on the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration (EIA), this paper presents historical energy-related carbon dioxide emission estimates for energy-intensive sub-sectors and 23 industries. Estimates are based on surveys of more than 15,000 manufacturing plants in 1991, 1994, 1998, and 2002. EIA is currently developing its collection of manufacturing data for 2006.

  11. Sunlight-induced carbon dioxide emissions from inland waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Birgit; Landelius, Tomas; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.; Machida, Nanako; Tranvik, Lars J.

    2014-07-01

    The emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from inland waters are substantial on a global scale. Yet the fundamental question remains open which proportion of these CO2 emissions is induced by sunlight via photochemical mineralization of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), rather than by microbial respiration during DOC decomposition. Also, it is unknown on larger spatial and temporal scales how photochemical mineralization compares to other C fluxes in the inland water C cycle. We combined field and laboratory data with atmospheric radiative transfer modeling to parameterize a photochemical rate model for each day of the year 2009, for 1086 lakes situated between latitudes from 55°N to 69°N in Sweden. The sunlight-induced production of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) averaged 3.8 ± 0.04 g C m-2 yr-1, which is a flux comparable in size to the organic carbon burial in the lake sediments. Countrywide, 151 ± 1 kt C yr-1 was produced by photochemical mineralization, corresponding to about 12% of total annual mean CO2 emissions from Swedish lakes. With a median depth of 3.2 m, the lakes were generally deep enough that incoming, photochemically active photons were absorbed in the water column. This resulted in a linear positive relationship between DIC photoproduction and the incoming photon flux, which corresponds to the absorbed photons. Therefore, the slope of the regression line represents the wavelength- and depth-integrated apparent quantum yield of DIC photoproduction. We used this relationship to obtain a first estimate of DIC photoproduction in lakes and reservoirs worldwide. Global DIC photoproduction amounted to 13 and 35 Mt C yr-1 under overcast and clear sky, respectively. Consequently, these directly sunlight-induced CO2 emissions contribute up to about one tenth to the global CO2 emissions from lakes and reservoirs, corroborating that microbial respiration contributes a substantially larger share than formerly thought, and generate annual C fluxes similar in

  12. Nanoparticle-stabilized carbon dioxide-in-water foams with fine texture.

    PubMed

    Worthen, Andrew J; Bagaria, Hitesh G; Chen, Yunshen; Bryant, Steven L; Huh, Chun; Johnston, Keith P

    2013-02-01

    The concept of hydrophilic/CO(2)-philic balance (HCB) was extended to describe stabilization of carbon dioxide-in-water (C/W) foams (also called emulsions) with silica nanoparticles adsorbed at the CO(2)-water interface. Opaque, white C/W foams (bubble diameter <100 μm) were generated with either PEG-coated silica or methylsilyl modified silica nanoparticles in a beadpack with CO(2) densities between 0.2 and 0.9 g mL(-1). For methylsilyl modified silica nanoparticles, 50% SiOH modification provided an optimal HCB for generation and stabilization of viscous C/W foams with high stability. The apparent viscosity measured with a capillary tube viscometer reached 120-fold that of a CO(2)-water mixture without nanoparticles, a consequence of the small bubble size and the energy required to deform a high density of aqueous lamellae between CO(2) bubbles. Air-in-water (A/W) foams stabilized with nanoparticles were used to gain insight into the relationship between nanoparticle surface properties and adsorption of the nanoparticles at various types of interfaces. With suitable nanoparticles, A/W foams were stable for at least 7 days and C/W foams were stable for at least 23 h. The ability to achieve long term stability for nanoparticle stabilized C/W foams could offer an alternative to conventional surfactants, which are known to have much lower adsorption energies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ab initio potential energy surface and vibration-rotation energy levels of sulfur dioxide.

    PubMed

    Koput, Jacek

    2017-05-05

    An accurate potential energy surface of sulfur dioxide, SO2 , in its ground electronic state X∼ 1A1 has been determined from ab initio calculations using the coupled-cluster approach in conjunction with the correlation-consistent basis sets up to septuple-zeta quality. The results obtained with the conventional and explicitly correlated coupled-cluster methods are compared. The role of the core-electron correlation, higher-order valence-electron correlation, scalar relativistic, and adiabatic effects in determining the structure and dynamics of the SO2 molecule is discussed. The vibration-rotation energy levels of the (32) SO2 and (34) SO2 isotopologues were predicted using a variational approach. It was shown that the inclusion of the aforementioned effects was mandatory to attain the "spectroscopic" accuracy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. An Analysis of Effect of Water Resources Constraint on Energy Production in Turkey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    BOTAS Petroleum Pipeline Corporation BWR Boiling Water Reactors °C Celsius CCS Carbon Capture and Sequestration CER Consortium on Energy...production; oil shale development, carbon sequestration , and nuclear power development can significantly augment water use and consumption. Future...Restructuring CO2 Carbon dioxide CPV Concentrating Photovoltaic CSP Concentrated solar power DAP Eastern Anatolia Project DOE Department of Energy DSI

  15. Mechanism Study of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Ambient Air by Hydration Energy Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Lackner, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    Hydration of neutral and ionic species on solid interfaces plays an important role in a wide range of natural and engineered processes within energy systems as well as biological and environmental systems. Various chemical reactions are significantly enhanced, both in the rate and the extent of the reaction, because of water molecules present or absent at the interface. A novel technology for carbon dioxide capture, driven by the free energy difference between more or less hydrated states of an anionic exchange resin is studied for a new approach to absorb CO2 from ambient air. For these materials the affinity to CO2 is dramatically lowered as the availability of water is increased. This makes it possible to absorb CO2 from air in a dry environment and release it at two orders of magnitude larger partial pressures in a wet environment. While the absorption process and the thermodynamic properties of air capture via ion exchange resins have been demonstrated, the underlying physical mechanisms remain to be understood. In order to rationally design better sorbent materials, the present work elucidates through molecular dynamics and quantum mechanical modeling the energy changes in the carbonate, bicarbonate and hydroxide ions that are induced by hydration, and how these changes affect sorbent properties. A methodology is developed to determine the free energy change during carbonate ion hydrolysis changes with different numbers of water molecules present. This makes it possible to calculate the equilibrium in the reaction CO3--•nH2O ↔ HCO3- • m1H2O + OH- • m2H2O + (n - 1 - m1 - m2)H2O Molecular dynamics models are used to calculate free energies of hydration for the CO32- ion, the HCO3- ion, and the OH- ion as function of the amount of water that is present. A quantum mechanical model is employed to study the equilibrium of the reaction Na2CO3 + H2O ↔ NaHCO3 + NaOHin a vacuum and at room temperature. The computational analysis of the free energy of

  16. Microbial production of multi-carbon chemicals and fuels from water and carbon dioxide using electric current

    DOEpatents

    Lovley, Derek R; Nevin, Kelly

    2015-11-03

    The invention provides systems and methods for generating organic compounds using carbon dioxide as a source of carbon and electrical current as an energy source. In one embodiment, a reaction cell is provided having a cathode electrode and an anode electrode that are connected to a source of electrical power, and which are separated by a permeable membrane. A biological film is provided on the cathode. The biological film comprises a bacterium that can accept electrons and that can convert carbon dioxide to a carbon-bearing compound and water in a cathode half-reaction. At the anode, water is decomposed to free molecular oxygen and solvated protons in an anode half-reaction. The half-reactions are driven by the application of electrical current from an external source. Compounds that have been produced include acetate, butanol, 2-oxobutyrate, propanol, ethanol, and formate.

  17. [Chlorine dioxide as an agent for optimization of drinking water preparation].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Iu A; Petrenko, N F; Mokienko, A V; Gozhenko, A I

    2007-01-01

    The paper deals with the important urgent problem in the provision of epidemiological drinking water. It considers the chemical, biological, toxicological, technological, environmental, and economic aspects of the use of chlorine dioxide as a highly effective disinfecting and oxidizing agent in water purification and decontamination processes. The authors present the results of their own studies. They conclude that chlorine dioxide is an epidemiologically, ecologically, and toxicologically safe and technologically adequate and economically acceptable agent for water treatment in the domestic water supply systems of localities.

  18. Water-wetting surfaces as hydrate promoters during transport of carbon dioxide with impurities.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Jensen, Bjørnar; Kvamme, Bjørn; Sjøblom, Sara

    2015-05-21

    Water condensing as liquid drops within the fluid bulk has traditionally been the only scenario accepted in the industrial analysis of hydrate risks. We have applied a combination of absolute thermodynamics and molecular dynamics modeling to analyze the five primary routes of hydrate formation in a rusty pipeline carrying dense carbon dioxide with methane, hydrogen sulfide, argon, and nitrogen as additional impurities. We have revised the risk analysis of all possible routes in accordance with the combination of the first and the second laws of thermodynamics to determine the highest permissible content of water. It was found that at concentrations lower than five percent, hydrogen sulfide will only support the formation of carbon dioxide-dominated hydrate from adsorbed water and hydrate formers from carbon dioxide phase rather than formation in the aqueous phase. Our results indicate that hydrogen sulfide leaving carbon dioxide for the aqueous phase will be able to create an additional hydrate phase in the aqueous region adjacent to the first adsorbed water layer. The growth of hydrate from different phases will decrease the induction time by substantially reducing the kinetically limiting mass transport across the hydrate films. Hydrate formation via adsorption of water on rusty walls will play the decisive role in hydrate formation risk, with the initial concentration of hydrogen sulfide being the critical factor. We concluded that the safest way to eliminate hydrate risks is to ensure that the water content of carbon dioxide is low enough to prevent water dropout via the adsorption mechanism.

  19. Roles of water molecules in trapping carbon dioxide molecules inside the interlayer space of graphene oxides.

    PubMed

    Yumura, Takashi; Yamasaki, Ayumi

    2014-05-28

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to investigate the energetics of carbon dioxide migration within hydrated or anhydrous graphene oxides (GOs). When anhydrous GO structures contain a carbon dioxide molecule, the carbon dioxide interacts repulsively with the GO layers to increase the interlayer spacing. The repulsive electrostatic interactions are reduced by the insertion of water molecules into CO2-containing GO structures due to the occurrence of attractive water-layer interactions through hydrogen bonding. Consequently, the interlayer spacings in CO2-containing hydrated structures are shortened compared with those in the anhydrous structures. The results indicate that the intercalated water molecules have the ability to connect the GO layers in the presence of carbon dioxide. Furthermore, the DFT calculations indicated that the GO interlayer spacings, which are influenced by the intercalation of water molecules, control carbon dioxide migration within the GO layers. The importance of the interlayer spacings on the migration of carbon dioxide arises from the occurrence of repulsive interactions between CO2 and oxygen-containing groups attached on the graphene sheets. When the GO interlayer spacings are short due to the presence of intercalated water molecules, the repulsive interactions between carbon dioxide and the GO layers are strong enough to prevent CO2 from migrating from its original position. Such repulsive interactions do not occur during the migration of CO2 within anhydrous GO structures because of the relatively longer interlayer spacing. Accordingly, CO2 migrates within anhydrous GO with a less significant barrier, indicating that carbon dioxide molecules are easily released from the GO.

  20. Transport properties of carbon dioxide and ammonia in water - ethylene glycol mixtures from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskrenova, Eugeniya; Patnaik, Soumya S.

    2015-03-01

    The endothermic decomposition of ammonium carbamate has been proposed as a novel heat sink mechanism for aircraft thermal management (Johnson et al. SAE Technical Paper 2012-01-2190, 2012, doi:10.4271/2012-01-2190]). The products of this decomposition are carbon dioxide and ammonia which need to be efficiently removed in order to better control the decomposition reaction. Molecular dynamics simulations can provide insight into the transport properties of carbon dioxide and ammonia in the carrier fluid. In this work, an extensive set of molecular dynamics simulations was performed to better quantify the concentration dependence of solubility and diffusivity of carbon dioxide and ammonia in water, ethylene glycol, and their mixtures at standard temperature and pressure and at elevated temperature. The simulation results confirm the experimental observations that ammonia is more soluble than carbon dioxide in either water or ethylene glycol and that both carbon dioxide and ammonia are more soluble in ethylene glycol than in water. The simulations of water - ethylene glycol mixtures show that increasing the molar fraction of ethylene glycol leads to increased solubility of carbon dioxide and ammonia in the mixture. The authors gratefully acknowledge the DoD High Performance Computing Centers for computational resources.

  1. Response of vegetation to carbon dioxide. Growth, yield and plant water relationships in sweet potatoes in response to carbon dioxide enrichment 1986

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    In the summer of 1985, under the joint program of US Department of Energy, Carbon Dioxide Division, and Tuskegee University, experiments were conducted to study growth, yield, photosynthesis and plant water relationships in sweet potato plants growth in an enriched CO{sub 2} environment. The main experiment utilized open top chambers to study the effects of CO{sub 2} and soil moisture on growth, yield and photosynthesis of field-grown plants. In addition, potted plants in open top chambers were utilized in a study of the effects of different CO{sub 2} concentrations on growth pattern, relative growth rate, net assimilation rate and biomass increment at different stages of development. The interaction effects of enriched CO{sub 2} and water stress on biomass production, yield, xylem potential, and stomatal conductance were also investigated. The overall results of the various studies are described.

  2. Visible light-harvesting photoanodes for solar energy conversion: A comparison of anchoring groups to titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Lauren A.

    Environmental concerns related to climate change and geopolitical issues related to energy security have led to a widespread pursuit of alternative, non-fossil fuel energy sources capable of meeting our increasing global energy demands. Solar energy, which strikes the earth's surface at a rate vastly exceeding our current worldwide power demand, presents itself as a promising source of clean, abundant and renewable energy. The capture and conversion of solar energy into electricity as well as storable, transportable chemical fuels has therefore become major area of chemical research. Inspired by photosynthesis in nature, in which plants and algae convert sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide into oxygen and stored chemical fuel in the form of sugars, recent work has focused on visible light-driven water-splitting technologies for the production of solar fuels. Honda and Fujishima reported the first example of photoelectrochemical water oxidation in 1972. In their system, an inexpensive titanium dioxide semiconductor irradiated with ultraviolet light produced oxygen at the photoanode surface and hydrogen at the surface of a platinum counter electrode. In attempt to harness visible light instead, titanium dioxide and other inexpensive wide band gap photoanodes have been functionalized with visible light-absorbing molecular dyes. These dye-sensitized photoanodes have been used successfully to convert solar energy into electrical current, as in dye-sensitized solar cells, and to drive chemical processes like water oxidation, as in photocatalytic cells. In both systems, a long-lived charge separation is established upon illumination of the photoanode surface when a photoexcited molecular chromophore transfers an electron to the semiconductor conduction band. Following this electron injection process, a nearby redox-active species is oxidized and refills the hole left behind on the molecular chromophore. While the steps of this scheme are relatively straightforward, the

  3. Adsorption of water and carbon dioxide on hematite and consequences for possible hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Kivelae, Pilvi-Helina

    2012-04-07

    The interest in carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery is increasing proportional to the decline in naturally driven oil production and also due to the increasing demand for reduced emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Transport of carbon dioxide in offshore pipelines involves high pressure and low temperatures, conditions which may lead to formation of hydrates from residual water dissolved in carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide. The critical question is whether the water at certain temperatures and pressures will drop out as liquid droplets first, and then form hydrates, or alternatively, adsorb on the pipeline surfaces, and subsequently form hydrates heterogeneously. In this work, we used several different basis sets of density functional theory in ab initio calculations to estimate the charge distribution of hematite (the dominating component of rust) crystals. These rust particles were embedded in water and chemical potential for adsorbed water molecules was estimated through thermodynamic integration and compared to similar estimates for water clusters of the same size. While the generated charges were not unique, the use of high order approximations and different basis sets provides a range of likely charge distributions. Values obtained for the chemical potential of water in different surroundings indicated that it would be thermodynamically favorable for water to adsorb on hematite, and that evaluation of potential carbon dioxide hydrate formation conditions and kinetics should be based on this formation mechanism. Depending on the basis set and approximations, the estimated gain for water to adsorb on the hematite surface rather than condense as droplets varied between -1.7 kJ mole(-1) and -3.4 kJ mole(-1). The partial charge distribution on the hematite surface is incompatible with the hydrate structure, and thus hydrates will be unable to attach to the surface. The behavior of water outside the immediate vicinity of hematite (beyond 3

  4. Smart Water: Energy-Water Optimization in Drinking Water Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project aims to develop and commercialize a Smart Water Platform – Sensor-based Data-driven Energy-Water Optimization technology in drinking water systems. The key technological advances rely on cross-platform data acquisition and management system, model-based real-time sys...

  5. Smart Water: Energy-Water Optimization in Drinking Water Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project aims to develop and commercialize a Smart Water Platform – Sensor-based Data-driven Energy-Water Optimization technology in drinking water systems. The key technological advances rely on cross-platform data acquisition and management system, model-based real-time sys...

  6. Surface reactions of carbon dioxide at the adsorbed water-iron oxide interface.

    PubMed

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Grassian, Vicki H

    2005-06-30

    Despite the fact that carbon dioxide is an abundant atmospheric gas with profound environmental implications, there is little information on the reaction of carbon dioxide at the adsorbed water-oxide interface. In this study, the chemistry of carbon dioxide at the adsorbed water-iron oxide interface is investigated with FTIR spectroscopy. As shown here, the thin water layer on the iron oxide surface plays an important role in the surface chemistry of carbon dioxide. In particular, adsorbed water enhances CO(2) uptake, undergoes isotope exchange with CO(2) in O(18)-labeled experiments, and influences the chemical nature of the predominant adsorbed product on the surface from bicarbonate to carbonate. The resultant thin water film is acidic in nature from the reaction of CO(2). The IR spectrum recorded of adsorbed carbonate at the adsorbed water-iron oxide interface is remarkably similar to that at the bulk liquid water-iron oxide interface. Since reactions in thin water films estimated to be approximately 2 layers will play a role in a number of environmental processes, it is essential to understand the chemistry of these "wet" interfaces with atmospheric gases.

  7. Carbon dioxide emissions, GDP, energy use, and population growth: a multivariate and causality analysis for Ghana, 1971-2013.

    PubMed

    Asumadu-Sarkodie, Samuel; Owusu, Phebe Asantewaa

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the relationship between carbon dioxide emissions, GDP, energy use, and population growth in Ghana was investigated from 1971 to 2013 by comparing the vector error correction model (VECM) and the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL). Prior to testing for Granger causality based on VECM, the study tested for unit roots, Johansen's multivariate co-integration and performed a variance decomposition analysis using Cholesky's technique. Evidence from the variance decomposition shows that 21 % of future shocks in carbon dioxide emissions are due to fluctuations in energy use, 8 % of future shocks are due to fluctuations in GDP, and 6 % of future shocks are due to fluctuations in population. There was evidence of bidirectional causality running from energy use to GDP and a unidirectional causality running from carbon dioxide emissions to energy use, carbon dioxide emissions to GDP, carbon dioxide emissions to population, and population to energy use. Evidence from the long-run elasticities shows that a 1 % increase in population in Ghana will increase carbon dioxide emissions by 1.72 %. There was evidence of short-run equilibrium relationship running from energy use to carbon dioxide emissions and GDP to carbon dioxide emissions. As a policy implication, the addition of renewable energy and clean energy technologies into Ghana's energy mix can help mitigate climate change and its impact in the future.

  8. Facilitating Conceptual Understanding of Gas-Liquid Mass Transfer Coefficient through a Simple Experiment Involving Dissolution of Carbon Dioxide in Water in a Surface Aeration Reactor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utgikar, Vivek P.; MacPherson, David

    2016-01-01

    Students in the undergraduate "transport phenomena" courses typically have a greater difficulty in understanding the theoretical concepts underlying the mass transport phenomena as compared to the concepts of momentum and energy transport. An experiment based on dissolution of carbon dioxide in water was added to the course syllabus to…

  9. Facilitating Conceptual Understanding of Gas-Liquid Mass Transfer Coefficient through a Simple Experiment Involving Dissolution of Carbon Dioxide in Water in a Surface Aeration Reactor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utgikar, Vivek P.; MacPherson, David

    2016-01-01

    Students in the undergraduate "transport phenomena" courses typically have a greater difficulty in understanding the theoretical concepts underlying the mass transport phenomena as compared to the concepts of momentum and energy transport. An experiment based on dissolution of carbon dioxide in water was added to the course syllabus to…

  10. Designer organisms for photosynthetic production of ethanol from carbon dioxide and water

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu

    2011-07-05

    The present invention provides a revolutionary photosynthetic ethanol production technology based on designer transgenic plants, algae, or plant cells. The designer plants, designer algae, and designer plant cells are created such that the endogenous photosynthesis regulation mechanism is tamed, and the reducing power (NADPH) and energy (ATP) acquired from the photosynthetic water splitting and proton gradient-coupled electron transport process are used for immediate synthesis of ethanol (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH) directly from carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) and water (H.sub.2O). The ethanol production methods of the present invention completely eliminate the problem of recalcitrant lignocellulosics by bypassing the bottleneck problem of the biomass technology. The photosynthetic ethanol-production technology of the present invention is expected to have a much higher solar-to-ethanol energy-conversion efficiency than the current technology and could also help protect the Earth's environment from the dangerous accumulation of CO.sub.2 in the atmosphere.

  11. Development of chlorine dioxide-related by-product models for drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Korn, Caroline; Andrew, Robert C; Escobar, Michael D

    2002-01-01

    Factorial experiments were conducted using source waters from seven drinking water treatment plants in Ontario, Canada to develop statistically based model equations capable of predicting chlorine dioxide consumption and chlorite and chlorate formation upon chlorine dioxide application. The equations address raw water quality and operational parameters including pH, temperature, chlorine dioxide concentration, reaction time and water organic content (as described by non-purgeable organic carbon x ultraviolet absorbance measured at 254 nm, NPOC x UV254). Terms describing two-factor interaction effects were also included, improving the accuracy of the predictive equations in fitting measured response concentrations as evaluated through internal and external validations. Nearly 80% of the predictions for chlorine dioxide consumption and chlorite formation were observed to be within 20% of the measured levels. Over 90% of the predicted chlorate levels were within +/- 0.1 mg/L of the measured levels. Chlorine dioxide concentration and NPOC x UV254 were key parameters when developing the predictive models.

  12. Further Sensitivity Analysis of Hypothetical Policies to Limit Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    This analysis supplements the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 alternative cases which imposed hypothetical carbon dioxide emission fees on fossil fuel consumers. It offers further cases that examine the impacts of fees placed only on the emissions from electric power facilities, impacts of returning potential revenues to consumers, and two cap-and-trade policies.

  13. Are renewable energy policies upsetting carbon dioxide emissions? The case of Latin America countries.

    PubMed

    Fuinhas, José Alberto; Marques, António Cardoso; Koengkan, Matheus

    2017-06-01

    The impact of renewable energy policies in carbon dioxide emissions was analysed for a panel of ten Latin American countries, for the period from 1991 to 2012. Panel autoregressive distributed lag methodology was used to decompose the total effect of renewable energy policies on carbon dioxide emissions in its short- and long-run components. There is evidence for the presence of cross-sectional dependence, confirming that Latin American countries share spatial patterns. Heteroskedasticity, contemporaneous correlation, and first-order autocorrelation cross-sectional dependence are also present. To cope with these phenomena, the robust dynamic Driscoll-Kraay estimator, with fixed effects, was used. It was confirmed that the primary energy consumption per capita, in both the short- and long-run, contributes to an increase in carbon dioxide emissions, and also that renewable energy policies in the long-run, and renewable electricity generation per capita both in the short- and long-run, help to mitigate per capita carbon dioxide emissions.

  14. Further Sensitivity Analysis of Hypothetical Policies to Limit Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    This analysis supplements the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 alternative cases which imposed hypothetical carbon dioxide emission fees on fossil fuel consumers. It offers further cases that examine the impacts of fees placed only on the emissions from electric power facilities, impacts of returning potential revenues to consumers, and two cap-and-trade policies.

  15. Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in the steel sector in key developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Price, L.K.; Phylipsen, G.J.M.; Worrell, E.

    2001-04-01

    Iron and steel production consumes enormous quantities of energy, especially in developing countries where outdated, inefficient technologies are still used to produce iron and steel. Carbon dioxide emissions from steel production, which range between 5 and 15% of total country emissions in key developing countries (Brazil, China, India, Mexico, and South Africa), will continue to grow as these countries develop and as demand for steel products such as materials, automobiles, and appliances increases. In this report, we describe the key steel processes, discuss typical energy-intensity values for these processes, review historical trends in iron and steel production by process in five key developing countries, describe the steel industry in each of the five key developing countries, present international comparisons of energy use and carbon dioxide emissions among these countries, and provide our assessment of the technical potential to reduce these emissions based on best-practice benchmarking. Using a best practice benchmark, we find that significant savings, in the range of 33% to 49% of total primary energy used to produce steel, are technically possible in these countries. Similarly, we find that the technical potential for reducing intensities of carbon dioxide emissions ranges between 26% and 49% of total carbon dioxide emissions from steel production in these countries.

  16. The Role of Water and Carbon Dioxide Intercalation on Na-Montmorillonite Swelling Behavior at Geological Carbon Sequestration Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makaremi, Meysam; Jordan, Kenneth; Guthrie, George; Myshakin, Evgeniy

    2015-03-01

    Swelling of Na-montmorillonite in the environment relevant to geological CO2 sequestration in deep underground formations is investigated by conducting classical Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. Both the binary (clay-water or clay- CO2) and the ternary (clay-water- CO2) systems containing the clay, water and carbon dioxide phases are simulated, and the free energy for clay swelling is calculated as a function of the interlayer distance. The calculations indicate that while water intercalates into the clay layer and forms stable monolayer and bilayer hydration states, in the absence of interlayer water adsorption of dry carbon dioxide is thermodynamically unfavorable. In the ternary system, two hydration states are observed with interlayer spacings corresponding closely to those of the pure water binary system. In addition, the simulations of the ternary system show that the incomplete first hydration state is more effective at adsorbing CO2 molecules than is the incomplete second hydration state. Work was performed in support of the NETL's ongoing research in Subtask 4000.4.641.061.002.254 under the RES Contract DE-FE0004000.

  17. Determination of Chlorine Dioxide and Chlorite in Water Supply Systems by Verified Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkáčová, Jana; Božíková, Jarmila

    2014-07-01

    This work is dedicated to the development and optimization of appropriate analytical methods for the determination of chlorine dioxide and chlorite in drinking water in order to obtain accurate and correct results in the quality control of drinking water. The work deals with the development and optimization of a method for the determination of chlorine dioxide using chlorophenol red. Furthermore, a new spectrophotometric method for the determination of chlorite via bromometry using methyl orange was developed, optimized and validated. An electrochemical method for the determination of chlorite by flow coulometry was also developed, optimized and validated.

  18. Carbonate effects on hexavalent uranium removal from water by nanocrystalline titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Wazne, Mahmoud; Meng, Xiaoguang; Korfiatis, George P; Christodoulatos, Christos

    2006-08-10

    A novel nanocrystalline titanium dioxide was used to treat depleted uranium (DU)-contaminated water under neutral and alkaline conditions. The novel material had a total surface area of 329 m(2)/g, total surface site density of 11.0 sites/nm(2), total pore volume of 0.415 cm(3)/g and crystallite size of 6.0 nm. It was used in batch tests to remove U(VI) from synthetic solutions and contaminated water. However, the capacity of the nanocrystalline titanium dioxide to remove U(VI) from water decreased in the presence of inorganic carbonate at pH > 6.0. Adsorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and surface charge measurements were used to investigate the causes of the reduced capacity. The surface charge and the FTIR measurements suggested that the adsorbed U(VI) species was not complexed with carbonate at neutral pH values. The decreased capacity of titanium dioxide to remove U(VI) from water in the presence of carbonate at neutral to alkaline pH values was attributed to the aqueous complexation of U(VI) by inorganic carbonate. The nanocrystalline titanium dioxide had four times the capacity of commercially available titanium dixoide (Degussa P-25) to adsorb U(VI) from water at pH 6 and total inorganic carbonate concentration of 0.01 M. Consequently, the novel material was used to treat DU-contaminated water at a Department of Defense (DOD) site.

  19. Carbon dioxide emissions, output, and energy consumption categories in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Amri, Fethi

    2017-06-01

    This study examines the relation between CO2 emissions, income, non-renewable, and renewable energy consumption in Algeria during the period extending from 1980 to 2011. Our work gives particular attention to the validity of environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis. The autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) with break point method outcome demonstrates the positive effect of non-renewable type of energy on CO2 emissions consumption. On the contrary, the results reveal an insignificant effect of renewable energy on environment improvement. Moreover, the results accept the existence of EKC hypothesis but the highest gross domestic product value in logarithm scale of our data is inferior to the estimated turning point. Consequently, policy-makers in Algeria should expand the ratio of renewable energy and should decrease the quota of non-renewable energy consumption.

  20. Free Energy Minimization Calculation of Complex Chemical Equilibria. Reduction of Silicon Dioxide with Carbon at High Temperature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wai, C. M.; Hutchinson, S. G.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the calculation of free energy in reactions between silicon dioxide and carbon. Describes several computer programs for calculating the free energy minimization and their uses in chemistry classrooms. Lists 16 references. (YP)

  1. Free Energy Minimization Calculation of Complex Chemical Equilibria. Reduction of Silicon Dioxide with Carbon at High Temperature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wai, C. M.; Hutchinson, S. G.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the calculation of free energy in reactions between silicon dioxide and carbon. Describes several computer programs for calculating the free energy minimization and their uses in chemistry classrooms. Lists 16 references. (YP)

  2. Chemical vapour deposition of thermochromic vanadium dioxide thin films for energy efficient glazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, Michael E. A.; Binions, Russell

    2014-06-01

    Vanadium dioxide is a thermochromic material that undergoes a semiconductor to metal transitions at a critical temperature of 68 °C. This phase change from a low temperature monoclinic structure to a higher temperature rutile structure is accompanied by a marked change in infrared reflectivity and change in resistivity. This ability to have a temperature-modulated film that can limit solar heat gain makes vanadium dioxide an ideal candidate for thermochromic energy efficient glazing. In this review we detail the current challenges to such glazing becoming a commercial reality and describe the key chemical vapour deposition technologies being employed in the latest research.

  3. Solvation dynamics in water confined within layered manganese dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remsing, Richard C.; Klein, Michael L.

    2017-09-01

    The confined environment presented by layered transition metal oxides is conducive to a variety of chemical reactions. Despite intense interest in these materials, little is known regarding the microscopic details relevant to their catalytic activity. We characterize aspects of the dynamics governing a redox reaction in the interlayer environment between manganese dioxide sheets. The nonequilibrium solvation dynamics surrounding charge transfer between an ion and the surface are highly non-linear and exhibit long-time relaxation that is governed by collective dynamics. These dynamics are rationalized in terms of structural rearrangements, allowing connections to be made to more complex reactions in these materials.

  4. [Comparison of the effects of chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite and their combination on simulative water disinfection].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Li, Na; Lu, Yi; Wang, Yazhou

    2008-05-01

    To compare the effects of disinfection of chlorine dioxide (ClO2), sodium hypochlorite(NaClO) and their combination (ClO + NaClO) on simulative water samples. The simulative water samples containing 5.0 x 10(4) - 5.0 x 10(5) cfu/100ml Escherichia coli were prepared in laboratory and disinfected by different doses of chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite and their combination for 60, 60, 30 + 60 min respectively. The kill ratio for Escherichia coli, and the residual chlorine dioxide, and the product of chlorite ion (ClO2-) and total residual chlorine were detected and compared by the membrane filter(MF) technique and electrometric titration. The minimum effective dosage (MED) for disinfect of simulative water samples were 0.4 mg/L of chlorine dioxide, 0.5 mg/L of sodium hypochlorite, and the 0.1 mg/L + 0.3 mg/L or 0.2 mg/L + 0.2 mg/L of their combination. By comparision with disinfection of ClO2 and NaClO alone, the residual chlorine dioxide increased 13.43% - 166.67% in simulative water sample under disinfection by the combination of ClO2 + NaClO, While chlorite ion decreased 13.11% - 19.97% and total residual chlorine increased 9.34% - 40.15%. The combination of chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite for disinfection of drinking water could achieve better effect of disinfection and decrease disinfection by-products as well.

  5. Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. cement industry

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

    1999-08-01

    This paper reports on an in-depth analysis of the U.S. cement industry, identifying cost-effective energy efficiency measures and potentials. The authors assess this industry at the aggregate level (Standard Industrial Classification 324), which includes establishments engaged in manufacturing hydraulic cements, including Portland, natural, masonry, and pozzolana when reviewing industry trends and when making international comparisons. Coal and coke are currently the primary fuels for the sector, supplanting the dominance of natural gas in the 1970s. Between 1970 and 1997, primary physical energy intensity for cement production (SIC 324) dropped 30%,from 7.9 GJ/t to 5.6 GJ/t, while carbon dioxide intensity due to fuel consumption (carbon dioxide emissions expressed in tons of carbon per ton cement) dropped 25%, from 0.16 tC/ton to 0.12 tC/ton. Carbon dioxide intensity due to fuel consumption and clinker calcination dropped 17%, from 0.29 tC/ton to 0.24 tC/ton. They examined 30 energy efficient technologies and measures and estimated energy savings, carbon dioxide savings, investment costs, and operation and maintenance costs for each of the measures. They constructed an energy conservation supply curve for U.S. cement industry which found a total cost-effective reduction of 0.6 GJ/ton of cement consisting of measures having a simple payback period of 3 years or less. This is equivalent to potential energy savings of 11% of 1994 energy use for cement making and a savings of 5% of total 1994 carbon dioxide emissions by the U.S. cement industry. Assuming the increased production of blended cement in the U.S., as is common in many parts of the world, the technical potential for energy efficiency improvement would not change considerably. However, the cost-effective potential, would increase to 1.1 GJ/ton cement or 18% of total energy use, and carbon dioxide emissions would be reduced by 16%.

  6. Diurnal changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in coral reef waters

    SciTech Connect

    Kayanne, Hajime; Suzuki, Atsushi; Saito, Hiroshi

    1995-07-14

    Coral reefs are considered to be a source of atmospheric carbon dioxide because of their high calcium carbonate production and low net primary production. This was tested by direct measurement of diurnal changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (P{sub CO2}) in reef waters during two 3-day periods, one in March 1993 and one in March 1994, on Shiraho reef of the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. Although the P{sub CO2} values in reef waters exhibited large diurnal changes ranging from 160 to 520 microatmospheres, they indicate that the reef flat area is a net sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. This suggests that the net organic production rate of the reef community exceeded its calcium carbonate production rate during the observation periods. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Adsorption and Desorption of Carbon Dioxide and Water Mixtures on Synthetic Hydrophobic Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Several synthetic carbonaceous adsorbents produced through pyrolysis of polymeric materials are available commercially. Some appear to have advantages over activated carbon for certain adsorption applications. In particular, they can have tailored hydrophobicities that are significantly greater than that of activated carbon, while moderately high surfaces areas are retained. These sorbents are being investigated for possible use in removing trace contaminants and excess carbon dioxide from air in closed habitats, plant growth chambers, and other applications involving purification of humid gas streams. We have analyzed the characteristics of a few of these adsorbents through adsorption and desorption experiments and standard characterization techniques. This paper presents pure and multicomponent adsorption data collected for carbon dioxide and water on two synthetic carbonaceous adsorbents having different hydrophobicities and capillary condensation characteristics. The observations are interpreted through consideration of the pore structure and surface chemistry of the solids and interactions between adsorbed carbon dioxide, water, and the solvent gas.

  8. Adsorption and Desorption of Carbon Dioxide and Water Mixtures on Synthetic Hydrophobic Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Several synthetic carbonaceous adsorbents produced through pyrolysis of polymeric materials are available commercially. Some appear to have advantages over activated carbon for certain adsorption applications. In particular, they can have tailored hydrophobicities that are significantly greater than that of activated carbon, while moderately high surfaces areas are retained. These sorbents are being investigated for possible use in removing trace contaminants and excess carbon dioxide from air in closed habitats, plant growth chambers, and other applications involving purification of humid gas streams. We have analyzed the characteristics of a few of these adsorbents through adsorption and desorption experiments and standard characterization techniques. This paper presents pure and multicomponent adsorption data collected for carbon dioxide and water on two synthetic carbonaceous adsorbents having different hydrophobicities and capillary condensation characteristics. The observations are interpreted through consideration of the pore structure and surface chemistry of the solids and interactions between adsorbed carbon dioxide, water, and the solvent gas.

  9. The use of chlorine dioxide for the inactivation of copepod zooplankton in drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Chen, Wei; Cai, Bo

    2014-01-01

    The presence of zooplankton in drinking water treatment system may cause a negative effect on the aesthetic value of drinking water and may also increase the threat to human health due to they being the carriers of bacteria. Very little research has been done on the effects of copepod inactivation and the mechanisms involved in this process. In a series of bench-scale experiments we used a response surface method to assess the sensitivity of copepod to inactivation when chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) was used as a disinfectant. We also assessed the effects of the ClO₂dosage, exposure time, organic matter concentration and temperature. Results indicated that the inactivation rate improved with increasing dosage, exposure time and temperature, whereas it decreased with increasing organic matter concentration. Copepod inactivation was more sensitive to the ClO₂dose than that to the exposure time, while being maintained at the same Ct-value conditions. The activation energy at different temperatures revealed that the inactivation of copepods with ClO₂was temperature-dependent. The presence of organic matter resulted in a lower available dose as well as a shorter available exposure time, which resulted in a decrease in inactivation efficiency.

  10. Task Order 20: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Energy Conversion Study

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Paul; Lindsay, Edward; McDowell, Michael; Huang, Megan

    2015-04-23

    AREVA Inc. developed this study for the US Department of Energy (DOE) office of Nuclear Energy (NE) in accordance with Task Order 20 Statement of Work (SOW) covering research and development activities for the Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (sCO2) Brayton Cycle energy conversion. The study addresses the conversion of sCO2 heat energy to electrical output by use of a Brayton Cycle system and focuses on the potential of a net efficiency increase via cycle recuperation and recompression stages. The study also addresses issues and study needed to advance development and implementation of a 10 MWe sCO2 demonstration project.

  11. Defective titanium dioxide single crystals exposed by high-energy {001} facets for efficient oxygen reduction

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Dan-Ni; Gong, Li; Zhang, Ai-Yong; Zhang, Xing; Chen, Jie-Jie; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The cathodic material plays an essential role in oxygen reduction reaction for energy conversion and storage systems. Titanium dioxide, as a semiconductor material, is usually not recognized as an efficient oxygen reduction electrocatalyst owning to its low conductivity and poor reactivity. Here we demonstrate that nano-structured titanium dioxide, self-doped by oxygen vacancies and selectively exposed with the high-energy {001} facets, exhibits a surprisingly competitive oxygen reduction activity, excellent durability and superior tolerance to methanol. Combining the electrochemical tests with density-functional calculations, we elucidate the defect-centred oxygen reduction reaction mechanism for the superiority of the reductive {001}-TiO2−x nanocrystals. Our findings may provide an opportunity to develop a simple, efficient, cost-effective and promising catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in energy conversion and storage technologies. PMID:26493365

  12. Defective titanium dioxide single crystals exposed by high-energy {001} facets for efficient oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Dan-Ni; Gong, Li; Zhang, Ai-Yong; Zhang, Xing; Chen, Jie-Jie; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-10-01

    The cathodic material plays an essential role in oxygen reduction reaction for energy conversion and storage systems. Titanium dioxide, as a semiconductor material, is usually not recognized as an efficient oxygen reduction electrocatalyst owning to its low conductivity and poor reactivity. Here we demonstrate that nano-structured titanium dioxide, self-doped by oxygen vacancies and selectively exposed with the high-energy {001} facets, exhibits a surprisingly competitive oxygen reduction activity, excellent durability and superior tolerance to methanol. Combining the electrochemical tests with density-functional calculations, we elucidate the defect-centred oxygen reduction reaction mechanism for the superiority of the reductive {001}-TiO2-x nanocrystals. Our findings may provide an opportunity to develop a simple, efficient, cost-effective and promising catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in energy conversion and storage technologies.

  13. Mitigation of carbon dioxide from the Indonesia energy system

    SciTech Connect

    Adi, A.C.; Nurrohim, A.; Hidajat, M.N.

    1996-12-31

    Energy consumption in Indonesia is growing fast in line with the development of national economy. During (1990 - 1993) the emission of CO{sub 2} gas coming from energy sector increased from 150 million tones to 200 million tones in 1993. Whereas, the total methane emission from the oil, gas and coal sub-sector reached 550 kilo tones in 1991 and increased to 670 kilo tones in 1994. This amount of CO{sub 2} and Methane from energy sector was 26% and 10 % respectively of the total emission of Indonesia. Based on the last two decades of Indonesia`s economic growth experience, as a developing country this high economic growth rate of Indonesia in the future will be kept until reaching the newly industrialized country level, which is more than 6% annually in the next decade. This high growth rate economic projection will also added the level of GHG emission in the future. As a developing country Indonesia is one of the fast growing countries. The GDP growth in the year 1995 was more than 7 percent, therefore growth rate of energy consumption in this country also rose following the economic growth.

  14. Water, energy, and farm production

    SciTech Connect

    Ulibarri, C.A.; Seely, H.S.; Willis, D.B.; Anderson, D.M.

    1996-04-01

    Electric utility rate deregulation can have disproportionate impacts on water-intensive crops, which have historically relied upon pressurized irrigation technologies and surface water resources. Based on a case study of agricultural growers in southern California, the paper models the impacts of utility rates considered in the Western Area Power Administration`s Sierra Nevada Customer Service Region. The study was performed as part of the 2004 Power Marketing Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement. The empirical results reflect linear-programming estimates of the income transfers from growers to energy providers based on county-wide coverage of 13 junior and senior irrigation districts and short-run production possibilities of 11 irrigated crops. Transfers of income from growers to energy suppliers occur through their losses in producer surplus.

  15. USING REDUCING AGENTS TO ELIMINATE CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND CHLORITE ION RESIDUALS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to determine the viability of various disinfection alternatives, the Evansville, Ind. Water and Sewer Utility is engaged in a pilot-plant investigation to compare chlorine dioxide and ozone pretreatment. As a result of increased speculation that the total residual c...

  16. Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in Water Treatment and in Topical Sunscreen (Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in Water Treatment and in Topical Sunscreen. This report is a starting point to determine what is known and what needs to be known about selected nanomaterials as par...

  17. USING REDUCING AGENTS TO ELIMINATE CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND CHLORITE ION RESIDUALS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to determine the viability of various disinfection alternatives, the Evansville, Ind. Water and Sewer Utility is engaged in a pilot-plant investigation to compare chlorine dioxide and ozone pretreatment. As a result of increased speculation that the total residual c...

  18. Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in Water Treatment and in Topical Sunscreen (Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in Water Treatment and in Topical Sunscreen. This report is a starting point to determine what is known and what needs to be known about selected nanomaterials as par...

  19. The impact of future carbon dioxide emission reduction targets on U.S. electric sector water use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Colin MacKay

    The U.S. electric sector's reliance on water makes it vulnerable to the impacts of climate change on water resources. Here we analyze how constraints on U.S. energy system carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions could affect water withdrawal and consumption in the U.S. electric sector through 2055. We use simulations of the EPA's U.S. 9-region (EPAUS9r) MARKAL least-cost optimization energy systems model with updated water use factors for electricity generating technologies. Model results suggest CO2 constraints could force the retirement of old power plants and drive increased use of low water-use renewable and nuclear power as well as natural gas CCS plants with more advanced cooling systems. These changes in electric sector technology mix reduce water withdrawal in all scenarios but increase water consumption in aggressive scenarios. Decreased electric sector water withdrawal would likely reduce electric sector vulnerability to climate change, but the rise in consumption could increase competition with other users.

  20. Alternate fluid to improve energy efficiency of supercritical water oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, C.H.

    1996-03-01

    This report discusses the replacement of water by carbon dioxide in both the quench stream and the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) reactor feed in order to reduce the energy utilization in the process. FLUENT was used to generate the input requirements and ASPEN PLUS was used to model the SCWO process. Simulations were made for normal MODAR operating conditions (baseline case) and two other cases replacing water by carbon dioxide. The basis for and assumptions used in the simulation are given. Economic evaluations were made and costs were compared with the baseline case and a case with 60% replacement of water by carbon dioxide. The equipment cost is almost the same. However, the case with replacement of water by carbon dioxide reduces the energy requirement in the end process by a factor of three, which is a significant energy savings in the operation. Also, the injection of carbon dioxide into the SCWO reactor feed is expected to reduce corrosion and makes salt particles non-sticky. However, these advantages need to be confirmed by experiment.

  1. Staying hydrated: the molecular journey of gaseous sulfur dioxide to a water surface.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Eric S; Valley, Nicholas A; Moore, Frederick G; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2013-05-14

    A water surface is a dynamic and constantly evolving terrain producing a vast array of unique molecular properties and interactions with chemical species in the environment. The complex dynamics of water surfaces permit life on earth to continue, but also complicate the development of a complete microscopic picture of the specific behaviors that take place within interfacial aqueous environments. This computational study examines a piece of the water puzzle by elucidating the bonding, dynamic interactions, and hydrate structures of sulfur dioxide gas adsorbing to a water cluster. Results described herein address the specific ways in which sulfur dioxide gas molecules bind to a water cluster, and paint a more complete picture of the adsorption pathway than was previously developed from experimental and computational studies. Ab initio molecular dynamics have been employed to study sulfur dioxide and water interactions at two environmentally relevant temperatures on a water cluster. The results of this study on a common environmental and industrially important gas provide molecular insight to aid our understanding of interactions on aqueous surfaces, and gaseous adsorption processes.

  2. Measurement of Trace Water Vapor in a Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly Product Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wormhoudt, Joda; Shorter, Joanne H.; McManus, J. Barry; Nelson, David D.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Freedman, Andrew; Campbell, Melissa; Chang, Clarence T.; Smith, Frederick D.

    2004-01-01

    The International Space Station Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) uses regenerable adsorption technology to remove carbon dioxide (COP) from cabin air. Product water vapor measurements from a CDRA test bed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center were made using a tunable infrared diode laser differential absorption spectrometer (TILDAS) provided by NASA Glenn Research Center. The TILDAS instrument exceeded all the test specifications, including sensitivity, dynamic range, time response, and unattended operation. During the COP desorption phase, water vapor concentrations as low as 5 ppmv were observed near the peak of CO2 evolution, rising to levels of approx. 40 ppmv at the end of a cycle. Periods of high water concentration (>100 ppmv) were detected and shown to be caused by an experimental artifact. Measured values of total water vapor evolved during a single desorption cycle were as low as 1 mg.

  3. Permeability of methane, carbon dioxide and water in PA11 and PVDF used for flexible pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, T.R.; Skar, J.I.; Hansteen, C.

    1999-11-01

    Permeability of methane, carbon dioxide and water in plasticized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and plasticized polyarnid 11 (PA11 ) has been measured for a number of temperatures and pressures in a small scale test apparatus and permeability coefficients have been calculated. The results have been used to predict if the annulus of flexible pipes will be water wet. For verification of the small scale test, a large scale test has also been carried out in a 50 mm flexible pipe. Both test methods show that the annulus of flexible pipes will be water wet when carrying gas and water. This implies that the conditions in the annulus will be corrosive when pipes are carrying gas which contains carbon dioxide or hydrogen sulfide. The corrosive conditions and corrosion fatigue must be taken into account when the fatigue life of flexible risers is calculated.

  4. Water-in-carbon dioxide microemulsions: An environment for hydrophiles including proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, K.P.; Harrison, K.L.; Clarke, M.J.

    1996-02-02

    Carbon dioxide in the liquid and supercritical fluid states is useful as a replacement for toxic organic solvents. However, nonvolatile hydrophilic substances such as proteins, ions, and most catalysts are insoluble. This limitation was overcome by the formation of aqueous microemulsion droplets in a carbon dioxide-continuous phase with a nontoxic ammonium carboxylate perfluoropolyether surfactant. Several spectroscopic techniques consistently indicated that the properties of the droplets approach those of bulk water. The protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) with a molecular weight of 67,000 is soluble in this microemulsion and experiences an environment similar to that of native BSA in buffer. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Storing carbon dioxide in saline formations : analyzing extracted water treatment and use for power plant cooling.

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Brian P.; Heath, Jason E.; Borns, David James; Dewers, Thomas A.; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse D.; McNemar, Andrea; Krumhansl, James Lee; Klise, Geoffrey T.

    2010-10-01

    In an effort to address the potential to scale up of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and sequestration in the United States saline formations, an assessment model is being developed using a national database and modeling tool. This tool builds upon the existing NatCarb database as well as supplemental geological information to address scale up potential for carbon dioxide storage within these formations. The focus of the assessment model is to specifically address the question, 'Where are opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use for existing and expanding power plants, and what are the economic impacts of these systems relative to traditional power systems?' Initial findings indicate that approximately less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data points meet the working criteria for combined CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water treatment systems. The initial results of the analysis indicate that less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data may meet the working depth, salinity and formation intersecting criteria. These results were taken from examining updated NatCarb data. This finding, while just an initial result, suggests that the combined use of saline formations for CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use may be limited by the selection criteria chosen. A second preliminary finding of the analysis suggests that some of the necessary data required for this analysis is not present in all of the NatCarb records. This type of analysis represents the beginning of the larger, in depth study for all existing coal and natural gas power plants and saline formations in the U.S. for the purpose of potential CO{sub 2} storage and water reuse for supplemental cooling. Additionally, this allows for potential policy insight when understanding the difficult nature of combined potential institutional (regulatory) and physical (engineered geological sequestration and extracted water system

  6. Physical and chemical transformations of highly compressed carbon dioxide at bond energies.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-06-07

    Carbon dioxide exhibits a richness of high-pressure polymorphs with a great diversity in intermolecular interaction, chemical bonding, and crystal structures. It ranges from typical molecular solids to fully extended covalent solids with crystal structures similar to those of SiO2. These extended solids of carbon dioxide are fundamentally new materials exhibiting interesting optical nonlinearity, low compressibility and high energy density. Furthermore, the large disparity in chemical bonding between the extended network and molecular structures results in a broad metastability domain for these phases to room temperature and almost to ambient pressure and thereby offers enhanced opportunities for novel materials developments. Broadly speaking, these molecular-to-non-molecular transitions occur due to electron delocalization manifested as a rapid increase in electron kinetic energy at high density. The detailed mechanisms, however, are more complex with phase metastabilities, path-dependent phases and phase boundaries, and large lattice strains and structural distortions - all of which are controlled by well beyond thermodynamic constraints to chemical kinetics associated with the governing phases and transitions. As a result, the equilibrium phase boundary is difficult to locate precisely (experimentally or theoretically) and is often obscured by the presence of metastable phases (ordered or disordered). This paper will review the pressure-induced transformations observed in highly compressed carbon dioxide and present chemistry perspectives on those molecular-to-non-molecular transformations that can be applied to other low-Z molecular solids at Mbar pressures where the compression energy rivals the chemical bond energies.

  7. Carbon dioxide release from ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Green, H.J. ); Guenther, P.R. )

    1990-09-01

    This paper presents the results of recent measurements of CO{sub 2} release from an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) experiment. Based on these data, the rate of short-term CO{sub 2} release from future open-cycle OTEC plants is projected to be 15 to 25 times smaller than that from fossil-fueled electric power plants. OTEC system that incorporate subsurface mixed discharge are expected to result in no long-term release. OTEC plants can significantly reduce CO{sub 2} emissions when substituted for fossil-fueled power generation. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Techniques for the conversion to carbon dioxide of oxygen from dissolved sulfate in thermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nehring, N.L.; Bowen, P.A.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    The fractionation of oxygen isotopes between dissolved sulfate ions and water provides a useful geothermometer for geothermal waters. The oxygen isotope composition of dissolved sulfate may also be used to indicate the source of the sulfate and processes of formation. The methods described here for separation, purification and reduction of sulfate to prepare carbon dioxide for mass spectrometric analysis are modifications of methods by Rafter (1967), Mizutani (1971), Sakai and Krouse (1971), and Mizutani and Rafter (1969). ?? 1976.

  9. Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide, Ammonia, Formaldehyde, and Water Vapor on Regenerable Carbon Sorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Serio, Michael A.; Wilburn, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of reversible sorbents for the combined carbon dioxide, moisture, and trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), and more specifically in the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The currently available life support systems use separate units for carbon dioxide, trace contaminants, and moisture control, and the long-term objective is to replace the above three modules with a single one. Furthermore, the current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is nonregenerable, and the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. In this study, several carbon sorbents were fabricated and tested for simultaneous carbon dioxide, ammonia, formaldehyde, and water sorption. Multiple adsorption/vacuum-regeneration cycles were demonstrated at room temperature, and also the enhancement of formaldehyde sorption by the presence of ammonia in the gas mixture.

  10. Automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water.

    PubMed

    Cadena-Pereda, Raúl O; Rivera-Muñoz, Eric M; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto; Gomez-Melendez, Domingo J; Anaya-Rivera, Ely K

    2012-01-01

    Biogas methane content is a relevant variable in anaerobic digestion processing where knowledge of process kinetics or an early indicator of digester failure is needed. The contribution of this work is the development of a novel, simple and low cost automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water as the precursor of a sensor for biogas quality monitoring. The device described in this work was used for determining the composition of binary mixtures, such as carbon dioxide-methane, in the range of 0-100%. The design and implementation of a digital signal processor and control system into a low-cost Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform has permitted the successful application of data acquisition, data distribution and digital data processing, making the construction of a standalone carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor possible.

  11. Automatic Carbon Dioxide-Methane Gas Sensor Based on the Solubility of Gases in Water

    PubMed Central

    Cadena-Pereda, Raúl O.; Rivera-Muñoz, Eric M.; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto; Gomez-Melendez, Domingo J.; Anaya-Rivera, Ely K.

    2012-01-01

    Biogas methane content is a relevant variable in anaerobic digestion processing where knowledge of process kinetics or an early indicator of digester failure is needed. The contribution of this work is the development of a novel, simple and low cost automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water as the precursor of a sensor for biogas quality monitoring. The device described in this work was used for determining the composition of binary mixtures, such as carbon dioxide-methane, in the range of 0–100%. The design and implementation of a digital signal processor and control system into a low-cost Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform has permitted the successful application of data acquisition, data distribution and digital data processing, making the construction of a standalone carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor possible. PMID:23112626

  12. Continuous flow determination of carbon dioxide in water by membrane separation-chemiluminescent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, T.; Ito, K.; Munemori, M.

    1988-10-01

    Carbon dioxide has been found to enhance the chemiluminescence of a luminol system. A determination method for carbon dioxide in water was developed by applying this reaction to a continuous flow membrane-separation system. Concentrations of carbon dioxide as low as 0.04 ..mu..g C/mL were determined. Membrane-separation effectively eliminated interferences from Co(II), Cr(III), Fe(III), and other ions which also enhance chemiluminescence. The relative standard deviation for this method was 2.8% (n=5) for 4.0 ..mu..g C/mL and the time required for the analysis of one sample was 3.0 min.

  13. Regional Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Exchange Over Heterogeneous Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahrt, Larry J.

    2005-01-01

    In spite of setbacks due to forest fires, eviction after a change of landowners and unanticipated need to upgrade and replace much of the instrumentation, substantial progress has been made during the past three years, resulting in major new findings. Although most of the results are in manuscript form, three papers have been published and a fourth was recently submitted. The data has been subjected to extensive quality control. Extra attention has been devoted to the influence of tilt rotation and flux-calculation method, particularly with respect to nocturnal fluxes. Previous/standard methods for calculating nocturnal fluxes with moderate and strong stability are inadequate and lead to large random fluxes errors for individual records, due partly to inadvertent inclusion of mesoscale motions that strongly contaminant the estimation of fluxes by weak turbulence. Such large errors are serious for process studies requiring carbon dioxide fluxes for individual records, but are substantially reduced when averaging fluxes over longer periods as in calculation of annual NEE budgets. We have employed a superior method for estimating fluxes in stable conditions with a variable averaging width . Mesoscale fluxes are generally unimportant except for events and are generally not systematic or predictable. Mesoscale or regional models of our region are not able to reproduce important aspects of the diurnally varying wind field

  14. Measurement of Small Molecule Diffusion in Carbon Dioxide Swollen Polymers using Fluorescence Nonradiative Energy Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, James; Gupta, Ravi; Ramachandrarao, Vijay

    2001-03-01

    Diffusion coefficients of molecular probes in CO2-swollen polystyrene films were measured in situ using high-pressure fluorescence nonradiative energy transfer (NRET). Specifically, the diffusivities of decacyclene and BPEA (9,10- bis phenyl ethnyl Anthracene), relatively large fluorescence acceptor probes, were determined in real time using pyrene-labeled polystyrene as the corresponding energy donor in carbon dioxide-plasticized films. Decacyclene diffusivities were measured at 65 and 80 C and carbon dioxide pressures ranging from 62 to 144 bar, conditions near and well above the previously reported, solvent-depressed glass transition of polystyrene. Decacyclene diffusivity shows an increase of over 5 orders of magnitude upon CO2 sorption relative to the PS glass at ambient pressure and equivalent temperatures. BPEA exhibits similar behavior but diffuses about an order of magnitude faster than decacyclene in CO2 plasticized polystyrene under similar conditions.

  15. Influence of elevated carbon dioxide on water relations of soybeans

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, H.H.; Sionit, N.; Cure, J.D.; Smith, J.M.; Bingham, G.E.

    1984-02-01

    Soybean (Clycine max L. Merrill cv 'Bragg') plants were grown in pots at six elevated atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations and two watering regimes in open top field chambers to characterize leaf xylem potential, stomatal resistance and conductance, transpiration, and carbohydrate contents of the leaves in response to CO/sub 2/ enrichment and water stress conditions. Groups of plants at each CO/sub 2/ concentration were subjected to water stress by withholding irrigation for 4 days during the pod-filling stage. Under well watered conditions, the stomatal conductance of the plants decreased with increasing CO/sub 2/ concentration. Therefore, although leaf area per plant was greater in the high CO/sub 2/ treatments, the rate of water loss per plant decreased with CO/sub 2/ enrichment. After 4 days without irrigation, plants in lower CO/sub 2/ treatments showed greater leaf tissue damage, lower leaf water potential, and higher stomatal resistance than high CO/sub 2/ plants. Stomatal closure occurred at lower leaf water potentials for the low CO/sub 2/ grown plants than high CO/sub 2/ grown plants. Significantly greater starch concentrations were found in leaves of high CO/sub 2/ plants, and the reductions in leaf starch and increases in soluble sugars due to water stress were greater for low CO/sub 2/ plants. The results showed that even though greater growth was observed at high atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations, lower rates of water use delayed and, thereby, prevented the onset of severe water stress under conditions of low moisture availability.

  16. Integrated Energy System with Beneficial Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Use - Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaolei; Rink, Nancy T

    2011-04-29

    This report presents an integrated energy system that combines the production of substitute natural gas through coal hydrogasification with an algae process for beneficial carbon dioxide (CO2) use and biofuel production (funded under Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-FE0001099). The project planned to develop, test, operate and evaluate a 2 ton-per-day coal hydrogasification plant and 25-acre algae farm at the Arizona Public Service (APS) 1000 Megawatt (MW) Cholla coal-fired power plant in Joseph City, Arizona. Conceptual design of the integrated system was undertaken with APS partners Air Liquide (AL) and Parsons. The process engineering was separated into five major areas: flue gas preparation and CO2 delivery, algae farming, water management, hydrogasification, and biofuel production. The process flow diagrams, energy and material balances, and preliminary major equipment needs for each major area were prepared to reflect integrated process considerations and site infrastructure design basis. The total project also included research and development on a bench-scale hydrogasifier, one-dimensional (1-D) kinetic-model simulation, extensive algae stressing, oil extraction, lipid analysis and a half-acre algae farm demonstration at APS?s Redhawk testing facility. During the project, a two-acre algae testing facility with a half-acre algae cultivation area was built at the APS Redhawk 1000 MW natural gas combined cycle power plant located 55 miles west of Phoenix. The test site integrated flue gas delivery, CO2 capture and distribution, algae cultivation, algae nursery, algae harvesting, dewatering and onsite storage as well as water treatment. The site environmental, engineering, and biological parameters for the cultivators were monitored remotely. Direct biodiesel production from biomass through an acid-catalyzed transesterification reaction and a supercritical methanol transesterification reaction were evaluated. The highest oil-to-biodiesel conversion of 79

  17. Exercise, energy expenditure and energy balance, as measured with doubly labelled water.

    PubMed

    Westerterp, Klaas R

    2017-07-20

    The doubly labelled water method for the measurement of total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) over 1-3 weeks under daily living conditions is the indicated method to study effects of exercise and extreme environments on energy balance. Subjects consume a measured amount of doubly labelled water (2H2 18O) to increase background enrichment of body water for 18O and 2H, and the subsequent difference in elimination rate between 18O and 2H, as measured in urine, saliva or blood samples, is a measure for carbon dioxide production and thus allows calculation of TDEE. The present review describes research showing that physical activity level (PAL), calculated as TDEE (assessed with doubly labelled water) divided by resting energy expenditure (REE, PAL = TDEE/REE), reaches a maximum value of 2·00-2·40 in subjects with a vigorously active lifestyle. Higher PAL values, while maintaining energy balance, are observed in professional athletes consuming additional energy dense foods to compete at top level. Exercise training can increase TDEE/REE in young adults to a value of 2·00-2·40, when energy intake is unrestricted. Furthermore, the review shows an exercise induced increase in activity energy expenditure can be compensated by a reduction in REE and by a reduction in non-exercise physical activity, especially at a negative energy balance. Additionally, in untrained subjects, an exercise-induced increase in activity energy expenditure is compensated by a training-induced increase in exercise efficiency.

  18. High temperature ultralow water content carbon dioxide-in-water foam stabilized with viscoelastic zwitterionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Alzobaidi, Shehab; Da, Chang; Tran, Vu; Prodanović, Maša; Johnston, Keith P

    2017-02-15

    Ultralow water content carbon dioxide-in-water (C/W) foams with gas phase volume fractions (ϕ) above 0.95 (that is <0.05 water) tend to be inherently unstable given that the large capillary pressures that cause the lamellar films to thin. Herein, we demonstrate that these C/W foams may be stabilized with viscoelastic aqueous phases formed with a single zwitterionic surfactant at a concentration of only 1% (w/v) in DI water and over a wide range of salinity. Moreover, they are stable with a foam quality ϕ up to 0.98 even for temperatures up to 120°C. The properties of aqueous viscoelastic solutions and foams containing these solutions are examined for a series of zwitterionic amidopropylcarbobetaines, R-ONHC3H6N(CH3)2CH2CO2, where R is varied from C12-14 (coco) to C18 (oleyl) to C22 (erucyl). For the surfactants with long C18 and C22 tails, the relaxation times from complex rheology indicate the presence of viscoelastic wormlike micelles over a wide range in salinity and pH, given the high surfactant packing fraction. The apparent viscosities of these ultralow water content foams reached more than 120cP with stabilities more than 30-fold over those for foams formed with the non-viscoelastic C12-14 surfactant. At 90°C, the foam morphology was composed of ∼35μm diameter bubbles with a polyhedral texture. The apparent foam viscosity typically increased with ϕ and then dropped at ϕ values higher than 0.95-0.98. The Ostwald ripening rate was slower for foams with viscoelastic versus non-viscoelastic lamellae as shown by optical microscopy, as a consequence of slower lamellar drainage rates. The ability to achieve high stabilities for ultralow water content C/W foams over a wide temperature range is of interest in various technologies including polymer and materials science, CO2 enhanced oil recovery, CO2 sequestration (by greater control of the CO2 flow patterns), and possibly even hydraulic fracturing with minimal use of water to reduce the requirements for

  19. Energy expenditure in space flight (doubly labelled water method) (8-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, Howard G.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Energy Expenditure in Space Flight (ESS) experiment is to demonstrate and evaluate the doubly labeled water method of measuring the energy expended by crew members during approximately 7 days in microgravity. The doubly labeled water technique determines carbon dioxide production which is then used to calculate energy expenditure. The method relies on the equilibrium between oxygen in respiratory carbon dioxide and oxygen in body water. Because of this equilibrium, the kinetic of water turnover and respiration are interdependent. Under normal conditions, man contains small but significant amounts of deuterium and oxygen 18. Deuterium is eliminated from the body as water while oxygen 18 is eliminated as water and carbon dioxide. The difference in the turnover rates in the two isotopes is proportional to the carbon dioxide production. Deliberately enriching the total body water with both of these isotopes allows the isotope turnovers to be accurately measured in urine, plasma, or saliva samples. The samples are taken to the laboratory for analysis using an ion-ratio spectrometer.

  20. Energy expenditure in space flight (doubly labelled water method) (8-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, Howard G.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Energy Expenditure in Space Flight (ESS) experiment is to demonstrate and evaluate the doubly labeled water method of measuring the energy expended by crew members during approximately 7 days in microgravity. The doubly labeled water technique determines carbon dioxide production which is then used to calculate energy expenditure. The method relies on the equilibrium between oxygen in respiratory carbon dioxide and oxygen in body water. Because of this equilibrium, the kinetic of water turnover and respiration are interdependent. Under normal conditions, man contains small but significant amounts of deuterium and oxygen 18. Deuterium is eliminated from the body as water while oxygen 18 is eliminated as water and carbon dioxide. The difference in the turnover rates in the two isotopes is proportional to the carbon dioxide production. Deliberately enriching the total body water with both of these isotopes allows the isotope turnovers to be accurately measured in urine, plasma, or saliva samples. The samples are taken to the laboratory for analysis using an ion-ratio spectrometer.

  1. Thermochemical cyclic system for splitting water and/or carbon dioxide by means of cerium compounds and reactions useful therein

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.; Robinson, P.R.

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen from water comprises reacting ceric oxide with monobasic or dibasic alkali metal phosphate to yield a solid reaction product, oxygen and water. The solid reaction product, alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate, and water, are reacted to yield hydrogen, ceric oxide, carbon dioxide and trialkali metal phosphate. Ceric oxide is recycled. Trialkali metal phosphate, carbon dioxide and water are reacted to yield monobasic or dibasic alkali metal phosphate and alkali metal bicarbonate, which are recycled. The cyclic process can be modified for producing carbon monoxide from carbon dioxide by reacting the alkali metal cerous phosphate and alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate in the absence of water to produce carbon monoxide, ceric oxide, carbon dioxide and trialkali metal phosphate. Carbon monoxide can be converted to hydrogen by the water gas shift reaction.

  2. Thermochemical cyclic system for splitting water and/or carbon dioxide by means of cerium compounds and reactions useful therein

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1980-01-01

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen from water comprises reacting ceric oxide with monobasic or dibasic alkali metal phosphate to yield a solid reaction product, oxygen and water. The solid reaction product, alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate, and water, are reacted to yield hydrogen, ceric oxide, carbon dioxide and trialkali metal phosphate. Ceric oxide is recycled. Trialkali metal phosphate, carbon dioxide and water are reacted to yield monobasic or dibasic alkali metal phosphate and alkali metal bicarbonate, which are recycled. The cylic process can be modified for producing carbon monoxide from carbon dioxide by reacting the alkali metal cerous phosphate and alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate in the absence of water to produce carbon monoxide, ceric oxide, carbon dioxide and trialkali metal phosphate. Carbon monoxide can be converted to hydrogen by the water gas shift reaction.

  3. Advances in Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor, Cirrus Clouds and Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Potter, John R.; Tola, Rebecca; Rush, Kurt; Veselovskii, Igor; Cadirola, Martin; Comer, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Narrow-band interference filters with improved transmission in the ultraviolet have been developed under NASA-funded research and used in the Raman Airborne Spectroscopic Lidar (RASL) in ground- based, upward-looking tests. RASL is an airborne Raman Lidar system designed to measure water vapor mixing ratio, and aerosol backscatter/extinction/depolarization. It also possesses the capability to make experimental measurements of cloud liquid water and carbon dioxide. It is being prepared for first flight tests during the summer of 2006. With the newly developed filters installed in RASL, measurements were made of atmospheric water vapor, cirrus cloud optical properties and carbon dioxide that improve upon any previously demonstrated using Raman lidar. Daytime boundary layer profiling of water vapor mixing ratio is performed with less than 5% random error using temporal and spatial resolution of 2-minutes and 60 - 210, respectively. Daytime cirrus cloud optical depth and extinction- to-backscatter ratio measurements are made using 1-minute average. Sufficient signal strength is demonstrated to permit the simultaneous profiling of carbon dioxide and water vapor mixing ratio into the free troposphere during the nighttime. Downward-looking from an airborne RASL should possess the same measurement statistics with approximately a factor of 5 - 10 decrease in averaging time. A description of the technology improvements are provided followed by examples of the improved Raman lidar measurements.

  4. Water Conservation in Kalanchoe blossfeldiana in Relation to Carbon Dioxide Dark Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Zabka, George G.; Chaturvedi, S. N.

    1975-01-01

    The succulent Kalanchoe blossfeldiana v. Poel. var Tom Thumb was treated on long and short photoperiods for 6 weeks during which short day plants developed thicker leaves, flowered prolifically, and exhibited extensive net dark fixation of carbon dioxide. In contrast, long day plants remained vegetative and did not develop thicker leaves or exhibit net carbon dioxide dark fixation. When examined after the photoperiodic state described, long day plants showed approximately three times more water loss over a 10-day period than short day plants. Water loss is similar during light and dark periods for short day plants but long day plants exhibited two times more water loss during the day than at night. The latter plants also lost three and one-half times more water during the light period than short day plants. The water conservation by short day plants is correlated with conditions of high carbon dioxide dark fixation and effects of its related Crassulacean acid metabolism on stomatal behavior. PMID:16659116

  5. Advances in Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor, Cirrus Clouds and Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Potter, John R.; Tola, Rebecca; Rush, Kurt; Veselovskii, Igor; Cadirola, Martin; Comer, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Narrow-band interference filters with improved transmission in the ultraviolet have been developed under NASA-funded research and used in the Raman Airborne Spectroscopic Lidar (RASL) in ground- based, upward-looking tests. RASL is an airborne Raman Lidar system designed to measure water vapor mixing ratio, and aerosol backscatter/extinction/depolarization. It also possesses the capability to make experimental measurements of cloud liquid water and carbon dioxide. It is being prepared for first flight tests during the summer of 2006. With the newly developed filters installed in RASL, measurements were made of atmospheric water vapor, cirrus cloud optical properties and carbon dioxide that improve upon any previously demonstrated using Raman lidar. Daytime boundary layer profiling of water vapor mixing ratio is performed with less than 5% random error using temporal and spatial resolution of 2-minutes and 60 - 210, respectively. Daytime cirrus cloud optical depth and extinction- to-backscatter ratio measurements are made using 1-minute average. Sufficient signal strength is demonstrated to permit the simultaneous profiling of carbon dioxide and water vapor mixing ratio into the free troposphere during the nighttime. Downward-looking from an airborne RASL should possess the same measurement statistics with approximately a factor of 5 - 10 decrease in averaging time. A description of the technology improvements are provided followed by examples of the improved Raman lidar measurements.

  6. Water vapor absorption of carbon dioxide laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S.; Menzies, R. T.; Margolis, J. S.; Rosengren, L.-G.

    1976-01-01

    An optoacoustic detector or spectrophone has been used to perform detailed measurements of the absorptivity of mixtures of water vapor in air. A (C-12) (O-16)2 laser was used as the source, and measurements were made at forty-nine different wavelengths from 9.2 to 10.7 microns. The details of the optoacoustic detector and its calibration are presented, along with a discussion of its performance characteristics. The results of the measurements of water vapor absorption show that the continuum absorption in the wavelength range covered is 5-10% lower than previous measurements.

  7. Potential Water and Energy Savings from Showerheads

    SciTech Connect

    Biermayer, Peter J.

    2005-09-28

    This paper estimates the benefits and costs of six water reduction scenarios. Benefits and costs of showerhead scenarios are ranked in this paper by an estimated water reduction percentage. To prioritize potential water and energy saving scenarios regarding showerheads, six scenarios were analyzed for their potential water and energy savings and the associated dollar savings to the consumer.

  8. Adsorption of carbon dioxide, methane, and their mixtures in porous carbons: effect of surface chemistry, water content, and pore disorder.

    PubMed

    Billemont, Pierre; Coasne, Benoit; De Weireld, Guy

    2013-03-12

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide, methane, and their mixtures in nanoporous carbons in the presence of water is studied using experiments and molecular simulations. Both the experimental and numerical samples contain polar groups that account for their partially hydrophilicity. For small amounts of adsorbed water, although the shape of the adsorption isotherms remain similar, both the molecular simulations and experiments show a slight decrease in the CO2 and CH4 adsorption amounts. For large amounts of adsorbed water, the experimental data suggest the formation of methane or carbon dioxide clathrates in agreement with previous work. In contrast, the molecular simulations do not account for the formation of such clathrates. Another important difference between the simulated and experimental data concerns the number of water molecules that desorb upon increasing the pressure of carbon dioxide and methane. Although the experimental data indicate that water remains adsorbed upon carbon dioxide and methane adsorption, the molecular simulations suggest that 40 to 75% of the initial amount of adsorbed water desorbs with carbon dioxide or methane pressure. Such discrepancies show that differences between the simulated and experimental samples are crucial to account for the rich phase behavior of confined water-gas systems. Our simulations for carbon dioxide-methane coadsorption in the presence of water suggest that the pore filling is not affected by the presence of water and that adsorbed solution theory can be applied for pressures as high as 15 MPa.

  9. CALCIUM OXIDE SINTERING IN ATMOSPHERES CONTAINING WATER AND CARBON DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of measurements of the effects of water vapor and CO2 on the sintering rate of nascent CaO, as a function of partial pressure and temperature using CaO prepared by rapid decomposition of CaCO3 and CA(OH)2. Each gas strongly catalyzed the sintering process ...

  10. CALCIUM OXIDE SINTERING IN ATMOSPHERES CONTAINING WATER AND CARBON DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of measurements of the effects of water vapor and CO2 on the sintering rate of nascent CaO, as a function of partial pressure and temperature using CaO prepared by rapid decomposition of CaCO3 and CA(OH)2. Each gas strongly catalyzed the sintering process ...

  11. Clean water and energy from hyacinths

    SciTech Connect

    Duffer, W.; Kellogg, J.

    1981-04-01

    Studies in 15 US cities and Japan on the water hyacinth show that the same characteristics which make it a nuisance - its ability to thrive in a variety of water systems - can make it a source of animal feed, soil mulch, energy, and water purification. The plant prefers slow-moving water enriched with the waste water from fields, factories, and residences. A water-hyacinth treatment facility is less expensive and uses less energy than conventional facilities. (DCK)

  12. Subduction fluxes of water, carbon dioxide, chlorine, and potassium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrard, Richard D.

    2003-05-01

    The alteration of upper oceanic crust entails growth of hydrous minerals and loss of macroporosity, with associated large-scale fluxes of H2O, CO2, Cl-, and K2O between seawater and crust. This age-dependent alteration can be quantified by combining a conceptual alteration model with observed age-dependent changes in crustal geophysical properties at DSDP/ODP sites, permitting estimation of crustal concentrations of H2O, CO2, Cl-, and K2O, given crustal age. Surprisingly, low-temperature alteration causes no net change in total water; pore water loss is nearly identical to bound water gain. Net change in total crustal K2O is also smaller than expected; the obvious low-temperature enrichment is partly offset by earlier high-temperature depletion, and most crustal K2O is primary rather than secondary. I calculate crustal concentrations of H2O, CO2, Cl-, and K2O for 41 modern subduction zones, thereby determining their modern mass fluxes both for individual subduction zones and globally. This data set is complemented by published flux determinations for subducting sediments at 26 of these subduction zones. Global mass fluxes among oceans, oceanic crust, continental crust, and mantle are calculated for H2O, Cl-, and K2O. Except for the present major imbalance between sedimentation and sediment subduction, most fluxes appear to be at or near steady state. I estimate that half to two thirds of subducted crustal water is later refluxed at the prism toe; most of the remaining water escapes at subarc depths, triggering partial melting. The flux of subducted volatiles, however, does not appear to correlate with either rate of arc magma generation or magnitude of interplate earthquakes.

  13. Binding of oxygen with titanium dioxide on singlet potential energy surface: An ab initio investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanchikov, Georgii A.; Baklanov, Alexey V.

    2017-01-01

    Ab initio calculations have been carried out to investigate interaction of titanium dioxide TiO2 with oxygen O2 in ground triplet and excited singlet states. On a singlet potential energy surface (PES) formation of a stable compound of titanium peroxide TiO4 is revealed which should appear in reaction of TiO2 with singlet oxygen without activation barrier. This peroxide is lower in energy than the ground state of two individual molecules TiO2 + 3O2 by 34.6 kcal/mol. Location of conical intersection between triplet and singlet PESs of TiO2sbnd O2 is also investigated.

  14. The use of renewable energy in the form of methane via electrolytic hydrogen generation using carbon dioxide as the feedstock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Kumagai, Naokazu; Izumiya, Koichi; Takano, Hiroyuki; Shinomiya, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Yusuke; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Kato, Zenta

    2016-12-01

    The history reveals the continuous increase in world energy consumption and carbon emissions. For prevention of intolerable global warming and complete exhaustion of fossil fuels we need complete conversion from fossil fuel consumption to renewable energy. We have been performing the research and development of global carbon dioxide recycling for more than 25 years to supply renewable energy to the world in the form of methane produced by the reaction of carbon dioxide captured from chimney with hydrogen generated electrolytically using electricity generated by renewable energy. We created the cathode and anode for electrolytic hydrogen generation and the catalyst for carbon dioxide methanation by the reaction with hydrogen. The methane formation from renewable energy will be the most convenient and efficient key technology for the use of renewable energy by storage of intermittent and fluctuating electricity generated from renewable energy and by regeneration of stable electricity. Domestic and international cooperation of companies for industrialization is in progress.

  15. Carbon dioxide recovery from cogeneration and energy projects: A technically, environmentally, and economically feasible option

    SciTech Connect

    Rushing, S.A.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, the topics of carbon dioxide recovery from cogeneration projects and related industrial usage of carbon dioxide will be covered from North American and international perspectives. The CO{sub 2} recovery discussion will largely focus on one particular technology, namely the application of proprietary monoethanolamine (MEA) solvents, which have a very satisfactory record of performance in the cogeneration and power production industries. The US Federal Energy Act, the impetus behind the development of such projects, will be discussed along with its impacts on the feasibility of U.S. projects. This subject would be reviewed for other developed countries and developing economies as well. Moreover, capital and operating costs and requirements will be summarized for such plants, plus existing CO{sub 2} recovery (from cogeneration) projects will be identified.

  16. Subduction Fluxes of Water, Carbon Dioxide, Chlorine, and Potassium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrard, R. D.

    2002-12-01

    The alteration of upper oceanic crust entails growth of hydrous minerals and loss of macroporosity, with associated large-scale fluxes of H2O, CO2, Cl-, and K2O between seawater and crust. This age-dependent alteration can be quantified by combining a conceptual alteration model with observed age-dependent changes in crustal geophysical properties at DSDP/ODP sites, permitting estimation of crustal concentrations of H2O, CO2, Cl-, and K2O, given crustal age. Surprisingly, low-temperature alteration causes no net change in total water; pore water loss is nearly identical to H2O+ gain. The overall alteration effect on total crustal content of K2O is also smaller than expected; the obvious low-temperature enrichment is partly offset by earlier high-temperature depletion, and most crustal K2O is primary rather than secondary. We calculate crustal concentrations of H2O, CO2, Cl-, and K2O for 41 modern subduction zones, thereby determining their modern mass fluxes both for individual subduction zones and globally. This dataset is complemented by published flux determinations for subducting sediments at 26 of these subduction zones. Global mass fluxes among oceans, oceanic crust, continental crust, and mantle are calculated for H2O, Cl-, and K2O. Except for the present major imbalance between sedimentation and sediment subduction, most fluxes appear to be at or near steady-state. We estimate that half to two thirds of subducted crustal water is later refluxed at the prism toe; most of the remaining water escapes at subarc depths, triggering partial melting. The flux of subducted volatiles, however, does not appear to correlate with either rate of arc magma generation or magnitude of interplate earthquakes.

  17. Growth, yield and plant water relationships in sweet potatoes in response to carbon dioxide enrichment: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    In the summer of 1985, under the joint program of US Department of Energy, Carbon Dioxide Division, and Tuskegee University, experiments were conducted to study growth, yield, photosynthesis and plant water relationships in sweet potato plants grown in an enriched CO/sub 2/ environment. The main experiment utilized open top chambers to study the effects of CO/sub 2/ and soil moisture on growth, yield and photosynthesis of field-grown plants. In addition, potted plants in open top chambers were utilized in a study of the effects of different CO/sub 2/ concentrations on growth pattern, relative growth rate, net assimilation rate and biomass increment at different stages of development. The interaction effects of enriched CO/sub 2/ and water stress on biomass production, yield, xylem potential, and stomatal conductance were also investigated. 29 refs., 18 figs., 41 tabs.

  18. Effect of pipe corrosion scales on chlorine dioxide consumption in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Stout, Janet E; Yu, Victor L; Vidic, Radisav

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies showed that temperature and total organic carbon in drinking water would cause chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) loss in a water distribution system and affect the efficiency of ClO(2) for Legionella control. However, among the various causes of ClO(2) loss in a drinking water distribution system, the loss of disinfectant due to the reaction with corrosion scales has not been studied in detail. In this study, the corrosion scales from a galvanized iron pipe and a copper pipe that have been in service for more than 10 years were characterized by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The impact of these corrosion scale materials on ClO(2) decay was investigated in de-ionized water at 25 and 45 degrees C in a batch reactor with floating glass cover. ClO(2) decay was also investigated in a specially designed reactor made from the iron and copper pipes to obtain more realistic reaction rate data. Goethite (alpha-FeOOH) and magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) were identified as the main components of iron corrosion scale. Cuprite (Cu(2)O) was identified as the major component of copper corrosion scale. The reaction rate of ClO(2) with both iron and copper oxides followed a first-order kinetics. First-order decay rate constants for ClO(2) reactions with iron corrosion scales obtained from the used service pipe and in the iron pipe reactor itself ranged from 0.025 to 0.083 min(-1). The decay rate constant for ClO(2) with Cu(2)O powder and in the copper pipe reactor was much smaller and it ranged from 0.0052 to 0.0062 min(-1). Based on these results, it can be concluded that the corrosion scale will cause much more significant ClO(2) loss in corroded iron pipes of the distribution system than the total organic carbon that may be present in finished water.

  19. Causal nexus between energy consumption and carbon dioxide emission for Malaysia using maximum entropy bootstrap approach.

    PubMed

    Gul, Sehrish; Zou, Xiang; Hassan, Che Hashim; Azam, Muhammad; Zaman, Khalid

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the relationship between energy consumption and carbon dioxide emission in the causal framework, as the direction of causality remains has a significant policy implication for developed and developing countries. The study employed maximum entropy bootstrap (Meboot) approach to examine the causal nexus between energy consumption and carbon dioxide emission using bivariate as well as multivariate framework for Malaysia, over a period of 1975-2013. This is a unified approach without requiring the use of conventional techniques based on asymptotical theory such as testing for possible unit root and cointegration. In addition, it can be applied in the presence of non-stationary of any type including structural breaks without any type of data transformation to achieve stationary. Thus, it provides more reliable and robust inferences which are insensitive to time span as well as lag length used. The empirical results show that there is a unidirectional causality running from energy consumption to carbon emission both in the bivariate model and multivariate framework, while controlling for broad money supply and population density. The results indicate that Malaysia is an energy-dependent country and hence energy is stimulus to carbon emissions.

  20. Water-based colourimetric optical indicators for the detection of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Mills, Andrew; Skinner, Graham A

    2010-08-01

    Water-based colourimetric indicator films are shown to have increased operational lifetimes under ambient conditions compared to similar solvent-based counterparts. The response and sensitivity characteristics of a water-based, carbon dioxide-responsive ink are characterised and compared and contrasted to those of a similar solvent-based indicator. The changes in the response characteristics of the ink as a function of the amount of base (sodium hydrogen carbonate) and plasticizer (glycerol) contained in the ink are reported, as are the effects of varying ambient temperature and humidity. The ink is incorporated into a felt tip pen and applied to a number of different substrates, producing a distinct, reversible colour change on all tested surfaces, when a sufficient level of carbon dioxide is present. The possible application of the indicator is discussed briefly.

  1. Carbon dioxide and water fluxes in grasslands of Inner Mongolia (China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, S.; Ketzer, B.; Grünwald, T.; Bernhofer, Ch.

    2009-04-01

    Grasslands are one of the dominating vegetation types in the world. In China grasslands capture 400 Mha. This huge area has great influence on water and carbon stocks and fluxes. Water and carbon exchange influence the local concentration of greenhouse gases. In the steppe of Inner Mongolia there are problems of overgrazing, erosion and ongoing desertification. Through these processes the seasonal patterns of the water and carbon cycles are changed. Within the project MAGIM (Matter fluxes in grasslands of Inner Mongolia as influenced by stocking rate), which is a multidisciplinary project bringing together German and Chinese expertise, matter fluxes were measured with eddy covariance method. In this study the results of MAGIM concerning the carbon dioxide and water fluxes were presented. The study site is in the Xilin River catchment in the Northeast of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China. The region is a continental temperate semiarid zone with cold dry winters and warm humid summers. The annual mean temperature is about 2 °C and the annual precipitation is 350 mm. The EC-measurements include measurements at different steppe types (Leymus chinensis, Stipa grandis) and various land use (overgrazed, winter grazed, continuously crazed, ungrazed since 1979) by one permanent and by two roving towers. From 2002 to 2004 there were continuous measurements at the ungrazed site (Leymus chinensis). The roving tower was used in the vegetation period at the other sites. From 2005 a third tower was available to measure at the overgrazed site continuously. The results show large differences in the carbon dioxide fluxes of the various land use. In general the carbon dioxide fluxes are small in Inner Mongolia. At the ungrazed site the results show negative net carbon exchange (CO2 sink). The positive net carbon exchange at overgrazed site indicates a CO2 source. The partially grazed sites switch between CO2 sink and source dependent on the environmental conditions. Lower

  2. New demands, new supplies : a national look at the water balance of carbon dioxide capture and sequestration.

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, James Lee; McNemar, Andrea , Morgantown, WV); Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2010-12-01

    Concerns over rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have resulted in serious consideration of policies aimed at reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. If large scale abatement efforts are undertaken, one critical tool will be geologic sequestration of CO2 captured from large point sources, specifically coal and natural gas fired power plants. Current CO2 capture technologies exact a substantial energy penalty on the source power plant, which must be offset with make-up power. Water demands increase at the source plant due to added cooling loads. In addition, new water demand is created by water requirements associated with generation of the make-up power. At the sequestration site however, saline water may be extracted to manage CO2 plum migration and pressure build up in the geologic formation. Thus, while CO2 capture creates new water demands, CO2 sequestration has the potential to create new supplies. Some or all of the added demand may be offset by treatment and use of the saline waters extracted from geologic formations during CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories, with guidance and support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, is creating a model to evaluate the potential for a combined approach to saline formations, as a sink for CO2 and a source for saline waters that can be treated and beneficially reused to serve power plant water demands. This presentation will focus on the magnitude of added U.S. power plant water demand under different CO2 emissions reduction scenarios, and the portion of added demand that might be offset by saline waters extracted during the CO2 sequestration process.

  3. New Demands, New Supplies: A National Look at the Water Balance of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, J. D.; Kobos, P.; Klise, G. T.; Krumhansl, J. L.; McNemar, A.

    2010-12-01

    Concerns over rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have resulted in serious consideration of policies aimed at reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. If large scale abatement efforts are undertaken, one critical tool will be geologic sequestration of CO2 captured from large point sources, specifically coal and natural gas fired power plants. Current CO2 capture technologies exact a substantial energy penalty on the source power plant, which must be offset with make-up power. Water demands increase at the source plant due to added cooling loads. In addition, new water demand is created by water requirements associated with generation of the make-up power. At the sequestration site however, saline water may be extracted to manage CO2 plum migration and pressure build up in the geologic formation. Thus, while CO2 capture creates new water demands, CO2 sequestration has the potential to create new supplies. Some or all of the added demand may be offset by treatment and use of the saline waters extracted from geologic formations during CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories, with guidance and support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, is creating a model to evaluate the potential for a combined approach to saline formations, as a sink for CO2 and a source for saline waters that can be treated and beneficially reused to serve power plant water demands. This presentation will focus on the magnitude of added U.S. power plant water demand under different CO2 emissions reduction scenarios, and the portion of added demand that might be offset by saline waters extracted during the CO2 sequestration process. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Reaction of Calcium Silicates with Carbon Dioxide and Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-26

    for Ca3SiO5 to 22.9 kcal/mole for CaSiO3 . The reaction products were calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and a calcium silicate hydrate of variable...Ca3SiO5, beta-Ca2SiO4, and gamma-Ca2SiO4 if free water is present. Aragonite forms in the absence of free H2O and in the carbonation of CaSiO3 . The

  5. Surface Chemistry and Tribology of Copper Surfaces in Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-23

    state that the copper brushes in the superconducting homopolar motor experience wear at rates greater than 3X10" wear /distance traveled when biased...positively. It has been found the motor operates best in an atmosphere of carbon dioxide and water vapor. The objective of our research therefore is...possible to prepare different chemical states of the Cu, as those produced in the motor electrodes under positive and negative bias. In situ XAS

  6. Application of Carbon Dioxide Treatment to Manage Scale in Building Potable Water Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    the upper residential floors in Doak Hall 45 28 Device for monitoring scale removal and corrosion 46 29 Effect of ph 5.5 on metal concentrations 47 30...38 7 Results of Scale Removal Experiments 39 8 Results of Corrosion Tests 39 9 Mineral Equilibrium Analyses for (Old) 1944 and (New) 1989 Water...although care is necessary to prevent pipe corrosion once the scale is completely eliminated. Carbon dioxide is much easier and safer to handle than

  7. Consequences of CO2 solubility for hydrate formation from carbon dioxide containing water and other impurities.

    PubMed

    Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Jensen, Bjørnar; Stensholt, Sigvat; Bauman, Jordan; Sjøblom, Sara; Nes Lervik, Kim

    2014-05-14

    Deciding on the upper bound of water content permissible in a stream of dense carbon dioxide under pipeline transport conditions without facing the risks of hydrate formation is a complex issue. In this work, we outline and analyze ten primary routes of hydrate formation inside a rusty pipeline, with hydrogen sulfide, methane, argon, and nitrogen as additional impurities. A comprehensive treatment of equilibrium absolute thermodynamics as applied to multiple hydrate phase transitions is provided. We also discuss in detail the implications of the Gibbs phase rule that make it necessary to consider non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The analysis of hydrate formation risk has been revised for the dominant routes, including the one traditionally considered in industrial practice and hydrate calculators. The application of absolute thermodynamics with parameters derived from atomistic simulations leads to several important conclusions regarding the impact of hydrogen sulfide. When present at studied concentrations below 5 mol%, the presence of hydrogen sulfide will only support the carbon-dioxide-dominated hydrate formation on the phase interface between liquid water and hydrate formers entering from the carbon dioxide phase. This is in contrast to a homogeneous hydrate nucleation and growth inside the aqueous solution bulk. Our case studies indicate that hydrogen sulfide at higher than 0.1 mol% concentration in carbon dioxide can lead to growth of multiple hydrate phases immediately adjacent to the adsorbed water layers. We conclude that hydrate formation via water adsorption on rusty pipeline walls will be the dominant contributor to the hydrate formation risk, with initial concentration of hydrogen sulfide being the critical factor.

  8. Carbon dioxide and the stomatal control of water balance and photosynthesis in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Taiz, L.; Zeiger, E.; Mawson, B. T.; Cornish, K.; Radin, J. W.; Turcotte, E. L.; Hercovitz, S.; Tallman, G.; Karlsson, P. E.; Bogomolni, R. A.; Talbott, L. D.; Srivastava, A.

    1992-01-01

    Research continued into the investigation of the effects of carbon dioxide on stomatal control of water balance and photosynthesis in higher plants. Topics discussed this period include a method of isolating a sufficient number of guard cell chloroplasts for biochemical studies by mechanical isolation of epidermal peels; the measurement of stomatal apertures with a digital image analysis system; development of a high performance liquid chromatography method for quantification of metabolites in guard cells; and genetic control of stomatal movements in Pima cotton. (CBS)

  9. The effect of plutonium dioxide water surface coverage on the generation of hydrogen and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Veirs, Douglas K.; Berg, John M.; Crowder, Mark L.

    2012-06-20

    The conditions for the production of oxygen during radiolysis of water adsorbed onto plutonium dioxide powder are discussed. Studies in the literature investigating the radiolysis of water show that both oxygen and hydrogen can be generated from water adsorbed on high-purity plutonium dioxide powder. These studies indicate that there is a threshold in the amount of water below which oxygen is not generated. The threshold is associated with the number of monolayers of adsorbed water and is shown to occur at approximately two monolayers of molecularly adsorbed water. Material in equilibrium with 50% relative humidity (RH) will be at the threshold for oxygen generation. Using two monolayers of molecularly adsorbed water as the threshold for oxygen production, the total pressure under various conditions is calculated assuming stoichiometric production of hydrogen and oxygen. The specific surface area of the oxide has a strong effect on the final partial pressure. The specific surface areas resulting in the highest pressures within a 3013 container are evaluated. The potential for oxygen generation is mitigated by reduced relative humidity, and hence moisture adsorption, at the oxide surface which occurs if the oxide is warmer than the ambient air. The potential for oxygen generation approaches zero as the temperature difference between the ambient air and the material approaches 6 C.

  10. Comparison of commercial analytical techniques for measuring chlorine dioxide in urban desalinated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ammar, T A; Abid, K Y; El-Bindary, A A; El-Sonbati, A Z

    2015-12-01

    Most drinking water industries are closely examining options to maintain a certain level of disinfectant residual through the entire distribution system. Chlorine dioxide is one of the promising disinfectants that is usually used as a secondary disinfectant, whereas the selection of the proper monitoring analytical technique to ensure disinfection and regulatory compliance has been debated within the industry. This research endeavored to objectively compare the performance of commercially available analytical techniques used for chlorine dioxide measurements (namely, chronoamperometry, DPD (N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine), Lissamine Green B (LGB WET) and amperometric titration), to determine the superior technique. The commonly available commercial analytical techniques were evaluated over a wide range of chlorine dioxide concentrations. In reference to pre-defined criteria, the superior analytical technique was determined. To discern the effectiveness of such superior technique, various factors, such as sample temperature, high ionic strength, and other interferences that might influence the performance were examined. Among the four techniques, chronoamperometry technique indicates a significant level of accuracy and precision. Furthermore, the various influencing factors studied did not diminish the technique's performance where it was fairly adequate in all matrices. This study is a step towards proper disinfection monitoring and it confidently assists engineers with chlorine dioxide disinfection system planning and management.

  11. Reducing the chlorine dioxide demand in final disinfection of drinking water treatment plants using activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Maria Cristina; Crotti, Barbara Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is one of the most widely employed chemicals in the disinfection process of a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP). The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of the adsorption process with granular activated carbon (GAC) on the chlorine dioxide consumption in final oxidation/disinfection. A first series of tests was performed at the laboratory scale employing water samples collected at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter of Cremona (Italy). The adsorption process in batch conditions with seven different types of GAC was studied. A second series of tests was performed on water samples collected at the outlet of four GAC columns installed at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter. The results showed that the best chlorine dioxide demand (ClO2-D) reduction yields are equal to 60-80% and are achieved in the first 30 min after ClO2 addition, during the first 16 days of the column operation using a mineral, coal-based, mesoporous GAC. Therefore, this carbon removes organic compounds that are more rapidly reactive with ClO2. Moreover, a good correlation was found between the ClO2-D and UV absorbance at wavelength 254 nm using mineral carbons; therefore, the use of a mineral mesoporous GAC is an effective solution to control the high ClO2-D in the disinfection stage of a DWTP.

  12. Energy's thirst for water in China.

    PubMed

    Cai, Beiming; Zhang, Bing; Bi, Jun; Zhang, Wenjing

    2014-10-21

    Water scarcity and uneven water distribution pose significant challenges to sustainable development and energy production in China. Based on the International Energy Agency (IEA)'s energy strategy scenarios for China, we evaluated the water withdrawal for energy production from 2011 to 2030. The results show that the amount of water withdrawal will be increased by 77% in 2030, which will aggravate China's water scarcity risk under current energy strategy. We also observed that 67% of the energy production in China occurs in areas that are facing water scarcity. Moreover, China's 12th Five-Year Plan of Energy Development does not change the existing energy strategies, and the planned total energy production is much higher than the IEA's projection, which will result in an increased demand for water resources. However, if China were to apply broad policies to reduce CO2 emissions, the amount of water withdrawal would also decline compared with current energy strategy. Thus, reforming China's energy structure and reducing energy usage are not only urgent because of climate challenges and air pollution but also essential to reducing the pressure of water scarcity.

  13. Interference of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor on the analysis for oxides of nitrogen by chemiluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.

    1975-01-01

    The interference of small concentrations (less than 4 percent by volume) of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor on the analysis for oxides of nitrogen by chemiluminescence was measured. The sample gas consisted primarily of nitrogen, with less than 100 parts per million concentration of nitric oxide, and with small concentrations of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor added. Results obtained under these conditions indicate that although oxygen does not measurably affect the analysis for nitric oxide, the presence of carbon dioxide and water vapor causes the indicated nitric oxide concentration to be too low. An interference factor - defined as the percentage change in indicated nitric oxide concentration (relative to the true nitric oxide concentration) divided by the percent interfering gas present - was determined for carbon dioxide to be -0.60 + or - 0.04 and for water vapor to be -2.1 + or - 0.3.

  14. Carbon dioxide releases from fossil-fuel burning: Statement before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Marland G.; Boden, T.

    1989-07-26

    Discussion of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere is given. There are three kinds of human activity that are currently resulting in net release of carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) to the atmosphere: burning fossil fuels, converting tropical forest area to other land use, and manufacturing cement. Although it is a comparatively small source of CO/sub 2/, cement manufacture involves the calcining of limestone (calcium carbonate) to produce calcium oxide. The associated CO/sub 2/ emissions are included in the figures that follow. Production of one metric ton of cement results in the release of 0.136 metric tons of carbon as CO/sub 2/. (This does not count the fuel used in the processing). When forest area is cleared and converted to land uses that have smaller inventories of carbon in the biota and in the surface liter and soil, there is a net release of carbon to become CO/sub 2/ in the atmosphere. Every cubic meter of timber burned releases about 0.26 metric tons of carbon as CO/sub 2/ to the atmosphere, and forest clearing generally results in a release of additional carbon from the soil and surface litter. When fossil fuels are burned, carbon that has been long stored in the earth is oxidized and released to the atmosphere as CO/sub 2/. Because fossil-fuel burning releases heat from the oxidation of both carbon (to produce carbon dioxide) and hydrogen (to produce water), and because the different fuel forms contain different ratios of carbon to hydrogen, the amount of CO/sub 2/ produced per unit of energy released is different for the various fuel forms. 14 figs.

  15. Amino acid synthesis in a supercritical carbon dioxide - water system.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-06-15

    Mars is a CO(2)-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO(2)-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO(2)/liquid H(2)O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life's origin.

  16. Amino Acid Synthesis in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide - Water System

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Mars is a CO2-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO2-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO2/liquid H2O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life’s origin. PMID:19582225

  17. Managing the urban water-energy nexus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escriva-Bou, Alvar; Pulido-Velazquez, Manuel; Lund, Jay R.

    2016-04-01

    Water use directly causes a significant amount of energy use in cities. In this paper we assess energy and greenhouse emissions related with each part of the urban water cycle and the consequences of several changes in residential water use for customers, water and energy utilities, and the environment. First, we develop an hourly model of urban water uses by customer category including water-related energy consumption. Next, using real data from East Bay Municipal Utility District in California, we calibrate a model of the energy used in water supply, treatment, pumping and wastewater treatment by the utility. Then, using data from the California Independent System Operator, we obtain hourly costs of energy for the energy utility. Finally, and using emission factors reported by the energy utilities we estimate greenhouse gas emissions for the entire urban water cycle. Results of the business-as-usual scenario show that water end uses account for almost 95% of all water-related energy use, but the 5% managed by the utility is still worth over 12 million annually. Several simulations analyze the potential benefits for water demand management actions showing that moving some water end-uses from peak to off-peak hours such as outdoor use, dishwasher or clothes washer use have large benefits for water and energy utilities, especially for locations with a high proportion of electric water heaters. Other interesting result is that under the current energy rate structures with low or no fixed charges, energy utilities burden most of the cost of the conservation actions.

  18. Graduate student theses supported by Carbon Dioxide Research Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Millemann, R.E.

    1987-09-01

    The US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Division (CDRD) has a strong commitment to support graduate education. The purpose of this report was to summarize information on thesis research supported by CDRD and to make it available to carbon dioxide researchers and other interested persons. To date, 25 Ph.D. and 23 Master's theses, including 4 internship reports for the M.En. degree from Miami University, have been written based on research supported in whole or in part by CDRD funds. Of these, 16 are in the Carbon Cycle area, 11 relate to Climate, 17 to Vegetation Response, 3 to Sea Level, and 4 pertain to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center with a few theses relevant to more than one area. The following four lists appear in this report: An Author List with the complete thesis citation, names of the major professor, major department, and contractor, and contract number. A Contractor List with the affiliation of each contractor and the thesis research supported by that contractor. A Program Area List with the theses grouped by subject area. Finally, a University List with the theses grouped by the degree-granting institutions.

  19. Biphasic catalysis in water/carbon dioxide micellar systems

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Gunilla B.; Tumas, William; Johnston, Keith P.

    2002-01-01

    A process is provided for catalyzing an organic reaction to form a reaction product by placing reactants and a catalyst for the organic reaction, the catalyst of a metal complex and at least one ligand soluble within one of the phases of said aqueous biphasic system, within an aqueous biphasic system including a water phase, a dense phase fluid, and a surfactant adapted for forming an emulsion or microemulsion within the aqueous biphasic system, the reactants soluble within one of the phases of the aqueous biphasic system and convertible in the presence of the catalyst to a product having low solubility in the phase in which the catalyst is soluble; and, maintaining the aqueous biphasic system under pressures, at temperatures, and for a period of time sufficient for the organic reaction to occur and form the reaction product and to maintain sufficient density on the dense phase fluid, the reaction product characterized as having low solubility in the phase in which the catalyst is soluble.

  20. Polyoxometalate complexes of anatase-titanium dioxide cores in water.

    PubMed

    Raula, Manoj; Gan Or, Gal; Saganovich, Marina; Zeiri, Offer; Wang, Yifeng; Chierotti, Michele R; Gobetto, Roberto; Weinstock, Ira A

    2015-10-12

    Polyoxometalate (POM) cluster anions are shown to serve as covalently coordinated ligands for anatase-TiO2 nanocrystals, giving isolable assemblies uniquely positioned between molecular macroanions and traditional colloidal nanoparticles. Na(+) salts of the water-soluble polyanionic structures are obtained by reacting amorphous TiO2 with the 1 nm lacunary ion, Na7 [α-XW11 O39 ] (X=P(5+) ), at 170 °C, after which an average of 55 α-PW11 O39 (7-) clusters are found as pentadentate ligands for Ti(IV) ions covalently linked to 6 nm single-crystal anatase cores. The attached POMs are reversible electron acceptors, the reduction potentials of which shift in a predictable fashion by changing the central heteroatom, X, directly influencing a model catalytic reaction. Just as POM cluster anions control the reactivities of metal centers in molecular complexes, directly coordinated POM ligands with tunable redox potentials now provide new options for rationally controlling the reactions of semiconductor nanocrystals. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Insights from a network of long-term measurements of biosphere-atmospheric exchanges of water vapor and carbon dioxide in a water-limited semiarid region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Russell; Biederman, Joel

    2017-04-01

    Around one-third of Earth's land surface is classified as semiarid, and carbon dioxide exchange in these regions has been shown to be an important regulator of both the trend and interannual variability of the terrestrial carbon sink. Fifteen years ago, when we began making measurements of biosphere-atmospheric exchanges of energy, water vapor, and carbon dioxide using eddy covariance in southern Arizona USA, there was paucity of semiarid observations in flux networks like AmeriFlux and EuroFlux. We started by establishing riparian sites across a woody plant encroachment gradient to quantify the productivity and consumptive plant water use along a iconic and ecologically important desert river. Soon thereafter, we added semiarid grassland, shrubland, and savanna sites that do not have access to groundwater in order to better understand how water limitation and changes in vegetation structure affect ecosystem productivity. Here, we highlight the value of multiyear, multisite flux data for addressing regional to global scale problems associated with groundwater pumping, land cover change, drought, and climate change. For the riparian sites, we find that ecosystem water availability is altered by vegetation structure such that ecosystems with more deeply rooted trees have higher productivity but at a cost of greater groundwater use. For the non-riparian sites, precipitation strongly controls ecosystem water availability and the resultant productivity, but differences in ecosystem structure impact water use efficiency due to the partitioning of evapotranspiration into its component sources. Also, the productivity at sites with more grass, and less woody, plants responds more quickly to precipitation fluctuations including long-term drought conditions. In semiarid regions, variability in water and carbon fluxes is much larger than in more mesic climes. Across our riparian and non-riparian sites, access to more stable groundwater reserves reduces variability in water and

  2. Underground coal gasification with integrated carbon dioxide mitigation supports Bulgaria's low carbon energy supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaten, Natalie; Kempka, Thomas; Azzam, Rafig

    2013-04-01

    Underground coal gasification allows for the utilisation of coal reserves that are economically not exploitable due to complex geological boundary conditions. The present study investigates underground coal gasification as a potential economic approach for conversion of deep-seated coals into a high-calorific synthesis gas to support the Bulgarian energy system. Coupling of underground coal gasification providing synthesis gas to fuel a combined cycle gas turbine with carbon capture and storage is considered to provide substantial benefits in supporting the Bulgarian energy system with a competitive source of energy. In addition, underground voids originating from coal consumption increase the potential for geological storage of carbon dioxide resulting from the coupled process of energy production. Cost-effectiveness, energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions of this coupled process are investigated by application of a techno-economic model specifically developed for that purpose. Capital (CAPEX) and operational expenditure (OPEX) are derived from calculations using six dynamic sub-models describing the entire coupled process and aiming at determination of the levelised costs of electricity generation (COE). The techno-economic model is embedded into an energy system-modelling framework to determine the potential integration of the introduced low carbon energy production technology into the Bulgarian energy system and its competitiveness at the energy market. For that purpose, boundary conditions resulting from geological settings as well as those determined by the Bulgarian energy system and its foreseeable future development have to be considered in the energy system-modelling framework. These tasks comprise integration of the present infrastructure of the Bulgarian energy production and transport system. Hereby, the knowledge on the existing power plant stock and its scheduled future development are of uttermost importance, since only phasing-out power

  3. Photoelectrochemical water splitting at titanium dioxide nanotubes coated with tungsten trioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong Hyeok; Park, O. Ok; Kim, Sungwook

    2006-10-01

    The photocatalytic splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen using solar light is a potentially clean and renewable source for hydrogen fuel. Titanium oxide nanotubes coated with tungsten oxide were prepared to harvest more solar light for the first time and characterized their water splitting efficiency. The tungsten trioxide coatings significantly enhanced the visible spectrum absorption of the titanium dioxide nanotube array, as well as their solar-spectrum induced photocurrents. For the sample, upon white light illumination at 150mW/cm2, hydrogen gas generated at the overall conversion efficiency of 0.87%.

  4. To estimation of the fluxes of carbon dioxide in the Lake Baikal water-atmosphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestunov, D. A.; Panchenko, Mikhail V.; Domysheva, V. M.; Belan, Boris D.

    2004-12-01

    Separate many-day series of measurements of the carbon dioxide concentration were carried out at the stationary site of the Limnological Institute SB RAS near village Bol"shie Koty in July, August and October 2003. The CO2 fluxes from the water surface are estimated. Maximum amplitude of the diurnal variations of the CO2 concentration in the chamber in August was 100 ppmV, and minimum was 45 ppmV. Comparison with the results of measurements in the atmosphere and the data on the CO2 content in the near-surface water of Lake Baikal is performed.

  5. Application of Vacuum Swing Adsorption for Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Removal from Manned Spacecraft Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, J.; Fulda, P.; Howard, D.; Ritter, J.; Levan, M.

    2007-01-01

    The design and testing of a vacuum-swing adsorption process to remove metabolic 'water and carbon dioxide gases from NASA's Orion crew exploration vehicle atmosphere is presented. For the Orion spacecraft, the sorbent-based atmosphere revitalization (SBAR) system must remove all metabolic water, a technology approach 1Lhathas not been used in previous spacecraft life support systems. Design and testing of a prototype SBAR in sub-scale and full-scale configurations is discussed. Experimental and analytical investigations of dual-ended and single-ended vacuum desorption are presented. An experimental investigation of thermal linking between adsorbing and desorbing columns is also presented.

  6. Photoelectrochemical water splitting at titanium dioxide nanotubes coated with tungsten trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong Hyeok; Park, O Ok; Kim, Sungwook

    2006-10-16

    The photocatalytic splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen using solar light is a potentially clean and renewable source for hydrogen fuel. Titanium oxide nanotubes coated with tungsten oxide were prepared to harvest more solar light for the first time and characterized their water splitting efficiency. The tungsten trioxide coatings significantly enhanced the visible spectrum absorption of the titanium dioxide nanotube array, as well as their solar-spectrum induced photocurrents. For the sample, upon white light illumination at 150 mW/cm{sup 2}, hydrogen gas generated at the overall conversion efficiency of 0.87%.

  7. Application of Vacuum Swing Adsorption for Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Removal from Manned Spacecraft Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, J.; Fulda, P.; Howard, D.; Ritter, J.; Levan, M.

    2007-01-01

    The design and testing of a vacuum-swing adsorption process to remove metabolic 'water and carbon dioxide gases from NASA's Orion crew exploration vehicle atmosphere is presented. For the Orion spacecraft, the sorbent-based atmosphere revitalization (SBAR) system must remove all metabolic water, a technology approach 1Lhathas not been used in previous spacecraft life support systems. Design and testing of a prototype SBAR in sub-scale and full-scale configurations is discussed. Experimental and analytical investigations of dual-ended and single-ended vacuum desorption are presented. An experimental investigation of thermal linking between adsorbing and desorbing columns is also presented.

  8. Titanium dioxide nanotube membranes for solar energy conversion: effect of deep and shallow dopants.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuchen; Nagpal, Prashant

    2017-04-12

    Nanostructured titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been intensively investigated as a material of choice for solar energy conversion in photocatalytic, photoelectrochemical, photovoltaic, and other photosensitized devices for converting light into chemical feedstocks or electricity. Towards management of light absorption in TiO2, while the nanotubular structure improves light absorption and simultaneous charge transfer to mitigate problems due to the indirect bandgap of the semiconductor, typically dopants are used to improve light absorption of incident solar irradiation in the wide bandgap of TiO2. While these dopants can be critical to the success of these solar energy conversion devices, their effect on photophysical and photoelectrochemical properties and detailed photokinetics are relatively under-studied. Here, we show the effect of deep and shallow metal dopants on the kinetics of photogenerated charged carriers in TiO2 and the resulting effect on photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical processes using these nanotube membranes. We performed a detailed optical, electronic, voltammetry and electrochemical impedance study to understand the effect of shallow and deep metal dopants (using undoped and niobium- and copper-doped TiO2 nanotubes) on light absorption, charge transport and charge transfer processes. Using wireless photocatalytic methylene blue degradation and carbon dioxide reduction, and wired photoelectrochemical device measurements, we elucidate the effect of different dopants on solar-to-fuel conversion efficiency and simultaneously describe the photokinetics using a model, to help design better energy conversion devices.

  9. Water demands for expanding energy development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, G.H.; Wood, Leonard A.

    1974-01-01

    Water is used in producing energy for mining and reclamation of mined lands, onsite processing, transportation, refining, and conversion of fuels to other forms of energy. In the East, South, Midwest, and along the seacoasts, most water problems are related to pollution rather than to water supply. West of about the 100th meridian, however, runoff is generally less than potential diversions, and energy industries must compete with other water users. Water demands for extraction of coal, oil shale, uranium, and oil and gas are modest, although large quantities of water are used in secondary recovery operations for oil. The only significant use of water for energy transportation, aside from in-stream navigation use, is for slurry lines. Substantial quantities of water are required in the retorting and the disposal of spent oil shale. The conversion of coal to synthetic gas or oil or to electric power and the generation of electric power with nuclear energy require large quantities of water, mostly for cooling. Withdrawals for cooling of thermal-electric plants is by far the largest category of water use in energy industry, totaling about 170 billion gallons (644 million m3) per day in 1970. Water availability will dictate the location and design of energy-conversion facilities, especially in water deficient areas of the West.

  10. Water demands for expanding energy development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, G.H.; Wood, Leonard A.

    1974-01-01

    Water is used in producing energy for mining and reclamation of mined lands, onsite processing, transportation, refining, and conversion of fuels to other forms of energy. In the East, South, Midwest, and along the seacoasts, most water problems are related to pollution rather than to water supply. West of about the 100th meridian, however, runoff is generally less than potential diversions, and energy industries must compete with other water users. Water demands for extraction of coal, oil shale, uranium, and oil and gas are modest, although large quantities of water are used in secondary recovery operations for oil. The only significant use of water for energy transportation, aside from in-stream navigation use, is for slurry lines. Substantial quantities of water are required in the retorting and the disposal of spent oil shale. The conversion of coal to synthetic gas or oil or to electric power and the generation of electric power with nuclear energy require large quantities of water, mostly for cooling. Withdrawals for cooling of thermal-electric plants is by far the largest category of water use in energy industry, totaling about 170 billion gallons (644 million m3) per day in 1970. Water availability will dictate the location and design of energy-conversion facilities, especially in water deficient areas of the West.

  11. Electrochemical energy storage device based on carbon dioxide as electroactive species

    DOEpatents

    Nemeth, Karoly; van Veenendaal, Michel Antonius; Srajer, George

    2013-03-05

    An electrochemical energy storage device comprising a primary positive electrode, a negative electrode, and one or more ionic conductors. The ionic conductors ionically connect the primary positive electrode with the negative electrode. The primary positive electrode comprises carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) and a means for electrochemically reducing the CO.sub.2. This means for electrochemically reducing the CO.sub.2 comprises a conductive primary current collector, contacting the CO.sub.2, whereby the CO.sub.2 is reduced upon the primary current collector during discharge. The primary current collector comprises a material to which CO.sub.2 and the ionic conductors are essentially non-corrosive. The electrochemical energy storage device uses CO.sub.2 as an electroactive species in that the CO.sub.2 is electrochemically reduced during discharge to enable the release of electrical energy from the device.

  12. Carbon dioxide-water clathrate as a reservoir of CO2 on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrovolskis, A.; Ingersell, A. P.

    1975-01-01

    It has been suggested that the residual polar caps of Mars contain a resorvoir of permanently frozen carbon dioxide which is controlling the atmospheric pressure. However, observational data and models of the polar heat balance suggest that the temperatures of the Martian poles are too high for solid CO2 to survive permanently. On the other hand, the icelike compound carbon dioxide-water clathrate could function as a CO2 reservoir instead of solid CO2, because it is stable at higher temperatures. This paper shows that the permanent polar caps may contain several millibars of CO2 in the form of clathrate, and discusses the implications of this permanent clathrate reservoir for the present and past atmospheric pressure on Mars.

  13. Carbon dioxide-water clathrate as a reservoir of CO2 on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrovolskis, A.; Ingersell, A. P.

    1975-01-01

    It has been suggested that the residual polar caps of Mars contain a resorvoir of permanently frozen carbon dioxide which is controlling the atmospheric pressure. However, observational data and models of the polar heat balance suggest that the temperatures of the Martian poles are too high for solid CO2 to survive permanently. On the other hand, the icelike compound carbon dioxide-water clathrate could function as a CO2 reservoir instead of solid CO2, because it is stable at higher temperatures. This paper shows that the permanent polar caps may contain several millibars of CO2 in the form of clathrate, and discusses the implications of this permanent clathrate reservoir for the present and past atmospheric pressure on Mars.

  14. Storage and recycling of water and carbon dioxide in the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Bernard J.

    1994-01-01

    The stabilities and properties of water- and carbon-bearing phases in the earth have been determined from phase equilibrium measurements, combined with new data on the equations of state of water, carbon dioxide, carbonates and hydrates. The data have then been used to predict the fate of calcite and hydrous phases in subducting oceanic lithosphere. From the compositions of MORB's one can estimate concentrations of water and carbon of around 200 ppm and 80 ppm respectively in the upper mantle. Lower mantle estimates are very uncertain, but 1900 ppm water and 2000 ppm C are plausible concentrations. Measurements of the density of supercritical water to 3 GPa demonstrate that this phase is less compressible than anticipated from the equations of state of Haar et al. or Saul and Wagner and is closer to predictions based on molecular dynamics simulations. Conversely, fugacity measurements on carbon dioxide to 7 GPa show that this fluid is more compressible than predicted from the MRK equation of state. The results imply that hydrates are relatively more stable and carbonates less stable at pressures greater than 5 GPa than would be predicted from simple extrapolation of the low pressure data. Nevertheless, carbonates remain extremely refractory phases within both the upper and lower mantle.

  15. Coring experiments with cryogenic water and carbon dioxide ices - toward planetary surface operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garry, J. R. C.; Wright, I. P.

    2004-08-01

    As a prelude to the design of sampling devices able to extract materials from the icy surfaces of comets, outer-planet satellites, and the martian poles, it is necessary to understand some of the physical properties of these ices. To this end we have investigated the mechanical resistance displayed by two ices subjected to coring operations at low temperatures and under vacuum. The ices used in this study were water ice, frozen from liquid water, and carbon dioxide ice grown from its vapour. The coring tool employed had dimensions and required power levels that were comparable to a sample extraction system designed for a present-day spacecraft lander. The specific cutting strength, a parameter that measures the toughness of the material, has been measured while coring these two ices. For water ice this property rose from 25 MJ m -3 at an ice temperature of 250 K, to 60 MJ m -3 at 140 K. At the lower temperature of 140 K, pore-free carbon dioxide ice has also been measured to have a specific cutting strength approximately half that of water ice at the same temperature. These laboratory-based measurements may be used as guides for the power levels needed to core solid water and CO 2 ices at certain rates.

  16. Internal energy distributions from nitrogen dioxide fluorescence. 1. Cumulative sum method

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, H.S.; Miller, C.E.; Oh, B.Y.; Patten, K.O. Jr.; Sisk, W.N. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1993-09-30

    This article describes a method of obtaining information about the internal energy (E) distribution of a fluorescing population of nitrogen dioxide, NO[sub 2]*, from its dispersed spectrum between 400 and 840 nm. We show that two fluorescing populations of the same average energy but different energy spread give statistically significant differences in their observed cumulative sum spectra, although the differences are small. Broadly spread distributions of NO[sub 2]* internal energy are produced by photolysis of RNO[sub 2] molecules and by collisional deactivation of monoenergetically excited NO[sub 2]. The cumulative sum fluorescence spectrum from a broadly distributed internal energy population is represented as a weighted combination of monoenergetically excited cumulative sum fluorescence spectra. A cumulative sum spectrum utilizes all of the data, is positive and single valued, and smoothly, monotonically increases with decreasing observation energy. By differentiation of the cumulative sum spectrum, the original spectrum is recovered undistorted. Unlike a structured monoenergetic fluorescence spectrum, the cumulative sum is well approximated by a simple algebraic expression, I(E,X), where E is the internal energy of NO[sub 2]* and X are the photon energies of the observed spectrum. 14 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Energy Efficiency in Water and Wastewater Facilities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Local Government Climate and Energy Strategy Series provides a comprehensive, straightforward overview of green-house gas (GHG) emissions reduction strategies for local governments. Developing and implementing energy efficiency improvements in water an

  18. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    2013-04-12

    This document describes some of the accomplishments of the Department of Energy Water Power Program, and how those accomplishments are supporting the advancement of renewable energy generated using hydropower technologies and marine and hydrokinetic technologies.

  19. Energy Efficiency in Water and Wastewater Facilities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Local Government Climate and Energy Strategy Series provides a comprehensive, straightforward overview of green-house gas (GHG) emissions reduction strategies for local governments. Developing and implementing energy efficiency improvements in water an

  20. Energy-efficient water heating

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    This fact sheet describes how to reduce the amount of hot water used in faucets and showers, automatic dishwashers, and washing machines; how to increase water-heating system efficiency by lowering the water heater thermostat, installing a timer and heat traps, and insulating hot water pipes and the storage tank; and how to use off-peak power to heat water. A resource list for further information is included.

  1. Energy Savings from Industrial Water Reductions

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Prakash; McKane, Aimee; de Fontaine, Andre

    2015-08-03

    Although it is widely recognized that reducing freshwater consumption is of critical importance, generating interest in industrial water reduction programs can be hindered for a variety of reasons. These include the low cost of water, greater focus on water use in other sectors such as the agriculture and residential sectors, high levels of unbilled and/or unregulated self-supplied water use in industry, and lack of water metering and tracking capabilities at industrial facilities. However, there are many additional components to the resource savings associated with reducing site water use beyond the water savings alone, such as reductions in energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, treatment chemicals, and impact on the local watershed. Understanding and quantifying these additional resource savings can expand the community of businesses, NGOs, government agencies, and researchers with a vested interest in water reduction. This paper will develop a methodology for evaluating the embedded energy consumption associated with water use at an industrial facility. The methodology developed will use available data and references to evaluate the energy consumption associated with water supply and wastewater treatment outside of a facility’s fence line for various water sources. It will also include a framework for evaluating the energy consumption associated with water use within a facility’s fence line. The methodology will develop a more complete picture of the total resource savings associated with water reduction efforts and allow industrial water reduction programs to assess the energy and CO2 savings associated with their efforts.

  2. Energy optimization of water distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    Energy costs associated with pumping treated water into the distribution system and boosting water pressures where necessary is one of the largest expenditures in the operating budget of a municipality. Due to the size and complexity of Detroit`s water transmission system, an energy optimization project has been developed to better manage the flow of water in the distribution system in an attempt to reduce these costs.

  3. Effect of water on the carbon dioxide absorption by 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Stevanovic, Stéphane; Podgoršek, Ajda; Pádua, Agilio A H; Costa Gomes, Margarida F

    2012-12-13

    The absorption of carbon dioxide by the pure ionic liquids 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C(1)C(2)Im][OAc]) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C(1)C(4)Im][OAc]) was studied experimentally from 303 to 343 K. As expected, the mole fraction of absorbed carbon dioxide is high (0.16 at 303 K and 5.5 kPa and 0.19 at 303 and 9.6 KPa for [C(1)C(2)Im][OAc] and [C(1)C(4)Im][OAc], respectively), does not obey Henry's law, and is compatible with the chemisorption of the gas by the liquid. Evidence of a chemical reaction between the gas and the liquid was found both by NMR and by molecular simulation. In the presence of water, the properties of the liquid absorber significantly change, especially the viscosity that decreases by as much as 25% (to 78 mPa s) and 30% (to 262 mPa s) in the presence of 0.2 mol fraction of water for [C(1)C(2)Im][OAc] and [C(1)C(2)Im][OAc] at 303 K, respectively. The absorption of carbon dioxide decreases when the water concentration increases: a decrease of 83% in CO(2) absorption is found for [C(1)C(4)Im][OAc] with 0.6 mol fraction of water at 303 K. It is proved in this work, by combining experimental data with molecular simulation, that the presence of water not only renders the chemical reaction between the gas and the ionic liquid less favorable but also lowers the (physical) solubility of the gas as it competes by the same solvation sites of the ionic liquid. The lowering of the viscosity of the liquid absorbent largely compensates these apparent drawbacks and the mixtures of [C(1)C(2)Im][OAc] and [C(1)C(2)Im][OAc] with water seem promising to be used for carbon dioxide capture.

  4. Nationwide water availability data for energy-water modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Zemlick, Katie M.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this effort is to explore where the availability of water could be a limiting factor in the siting of new electric power generation. To support this analysis, water availability is mapped at the county level for the conterminous United States (3109 counties). Five water sources are individually considered, including unappropriated surface water, unappropriated groundwater, appropriated water (western U.S. only), municipal wastewater and brackish groundwater. Also mapped is projected growth in non-thermoelectric consumptive water demand to 2035. Finally, the water availability metrics are accompanied by estimated costs associated with utilizing that particular supply of water. Ultimately these data sets are being developed for use in the National Renewable Energy Laboratories' (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, designed to investigate the likely deployment of new energy installations in the U.S., subject to a number of constraints, particularly water.

  5. The carbon dioxide-water interface at conditions of gas hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Paulus, Michael; Sternemann, Christian; Lietz, Daniela; Venturini, Federica; Gutt, Christian; Tolan, Metin

    2009-01-21

    The structure of the carbon dioxide-water interface was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and reflectivity at temperature and pressure conditions which allow the formation of gas hydrate. The water-gaseous CO2 and the water-liquid CO2 interface were examined. The two interfaces show a very different behavior with respect to the formation of gas hydrate. While the liquid-gas interface exhibits the formation of thin liquid CO2 layers on the water surface, the formation of small clusters of gas hydrate was observed at the liquid-liquid interface. The data obtained from both interfaces points to a gas hydrate formation process which may be explained by the so-called local structuring hypothesis.

  6. Progress on Development of an Airborne Two-Micron IPDA Lidar for Water Vapor and Carbon Dioxide Column Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong; Antill, Charles W.; Taylor, Bryant D.; Bowen, Stephen C.; Welters, Angela M.; Remus, Ruben G.; Wong, Teh-Hwa; hide

    2014-01-01

    An airborne 2 micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is currently under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). This lidar targets both atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) column measurements, simultaneously. Advancements in the development of this IPDA lidar are presented in this paper. Updates on advanced two-micron triple-pulse high-energy laser transmitter will be given including packaging and lidar integration status. In addition, receiver development updates will also be presented. This includes a state-of-the-art detection system integrated at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This detection system is based on a newly developed HgCdTe (MCT) electron-initiated avalanche photodiode (e-APD) array. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will be discussed.

  7. Nuclear Energy for a Low-Carbon-Dioxide-Emission Transportation System with Liquid Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, Charles W

    2007-01-01

    The two major energy challenges for the United States are to replace crude oil in our transportation system and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. A multilayer strategy to replace oil using nuclear energy and various carbon sources (fossil fuels, biomass, or air) is described that (a) allows the continued use of liquid fuels (ethanol, gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) in the transport sector, (b) does not require major changes in lifestyle by the consumer, and (c) ultimately eliminates carbon dioxide emissions from the transport sector. Nuclear energy is used to provide electricity, heat, and ultimately hydrogen, with the hydrogen produced by either electrolysis or more advanced thermochemical production methods. In the near term, nuclear energy can provide low-temperature heat (steam) for ethanol production and electricity for transportation. Midterm options include low-temperature heat and limited quantities of hydrogen for processing cellulosic biomass into liquid fuels (ethanol and lignin-derived hydrocarbons) and providing high-temperature heat for (a) traditional refining and (b) underground oil production and refining. In the longer term, biomass becomes the feedstock for liquid-fuels production, with nuclear energy providing heat and large quantities of hydrogen for complete biomass conversion to hydrocarbon fuels. Nuclear energy could be used to provide over half the total energy required by the transportation system, and the use of oil in the transport sector could potentially be eliminated within several decades.

  8. Intersects between Land, Energy, Water and the Climate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbard, K. A.; Skaggs, R.; Wilson, T.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change affects water, and land resources, and with growing human activity, each of these sectors relies increasingly on the others for critical resources. Events such as drought across the South Central U.S. during 2011 demonstrate that climatic impacts within each of these sectors can cascade through interactions between sectors. Energy, water, and land resources are each vulnerable to impacts on either of the other two sectors. For example, energy systems inherently require land and water. Increased electricity demands to contend with climate change can impose additional burdens on overly subscribed water resources. Within this environment, energy systems compete for water with agriculture, human consumption, and other needs. In turn, climate driven changes in landscape attributes and land use affect water quality and availability as well as energy demands. Diminishing water quality and availability impose additional demands for energy to access and purify water, and for land to store and distribute water. In some situations, interactions between water, energy, and land resources make options for reducing greenhouse gas emissions vulnerable to climate change. Energy options such as solar power or biofuel use can reduce net greenhouse gas emissions as well as U.S. dependence on foreign resources. As a result, the U.S. is expanding renewable energy systems. Advanced technology such as carbon dioxide capture with biofuels may offer a means of removing CO2 from the atmosphere. But as with fossil fuels, renewable energy sources can impose significant demands for water and land. For example, solar power mayrequire significant land to site facilities and water for cooling or to produce steam. Raising crops to produce biofuels uses arable land and water that might otherwise be available for food production. Thus, warmer and drier climate can compromise these renewable energy resources, and drought can stress water supplies creating competition between energy

  9. The nexus of food, energy, and water.

    PubMed

    Finley, John W; Seiber, James N

    2014-07-09

    The Earth's population is expected to exceed 9 billion by 2050, posing significant challenges in meeting human needs while minimally affecting the environment. To support this population, we will need secure and safe sources of food, energy, and water. The nexus of food, energy, and water is one of the most complex, yet critical, issues that face society. There is no more land to exploit, and the supply of fresh water in some areas of the world limits the use of land for food. All solutions must also deal with the overlay of global climate change. Meeting current and future populations needs will require security in food, energy, and water supplies. A nexus approach is needed to improve food, energy, and water security integrating the management of the limited resources while transitioning to a more "green" economy, which provides adequate food, energy, and water for the expanding human population.

  10. Increase in forest water-use efficiency as atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations rise

    Treesearch

    Trevor F. Keenan; David Y. Hollinger; Gil Boher; Danilo Dragoni; J. William Munger; Hans Peter. Schmid

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial plants remove CO2 from the atmosphere through photosynthesis, a process that is accompanied by the loss of water vapour from leaves. The ratio of water loss to carbon gain, or water-use efficiency, is a key characteristic of ecosystem function that is central to the global cycles of water, energy and carbon. Here we analyse direct,...

  11. Application of electrochemical technology for removing petroleum hydrocarbons from produced water using lead dioxide and boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Boutheina; Gargouri, Olfa Dridi; Gargouri, Bochra; Trabelsi, Souhel Kallel; Abdelhedi, Ridha; Bouaziz, Mohamed

    2014-12-01

    Although diverse methods exist for treating polluted water, the most promising and innovating technology is the electrochemical remediation process. This paper presents the anodic oxidation of real produced water (PW), generated by the petroleum exploration of the Petrobras plant-Tunisia. Experiments were conducted at different current densities (30, 50 and 100 mA cm(-2)) using the lead dioxide supported on tantalum (Ta/PbO2) and boron-doped diamond (BDD) anodes in an electrolytic batch cell. The electrolytic process was monitored by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the residual total petroleum hydrocarbon [TPH] in order to know the feasibility of electrochemical treatment. The characterization and quantification of petroleum wastewater components were performed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The COD removal was approximately 85% and 96% using PbO2 and BDD reached after 11 and 7h, respectively. Compared with PbO2, the BDD anode showed a better performance to remove petroleum hydrocarbons compounds from produced water. It provided a higher oxidation rate and it consumed lower energy. However, the energy consumption and process time make useless anodic oxidation for the complete elimination of pollutants from PW. Cytotoxicity has shown that electrochemical oxidation using BDD could be efficiently used to reduce more than 90% of hydrocarbons compounds. All results suggest that electrochemical oxidation could be an effective approach to treat highly concentrated organic pollutants present in the industrial petrochemical wastewater and significantly reduce the cost and time of treatment.

  12. Changing Western water institutions: energy's role

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.L.; Roach, F.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the institutional mechanisms through which physical availability of water, historical pattern of water use, and unresolved water issues combine to constrain and channel the energy industry's use of water. These institutional mechanisms include the developing markets for water rights, the legal and administrative structure governing water allocation, the formation of social attitudes about water, and the political process that often implements concensus. Within this context, the narrow physical interpretation commonly given to the question, Is there enough water, broadens greatly to include the institutional dimension that is the most important component of the question.

  13. SYNTHESIS OF SULFUR-BASED WATER TREATMENT AGENT FROM SULFUR DIOXIDE WASTE STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Maohong Fan

    2001-12-01

    We propose a process that uses sulfur dioxide from coal combustion as a raw material to synthesize polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS), a water treatment agent. The process uses sodium chlorate as an oxidant and ferrous sulfate as an absorbent. The major chemical mechanisms in this reaction system include oxidation, hydrolysis, and polymerization. Oxidation determines sulfur conversion efficiency while hydrolysis and polymerization control the quality of product. Many factors, including SO{sub 2} inlet concentration, flow rate of simulated flue gas, reaction temperature, addition rate of oxidant and stirring rate, may affect the efficiencies of SO{sub 2} removal. Currently, the effects of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration, the flow rate of simulated flue gas and addition rate of flue gas on removal efficiencies of SO{sub 2}, are being investigated. Experiments shown in this report have demonstrated that the conversion efficiencies of sulfur dioxide with ferrous sulfate as an absorbent are in the range of 60-80% under the adopted process conditions. However, the conversion efficiency of sulfur dioxide may be improved by optimizing reaction conditions to be investigated. Partial quality indices of the synthesized products, including Fe{sup 2+} concentration and total iron concentration, have been evaluated.

  14. The photodetachment cross-section and threshold energy of negative ions in carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmy, E. M.; Woo, S. B.

    1974-01-01

    Threshold energy and sunlight photodetachment measurements on negative carbon dioxide ions, using a 2.5 kw light pressure xenon lamp, show that: (1) Electron affinity of CO3(+) is larger than 2.7 e.V. and that an isomeric form of CO3(+) is likely an error; (2) The photodetachment cross section of CO3(-) will roughly be like a step function across the range of 4250 to 2500A, having its threshold energy at 4250A; (3) Sunlight photodetachment rate for CO3(-) is probably much smaller than elsewhere reported; and (4) The probability of having photodetached electrons re-attach to form negative ions is less than 1%. Mass identifying drift tube tests confirm that the slower ion is CO3(-), formed through the O(-) + 2CO2 yields CO3(-) + CO2 reaction.

  15. Ancient water supports today's energy needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, Paolo; Natyzak, Jennifer L.; Castner, Elizabeth A.; Davis, Kyle F.; Emery, Kyle A.; Gephart, Jessica A.; Leach, Allison M.; Pace, Michael L.; Galloway, James N.

    2017-05-01

    The water footprint for fossil fuels typically accounts for water utilized in mining and fuel processing, whereas the water footprint of biofuels assesses the agricultural water used by crops through their lifetime. Fossil fuels have an additional water footprint that is not easily accounted for: ancient water that was used by plants millions of years ago, before they were transformed into fossil fuel. How much water is mankind using from the past to sustain current energy needs? We evaluate the link between ancient water virtually embodied in fossil fuels to current global energy demands by determining the water demand required to replace fossil fuels with biomass produced with water from the present. Using equal energy units of wood, bioethanol, and biodiesel to replace coal, natural gas, and crude oil, respectively, the resulting water demand is 7.39 × 1013 m3 y-1, approximately the same as the total annual evaporation from all land masses and transpiration from all terrestrial vegetation. Thus, there are strong hydrologic constraints to a reliance on biofuel energy produced with water from the present because the conversion from fossil fuels to biofuels would have a disproportionate and unsustainable impact on the modern water. By using fossil fuels to meet today's energy needs, we are virtually using water from a geological past. The water cycle is insufficient to sustain the production of the fuel presently consumed by human societies. Thus, non-fuel-based renewable energy sources are needed to decrease mankind's reliance on fossil fuel energy without placing an overwhelming pressure on global freshwater resources.

  16. Effect of the cascade energy on defect production in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Garcia, P.; Van Brutzel, L.; Dorado, B.; Maillard, S.

    2011-07-01

    The primary damage induced by a displacement cascade in a pure uranium dioxide matrix was investigated using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Cascades were initiated by accelerating a uranium primary knock-on atom (PKA) to a kinetic energy ranging from 1 keV to 80 keV inside a perfect UO2 lattice at low temperature (300 K and 700 K). There is little effect of temperature in the temperature range studied. Following the cascade event, the damage level, defined as the total number of defects irrespective of whether they form clusters or not, is proportional to the initial kinetic energy of the PKA, in agreement with the literature relating to other materials. The linear dependence of damage upon initial PKA energy results from the formation of subcascades at high energy and constitutes a simple law which can be applied to any material and used in order to extrapolate molecular dynamics results to high energy PKAs. The nature of irradiation induced defects has also been studied as a function of the cascade energy.

  17. Energy for water and water for energy on Maui Island, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubert, Emily A.; Webber, Michael E.

    2015-06-01

    Energy and water systems are interconnected. This work first characterizes 2010 primary energy demand for direct water services and local freshwater demand for energy on Maui Island, Hawaii, then investigates scenarios for future changes in these demands. The goal of this manuscript is to dissect the relationship and trends of energy-water connections to inform policymaking decisions related to water and energy planning. Analysis proceeds by inventorying water and energy flows and adjusting to a 2010 base year, then applying intensity factors for energy or water used at a given stage for a given sector to determine absolute energy and water demands for the isolated system of Maui Island. These bottom-up, intensity-based values are validated against published data where available. Maui consumes about 0.05% of its freshwater for energy (versus >6% for the US on average) and about 32% of its electricity (19% of its on-island primary energy) for direct water services (versus 8% of primary energy for the US on average). These values could change with policy choices like increased instream flows, higher wastewater treatment standards, electricity fuel mix changes, desalination, or increased biofuels production. This letter contributes a granular assessment of both energy for water and water for energy in a single isolated system, highlighting opportunities to address energy-water interdependencies in a context that could be relevant in other communities facing similar choices.

  18. Solar Energy for Space Heating & Hot Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC. Div. of Solar Energy.

    This pamphlet reviews the direct transfer of solar energy into heat, particularly for the purpose of providing space and hot water heating needs. Owners of buildings and homes are provided with a basic understanding of solar heating and hot water systems: what they are, how they perform, the energy savings possible, and the cost factors involved.…

  19. Unsteady absorption of sulfur dioxide by an atmospheric water droplet with internal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Hsin

    Unsteady absorption characteristics of sulfur dioxide by an atmospheric water droplet in motion are predicted numerically and analyzed theoretically to recognize the physical mass transport processes inside an aerosol droplet, which is frequently encountered in the atmosphere. Considering the absorption of sulfur dioxide by a droplet in cloud or fog with various velocities, three different Reynolds numbers, viz., Reg=0.643, 1.287, and 12.87 are studied and compared with each other. The results indicate that for the Reynolds number of 0.643, sulfur dioxide always penetrates toward the droplet centerline throughout the entire absorption period. This is due to the mass transfer dominated by diffusion along the radial direction. In contrast, when the Reynolds number is 12.87, the strength of the vortex motion inside the droplet is strong enough. It results in that, most of the time the concentration contours parallel the streamlines and the lowest SO 2 concentration is located at the vortex center. As a consequence, the diffusion distance is reduced by a factor of three and the absorption time for the droplet reaching the saturated state is shortened in a significant way. With regard to an intermediate Reynolds number such as 1.287, a two-stage mass transfer process can be clearly identified. In the first stage, it is dominated by one-dimensional diffusion, in which over 50% sulfur dioxide is absorbed before the saturated state is reached. In the second stage, the vortex motion mainly controls the mass transfer. However, the contour core is inconsistent with the vortex center. This is because the characteristic time of mass diffusion is in a comparable state with that of droplet internal circulation. The present study elucidates that the strength of a droplet's internal motion plays a vital role in determining SO 2 absorption process.

  20. Saving Energy, Water, and Money with Efficient Water Treatment Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-06-01

    Reverse Osmosis (RO) is a method of purifying water for industrial processes and human consumption; RO can remove mineral salts as well as contaminants such as bacteria and pesticides. Advances in water treatment technologies have enhanced and complemented the conventional RO process, reducing energy and water consumption, lowering capital and operating costs, and producing purer water. This publication of the Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program introduces RO, describes the benefits of high-efficiency reverse osmosis (HERO), and compares HERO with RO/electrodeionization (EDI) technology.

  1. Power Satellites, Carbon Dioxide, Synthetic Fuel, Sequestering Carbon as Synthetic Oil and Fresh Water from Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith Henson, H.

    2010-05-01

    A small number of people have been working for the past year on ways to reduce the cost of power from space to the point that it could entirely displace fossil fuels and even put carbon dioxide back in empty oil fields as synthetic oil. The challenging part is reducing the cost of transport to GEO by a factor of ˜200 discussed in another paper in this volume. Given low cost power, synthetic fuels, carbon sequestration, and fresh water from seawater become economical.

  2. Description of data on the Nimbus 7 LIMS map archive tape: Water vapor and nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggard, Kenneth V.; Marshall, B. T.; Kurzeja, Robert J.; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Russell, James M., III

    1988-01-01

    Described is the process by which the analysis of the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment data were used to produce estimates of synoptic maps of water vapor and nitrogen dioxide. In addition to a detailed description of the analysis procedure, also discussed are several interesting features in the data which are used to demonstrate how the analysis procedure produced the final maps and how one can estimate the uncertainties in the maps. In addition, features in the analysis are noted that would influence how one might use, or interpret, the results. These include subjects such as smoothing and the interpretation of wave components.

  3. The fate of carbon dioxide in water-rich fluids under extreme conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ding; Galli, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the fate of dissolved carbon dioxide under extreme conditions is critical to understanding the deep carbon cycle in Earth, a process that ultimately influences global climate change. We used first-principles molecular dynamics simulations to study carbonates and carbon dioxide dissolved in water at pressures (P) and temperatures (T) approximating the conditions of Earth’s upper mantle. Contrary to popular geochemical models assuming that molecular CO2(aq) is the major carbon species present in water under deep Earth conditions, we found that at 11 GPa and 1000 K, carbon exists almost entirely in the forms of solvated carbonate (CO32−) and bicarbonate (HCO3−) ions and that even carbonic acid [H2CO3(aq)] is more abundant than CO2(aq). Furthermore, our simulations revealed that ion pairing between Na+ and CO32−/HCO3− is greatly affected by P-T conditions, decreasing with increasing pressure at 800 to 1000 K. Our results suggest that in Earth’s upper mantle, water-rich geofluids transport a majority of carbon in the form of rapidly interconverting CO32− and HCO3− ions, not solvated CO2(aq) molecules. PMID:27757424

  4. The fate of carbon dioxide in water-rich fluids under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ding; Galli, Giulia

    2016-10-01

    Investigating the fate of dissolved carbon dioxide under extreme conditions is critical to understanding the deep carbon cycle in Earth, a process that ultimately influences global climate change. We used first-principles molecular dynamics simulations to study carbonates and carbon dioxide dissolved in water at pressures (P) and temperatures (T) approximating the conditions of Earth's upper mantle. Contrary to popular geochemical models assuming that molecular CO2(aq) is the major carbon species present in water under deep Earth conditions, we found that at 11 GPa and 1000 K, carbon exists almost entirely in the forms of solvated carbonate ([Formula: see text]) and bicarbonate ([Formula: see text]) ions and that even carbonic acid [H2CO3(aq)] is more abundant than CO2(aq). Furthermore, our simulations revealed that ion pairing between Na(+) and [Formula: see text]/[Formula: see text] is greatly affected by P-T conditions, decreasing with increasing pressure at 800 to 1000 K. Our results suggest that in Earth's upper mantle, water-rich geofluids transport a majority of carbon in the form of rapidly interconverting [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] ions, not solvated CO2(aq) molecules.

  5. Water and Carbon Dioxide Ices-Rich Areas on Comet 67P/CG Nucleus Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Raponi, A.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ciarniello, M.; Barucci, M. A.; Tosi, F.; Migliorini, A.; Capria, M. T.; Erard, S.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Leyrat, C.; Arnold, G.; Kappel, D.; McCord, T. B.

    2017-01-01

    So far, only two ice species have been identified by Rosetta/VIRTIS-M [1] on the surface of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during the pre-perihelion time: crystalline water and carbon dioxide ice. Water ice has been spectroscopically identified in three distinct modalities: 1) On the active areas of Hapi region where water ice changes its abundance with local time and illumination conditions, condensing during the night hours and sublimating during daytime [2]; 2) On recent debris fields collapsed from two elevated structures in the Imhotep region where more fresh and pristine material is exposed [3]; 3) On eight bright areas located in Khonsu, Imhotep, Anhur, Atum and Khepry regions [4] where single or multiple grouped icy patches with sizes ranging between few meters to about 60 m are observed. Carbon dioxide ice has been detected only in a 60-80 m area in Anhur region while it was exiting from a four year-long winter-night season [5]. This ice deposit underwent a rapid sublimation, disappearing in about one month after its initial detection. While water and carbon dioxide ice appear always mixed with the ubiquitous dark material [6,7], there are no evidences of the presence of water and carbon dioxide ices mixed together in the same area. If observed, ices always account for very small fraction (few percent) with respect to the dark material. Moreover, the surface ice deposits are preferentially located on the large lobe and the neck while they are absent on the small lobe. Apart from these differences in the spatial distribution of ices on the surface, a large variability is observed the mixing modalities and in the grain size distributions, as retrieved from spectral modeling [8]: 1) very small μm-sized water ice grains in intimate mixing with the dark terrain are detected on Hapi active regions [2]; 2) two monodispersed distributions with maxima at 56 μm and at 2 mm, corresponding to the intimate and areal mixing classes, are observedon the Imhotep debris

  6. Water, sulfur dioxide and nitric acid adsorption on calcium carbonate: a transmission and ATR-FTIR study.

    PubMed

    Al-Hosney, H A; Grassian, V H

    2005-03-21

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is a reactive component of mineral dust aerosol as well as buildings, statues and monuments. In this study, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) have been used to study the uptake of water, sulfur dioxide and nitric acid on CaCO3 particles at 296 K. Under atmospheric conditions, CaCO3 particles are terminated by a Ca(OH)(CO3H) surface layer. In the presence of water vapor between 5 and 95% relative humidity (RH), water molecularly adsorbs on the Ca(OH)(CO3H) surface resulting in the formation of an adsorbed thin water film. The adsorbed water film assists in the enhanced uptake of sulfur dioxide and nitric acid on CaCO3 in several ways. Under dry conditions (near 0% RH), sulfur dioxide and nitric acid react with the Ca(OH)(CO3H) surface to form adsorbed carbonic acid (H2CO3) along with sulfite and nitrate, respectively. Adsorbed carbonic acid is stable on the surface under vacuum conditions. Once the surface saturates with a carbonic acid capping layer, there is no additional uptake of gas-phase sulfur dioxide and nitric acid. However, upon adsorption of water, carbonic acid dissociates to form gaseous carbon dioxide and there is further uptake of sulfur dioxide and nitric acid. In addition, adsorbed water increases the mobility of the ions at the surface and enhances uptake of SO2 and HNO3. In the presence of adsorbed water, CaSO3 forms islands of a crystalline hydrate whereas Ca(NO3)2 forms a deliquescent layer or micropuddles. Thus adsorbed water plays an important and multi-faceted role in the uptake of pollutant gases on CaCO3.

  7. Structure and stability of graphene nanoribbons in oxygen, carbon dioxide, water, and ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitsonen, Ari P.; Saitta, A. Marco; Wassmann, Tobias; Lazzeri, Michele; Mauri, Francesco

    2010-09-01

    We determine, by means of density-functional theory, the stability and the structure of graphene-nanoribbon (GNR) edges in presence of molecules such as oxygen, water, ammonia, and carbon dioxide. As in the case of hydrogen-terminated nanoribbons, we find that the most stable armchair and zigzag configurations are characterized by a nonmetallic/nonmagnetic nature, and are compatible with Clar’s sextet rules, well known in organic chemistry. In particular, we predict that, at thermodynamic equilibrium, neutral GNRs in oxygen-rich atmosphere should preferentially be along the armchair direction while water-saturated GNRs should present zigzag edges. Our results promise to be particularly useful to GNRs synthesis since the most recent and advanced experimental routes are most effective in water and/or ammonia-containing solutions.

  8. Comparison of chlorine dioxide photochemistry in acetonitrile and water using subpicosecond pump probe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philpott, Matthew J.; Charalambous, Sophia; Reid, Philip J.

    1997-12-01

    The photochemical reaction dynamics of chlorine dioxide (OClO) dissolved in water and acetonitrile are investigated using subpicosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. The spectral dynamics observed at 267 and 400 nm demonstrate that the quantum yield for geminate recombination of ClO and O to form OClO is reduced in acetonitrile relative to water. However, the dynamics at 800 nm are similar for both solvents consistent with ClOO rather than OClO being responsible for the evolution at this wavelength. The kinetics for ground-state ClOO production and decomposition are significantly slower in acetonitrile relative to water suggesting that solvent-solute hydrogen bonding is important in defining the ground state reactivity of this photoproduct.

  9. Copper and cerium co-doped titanium dioxide on catalytic photo reduction of carbon dioxide with water: Experimental and theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Dongmei; Bi, Ye; Kan, Wei; Zhang, Ning; Hong, Sanguo

    2011-05-01

    The catalytic activities of copper and cerium co-doped titanium dioxide were studied experimentally and theoretically in the synthesis of methanol by the photo reduction of carbon dioxide with water firstly. Photo catalysts copper and cerium co-doped titanium dioxide were prepared via the equivalent-volume incipient wetness impregnation method. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, Raman, BET, and electrochemistry analyses. The catalytic properties were determined in the synthesis of methanol from CO 2 in the aqueous solution. The experimental results suggested that Cu/Ce-TiO 2 catalysts obviously enhanced the efficiency of the photocatalytic reduction of CO 2. The methanol yield could reach up to 180.3 μmol/g-cat rapidly. The different effects of copper and cerium on the surface of titanium dioxide have been calculated at the Becke's three-parameter hybrid exchange functional together with the Lee-Yang-Parr correlation functional (B3LYP) level. Our results revealed that Ce atoms affect the reaction more profoundly than Cu atoms do. Ce atoms activated H 2O and CO 2 molecules, while Cu atoms act as the channel of photoelectrons in real time and prevent the recombination of electrons and holes.

  10. [Energy turnover of water bugs].

    PubMed

    Waitzbauer, Wolfgang

    1976-06-01

    1. This study concerns the energy turnover of the water bug species Naucoris cimicoides (Naucoridae), Notonecta glauca (Notonectidae) and Ranatra linearis (Nepidae). The results refer to the conditions in the reed belt of the lake "Neusiedler See" in eastern Austria. 2. Population density was, using various methods, quantitatively determined for each test species. In summer the values were as follows: Naucoris 8, Notonecta 2 and Ranatra 0.5 individuals per m(2) in the closed reed belt. Abundance in the next spring was a halving of the initial values due to an increase in the death rate of males in winter. Generally, mortality was very high; the highest death rate for all species occurred in the first two larval stages. The total mortality, beginning at emergence and continuing until immediately after oviposition, was determined to be 91% for Naucoris, 97% for Notonecta and 99% for Ranatra. 3. Production of an average male was 211.45 cal (Naucoris), 243.24 cal (Notonecta) and 256.26 cal (Ranatra) for the entire life span. The production values determined for average females until oviposition are 316.87 cal (Naucoris), 300.79 cal (Notonecta) and 559.51 cal (Ranatra). 53.89 cal (Naucoris), 73.35 cal (Notonecta) and 264.66 cal (Ranatra) are needed for egg production. 4. Respiration was determined by volumetric measurement for all developmental stages and the imago at different times of the year. From emergence until death the following spring the O2-consumption of an average individual was determined as 129.27 cal (♂), 156.45 cal (♀) for Naucoris, 690.66 cal (♂), 882.04 cal (♀) for Notonecta and 548.30 cal (♂), 589.16 cal (♀) for Ranatra. 5. Assimilation was calculated from production and respiration (A=P+R) for all larval and mature stages. Assimilation was determined as 340.72 cal (♂), 419.43 cal (♀) for Naucoris, 933.90 cal (♂), 1109.48 cal (♀) for Notonecta and 804.56 cal (♂), 884.01 cal (♀) for Ranatra, (cumulative values). 6. Since the

  11. Influences of water properties on the aggregation and deposition of engineered titanium dioxide nanoparticles in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Sillanpää, Markus; Risto, Maarit

    2016-12-01

    With the increasing usage of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (NPs), their release into the environment makes it important to understand their transport, fate and behaviour in natural waters. In this study, aggregation and deposition of TiO2 NPs were studied during a 3-h period by using a dynamic light scattering instrument and a UV-vis spectrophotometer, respectively. TiO2 NPs were spiked in 34 lake and 5 brackish water samples at an initial concentration of 10 mg L(-1). Depending on the physicochemical properties of the natural waters, TiO2 NPs exhibited different colloidal stability. In brackish waters with high salinity, TiO2 NPs were prone to aggregate and settled rapidly. Whereas under conditions of humic and humus-poor lake waters, TiO2 NPs were suspended in water column for a longer time without remarkable change in particle size and concentration. Deposition likely occurred in nutrient-rich lakes which had high amount of nitrogen and phosphorus accompanied by high values of conductivity, alkalinity, pH and turbidity. Linear regression analysis revealed the statistically significant relationships (p ≤ 0.008) between the TiO2 NPs stability and these water properties. Our study makes a better understanding of the water properties that control the aggregation and deposition of TiO2 NPs in complex natural waters.

  12. Carbon dioxide and climate: The effects of water transport in radiative-convective models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, John R.; Reck, Ruth A.

    1981-12-01

    Considerable attention is being focused on the possible climatic effects resulting from increases in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. In calculating CO2 influence on the thermal structure of the atmosphere, the role of clouds is critically important. Not only are the cloud properties, such as amount, numbers of clouds, altitudes, and optical properties important but also whether or not these properties are fixed or coupled to model temperatures. The transport of water vapor determines whether or not a region has clouds, the cloud properites, and the water vapor profiles appropriate for clear and cloudy skies. Results are presented of the change in surface temperature with changes in carbon dioxide content for two radiative-convective models with three different cloud coverages. We used (1) the Manabe-Wetherald radiative-convective model in which three clouds with fixed pressures, thicknesses, and optical properties and a single water vapor profile are inputed and (2) the Hummel-Kuhn model, which couples radiative heating, convection, and water vapor transport in order to calculate locations and thicknesses. The Hummel-Kuhn model yields temperature increases for doubled CO2 larger than the Manabe-Wetherald model for various assumed total cloud cover amounts. For assumed standard cloud cover amounts the Hummel-Kuhn estimate is 20% larger than the Manabe-Wetherald estimate. For reduced and enhanced cloud cover amounts the Hummel-Kuhn estimates are 37% and 17% larger, respectively. The calculated cloud locations and thicknesses did not change in the calculations; therefore the increased sensitivity in the Hummel-Kuhn model is due to the larger water vapor amounts in the Hummel-Kuhn model and the added infrared absorption by the water vapor dimer.

  13. Modeling Caspian Sea water level oscillations under different scenarios of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The rapid rise of Caspian Sea water level (about 2.25 meters since 1978) has caused much concern to all five surrounding countries, primarily because flooding has destroyed or damaged buildings and other engineering structures, roads, beaches and farm lands in the coastal zone. Given that climate, and more specifically climate change, is a primary factor influencing oscillations in Caspian Sea water levels, the effect of different climate change scenarios on future Caspian Sea levels was simulated. Variations in environmental parameters such as temperature, precipitation, evaporation, atmospheric carbon dioxide and water level oscillations of the Caspian sea and surrounding regions, are considered for both past (1951-2006) and future (2025-2100) time frames. The output of the UKHADGEM general circulation model and five alternative scenarios including A1CAI, BIASF, BIMES WRE450 and WRE750 were extracted using the MAGICC SCENGEN Model software (version 5.3). The results suggest that the mean temperature of the Caspian Sea region (Bandar-E-Anzali monitoring site) has increased by ca. 0.17°C per decade under the impacts of atmospheric carbon dioxide changes (r=0.21). The Caspian Sea water level has increased by ca. +36cm per decade (r=0.82) between the years 1951-2006. Mean results from all modeled scenarios indicate that the temperature will increase by ca. 3.64°C and precipitation will decrease by ca. 10% (182 mm) over the Caspian Sea, whilst in the Volga river basin, temperatures are projected to increase by ca. 4.78°C and precipitation increase by ca. 12% (58 mm) by the year 2100. Finally, statistical modeling of the Caspian Sea water levels project future water level increases of between 86 cm and 163 cm by the years 2075 and 2100, respectively. PMID:23369617

  14. Modeling Caspian Sea water level oscillations under different scenarios of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations.

    PubMed

    Roshan, Gholamreza; Moghbel, Masumeh; Grab, Stefan

    2012-12-12

    The rapid rise of Caspian Sea water level (about 2.25 meters since 1978) has caused much concern to all five surrounding countries, primarily because flooding has destroyed or damaged buildings and other engineering structures, roads, beaches and farm lands in the coastal zone. Given that climate, and more specifically climate change, is a primary factor influencing oscillations in Caspian Sea water levels, the effect of different climate change scenarios on future Caspian Sea levels was simulated. Variations in environmental parameters such as temperature, precipitation, evaporation, atmospheric carbon dioxide and water level oscillations of the Caspian sea and surrounding regions, are considered for both past (1951-2006) and future (2025-2100) time frames. The output of the UKHADGEM general circulation model and five alternative scenarios including A1CAI, BIASF, BIMES WRE450 and WRE750 were extracted using the MAGICC SCENGEN Model software (version 5.3). The results suggest that the mean temperature of the Caspian Sea region (Bandar-E-Anzali monitoring site) has increased by ca. 0.17°C per decade under the impacts of atmospheric carbon dioxide changes (r=0.21). The Caspian Sea water level has increased by ca. +36cm per decade (r=0.82) between the years 1951-2006. Mean results from all modeled scenarios indicate that the temperature will increase by ca. 3.64°C and precipitation will decrease by ca. 10% (182 mm) over the Caspian Sea, whilst in the Volga river basin, temperatures are projected to increase by ca. 4.78°C and precipitation increase by ca. 12% (58 mm) by the year 2100. Finally, statistical modeling of the Caspian Sea water levels project future water level increases of between 86 cm and 163 cm by the years 2075 and 2100, respectively.

  15. Global energy consumption for direct water use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Hejazi, M. I.; Kim, S. H.; Kyle, P.; Davies, E. G.; Miralles, D. G.; Teuling, R.; He, Y.; Niyogi, D.

    2015-12-01

    Despite significant efforts to quantify the mutual inter-dependence of the water and energy sectors, global energy for water (EFW) remains poorly understood, resulting in biases in energy accounting that directly affect water and energy management and policy. We firstly evaluate the global energy consumption for direct water use from 1973 to 2012 with sectoral, regional and process-level details. Over the 40-year period, we detected multiple shifts in EFW by county and region. For example, we find that India, the Middle East and China have surpassed the United States as the three largest consumers of EFW since 2003, mostly because of rapid growth in groundwater-based irrigation, desalination, and industrial and municipal water use, respectively. Globally, EFW accounts for 1-3% of total primary energy consumption in 2010, of which 52% is surface water, 36% is groundwater, and 12% is non-fresh water. The sectoral allocation of EFW includes municipal (45%), industrial (29%), and agricultural use (26%), and process-level contributions are from source/conveyance (41%), water purification (19%), water distribution (13%) and wastewater treatment (22%). Our evaluation suggests that the EFW may increase in importance in the future due to growth in population and income, and depletion of surface and shallow aquifer water resources in water-scarce regions. We are incorporating this element into an integrated assessment model (IAM) and linking it back to energy balance within that IAM. By doing this, we will then explore the impacts of EFW on the global energy market (e.g., changes in the share of groundwater use and desalination), and the uncertainty of future EFW under different shared social pathway (SSP) and representative concentration pathway (RCP) scenarios, and consequences on the emission of greenhouse gases as well. We expect these EFW induced impacts will be considerable, and will then have significant implications for adaptive management and policy making.

  16. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrogen dioxide in air and nitrite in water and soil samples

    SciTech Connect

    Pandurangappa, M.; Balasubramanian, N.

    1995-02-01

    A sensitive spectrophotometric method for the determination of nitrogen dioxide in air and nitrite in water and soil samples is described. Nitrogen dioxide in air is fixed as nitrite ion in alkaline sodium arsenite or in triethanolamine absorber solutions. The method is based on the diazo coupling reaction between p-nitro aniline and 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid. The azo dye formed under aqueous condition has an absorption maximum at 585nm and obeys Beer`s law over the range 0-25{mu}g of nitrite. The colour system is stable for 72h. The relative standard deviation is 2.7% for ten determinations at 15{mu}g of nitrite. The dye is extracted with 1:1 isoamyl alcohol-IBMK mixture and stabilisation with methanolic potassium hydroxide showed {lambda}{sub max} at 610nm. It obeys Beer`s law over the range 0-4{mu}g of nitrite. The colour system is stable for 40h in organic phase and the relative standard deviation is 2.5% for ten determinations at 3{mu}g of nitrite. The molar absorptivity of the colour system is 3.68 x 10{sup 4} Lmol{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1}. The effect of interfering gases and other ions on the determination of nitrite is described. The developed method has been applied for the determination of residual nitrogen dioxide gas present in the laboratory fume cupboard and automobile exhaust gases. In addition, the method has been applied for the determination of nitrite and nitrate in samples like water, soil and radiator coolants.

  17. Carbon dioxide and Water Vapor Fluxes of Winter Wheat and Tallgrass Prairie Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajgain, R.; Xiao, X.; Basara, J. B.; Wagle, P.; Zhou, Y.; Gowda, P. H.; Mahan, H. R.; Steiner, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and tallgrass prairie are common land cover types in the Southern Plains of the United States. In recent years, agricultural expansion into native grasslands has been extensive, particularly either managed pasture or dryland crops such as wheat. In this study, we measured the exchange of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes from two major ecosystems (winter wheat and tallgrass prairie) in the Southern Plains of the United States using the eddy covariance technique. The major objective of this study was to compare and contrast carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes between these two ecosystems for providing insights on how the conversion of tallgrass prairie grassland to winter wheat could impact the carbon and water budgets of the region. Daily net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) reached seasonal peaks of - 9.24 g C m-2 d-1 and - 6.23 g C m-2 d-1in winter wheat and tall grass prairie, respectively. The wheat ecosystem was a net sink of carbon for four months (February-May), whereas the tallgrass prairie ecosystem was a net sink of carbon for seven months (March-September). Although both ecosystems were sinks of carbon during their respective growing seasons, the wheat ecosystem was a net source of carbon on an annual scale (128 ± 46 g C m-2 yr-1) when fluxes from summer fallow period were considered. In contrast, the tallgrass prairie ecosystem was a net sink of carbon on an annual scale (-147 ± 30 g C m-2 yr-1). The daily ET reached seasonal maximum of 6.0 mm day-1 and 7.2 mm day-1in winter wheat and tallgrass prairie, respectively. Although, ecosystem water use efficiency (EWUE, the ratio of cumulative gross primary production (GPP) to evapotranspiration (ET)) was higher in wheat (13.1 g CO2 mm-1 ET) than in tallgrass prairie (7.6 g CO2 mm-1 ET) on a seasonal scale, it was slightly higher in tallgrass prairie (6.9 g CO2 mm-1 ET) than in wheat (6.2 g CO2 mm-1 ET) on an annual scale. Results suggest that the differences in

  18. In Situ Determination of the Water Condensation Mechanisms on Superhydrophobic and Superhydrophilic Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Macias-Montero, Manuel; Lopez-Santos, Carmen; Filippin, A Nicolas; Rico, Victor J; Espinos, Juan P; Fraxedas, Jordi; Perez-Dieste, Virginia; Escudero, Carlos; Gonzalez-Elipe, Agustin R; Borras, Ana

    2017-07-05

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructured surfaces based on high-density arrays of nanowires and nanotubes of photoactive titanium dioxide (TiO2) present a tunable wetting behavior from superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic states. These situations are depicted in a reversible way by simply irradiating with ultraviolet light (superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic) and storage in dark. In this article, we combine in situ environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and near ambient pressure photoemission analysis (NAPP) to understand this transition. These experiments reveal complementary information at microscopic and atomic level reflecting the surface wettability and chemical state modifications experienced by these 1D surfaces upon irradiation. We pay special attention to the role of the water condensation mechanisms and try to elucidate the relationship between apparent water contact angles of sessile drops under ambient conditions at the macroscale with the formation of droplets by water condensation at low temperature and increasing humidity on the nanotubes' surfaces. Thus, for the as-grown nanotubes, we reveal a metastable and superhydrophobic Cassie state for sessile drops that tunes toward water dropwise condensation at the microscale compatible with a partial hydrophobic Wenzel state. For the UV-irradiated surfaces, a filmwise wetting behavior is observed for both condensed water and sessile droplets. NAPP analyses show a hydroxyl accumulation on the as-grown nanotubes surfaces during the exposure to water condensation conditions, whereas the water filmwise condensation on a previously hydroxyl enriched surface is proved for the superhydrophilic counterpart.

  19. Molecular dynamics study of combustion reactions in supercritical environment. Part 1: Carbon dioxide and water force field parameters refitting and critical isotherms of binary mixtures

    DOE PAGES

    Masunov, Artem E.; Atlanov, Arseniy Alekseyevich; Vasu, Subith S.

    2016-10-04

    Oxy-fuel combustion process is expected to drastically increase the energy efficiency and enable easy carbon sequestration. In this technology the combustion products (carbon dioxide and water) are used to control the temperature and nitrogen is excluded from the combustion chamber, so that nitrogen oxide pollutants do not form. Therefore, in oxycombustion the carbon dioxide and water are present in large concentrations in their transcritical state, and may play an important role in kinetics. The computational chemistry methods may assist in understanding these effects, and Molecular Dynamics with ReaxFF force field seem to be a suitable tool for such a study.more » Here we investigate applicability of the ReaxFF to describe the critical phenomena in carbon dioxide and water and find that several nonbonding parameters need adjustment. We report the new parameter set, capable to reproduce the critical temperatures and pressures. Furthermore, the critical isotherms of CO2/H2O binary mixtures are computationally studied here for the first time and their critical parameters are reported.« less

  20. Molecular dynamics study of combustion reactions in supercritical environment. Part 1: Carbon dioxide and water force field parameters refitting and critical isotherms of binary mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Masunov, Artem E.; Atlanov, Arseniy Alekseyevich; Vasu, Subith S.

    2016-10-04

    Oxy-fuel combustion process is expected to drastically increase the energy efficiency and enable easy carbon sequestration. In this technology the combustion products (carbon dioxide and water) are used to control the temperature and nitrogen is excluded from the combustion chamber, so that nitrogen oxide pollutants do not form. Therefore, in oxycombustion the carbon dioxide and water are present in large concentrations in their transcritical state, and may play an important role in kinetics. The computational chemistry methods may assist in understanding these effects, and Molecular Dynamics with ReaxFF force field seem to be a suitable tool for such a study. Here we investigate applicability of the ReaxFF to describe the critical phenomena in carbon dioxide and water and find that several nonbonding parameters need adjustment. We report the new parameter set, capable to reproduce the critical temperatures and pressures. Furthermore, the critical isotherms of CO2/H2O binary mixtures are computationally studied here for the first time and their critical parameters are reported.

  1. Molecular dynamics study of combustion reactions in supercritical environment. Part 1: Carbon dioxide and water force field parameters refitting and critical isotherms of binary mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Masunov, Artem E.; Atlanov, Arseniy Alekseyevich; Vasu, Subith S.

    2016-10-04

    Oxy-fuel combustion process is expected to drastically increase the energy efficiency and enable easy carbon sequestration. In this technology the combustion products (carbon dioxide and water) are used to control the temperature and nitrogen is excluded from the combustion chamber, so that nitrogen oxide pollutants do not form. Therefore, in oxycombustion the carbon dioxide and water are present in large concentrations in their transcritical state, and may play an important role in kinetics. The computational chemistry methods may assist in understanding these effects, and Molecular Dynamics with ReaxFF force field seem to be a suitable tool for such a study. Here we investigate applicability of the ReaxFF to describe the critical phenomena in carbon dioxide and water and find that several nonbonding parameters need adjustment. We report the new parameter set, capable to reproduce the critical temperatures and pressures. Furthermore, the critical isotherms of CO2/H2O binary mixtures are computationally studied here for the first time and their critical parameters are reported.

  2. A model of vertical exchange of water and carbon dioxide in the boreal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchment, L. S.; Demidov, V. N.; Startseva, Z. P.

    2003-04-01

    The vertical movement of soil moisture is described by the Richards equation including the term accounting for water extraction by plant roots. Evapotranspiration is presented in the form of two separate fluxes: the evaporation from the soil surface and the transpiration. The bulb formulas have been used to calculate both these components. The ground and leave temperatures are calculated on the basis of heat balance approach using the solar radiation components as input data. The stomatal resistance is a function of leave water potential and photosynthesis. The photosynthesis is calculated as the diffusion of carbon dioxide through the stomatal openings or the leaf photosynthesis model is applied. To estimate the canopy dark respiration and the respiration from soil, root and stem empirical formulas are used. The model has been calibrated and validated on the basis of tower flux and meteorological data obtained for Southern Study Area Old Jack Pine site (Saskatchevan, Canada) during the 1994 BOREAS project. The influence of soil moisture content on the carbon dioxide fluxes and the photosynthesis has been investigated.

  3. Nanostructured water and carbon dioxide inside collapsing carbon nanotubes at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wenwen; Cerqueira, Tiago F T; Botti, Silvana; Marques, Miguel A L; San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2016-07-20

    We present simulations of the collapse under hydrostatic pressure of carbon nanotubes containing either water or carbon dioxide. We show that the molecules inside the tube alter the dynamics of the collapse process, providing either mechanical support and increasing the collapse pressure, or reducing mechanical stability. At the same time the nanotube acts as a nanoanvil, and the confinement leads to the nanostructuring of the molecules inside the collapsed tube. In this way, depending on the pressure and on the concentration of water or carbon dioxide inside the nanotube, we observe the formation of 1D molecular chains, 2D nanoribbons, and even molecular single and multi-walled nanotubes. The structure of the encapsulated molecules correlates with the mechanical response of the nanotube, opening up opportunities for the development of new devices or composite materials. Our analysis is quite general and it can be extended to other molecules in carbon nanotube nanoanvils, providing a strategy to obtain a variety of nano-objects with controlled features.

  4. Henry Cavendish (1731-1810): hydrogen, carbon dioxide, water, and weighing the world.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-07-01

    Henry Cavendish (1731-1810) was an outstanding chemist and physicist. Although he was not a major figure in the history of respiratory physiology he made important discoveries concerning hydrogen, carbon dioxide, atmospheric air, and water. Hydrogen had been prepared earlier by Boyle but its properties had not been recognized; Cavendish described these in detail, including the density of the gas. Carbon dioxide had also previously been studied by Black, but Cavendish clarified its properties and measured its density. He was the first person to accurately analyze atmospheric air and reported an oxygen concentration very close to the currently accepted value. When he removed all the oxygen and nitrogen from an air sample, he found that there was a residual portion of about 0.8% that he could not characterize. Later this was shown to be argon. He produced large amounts of water by burning hydrogen in oxygen and recognized that these were its only constituents. Cavendish also worked on electricity and heat. However, his main contribution outside chemistry was an audacious experiment to measure the density of the earth, which he referred to as "weighing the world." This involved determining the gravitational attraction between lead spheres in a specially constructed building. Although this was a simple experiment in principle, there were numerous complexities that he overcame with meticulous attention to experimental details. His result was very close to the modern accepted value. The Cavendish Experiment, as it is called, assures his place in the history of science.

  5. Water shortages: the next energy crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, B.

    1983-04-01

    Water shortages in the late 1980s could rival the energy crisis of the 70s because of world demand for irrigation to feed a growing population. The environmental and energy costs of new systems for water transfer and irrigation will be enormous for each of the major food-producing countries. Competition between urban and agricultural water users and preservationists will be intense. As with the discovery that wasted energy can be a potential resource, society must recycle wasted water to reverse the trend of drawing down ground-water reserves. Current estimates are that the Herculean water projects of the US, Soviet Union, China, and India barely achieve a 50% efficiency. A shift in philosophy from supply to demand management will be helped by higher prices and new irrigation techniques. (DCK)

  6. Experimental carbon dioxide laser brain lesions and intracranial dynamics. Part 2. Effect on brain water content and its response to acute therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tiznado, E.G.; James, H.E.; Moore, S.

    1985-04-01

    Experimental brain lesions were created over the left parietooccipital cortex of the albino rabbit through the intact dura mater with high radiating carbon dioxide laser energy. The brain water content was studied 2, 6, and 24 hours after the insult. Another two groups of animals received acute therapy with either dexamethasone (1 mg/kg) or furosemide (1 mg/kg). In all groups, Evans blue extravasation uniformly extended from the impact crater into the surrounding white matter. The brain water content in the gray matter was elevated from the control value by 2 hours after impact and remained elevated at 6 and 24 hours. The white matter brain water content did not increase until 6 hours after impact and remained elevated in the 24-hour group. After dexamethasone treatment, there was a significant decrease of water in the gray matter, but not in the white matter. With furosemide therapy, there was no reduction of gray or white matter brain water.

  7. Significantly improving trace thallium removal from surface waters during coagulation enhanced by nanosized manganese dioxide.

    PubMed

    Huangfu, Xiaoliu; Ma, Chengxue; Ma, Jun; He, Qiang; Yang, Chun; Jiang, Jin; Wang, Yaan; Wu, Zhengsong

    2017-02-01

    Thallium (Tl) is an element of high toxicity and significant accumulation in human body. There is an urgent need for the development of appropriate strategies for trace Tl removal in drinking water treatment plants. In this study, the efficiency and mechanism of trace Tl (0.5 μg/L) removal by conventional coagulation enhanced by nanosized manganese dioxide (nMnO2) were explored in simulated water and two representative surface waters (a river water and a reservoir water obtained from Northeast China). Experimental results showed that nMnO2 significantly improve Tl(I) removal from selected waters. The removal efficiency was dramatically higher in the simulated water, demonstrating by less than 0.1 μg/L Tl residual. The enhancement of trace Tl removal in the surface waters decreased to a certain extent. Both adjusting water pH to alkaline condition and preoxidation of Tl(I) to Tl(III) benefit trace Tl removal from surface waters. Data also indicated that competitive cation of Ca(2+) decreased the efficiency of trace Tl removal, resulting from the reduction of Tl adsorption on nMnO2. Humic acid could largely low Tl removal efficiency during nMnO2 enhanced coagulation processes. Trace elemental Tl firstly adsorbed on nMnO2 and then removed accompanying with nMnO2 settling. The information obtained in the present study may provide a potential strategy for drinking water treatment plants threatened by trace Tl.

  8. Methane Production from Carbon Dioxide and Increasing Energy Return of Investment (EROI) in Shale Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akoubeh, Osama T.

    The utilization of Greenhouse gases (GHG) CO2 and CH4 caught Government & Scientists attention due to global warming effects in our climate changes , most of GHG emission are responsible for this changes are coming from the burning fossil fuel. Carbon dioxide classified as one of most reasons where gases from burning fossil fuels is the largest single source of greenhouse gas emissions used by human activities , even the old well known mechanism to convert CO2 to organic species using Sabatier reaction cannot be applied in commercial application due to energy required to provide hydrogen gas which is important to proceed with this reaction ,poisoning of Nickel catalyst or other used catalyst through reaction, minor products produced such as methanol, diethyl ether , formic acid and other hydrocarbons, the limitation of this reaction at low temperature.

  9. Development of a local carbon dioxide emissions inventory based on energy demand and waste production.

    PubMed

    Gomes, João; Nascimento, Joana; Rodrigues, Helena

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes the study that led to the development of a carbon dioxide emissions matrix for the Oeiras municipality, one of the largest Portuguese municipalities, located in the metropolitan area of Lisbon. This matrix takes into account the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to an increase of electricity demand in buildings as well as solid and liquid wastes treatment from the domestic and services sectors. Using emission factors that were calculated from the relationship between the electricity produced and amount of treated wastes, the GHC emissions in the Oeiras municipality were estimated for a time series of 6 yr (1998-2003). The obtained results showed that the electricity sector accounts for approximately 75% of the municipal emissions in 2003. This study was developed to obtain tools to base options and actions to be undertaken by local authorities such as energy planning and also public information.

  10. Water for Energy: Quantifying Water Use in the United States Energy Economy as of 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubert, E.; Sanders, K.

    2016-12-01

    The US energy economy requires significant quantities of water for primary energy extraction, processing and refining, conversion to secondary forms, waste disposal and site remediation. Major shifts in the energy sector have affected the water requirements of the US energy system in ways that are widely acknowledged but poorly quantified. For example, hydraulic fracturing represents a new demand for water, but wind turbines and solar photovoltaics require essentially no water. Further, many water intensity factors commonly used in energy studies are several decades old. This work updates water intensity factors for the US energy system based on recent data and thermodynamic principles, with a near comprehensive treatment of 16 energy fuel cycles from resource capture through post-conversion waste management. For the first time, we also provide absolute estimates of water withdrawn and consumed for energy, differentiated by water source (surface, ground, or reclaimed) and quality (fresh, brackish, saline, and brine). We find that as of 2014, the US consumed approximately 19 billion cubic meters (m3) and withdrew 210 billion m3 of water for the energy system. Most of this water was freshwater (76% of consumption and 86% of withdrawal). Essentially all withdrawals (excluding flow through hydroelectric facilities) are for thermoelectric power plant cooling, accounting for about 38% of total US water withdrawals. Water consumption for energy is estimated at about 12% of total US water consumption, of which an estimated 37% and 17% is for thermoelectric cooling and evaporation from hydroelectric reservoirs, respectively. Withdrawals and consumption for life cycle stages other than thermoelectric cooling are reported in detail, with locally relevant findings like basin-specific water use for coal mining. This work provides a new baseline understanding of water use for the changing US energy economy that can guide decision makers integrating water and energy decisions.

  11. Flexible Pipes-Permeation of Methane, Carbon Dioxide and Water Through Tefzel ETFE: Experiments 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Per Arne; Hydro, Norsk

    1997-01-01

    The permeation of a mixture of CH4 and CO2 (97% CH4 and 3% CO2) saturated with water vapour through Tefzel has been studied at 950 C and 25 and 50 bars. Tefzel is the Du Pont trademark of an ETFE (ethylenetetrafluorethylene) which is a copolymer of ethylene and tetrafluorethylene. This material might be used as inner plastic lining of flexible pipes. For methane and carbon dioxide, the permeability of Tefzel is higher than the deplasticized PVDF (Polyvinylidenefluoride), but lower than the plasticized PVDF. For water, the situation seems to be the other way round; Tefzel has a lower permeability than deplasticized PVDF. Whether the permeability tests on Tefzel at higher temperatures and pressures will be pursued or not, will be considered by the steering committee of the CAPP project in May.

  12. Analysis of field measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, Shashi B.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of the field measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes is discussed. These data were examined in conjunction with reflectance obtained from helicopter mounted Modular Multiband Radiometer. These measurements are representative of the canopy scale (10 to 100 m)(exp 2) and provide a good basis for investigating the hypotheses/relationship potentially useful in remote sensing applications. All the micrometeorological data collected during FIFE-89 were processed and fluxes of CO2, water vapor, and sensible heat were calculated. Soil CO2 fluxes were also estimated. Employing these soil CO2 flux values, in conjunction with micrometeorological measurements, canopy photosynthesis is being estimated. A biochemical model of leaf photosynthesis was adapted to the prairie vegetation. The modeled leaf photosynthesis rates were scaled up to the canopy level. This model and a multiplicative stomatal conductance model are also used to calculate canopy conductance.

  13. Energy and water in the Great Lakes.

    SciTech Connect

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll

    2011-11-01

    The nexus between thermoelectric power production and water use is not uniform across the U.S., but rather differs according to regional physiography, demography, power plant fleet composition, and the transmission network. That is, in some regions water demand for thermoelectric production is relatively small while in other regions it represents the dominate use. The later is the case for the Great Lakes region, which has important implications for the water resources and aquatic ecology of the Great Lakes watershed. This is today, but what about the future? Projected demographic trends, shifting lifestyles, and economic growth coupled with the threat of global climate change and mounting pressure for greater U.S. energy security could have profound effects on the region's energy future. Planning for such an uncertain future is further complicated by the fact that energy and environmental planning and regulatory decisionmaking is largely bifurcated in the region, with environmental and water resource concerns generally taken into account after new energy facilities and technologies have been proposed, or practices are already in place. Based on these confounding needs, the objective of this effort is to develop Great Lakes-specific methods and tools to integrate energy and water resource planning and thereby support the dual goals of smarter energy planning and development, and protection of Great Lakes water resources. Guiding policies for this planning are the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The desired outcome of integrated energy-water-aquatic resource planning is a more sustainable regional energy mix for the Great Lakes basin ecosystem.

  14. Great Lakes Energy-Water Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tidwell, Vincent

    2014-09-18

    The nexus between thermoelectric power production and water use is not uniform across the U.S., but rather differs according to regional physiography, demography, power plant fleet composition, and the transmission network. That is, in some regions water demand for thermoelectric production is relatively small while in other regions it represents the dominate use. The later is the case for the Great Lakes region, which has important implications for the water resources and aquatic ecology of the Great Lakes watershed. This is today, but what about the future? Projected demographic trends, shifting lifestyles, and economic growth coupled with the threat of global climate change and mounting pressure for greater U.S. energy security could have profound effects on the region’s energy future. Planning for such an uncertain future is further complicated by the fact that energy and environmental planning and regulatory decision-making is largely bifurcated in the region, with environmental and water resource concerns generally taken into account after new energy facilities and technologies have been proposed, or practices are already in place. Based on these confounding needs, the objective of this effort is to develop Great Lakes-specific methods and tools to integrate energy and water resource planning and thereby support the dual goals of smarter energy planning and development, and protection of Great Lakes water resources. Guiding policies for this planning are the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The desired outcome of integrated energy-water-aquatic resource planning is a more sustainable regional energy mix for the Great Lakes basin ecosystem.

  15. Water Desalination Systems Powered by Solar Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barseghyan, A.

    2015-12-01

    The supply of potable water from polluted rivers, lakes, unsafe wells, etc. is a problem of high priority. One of the most effective methods to obtain low cost drinking water is desalination. Advanced water treatment system powered by Solar Energy and based on electrodialysis for water desalination and purification, is suggested. Technological and economic evaluations and the benefits of the suggested system are discussed. The Advanced Water Treatment System proposed clears water not only from different salts, but also from some infections, thus decreasing the count of diseases which are caused by the usage of non-clear water. Using Solar Energy makes the system stand alone which is convenient to use in places where power supply is problem.

  16. Energy Efficiency in Water and Wastewater Facilities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This guide describes how water and wastewater facilities can lead by example and achieve multiple benefits by improving the energy efficiency of their new, existing, and renovated buildings and their day-to-day operations.

  17. On the Transient Correlation Structure of Water Vapor and Carbon Dioxide Time Series Over Low-Profile Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, T. M.; Sahu, P.

    2007-12-01

    Much work has previously centered on temperature and water vapor similarity as a result of its application to the flux-variance method. Less attention, however, has been paid to similarity between carbon dioxide and water vapor. In this study, we analyze water vapor and carbon dioxide time series to infer causes of departure from correlation coefficients of +/-1. Photosynthesis and transpiration, both stomatal processes, have identical sources and sinks. Therefore, under hypothetical conditions in which carbon and water fluxes are comprised of only these two components, the effects of entrainment (which operates at a large scale) and differences in molecular diffusivities between water vapor and carbon dioxide (which operates at a small scale) can cause degradation in the correlation between the two time series. Under more realistic conditions in which the non- stomatal processes of respiration and bare evaporation are active, additional degradation is imparted upon the correlation. The correlation structure between water vapor and carbon dioxide time series is analyzed using high- frequency data collected over an early-growth corn field on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. We contrast the correlations observed following a long dry-down period with those observed shortly after a significant rainfall, when both bare soil evaporation and respiration fluxes became enhanced. Wavelet analysis is applied to the time series to distinguish between the effects of small-scale vs. large-scale process on the degradation of the correlation.

  18. SWEEP - Save Water & Energy Education Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Gregory P.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Hillman, Tim C.; Hadley, Adam; Ledbetter, Marc R.; Payson, David R.

    2001-05-03

    The objective of this study was to develop, monitor, analyze, and report on an integrated resource-conservation program highlighting efficient residential appliances and fixtures. The sites of study were 50 homes in two water-constrained communities located in Oregon. The program was designed to maximize water savings to these communities and to serve as a model for other communities seeking an integrated approach to energy and water resource efficiency. The program included the installation and in-place evaluation of energy- and water-efficient devices including the following: horizontal axis clothes washers (and the matching clothes dryers), resource-efficient dishwashers, an innovative dual flush low-flow toilet, low-flow showerheads, and faucet aerators. The significance of this activity lies in its integrated approach and unique metering evaluation of individual end-use, aggregated residential total use, and system-wide energy and water benefits.

  19. SWEEP - Save Water and Energy Education Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Gregory P; Elliott, Douglas B; Hillman, Tim C; Hadley, Adam; Ledbetter, Marc R; Payson, David R

    2001-05-03

    The objective of this study was to develop, monitor, analyze, and report on an integrated resource-conservation program highlighting efficient residential appliances and fixtures. The sites of study were 50 homes in two water-constrained communities located in Oregon. The program was designed to maximize water savings to these communities and to serve as a model for other communities seeking an integrated approach to energy and water resource efficiency. The program included the installation and in-place evaluation of energy- and water-efficient devices including the following: horizontal axis clothes washers (and the matching clothes dryers), resource-efficient dishwashers, an innovative dual flush low-flow toilet, low-flow showerheads, and faucet aerators. The significance of this activity lies in its integrated approach and unique metering evaluation of individual end-use, aggregated residential total use, and system-wide energy and water benefits.

  20. Sabatier Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly Development for Closed Loop Water Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Frederick; Perry, Jay; Murdoch, Karen; Goldblatt, Loel

    2004-01-01

    The Sabatier Carbon Dioxide Reduction System (CRA) offers water recovery on a long duration space mission to reduce water resupply. Currently, NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International, Inc. (HSSSI), and Southwest Research Institute (SWRI) are working together to develop a Sabatier CRA for the International Space Station (ISS). This effort is being funded by the Office of Biological and Physical Research (Code U)/Advanced Life Support program which is administered by NASA JSC. The Sabatier CRA is the next step in closing the oxygen life support loop on future space missions. The Sabatier reaction combines the waste carbon dioxide (recovered from crew metabolism) with waste hydrogen (a byproduct of electrolysis to produce oxygen) to produce water and methane (CH4). On ISS, the methane would be vented overboard, however the methane can be utilized for propulsion during a planetary exploration mission. Based on a crew size of 7-equivalent people, the Sabatier CRA can produce as much a 2000 lb/year water. Use of the Sabatier CRA will significantly reduce the amount of water that needs to be resupplied to the ISS on a yearly basis, at a tremendous cost saving to the program. Additionally, by recycling this additional water, the Sabatier CRA enables additional launch capacity for science experiments to be brought up to the ISS. The NASA/Industry team noted above has been working to reduce technical risks associated with the Sabatier CRA system. To date the technical risks have been considerably reduced, bringing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) from TRL 4 to TRL 5/6. In doing so, the team has developed the system schematic, system models, control scheme, produced engineering development unit (EDU) hardware, performed limited integration testing of the EDU's and verified system modeling through testing. Additionally, the system schematic has been evaluated for failure modes and hazards

  1. The effects of low level chlorination and chlorine dioxide on biofouling control in a once-through service water system

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, W.E. Jr.

    1995-06-01

    Continuous chlorination has been successfully used for the control of Corbicula at a nuclear power plant located on the Chattahoochee River in southeastern Alabama, since 1986. The purpose of this study was to investigate further minimization of chlorine usage and determine if chlorine dioxide is a feasible alternative. Four continuous biocide treatments were evaluated for macro and microfouling control effectiveness, operational feasibility, and environmental acceptability. One semi-continuous chlorination treatment was also evaluated for macrofouling control effectiveness. Higher treatment residuals were possible with chlorine dioxide than with chlorination due to the river discharge limitations. At the levels tested, continuous chlorine dioxide was significantly more effective in providing both macro and microfouling control. Semi-continuous chlorination was just as effective as continuous chlorination for controlling macrofouling. The Corbicula treatment programs that were tested should all provide sufficient control for zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide was not as cost effective as chlorination for providing macrofouling control. The semi-continuous treatment save 50% on chemical usage and will allow for the simultaneous treatment of two service water systems. Chlorite levels produced during the chlorine dioxide treatments were found to be environmentally acceptable. Levels of trihalomethanes in the chlorinated service water were less than the maximum levels allowed in drinking water.

  2. [A pilot study on trihalomethane formation in water treated by chlorine dioxide].

    PubMed

    Li, J; Yu, Z; Gao, M

    1996-01-01

    Trihalomethane (THM) formation was determined by gas chromatography in water disinfected with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) only or ClO2 combined with chlorine (Cl2), to lay a basis for water disinfected with ClO2. Results showed no THM was produced in water disinfected with ClO2 only if without existence of bromine (Br) ion in it; certain amount of bromoform could be formed with existence of bromine ion, and THM formation could be inhibited by ClO2 and Cl2, with a ratio of greater than 1 between them. Light irradiation could decrease the amount of THM produced whether in disinfection with ClO2 or combination with ClO2 and Cl2. No significant effect of pH value of water on THM formation was observed, but pH should be controlled under neutral or slightly acidic to ensure the concentration of ClO2 in water.

  3. Crack Extension in Hydraulic Fracturing of Shale Cores Using Viscous Oil, Water, and Liquid Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennour, Ziad; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Nagaya, Yuya; Chen, Youqing; Nara, Yoshitaka; Chen, Qu; Sekine, Kotaro; Nagano, Yu

    2015-07-01

    We performed hydraulic fracturing experiments on cylindrical cores of anisotropic shale obtained by drilling normal to the sedimentary plane. Experiments were conducted under ambient condition and uniaxial stresses, using three types of fracturing fluid: viscous oil, water, and liquid carbon dioxide (L-CO2). In the experiments using water and oil, cracks extended along the loading direction normal to the sedimentary plane under the uniaxial loading and extended along the sedimentary plane without loading. These results suggest that the direction of crack extension is strongly affected by in situ stress conditions. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that hydraulic fracturing with viscous oil produced linear cracks with few branches, whereas that with water produced cracks with many branches inclining from the loading axis. Statistical analysis of P wave polarity of acoustic emission waveforms showed that viscous oil tended to induce Mode I fracture, whereas both water and L-CO2 tended to induce Mode II fracture. Crack extension upon injection of L-CO2 was independent of loading condition unlike extension for the other two fluids. This result seemed attributable to the low viscosity of L-CO2 and was consistent with previous observations for granite specimens that low-viscosity fluids like CO2 tend to induce widely extending cracks with many branches, with Mode II fractures being dominant. These features are more advantageous for shale gas production than those induced by injection of conventional slick water.

  4. Interaction of hydrogen chloride and water with oxide surfaces. III - Titanium dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siriwardane, R. V.; Wightman, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen chloride and water vapors on five TiO2 powders in both the anatase and rutile crystalline forms was studied as a function of temperature, pressure, and outgas conditions. The adsorbents were characterized utilizing X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, surface area analysis, indicator method, microelectrophoresis, XPS, and infrared spectroscopy. It was found that both outgas temperature and adsorption temperature influenced the adsorption of water vapor on TiO2, while water vapor adsorption on TiO2 was completely reversible. It is argued that the number of hydroxyl groups present on the surface determines the adsorption capacity of water on the different titanium dioxides. It was found that heats of immersion in water were affected significantly by outgas temperature. Hydrogen chloride adsorption isotherms at 30 C measured on TiO2 after outgassing at 100-400 C showed that a part of the total HCl adsorbed was irreversibly adsorbed. The highest HCl adsorption capacity per unit area was exhibited by anatase, while pure rutile exhibited the lowest adsorption capacity.

  5. Interaction of hydrogen chloride and water with oxide surfaces. III - Titanium dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siriwardane, R. V.; Wightman, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen chloride and water vapors on five TiO2 powders in both the anatase and rutile crystalline forms was studied as a function of temperature, pressure, and outgas conditions. The adsorbents were characterized utilizing X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, surface area analysis, indicator method, microelectrophoresis, XPS, and infrared spectroscopy. It was found that both outgas temperature and adsorption temperature influenced the adsorption of water vapor on TiO2, while water vapor adsorption on TiO2 was completely reversible. It is argued that the number of hydroxyl groups present on the surface determines the adsorption capacity of water on the different titanium dioxides. It was found that heats of immersion in water were affected significantly by outgas temperature. Hydrogen chloride adsorption isotherms at 30 C measured on TiO2 after outgassing at 100-400 C showed that a part of the total HCl adsorbed was irreversibly adsorbed. The highest HCl adsorption capacity per unit area was exhibited by anatase, while pure rutile exhibited the lowest adsorption capacity.

  6. Energy requirements for waste water treatment.

    PubMed

    Svardal, K; Kroiss, H

    2011-01-01

    The actual mathematical models describing global climate closely link the detected increase in global temperature to anthropogenic activity. The only energy source we can rely on in a long perspective is solar irradiation which is in the order of 10,000 kW/inhabitant. The actual primary power consumption (mainly based on fossil resources) in the developed countries is in the range of 5 to 10 kW/inhabitant. The total power contained in our nutrition is in the range of 0.11 kW/inhabitant. The organic pollution of domestic waste water corresponds to approximately 0.018 kW/inhabitant. The nutrients contained in the waste water can also be converted into energy equivalents replacing market fertiliser production. This energy equivalent is in the range of 0.009 kW/inhabitant. Hence waste water will never be a relevant source of energy as long as our primary energy consumption is in the range of several kW/inhabitant. The annual mean primary power demand of conventional municipal waste water treatment with nutrient removal is in the range of 0.003-0.015 kW/inhabitant. In principle it is already possible to reduce this value for external energy supply to zero. Such plants should be connected to an electrical grid in order to keep investment costs low. Peak energy demand will be supported from the grid and surplus electric energy from the plant can be is fed to the grid. Zero 'carbon footprint' will not be affected by this solution. Energy minimisation must never negatively affect treatment efficiency because water quality conservation is more important for sustainable development than the possible reduction in energy demand. This argument is strongly supported by economical considerations as the fixed costs for waste water infrastructure are dominant.

  7. Thorium dioxide: properties and nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect

    Belle, J.; Berman, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    This is the sixth book on reactor materials published under sponsorship of the Naval Reactors Office of the United States Department of Energy, formerly the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This book presents a comprehensive compilation of the most significant properties of thorium dioxide, much like the book Uranium Dioxide: Properties and Nuclear Applications presented information on the fuel material used in the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor core.

  8. Conceptual Design of Optimized Fossil Energy Systems with Capture and Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Nils Johnson; Joan Ogden

    2010-12-31

    In this final report, we describe research results from Phase 2 of a technical/economic study of fossil hydrogen energy systems with carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and storage (CCS). CO{sub 2} capture and storage, or alternatively, CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration, involves capturing CO{sub 2} from large point sources and then injecting it into deep underground reservoirs for long-term storage. By preventing CO{sub 2} emissions into the atmosphere, this technology has significant potential to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from fossil-based facilities in the power and industrial sectors. Furthermore, the application of CCS to power plants and hydrogen production facilities can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions associated with electric vehicles (EVs) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs) and, thus, can also improve GHG emissions in the transportation sector. This research specifically examines strategies for transitioning to large-scale coal-derived energy systems with CCS for both hydrogen fuel production and electricity generation. A particular emphasis is on the development of spatially-explicit modeling tools for examining how these energy systems might develop in real geographic regions. We employ an integrated modeling approach that addresses all infrastructure components involved in the transition to these energy systems. The overall objective is to better understand the system design issues and economics associated with the widespread deployment of hydrogen and CCS infrastructure in real regions. Specific objectives of this research are to: Develop improved techno-economic models for all components required for the deployment of both hydrogen and CCS infrastructure, Develop novel modeling methods that combine detailed spatial data with optimization tools to explore spatially-explicit transition strategies, Conduct regional case studies to explore how these energy systems might develop in different regions of the United States, and Examine how the

  9. Nuclear Energy for Water Desalting, A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhns, Helen F., Comp.; And Others

    This bibliography includes 215 abstracts of publications on the use of nuclear energy in the production of potable water from saline or brackish waters. The uses of nuclear reactors, radioisotopic heat sources, and nuclear explosives are covered in relation to the various desalination methods available. Literature through April 1967 has been…

  10. Preparation of platinum modified titanium dioxide nanoparticles with the use of laser ablation in water.

    PubMed

    Siuzdak, K; Sawczak, M; Klein, M; Nowaczyk, G; Jurga, S; Cenian, A

    2014-08-07

    We report on the preparation method of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide modified with platinum by using nanosecond laser ablation in liquid (LAL). Titania in the form of anatase crystals has been prepared in a two-stage process. Initially, irradiation by laser beam of a titanium metal plate fixed in a glass container filled with deionized water was conducted. After that, the ablation process was continued, with the use of a platinum target placed in a freshly obtained titania colloid. In this work, characterization of the obtained nanoparticles, based on spectroscopic techniques--Raman, X-ray photoelectron and UV-vis reflectance spectroscopy--is given. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to describe particle morphology. On the basis of photocatalytic studies we observed the rate of degradation process of methylene blue (MB) (a model organic pollution) in the presence of Pt modified titania in comparison to pure TiO2--as a reference case. Physical and chemical mechanisms of the formation of platinum modified titania are also discussed here. Stable colloidal suspensions containing Pt modified titanium dioxide crystalline anatase particles show an almost perfect spherical shape with diameters ranging from 5 to 30 nm. The TiO2 nanoparticles decorated with platinum exhibit much higher (up to 30%) photocatalytic activity towards the degradation of MB under UV illumination than pure titania.

  11. Energy Primer: Solar, Water, Wind, and Biofuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portola Inst., Inc., Menlo Park, CA.

    This is a comprehensive, fairly technical book about renewable forms of energy--solar, water, wind, and biofuels. The biofuels section covers biomass energy, agriculture, aquaculture, alcohol, methane, and wood. The focus is on small-scale systems which can be applied to the needs of the individual, small group, or community. More than one-fourth…

  12. Energy Primer: Solar, Water, Wind, and Biofuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portola Inst., Inc., Menlo Park, CA.

    This is a comprehensive, fairly technical book about renewable forms of energy--solar, water, wind, and biofuels. The biofuels section covers biomass energy, agriculture, aquaculture, alcohol, methane, and wood. The focus is on small-scale systems which can be applied to the needs of the individual, small group, or community. More than one-fourth…

  13. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles increase sensitivity in the next generation of the water flea Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Mirco; Seitz, Frank; Rosenfeldt, Ricki R; Schulz, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The nanoparticle industry is expected to become a trillion dollar business in the near future. Therefore, the unintentional introduction of nanoparticles into the environment is increasingly likely. However, currently applied risk-assessment practices require further adaptation to accommodate the intrinsic nature of engineered nanoparticles. Combining a chronic flow-through exposure system with subsequent acute toxicity tests for the standard test organism Daphnia magna, we found that juvenile offspring of adults that were previously exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles exhibit a significantly increased sensitivity to titanium dioxide nanoparticles compared with the offspring of unexposed adults, as displayed by lower 96 h-EC(50) values. This observation is particularly remarkable because adults exhibited no differences among treatments in terms of typically assessed endpoints, such as sensitivity, number of offspring, or energy reserves. Hence, the present study suggests that ecotoxicological research requires further development to include the assessment of the environmental risks of nanoparticles for the next and hence not directly exposed generation, which is currently not included in standard test protocols.

  14. A new method of applying a controlled soil water stress, and its effect on the growth of cotton and soybean seedlings at ambient and elevated carbon dioxide

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While numerous studies have shown that elevated carbon dioxide can delay soil water depletion by causing partial stomatal closure, few studies have compared responses of plant growth to the same soil water deficits imposed at ambient and elevated carbon dioxide. We applied a vacuum to ceramic cups ...

  15. Photochemical generation of carbon monoxide and hydrogen by reduction of carbon dioxide and water under visible light irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lehn, Jean-Marie; Ziessel, Raymond

    1982-01-01

    Visible light irradiation of solutions of Ru(2,2′-bipyridine)32+, cobalt(II) chloride, and carbon dioxide in acetonitrile/water/triethylamine generates simultaneously carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The reaction involves photoinduced reduction of CO2 and H2O, triethylamine serving as electron donor in the Ru(2,2′-bipyridine)32+/Co2+ system. The amount of gas (CO + H2) produced and the selectivity ratio CO/H2 depend markedly on the composition of the system. Addition of free bipyridine strongly decreases CO generation but increases H2 production. With different tertiary amines, NR3, both the quantity (CO + H2) and the ratio CO/H2 increase markedly along the sequence R = methyl, ethyl, propyl. Higher selectivity for CO2 reduction to CO in preference to water reduction occurs when triethanolamine is used instead of triethylamine. CoCl2 is the most efficient mediator for both CO and H2 generation and specifically promotes CO formation, whereas salts of other cations studied only yield H2. The mechanism of the reaction may involve intermediate formation of Co(I) species. These processes represent an abiotic photosynthetic system allowing simultaneous generation of CO and H2 and regulation of the CO/H2 ratio. Mechanistic studies and explorations of other components that may increase efficiency and product selectivity should be carried out. The results obtained are also of significance for solar energy conversion with consumption of a pollutant, CO2. PMID:16593151

  16. Lifetime Prediction of Polyethylene Pipes Transporting Drinking Water in the Presence of Chlorine Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, X.; Audouin, L.; Verdu, J.

    2008-08-01

    A kinetic model for lifetime prediction of polyethylene pipes transporting pressurized water disinfected by chlorine dioxide (DOC) has been elaborated. This model is composed of three sub-models: —A system of differential equations, derived from a realistic mechanistic scheme for radical chain oxidation in the presence of DOC of stabilized polyethylene (PE), giving access to the spatial distribution of structural changes in the pipe wall and its evolution against time of exposure; —The classical Saito's equation to predict the profiles of average molar masses from the spatial distribution of chain scissions and crosslinking events; —An empirical creep equation and an empirical fracture criterion derived from regression curves obtained in pure water. It is assumed that chemical degradation modifies only the time to transition tc between ductile and brittle regimes of failure, and that tc is linked to the weight average molar mass by a power law. By combining these three sub-models, it is possible to predict the time to failure tF under the coupled effects of pressure and chemical degradation. In current use conditions (under 3-12 bars water pressure, at 15 °C, in the presence of 0.15 mg of DOC per liter of water), the model predicts a tF of the order of 15 years against more than 50 years expected lifetime, that agrees well with experimental results.

  17. Interactions between amino-phosphonates pesticides and titanium dioxide nanoparticle in water: consequences on their mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilina, Svetlana; Baran, Nicole; Slomberg, Danielle; Devau, Nicolas; Pariat, Anne; Sani-Kast, Nicole; Scheringer, Martin; Labille, Jérôme; Ollivier, patrick

    2017-04-01

    Water quality is increasingly monitored worldwide, where various levels of nitrate and pesticide and/or metabolite contamination have been confirmed. Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] is probably the most widely used herbicide in the world. AMPA [aminomethylphosphonic acid] is its main degradation product. Although glyphosate mobility in the environment is supposed to be limited because of its high adsorption capacity in soils several studies show that glyphosate may reach both surface and ground-waters either by transport in dissolved form, or particle bonded onto soil colloids. At the same time, in recent years, rapid development of new technologies has resulted in a significant increase in the production and uses of products containing nanoparticles, notably dioxide titanium nanoparticles. This enthusiasm for nanotechnology is however accompanied by awareness about the potential release and impact of the nanoparticles in the environment. The aim of the study is to increase the knowledge on pesticide and nanoparticles interactions that may be present as contaminant cocktail in waters. Thanks to lab-experiments conducted with glyphosate or AMPA and rutile or anatase under different water chemistry conditions (pH, ionic strength, presence and concentrations of mono- and bivalent cations), we were able to describe the colloidal stability of nanoparticles that control their mobility and to characterize the sorption of pesticide on these nanoparticles and their transformation.

  18. Potassium iodate assisted synthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with superior water-dispersibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yawen; Duo, Fangfang; Peng, Shiqi; Jia, Falong; Fan, Caimei

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, we report a novel polyol process to synthesize highly water-dispersible anatase titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (∼5 nm) by the introduction of inorganic oxidizing agent--KIO3. The obtained TiO2 nanoparticles are well dispersible in water at pH≥5.0 and the resulting aqueous dispersion remains stable over months. The superior water-dispersibility of as-formed TiO2 is ascribed to the electrostatic repulsion from carboxylic acid group modified on TiO2 nanoparticles, which is the oxidation product of solvent diethylene glycol (DEG) by KIO3. Based on the characterization results, the formation processes of water-dispersibility TiO2 nanoparticles are proposed. Meanwhile, the synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles are found to be doped by iodine and exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity on degradation of rhodamine-B (RhB) under visible-light irradiation. The further tests demonstrate that the O(2-) is the main active species during photodegradation of RhB.

  19. Effect of surfactants on the interfacial tension and emulsion formation between water and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, S.R.P. da; Harrison, K.L.; Johnston, K.P.

    1999-01-19

    The lowering of the interfacial tension ({gamma}) between water and carbon dioxide by various classes of surfactants is reported and used to interpret complementary measurements of the capacity, stability, and average drop size of water-in-CO{sub 2} emulsions. {gamma} is lowered from {approximately}20 to {approximately}2 mN/m for the best poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide) (PPO-b-PEO-b-PPO) and PeO-b-PPO-b-PEO Pluronic triblock copolymers, 1.4 mN/m for a poly(butylene oxide)-b-PEO copolymer, 0.8 mN/m for a perfluoropolyether (PEPE) ammonium carboxylate and 0.2 mN/m for PDMS{sub 24}-g-EO{sub 22}. The hydrophilic-CO{sub 2}-philic balance (HCB) of the triblock Pluronic and PDMS-g-PEO-PPO surfactants is characterized by the CO{sub 2}-to-water distribution coefficient and V-shaped plots of log {gamma} vs wt % EO. A minimum in {gamma} is observed for the optimum HCB. As the CO{sub 2}-philicity of the surfactant tail is increased, the molecular weight of the hydrophilic segment increases for an optimum HCB. The stronger interactions on both sides of the interface lead to a lower {gamma}. Consequently, more water was emulsified for the PDMS-based copolymers than either the PPO- or PBO-based copolymers.

  20. Switchable water: microfluidic investigation of liquid-liquid phase separation mediated by carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Lestari, Gabriella; Abolhasani, Milad; Bennett, Darla; Chase, Preston; Günther, Axel; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2014-08-27

    Increase in the ionic strength of water that is mediated by the reaction of carbon dioxide (CO2) with nitrogenous bases is a promising approach toward phase separation in mixtures of water with organic solvents and potentially water purification. Conventional macroscale studies of this complicated process are challenging, due to its occurrence via several consecutive and concurrent steps, mass transfer limitation, and lack of control over gas-liquid interfaces. We report a new microfluidic strategy for fundamental studies of liquid-liquid phase separation mediated by CO2 as well as screening of the efficiency of nitrogenous agents. A single set of microfluidic experiments provided qualitative and quantitative information on the kinetics and completeness of water-tetrahydrofuran phase separation, the minimum amount of CO2 required to complete phase separation, the total CO2 uptake, and the rate of CO2 consumption by the liquid mixture. The efficiency of tertiary diamines with different lengths of alkyl chain was examined in a time- and labor-efficient manner and characterized with the proposed efficiency parameter. A wealth of information obtained using the MF methodology can facilitate the development of new additives for switchable solvents in green chemistry applications.

  1. Multiple regression analysis in modelling of carbon dioxide emissions by energy consumption use in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keat, Sim Chong; Chun, Beh Boon; San, Lim Hwee; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat

    2015-04-01

    Climate change due to carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is one of the most complex challenges threatening our planet. This issue considered as a great and international concern that primary attributed from different fossil fuels. In this paper, regression model is used for analyzing the causal relationship among CO2 emissions based on the energy consumption in Malaysia using time series data for the period of 1980-2010. The equations were developed using regression model based on the eight major sources that contribute to the CO2 emissions such as non energy, Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG), diesel, kerosene, refinery gas, Aviation Turbine Fuel (ATF) and Aviation Gasoline (AV Gas), fuel oil and motor petrol. The related data partly used for predict the regression model (1980-2000) and partly used for validate the regression model (2001-2010). The results of the prediction model with the measured data showed a high correlation coefficient (R2=0.9544), indicating the model's accuracy and efficiency. These results are accurate and can be used in early warning of the population to comply with air quality standards.

  2. Integrated Energy System with Beneficial Carbon Dioxide (CO{sub 2}) Use

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaolei; Rink, Nancy

    2011-04-30

    To address the public concerns regarding the consequences of climate change from anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions, the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) is actively funding a CO{sub 2} management program to develop technologies capable of reducing the CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel power plants and other industrial facilities. Over the past decade, this program has focused on reducing the costs of carbon capture and storage technologies. Recently, DOE-NETL launched an alternative CO{sub 2} mitigation program focusing on beneficial CO{sub 2} reuse and supporting the development of technologies that mitigate emissions by converting CO{sub 2} to solid mineral form that can be utilized for enhanced oil recovery, in the manufacturing of concrete or as a benign landfill, in the production of valuable chemicals and/or fuels. This project was selected as a CO{sub 2} reuse activity which would conduct research and development (R&D) at the pilot scale via a cost-shared Cooperative Agreement number DE-FE0001099 with DOE-NETL and would utilize funds setaside by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 for Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration R&D,

  3. WATER, METHANE, AND CARBON DIOXIDE PRESENT IN THE DAYSIDE SPECTRUM OF THE EXOPLANET HD 209458b

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, M. R.; Vasisht, G.; Deroo, P.; Chen, Pin; Brown, L. R.; Tinetti, G.; Griffith, C.; Bouwman, J.; Yung, Y.; Burrows, A.; Matthews, J.; Rowe, J. F.; Kuschnig, R.; Angerhausen, D.

    2009-10-20

    Using the NICMOS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope, we have measured the dayside spectrum of HD 209458b between 1.5 and 2.5 mum. The emergent spectrum is dominated by features due to the presence of methane (CH{sub 4}) and water vapor (H{sub 2}O), with smaller contributions from carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Combining this near-infrared spectrum with existing mid-infrared measurements shows the existence of a temperature inversion and confirms the interpretation of previous photometry measurements. We find a family of plausible solutions for the molecular abundance and detailed temperature profile. Observationally resolving the ambiguity between abundance and temperature requires either (1) improved wavelength coverage or spectral resolution of the dayside emission spectrum or (2) a transmission spectrum where abundance determinations are less sensitive to the temperature structure.

  4. Sulfur balance of sulfur dioxide-ethanol-water fractionation of sugarcane straw.

    PubMed

    You, Xiang; van Heiningen, Adriaan; Sixta, Herbert; Iakovlev, Mikhail

    2017-10-01

    The sulfur balance of SO2-ethanol-water (AVAP®) fractionation of sugarcane (SC) straw was investigated. Hydrogen sulfite and sulfite anions are nearly absent in the liquors, despite cations present in straw, whose effect is thus limited to neutralization of lignosulfonic acids decreasing the acidity. Higher degree of sulfonation was observed for dissolved straw lignin compared to wood lignin (0.8-0.9 vs. 0.25 S/C9). Sulfur dioxide amounts of 0.9-1.2, 4.1-4.3 and 44-49g per o.d.kg straw were bound to pulp, precipitated lignin and lignosulfonic acid, respectively, while the rest of SO2 was recovered by distillation from the spent fractionation suspensions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of a solid electrolyte carbon dioxide and water reduction system for oxygen recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elikan, L.; Morris, J. P.; Wu, C. K.

    1972-01-01

    A 1/4-man solid electrolyte oxygen regeneration system, consisting of an electrolyzer, a carbon deposition reactor, and palladium membranes for separating hydrogen, was operated continuously in a 180-day test. Oxygen recovery from the carbon dioxide-water feed was 95%. One percent of the oxygen was lost to vacuum with the hydrogen off-gas. In a space cabin, the remaining 4% would have been recycled to the cabin and recovered. None of the electrolysis cells used in the 180-day test failed. Electrolysis power rose 20% during the test; the average power was 283.5 watts/man. Crew time was limited to 18 min/day of which 12 min/day was used for removing carbon. The success achieved in operating the system can be attributed to an extensive component development program, which is described. Stability of operation, ease of control, and flexibility in feed composition were demonstrated by the life test.

  6. THERMODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF AMMONIA-WATER-CARBON DIOXIDE MIXTURES FOR DESIGNING NEW POWER GENERATION CYCLES

    SciTech Connect

    Ashish Gupta

    2003-01-15

    This project was undertaken with the goal of developing a computational package for the thermodynamic properties of ammonia-water-carbon dioxide mixtures at elevated temperature and pressure conditions. This objective was accomplished by modifying an existing set of empirical equations of state for ammonia-water mixtures. This involved using the Wagner equation of state for the gas phase properties of carbon dioxide. In the liquid phase, Pitzer's ionic model was used. The implementation of this approach in the form of a computation package that can be used for the optimization of power cycles required additional code development. In particular, this thermodynamic model consisted of a large set of non-linear equations. Consequently, in the interest of computational speed and robustness that is required when applied to optimization problems, analytic gradients were incorporated in the Newton solver routines. The equations were then implemented using a stream property predictor to make initial guesses of the composition, temperature, pressure, enthalpy, entropy, etc. near a known state. The predictor's validity is then tested upon the convergence of an iteration. It proved difficult to obtain experimental data from the literature that could be used to test the accuracy of the new thermodynamic property package, and this remains a critical need for future efforts in the area. It was possible, however, to assess the feasibility of using this complicated property prediction package for power cycle design and optimization. Such feasibility was first demonstrated by modification of our Kalina cycle optimization code to use the package with either a deterministic optimizer, MINOS, or a stochastic optimizer using differential evolution, a genetic-algorithm-based technique. Beyond this feasibility demonstration, a new approach to the design and optimization of power cycles was developed using a graph theoretic approach.

  7. Application of Vacuum Swing Adsorption for Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Removal from Manned Spacecraft Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, J.; Howard, D.

    2007-01-01

    In NASA's Vision for Space Exploration (Bush, 2004), (Griffin, 2007), humans will once again travel beyond the confines of earth's gravity, this time to remain there for extended periods. These forays will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must not only blast out of earth's gravity well as during the Apollo moon missions, but also liftoff the supplies needed to sustain a larger crew over much longer periods. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. For short-term phases of manned space exploration, such as transit from the earth to the moon, venting of metabolic carbon dioxide and water to space is more efficient than the inclusion of large recycling systems on the spacecraft. The baseline system for the Orion spacecraft is an amine-based vacuum swing system (Smith, Perry et aI., 2006). As part of the development of an alternative approach, a sorbent-based CO2 and H2O removal system (Knox, Adams et aI., 2006), subscale testing was conducted to evaluate potential performance improvements obtainable by recuperating the heat of adsorption to aid in vacuum desorption. This bed design is shown in Figure 1, is depicted here with a lattice structure instead of reticulated foam for heat transfer. The slot widths are approximately 1.2 mm wide and 8.5 mm long. Bed depth is approximately 4.7 mm. Headers (not shown) were produced by the stereo lithography apparatus at MSFC.

  8. Food Waste in the Food-Energy-Water Nexus: Energy and Water Footprints of Wasted Food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibler, K. M.; Sarker, T.; Reinhart, D.

    2016-12-01

    The impact of wasted food to the food-energy-water (FEW) nexus is not well conceptualized or quantified, and is thus poorly understood. While improved understanding of water and energy requirements for food production may be applied to estimate costs associated with production of wasted food, the post-disposal costs of food waste to energy and water sectors are unknown. We apply both theoretical methods and direct observation of landfill leachate composition to quantify the net energy and water impact of food waste that is disposed in landfills. We characterize necessary energy inputs and biogas production to compute net impact to the energy sector. With respect to water, we quantify the volumes of water needed to attain permitted discharge concentrations of treated leachate, as well as the gray water footprint necessary for waste assimilation to the ambient regulatory standard. We find that approximately three times the energy produced as biogas (4.6E+8 kWh) is consumed in managing food waste and treating contamination from wasted food (1.3E+9 kWh). This energy requirement represents around 3% of the energy consumed in food production. The water requirement for leachate treatment and assimilation may exceed the amount of water needed to produce food. While not a consumptive use, the existence and replenishment of sufficient quantities of water in the environment for waste assimilation is an ecosystem service of the hydrosphere. This type of analysis may be applied to create water quality-based standards for necessary instream flows to perform the ecosystem service of waste assimilation. Clearer perception of wasted food as a source/sink for energy and water within the FEW nexus could be a powerful approach towards reducing the quantities of wasted food and more efficiently managing food that is wasted. For instance, comparative analysis of FEW impact across waste management strategies (e.g. landfilling, composting, anaerobic digestion) may assist local governments

  9. Balancing Energy-Water-Agriculture Tradeoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidwell, V.; Hightower, M.

    2011-12-01

    In 2005 thermoelectric power production accounted for withdrawals of 201 billion gallons per day (BGD) representing 49% of total withdrawals, making it the largest user of water in the U.S. In terms of freshwater withdrawals thermoelectric power production is the second largest user at 140 BGD just slightly behind freshwater withdrawals for irrigation (USGS 2005). In contrast thermoelectric water consumption is projected at 3.7 BGD or about 3% of total U.S. consumption (NETL 2008). Thermoelectric water consumption is roughly equivalent to that of all other industrial demands and represents one of the fastest growing sectors since 1980. In fact thermoelectric consumption is projected to increase by 42 to 63% between 2005 and 2030 (NETL 2008). Agricultural water consumption has remained relatively constant at roughly 84 BGD or about 84% of total water consumption. While long-term regional electricity transmission planning has traditionally focused on cost, infrastructure utilization, and reliability, issues concerning the availability of water represent an emerging issue. Thermoelectric expansion must be considered in the context of competing demands from other water use sectors balanced with fresh and non-fresh water supplies subject to climate variability. Often such expansion targets water rights transfers from irrigated agriculture. To explore evolving tradeoffs an integrated energy-water-agriculture decision support system has been developed. The tool considers alternative expansion scenarios for the future power plant fleet and the related demand for water. The availability of fresh and non-fresh water supplies, subject to local institutional controls is then explored. This paper addresses integrated energy-water-agriculture planning in the western U.S. and Canada involving an open and participatory process comprising decision-makers, regulators, utility and water managers.

  10. The Energy-Water Nexus: Managing the Links between Energy and Water for a Sustainable Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussey, Karen; Petit, Carine

    2010-05-01

    Water and energy are both indispensable inputs to modern economies but currently both resources are under threat owing to the impacts of an ever-increasing population and associated demand, unsustainable practices in agriculture and manufacturing, and the implications of a changing climate. However, it is where water and energy rely on each other that pose the most complex challenges for policy-makers. Water is needed for mining coal, drilling oil, refining gasoline, and generating and distributing electricity; and, conversely, vast amounts of energy are needed to pump, transport, treat and distribute water, particularly in the production of potable water through the use of desalination plants and waste water treatment plants. Despite the links, and the urgency in both sectors for security of supply, in existing policy frameworks energy and water policies are developed largely in isolation from one another. Worse still, some policies designed to encourage alternative energy supplies give little thought to the resultant consequences on water resources, and, similarly, policies designed to secure water supplies pay little attention to the resultant consequences on energy use. The development of new technologies presents both opportunities and challenges for managing the energy-water nexus but a better understanding of the links between energy and water is essential in any attempt to formulate policies for more resilient and adaptable societies. The energy-water nexus must be adequately integrated into policy and decision-making or governments run the risk of contradicting their efforts, and therefore failing in their objectives, in both sectors. A series of COST Exploratory Workshops, drawing on on-going research in the energy-water nexus from a number of international teams, identified the implications of the energy-water nexus on the development of (i) energy policies (ii) water resource management policies and (iii) climate adaptation and mitigation policies. A

  11. The effects of carbon dioxide on performance and histopathology of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in water recirculation aquaculture systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chronic exposure to elevated levels of dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) has been linked to reduced growth, physiological disturbances and negative health outcomes in intensively reared fish. Although pumping to a degassing tower can lower concentrations of dissolved CO2 in water recirculation aquacult...

  12. Carbon dioxide and water vapour exchange in a tropical dry forest as influenced by the North American Monsoon System (NAMS)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To better understand the effects and relationship between precipitation, net ecosystem carbon dioxide (NEE) and water vapor exchange (ET), we report a study conducted in the tropical dry forest (TDF) in the northwest of Mexico. Ecosystem gas exchange was measured using the eddy correlation technique...

  13. Water and Carbon Dioxide Preserved in Crystals of the Deccan Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, S. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary event (~66 Ma) is approximately contemporaneous with the Chicxulub impact and with the eruption of the Deccan traps. Phipps Morgan and others (2004) suggested that volatile-rich mantle plumes could generate extraordinarily explosive events that result in excavation and transport of large masses of shocked crust and mantle, the impacts of which would be indistinguishable from those of extraterrestrial bolides. While the authors called their suggestion “extreme”, the events they describe, in terms of style of eruption and destructive potential, may be analogous to large-scale kimberlite eruptions. In their model, build-up of volatiles at the asthenosphere-lithosphere boundary in a region of plume-induced continental rifting would lead to the explosive event, and subsequent depressurization of the vent would cause excavation of large bodies of crust and mantle rock. Volatiles preserved in Deccan rocks offer a means of evaluating the volatile abundance of the Deccan source. Self et al. (2008) reported sulfur and chlorine concentrations of melt inclusions from four samples of Deccan basalt, and used these concentrations to estimate atmospheric loading of sulfur and chlorine resulting from the Deccan eruptions. Our efforts to measure volatiles in melt inclusions in the Deccan basalts met with the same problem that Self et al. (2008) encountered: melt inclusions are extraordinarily rare in these rocks. However, a more faithful recorder of volatile concentrations may be the crystals themselves, which incorporate water and carbon dioxide into their crystal structure as well as capturing fluid inclusions that represent the volatile phase of the melt from which they crystallized. A pilot study of fifty basalt samples from the Deccan traps indicates that 1) water concentrations are high in plagioclase crystals from the Tapi valley-Satpura mountain range in the north-central Deccan, and 2) carbon is abundant in clinopyroxene, and it occurs a

  14. Evaluation of Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Devices in Energy Cascade Systems under the Restriction of Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, Yoichi; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    It is necessary to introduce energy cascade systems into the industrial sector in Japan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The aim of this study is to evaluate the refrigerating and air conditioning devices in cases of introducing both energy cascade systems and thermal recycling systems in industries located around urban areas. The authors have developed an energy cascade model based on linear programming so as to minimize the total system costs with carbon taxes. Five cases are investigated. Limitation of carbon dioxide emissions results in the enhancement of heat cascading, where high temperature heat is supplied for process heating while low temperature one is shifted to refrigeration. It was found that increasing the amount of garbage combustor waste heat can reduce electric power for the turbo refrigerator by promoting waste heat driven ammonia absorption refrigerator.

  15. Absorption removal of sulfur dioxide by falling water droplets in the presence of inert solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, I.-Hung; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Liu, Su-Chin; Chang, I.-Cheng; Shih, Shin-Min

    An experimental analysis of the absorption removal of sulfur dioxide by the free falling water droplets containing the inert solid particles is presented. The wheat flour powder is introduced as the inert solid particles. Tests with and without the flour powder in the water droplets are examined. The mass fluxes and mass transfer coefficients of SO 2 for the cases with and without the flour powder are compared to elucidate the effects of the inert solid particles contained in the water droplets on the gas absorption. The results indicate aignificant difference between the two cases for the concentrations of the flour powder in the absorbent droplets ( Cs) within the ranges of the experimental conditions, namely 0.1 to 10 wt% flour powder in the absorbent droplets. In general, the inert solid particles of the flour powder as the impurities in the water droplets tend to decrease the SO 2 absorption rate for the experimental absorption system under investigation. Various values of Cs cause various levels of the interfacial resistance and affect the gas absorption rate. The interfacial resistance is recognized by introducing an interfacial mass transfer coefficient ks with its reciprocal being proportional to the magnitude of the interfacial resistance. The values of 1/ ks may be computed by the use of the equation 1/ ks=(1/ KOLs-1/ KOL), where KOLs and KOL are the overall liquid-phase mass transfer coefficients with and without the inert solid particles, respectively. The values of ks with Cs of 0.1 to 10 wt% are about 0.295-0.032 cms -1 for absorbing 1000-3000 ppmv SO 2 with the water droplets. This kind of information is useful for the SO 2 removal and the information of acid rain that the impurities of the inert solid particles contaminate the water droplets.

  16. Absolute Entropy and Energy of Carbon Dioxide Using the Two-Phase Thermodynamic Model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shao-Nung; Pascal, Tod A; Goddard, William A; Maiti, Prabal K; Lin, Shiang-Tai

    2011-06-14

    The two-phase thermodynamic (2PT) model is used to determine the absolute entropy and energy of carbon dioxide over a wide range of conditions from molecular dynamics trajectories. The 2PT method determines the thermodynamic properties by applying the proper statistical mechanical partition function to the normal modes of a fluid. The vibrational density of state (DoS), obtained from the Fourier transform of the velocity autocorrelation function, converges quickly, allowing the free energy, entropy, and other thermodynamic properties to be determined from short 20-ps MD trajectories. The anharmonic effects in the vibrations are accounted for by the broadening of the normal modes into bands from sampling the velocities over the trajectory. The low frequency diffusive modes, which lead to finite DoS at zero frequency, are accounted for by considering the DoS as a superposition of gas-phase and solid-phase components (two phases). The analytical decomposition of the DoS allows for an evaluation of properties contributed by different types of molecular motions. We show that this 2PT analysis leads to accurate predictions of entropy and energy of CO2 over a wide range of conditions (from the triple point to the critical point of both the vapor and the liquid phases along the saturation line). This allows the equation of state of CO2 to be determined, which is limited only by the accuracy of the force field. We also validated that the 2PT entropy agrees with that determined from thermodynamic integration, but 2PT requires only a fraction of the time. A complication for CO2 is that its equilibrium configuration is linear, which would have only two rotational modes, but during the dynamics it is never exactly linear, so that there is a third mode from rotational about the axis. In this work, we show how to treat such linear molecules in the 2PT framework.

  17. Carbon Dioxide and Water Cycling in a Semiarid Savanna in Southern Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, R. L.; Hultine, K.; Barron-Gafford, G.; Huxman, T.

    2007-12-01

    The consequences of recent woody plant encroachment on the carbon and water cycling of semiarid ecosystems are not well understood. In this presentation, we present measurements made from 2004 - 2006 using sap flow and eddy covariance techniques to examine the carbon dioxide and water fluxes that occurred over a semiarid savanna on the Santa Rita Experimental Range in southern Arizona, USA. Over the last one hundred years this site has been transformed from a desert grassland to a savanna with greater than 35% tree cover by the encroachment of the native woody plant, mesquite ( Prosopis velutina). We have found that mesquite, even when they were dormant above ground, readily redistributed water upwards and downwards in the soil profile via their roots. This redistribution had important ecohydrological consequences like extending the season over which photosynthesis occurred. During the study period the site experienced below normal precipitation especially during the winter and spring period, and the site each year appeared to be a net carbon source. The two decades that preceded our study had above average precipitation, and this possibly resulted in a great deal of carbon accumulation that is now being released due to the current drought that has truncated the growing season.

  18. Femtosecond pump probe studies of chlorine dioxide photochemistry in water and acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philpott, Matthew J.; Hayes, Sophia C.; Reid, Philip J.

    1998-09-01

    The reaction dynamics of chlorine dioxide (OClO) dissolved in water and acetonitrile are investigated using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. The change in optical density following photoexcitation of OClO at 400 nm is monitored at 12 wavelengths ranging from 267 to 900 nm. The dynamics observed at 267 and 400 nm demonstrate that the geminate recombination quantum yield of the primary ClO and O photofragments to reform ground-state OClO is reduced by a factor of six in acetonitrile relative to water. Calculations are presented that model the contribution of vibrationally excited OClO formed by geminate recombination to the pump-probe dynamics. Comparison of the experimental and computational results demonstrates that a portion of the dynamics can be attributed to vibrationally excited OClO. However, the optical-density changes observed between 700 and 900 nm are similar in magnitude for both solvents, suggesting that another species not produced by geminate recombination is responsible for these dynamics. The appearance and relaxation kinetics in acetonitrile are significantly slower than in water demonstrating the solvent dependence of photoproduct formation and ground-state vibrational relaxation. Reasons for this dependence including Coulombic solvent-solute interactions and intermolecular hydrogen bonding are discussed.

  19. Extraction of Sudan dyes from environmental water by hemimicelles-based magnetic titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenyu; Chen, Ligang; You, Xiaoxiao

    2014-11-01

    A novel method for the extraction of Sudan dyes including Sudan I, II, III, and IV from environmental water by magnetic titanium dioxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4@TiO2) coated with sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) as adsorbent was reported. Fe3O4@TiO2 was synthesized by a simple method and was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The magnetic separation was quite efficient for the adsorption and desorption of Sudan dyes. The effect of the amount of SDS, extraction time, pH, desorption condition, maximal extraction volume, and humic acid on the extraction process were investigated. This method was employed to analyze three environmental water samples. The results demonstrated that our proposed method had wide linear range (25-5,000 ng L(-1)) with a good linearity (R (2) > 0.999) and low detection limits (2.9-7.3 ng L(-1)). An enrichment factor of 1,000 was achieved. In all three spiked levels (25, 250, and 2,500 ng L(-1)), the recoveries of Sudan dyes were in the range of 86.9-93.6 %. The relative standard deviations obtained were ranging from 2.5 to 9.3 %. That is to say, the new method was fast and effective for the extraction of Sudan dye from environmental water.

  20. Solubilities of carbon dioxide and water in rhyolitic melt at 850 C and 750 bars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blank, J. G.; Stloper, E. M.; Carroll, M. R.

    1993-01-01

    Concentrations of carbon dioxide and water dissolved in glasses quenched from rhyolitic melts equilibrated with H2O-CO2 fluids at 850 C and 750 bar were measured using IR spectroscopy; concentrations of H2O and CO2 in the quenched fluids were measured manometrically. The mole fraction of CO2 in the quenched fluid ranged from 0.06 to 0.91. Concentrations of CO2 in the coexisting rhyolitic melt increased from 23(+/-6) ppm for the sample equilibrated with the most CO2-poor fluid to 515(+/-16) ppm for that equilibrated with the most CO2-rich fluid. The water content of the melt varied from 0.51(+/-0.06) to 3.34(+/-0.08) wt pct. Our results show that concentrations of molecular CO2 and H2O in the glasses obey Henry's Law; the mole fractions of molecular CO2 and molecular H2O in the quenched melts are proportional to their fugacities in the coexisting vapor. CO2 contents of vapor-saturated melts are not enhanced by addition of water to CO2-rich vapor, contrary to previous reports for silicate melts at higher pressures. The Henrian behavior of CO2 and H2O at low pressure considerably simplifies modeling of the degassing of silicic magmas.

  1. Efficacy of Nucleic Acid Probes for Detection of Poliovirus in Water Disinfected by Chlorine, Chlorine Dioxide, Ozone, and UV Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Norman J.; Margolin, Aaron B.

    1994-01-01

    MilliQ water was inoculated with poliovirus type 1 strain LSc-1 and was treated with disinfectants, including chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, and UV light. No relationship between probes and plaque assays were seen, demonstrating that viral nucleic acids were not destroyed. These findings suggest that nucleic acid probes cannot distinguish between infectious and noninfectious viruses and cannot be used in the evaluation of treated waters. PMID:16349448

  2. In-situ Raman spectroscopic study the growth and partitioning of mixed hydrate from dissolved methane and carbon dioxide in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W.; Wang, F.; Guo, H.

    2012-12-01

    The growth of mixed methane-carbon dioxide hydrate in aqueous solution in the absence of vapor phase was observed at temperatures from 295 K to 275 K in a capillary high pressure optical cell. The effect of temperature on methane-carbon dioxide hydrate-water partitioning has been investigated by determining the composition for coexisting hydrate crystal and liquid water with Raman spectroscopy. The results show that, methane to carbon dioxide ratio in hydrate decrease with decreasing temperature, indicating carbon dioxide intends to more stable than methane under lower temperature. The hydrate-water distribution coefficients for methane and carbon dioxide both decrease with decreasing temperature, and change with the dissolved gas composition in water.

  3. Effective removal of trace thallium from surface water by nanosized manganese dioxide enhanced quartz sand filtration.

    PubMed

    Huangfu, Xiaoliu; Ma, Chengxue; Ma, Jun; He, Qiang; Yang, Chun; Zhou, Jian; Jiang, Jin; Wang, Yaan

    2017-09-12

    Thallium (Tl) has drawn wide concern due to its high toxicity even at extremely low concentrations, as well as its tendency for significant accumulation in the human body and other organisms. The need to develop effective strategies for trace Tl removal from drinking water is urgent. In this study, the removal of trace Tl (0.5 μg L(-1)) by conventional quartz sand filtration enhanced by nanosized manganese dioxide (nMnO2) has been investigated using typical surface water obtained from northeast China. The results indicate that nMnO2 enhanced quartz sand filtration could remove trace Tl(I) and Tl(III) efficiently through the adsorption of Tl onto nMnO2 added to a water matrix and onto nMnO2 attached on quartz sand surfaces. Tl(III)-HA complexes might be responsible for higher residual Tl(III) in the effluent compared to residual Tl(I). Competitive Ca(2+) cations inhibit Tl removal to a certain extent because the Ca(2+) ions will occupy the Tl adsorption site on nMnO2. Moreover, high concentrations of HA (10 mgTOC L(-1)), which notably complexes with and dissolves nMnO2 (more than 78%), resulted in higher residual Tl(I) and Tl(III). Tl(III)-HA complexes might also enhance Tl(III) penetration to a certain extent. Additionally, a higher pH level could enhance the removal of trace Tl from surface water. Finally, a slight increase of residual Tl was observed after backwash, followed by the reduction of the Tl concentration in the effluent to a "steady" state again. The knowledge obtained here may provide a potential strategy for drinking water treatment plants threatened by trace Tl. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Planning and the Energy-Water Nexus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidwell, V. C.; Bailey, M.; Zemlick, K.; Moreland, B.

    2015-12-01

    While thermoelectric power generation accounts for only 3-5% of the nation's consumptive use of freshwater, its future potential to exert pressure on limited water supplies is of concern given projected growth in electric power generation. The corresponding thermoelectric water footprint could look significantly different depending on decisions concerning the mix of fuel type, cooling type, location, and capacity, which are influenced by such factors as fuel costs, technology evolution, demand growth, policies, and climate change. The complex interplay among these disparate factors makes it difficult to identify where water could limit siting choices for thermoelectric generation or alternatively, thermoelectric development could limit growth in other water use sectors. These arguments point to the need for joint coordination, analysis and planning between energy and water managers. Here we report on results from a variety of planning exercises spanning scales from the national, interconnection, to the utility. Results will highlight: lessons learned from the integrated planning exercises; the broad range in potential thermoelectric water use futures; regional differences in the thermoelectric-water nexus; and, opportunities for non-traditional waters to ease competition over limited freshwater supplies and to harden thermoelectric generation against drought vulnerability. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. GCIP Water and Energy Budget Synthesis (WEBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roads, J. O.

    2002-12-01

    As part of the World Climate Research Program's (WCRP's) Global Energy and Water-Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Continental-scale International Project (GCIP), a water and energy budget synthesis (WEBS) has been developed from the "best available" observations and models for the period 1996-1999. This WEBS includes a general description of the Mississippi River Basin climate, physiographic characteristics, available observations, representative types of models used for GCIP investigations, and a comparison of water and energy variables and budgets from models and observations. Besides this summary paper, a companion CD-ROM with more extensive discussion, figures, tables, and raw data is also available to the interested researcher. Observations cannot adequately "close" budgets since too many fundamental processes are missing. Models that properly represent the many complicated atmospheric and near-surface interactions are required for overall descriptions of the budgets. Models will also be needed for eventual predictions of these water and energy processes. Therefore, different classes of models have also been compared with available observations. The comparison includes a representative global general circulation model, regional climate model, and a macroscale hydrologic model. There does appear to be a clear advantage to using a regional analysis over a global analysis or a regional simulation over a global simulation to describe the Mississippi River Basin budgets. There also appears to be some advantage to using a macroscale hydrologic model for at least the surface water budgets.

  6. GCIP water and energy budget synthesis (WEBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roads, J.; Lawford, R.; Bainto, E.; Berbery, E.; Chen, S.; Fekete, B.; Gallo, K.; Grundstein, A.; Higgins, W.; Kanamitsu, M.; Krajewski, W.; Lakshmi, V.; Leathers, D.; Lettenmaier, D.; Luo, L.; Maurer, E.; Meyers, T.; Miller, D.; Mitchell, K.; Mote, T.; Pinker, R.; Reichler, T.; Robinson, D.; Robock, A.; Smith, J.; Srinivasan, G.; Verdin, K.; Vinnikov, K.; Vonder Haar, T.; VöRöSmarty, C.; Williams, S.; Yarosh, E.

    2003-08-01

    As part of the World Climate Research Program's (WCRPs) Global Energy and Water-Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Continental-scale International Project (GCIP), a preliminary water and energy budget synthesis (WEBS) was developed for the period 1996-1999 from the "best available" observations and models. Besides this summary paper, a companion CD-ROM with more extensive discussion, figures, tables, and raw data is available to the interested researcher from the GEWEX project office, the GAPP project office, or the first author. An updated online version of the CD-ROM is also available at http://ecpc.ucsd.edu/gcip/webs.htm/. Observations cannot adequately characterize or "close" budgets since too many fundamental processes are missing. Models that properly represent the many complicated atmospheric and near-surface interactions are also required. This preliminary synthesis therefore included a representative global general circulation model, regional climate model, and a macroscale hydrologic model as well as a global reanalysis and a regional analysis. By the qualitative agreement among the models and available observations, it did appear that we now qualitatively understand water and energy budgets of the Mississippi River Basin. However, there is still much quantitative uncertainty. In that regard, there did appear to be a clear advantage to using a regional analysis over a global analysis or a regional simulation over a global simulation to describe the Mississippi River Basin water and energy budgets. There also appeared to be some advantage to using a macroscale hydrologic model for at least the surface water budgets.

  7. Water Efficient Energy Production for Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect

    GTO

    2015-06-01

    Water consumption in geothermal energy development occurs at several stages along the life cycle of the plant, during construction of the wells, piping, and plant; during hydroshearing and testing of the reservoir (for EGS); and during operation of the plant. These stages are highlighted in the illustration above. For more information about actual water use during these stages, please see the back of this sheet..

  8. WATER, ENERGY AND LIFE: FRESH VIEWS FROM THE WATER'S EDGE.

    PubMed

    Pollack, G H

    2010-12-03

    Recent observations have shown an unexpected feature of water adjacent to hydrophilic surfaces: the presence of wide interfacial zone that excludes solutes. The exclusion zone is charged, while the water beyond is oppositely charged, yielding a battery-like feature. The battery is powered by absorbed radiant energy. Implications of this energetic feature are discussed. It appears that the presence of this 'exclusion zone' may play an important role in the behavior of aqueous systems.

  9. Toward Solar Fuels: Photocatalytic Conversion of Carbon Dioxide to Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, SC; Varghese, OK; Paulose, M; Grimes, CA

    2010-03-01

    The past several decades have seen a significant rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels resulting from the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. A solar energy based technology to recycle carbon dioxide into readily transportable hydrocarbon fuel (i.e., a solar fuel) would help reduce atmospheric CO2 levels and partly fulfill energy demands within the present hydrocarbon based fuel infrastructure. We review the present status of carbon dioxide conversion techniques, with particular attention to a recently developed photocatalytic process to convert carbon dioxide and water vapor into hydrocarbon fuels using sunlight.

  10. Energy trends and the water-energy binomium for Brazil.

    PubMed

    Da Rocha, Gisele O; Dos Anjos, Jeancarlo P; De Andrade, Jailson B

    2015-01-01

    According to the demands of energy saving and carbon emission reduction, the water vs. energy nexus has become a major concern worldwide. Brazil occupies a singular position in the global energy system. A major portion of the Brazilian occupancies has electricity and the energy system expansion that, at first, possesses adequate means for supporting the economic growing may experience some turnovers. The Brazil determination through alternative fuels was a natural choice, given its large hydropower potential and land agricultural base. In the transportation sector Brazil has developed its energy matrix towards an important rate of ethanol and biodiesel. Although those fuels are low carbon emitter, they may probably not be an affordable alternative regarding land use, food security and water footprint. In this way, considering the recent advances in the exploration of oil from Pre-salt (9-15 million barrels) and the discovery of shale gas wells up to 245 tcf, together to unfavorable social and environmental issues associated to biofuels, the Brazilian energy matrix might turn back to the fossil fuels again. These represent challenges to the Brazilian policymakers and how they will be solved will reflect not only in Brazil but also to the world at large.

  11. Multiple metrics for quantifying the intensity of water consumption of energy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spang, E. S.; Moomaw, W. R.; Gallagher, K. S.; Kirshen, P. H.; Marks, D. H.

    2014-10-01

    Discussion of the environmental implications of worldwide energy demand is currently dominated by the effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions on global climate. At the regional scale, however, water resource challenges associated with energy systems are a growing concern. This paper, based on an inventory of national energy portfolios, posits an indicator-based framework for characterizing regional energy portfolios’ relative water intensity. These calculations extend upon a previous paper that established a method for calculating the national water consumption of energy production (WCEP) at the global level. Intensity indicators are based on normalizing the WCEP results with a set of additional indicators (including population, gross domestic product, total energy production, and regional water availability). The results show great variability in water consumption across nations, as well as across the various water intensity measures that were applied. Therefore, it is best to apply this full suite of indicators to each country to develop an integrated understanding of the intensity of water use for energy across countries.

  12. Carbon dioxide and water vapor exchange by young and old ponderosa pine ecosystems during a dry summer.

    PubMed

    Law, B E; Goldstein, A H; Anthoni, P M; Unsworth, M H; Panek, J A; Bauer, M R; Fracheboud, J M; Hultman, N

    2001-03-01

    We investigated key factors controlling mass and energy exchange by a young (6-year-old) ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) plantation on the west side of the Sierra Nevada Mountains and an old-growth ponderosa pine forest (mix of 45- and 250-year-old trees) on the east side of the Cascade Mountains, from June through September 1997. At both sites, we operated eddy covariance systems above the canopy to measure net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide and water vapor, and made concurrent meteorological and ecophysiological measurements. Our objective was to understand and compare the controls on ecosystem processes in these two forests. Precipitation is much higher in the young plantation than in the old-growth forest (1660 versus 550 mm year-1), although both forests experienced decreasing soil water availability and increasing vapor pressure deficits (D) as the summer of 1997 progressed. As a result, drought stress increased at both sites during this period, and changes in D strongly influenced ecosystem conductance and net carbon uptake. Ecosystem conductance for a given D was higher in the young pine plantation than in the old-growth forest, but decreased dramatically following several days of high D in late summer, possibly because of xylem cavitation. Net CO2 exchange generally decreased with conductance at both sites, although values were roughly twice as high at the young site. Simulations with the 3-PG model, which included the effect of tree age on fluxes, suggest that, during the fall through spring period, milder temperatures and ample water availability at the young site provide better conditions for photosynthesis than at the old pine site. Thus, over the long-term, the young site can carry more leaf area, and the climatic conditions between fall and spring offset the more severe limitations imposed by summer drought.

  13. Army Energy and Water Reporting System Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Deprez, Peggy C.; Giardinelli, Michael J.; Burke, John S.; Connell, Linda M.

    2011-09-01

    There are many areas of desired improvement for the Army Energy and Water Reporting System. The purpose of system is to serve as a data repository for collecting information from energy managers, which is then compiled into an annual energy report. This document summarizes reported shortcomings of the system and provides several alternative approaches for improving application usability and adding functionality. The U.S. Army has been using Army Energy and Water Reporting System (AEWRS) for many years to collect and compile energy data from installations for facilitating compliance with Federal and Department of Defense energy management program reporting requirements. In this analysis, staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that substantial opportunities exist to expand AEWRS functions to better assist the Army to effectively manage energy programs. Army leadership must decide if it wants to invest in expanding AEWRS capabilities as a web-based, enterprise-wide tool for improving the Army Energy and Water Management Program or simply maintaining a bottom-up reporting tool. This report looks at both improving system functionality from an operational perspective and increasing user-friendliness, but also as a tool for potential improvements to increase program effectiveness. The authors of this report recommend focusing on making the system easier for energy managers to input accurate data as the top priority for improving AEWRS. The next major focus of improvement would be improved reporting. The AEWRS user interface is dated and not user friendly, and a new system is recommended. While there are relatively minor improvements that could be made to the existing system to make it easier to use, significant improvements will be achieved with a user-friendly interface, new architecture, and a design that permits scalability and reliability. An expanded data set would naturally have need of additional requirements gathering and a focus on integrating

  14. System for harvesting water wave energy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhong Lin; Su, Yanjie; Zhu, Guang; Chen, Jun

    2016-07-19

    A generator for harvesting energy from water in motion includes a sheet of a hydrophobic material, having a first side and an opposite second side, that is triboelectrically more negative than water. A first electrode sheet is disposed on the second side of the sheet of a hydrophobic material. A second electrode sheet is disposed on the second side of the sheet of a hydrophobic material and is spaced apart from the first electrode sheet. Movement of the water across the first side induces an electrical potential imbalance between the first electrode sheet and the second electrode sheet.

  15. GEWEX Water and Energy Budget Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roads, J.; Bainto, E.; Masuda, K.; Rodell, Matthew; Rossow, W. B.

    2008-01-01

    Closing the global water and energy budgets has been an elusive Global Energy and Water-cycle Experiment (GEWEX) goal. It has been difficult to gather many of the needed global water and energy variables and processes, although, because of GEWEX, we now have globally gridded observational estimates for precipitation and radiation and many other relevant variables such as clouds and aerosols. Still, constrained models are required to fill in many of the process and variable gaps. At least there are now several atmospheric reanalyses ranging from the early National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) and NCEP/Department of Energy (DOE) reanalyses to the more recent ERA40 and JRA-25 reanalyses. Atmospheric constraints include requirements that the models state variables remain close to in situ observations or observed satellite radiances. This is usually done by making short-term forecasts from an analyzed initial state; these short-term forecasts provide the next guess, which is corrected by comparison to available observations. While this analysis procedure is likely to result in useful global descriptions of atmospheric temperature, wind and humidity, there is no guarantee that relevant hydroclimate processes like precipitation, which we can observe and evaluate, and evaporation over land, which we cannot, have similar verisimilitude. Alternatively, the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS), drives uncoupled land surface models with precipitation, surface solar radiation, and surface meteorology (from bias-corrected reanalyses during the study period) to simulate terrestrial states and surface fluxes. Further constraints are made when a tuned water balance model is used to characterize the global runoff observational estimates. We use this disparate mix of observational estimates, reanalyses, GLDAS and calibrated water balance simulations to try to characterize and close global and terrestrial atmospheric

  16. Sensitivity of methods for calculating energy expenditure by use of doubly labeled water

    SciTech Connect

    Seale, J.; Miles, C.; Bodwell, C.E.

    1989-02-01

    Attempts to estimate human energy expenditure by use of doubly labeled water have produced three methods currently used for calculating carbon dioxide production from isotope disappearance data: (1) the two-point method, (2) the regression method, and (3) the integration method. An ideal data set was used to determine the error produced in the calculated energy expenditure for each method when specific variables were perturbed. The analysis indicates that some of the calculation methods are more susceptible to perturbations in certain variables than others. Results from an experiment on one adult human subject are used to illustrate the potential for error in actual data. Samples of second void urine, 24-h urine, and breath collected every other day for 21 days are used to calculate the average daily energy expenditure by three calculation methods. The difference between calculated energy expenditure and metabolizable energy on a weight-maintenance diet is used to estimate the error associated with the doubly labeled water method.

  17. SYNTHESIS OF SULFUR-BASED WATER TREATMENT AGENT FROM SULFUR DIOXIDE WASTE STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Maohong Fan; Adrienne Cooper

    2002-10-01

    Absorption of sulfur dioxide from a simulated flue gas was investigated for the production of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS), a highly effective coagulant useful in treatment of drinking water and wastewater. The reaction for PFS synthesis took place near atmospheric pressure and at temperatures of 30-80 C. SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies greater than 90% were achieved, with ferrous iron concentrations in the product less than 0.1%. A factorial analysis of the effect of temperature, oxidant dosage, SO{sub 2} concentration, and gas flow rate on SO{sub 2} removal efficiency was carried out, and statistical analyses are conducted. The solid PFS was also characterized with different methods. Characterization results have shown that PFS possesses both crystalline and non-crystalline structure. The kinetics of reactions among FeSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 7H{sub 2}O, NaHSO{sub 3} and NaClO{sub 3} was investigated. The PFS product was used in pilot-scale tests at a municipal water treatment facility and gave good results in removal of turbidity and superior results in removal of disinfection byproduct precursors (TOC, DOC, UV-254) when compared with equal doses of ferric chloride.

  18. [Measurements of "Total Water" and Carbon Dioxide from the NASA WB-57 During Crystal-Face

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avallone, Linnea M.

    2003-01-01

    An existing closed-path tunable diode laser hygrometer (CLH) was employed for the measurements of total water made during CRYSTAL-FACE. This instrument had flown previously on the NASA DC-8 during the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) and also on the NCAR C-130 during some local flights designed to test the extent of water vapor interference in carbon dioxide measurements. The instrument was largely unchanged from previous studies, but a new inlet appropriate to the WB-57F wingpod was constructed. In order to minimize the impact on the over-subscribed right wingpod and to achieve good thermal control of the inlet temperature, the CLH inlet was made of carbon-fiber/epoxy composite. Considerable effort was spent to design and build the lightest possible mounting hardware and design relatively low-power inlet heaters. As a result, the instrument and mounting hardware came in below the NASA/JSC-imposed weight cap of 35 lbs. Data were obtained on all test flights during May 2002 and during all but one mission flight in July 2002 (the one lost flight was due to an unplugged instrument power cable). Instrument performance during the test flights was good, but the data are not science- quality, as a variety of tests were performed to optimize the inlet configuration and heating. Data on all mission flights is of high quality, despite some difficulties caused by flying through wet low-altitude air masses and dense anvils, which saturated the instrument response.

  19. Disinfection of bore well water with chlorine dioxide/sodium hypochlorite and hydrodynamic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifei; Jia, Aiyin; Wu, Yue; Wu, Chunde; Chen, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    The effect of hydrodynamic cavitation (HC) on potable water disinfection of chemicals was investigated. The bore well water was introduced into HC set-up to examine the effect of HC alone and combination of HC and chemicals such as chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite. The effect of inlet pressure and geometrical parameters on disinfection was studied using HC alone and the results showed that increasing inlet pressure and using more and bigger holes of orifice plates can result in a higher disinfection rates. When HC was combined with chemicals, HC can reduce the doses of the chemicals and shorten the time of disinfection. It was also found that the decrease in bacteria concentration followed a first-order kinetic model. As for the experiment of combination of HC and sodium hypochlorite for disinfection, HC not only improves the disinfection rate but also degrades natural organic matter and chloroform. Compared with only sodium hypochlorite disinfection, combined processes get higher disinfection rate and lower production of chloroform, particularly the pretreatment with HC enhances the disinfection rate by 32% and there is a simultaneous reduction in production of chloroform by 39%.

  20. DESIGN OF HYBRID POWER GENERATION CYCLES EMPLOYING AMMONIA-WATER-CARBON DIOXIDE MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Ashish Gupta

    2002-06-01

    A power cycle generates electricity from the heat of combustion of fossil fuels. Its efficiency is governed by the cycle configuration, the operating parameters, and the working fluid. Typical. designs use pure water as the fluid. in the last two decades, hybrid cycles based on ammonia-water, and carbon-dioxide mixtures as the working fluid have been proposed. These cycles may improve the power generation efficiency of Rankine cycles by 15%. Improved efficiency is important for two reasons: it lowers the cost of electricity being produced, and by reducing the consumption of fossil fuels per unit power, it reduces the generation of environmental pollutants. The goal of this project is to develop a computational optimization-based method for the design and analysis of hybrid bottoming power cycles to minimize the usage of fossil fuels. The development of this methodology has been achieved by formulating this task as that of selecting the least cost power cycle design from all possible configurations. They employ a detailed thermodynamic property prediction package they have developed under a DOE-FETC grant to model working fluid mixtures. Preliminary results from this work suggest that a pure NH{sub 3} cycle outperforms steam or the expensive Kalina cycle.

  1. Chlorine dioxide as a treatment for ballast water to control invasive species: shipboard testing.

    PubMed

    Maranda, Lucie; Cox, Annie M; Campbell, Robert G; Smith, David C

    2013-10-15

    The efficacy of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) in eliminating organisms present in estuarine ballast water of a containership was determined under actual operating conditions by comparing the survival of planktonic communities present in waters of treated and control ballast tanks. Sampling was via ballast-tank hatches. The treatment (5 mg L(-1)ClO2 without pre-filtration) delivered by a prototype ClO2-generating system was generally effective against planktonic assemblages, although bacterial communities rebounded after a few days. Regardless of temperature, ClO2 was very effective against phytoplankton; the effect was immediate, without resurgence. Some zooplankters in the ≥ 50-μm fraction may survive the biocide, especially those able to find refuge within a protective coating (e.g., cysts, resting eggs, and shells) or in sediment. In order to boost efficacy, a pre-filtration step is recommended (now installed as standard equipment) to lower the intake of the ≥ 50-μm fraction and lessen the challenge posed by this size class.

  2. Gas-phase energies of actinide oxides -- an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium

    SciTech Connect

    Marcalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2009-08-10

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  3. Dissociation energy and dynamics of water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ch'ng, Lee Chiat

    The state-to-state vibrational predissociation (VP) dynamics of water clusters were studied following excitation of a vibrational mode of each cluster. Velocity-map imaging (VMI) and resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) were used to determine pair-correlated center-of-mass translational energy distributions. Product energy distributions and dissociation energies were determined. Following vibrational excitation of the HCl stretch fundamental of the HCl-H2O dimer, HCl fragments were detected by 2 + 1 REMPI via the f 3□2(nu' = 0) ← X 1Sigma+(nu'' = 0) and V1Sigma + (nu' = 11 and 12) ← X1Sigma+ (nu'' = 0) transitions. REMPI spectra clearly show HCl from dissociation produced in the ground vibrational state with J'' up to 11. The fragments' center-of-mass translational energy distributions were determined from images of selected rotational states of HCl and were converted to rotational state distributions of the water cofragment. All the distributions could be fit well when using a dimer dissociation energy of bond dissociation energy D0 = 1334 +/- 10 cm--1. The rotational distributions in the water cofragment pair-correlated with specific rotational states of HCl appear nonstatistical when compared to predictions of the statistical phase space theory. A detailed analysis of pair-correlated state distributions was complicated by the large number of water rotational states available, but the data show that the water rotational populations increase with decreasing translational energy. H2O fragments of this dimer were detected by 2 + 1 REMPI via the C˜1B1(000) ← X˜1A1(000) transition. REMPI clearly shows that H2O from dissociation is produced in the ground vibrational state. The fragment's center-of-mass translational energy distributions were determined from images of selected rotational states of H2O and were converted to rotational state distributions of the HCl cofragment. The distributions gave D0 = 1334 +/- 10 cm --1 and show a clear

  4. Use of saline water in energy development

    SciTech Connect

    Israelsen, C.E.; Adams, V.D.; Batty, J.C.; George, D.B.; Hughes, T.C.; Seierstad, A.J.; Wang, H.C.; Kuo, H.P.

    1980-06-01

    Maps were made of the Upper Colorado River Basin showing locations of coal deposits, oil and gas, oil shale, uranium, and tar sand, in relationship to cities and towns in the area. Superimposed on these are locations of wells showing four ranges of water quality; 1000 to 3000 mg/l, 3000 to 10,000 mg/l, 10,000 to 35,000 mg/l, and over 35,000 mg/l. Information was assembled relative to future energy-related projects in the upper basin, and estimates were made of their anticipated water needs. Using computer models, various options were tested for using saline water for coal-fired power plant cooling. Both cooling towers and brine evaporation ponds were included. Information is presented of several proven water treatment technologies, and comparisons are made of their cost effectiveness when placed in various combinations in the power plant makeup and blowdown water systems. A relative value scale was developed which compares graphically the relative values of waters of different salinities based on three different water treatment options and predetermined upper limits of cooling tower circulating salinities. Coal from several different mines was slurried in waters of different salinities. Samples were analyzed in the laboratory to determine which constituents had been leached from or absorbed by the coal, and what possible deleterious effects this might have on the burning properties of the coal, or on the water for culinary use or irrigation.

  5. Water quality issues and energy assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.J.; Chiu, S.

    1980-11-01

    This report identifies and evaluates the significant water quality issues related to regional and national energy development. In addition, it recommends improvements in the Office assessment capability. Handbook-style formating, which includes a system of cross-references and prioritization, is designed to help the reader use the material.

  6. Education Highlights: Food-Energy-Water Nexus

    SciTech Connect

    Redd, Shanterell; Zvolanek, Emily

    2016-12-29

    Argonne intern Shanterell Redd from Tougaloo College worked with Argonne mentor Emily Zvolanek in studying the food-energy-water-women nexus in Egypt and Jordan. This research will help scientists determine sustainable ways in which women in developing countries gather and use non-renewable resources.

  7. Formation of assimilable organic carbon during oxidation of natural waters with ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, permanganate, and ferrate.

    PubMed

    Ramseier, Maaike K; Peter, Andreas; Traber, Jacqueline; von Gunten, Urs

    2011-02-01

    Five oxidants, ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, permanganate, and ferrate were studied with regard to the formation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and oxalate in absence and presence of cyanobacteria in lake water matrices. Ozone and ferrate formed significant amounts of AOC, i.e. more than 100 μg/L AOC were formed with 4.6 mg/L ozone and ferrate in water with 3.8 mg/L dissolved organic carbon. In the same water samples chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and permanganate produced no or only limited AOC. When cyanobacterial cells (Aphanizomenon gracile) were added to the water, an AOC increase was detected with ozone, permanganate, and ferrate, probably due to cell lysis. This was confirmed by the increase of extracellular geosmin, a substance found in the selected cyanobacterial cells. AOC formation by chlorine and chlorine dioxide was not affected by the presence of the cells. The formation of oxalate upon oxidation was found to be a linear function of the oxidant consumption for all five oxidants. The following molar yields were measured in three different water matrices based on oxidant consumed: 2.4-4.4% for ozone, 1.0-2.8% for chlorine dioxide and chlorine, 1.1-1.2% for ferrate, and 11-16% for permanganate. Furthermore, oxalate was formed in similar concentrations as trihalomethanes during chlorination (yield ∼ 1% based on chlorine consumed). Oxalate formation kinetics and stoichiometry did not correspond to the AOC formation. Therefore, oxalate cannot be used as a surrogate for AOC formation during oxidative water treatment.

  8. Infrared Spectroscopic Measurement of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Shallow Trap State Energies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-10

    the spectra of M-type red stars and in the composition of lunar soil samples returned during the Apollo missions.51 Titanium dioxide is a widely...oxygen from the titania crystal lattice. The oxygen departing the lattice leaves behind electrons which populate the Ti4+ 3d orbitals to form Ti3+ or...that the titanium 3d orbital is energetically close to the titanium dioxide conduction band.98 This evidence strongly indicates that reduced Ti3

  9. Growth responses of Melastoma malabathricum to elevated carbon dioxide and water regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, Wan Nur Ain Mat; Ahmad, Wan Juliana Wan; Musa, Nor Lailatul Wahidah

    2016-11-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 has significant effects on plant growth depending on the species and the interaction between treatments given. In other words, the impacts vary among species, depending on differences in photosynthetic pathways, intrinsic growth rates and other properties. In this research we studied the effects of increased carbon dioxide concentration and water regimes on a shrub species, Melastoma malabathricum in a shade house at ambient CO2 and open roof greenhouse at elevated CO2. The factor of water stress was also included, in which for each CO2 treatment, the amount of water was given once or twice daily. The treatment of elevated CO2 was at 800 ppm, when the plants were exposed daily from 0900h until 1100h. The plant growth was monitored through their biomass, height and leaf area that were recorded fortnightly for six months. The results showed that the height of M. malabathricum stem in elevated CO2 was significantly higher than those in ambient CO2. Similarly, leaf area in the elevated CO2 showed a big difference with a value of 46.24 cm2 for elevated CO2 with twice watering, but only 17.94 cm2 for ambient CO2 with twice watering. Even for once watering, we can see the values of leaf area were higher with 32.06 cm2 for elevated and 24.35 cm2 in ambient CO2. The above ground and below ground biomass differed significantly between ambient and elevated CO2. Above ground biomass in ambient CO2 was higher than that in elevated CO2 with a percentage of 25.7%. In contrast, the below ground biomass in elevated CO2 was higher than that in ambient CO2 with a percentage of 17.4%. The results suggested that the increment of CO2 concentrations and water regime in the natural environment may influence the growth and ultimately the abundance and distribution of this shrub species in urban forest.

  10. Direct gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite residues in the absence and presence of water vapor: a feasibility study for carbon dioxide sequestration.

    PubMed

    Veetil, Sanoopkumar Puthiya; Pasquier, Louis-César; Blais, Jean-François; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Kentish, Sandra; Mercier, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Mineral carbonation of serpentinite mining residue offers an environmentally secure and permanent storage of carbon dioxide. The strategy of using readily available mining residue for the direct treatment of flue gas could improve the energy demand and economics of CO2 sequestration by avoiding the mineral extraction and separate CO2 capture steps. The present is a laboratory scale study to assess the possibility of CO2 fixation in serpentinite mining residues via direct gas-solid reaction. The degree of carbonation is measured both in the absence and presence of water vapor in a batch reactor. The gas used is a simulated gas mixture reproducing an average cement flue gas CO2 composition of 18 vol.% CO2. The reaction parameters considered are temperature, total gas pressure, time, and concentration of water vapor. In the absence of water vapor, the gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite mining residues is negligible, but the residues removed CO2 from the feed gas possibly due to reversible adsorption. The presence of small amount of water vapor enhances the gas-solid carbonation, but the measured rates are too low for practical application. The maximum CO2 fixation obtained is 0.07 g CO2 when reacting 1 g of residue at 200 °C and 25 barg (pCO2 ≈ 4.7) in a gas mixture containing 18 vol.% CO2 and 10 vol.% water vapor in 1 h. The fixation is likely surface limited and restricted due to poor gas-solid interaction. It was identified that both the relative humidity and carbon dioxide-water vapor ratio have a role in CO2 fixation regardless of the percentage of water vapor.

  11. Plant extract-mediated biogenic synthesis of silver, manganese dioxide, silver-doped manganese dioxide nanoparticles and their antibacterial activity against food- and water-borne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Krishnaraj, Chandran; Ji, Byoung-Jun; Harper, Stacey L; Yun, Soon-Il

    2016-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), manganese dioxide nanoparticles (MnO₂NPs) and silver-doped manganese dioxide nanoparticles (Ag-doped MnO₂NPs) were synthesized by simultaneous green chemistry reduction approach. Aqueous extract from the leaves of medicinally important plant Cucurbita pepo was used as reducing and capping agents. Various characterization techniques were carried out to affirm the formation of nanoparticles. HR-TEM analysis confirmed the size of nanoparticles in the range of 15-70 nm and also metal doping was confirmed through XRD and EDS analyses. FT-IR analysis confirmed that the presence of biomolecules in the aqueous leaves extract was responsible for nanoparticles synthesis. Further, the concentration of metals and their doping in the reaction mixture was achieved by ICP-MS. The growth curve and well diffusion study of synthesized nanoparticles were performed against food- and water-borne Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. The mode of interaction of nanoparticles on bacterial cells was demonstrated through Bio-TEM analysis. Interestingly, AgNPs and Ag-doped MnO₂NPs showed better antibacterial activity against all the tested bacterial pathogens; however, MnO₂NPs alone did not show any antibacterial properties. Hence, AgNPs and Ag-doped MnO₂NPs synthesized from aqueous plant leaves extract may have important role in controlling various food spoilage caused by bacteria.

  12. Use of the response of photosynthesis to oxygen to estimate mesophyll conductance to carbon dioxide in water-stressed soybean leaves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several types of evidence indicate that there is a significant resistance to the movement of carbon dioxide from the substomatal air space to the site of fixation in the chloroplasts and that the resistance may vary with temperature, carbon dioxide concentration and water stress. Methods of estimat...

  13. Methane and carbon dioxide concentrations in sediments and diffusive fluxes at the sediment-water interface from three tropical systems in Brazil during the pre-impoundment phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, D. S.; Sidagis-Galli, C.; Grimberg, D. E.; Blanco, F. D.; Rodrigues-Filho, J. L.; Tundisi, J. G.; Matsumura-Tundisi, T.; Tundisi, J. E.; Cimbleris, A. C.; Damázio, J. M.; Project Balcar

    2013-05-01

    The concentrations of methane and carbon dioxide in the sediments pore water were quantified by gas chromatography in three hydroelectric reservoirs under construction during the pre-impoundment phase. Sediment sampling was performed in ten to twelve stations in each river by a Kajak-Brinkhurst corer coupled to a 3 m long aluminum rod in four seasons. The theoretical diffusive fluxes of these gases at the sediment-water interface were also calculated using the Fick's first law of diffusion. The mean annual concentration and diffusive flux of methane were highest in the sediments of the Xingu River (12.71 ± 3.03 mmol CH4 m-2 and 3.84 ± 0.91 mmol CH4 m-2 d-1), located in the Amazon, influenced by the presence of organic matter originating from the surrounding forest. The mean annual concentration of carbon dioxide was highest in the São Marcos River (71.36 ± 10.36 mmol CO2 m-2), located in an area of cerrado savanna, while the highest diffusive flux of carbon dioxide was observed in the Madeira River (30.23 ± 2.41 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1), which rises in the Andes Cordillera and has a very high water flow. The mean concentration and diffusive flux of carbon dioxide in the three studied systems were much higher (64-98%) in comparison with the methane, influenced by the oxic condition in these lotic systems. Nevertheless, the present study shows that the sediments of these systems, especially in the Xingu River, have significant amount of methane dissolved in the pore water which is being diffused to the overlying water. The information obtained in this study during the pre-filling phase will be important for the calculation of net flows of greenhouse gases after the impoundment of these future reservoirs. This study is part of the Strategic Project "Monitoring Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in Hydroelectric Reservoirs" - Call 099/2008 of the Brazilian Agency of Electric Energy (ANEEL) and sponsored by ELETRONORTE, FURNAS and CHESF.

  14. Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water Emulsions Stabilized by Fine Particles for Ocean and Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Golomb; David Ryan; Eugene Barry

    2007-01-08

    Since the submission of our last Semi-annual Report, dated September 2006, the research objectives of this Co-operative Agreement shifted toward geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. In the period September 2006-February 2007, experiments were conducted in a High-Pressure Batch Reactor (HPBR) for creating emulsions of liquid carbon dioxide (/CO{sub 2})-in-water stabilized by fine particles for geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Also, emulsions were created in water of a binary mixture of liquid carbon dioxide and liquid hydrogen sulfide (/H{sub 2}S), called Acid Gas (AG). This leads to the possibility of safe disposal of AG in deep geologic formations, such as saline aquifers. The stabilizing particles included pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), unprocessed flyash, collected by an electrostatic precipitator at a local coal-fired power plant, and pulverized siderite (FeCO{sub 3}). Particle size ranged from submicron to a few micrometers. The first important finding is that /CO{sub 2} and /H{sub 2}S freely mix as a binary liquid without phase separation. The next finding is that the mixture of /CO{sub 2} and /H{sub 2}S can be emulsified in water using fine particles as emulsifying agents. Such emulsions are stable over prolonged periods, so it should not be a problem to inject an emulsion into subterranean formations. The advantage of injecting an emulsion into subterranean formations is that it is denser than the pure liquid, therefore it is likely to disperse in the bottom of the geologic formation, rather than buoying upward (called fingering). In such a fashion, the risk of the liquids escaping from the formation, and possibly re-emerging into the atmosphere, is minimized. This is especially important for H{sub 2}S, because it is a highly toxic gas. Furthermore, the emulsion may interact with the surrounding minerals, causing mineral trapping. This may lead to longer sequestration periods than injecting the pure liquids alone.

  15. Quantifying simultaneous fluxes of ozone, carbon dioxide and water vapor above a subalpine forest ecosystem

    Treesearch

    K. F. Zeller; N. T. Nikolov

    2000-01-01

    Assessing the long-term exchange of trace gases and energy between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere is an important priority of the current climate change research. In this regard, it is particularly significant to provide valid data on simultaneous fluxes of carbon, water vapor and pollutants over representative ecosystems. Eddy covariance measurements and...

  16. Interactions of Plutonium Dioxide with Water and Oxygen-Hydrogen Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, J.M.; Allen, T.H.

    1999-01-01

    Pressure-volume-temperature data and mass spectrometric results obtained during exposure of PuO{sub 2} to D{sub 2}O show that the dioxide reacts with water at room temperature to produce a higher oxide (PuO{sub 2+x})and H{sub 2}. Results demonstrate that PuO{sub 2+x} is the thermodynamically stable oxide in air. The absence of O{sub 2} at detectable levels in the gas phase implies that radiolytic decomposition of water to the elements is not a significant reaction. The rate of the PuO{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O reaction is 6{+-}4 nmol H{sub 2}/m{sup 2} day, a value that is independent of the H{sub 2}O concentration on the oxide over a range that extends from fractional monolayer coverage to saturation by liquid water. Evaluation of literature data shows that oxide compositions in excess of PuO{sub 2.25} are attained, but the maximum value of x is unknown. During exposure of PuO{sub 2} to a 2:1 D{sub 2}:O{sub 2} mixture at room temperature, the elements combine by a process consistent with a surface-catalyzed reaction. Water is simultaneously formed by the H{sub 2}+O{sub 2} reaction and consumed by the PuO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O reaction and accumulates until the opposing rates are equal. Thereafter, PuO{sub 2+x} is formed at a constant rate by the water-catalyzed PuO{sub 2} + O{sub 2} reaction. The failure of earlier attempts to prepare higher oxides of plutonium is discussed and the catalytic cycle that promotes the reaction of PuO{sub 2} with O{sub 2} is described. Implications of the results for extended storage and environmental chemistry of oxide are examined. Moisture-catalyzed oxidation of PuO{sub 2} accounts for observation of both pressure increases and decreases in oxide storage containers with air atmospheres. Application of the experimental rate results indicates that the reaction of a typical oxide with 0.5 mass % of adsorbed water maybe complete after 25 to 50 years at room temperature.

  17. Disinfection byproduct formation resulting from settled, filtered, and finished water treated by titanium dioxide photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Brooke K; Daugherty, Erin; Abbaszadegan, Morteza

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated strategies targeting disinfection byproduct (DBP) mitigation using TiO2 photocatalysis with varying influent water quality. A Purifics Photo-CAT Lab reactor was used to assess total trihalomethane (TTHM) and haloacetic acid (HAA) formation as a function of photocatalytic treatment using water from a conventional coagulation/flocculation/sedimentation process, granular activated carbon filtration, and a DBP hot spot in the water distribution system. Regardless of influent water quality, photocatalysis reduced DBP precursors; however, low-energy limited photocatalysis (<5 kW h m(-3)), exacerbated the production of TTHMs and HAA5s beyond initial levels. Accordingly, limited photocatalysis is not a suitable option when TTHMs and HAA5s are a concern, regardless of the level of pretreatment. Limited photocatalysis yields incomplete oxidation, wherein larger, more aromatic, humic organic compounds are broken into smaller molecular weight, less aromatic, and less humic moieties, which have considerable potential to produce DBPs. More complete mineralization of DBP precursors is obtained using extended photocatalysis (80-160 kW h m(-3)), which substantially decreases DBP precursors as well as TTHM and HAA5 concentrations. In order to balance DBP mitigation, energy, and chemical usage, targeted use of TiO2 photocatalysis is necessary in a water treatment train (e.g., extended photocatalysis at a distribution system hot spot, where the volumetrically high energy requirements may be justifiable). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of candidate DIAL lidar water-vapor and carbon dioxide absorption lines in the 2-um region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sova, Raymond M.; Thomas, Michael E.; Tobin, David; Byrum, Daniel; Strow, L. Larrabee

    1995-02-01

    DIAL lidar for water-vapor and temperature remote sensing in the eye-safe two micron region has been receiving much interest. Such systems rely on accurate spectral line characterization. Typically spectral line properties are taken from the HITRAN database. A series of transmittance measurements are made to complete and improve the HITRAN database in this important spectral region. A 3-meter base-path White cell attached to a BOMEM DA3.02 is used for the transmittance measurements. The White cell is set to a path length of 216 meters for all experiments. Measurements of pure water-vapor, nitrogen broadened water-vapor, pure carbon dioxide, and nitrogen broadened carbon dioxide are collected at room temperature. Data analysis is performed on water-vapor lines that are relatively temperature insensitive and carbon dioxide lines that are relatively temperature sensitive over the range of typical atmospheric temperatures. The measured spectrum is converted to the absorption coefficient and is nonlinear least squares fitted to determine the spectral line parameters. Some lines show good agreement (within a few percent) with the HITRAN database, other lines disagree by more than +/- 10%. Thus care must be exercised in applying the HITRAN database to DIAL lidar applications. New parameters are obtained that are not available on the current 1992 HITRAN database, such as the self width and pressure shift.

  19. Materials-Related Aspects of Thermochemical Water and Carbon Dioxide Splitting: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Roeb, Martin; Neises, Martina; Monnerie, Nathalie; Call, Friedemann; Simon, Heike; Sattler, Christian; Schmücker, Martin; Pitz-Paal, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Thermochemical multistep water- and CO2-splitting processes are promising options to face future energy problems. Particularly, the possible incorporation of solar power makes these processes sustainable and environmentally attractive since only water, CO2 and solar power are used; the concentrated solar energy is converted into storable and transportable fuels. One of the major barriers to technological success is the identification of suitable active materials like catalysts and redox materials exhibiting satisfactory durability, reactivity and efficiencies. Moreover, materials play an important role in the construction of key components and for the implementation in commercial solar plants. The most promising thermochemical water- and CO2-splitting processes are being described and discussed with respect to further development and future potential. The main materials-related challenges of those processes are being analyzed. Technical approaches and development progress in terms of solving them are addressed and assessed in this review.

  20. Hydrogen production through solar energy water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dini, D.

    Water electrolysis systems are seen as the principal means of producing a large amount of hydrogen in the future. Hydrogen energy production from direct solar energy conversion facilities located on the shores of oceans and lakes is discussed. The electrolysis interface is shown to be conveniently adapted to direct solar energy conversion; this, however, will depend on technical and economic feasibility aspects as they emerge from the research phases. The basic requirements for relatively immense solar collection areas for large-scale central conversion facilities, with widely variable electricity charges, are outlined. The operation of electrolysis and photovoltaic array combination is verified at various insolation levels. It is pointed out that solar cell arrays and electrolyzers are producing the expected results with solar energy inputs that are continuously varying.

  1. Water flow energy harvesters for autonomous flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisseau, Sebastien; Duret, Alexandre-Benoit; Perez, Matthias; Jallas, Emmanuel; Jallas, Eric

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports on a water flow energy harvester exploiting a horizontal axis turbine with distributed magnets of alternate polarities at the rotor periphery and air coils outside the pipe. The energy harvester operates down to 1.2L/min with an inlet section of 20mm of diameter and up to 25.2mW are provided at 20L/min in a 2.4V NiMH battery through a BQ25504 power management circuit. The pressure loss induced by the insertion of the energy harvester in the hydraulic circuit and by the extraction of energy has been limited to 0.05bars at 30L/min, corresponding to a minor loss coefficient of KEH=3.94.

  2. SYNTHESIS OF SULFUR-BASED WATER TREATMENT AGENT FROM SULFUR DIOXIDE WASTE STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Maohong Fan; Adrienne Cooper

    2004-11-01

    Absorption of sulfur dioxide from a simulated flue gas was investigated for the production of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS), a highly effective coagulant useful in treatment of drinking water and wastewater. The reaction for PFS synthesis took place near atmospheric pressure and at temperatures of 30-80 C. SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies greater than 90% were achieved, with ferrous iron concentrations in the product less than 0.1%. A factorial analysis of the effect of temperature, oxidant dosage, SO{sub 2} concentration, and gas flow rate on SO{sub 2} removal efficiency was carried out, and statistical analyses are conducted. The solid PFS was also characterized with different methods. Characterization results have shown that PFS possesses both crystalline and non-crystalline structure. The kinetics of reactions among FeSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 7H{sub 2}O, NaHSO{sub 3} and NaClO{sub 3} was investigated. Characterizations of dry PFS synthesized from SO{sub 2} show the PFS possesses amorphous structure, which is desired for it to be a good coagulant in water and wastewater treatment. A series of lab-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of PFS synthesized from waste sulfur dioxide, ferrous sulfate and sodium chlorate. The performance assessments were based on the comparison of PFS and other conventional and new coagulants for the removal of turbidity and arsenic under different laboratory coagulant conditions. Pilot plant studies were conducted at Des Moines Water Works in Iowa and at the City of Savannah Industrial and Domestic (I&D) Water Treatment Plant in Port Wentworth, Georgia. PFS performances were compared with those of conventional coagulants. The tests in both water treatment plants have shown that PFS is, in general, comparable or better than other coagulants in removal of turbidity and organic substances. The corrosion behavior of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS) prepared from SO{sub 2} and ferric chloride (FC) were compared. Results

  3. Light energy dissipation under water stress conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Stuhlfauth, T.; Scheuermann, R.; Fock, H.P. )

    1990-04-01

    Using {sup 14}CO{sub 2} gas exchange and metabolite analyses, stomatal as well as total internal CO{sub 2} uptake and evolution were estimated. Pulse modulated fluorescence was measured during induction and steady state of photosynthesis. Leaf water potential of Digitalis lanata EHRH. plants decreased to {minus}2.5 megapascals after withholding irrigation. By osmotic adjustment, leaves remained turgid and fully exposed to irradiance even at severe water stress. Due to the stress-induced reduction of stomatal conductance, the stomatal CO{sub 2} exchange was drastically reduced, whereas the total CO{sub 2} uptake and evolution were less affected. Stomatal closure induced an increase in the reassimilation of internally evolved CO{sub 2}. This CO{sub 2}-recycling consumes a significant amount of light energy in the form of ATP and reducing equivalents. As a consequence, the metabolic demand for light energy is only reduced by about 40%, whereas net photosynthesis is diminished by about 70% under severe stress conditions. By CO{sub 2} recycling, carbon flux, enzymatic substrate turnover and consumption of light energy were maintained at high levels, which enabled the plant to recover rapidly after rewatering. In stressed D. lanata plants a variable fluorescence quenching mechanism, termed coefficient of actinic light quenching, was observed. Besides water conservation, light energy dissipation is essential and involves regulated metabolic variations.

  4. Understanding the Phase Behavior of Tetrahydrofuran + Carbon Dioxide, + Methane, and + Water Binary Mixtures from the SAFT-VR Approach.

    PubMed

    Míguez, J M; Piñeiro, M M; Algaba, J; Mendiboure, B; Torré, J P; Blas, F J

    2015-11-05

    The high-pressure phase diagrams of the tetrahydrofuran(1) + carbon dioxide(2), + methane(2), and + water(2) mixtures are examined using the SAFT-VR approach. Carbon dioxide molecule is modeled as two spherical segments tangentially bonded, water is modeled as a spherical segment with four associating sites to represent the hydrogen bonding, methane is represented as an isolated sphere, and tetrahydrofuran is represented as a chain of m tangentially bonded spherical segments. Dispersive interactions are modeled using the square-well intermolecular potential. In addition, two different molecular model mixtures are developed to take into account the subtle balance between water-tetrahydrofuran hydrogen-bonding interactions. The polar and quadrupolar interactions present in water, tetrahydrofuran, and carbon dioxide are treated in an effective way via square-well potentials of variable range. The optimized intermolecular parameters are taken from the works of Giner et al. (Fluid Phase Equil. 2007, 255, 200), Galindo and Blas (J. Phys. Chem. B 2002, 106, 4503), Patel et al. (Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 2003, 42, 3809), and Clark et al. (Mol. Phys. 2006, 104, 3561) for tetrahydrofuran, carbon dioxide, methane, and water, respectively. The phase diagrams of the binary mixtures exhibit different types of phase behavior according to the classification of van Konynenburg and Scott, ranging from types I, III, and VI phase behavior for the tetrahydrofuran(1) + carbon dioxide(2), + methane(2), and + water(2) binary mixtures, respectively. This last type is characterized by the presence of a Bancroft point, positive azeotropy, and the so-called closed-loop curves that represent regions of liquid-liquid immiscibility in the phase diagram. The system exhibits lower critical solution temperatures (LCSTs), which denote the lower limit of immiscibility together with upper critical solution temperatures (UCSTs). This behavior is explained in terms of competition between the incompatibility

  5. GCIP water and energy budget synthesis (WEBS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roads, J.; Lawford, R.; Bainto, E.; Berbery, E.; Chen, S.; Fekete, B.; Gallo, K.; Grundstein, A.; Higgins, W.; Kanamitsu, M.; Krajewski, W.; Lakshmi, V.; Leathers, D.; Lettenmaier, D.; Luo, L.; Maurer, E.; Meyers, T.; Miller, D.; Mitchell, Ken; Mote, T.; Pinker, R.; Reichler, T.; Robinson, D.; Robock, A.; Smith, J.; Srinivasan, G.; Verdin, K.; Vinnikov, K.; Vonder, Haar T.; Vorosmarty, C.; Williams, S.; Yarosh, E.

    2003-01-01

    As part of the World Climate Research Program's (WCRPs) Global Energy and Water-Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Continental-scale International Project (GCIP), a preliminary water and energy budget synthesis (WEBS) was developed for the period 1996-1999 fromthe "best available" observations and models. Besides this summary paper, a companion CD-ROM with more extensive discussion, figures, tables, and raw data is available to the interested researcher from the GEWEX project office, the GAPP project office, or the first author. An updated online version of the CD-ROM is also available at http://ecpc.ucsd.edu/gcip/webs.htm/. Observations cannot adequately characterize or "close" budgets since too many fundamental processes are missing. Models that properly represent the many complicated atmospheric and near-surface interactions are also required. This preliminary synthesis therefore included a representative global general circulation model, regional climate model, and a macroscale hydrologic model as well as a global reanalysis and a regional analysis. By the qualitative agreement among the models and available observations, it did appear that we now qualitatively understand water and energy budgets of the Mississippi River Basin. However, there is still much quantitative uncertainty. In that regard, there did appear to be a clear advantage to using a regional analysis over a global analysis or a regional simulation over a global simulation to describe the Mississippi River Basin water and energy budgets. There also appeared to be some advantage to using a macroscale hydrologic model for at least the surface water budgets. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Reactions of plutonium dioxide with water and oxygen-hydrogen mixtures: Mechanisms for corrosion of uranium and plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, John M.; Allen, Thomas H.; Morales, Luis A.

    1999-06-18

    Investigation of the interactions of plutonium dioxide with water vapor and with an oxygen-hydrogen mixture show that the oxide is both chemically reactive and catalytically active. Correspondence of the chemical behavior with that for oxidation of uranium in moist air suggests that similar catalytic processes participate in the mechanism of moisture-enhanced corrosion of uranium and plutonium. Evaluation of chemical and kinetic data for corrosion of the metals leads to a comprehensive mechanism for corrosion in dry air, water vapor, and moist air. Results are applied in confirming that the corrosion rate of Pu in water vapor decreases sharply between 100 and 200 degrees C.

  7. Increase in forest water-use efficiency as atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations rise.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Trevor F; Hollinger, David Y; Bohrer, Gil; Dragoni, Danilo; Munger, J William; Schmid, Hans Peter; Richardson, Andrew D

    2013-07-18

    Terrestrial plants remove CO2 from the atmosphere through photosynthesis, a process that is accompanied by the loss of water vapour from leaves. The ratio of water loss to carbon gain, or water-use efficiency, is a key characteristic of ecosystem function that is central to the global cycles of water, energy and carbon. Here we analyse direct, long-term measurements of whole-ecosystem carbon and water exchange. We find a substantial increase in water-use efficiency in temperate and boreal forests of the Northern Hemisphere over the past two decades. We systematically assess various competing hypotheses to explain this trend, and find that the observed increase is most consistent with a strong CO2 fertilization effect. The results suggest a partial closure of stomata-small pores on the leaf surface that regulate gas exchange-to maintain a near-constant concentration of CO2 inside the leaf even under continually increasing atmospheric CO2 levels. The observed increase in forest water-use efficiency is larger than that predicted by existing theory and 13 terrestrial biosphere models. The increase is associated with trends of increasing ecosystem-level photosynthesis and net carbon uptake, and decreasing evapotranspiration. Our findings suggest a shift in the carbon- and water-based economics of terrestrial vegetation, which may require a reassessment of the role of stomatal control in regulating interactions between forests and climate change, and a re-evaluation of coupled vegetation-climate models.

  8. Synthesizing and dispersing silver nanoparticles in a water-in-supercritical carbon dioxide microemulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, M.; Chen, X.; Wai, C.M.; Fulton, J.L.

    1999-03-24

    Reverse micelles and microemulsions formed in liquid and supercritical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) allow highly polar or polarizable compounds to be dispersed in this nonpolar fluid. However, since the polarizability per unit volume of dense CO{sub 2} is quite low, it is difficult to overcome the strong van der Waals attractive interactions between particles in order to stably suspend macromolecular species. Conventional surfactants by themselves do not form reverse micelles or microemulsions in CO{sub 2} because the van der Waals interdroplet attractions are too high. The use of surfactants or cosurfactants with fluorinated tails provides a layer of a weakly attractive compound covering the highly attractive droplet cores, thus preventing their short-range interactions that would destabilize the system. Using this strategy, the authors describe a method to synthesize and stabilize metallic silver nanoparticles having diameters from 5 to 15 nm in supercritical CO{sub 2} using an optically transparent, water-in-CO{sub 2} microemulsion.

  9. Pilot study on bromate reduction in ozonation of water with low carbonate alkalinities by carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Zou, Li; Guo, Lulu; Ji, Jialin

    2011-01-01

    A pilot study was carried out to explore the application of carbon dioxide for pH depression in a bubble column and its ability to inhibit bromate formation for water with a low alkalinity. Results showed that in the absence of ammonia, CO2 was capable of reducing bromate 38.0%-65.4% with one-unit pH depression. CO2 caused a slightly lower bromate reduction (4.2%) than did H2SO4 when the pH was depressed to 7.4, and a more a pronounced lower reduction (8.8%) when the pH was depressed to 6.9. In the presence of 0.20 mg/L-N ammonia, bromate was largely inhibited with 73.9% reduction. When the pH was depressed to 7.4, CO2 and H2SO4 showed an 11.3% and 23.5% bromate reduction respectively, demonstrating that the joint use of CO2 and ammonia might be a plausible strategy of blocking all three bromate formation pathways. CO2 could be applied through the aeration diffuser together with ozone gas, resulting in a similar bromate reduction compared with the premixing method through Venturi mixer.

  10. Surface activity of a fluorinated carbohydrate ester in water/carbon dioxide emulsions.

    PubMed

    Favrelle, Audrey; Boyère, Cédric; Tran, Kien My; Alaimo, David; Calvignac, Brice; Paquot, Michel; Boury, Frank; Jérôme, Christine; Debuigne, Antoine

    2013-05-15

    The water/carbon dioxide (W/CO2) interfacial activity and emulsifying capacity of hydrocarbon and fluorinated carbohydrate esters are investigated of the first time and compared to the performance of sodium-bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT). The reduction of the W/CO2 interfacial tension was measured using a pendant drop tensiometer equipped with a cell view pressurized with CO2 at 80 bar and 45°C. It was found that the interface stabilization improved in the order AOT<6-O-myristoyl mannose<6-O-(2H,2H,3H,3H-perfluoroundecanoyl)-D-mannose. In the latter case, a drastic reduction of the W/CO2 interfacial tension was observed (85% reduction, interfacial tension at the equilibrium=3.6 mN/m), which emphasizes the advantage of using a fluorinated CO2-philic tail and the potential of sugars as hydrophilic head. The formulation of stable W/CO2 emulsions was also achieved using the fluorinated mannose derivative. This study paves the way to the design of a novel class of competitive surface active agents for W/CO2 emulsions.

  11. Water-carbon dioxide solid phase equilibria at pressures above 4 GPa.

    PubMed

    Abramson, E H; Bollengier, O; Brown, J M

    2017-04-11

    A solid phase in the mixed water-carbon dioxide system, previously identified as carbonic acid, was observed in the high-pressure diamond-anvil cell. The pressure-temperature paths of both its melting and peritectic curves were measured, beginning at 4.4 GPa and 165 °C (where it exists in a quadruple equilibrium, together with an aqueous fluid and the ices H2O(VII) and CO2(I)) and proceeding to higher pressures and temperatures. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed a triclinic crystal with unit cell parameters (at 6.5 GPa and 20 °C) of a = 5.88 Å, b = 6.59 Å, c = 6.99 Å, α = 88.7°, β = 79.7°, and γ = 67.7°. Raman spectra exhibit a major line at ~1080 cm(-1) and lattice modes below 300 cm(-1).

  12. Fabrication of water-repellent cellulose fiber coated with magnetic nanoparticles under supercritical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shengjie; Shen, Danping; Wu, Peiyi

    2013-04-01

    Hematite nanoparticle-coated magnetic composite fiber was prepared in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). With the help of scCO2, cellulose did not need to be dissolved and regenerated and it could be in any form (e.g., cotton wool, filter paper, textile, etc.). The penetrating and swelling effect of scCO2, the slowing reaction rate of weak alkalis, and the template effect of cellulose fibers were discovered to be the key factors for the fabrication of ordered cellulose/Fe2O3 composite fibers. The structures of the composite fibers as well as the layers of Fe2O3 particles were characterized by means of scanning/transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman investigation. It was found that α-Fe2O3 granules which ranged from 30 to 85 nm with average diameter around 55 nm would be generated on the surface of cellulose fibers via potassium acetate, while irregular square prisms (ranged from 200 to 600 nm) which were composed of smaller nanoparticles ( 10 nm) would be fabricated via urea. And, the obtained composite was highly water repellent with superparamagnetic or ferromagnetic properties.

  13. Crosslinked PEG and PEBAX Membranes for Concurrent Permeation of Water and Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, Colin A.; Chen, George Q.; Lu, Hiep T.; Kentish, Sandra E.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane technology can be used for both post combustion carbon dioxide capture and acidic gas sweetening and dehydration of natural gas. These processes are especially suited for polymeric membranes with polyether functionality, because of the high affinity of this species for both H2O and CO2. Here, both crosslinked polyethylene glycol diacrylate and a polyether-polyamide block copolymer (PEBAX 2533©) are studied for their ability to separate CO2 from CH4 and N2 under single and mixed gas conditions, for both dry and wet feeds, as well as when 500 ppm H2S is present. The solubility of gases within these polymers is shown to be better correlated with the Lennard Jones well depth than with critical temperature. Under dry mixed gas conditions, CO2 permeability is reduced compared to the single gas measurement because of competitive sorption from CH4 or N2. However, selectivity for CO2 is retained in both polymers. The presence of water in the feed is observed to swell the PEG membrane resulting in a significant increase in CO2 permeability relative to the dry gas scenario. Importantly, the selectivity is again retained under wet feed gas conditions. The presence of H2S is observed to only slightly reduce CO2 permeability through both membranes. PMID:26703745

  14. Friction factors of colloidal suspension containing silicon dioxide nanoparticles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Clement; Pant, Sarbottam; Sharif, Md. Tanveer

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to experimentally characterize the friction factor of a colloidal suspension flow in circular and square tubes. The suspension contained silicon dioxide nanoparticles dispersed in distilled water at 9.58% volume concentration. Rheological measurements indicated that the suspension exhibits non-Newtonian behavior, and could be modelled as a power-law generalized Newtonian fluid. The experimental study showed that, with proper characterization of the consistency and flow behavior indices, the suspension flow friction factors in circular and square tubes exhibit similarities with those of Newtonian fluid flow. In the laminar fully-developed flow region, the Poiseuille numbers are similar to those established for Newtonian fluid flow. In the turbulent region, the Dodge and Metzner relation between the friction factor and a generalized Reynolds number can adequately describe the flow. The onsets of transition to turbulent flow for the suspension vary with the shape of the tube and differ from those of Newtonian fluid flow. The deviations suggest that the flow passage shape and the presence of nanoparticles affect the onset of transition to turbulent flow. Supported by North Dakota NASA EPSCoR.

  15. Lignin depolymerisation in supercritical carbon dioxide/acetone/water fluid for the production of aromatic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Gosselink, Richard J A; Teunissen, Wouter; van Dam, Jan E G; de Jong, Ed; Gellerstedt, Göran; Scott, Elinor L; Sanders, Johan P M

    2012-02-01

    Valorisation of lignin plays a key role in further development of lignocellulosic biorefinery processes the production of biofuels and bio-based materials. In the present study, organosolv hardwood and wheat straw lignins were converted in a supercritical fluid consisting of carbon dioxide/acetone/water (300-370°C, 100bar) to a phenolic oil consisting of oligomeric fragments and monomeric aromatic compounds with a total yield of 10-12% based on lignin. These yields are similar to the state-of-the-art technologies such as base-catalysed thermal processes applied for lignin depolymerisation. Addition of formic acid increases the yield of monomeric aromatic species by stabilizing aromatic radicals. Supercritical depolymerisation of wheat straw and hardwood lignin yielded monomeric compounds in different compositions with a maximum yield of 2.0% for syringic acid and 3.6% for syringol, respectively. The results of the present study showed that under the applied conditions competition occurred between lignin depolymerisation and recondensation of fragments.

  16. The Extent to Which Different 100% Clean, Renewable Energy Transition Scenarios can Reduce World Carbon Dioxide Levels to 350-400 ppmv by 2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. Z.; Byrne, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Future levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) depend on CO2's natural and anthropogenic emission rates and its removal rates by primarily water dissolution, photosysnthesis, and weathering. We compare modeled past CO2 from 1750 to 2015 with data then model projected future changes in CO2 under different energy emission scenarios, including two where 100% of the world's all-purpose energy (electricity, transportation, heating/cooling, industry, and agriculture/forestry/fishing) is electrified, and the electricity is powered by wind, water, and sunlight (WWS). The scenarios are derived from country-by-country energy roadmaps found at http://web.stanford.edu/group/efmh/jacobson/Articles/I/WWS-50-USState-plans.html. In one 100% scenario, 80% of the conversion is assumed to occur by 2030 and 100%, by 2050. In the second, 80% is assumed to occur by 2050, and the rest by 2100. We also compare with an unrealistic but best-case 100% conversion scenario starting in 2015 and IPCC scenarios A1B, A2, B1, B2, and A1F1. Results will be shown, and conclusions, drawn about the practicality of reducing CO2 to 350-400 ppmv by 2100. These results have significant impact on current and future energy policy.

  17. Water Conservation Study (Water and Energy), Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP) FY94S, Fort Knox, Kentucky; Executive Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-30

    plants, cooling towers, water treatment plants and water distribution systems. The water and energy conservation opportunities ( ECOs ) are evaluated...in Design (LCCID) computer program. Project descriptions and DD1391 forms were prepared for four Energy Conservation Investment program (ECIP

  18. Acquiring water for energy: institutional aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherford, G.; Nardi, K.; Osterhoudt, F.; Roach, F.

    1982-01-01

    This book provides basic information about the legal, political and social constraints faced by energy developers in the acquisition of water. It is a guide to those institutional constraints which are general and pronounced enough to be important for regional assessments. It is not a manual for facility siting or site-specific assessments. Only the acquisition phase of the water use cycle is emphasized. The study focuses primarily on legal constraints and secondarily on political constraints, because they tend to encompass or reflect other forms of institutional constraints such as economic ones. 11 figures, 9 tables.

  19. A flow-system comparison of the reactivities of calcium superoxide and potassium superoxide with carbon dioxide and water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, P. C.; Ballou, E. V.; Spitze, L. A.; Wydeven, T.

    1982-01-01

    A single pass flow system was used to test the reactivity of calcium superoxide with respiratory gases and the performance was compared to that of potassium superoxide. The KO2 system is used by coal miners as a self-contained unit in rescue operations. Particular attention was given to the reactivity with carbon dioxide and water vapor at different temperatures and partial pressures of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. The calcium superoxide beds were found to absorb CO2 and H2O vapor, releasing O2. The KO2 bed, however, released O2 at twice the rate of CO2 absorption at 37 C. It is concluded that the calcium superoxide material is not a suitable replacement for the KO2 bed, although Ca(O2)2 may be added to the KO2 bed to enhance the CO2 absorption.

  20. High energy ball milling and supercritical carbon dioxide impregnation as co-processing methods to improve dissolution of tadalafil.

    PubMed

    Krupa, Anna; Descamps, Marc; Willart, Jean-François; Jachowicz, Renata; Danède, Florence

    2016-12-01

    Tadalafil (TD) is a crystalline drug of a high melting point (Tm=299°C) and limited solubility in water (<5μg/mL). These properties may result in reduced and variable bioavailability after oral administration. Since the melting of TD is followed by its decomposition, the drug processing at high temperatures is limited. The aim of the research is, therefore, to improve the dissolution of TD by its co-processing with the hydrophilic polymer Soluplus® (SL) at temperatures below 40°C. In this study, two methods, i.e. high energy ball-milling and supercritical carbon dioxide impregnation (scCO2) are compared, with the aim to predict their suitability for the vitrification of TD. The influence of the amount of SL and the kind of co-processing method on TD thermal properties is analyzed. The results show that only the high energy ball milling process makes it possible to obtain a completely amorphous form of TD, with the characteristic X-ray 'halo' pattern. The intensity of the Bragg peaks diminishes for all the formulations treated with scCO2, but these samples remain crystalline. The MDSC results show that high energy ball milling is capable of forcing the mixing of TD and SL at a molecular level, providing a homogeneous amorphous solid solution. The glass transition temperatures (Tg), determined for the co-milled formulations, range from 79°C to 139°C and they are higher than Tg of pure SL (ca. 70°C) and lower than Tg of pure TD (ca. 149°C). In contrast to the co-milled formulations which are in the form of powder, all the formulations after scCO2 impregnation form a hard residue, sticking to the reaction vessel, which needs to be ground before analysis or further processing. Finally, the dissolution studies show that not only has SL a beneficial effect on the amount of TD dissolved, but also both co-processing methods make the dissolution enhancement of TD possible. After co-processing by scCO2, the amount of TD dissolved increases with the decreasing amount

  1. Determination of diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in water between 268 and 473 K in a high-pressure capillary optical cell with in situ Raman spectroscopic measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Wanjun; Guo, Huirong; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.; Li, Lanlan

    2013-01-01

    Accurate values of diffusion coefficients for carbon dioxide in water and brine at reservoir conditions are essential to our understanding of transport behavior of carbon dioxide in subsurface pore space. However, the experimental data are limited to conditions at low temperatures and pressures. In this study, diffusive transfer of carbon dioxide in water at pressures up to 45 MPa and temperatures from 268 to 473 K was observed within an optical capillary cell via time-dependent Raman spectroscopy. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by the least-squares method for the measured variations in carbon dioxide concentration in the cell at various sample positions and time. At the constant pressure of 20 MPa, the measured diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in water increase with increasing temperature from 268 to 473 K. The relationship between diffusion coefficient of carbon dioxide in water [D(CO2) in m2/s] and temperature (T in K) was derived with Speedy–Angell power-law approach as: D(CO2)=D0[T/Ts-1]m where D0 = 13.942 × 10−9 m2/s, Ts = 227.0 K, and m = 1.7094. At constant temperature, diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in water decrease with pressure increase. However, this pressure effect is rather small (within a few percent).

  2. Comparative analysis of the photocatalytic reduction of drinking water oxoanions using titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Marks, Randal; Yang, Ting; Westerhoff, Paul; Doudrick, Kyle

    2016-11-01

    Regulated oxidized pollutants in drinking water can have significant health effects, resulting in the need for ancillary treatment processes. Oxoanions (e.g., nitrate) are one important class of oxidized inorganic ions. Ion exchange and reverse osmosis are often used treatment processes for oxoanions, but these separation processes leave behind a concentrated waste product that still requires treatment or disposal. Photocatalysis has emerged as a sustainable treatment technology capable of catalytically reducing oxoanions directly to innocuous byproducts. Compared with the large volume of knowledge available for photocatalytic oxidation, very little knowledge exists regarding photocatalytic reduction of oxoanion pollutants. This study investigates the reduction of various oxoanions of concern in drinking water (nitrate, nitrite, bromate, perchlorate, chlorate, chlorite, chromate) using a commercial titanium dioxide photocatalyst and a polychromatic light source. Results showed that oxoanions were readily reduced under acidic conditions in the presence of formate, which served as a hole scavenger, with the first-order rate decreasing as follows: bromate > nitrite > chlorate > nitrate > dichromate > perchlorate, corresponding to rate constants of 0.33, 0.080, 0.052, 0.0074, 0.0041, and 0 cm(2)/photons × 10(18), respectively. Only bromate and nitrite were reduced at neutral pH, with substantially lower rate constants of 0.034 and 0.0021 cm(2)/photons × 10(18), respectively. No direct relationship between oxoanion physicochemical properties, including electronegativity of central atom, internal bond strength, and polarizability was discovered. However, observations presented herein suggest the presence of kinetic barriers unique to each oxoanion and provides a framework for investigating photocatalytic reduction mechanisms of oxoanions in order to design better photocatalysts and optimize treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Multi-decadal uptake of carbon dioxide into subtropical mode water of the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, N. R.

    2012-07-01

    Natural climate variability impacts the multi-decadal uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (Cant) into the North Atlantic Ocean subpolar and subtropical gyres. Previous studies have shown that there is significant uptake of CO2 into subtropical mode water (STMW) of the North Atlantic. STMW forms south of the Gulf Stream in winter and constitutes the dominant upper-ocean water mass in the subtropical gyre of the North Atlantic Ocean. Observations at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site near Bermuda show an increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of +1.51 ± 0.08 μmol kg-1 yr-1 between 1988 and 2011, but also an increase in ocean acidification indicators such as pH at rates (-0.0022 ± 0.0002 yr-1) higher than the surface ocean (Bates et al., 2012). It is estimated that the sink of CO2 into STMW was 0.985 ± 0.018 Pg C (Pg = 1015 g C) between 1988 and 2011 (70 ± 1.8% of which is due to uptake of Cant). The sink of CO2 into the STMW is 20% of the CO2 uptake in the North Atlantic Ocean between 14°-50° N (Takahashi et al., 2009). However, the STMW sink of CO2 was strongly coupled to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), with large uptake of CO2 into STMW during the 1990s during a predominantly NAO positive phase. In contrast, uptake of CO2 into STMW was much reduced in the 2000s during the NAO neutral/negative phase. Thus, NAO induced variability of the STMW CO2 sink is important when evaluating multi-decadal changes in North Atlantic Ocean CO2 sinks.

  4. Chlorine dioxide oxidation of Escherichia coli in water - A study of the disinfection kinetics and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ofori, Isaac; Maddila, Suresh; Lin, Johnson; Jonnalagadda, Sreekantha B

    2017-03-16

    This study investigated the kinetics and mechanism of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) inactivation of a Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (ATCC 35218) in oxidant demand free (ODF) water in detail as a function of disinfectant concentration (0.5-5.0 mg/L), water pH (6.5-8.5), temperature variations (4-37°C) and bacterial density (10(5)-10(7) cfu/mL). The effects of ClO2 on bacterial cell morphology, outer membrane permeability, cytoplasmic membrane disruption and intracellular enzymatic activity were also studied to elucidate the mechanism of action on the cells. Increasing temperature and disinfectant concentration were proportional to the rate of cell killing, but efficacy was found to be significantly subdued at 0.5 mg/L and less dependent on the bacterial density. The bactericidal efficiency was higher at alkaline pH of 8 or above as compared to neutral and slightly acidic pH of 7 and 6.5 respectively. The disinfection kinetic curves followed a biphasic pattern of rapid inactivation within the initial 2 min which were followed by a tailing even in the presence of residual biocide. The curves were adequately described by the Cavg Hom model. Transmission Electron Microscopy images of the bacteria cells exposed to lethal concentrations of ClO2 indicated very little observable morphological damage to the outer membranes of the cells. ClO2 however was found to increase the permeability of the outer and cytoplasmic membranes leading to the leakage of membrane components such as 260 nm absorbing materials and inhibiting the activity of the intracellular enzyme β-D-galactosidase. It is suggested that the disruption of the cytoplasmic membrane and subsequent efflux of intracellular components result in the inactivation of the Gram-negative bacteria.

  5. Validation of the doubly-labeled water (H/sup 3/H/sup 18/O) method for measuring water flux and energy metabolism in tenebrionid beetles

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    Doubly-labeled water (H/sup 3/H/sup 18/O) has been used to determine water flux and energy metabolism in a variety of vertebrates. This study examines the applicability of this technique to arthropods. The theory of the technique depends upon the assumption that doubly-labeled water introduced into the animal's body water equilibrates with water and carbon dioxide by the action of carbonic anhydrase. Tritium (/sup 3/H) is lost from the animal only with water while oxygen-18 is lost with both water and carbon dioxide. The difference bwtween the rates of loss of the two isotopes is proportional to CO/sub 2/ loss rate. Validation of the use of tritiated water for measuring water flux was accomplished by comparing gravimetric measurements of water gain with flux rates determined by loss of tritiated water. At room humidity, an overestimate for influx calculated from labeled water calculations was found, averaging 12 mg H/sub 2/O (g.d)/sup -1/. Comparison of CO/sub 2/ loss rate determined isotopically with rates of CO/sub 2/ loss determined by standard metabolic rates also yielded overestimates for the isotopic technique, overestimates ranging between 20 and 30%. The relevance of this for studies using labeled water for studying water fluxes and free metabolism of free-ranging arthropods is discussed.

  6. Raman spectroscopy of solutions and interfaces containing nitrogen dioxide, water, and 1,4 dioxane: Evidence for repulsion of surface water by NO{sub 2} gas

    SciTech Connect

    Murdachaew, Garold; Varner, Mychel E.; Veer, Wytze E. van der; Gerber, R. Benny; Phillips, Leon F.

    2014-05-14

    The interaction of water, 1,4 dioxane, and gaseous nitrogen dioxide, has been studied as a function of distance measured through the liquid-vapour interface by Raman spectroscopy with a narrow (<0.1 mm) laser beam directed parallel to the interface. The Raman spectra show that water is present at the surface of a dioxane-water mixture when gaseous NO{sub 2} is absent, but is virtually absent from the surface of a dioxane-water mixture when gaseous NO{sub 2} is present. This is consistent with recent theoretical calculations that show NO{sub 2} to be mildly hydrophobic.

  7. Global Energy and Water Budgets in MERRA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Robertson, Franklin R.; Chen, Junye

    2010-01-01

    Reanalyses, retrospectively analyzing observations over climatological time scales, represent a merger between satellite observations and models to provide globally continuous data and have improved over several generations. Balancing the Earth s global water and energy budgets has been a focus of research for more than two decades. Models tend to their own climate while remotely sensed observations have had varying degrees of uncertainty. This study evaluates the latest NASA reanalysis, called the Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), from a global water and energy cycles perspective. MERRA was configured to provide complete budgets in its output diagnostics, including the Incremental Analysis Update (IAU), the term that represents the observations influence on the analyzed states, alongside the physical flux terms. Precipitation in reanalyses is typically sensitive to the observational analysis. For MERRA, the global mean precipitation bias and spatial variability are more comparable to merged satellite observations (GPCP and CMAP) than previous generations of reanalyses. Ocean evaporation also has a much lower value which is comparable to observed data sets. The global energy budget shows that MERRA cloud effects may be generally weak, leading to excess shortwave radiation reaching the ocean surface. Evaluating the MERRA time series of budget terms, a significant change occurs, which does not appear to be represented in observations. In 1999, the global analysis increments of water vapor changes sign from negative to positive, and primarily lead to more oceanic precipitation. This change is coincident with the beginning of AMSU radiance assimilation. Previous and current reanalyses all exhibit some sensitivity to perturbations in the observation record, and this remains a significant research topic for reanalysis development. The effect of the changing observing system is evaluated for MERRA water and energy budget terms.

  8. UV-Vis, infrared, and mass spectroscopy of electron irradiated frozen oxygen and carbon dioxide mixtures with water

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Brant M.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Strazzulla, Giovanni

    2014-02-01

    Ozone has been detected on the surface of Ganymede via observation of the Hartley band through the use of ultraviolet spectroscopy and is largely agreed upon to be formed by radiolytic processing via interaction of magnetospheric energetic ions and/or electrons with oxygen-bearing ices on Ganymede's surface. Interestingly, a clearly distinct band near 300 nm within the shoulder of the UV-Vis spectrum of Ganymede was also observed, but currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. Consequently, the primary motivation behind this work was the collection of UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy of ozone formation by energetic electron bombardment of a variety of oxygen-bearing ices (oxygen, carbon dioxide, water) relevant to this moon as well as other solar system. Ozone was indeed synthesized in pure ices of molecular oxygen, carbon dioxide and a mixture of water and oxygen, in agreement with previous studies. The Hartley band of the ozone synthesized in these ice mixtures was observed in the UV-Vis spectra and compared with the spectrum of Ganymede. In addition, a solid state ozone absorption cross section of 6.0 ± 0.6 × 10{sup –17} cm{sup 2} molecule{sup –1} was obtained from the UV-Vis spectral data. Ozone was not produced in the irradiated carbon dioxide-water mixtures; however, a spectrally 'red' UV continuum is observed and appears to reproduce well what is observed in a large number of icy moons such as Europa.

  9. Thermocapillary transport of energy during water evaporation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fei; Badam, V K; Durst, F; Ward, C A

    2005-11-01

    When evaporation occurs at a spherical water-vapor interface maintained at the circular mouth of a small funnel, studies of the energy transport have indicated that thermal conduction alone does not provide enough energy to evaporate the liquid at the observed rate. If the Gibbs model of the interface is adopted and the "surface-thermal capacity" is assigned a value of 30.6+/-0.8 kJ/(m2 K), then for evaporation experiments with the interfacial temperature in the range -10 degrees C< or =TLV< or =3.5 degrees C and Marangoni number (Ma) in the range 100energy transport by both thermocapillary convection and thermal conduction were taken into account, conservation of energy was fully satisfied. The question addressed herein is whether the assigned value of the surface-thermal capacity is an ad hoc empirical parameter or a property of the water-vapor interface that can be used in other circumstances. Accordingly, a series of experiments has been conducted in which water evaporated at cylindrical interfaces that were, on average, 4.4 times larger in area than that of the spherical interfaces used to measure the surface-thermal capacity initially. It is shown that using the value of the surface-thermal capacity determined at a spherical interface, the energy transported by thermocapillary convection and thermal conduction at a cylindrical interface is sufficient to evaporate the liquid at the observed rate. Knowing the value of the surface-thermal capacity also allows the local evaporation flux to be calculated from the measured temperature profiles in the liquid and vapor phases. The calculated local evaporation flux can then be used with statistical rate theory to calculate the vapor-phase pressure along the interface. The predicted mean vapor-phase pressure is in close agreement with that measured, and the predicted pressure gradient is consistent with that expected when thermocapillary convection is present.

  10. Chlorine dioxide inactivation of enterovirus 71 in water and its impact on genomic targets.

    PubMed

    Jin, Min; Shan, Jinyang; Chen, Zhaoli; Guo, Xuan; Shen, Zhiqiang; Qiu, Zhigang; Xue, Bin; Wang, Yongguang; Zhu, Dunwan; Wang, Xinwei; Li, Junwen

    2013-05-07

    To control the waterborne transmission of enterovirus 71(EV71), which is associated with hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD), it is essential to know the inactivation effectiveness of disinfectants on EV71 in water. In this article, we present a comparative analysis of the effects on EV71 following exposure to chlorine dioxide (ClO2) under different doses, pH, and temperature conditions. We show that the EV71 exhibited strong resistance to ClO2 (more than the MS2 standard) and that Ct value ranges required for a 4-log reduction of EV71 in buffered, disinfectant demand-free water at pH 7.2 and 20 °C by ClO2 were 4.24-6.62 mg/L·min according to the efficiency factor Hom model. ClO2 inactivation of the virus was temperature- and pH-dependent. The virucidal efficiency was higher at pH 8.2 than at pH 5.6 and pH 7.2 and higher at 36 °C than at 4 and 20 °C. In addition, we also observed the impact of ClO2 on the entire viral genome using RT-PCR, which indicated that the 5' noncoding region (5'-NCR) within the EV71 genome, specifically the 1-118 nt region, was the most easily damaged by ClO2 and correlated with viral infectivity. Our study has not only provided guidelines for EV71 disinfection strategies of waste and drinking water, but also confirmed the importance of the 5'-NCR for EV71 infectivity and may demonstrate a general inactivation by ClO2 of enteric virus by damaging the 5'-NCR. Furthermore, 5'-NCR can be used as a target region for PCR to investigate infectious virus contamination in environmental water and evaluate the inactivation effects of ClO2.

  11. A New Model for the Solubility of Water+Carbon Dioxide Mixed Fluids in Magmatic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiorso, M. S.; Gualda, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    A model is calibrated that permits estimation of the thermodynamic properties of dissolved H2O and CO2 components in silicate liquids of magmatic composition.The model is internally consistent with thermodynamic data/model collections in both MELTS (CMP 119; 197-212) and rhyolite-MELTS (JP 53, 875-890). It is calibrated from extensive literature data collected over a broad range of melt compositions (mafic to silicic) on the solubility of water (>1225 experiments, 700°-1600°C, 0-3 GPa), carbon dioxide (>450 experiments, 1150°-1800°C, 0-3.5 GPa), and mixed H2O-CO2 fluids (>140 experiments, 950°-1650°C, 0-3 GPa) in silicate liquids. The model reproduces these solubility data without bias over the entire range of temperature, pressure and composition. At lower pressures (<1 GPa) model residuals are within experimental uncertainty, but residuals are systematically larger at more elevated pressures. The model formulation relies on the EOS of Duan and Zhang (GCA 70, 2311-2324) for estimation of thermodynamic properties of fluid end members and of the mixed fluid. Melt properties are modeled under the simplifying assumption that water disassociates to hydroxyl species in the melt and that carbon dioxide dissolves as a molecular species. Both of these assumptions have been tested against more refined approximations involving speciation, with insufficient improvement of model recovery for solubility data to warrant the additional complexity. The calibrated mixed fluid model is an extension of and is backward compatible with the thermodynamic model for dissolved water in MELTS and rhyolite-MELTS. Additional calibration parameters for the mixed fluid include the enthalpy, entropy and volume of the CO2-melt component as well as regular solution-type interaction parameters between CO2 and "anhydrous" melt components (after MELTS); a total of 12 parameters in all. We find no compelling experimental evidence to justify a CO2-H2O interaction term in the melt. In addition to

  12. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection by-products (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, Indiana, that uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. nconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high and low r...

  13. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection by-products (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, Indiana, that uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. nconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high and low r...

  14. An annual energy and carbon dioxide balance from the CarboEurope wetland site at Tadham Moor, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, C. R.; Harding, R. J.

    2003-04-01

    Peat-rich wetlands can be a major source or sink of carbon depending on the particular hydrological, climatic and biological conditions occurring throughout the year. In managed agricultural wetlands, such a system's equilibrium can be perturbed through farming practice that seeks to maximise crop yield from hay and cattle, and from ecological pressure to maximise the period of inundation. The effects upon the energy and carbon balance brought about by the varying hydrology, climate and farming practice are conplex and require long-term measurements to appreciate the overall gain or loss of the carbon store of vegetation and soil, and to gauge the consequences of current practice upon the wetlands future. Continuous eddy correlation measurements of energy, evaporation and carbon dioxide fluxes were begun in June 1999 at Tadham Moor as part of the EC funded CarboEurope cluster. Tadham Moor is a managed wetland site within the Somerset Levels south of Bristol, UK. A full years data is used to highlight the oscillations and progressions of the energy balance and Net Ecosystem Productivity as climate, hydrology and farming practice alter the overall balance and to create an annual budget of energy and carbon dioxide exchange.

  15. Doubly labelled water assessment of energy expenditure: principle, practice, and promise.

    PubMed

    Westerterp, Klaas R

    2017-07-01

    The doubly labelled water method for the assessment of energy expenditure was first published in 1955, application in humans started in 1982, and it has become the gold standard for human energy requirement under daily living conditions. The method involves enriching the body water of a subject with heavy hydrogen ((2)H) and heavy oxygen ((18)O), and then determining the difference in washout kinetics between both isotopes, being a function of carbon dioxide production. In practice, subjects get a measured amount of doubly labelled water ((2)H 2(18) O) to increase background enrichment of body water for (18)O of 2000 ppm with at least 180 ppm and background enrichment of body water for (2)H of 150 ppm with 120 ppm. Subsequently, the difference between the apparent turnover rates of the hydrogen and oxygen of body water is assessed from blood-, saliva-, or urine samples, collected at the start and end of the observation interval of 1-3 weeks. Samples are analyzed for (18)O and (2)H with isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The doubly labelled water method is the indicated method to measure energy expenditure in any environment, especially with regard to activity energy expenditure, without interference with the behavior of the subjects. Applications include the assessment of energy requirement from total energy expenditure, validation of dietary assessment methods and validation of physical activity assessment methods with doubly labelled water measured energy expenditure as reference, and studies on body mass regulation with energy expenditure as a determinant of energy balance.

  16. Phase Relations in the Carbon Dioxide/Water System at Pressures and Temperatures Relevant to Subducting Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. M.; Abramson, E.; Bollengier, O.

    2015-12-01

    Aqueous solutions of carbon dioxide, produced in situ, may be presumed to be important vehicles for both carbon transport and metasomatism in subducting slabs. Due to the many difficulties of working with these solutions, data to date are scarce; previously reported observations of fluid-fluid phase behavior have been limited to pressures lower than 3 kbar. We report measurements of this system, including fluid-fluid and fluid-solid equilibria, to pressures of 70 kbar and temperatures of 400°C. Carbon dioxide-to-water ratios, as loaded into the diamond-anvil cell, are quantified through isotopic exchange. As pressures are raised above 3 kbar, carbon dioxide and water at first become increasingly immiscible, but with further increase of pressure this process reverses to produce a homogeneous fluid. This reversal may be indicative of a significant change in chemical character of the final fluid. A surface of solubility isotherms, deriving from currently available data, is shown in the accompanying figure. The black and white dashed line indicates the critical curve. Data below 3 kbar are from Todheide and Franck [Z. physick Chem. Neue Folge, 37, 387 (1963)]. At lower pressures (<3 kbar) addition of salts (e.g., NaCl) is known to stabilize the existence of the two-fluid regime. The effects of salts, such as would be pertinent to metasomatism, are as yet unknown at the higher pressures of the current experiments; the observed miscibility reversal in pure carbon dioxide/water argues that such effects are unlikely to be well estimated on the basis of lower pressure trends.

  17. Toxicity profiling of water contextual zinc oxide, silver, and titanium dioxide nanoparticles in human oral and gastrointestinal cell systems.

    PubMed

    Giovanni, Marcella; Tay, Chor Yong; Setyawati, Magdiel Inggrid; Xie, Jianping; Ong, Choon Nam; Fan, Rongli; Yue, Junqi; Zhang, Lifeng; Leong, David Tai

    2015-12-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are increasingly detected in water supply due to environmental release of ENPs as the by-products contained within the effluent of domestic and industrial run-off. The partial recycling of water laden with ENPs, albeit at ultra-low concentrations, may pose an uncharacterized threat to human health. In this study, we investigated the toxicity of three prevalent ENPs: zinc oxide, silver, and titanium dioxide over a wide range of concentrations that encompasses drinking water-relevant concentrations, to cellular systems representing oral and gastrointestinal tissues. Based on published in silico-predicted water-relevant ENPs concentration range from 100 pg/L to 100 µg/L, we detected no cytotoxicity to all the cellular systems. Significant cytotoxicity due to the NPs set in around 100 mg/L with decreasing extent of toxicity from zinc oxide to silver to titanium dioxide NPs. We also found that noncytotoxic zinc oxide NPs level of 10 mg/L could elevate the intracellular oxidative stress. The threshold concentrations of NPs that induced cytotoxic effect are at least two to five orders of magnitude higher than the permissible concentrations of the respective metals and metal oxides in drinking water. Based on these findings, the current estimated levels of NPs in potable water pose little cytotoxic threat to the human oral and gastrointestinal systems within our experimental boundaries. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Predicting carbon dioxide and energy fluxes with empirical approaches in FLUXNET.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramontana, Gianluca; Jung, Martin; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Ichii, Kazuhito; Camps-Valls, Gustau; Ráduly, Botond; Reichstein, Markus; Altaf Arain, M.; Cescatti, Alessandro; Kiely, Gerard; Merbold, Lutz; Serrano-Ortiz, Penelope; Sickert, Sven; Wolf, Sebastian; Papale, Dario

    2017-04-01

    Global spatio-temporal fields of land-atmosphere fluxes derived from data-driven models and eddy covariance measurements can complement simulations by process-based Land Surface Models. Furthermore, they are also increasingly used for analyzing variations of the global carbon and energy cycles. However, while a number of strategies for empirical models with eddy covariance flux data have been applied, a systematic intercomparison of these methods is missing so far. Here, we report the results of a cross-validation experiment for predicting carbon dioxide, latent heat, sensible heat and net radiation fluxes, across different ecosystem types. That experiment was performed in the context of the FLUXCOM activities that aims at providing an array of improved data-driven flux products. Empirical models were derived by eleven machine learning (ML) methods from four different classes (kernel methods, neural networks, tree methods, and regression splines). Fluxes data were taken by more than 200 eddy covariance study sites over the globe. Two complementary experimental setups have been carried out: (1) 8-day average fluxes based on remotely sensed data, and (2) daily mean fluxes based on meteorological data and mean seasonal cycle of remotely sensed variables. The pattern of predictions from different ML and experimental setups were highly consistent. Instead there were systematic differences in performance among the fluxes, with the following ascending order: net ecosystem exchange (R2<0.5), ecosystem respiration (R2>0.6), gross primary production (R2>0.7), latent heat (R2>0.7), sensible heat (R2>0.7), net radiation (R2>0.8). The ML methods predicted very well the across site variability and the mean seasonal cycle of the observed fluxes (R2> 0.7), while the 8-day deviations from the mean seasonal cycle were not well predicted (R2< 0.5). Fluxes were better predicted at forested sites (excepting the evergreen broadleaved forest) and in the temperate or boreal climate sites

  19. Energy transduction inside vesicles, photocatalysis by titanium dioxide and formation of NADH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, David; Noveron, Juan; Rodoni, David; Basa, Ranor

    A number of theories on the origin and early evolution of life have focused on the role of lipid bilayer membrane structures (vesicles). These vesicles are similar to modern cellular membranes , and have been postulated to have been abiotically formed and spontaneously assemble on the prebiotic Earth to provide compartments for early cellular life. They can contain water-soluble species, concentrate species, and have the potential to catalyze reactions. The origin of the use of photochemical energy to drive metabolism (ie. energy transduction) is also one of the central issues in our attempts to understand the origin and evolution of life. When did energy transduction and photosynthesis begin? What was the original system for capturing photochemical energy? How simple can such a system be? It has been postulated that vesicle structures developed the ability to capture and transduce light, providing energy for reactions. It has been shown that pH gradients can be photo-chemically created, but it has been found difficult to couple these to drive chemical reactions. Minerals can introduce a number of properties to a vesicle system. The incorporation of clay particles into vesicles can provide catalytic activity that mediates both vesicle assembly and RNA oligomerization. It is known that colloidal semiconducting mineral particles can act as photocatalysts and drive redox chemistry. We show that encapsulation of these particles has the potential to provide a source of energy transduction inside vesicles, and thereby drive protocellular chemistry and represent a model system for early photosynthesis. TiO2 particles can be incorporated into vesicles and retain their photoactivity through the dehydration/rehydration cycles that have been shown to be able concentrate species inside a vesicle. It is shown that these can be used to produce biochemical species such as enzymatically active NADH in such structures. This system demonstrates a simple energy source inside vesicles

  20. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions at the State Level, 2000-2014

    EIA Publications

    2017-01-01

    This analysis examines some of the factors that influence state-level carbon dioxide emissions from the consumption of fossil fuels. These factors include: the fuel mix — especially in the generation of electricity; the state climate; the population density of the state; the industrial makeup of the state and whether the state is a net exporter or importer of electricity.

  1. Interactions between plant nutrients, water and carbon dioxide as factors limiting crop yields

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, P. J.; Simmonds, L. P.; Warren, G. P.

    1997-01-01

    Biomass production of annual crops is often directly proportional to the amounts of radiation intercepted, water transpired and nutrients taken up. In many places the amount of rainfall during the period of rapid crop growth is less than the potential rate of evaporation, so that depletion of stored soil water is commonplace. The rate of mineralization of nitrogen (N) from organic matter and the processes of nutrient loss are closely related to the availability of soil water. Results from Kenya indicate the rapid changes in nitrate availability following rain.
    Nutrient supply has a large effect on the quantity of radiation intercepted and hence, biomass production. There is considerable scope for encouraging canopy expansion to conserve water by reducing evaporation from the soil surface in environments where it is frequently rewetted, and where the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of the soil is sufficient to supply water at the energy limited rate (e.g. northern Syria). In regions with high evaporative demand and coarse-textured soils (e.g. Niger), transpiration may be increased by management techniques that reduce drainage.
    Increases in atmospheric [CO2] are likely to have only a small impact on crop yields when allowance is made for the interacting effects of temperature, and water and nutrient supply.

  2. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-07-01

    Sodium based sorbents including sodium carbonate may be used to capture carbon dioxide from flue gas. A relatively concentrated carbon dioxide stream may be recoverable for sequestration when the sorbent is regenerated. Electrobalance tests indicated that sodium carbonate monohydrate was formed in a mixture of helium and water vapor at temperatures below 65 C. Additional compounds may also form, but this could not be confirmed. In the presence of carbon dioxide and water vapor, both the initial reaction rate of sodium carbonate with carbon dioxide and water and the sorbent capacity decreased with increasing temperature, consistent with the results from the previous quarter. Increasing the carbon dioxide concentration at constant temperature and water vapor concentration produced a measurable increase in rate, as did increasing the water vapor concentration at constant carbon dioxide concentration and temperature. Runs conducted with a flatter TGA pan resulted in a higher initial reaction rate, presumably due to improved gas-solid contact, but after a short time, there was no significant difference in the rates measured with the different pans. Analyses of kinetic data suggest that the surface of the sodium carbonate particles may be much hotter than the bulk gas due to the highly exothermic reaction with carbon dioxide and water, and that the rate of heat removal from the particle may control the reaction rate. A material and energy balance was developed for a cyclic carbonation/calcination process which captures about 26 percent of the carbon dioxide present in flue gas available at 250 C.

  3. A comparison of six different ballast water treatment systems based on UV radiation, electrochlorination and chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Stehouwer, Peter Paul; Buma, Anita; Peperzak, Louis

    2015-01-01

    The spread of aquatic invasive species through ballast water is a major ecological and economical threat. Because of this, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) set limits to the concentrations of organisms allowed in ballast water. To meet these limits, ballast water treatment systems (BWTSs) were developed. The main techniques used for ballast water treatment are ultraviolet (UV) radiation and electrochlorination (EC). In this study, phytoplankton regrowth after treatment was followed for six BWTSs. Natural plankton communities were treated and incubated for 20 days. Growth, photosystem II efficiency and species composition were followed. The three UV systems all showed similar patterns of decrease in phytoplankton concentrations followed by regrowth. The two EC and the chlorine dioxide systems showed comparable results. However, UV- and chlorine-based treatment systems showed significantly different responses. Overall, all BWTSs reduced phytoplankton concentrations to below the IMO limits, which represents a reduced risk of aquatic invasions through ballast water.

  4. Efficiency of solar water disinfection photocatalized by titanium dioxide of varying particle size.

    PubMed

    Salih, F M; Pillay, A E

    2007-09-01

    Titanium dioxide photocatalysed water disinfection is induced by the interaction of light with TiO(2), which generates highly reactive free hydroxyl radicals (OH(*)). These free radicals create lethal damage that leads to bacterial death. Normally, decreasing TiO(2) particle size increases the area of light interaction. This may possibly increase the concentration of OH(*) generated and hence increases disinfection efficiency. Moreover, decreasing the particle size increases the force of attraction between the particles and cells, which could create aggregates that may contribute to the local OH(*) concentration. In the present investigation cells of Escherichia coli were used as the test microorganism, TiO(2) as the photocatalyst and sunlight as the light source. Four different surface areas of TiO(2) particles corresponding to 10, 50, 80-100 and > or =300 m(2) g(-1) were tested at a concentration of 1 g l(-1). Disinfection efficiency increased with increasing the surface area producing a maximum between 80-100 m(2) g(-1) followed by a reduction at > or =300 m(2) g(-1). The reduction in the efficiency at this relatively high surface area was attributed to the increase in the local concentration of OH(*). This increase may be high enough to initiate radical-radical interaction that would compete with bacterial cells and reduce the chance of bacterial cell-radical interaction taking place. Moreover, the phenomenon of TiO(2) aggregation with bacterial cells plays an important role, and the extent of aggregation increases with decreasing particle size. Such aggregation could augment the concentration of OH(*) within the cell vicinity. This suggests that surface area is a key factor in determining the efficiency of disinfection, and that concentration is a vital factor.

  5. Single particle ICP-MS characterization of titanium dioxide, silver, and gold nanoparticles during drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Ariel R; Adams, Craig D; Ma, Yinfa; Stephan, Chady; Eichholz, Todd; Shi, Honglan

    2016-02-01

    One of the most direct means for human exposure to nanoparticles (NPs) released into the environment is drinking water. Therefore, it is critical to understand the occurrence and fate of NPs in drinking water systems. The objectives of this study were to develop rapid and reliable analytical methods and apply them to investigate the fate and transportation of NPs during drinking water treatments. Rapid single particle ICP-MS (SP-ICP-MS) methods were developed to characterize and quantify titanium-containing, titanium dioxide, silver, and gold NP concentration, size, size distribution, and dissolved metal element concentration in surface water and treated drinking water. The effectiveness of conventional drinking water treatments (including lime softening, alum coagulation, filtration, and disinfection) to remove NPs from surface water was evaluated using six-gang stirrer jar test simulations. The selected NPs were nearly completely (97 ± 3%) removed after lime softening and alum coagulation/activated carbon adsorption treatments. Additionally, source and drinking waters from three large drinking water treatment facilities utilizing similar treatments with the simulation test were collected and analyzed by the SP-ICP-MS methods. Ti-containing particles and dissolved Ti were present in the river water samples, but Ag and Au were not present. Treatments used at each drinking water treatment facility effectively removed over 93% of the Ti-containing particles and dissolved Ti from the source water.

  6. Nitrogen-assisted Three-phase Equilibrium in Hydrate Systems Composed of Water, Methane, Carbon Dioxide, and Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnell, K.; Flemings, P. B.; DiCarlo, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Guest molecule exchange is a new and promising methane hydrate production technique in which methane gas is produced by injection of another gas without requiring depressurization or thermal stimulation. The technique is generally associated with injection of carbon dioxide, but injection of nitrogen and carbon dioxide mixtures are the most efficient and economical. However, thermodynamic behavior of injection mixtures is poorly understood, and it is unclear how nitrogen affects the exchange process. Here, we describe thermodynamic stability of hydrate systems that contain water, methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen. We present a series of ternary and quaternary phase diagrams and show the impact nitrogen has on hydrate stability. Our results demonstrate that nitrogen can either stabilize hydrate, de-stabilize hydrate, or produce three-phase equilibrium (gas, water, and hydrate) depending on its relative abundance. At low abundance nitrogen forms hydrate and directly contributes to the exchange process. At high abundance nitrogen de-stabilizes hydrate akin to traditional hydrate inhibitors, such as salt, alcohol, or mono-ethylene glycol. We show how the dual properties of nitrogen lead to three-phase equilibrium and how three-phase equilibrium may explain much of the behavior observed in methane production from nitrogen-rich injections. We apply our analysis to laboratory experiments and the methane hydrate field test on the northern Alaskan slope at Ignik Sikumi. These results can be extended to analyze dynamic evolution of mixed hydrate systems.

  7. Energy and phosphorus recovery from black water.

    PubMed

    de Graaff, M S; Temmink, H; Zeeman, G; Buisman, C J N

    2011-01-01

    Source-separated black water (BW) (toilet water) containing 38% of the organic material and 68% of the phosphorus in the total household waste (water) stream including kitchen waste, is a potential source for energy and phosphorus recovery. The energy recovered, in the form of electricity and heat, is more than sufficient for anaerobic treatment, nitrogen removal and phosphorus recovery. The phosphorus balance of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating concentrated BW showed a phosphorus conservation of 61% in the anaerobic effluent. Precipitation of phosphate as struvite from this stream resulted in a recovery of 0.22 kgP/p/y, representing 10% of the artificial phosphorus fertiliser production in the world. The remaining part of the phosphorus ended up in the anaerobic sludge, mainly due to precipitation (39%). Low dilution and a high pH favour the accumulation of phosphorus in the anaerobic sludge and this sludge could be used as a phosphorus-enriched organic fertiliser, provided that it is safe regarding heavy metals, pathogens and micro-pollutants.

  8. Water Resources Management for Shale Energy Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoxtheimer, D.

    2015-12-01

    The increase in the exploration and extraction of hydrocarbons, especially natural gas, from shale formations has been facilitated by advents in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies. Shale energy resources are very promising as an abundant energy source, though environmental challenges exist with their development, including potential adverse impacts to water quality. The well drilling and construction process itself has the potential to impact groundwater quality, however if proper protocols are followed and well integrity is established then impacts such as methane migration or drilling fluids releases can be minimized. Once a shale well has been drilled and hydraulically fractured, approximately 10-50% of the volume of injected fluids (flowback fluids) may flow out of the well initially with continued generation of fluids (produced fluids) throughout the well's productive life. Produced fluid TDS concentrations often exceed 200,000 mg/L, with elevated levels of strontium (Sr), bromide (Br), sodium (Na), calcium (Ca), barium (Ba), chloride (Cl), radionuclides originating from the shale formation as well as fracturing additives. Storing, managing and properly disposisng of these fluids is critical to ensure water resources are not impacted by unintended releases. The most recent data in Pennsylvania suggests an estimated 85% of the produced fluids were being recycled for hydraulic fracturing operations, while many other states reuse less than 50% of these fluids and rely moreso on underground injection wells for disposal. Over the last few years there has been a shift to reuse more produced fluids during well fracturing operations in shale plays around the U.S., which has a combination of economic, regulatory, environmental, and technological drivers. The reuse of water is cost-competitive with sourcing of fresh water and disposal of flowback, especially when considering the costs of advanced treatment to or disposal well injection and lessens

  9. Photooxidation of organic impurities in water using thin films of titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.W.

    1987-06-04

    Results of the destruction of organic solutes in a simple, thin film TiO2 reactor are described. The reactor was illuminated with a 20-W blacklight UV fluorescent tube and the aqueous stream containing the organic solute flowed past the stationary photocatalyst. In the continuous recirculation mode, the destructive rate of each solute obeyed approximately first-order kinetics. The reaction rate constant decreased with increasing solute concentration. The times for 50% destruction of 500 cmT of 10 M solutions of each of the solutes salicylic acid, phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, benzoic acid, 2-naphthol, naphthalene, and fluorescein were 7.1, 7.2, 8.2, 8.7, 6.9, 8.5, 4.3, and 6.4 min, respectively. It was found that the observed apparent first-order dependence and the change in rate constant with concentration could by explained in terms of the integrated form of the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. A marked dependence of the destruction rate on flow rate was observed and an expression developed which allows the calculation of the destruction curve with good precision at any solute concentration and flow rate. A corresponding curve was observed for the formation of carbon dioxide from salicylic acid solution. It was shown that hydroxylation of the aromatic ring to give salicylic acid is a minor reaction path in the destruction of benzoic acid. The maximum quantum yield for the destruction of salicyclic acid at 25C was found to be 0.022. The activation energy for the photooxidation of salicyclic acid was determined to be 11.0 +/- 0.8 kJ mol .

  10. Calculation of partition functions and free energies of a binary mixture using the energy partitioning method: application to carbon dioxide and methane.

    PubMed

    Do, Hainam; Hirst, Jonathan D; Wheatley, Richard J

    2012-04-19

    It is challenging to compute the partition function (Q) for systems with enormous configurational spaces, such as fluids. Recently, we developed a Monte Carlo technique (an energy partitioning method) for computing Q [ J. Chem. Phys. 2011 , 135 , 174105 ]. In this paper, we use this approach to compute the partition function of a binary fluid mixture (carbon dioxide + methane); this allows us to obtain the Helmholtz free energy (F) via F = -k(B)T ln Q and the Gibbs free energy (G) via G = F + pV. We then utilize G to obtain the coexisting mole fraction curves. The chemical potential of each species is also obtained. At the vapor-liquid equilibrium condition, the chemical potential of methane significantly increases, while that of carbon dioxide slightly decreases, as the pressure increases along an isotherm. Since Q is obtained from the density of states, which is independent of the temperature, equilibrium thermodynamic properties at any condition can be obtained by varying the total composition and volume of the system. Our methodology can be adapted to explore the free energies of other binary mixtures in general and of those containing CO(2) in particular. Since the method gives access to the free energy and chemical potentials, it will be useful in many other applications.

  11. Ambiphilic Frustrated Lewis Pair Exhibiting High Robustness and Reversible Water Activation: Towards the Metal-Free Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Rochette, Étienne; Courtemanche, Marc-André; Pulis, Alexander P; Bi, Wenhua; Fontaine, Frédéric-Georges

    2015-06-29

    The synthesis and structural characterization of a phenylene-bridged Frustrated Lewis Pair (FLP) having a 2,2,6,6‑tetramethylpiperidine (TMP) as the Lewis base and a 9-borabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane (BBN) as the Lewis acid is reported. This FLP exhibits unique robustness towards the products of carbon dioxide hydrogenation. The compound shows reversible splitting of water, formic acid and methanol while no reaction is observed in the presence of excess formaldehyde. The molecule is incredibly robust, showing little sign of degradation after heating at 80 °C in benzene with 10 equiv. of formic acid for 24 h. The robustness of the system could be exploited in the design of metal-free catalysts for the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide.

  12. Metal oxide absorbents for regenerative carbon dioxide and water vapor removal for advanced portable life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Joan M.; Borghese, Joseph B.; Chang, Craig H.; Stonesifer, Greg T.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies of Allied Signal metal oxide based absorbents demonstrated that these absorbents offer a unique capability to regeneratively remove both metabolic carbon dioxide and water vapor from breathing air; previously, metal oxides were considered only for the removal of CO2. The concurrent removal of CO2 and H2O vapor can simplify the astronaut Portable Life Support System (PLSS) by combining the CO2 and humidity control functions into one regenerative component. The use of metal oxide absorbents for removal of both CO2 ad H2O vapor in the PLSS is the focus of an ongoing program. The full scale Metal Oxide Carbon dioxide and Humidity Remover (MOCHR) and regeneration unit is described.

  13. Carbon Dioxide Extraction from the Atmosphere Through Engineered Chemical Sinkage: Enabling Energy and Environmental Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, M. K.; Ziock, H.; Rueff, G.; Smith, W. S.; Colman, J.; Elliott, S.; Lackner, K.; Johnston, N. A.

    2002-05-01

    We present the case for carbon dioxide (CO2) extraction from air using engineered chemical sinks as a means of sustaining fossil energy use by avoiding climate change. Existing carbon sequestration strategies such as CO2 injection into geologic formations or the deep ocean and mineral carbonation, require a pure stream of concentrated CO2 to be viable. Furthermore, current emphasis on reducing the global CO2 emissions is on large centralized power plants. However, more than half of all emissions are from the transportation sector and small, distributed sources such as home heating, etc. Most solutions for dealing with these sources explicitly or implicitly entail completely overhauling the existing infrastructure. To solve these problems, Los Alamos National Laboratory has conceived a novel approach for directly extracting CO2 from the atmosphere. Direct extraction converts the dilute CO2 (370 parts per million) in the atmosphere into a pure CO2 stream ready for permanent sequestration. It provides the following advantages: (1) Preserves our existing energy use and fuel distribution systems, which represent a large investment, (2) Indirectly captures CO2 from the myriad of small, distributed, and mobile sources that otherwise are not accessible to sequestration, (3) Allows atmospheric CO2 levels to be restored to their pre-industrial age value, (4) Provides free transport of CO2 to suitable sequestration sites by using natural atmospheric circulation, and (5) Is relatively compact and therefore inexpensive when compared to renewable concepts. Our concept harnesses atmospheric circulation to transport CO2 to sites where the CO2 is extracted by binding it to an adsorbent. The bound CO2 is then recovered as pure gas by heating together with the solid adsorbent that is recycled. As a proof of concept, we show that an aqueous Ca(OH)2 solution efficiently converts CO2 to a CaCO3 solid that can be heated to obtain pure CO2 and recover the CaO. Even with recycling costs

  14. Harvesting energy from water flow over graphene?

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Zhang, Zhuhua; Li, Xuemei; Zhou, Jianxin; Guo, Wanlin

    2012-03-14

    It is reported excitingly in a previous letter (Nano Lett. 2011, 11, 3123) that a small piece of graphene sheet about 30 × 16 μm(2) immersed in flowing water with 0.6 M hydrochloric acid can produce voltage ~20 mV. Here we find that no measurable voltage can be induced by the flow over mono-, bi- and trilayered graphene samples of ~1 × 1.5 cm(2) in size in the same solution once the electrodes on graphene are isolated from interacting with the solution, mainly because the H(3)O(+) cations in the water adsorb onto graphene by strong covalent bonds as revealed by our first-principles calculations. When both the graphene and its metal electrodes are exposed to the solution as in the previous work, water flow over the graphene-electrode system can induce voltages from a few to over a hundred millivolts. In this situation, the graphene mainly behaves as a load connecting between the electrodes. Therefore, the harvested energy is not from the immersed carbon nanomaterials themselves in ionic water flow but dominated by the exposed electrodes.

  15. Renewable energy water supply - Mexico program summary

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, R.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a program directed by the US Agency for International Development and Sandia National Laboratory which installed sustainable energy sources in the form of photovoltaic modules and wind energy systems in rural Mexico to pump water and provide solar distillation services. The paper describes the guidelines which appeared most responsible for success as: promote an integrated development program; install quality systems that develop confidence; instill local project ownership; train local industry and project developers; develop a local maintenance infrastructure; provide users training and operations guide; develop clear lines of responsibilities for system upkeep. The paper emphasizes the importance of training. It also presents much collected data as to the characteristics and performance of the installed systems.

  16. Zero point energy of polyhedral water clusters.

    PubMed

    Anick, David J

    2005-06-30

    Polyhedral water clusters (PWCs) are cage-like (H2O)n clusters where every O participates in exactly three H bonds. For a database of 83 PWCs, 8 < or = n < or = 20, geometry was optimized and zero point energy (ZPE) was calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level. ZPE correlates negatively with electronic energy (E0): each increase of 1 kcal/mol in E0 corresponds to a decrease of about 0.11 kcal/mol in ZPE. For each n, a set of four connectivity parameters accounts for 98% or more of the variance in ZPE. Linear regression of ZPE against n and this set gives an RMS error of 0.13 kcal/mol. The contributions to ZPE from stretch modes only (ZPE(S)) and from torsional modes only (ZPE(T)) also correlate strongly with E0 and with each other.

  17. Water and energy as inseparable twins for sustainable solutions.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Jan; Hofman-Caris, Roberta; Nederlof, Maarten; Frijns, Jos; van Loosdrecht, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Although the water cycle is only a minor contributor to the energy demand in society, it is a matter of good housekeeping to minimize the energy need within a sustainable water cycle. Wastewater treatment should not only be applied to purify the water, but also recover the energy present in this water, as well as to recover essential elements like nitrogen and phosphorus. From an energy analysis of the Dutch water cycle it is concluded that creating an energy neutral water cycle by using the heat content or by making use of the organic load of wastewater is within hands.

  18. Increases in desert shrub productivity under elevated carbon dioxide vary with water availability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Housman, D.C.; Naumburg, E.; Huxman, T. E.; Charlet, T.N.; Nowak, R.S.; Smith, S.D.

    2006-01-01

    Productivity of aridland plants is predicted to increase substantially with rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations due to enhancement in plant water-use efficiency (WUE). However, to date, there are few detailed analyses of how intact desert vegetation responds to elevated CO2. From 1998 to 2001, we examined aboveground production, photosynthesis, and water relations within three species exposed to ambient (around 38 Pa) or elevated (55 Pa) CO2 concentrations at the Nevada Desert Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Facility in southern Nevada, USA. The functional types sampled - evergreen (Larrea tridentata), drought-deciduous (Ambrosia dumosa), and winter-deciduous shrubs (Krameria erecta) - represent potentially different responses to elevated CO2 in this ecosystem. We found elevated CO2 significantly increased aboveground production in all three species during an anomalously wet year (1998), with relative production ratios (elevated:ambient CO2) ranging from 1.59 (Krameria) to 2.31 (Larrea). In three below-average rainfall years (1999-2001), growth was much reduced in all species, with only Ambrosia in 2001 having significantly higher production under elevated CO2. Integrated photosynthesis (mol CO2 m-2 y-1) in the three species was 1.26-2.03-fold higher under elevated CO2 in the wet year (1998) and 1.32-1.43-fold higher after the third year of reduced rainfall (2001). Instantaneous WUE was also higher in shrubs grown under elevated CO2. The timing of peak canopy development did not change under elevated CO2; for example, there was no observed extension of leaf longevity into the dry season in the deciduous species. Similarly, seasonal patterns in CO2 assimilation did not change, except for Larrea. Therefore, phenological and physiological patterns that characterize Mojave Desert perennials - early-season lags in canopy development behind peak photosynthetic capacity, coupled with reductions in late-season photosynthetic capacity prior to reductions

  19. Low Energy Electron Impact Excitation of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralphs, Kevin; Serna, Gabriela; Hargreaves, Leigh R.; Khakoo, Murtadha A.; Winstead, Carl; McKoy, B. Vincent

    2011-10-01

    We present normalized absolute differential and integral cross-section measurements for the low energy electron impact excitation of the lowest dissociative 3B1, 1B1,3A1 and 1A1 states of H2O. The DCS were taken at incident energies of 9 eV, 10 eV, 12 eV, 15 eV and 20 eV and scattering angles of 15° to 130° and normalized to the elastic electron scattering measurements of. The DCS were obtained after a sophisticated unfolding of the electron energy loss spectrum of water using photoabsorption data in the literature as investigated by Thorn et al.. Our measurements extend those of to near-threshold energies. We find both important agreements and differences between our DCS and those of. Comparison to our theory (multi-channel Schwinger) and that of earlier work will also be presented. Funded by an NSF grant # RUI-PHY 0968874.

  20. Estimated Carbon Dioxide Emissions in 2008: United States

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-04-01

    Flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of state-level energy use patterns. Approximately 5,800 million metric tons of carbon dioxide were emitted throughout the United States for use in power production, residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation applications in 2008. Carbon dioxide is emitted from the use of three major energy resources: natural gas, coal, and petroleum. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and one national) carbon dioxide flow charts representing a comprehensive systems view of national CO{sub 2} emissions. Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) has published flow charts (also referred to as 'Sankey Diagrams') of important national commodities since the early 1970s. The most widely recognized of these charts is the U.S. energy flow chart (http://flowcharts.llnl.gov). LLNL has also published charts depicting carbon (or carbon dioxide potential) flow and water flow at the national level as well as energy, carbon, and water flows at the international, state, municipal, and organizational (i.e. United States Air Force) level. Flow charts are valuable as single-page references that contain quantitative data about resource, commodity, and byproduct flows in a graphical form that also convey structural information about the system that manages those flows. Data on carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector are reported on a national level. Because carbon dioxide emissions are not reported for individual states, the carbon dioxide emissions are estimated using published energy use information. Data on energy use is compiled by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (U.S. EIA) in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). SEDS is updated annually and reports data from 2 years prior to the year of the update. SEDS contains data on primary

  1. Energy from Water and Sunlight: Affordable Energy from Water and Sunlight

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Sun Catalytix is developing wireless energy-storage devices that convert sunlight and water into renewable fuel. Learning from nature, one such device mimics the ability of a tree leaf to convert sunlight into storable energy. It is comprised of a silicon solar cell coated with catalytic materials, which help speed up the energy conversion process. When this cell is placed in a container of water and exposed to sunlight, it splits the water into bubbles of oxygen and hydrogen. The hydrogen and oxygen can later be recombined to create electricity, when the sun goes down for example. The Sun Catalytix device is novel in many ways: it consists primarily of low-cost, earth-abundant materials where other attempts have required more expensive materials like platinum. Its operating conditions also facilitate the use of less costly construction materials, whereas other efforts have required extremely corrosive conditions.

  2. A vibrational spectroscopic study of structure evolution of water dissolved in supercritical carbon dioxide under isobaric heating.

    PubMed

    Oparin, R; Tassaing, T; Danten, Y; Besnard, M

    2004-06-08

    A combination of Raman scattering spectroscopy and infrared absorption was applied to investigate the structural evolution of water dissolved in supercritical carbon dioxide under isobaric heating (T=40-340 degrees C, P=250 bar). Quantitative analysis of experimental spectra allowed us to determine that at relatively moderate temperatures water dissolved in CO(2)-rich phase exists only under monomeric form (solitary water surrounding by CO(2) molecules), but hydrogen-bonded species, namely, dimers, begin to appear upon heating. At the same time, the ratio of dimers to monomers concentration increases with further temperature increase and at temperatures close to the temperature of total miscibility of the mixture (T=366 degrees C, P=250 bar), water dimers only are present in the CO(2)-rich phase. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Effectiveness of the sulfur(IV) compound, sodium bisulfite, in reducing chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and chlorite toxicity to Daphnia magna in well water and pond water.

    PubMed

    Yonkos, L T; Fisher, D J; Burton, D T; Whitekettle, W K; Peterille, J C

    2001-03-01

    Flow-through toxicity tests were conducted with Daphnia magna to determine the residual toxicity of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and chlorite after treatment with the sulfur(IV) compound sodium bisulfite. Daphnids were exposed separately to 0.5-mg/L concentrations of each of the three compounds without the addition of sodium bisulfite, with a low stoichiometric dose of sodium bisulfite, and with a high stoichiometric dose of sodium bisulfite. Tests were performed in well water with a low total organic carbon (TOC) content and pond water with a high TOC content. Analysis of results indicated that sodium bisulfite did not eliminate the toxicity of chlorine dioxide or chlorite to D. magna. Total residual oxidant (TRO) concentrations were reduced and survival times were extended, but acute toxicity persisted even with a S(IV) concentration 10.0 times the stoichiometric ratio of oxidant. Mortality occurred in chlorine dioxide treatments in which no TRO was detected, indicating that standard analytical (amperometric) techniques may be inadequate to detect toxicity. Sodium bisulfite did succeed in eliminating chlorine toxicity except in pond water receiving a low (3.0x) sodium bisulfite dose. Oxidant reactions with organic substrates may have produced chlorinated residuals that were resistant to S(IV) dechlorination.

  4. Sustainable energy development and water supply security in Kamojang Geothermal Field: The Energy-Water Nexus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofyan, Y.; Nishijima, J.; Fujimitsu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Kamojang Geothermal Field (KGF) is a typical vapor dominated hydrothermal system in West Java, Indonesia. This geothermal field is the oldest exploited geothermal field in Indonesia. From 1983 to 2005, more than 160 million tons of steam have been exploited from the KGF and more than 30 million tons of water were injected into the reservoir system. The injected water come from condensed water, local river and ground water. Sustainable production in the geothermal energy development is the ability of the production system applied to sustain the stable production level over long times and to manage the mass balance between production, injection and natural recharge in the geothermal reservoir during exploitation. Mass balance in the reservoir system can be monitored by using time lapse gravity monitoring. Mass variation of hydrodynamic in the reservoir of KGF from 1999 to 2005 is about -3.34 Mt/year while is about -3.78 Mt/year from 1999 to 2008. Another period between 2009 and 2010, mass variation decreased about -8.24 Mt. According to the history of production and injection, natural recharge to the KGF's reservoir is estimated at about 2.77 Mt/year from 1999 to 2005 and 2.75 Mt/year from 1999 to 2008. Between 2009 and 2010, KGF has a bigger mass deficiency rate throughout 200 MWe maintain production. Large amount of fresh water is needed for sustainable geothermal energy production, while the domestic water supply need is also increased. Natural recharge, about 50% of injected water, cooling system, drilling and other production activities in KGF spend large amounts of fresh water. Water consumption for local people around KGF is about 1.46 MT/year. The water volume around KGF of total runoff is the range between dry season 0.07 MT/month and rainy season 4.4 MT/month. The water demands for sustainable geothermal production of KGF and for local people's consumption will increase in the future. Integrated planning between the energy and water sectors in KGF

  5. Environmental controls over carbon dioxide and water vapor exchange of terrestrial vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    B. E. Law; E. Falgeb; L. Guc; D. D. Baldocchic; P. Bakwind; P. Berbigiere; K. Davisf; A. J. Dolmang; M. Falkh; J. D. Fuentesi; A. Goldsteinc; A. Granierj; A. Grellek; D. Hollingerl; I. A. Janssensm; P. Jarvisn; N. O. Jenseno; G. Katulp; Y. Mahliq; G. Matteuccir; T. Meyerss; R. Monsont; W. Mungeru; W. Oechelv; R. Olsonw; K. Pilegaardx; K. T. Paw Uh; H. Thorgeirssony; R. Valentinir; S. Vermaz; T. Vesalaa1; K. Wilsons; S. Wofsyu

    2002-12-02

    The objective of this research was to compare seasonal and annual estimates of CO2 and water vapor exchange across sites in forests, grasslands, crops, and tundra that are part of an international network called FLUXNET, and to investigating the responses of vegetation to environmental variables. FLUXNETs goals are to understand the mechanisms controlling the exchanges of CO2, water vapor and energy across a spectrum of time and space scales, and to provide information for modeling of carbon and water cycling across regions and the globe. At a subset of sites, net carbon uptake (net ecosystem exchange, the net of photosynthesis and respiration) was greater under diffuse than under direct radiation conditions, perhaps because of a more efficient distribution of non-saturating light conditions for photosynthesis, lower vapor pressure deficit limitation to photosynthesis, and lower respiration associated with reduced temperature. The slope of the relation between monthly gross ecosystem production and evapotranspiration was similar between biomes, except for tundra vegetation, showing a strong linkage between carbon gain and water loss integrated over the year (slopes=3.4 g CO2/kg H2O for grasslands, 3.2 for deciduous broadleaf forests, 3.1 for crops, 2.4 for evergreen conifers, and 1.5 for tundra vegetation). The ratio of annual ecosystem respiration to gross photosynthesis averaged 0.83, with lower values for grasslands, presumably because of less investment in respiring plant tissue compared with forests. Ecosystem respiration was weakly correlated with mean annual temperature across biomes, in spite of within site sensitivity over shorter temporal scales. Mean annual temperature and site water balance explained much of the variation in gross photosynthesis. Water availability limits leaf area index over the long-term, and inter-annual climate variability can limit carbon uptake below the potential of the leaf area present.

  6. Collaboration essential for an energy neutral urban water cycle.

    PubMed

    Frijns, Jos; Mulder, Mirabella; Roorda, Jelle; Schepman, Hans; Voskamp, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Two Dutch water boards prepared a Master Plan with measures to substantially reduce their energy use by 2027. In total, more than 100 measures were identified such as bubble aeration and heat recovery from effluent. Together these measures result in a 90-95% reduction in energy use at the water boards. However, for the whole urban water cycle, thus including the energy required for warm water use in households, the total energy reduction from these measures at the water boards is only 5-6%. To attain the objective to have an energy neutral urban water cycle, collaboration with other sectors such as housing, energy, agriculture and industry will be essential. Active collaboration of the water boards through the incorporation of energy efficient water measures as part of the carbon neutral effort of cities is recognized to be a promising strategy.

  7. Development of High Efficiency Carbon Dioxide Commercial Heat Pump Water Heater

    SciTech Connect

    Michael PETERSEN; Chad D. BOWERS; Stefan ELBEL; Pega HRNJAK

    2012-07-01

    Although heat pump water heaters are today widely accepted in both Japan and Europe, where energy costs are high and government incentives for their use exist, acceptance of such products in the US has been limited. While this trend is slowly changing with the introduction of heat pump water heaters into the residential market, but acceptance remains low in the commercial sector. The objective of the presented work is the development of a high efficiency R744 heat pump water heater for commercial applications with effective utilization of the cooling capability for air conditioning and/or refrigeration. The ultimate goal is to achieve total system COP of up to 8. This unit will be targeted at commercial use where some cooling load is typically needed year round, such as restaurants, hotels, nursing homes, and hospitals. This paper presents the performance results from the development of four R744 commercial heat pump water heater packages of approximately 35 kW and comparison to a commercially available baseline R134a unit of the same capacity and footprint. In addition, the influences of an internal heat exchanger and an enhanced evaporator on the system performance are described and recommendations are made for further improvements of the R744 system.

  8. Chlorine Dioxide Disinfection in the Use of Individual Water Purification Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    successfully meet the EPA Guide’s minimum performance standards. General Chlorine dioxide ( ClO2 ) was discovered in 1811 (reference 2). It’s widely...reference 3). However, chlorine dioxide is an oxidant and reactions with organic matter form inorganic DBPs including primarily chlorite ion ( ClO2 ...8 containing organic matter is suggested to be (reference 6): ClO2 + e- → ClO2 - ClO2 - + H+ ↔ HClO2 (chlorous acid) 4HClO2 → 2ClO2 + H+ + Cl

  9. Monochloramine and chlorine dioxide for controlling Legionella pneumophila contamination: biocide levels and disinfection by-product formation in hospital water networks.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Isabella; Ferranti, Greta; Bargellini, Annalisa; Marchegiano, Patrizia; Predieri, Guerrino; Stout, Janet E; Borella, Paola

    2013-12-01

    Legionella colonization in hospital hot water distribution networks was evaluated following 36 months of continuous treatment with monochloramine and compared with chlorine dioxide. Nitrite, nitrate, chlorite, chlorate, bromide, trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids as well as the biocide concentration at sampled points were measured. Only 8/84 samples treated with monochloramine were found contaminated and after the first 8 months of treatment no Legionella was isolated. Chlorine dioxide was associated with a strong reduction in Legionella contamination compared to pre-treatment, but differences according to the device were observed. Monochloramine between 2 and 3 mg l(-1) and chlorine dioxide between 0.50 and 0.70 mg l(-1) were needed to control Legionella colonization. Comparing no- and post-flush samples, a higher frequency of no-flush positive samples was noted using chlorine dioxide, suggesting an increased risk for patients when they open the tap. No increase in chlorite levels and no water nitrification occurred by using monochloramine. Chlorite at levels exceeding the limit requested for drinking water was measured when chlorine dioxide was applied. In conclusion, we highlight that continuous injection of monochloramine should be considered as an effective alternative to chlorine dioxide in controlling legionellae contamination inside hospital water distribution systems.

  10. Energy and water in aestivating amphibians.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, José E; Navas, Carlos A; Pereira, Isabel C

    2010-01-01

    The physiological mechanisms, behavioral adjustments, and ecological associations that allow animal species to live in extreme environments have evoked the attention of many zoologists. Often, extreme environments are defined as those believed to be limiting to life in terms of water, energetic availability, and temperature. These three elements seem extreme in a number of arid and semi-arid settings that even so have been colonized by amphibians. Because this taxon is usually seen as the quintessential water-dependent ectotherm tetrapods, their presence in a number of semi-arid environments poses a number of intriguing questions regarding microhabitat choice and physiological plasticity, particularly regarding the ecological and physiological correlates of behaviors granting avoidance of the harshest conditions of semi-arid environments. Such avoidance states, generally associated to the concept of aestivation, are currently seen as a diverse and complex phenomena varying from species to species and involving numerous behavioral and metabolic adjustments that enhance survival during the drought. This chapter reviews the physiological ecology of anuran aestivation, mainly from the perspective of water and energy balance.

  11. Handbook of methods for the analysis of the various parameters of the carbon dioxide system in sea water. Version 2

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, A.G.; Goyet, C.

    1994-09-01

    The collection of extensive, reliable, oceanic carbon data is a key component of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS). A portion of the US JGOFS oceanic carbon dioxide measurements will be made during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment Hydrographic Program. A science team has been formed to plan and coordinate the various activities needed to produce high quality oceanic carbon dioxide measurements under this program. This handbook was prepared at the request of, and with the active participation of, that science team. The procedures have been agreed on by the members of the science team and describe well tested methods. They are intended to provide standard operating procedures, together with an appropriate quality control plan, for measurements made as part of this survey. These are not the only measurement techniques in use for the parameters of the oceanic carbon system; however, they do represent the current state-of-the-art for ship-board measurements. In the end, the editors hope that this handbook can serve widely as a clear and unambiguous guide to other investigators who are setting up to analyze the various parameters of the carbon dioxide system in sea water.

  12. Open path measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor under foggy conditions - technical problems, approaches and effects on flux measurements and budget calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Madany, T.; Griessbaum, F.; Maneke, F.; Chu, H.-S.; Wu, C.-C.; Chang, S. C.; Hsia, Y.-J.; Juang, J.-Y.; Klemm, O.

    2010-07-01

    To estimate carbon dioxide or water vapor fluxes with the Eddy Covariance method high quality data sets are necessary. Under foggy conditions this is challenging, because open path measurements are influenced by the water droplets that cross the measurement path as well as deposit on the windows of the optical path. For the LI-7500 the deposition of droplets on the window results in an intensity reduction of the infrared beam. To keep the strength of the infrared beam under these conditions, the energy is increased. A measure for the increased energy is given by the AGC value (Automatic Gain Control). Up to a AGC threshold value of 70 % the data from the LI-7500 is assumed to be of good quality (personal communication with LICOR). Due to fog deposition on the windows, the AGC value rises above 70 % and stays there until the fog disappears and the water on the windows evaporates. To gain better data quality during foggy conditions, a blower system was developed that blows the deposited water droplets off the window. The system is triggered if the AGC value rises above 70 %. Then a pneumatic jack will lift the blower system towards the LI-7500 and the water-droplets get blown off with compressed air. After the AGC value drops below 70 %, the pneumatic jack will move back to the idle position. Using this technique showed that not only the fog droplets on the window causing significant problems to the measurement, but also the fog droplets inside the measurement path. Under conditions of very dense fog the measured values of carbon dioxide can get unrealistically high, and for water vapor, negative values can be observed even if the AGC value is below 70 %. The negative values can be explained by the scatter of the infrared beam on the fog droplets. It is assumed, that different types of fog droplet spectra are causing the various error patterns observed. For high quality flux measurements, not only the AGC threshold value of 70 % is important, but also the fluctuation

  13. Enhanced chlorine dioxide decay in the presence of metal oxides: relevance to drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; von Gunten, Urs; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2013-08-06

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) decay in the presence of typical metal oxides occurring in distribution systems was investigated. Metal oxides generally enhanced ClO2 decay in a second-order process via three pathways: (1) catalytic disproportionation with equimolar formation of chlorite and chlorate, (2) reaction to chlorite and oxygen, and (3) oxidation of a metal in a reduced form (e.g., cuprous oxide) to a higher oxidation state. Cupric oxide (CuO) and nickel oxide (NiO) showed significantly stronger abilities than goethite (α-FeOOH) to catalyze the ClO2 disproportionation (pathway 1), which predominated at higher initial ClO2 concentrations (56-81 μM). At lower initial ClO2 concentrations (13-31 μM), pathway 2 also contributed. The CuO-enhanced ClO2 decay is a base-assisted reaction with a third-order rate constant of 1.5 × 10(6) M(-2) s(-1) in the presence of 0.1 g L(-1) CuO at 21 ± 1 °C, which is 4-5 orders of magnitude higher than in the absence of CuO. The presence of natural organic matter (NOM) significantly enhanced the formation of chlorite and decreased the ClO2 disproportionation in the CuO-ClO2 system, probably because of a higher reactivity of CuO-activated ClO2 with NOM. Furthermore, a kinetic model was developed to simulate CuO-enhanced ClO2 decay at various pH values. Model simulations that agree well with the experimental data include a pre-equilibrium step with the rapid formation of a complex, namely, CuO-activated Cl2O4. The reaction of this complex with OH(-) is the rate-limiting and pH-dependent step for the overall reaction, producing chlorite and an intermediate that further forms chlorate and oxygen in parallel. These novel findings suggest that the possible ClO2 loss and the formation of chlorite/chlorate should be carefully considered in drinking water distribution systems containing copper pipes.

  14. Water and carbon dioxide investigation in the inner coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorini, Alessandra; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Erard, Stefan; Leyrat, Cedric; Combi, Michael; Fougere, Nicolas; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina

    2015-11-01

    The study of 67P/CG coma environment is one of the primary scientific goals of the VIRTIS experiment aboard ESA Rosetta mission.In the present work, results of 74 observations acquired by VIRTIS-M IR channel in the 1-5 μm spectral range from 8 to 14 April 2015 are discussed. In this time, 67P/CG was at heliocentric distance of 1.9 AU, and the coma activity was monitored for about 10 full comet rotations. This allows one to tentatively correlate gas distribution with active areas on the nucleus and to disentangle gas emissions from dust.Vibrational emission lines of H2O and CO2 at 2.67 and 4.27 μm, respectively, are identified by VIRTIS-M imaging channel and mapped from the surface up to about 10 km altitude with a spatial resolution of approximately 40 m/px.The maximum H2O emission is mainly concentrated above Aten-Babi and Seth-Hapi active regions, which are located on the neck connecting the two principal lobes. The CO2 column density is quite poor in the neck region, while diffuse emission is clear above the small and great lobe regions. These observations confirm the anti correlation between these two main species, as already noticed by Bockelée-Morvan et al. (2015) and Hässig et al. (2014). Column density of both species decreases with altitude with the CO2 distribution decreasing more rapidly than the H2O. The H2O/CO2 ratio, which increases with the altitude, varies from 18.7 close to the nucleus to 30.8 at 2-3 km above the nucleus. These values refer to the equatorial region, calculated considering all the longitudes. Gas emission is maximum in the afternoon quadrant, from 12 LST to 18 LST.VIRTIS-M has revealed with unprecedented spatial resolution the distribution of gaseous species around a cometary nucleus and correlated the emissions with surface-active areas, altitude above the nucleus and local time. Our study confirms the asymmetric distribution of carbon dioxide, which has a more uniform distribution above the comet's nucleus than water vapour

  15. 48 CFR 952.223 - Clauses related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational safety, and drug-free workplace. 952.223 Section 952.223 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLAUSES AND... related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational...

  16. 48 CFR 952.223 - Clauses related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational safety, and drug-free workplace. 952.223 Section 952.223 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLAUSES AND... related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational...

  17. 48 CFR 952.223 - Clauses related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational safety, and drug-free workplace. 952.223 Section 952.223 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLAUSES AND... related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational...

  18. 48 CFR 952.223 - Clauses related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational safety, and drug-free workplace. 952.223 Section 952.223 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLAUSES AND... related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational...

  19. 48 CFR 952.223 - Clauses related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational safety, and drug-free workplace. 952.223 Section 952.223 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLAUSES AND... related to environment, energy and water efficiency, renewable energy technologies, occupational...

  20. Simulation of Multiphase Water-Carbon Dioxide Mixture Flows in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, A. A.

    2012-04-01

    Filtration Transport Simulator) code for compositional hydrodynamic simulations. The code was used for 1D, 2D and 3D simulations of carbon dioxide injection in water saturated reservoirs. The sample 1D simulation demonstrates a simple scenario when gaseous CO2 injection results in underground CO2 liquefaction and evolution of the three-phase flow zone. The two-phase and three-phase state zones are separated by clearly visible mobile phase discontinuities. The 2D and 3D examples demonstrate different scenarios of CO2 injection in a folded reservoirs with CO2 being both only in gaseous state (conventional situation) and in liquid state too. The 10th SPE comparative solution project reservoir was used to test the MUFITS code robustness in simulation of flows in highly heterogeneous reservoir. The work is supported financially by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (projects 12-01-00465, 12-08-01039) and grant for leading scientific schools (1303.2012.1).

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis of nanocubes of sillenite type compounds for photovoltaic applications and solar energy conversion of carbon dioxide to fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Vaidyanathan; Murugesan, Sankaran

    2014-04-29

    The present invention relates to formation of nanocubes of sillenite type compounds, such as bismuth titanate, i.e., Bi.sub.12TiO.sub.20, nanocubes, via a hydrothermal synthesis process, with the resulting compound(s) having multifunctional properties such as being useful in solar energy conversion, environmental remediation, and/or energy storage, for example. In one embodiment, a hydrothermal method is disclosed that transforms nanoparticles of TiO.sub.2 to bismuth titanate, i.e., Bi.sub.12TiO.sub.20, nanocubes, optionally loaded with palladium nanoparticles. The method includes reacting titanium dioxide nanotubes with a bismuth salt in an acidic bath at a temperature sufficient and for a time sufficient to form bismuth titanate crystals, which are subsequently annealed to form bismuth titanate nanocubes. After annealing, the bismuth titanate nanocubes may be optionally loaded with nano-sized metal particles, e.g., nanosized palladium particles.

  2. Energy and economic analysis of the carbon dioxide capture installation with the use of monoethanolamine and ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochon, Krzysztof; Chmielniak, Tadeusz

    2015-03-01

    In the study an accurate energy and economic analysis of the carbon capture installation was carried out. Chemical absorption with the use of monoethanolamine (MEA) and ammonia was adopted as the technology of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from flue gases. The energy analysis was performed using a commercial software package to analyze the chemical processes. In the case of MEA, the demand for regeneration heat was about 3.5 MJ/kg of CO2, whereas for ammonia it totalled 2 MJ/kg CO2. The economic analysis was based on the net present value (NPV) method. The limit price for CO2 emissions allowances at which the investment project becomes profitable (NPV = 0) was more than 160 PLN/Mg for MEA and less than 150 PLN/Mg for ammonia. A sensitivity analysis was also carried out to determine the limit price of CO2 emissions allowances depending on electricity generation costs at different values of investment expenditures.

  3. Role of understory vegetation in decadal variation of water and carbon dioxide exchange over larch forest of eastern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotani, Ayumi; Ohta, Takeshi; Iijima, Yoshihiro; Maximov, Trofim

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated evapotranspiration and carbon dioxide exchange by the eddy covariance methods over larch-dominated forests in the middle part of the Lena basin, eastern Siberia. Forest ecosystem in this region is characterized by low precipitation, a short growing season, and extensive permafrost. Seasonal thawing permafrost supplies soil water, which is prevented to infiltrating by an impermeable frozen layer, and supports forest development. A decadal observation of hydro-meteorological variables shows inter-annual variability including extreme environmental conditions such as unusually wet active layer, which was maintained for a few years. Some mature larch trees locating poor drainage area suffered wet damage, while young birch and willow trees developed and herbs with water tolerance expanded. Compared to fluxes of the whole ecosystem, those based on the understory layer changed through the study period due to increase biomass and change of inside canopy environments; plentiful light and soil water, and enhanced turbulent mixing. Evapotranspiration from the understory layer increased and contribution to the whole forest flux reached 60%. Although this layer always acts as carbon dioxide source in seasonal average through the study period, source strength weaken and changed to temporal sink in the early summer. On contrast, contribution of the larch layer, in spite of remaining uncertainty in quantity, decreased in both of evapotranspiration and carbon dioxide uptake. Interactions between larch and understory support maintenance of this forest ecosystem. Decline of larch contribution is made up by understory growing, resulting in relatively stable whole forest exchange rate at least until this wet event.

  4. Variations with Time of the Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure in Central and South Atlantic Surface Waters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-25

    Increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide have been hypothesized to cause future global warming as a result of an enhanced greenhouse effect...continents. Future climatic changes caused by a global warming are of governmental concern because of their economic impact, and possible future

  5. Improvement of water resistance and dimensional stability of wood through titanium dioxide coating

    Treesearch

    Qingfeng Sun; Haipeng Yu; Yixing Liu; Jian Li; Yun Lu; John F. Hunt

    2010-01-01

    Moisture absorption and dimensional distortion are the major drawbacks of wood utilization as building material. In this study, poplar wood coated with a thin layer of titanium dioxide (TiO2) was prepared by the cosolvent-controlled hydrothermal method. Subsequently, its moisture absorption and dimensional stability were examined. Scanning...

  6. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Regeneration of Activated Carbon Loaded with Contaminants from Rocky Mountain Arsenal Well Water.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    15 111-7 GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION ISOTHERMS THERMALLY REACTIVATED CARBON .............. 16 I IV-1 PROCESS FLOW DIAGRAM FOR... PROCESSING COST OF ACTIVATED CHARCOAL REGENERATION BY SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE PROCESS ........................... 25 l IV-4 SENSITIVITY OF GAC...regenerate adsorbents such as granular activated carbon loaded with a broad variety of organic adsorbates. This regeneration process uses a supercritical

  7. Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn; Arens, Marlene

    2013-01-31

    Iron and steel manufacturing is among the most energy-intensive industries and accounts for the largest share, approximately 27 percent, of global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the manufacturing sector. The ongoing increase in world steel demand means that this industry’s energy use and CO2 emissions continue to grow, so there is significant incentive to develop, commercialize and adopt emerging energy-efficiency and CO2 emissions-reduction technologies for steel production. Although studies from around the world have identified a wide range of energy-efficiency technologies applicable to the steel industry that have already been commercialized, information is limited and/or scattered regarding emerging or advanced energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies that are not yet commercialized. This report consolidates available information on 56 emerging iron and steel industry technologies, with the intent of providing a well-structured database of information on these technologies for engineers, researchers, investors, steel companies, policy makers, and other interested parties. For each technology included, we provide information on energy savings and environmental and other benefits, costs, and commercialization status; we also identify references for more information.

  8. Comparisons of calculated and measured effective attenuation lengths for silicon dioxide over a wide electron energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. J.; Jablonski, A.

    2001-08-01

    We report calculations of effective attenuation lengths (EALs) for Si 2p photoelectrons in silicon dioxide at photoelectron energies between 82 and 1385 eV. These EALs are compared with measured values reported recently by Shimada et al. (Surf. Interf. Anal. 29 (2000) 336) at photoelectron emission angles of 0° and 55° for photoelectron energies between 140 and 1000 eV. Close agreement is found between the calculated and measured energy dependencies of the EALs for photoelectron energies between 400 and 1000 eV. Agreement is also found in the absolute values if the SiO 2 film thicknesses in the experiments were increased by 29% or if the inelastic mean free paths used in our calculations were decreased by the same percentage. Deviations between measured and calculated EALs for energies between 140 and 400 eV are attributed to the effects of surface-plasmon excitation. Calculated EALs for a photoelectron emission angle of 55° were larger than those found for normal photoelectron emission, particularly for low photoelectron energies, as was found in the Shimada et al. experiments.

  9. Water and carbon dioxide distribution in the 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko coma from VIRTIS-M infrared observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorini, A.; Piccioni, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Erard, S.; Leyrat, C.; Combi, M. R.; Fougere, N.; Crovisier, J.; Taylor, F. W.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Capria, M. T.; Grassi, D.; Rinaldi, G.; Tozzi, G. P.; Fink, U.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Studying the coma environment of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P) is one of the primary scientific goals of the VIRTIS experiment on the ESA Rosetta mission. Aims: The distribution and variability of water vapour and carbon dioxide in the comet's coma are needed to estimate their production rate, abundances in the nucleus, and the spatial distribution of the active regions. Methods: Infrared emission lines from vibrational bands of water and carbon dioxide at 2.67 and 4.27 μm, respectively, were observed by the VIRTIS-M imaging channel and mapped from close to the nucleus up to ~10 km altitude with a resolution of ~40 m/px. A dataset consisting of 74 observations in the 1-5 μm spectral range acquired from 8 to 14 April 2015 when 67P was at a heliocentric distance of 1.9 AU is analysed in this work. A statistical correlation between the gas distribution and the surface's active regions was performed. Results: The maximum H2O emission is observed within 3 km from the nucleus and is mainly concentrated above two active regions, Aten-Babi and Seth-Hapi, while the CO2 distribution appears more uniform with significant emissions coming from both the "head" and southern latitude regions. In the equatorial region, the column densities of both species decrease with altitude, although CO2 decreases more rapidly than H2O. The calculated CO2/H2O column density ratios above Aten-Babi and Seth-Hapi are 2.4 ± 0.6% and 3.0 ± 0.7%, respectively. A value equal to 3.9 ± 1.0% is observed at equatorial latitudes in the region encompassing Imothep. Conclusions: VIRTIS-M has mapped the distribution of water vapour and carbon dioxide around the nucleus of 67P with unprecedented spatial resolution. The different water and carbon dioxide outgassing above the surface, seen in the VIRTIS-M data, might be indicative of a different thermal history of the northern and southern hemispheres of 67P.

  10. Effects of carbon dioxide variations in the unsaturated zone on water chemistry in a glacial-outwash aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    The research site at Otis Air Base, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, has been developed for hydrogeological and geochemical studies of sewage-effluent contaminated groundwater since 1982. Research of hydrologic properties, transport, and chemical and biological processes is ongoing, but the origin of background water chemistry has not been determined. The principal geochemical process giving rise to the observed background water chemistry is CO2-controlled hydrolysis of Na feldspar. Geochemical modeling demonstrated that CO2 sources could vary over the project area. Analyses of unsaturated zone gases showed variations in CO2 which were dependent on land use and vegetative cover in the area of groundwater recharge. Measurements of CO2 in unsaturated-zone gases showed that concentrations of total inorganic C in recharge water should range from about 0.035 to 1.0 mmoles/L in the vicinity of Otis Air Base. Flux of CO2 from the unsaturated zone varied for a principal land uses, ranging from 86 gC/m2/yr for low vegetated areas to 1630 gC/m2/yr for a golf course. Carbon dioxide flux from woodlands was 220 gC/m2/yr, lower than reported fluxes of 500 to 600 gC/m2/yr for woodlands in a similar climate. Carbon dioxide flux from grassy areas was 540 gC/m2/yr, higher than reported fluxes of 230 to 490 gC/m2/yr for grasslands in a similar climate.

  11. Effect of disinfection of drinking water with ozone or chlorine dioxide on survival of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts.

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, J E; Mazás, E A; Masschelein, W J; Villacorta Martiez de Maturana, I; Debacker, E

    1989-01-01

    Demineralized water was seeded with controlled numbers of oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum purified from fresh calf feces and subjected to different treatments with ozone or chlorine dioxide. The disinfectants were neutralized by sodium thiosulfate, and neonatal mice were inoculated intragastrically and sacrificed 7 days later for enumeration of oocyst production. Preliminary trials indicated that a minimum infection level of 1,000 oocysts (0.1-ml inoculum) per mouse was necessary to induce 100% infection. Treatment of water containing 10(4) oocysts per ml with 1.11 mg of ozone per liter (concentration at time zero [C0]) for 6 min totally eliminated the infectivity of the oocysts for neonatal mice. A level of 2.27 mg of ozone per liter (C0) was necessary to inactivate water containing 5 x 10(5) oocysts per ml within 8 min. Also, 0.4 mg of chlorine dioxide per liter (C0) significantly reduced infectivity within 15 min of contact, although some oocysts remained viable. PMID:2764564

  12. Disinfection aboard cruise liners and naval units: formation of disinfection by-products using chlorine dioxide in different qualities of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ufermann, Petra; Petersen, Hauke; Exner, Martin

    2011-12-01

    The world-wide deployment of cruise liners and naval units has caused an increased need for the disinfection of drinking water. The main cause for this is the unknown quality of drinking water in foreign harbours--besides the formation of bio-films due to the climatically disadvantageous conditions in the operational area. Water conduits on board are currently disinfected with calcium hypochlorite in case of microbiological contamination. Chemical and physical analyses after disinfection with calcium hypochlorite have shown that organic by-products consisting of trihalomethanes develop in considerable amounts during disinfection. Furthermore, the method is susceptible to handling errors and thus often leads to insufficient disinfection results. Hitherto, the use of other disinfection methods allowed by government regulations, especially chlorine dioxide, is not widely spread. Unlike disinfection with calcium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide does not lead to the formation of trihalomethanes. Typical disinfection by-products (DBP) are the anions chlorite and chlorate, which are formed in oxidative processes. The formation conditions of these anions have not yet been elucidated. For this reason, the probability of the generation of inorganic by-products after disinfection with chlorine dioxide has been determined, and their occurrence in drinking water on board has been examined with respect to a possible correlation between water quality and the formation of chlorate and chlorite. Therefore, a chromatographic method was developed and validated in order to determine the periodical development of chlorate and chlorite from chorine dioxide in purified water at different pH-values as well as in actual drinking water samples from water conduits on board. The formation of the by-products chlorite and chlorate after disinfection with chlorine dioxide is influenced neither by pH-value nor by chemical properties of the disinfected water. Considering the examined conditions

  13. Diffusion and Clustering of Carbon Dioxide on Non-porous Amorphous Solid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiao; Emtiaz, Shahnewaj M.; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2017-03-01

    Observations by ISO and Spitzer toward young stellar objects showed that CO2 segregates in the icy mantles covering dust grains. Thermal processing of the ice mixture was proposed as being responsible for the segregation. Although several laboratories studied thermally induced segregation, a satisfying quantification is still missing. We propose that the diffusion of CO2 along pores inside water ice is the key to quantify segregation. We combined Temperature Programmed Desorption and Reflection Absorption InfraRed Spectroscopy to study how CO2 molecules interact on a non-porous amorphous solid water (np-ASW) surface. We found that CO2 diffuses significantly on an np-ASW surface above 65 K and clusters are formed at well below one monolayer. A simple rate equation simulation finds that the diffusion energy barrier of CO2 on np-ASW is 2150 ± 50 K, assuming a diffusion pre-exponential factor of 1012 s‑1. This energy should also apply to the diffusion of CO2 on the wall of pores. The binding energy of CO2 from CO2 clusters and CO2 from H2O ice has been found to be 2415 ± 20 K and 2250 ± 20 K, respectively, assuming the same prefactor for desorption. CO2–CO2 interaction is stronger than CO2–H2O interaction, in agreement with the experimental finding that CO2 does not wet the np-ASW surface. For comparison, we carried out similar experiments with CO on np-ASW, and found that the CO–CO interaction is always weaker than CO–H2O. As a result, CO wets the np-ASW surface. This study should be of help to uncover the thermal history of CO2 on the icy mantles of dust grains.

  14. Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Cropland Production in the United States, 1990-2004

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nelson, R. G.; Hellwinckel, C. H.; Brandt, C. C.; West, T. O.; De La Torre Ugarte, D. G.; Marland, G.

    2008-01-01

    These data represent energy use and fossil-fuel CO2 emissions associated with cropland production in the U.S. Energy use and emissions occurring on the farm are referred to as on-site energy and on-site emissions. Energy use and emissions associated with cropland production that occur off the farm (e.g., use of electricity, energy and emissions associated with fertilizer and pesticide production) are referred to as off-site energy and off-site emissions. The combination of on-site and off-site energy and carbon is referred to as total energy and total carbon, respectively.

  15. In situ infrared spectroscopic study of brucite carbonation in dry to water-saturated supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Loring, John S; Thompson, Christopher J; Zhang, Changyong; Wang, Zheming; Schaef, Herbert T; Rosso, Kevin M

    2012-05-17

    In geologic carbon sequestration, whereas part of the injected carbon dioxide will dissolve into host brine, some will remain as neat to water saturated supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2)) near the well bore and at the caprock, especially in the short term life cycle of the sequestration site. Little is known about the reactivity of minerals with scCO(2) containing variable concentrations of water. In this study, we used high-pressure infrared spectroscopy to examine the carbonation of brucite (Mg(OH)(2)) in situ over a 24 h reaction period with scCO(2) containing water concentrations between 0% and 100% saturation, at temperatures of 35, 50, and 70 °C, and at a pressure of 100 bar. Little or no detectable carbonation was observed when brucite was reacted with neat scCO(2). Higher water concentrations and higher temperatures led to greater brucite carbonation rates and larger extents of conversion to magnesium carbonate products. The only observed carbonation product at 35 °C was nesquehonite (MgCO(3)·3H(2)O). Mixtures of nesquehonite and magnesite (MgCO(3)) were detected at 50 °C, but magnesite was more prevalent with increasing water concentration. Both an amorphous hydrated magnesium carbonate solid and magnesite were detected at 70 °C, but magnesite predominated with increasing water concentration. The identity of the magnesium carbonate products appears strongly linked to magnesium water exchange kinetics through temperature and water availability effects.

  16. Optimal residential water conservation strategies considering related energy in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escriva-Bou, Alvar; Lund, Jay R.; Pulido-Velazquez, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    Although most freshwater resources are used in agriculture, residential water use is a much more energy intensive user. Based on this, we analyze the increased willingness to adopt water conservation strategies if energy cost is included in the customers' utility function. Using a Water-Energy-CO2 emissions model for household water end uses and probability distribution functions for parameters affecting water and water-related energy use in 10 different locations in California, this research introduces a probabilistic two-stage optimization model considering technical and behavioral decision variables to obtain the most economical strategies to minimize household water and water-related energy bills and costs given both water and energy price shocks. Results can provide an upper bound of household savings for customers with well-behaved preferences, and show greater adoption rates to reduce energy intensive appliances when energy is accounted, resulting in an overall 24% reduction in indoor water use that represents a 30% reduction in water-related energy use and a 53% reduction in household water-related CO2 emissions. Previous use patterns and water and energy rate structures can affect greatly the potential benefits for customers and so their behavior. Given that water and energy are somewhat complementary goods for customers, we use results of the optimization to obtain own-price and cross-price elasticities of residential water use by simulating increases in water and energy prices. While the results are highly influenced by assumptions due to lack of empirical data, the method presented has no precedent in the literature and hopefully will stimulate the collection of additional relevant data.

  17. The Energy-Water-Food Nexus.

    PubMed

    Keairns, D L; Darton, R C; Irabien, A

    2016-06-07

    As the global population grows in size and increasingly lives in cities, and with lifestyles based on greater material consumption, more attention is being given to the integrated system that supplies our energy, water, and food, the Nexus. There is also mounting concern about effects on the Nexus of climate change and damage to the natural environment that provides essential ecosystem services. Nexus analysis applies existing techniques, such as computational modelling and Life Cycle Assessment, but new frameworks and tools are needed, including those that will integrate societal and technical dimensions. Case studies show the vital role played by stakeholder involvement in clarifying issues, priorities, and values. They also demonstrate the importance of an integrated systems view of the complex interrelationships of the Nexus when planning effective remedies. Assessments conclude that transformative social and political change is needed to create new structures, markets, and governance to deal with the Nexus if we are to meet agreed-upon sustainable development goals.

  18. The structure and dynamics of carbon dioxide and water containing ices investigated via THz and mid-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Allodi, Marco A; Ioppolo, Sergio; Kelley, Matthew J; McGuire, Brett A; Blake, Geoffrey A

    2014-02-28

    Icy dust grains play a key role in the chemistry of the interstellar medium. The cumulative outcome of recent observations, laboratory studies, and astrochemical models indicates that solid-phase reaction mechanisms may dominate the formation of complex organic molecules such as amino acids and sugars in space. Consequently, the composition and structure of the icy grain mantle may significantly influence solid-phase reaction pathways. In this work, we present a new experimental setup capable of studying astrochemical ice analogs in both the TeraHertz (THz), or far-Infrared (far-IR), region (0.3-7.5 THz; 10-250 cm(-1)) and the mid-IR (400-4000 cm(-1)). The instruments are capable of performing a variety of spectroscopic studies that can provide especially relevant laboratory data to support astronomical observations from telescopes such as Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA. Experimental spectra of astrochemical ice analogs of water and carbon dioxide in pure, mixed, and layered ices were collected at different temperatures under high vacuum conditions with the goal of investigating the structure of the ice. We tentatively observe a new feature in both amorphous solid water and crystalline water at 33 cm(-1) (1 THz). In addition, our studies of mixed and layered ices show how it is possible to identify the location of carbon dioxide as it segregates within the ice by observing its effect on the THz spectrum of water ice. The THz spectra of mixed and layered ices are further analyzed by fitting their spectral features to those of pure amorphous solid water and crystalline water ice to quantify the effects of temperature changes on structure. From the results of this work, it appears that THz spectroscopy is potentially well suited to study thermal transformations within the ice.

  19. Opportunities for public water utilities in the market of energy from water.

    PubMed

    Mol, S S M; Kornman, J M; Kerpershoek, A J; van der Helm, A W C

    2011-01-01

    An inventory is made of the possibilities to recover sustainable energy from the water cycle by identifying different water flows in a municipal environment as a sustainable energy source. It is discussed what role public water utilities should play in the market of energy from water. This is done for Waternet, the public water utility of Amsterdam, by describing experiences on two practical applications for aquifer thermal energy storage and energy recovery from drinking water. The main conclusion is that public water utilities can substantially contribute to the production of sustainable energy, especially by making use of heat and cold from the water cycle. Public water utilities have the opportunity to both regulate and enter the market for energy from water.

  20. Fuel from Bacteria, CO2, Water, and Solar Energy: Engineering a Bacterial Reverse Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: Harvard is engineering a self-contained, scalable Electrofuels production system that can directly generate liquid fuels from bacteria, carbon dioxide (CO2), water, and sunlight. Harvard is genetically engineering bacteria called Shewanella, so the bacteria can sit directly on electrical conductors and absorb electrical current. This current, which is powered by solar panels, gives the bacteria the energy they need to process CO2 into liquid fuels. The Harvard team pumps this CO2 into the system, in addition to water and other nutrients needed to grow the bacteria. Harvard is also engineering the bacteria to produce fuel molecules that have properties similar to gasoline or diesel fuel—making them easier to incorporate into the existing fuel infrastructure. These molecules are designed to spontaneously separate from the water-based culture that the bacteria live in and to be used directly as fuel without further chemical processing once they’re pumped out of the tank.

  1. Evaluating the energy performance of a hybrid membrane-solvent process for flue gas carbon dioxide capture

    DOE PAGES

    Kusuma, Victor A.; Li, Zhiwei; Hopkinson, David; ...

    2016-10-13

    In this study, a particularly energy intensive step in the conventional amine absorption process to remove carbon dioxide is solvent regeneration using a steam stripping column. An attractive alternative to reduce the energy requirement is gas pressurized stripping, in which a high pressure noncondensable gas is used to strip CO2 off the rich solvent stream. The gas pressurized stripping column product, having CO2 at high concentration and high partial pressure, can then be regenerated readily using membrane separation. In this study, we performed an energetic analysis in the form of total equivalent work and found that, for capturing CO2 frommore » flue gas, this hybrid stripping process consumes 49% less energy compared to the base case conventional MEA absorption/steam stripping process. We also found the amount of membrane required in this process is much less than required for direct CO2 capture from the flue gas: approximately 100-fold less than a previously published two-stage cross-flow scheme, mostly due to the more favorable pressure ratio and CO2 concentration. There does exist a trade-off between energy consumption and required membrane area that is most strongly affected by the gas pressurized stripper operating pressure. While initial analysis looks promising from both an energy requirement and membrane unit capital cost, the viability of this hybrid process depends on the availability of advanced, next generation gas separation membranes to perform the stripping gas regeneration.« less

  2. Evaluating the energy performance of a hybrid membrane-solvent process for flue gas carbon dioxide capture

    SciTech Connect

    Kusuma, Victor A.; Li, Zhiwei; Hopkinson, David; Luebke, David R.; Chen, Shiaoguo

    2016-10-13

    In this study, a particularly energy intensive step in the conventional amine absorption process to remove carbon dioxide is solvent regeneration using a steam stripping column. An attractive alternative to reduce the energy requirement is gas pressurized stripping, in which a high pressure noncondensable gas is used to strip CO2 off the rich solvent stream. The gas pressurized stripping column product, having CO2 at high concentration and high partial pressure, can then be regenerated readily using membrane separation. In this study, we performed an energetic analysis in the form of total equivalent work and found that, for capturing CO2 from flue gas, this hybrid stripping process consumes 49% less energy compared to the base case conventional MEA absorption/steam stripping process. We also found the amount of membrane required in this process is much less than required for direct CO2 capture from the flue gas: approximately 100-fold less than a previously published two-stage cross-flow scheme, mostly due to the more favorable pressure ratio and CO2 concentration. There does exist a trade-off between energy consumption and required membrane area that is most strongly affected by the gas pressurized stripper operating pressure. While initial analysis looks promising from both an energy requirement and membrane unit capital cost, the viability of this hybrid process depends on the availability of advanced, next generation gas separation membranes to perform the stripping gas regeneration.

  3. Inelastic cross-sections and energy loss properties by non-relativistic heavy ions in zirconium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, Jennifer; Pimblott, Simon M.

    2016-04-01

    A formalism for the inelastic cross-section for electronic collisions of protons and heavier ions in a material is developed based on a quadratic extrapolation of the experimentally based dipole oscillator strength distribution (DOSD) of the material into the energy momentum plane. The approach is tested by calculating various energy loss properties in zirconium dioxide. Mean free path, stopping power and continuous slowing down approximation (csda) range are predicted as a function of ion energy for various incident ions, with the stopping powers compared to experimental data to assess the effectiveness of the methodology. The DOSD is straightforwardly obtained from the experimentally measured energy loss function data below 80 eV and atomic photo-absorption cross-section data above 100 eV. Agreement between the results of the calculation for stopping power and the experimental data is within 10% for all ions when compared for energies greater than the Bragg peak. The discrepancy is larger below the peak due to limitations in the methodology, especially the failure to make corrections for the Barkas and higher order effects and the lack of charge cycling cross-section data.

  4. Colorado's Energy and Water Systems in a Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averyt, K. B.; Pulwarty, R. S.; Udall, B.

    2008-12-01

    Greater energy demands are driving development of domestic energy resources and advancement of fossil- fuel independent energy technologies. However, water is necessary for most energy production. Greenhouse gas emissions are increasing global temperatures, impacting the quality and quantity of water resources. Warming temperatures are also altering the timing and nature of energy demand. As water is necessary for energy production, and energy is needed for the water supply, climate change will further exacerbate the interplay between these two sectors and create additional challenges for adaptation planning. To investigate the energy-water nexus, and evaluate the basic information necessary to undertake more comprehensive regional climate impact studies and create adaptation strategies, the energy intensity of Colorado's water systems, and water usage by energy sector, are presented. The geology of Colorado is such that it has both carbon (oil shale, tar sands, coal-bed methane) and non-fossil-fuel (geothermal, winds) energy resources. There is an increasing need to develop these resources, but the impact on the region's water supply is often neglected, as is the energy required to support the water infrastructure. Temperatures in Colorado have risen by an average of about 1°C in the past 30 years, and are projected to increase an additional 2°C by 2050. Precipitation is highly variable and will continue to be in the future, but more severe and persistent droughts are anticipated. Given the suite of potential futures, the interdependence of water and energy in the state necessitates that decision makers consider both water and energy systems when developing adaptive strategies to climate change. The work presented here represents initial efforts towards a more comprehensive analysis of climate change impacts on water and energy supply in support of adaptive management approaches in the intermountain west.

  5. Effects of Water Vapor on the Data Quality of the Stable Oxygen Isotopic Ratio of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C. U.; White, J. W.; Vaughn, B.; Tans, P. P.; Pardo, L.

    2007-12-01

    The stable oxygen isotopic ratio of carbon dioxide can potentially track fundamental indicators of environmental change such as the balance between photosynthesis and respiration on regional to global scales. The Stable Isotope Laboratory (SIL) at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR), University of Colorado at Boulder, has measured the stable isotopes of atmospheric carbon dioxide from more than 60 NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) air flask-sampling sites since the early 1990s. If air is sampled without drying, oxygen can exchange between carbon dioxide and water in the flasks, entirely masking the desired signal. An attempt to investigate how water vapor is affecting the δ18O signal is accomplished by comparing the SIL measurements with specific humidity, calculated from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) global integrated surface hourly temperature and dew point database, at the time of sampling. Analysis of sites where samples have been collected initially without drying, and subsequently with a drying kit, in conjunction with the humidity data, has led to several conclusions. Samples that initially appear isotopically unaltered, in that their δ18O values are within the expected range, are being subtly influenced by the water vapor in the air. At Bermuda and other tropical to semi-tropical sites, the 'wet' sampling values have a seasonal cycle that is strongly anti-correlated to the specific humidity, while the 'dry' values have a seasonal cycle that is shifted earlier than the specific humidity cycle by 1-2 months. The latter phasing is expected given the seasonal phasing between climate over the ocean and land, while the former is consistent with a small, but measurable isotope exchange in the flasks. In addition, we note that there is a strong (r > 0.96) correlation between the average specific humidity and the percent of rejected samples for 'wet' sampling. This presents an opportunity for determining a threshold of

  6. Nonthermal inactivation of Escherichia coli K12 in buffered peptone water using a pilot-plant scale supercritical carbon dioxide system with gas-liquid porous metal contractor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) system, with a gas-liquid CO2 contactor, for reducing Escherichia coli K12 in diluted buffered peptone water. 0.1% (w/v) buffered peptone water inoculated with E. coli K12 was processed using the SCCO2 system at CO2 con...

  7. Free Energy-Based Coarse-Grained Force Field for Binary Mixtures of Hydrocarbons, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fenglei; Deetz, Joshua D; Sun, Huai

    2017-01-23

    The free energy based Lennard-Jones 12-6 (FE-12-6) coarse-grained (CG) force field developed for alkanes1 has been extended to model small molecules of light hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, propane, butane, and isobutane), nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide. The adjustable parameters of the FE-12-6 potential are determined by fitting against experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) curves and heat of vaporization (HOV) data for pure substance liquids. Simulations using the optimized FE-12-6 parameters correctly reproduced experimental measures of the VLE, HOV, density, vapor pressure, compressibility, critical point, and surface tension for pure substances over a wide range of thermodynamic states. The force field parameters optimized for pure substances were tested on methane/butane, nitrogen/decane, and carbon dioxide/decane binary mixtures to predict their vapor-liquid equilibrium phase diagrams. It is found that for nonpolar molecules represented by different sized beads, a common scaling factor (0.08) that reduces the strength of the interaction potential between unlike beads, generated using Lorentz-Berthelot (LB) combination rules, is required to predict vapor-liquid phase equilibria accurately.

  8. Progress on High-Energy 2-micron Solid State Laser for NASA Space-Based Wind and Carbon Dioxide Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.

    2011-01-01

    Sustained research efforts at NASA Langley Research Center during last fifteen years have resulted in significant advancement of a 2-micron diode-pumped, solid-state laser transmitter for wind and carbon dioxide measurements from ground, air and space-borne platforms. Solid-state 2-micron laser is a key subsystem for a coherent Doppler lidar that measures the horizontal and vertical wind velocities with high precision and resolution. The same laser, after a few modifications, can also be used in a Differential Absorption Lidar system for measuring atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have developed a compact, flight capable, high energy, injection seeded, 2-micron laser transmitter for ground and airborne wind and carbon dioxide measurements. It is capable of producing 250 mJ at 10 Hz by an oscillator and one amplifier. This compact laser transmitter was integrated into a mobile trailer based coherent Doppler wind and CO2 DIAL system and was deployed during field measurement campaigns. This paper will give an overview of 2-micron solid-state laser technology development and discuss results from recent ground-based field measurements.

  9. Mapping the Energy-Water Nexus around the Pacific Rim

    SciTech Connect

    Tidwell, Vincent C.; Moreland, Barbara Denise

    2016-01-01

    The energy-water nexus has been mapped for almost 12,000 watersheds distributed across the 21-economies comprising the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation. Water consumption for energy production was estimated for 9 different sectors including thermoelectric and hydroelectric power; energy extraction including coal, oil, natural gas, uranium and unconventional oil/gas; and, energy processing including oil and biofuels. Conversely, the energy consumed providing water services was mapped for three sectors, drinking water, waste water and seawater desalination. These measures of resource use were put in context by drawing comparison with published measures of water risk. The objective of the mapping was to quantify the energy-water nexus and its variability at the subnational level, pinpoint potential vulnerabilities, and identify opportunities for international collaboration.

  10. Running hot water: A systems approach to energy conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulff, P.

    1982-03-01

    Ways to conserve energy in domestic hot water systems are discussed. Examination of the Swedish situation shows that centralized systems, where water heating is a subsidiary of space heating, waste energy because water cools in the pipes after use, and the entire system must operate in summer. Also, water temperature is often much higher than required. Solar panels, individual water heaters, heat pumps, and heat exchangers could contribute to energy conservation, but changes in consumer behavior can also be extremely effective. For example, dish washing energy requirements were reduced by 80% in one neighborhood by giving each apartment a plastic bowl for washing up.

  11. Operation of a breadboard liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor system for removing carbon dioxide and water vapor from air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, Scott B.; Ray, Rod; Newbold, David D.; Millard, Douglas L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Foerg, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Processes to remove and recover carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor from air are essential for successful long-duration space missions. This paper presents results of a developmental program focused on the use of a liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor (LSMC) system for removal of CO2 and water vapor from air. In this system, air from the spacecraft cabin atmosphere is circulated through one side of a hollow-fiber membrane contactor. On the other side of the membrane contactor is flowed a liquid sorbent, which absorbs the CO2 and water vapor from the feed air. The liquid sorbent is then heated to desorb the CO2 and water vapor. The CO2 is subsequently removed from the system as a concentrated gas stream, whereas the water vapor is condensed, producing a water stream. A breadboard system based on this technology was designed and constructed. Tests showed that the LSMC breadboard system can produce a CO2 stream and a liquid-water stream. Details are presented on the operation of the system, as well as the effects on performance of variations in feed conditions.

  12. Operation of a breadboard liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor system for removing carbon dioxide and water vapor from air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, Scott B.; Ray, Rod; Newbold, David D.; Millard, Douglas L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Foerg, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Processes to remove and recover carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor from air are essential for successful long-duration space missions. This paper presents results of a developmental program focused on the use of a liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor (LSMC) system for removal of CO2 and water vapor from air. In this system, air from the spacecraft cabin atmosphere is circulated through one side of a hollow-fiber membrane contactor. On the other side of the membrane contactor is flowed a liquid sorbent, which absorbs the CO2 and water vapor from the feed air. The liquid sorbent is then heated to desorb the CO2 and water vapor. The CO2 is subsequently removed from the system as a concentrated gas stream, whereas the water vapor is condensed, producing a water stream. A breadboard system based on this technology was designed and constructed. Tests showed that the LSMC breadboard system can produce a CO2 stream and a liquid-water stream. Details are presented on the operation of the system, as well as the effects on performance of variations in feed conditions.

  13. The energy cost of water independence: the case of Singapore.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Lenouvel; Michel, Lafforgue; Catherine, Chevauché; Pauline, Rhétoré

    2014-01-01

    Finding alternative resources to secure or increase water availability is a key issue in most urban areas. This makes the research of alternative and local water resources of increasing importance. In the context of political tension with its main water provider (Malaysia), Singapore has been implementing a comprehensive water policy for some decades, which relies on water demand management and local water resource mobilisation in order to reach water self-sufficiency by 2060. The production of water from alternative resources through seawater desalination or water reclamation implies energy consumptive technologies such as reverse osmosis. In the context of increasing energy costs and high primary energy dependency, this water self-sufficiency objective is likely to be an important challenge for Singapore. The aim of this paper is to quantify the long-term impact of Singapore's water policy on the national electricity bill and to investigate the impact of Singapore's projects to reduce its water energy footprint. We estimate that 2.0% of the Singaporean electricity demand is already dedicated to water and wastewater treatment processes. If its water-energy footprint dramatically increases in the coming decades, ambitious research projects may buffer the energy cost of water self-sufficiency.

  14. Mapping water consumption for energy production around the Pacific Rim

    DOE PAGES

    Tidwell, Vincent; Moreland, Barbie

    2016-09-07

    World energy demand is projected to increase by more than a third by 2035 and with it the use of water to extract and process fuels and generate electricity. Management of this energy-water nexus requires a clear understanding of the inter-related demands of these resources as well as their regional distribution. Toward this need the fresh water consumed for energy production was mapped for almost 12 000 watersheds distributed across the 21-economies comprising the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation. Fresh water consumption was estimated for ten different sectors including thermoelectric and hydroelectric power; energy extraction including coal, oil, natural gas, uranium andmore » unconventional oil/gas; energy processing including oil and biofuels; and biofuel feedstock irrigation. These measures of water consumption were put in context by drawing comparison with published measures of water risk. In total 791 watersheds (32%) of the 2511 watersheds where energy related water consumption occurred were also characterized by high to extreme water risk, these watersheds were designated as being at energy-water risk. Furthermore, for six economies watersheds at energy-water risk represented half or more of all basins where energy related water consumption occurred, while four additional economies exceeded 30%.« less

  15. Mapping water consumption for energy production around the Pacific Rim

    SciTech Connect

    Tidwell, Vincent; Moreland, Barbie

    2016-09-07

    World energy demand is projected to increase by more than a third by 2035 and with it the use of water to extract and process fuels and generate electricity. Management of this energy-water nexus requires a clear understanding of the inter-related demands of these resources as well as their regional distribution. Toward this need the fresh water consumed for energy production was mapped for almost 12 000 watersheds distributed across the 21-economies comprising the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation. Fresh water consumption was estimated for ten different sectors including thermoelectric and hydroelectric power; energy extraction including coal, oil, natural gas, uranium and unconventional oil/gas; energy processing including oil and biofuels; and biofuel feedstock irrigation. These measures of water consumption were