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Sample records for direct borohydride fuel

  1. Catalytic polymeric electrodes for direct borohydride fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayatsarmadi, Bita; Peters, Alice; Talemi, Pejman

    2016-08-01

    The direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) is a new class of fuel cells that produces non-toxic by-products and has a potential for a high voltage and high energy density. A major challenge in developing efficient DBFCs is the development of an efficient, stable, and economic catalyst for the oxidation of borohydride. In this paper, we report the use of conducting polymer Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) as electrocatalysts in DBFC. PEDOT electrodes prepared by vacuum phase polymerization exhibited electrocatalytic behavior towards oxidation of borohydride and reduction of hydrogen peroxide. Spectroscopic analysis of samples showed that PEDOT can act as an interface for electron transfer from borohydride ions. Comparing the polarization curves of DBFCs with PEDOT coated on graphite electrodes and cells with bare graphite electrodes, demonstrated higher voltage, maximum power density, and stability.

  2. The direct borohydride fuel cell for UUV propulsion power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakeman, J. Barry; Rose, Abigail; Pointon, Kevin D.; Browning, Darren J.; Lovell, Keith V.; Waring, Susan C.; Horsfall, Jackie A.

    The development of proton exchange membrane and direct methanol fuel cell stacks is now well advanced for many applications. However, the significant performance advantages that these have over the battery for small to moderate scale applications will not be realised until a credible fuel source has been developed. The deficiencies of the PEMFC and DMFC can be eliminated by cation or anion-conducting membranes incorporated into a direct sodium borohydride fuel cell (DSBFC). The characterisation of membranes for the DSBFC is discussed. Novel membranes have been prepared which have resistance of an equal magnitude to the commercially available Nafion ® membrane.

  3. Electrochemical oxidation of borohydride at nano-gold-based electrodes: Application in direct borohydride fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coowar, Fazlil A.; Vitins, Girts; Mepsted, Gary O.; Waring, Susan C.; Horsfall, Jacqueline A.

    Nano-particulate gold-based materials along with commercial gold supported over carbon were investigated as possible alternative electrocatalysts for the oxidation of borohydride in alkaline media. Cyclic voltammetry experiments conducted on these materials show very high activity for the nano-particulate materials compared to the commercial materials despite a lower loading of gold (0.8 mg cm -2 compared to 1.0 mg cm -2) and lower interface area in the nano-particulate materials. The presence of BH 4 - appears to have detrimental effect on the performances of the air-electrode for oxygen reduction. The current density recorded at -0.6 V versus Hg/HgO has decreased by a factor of six for silver nitrate AC65 while for MnO 2 a reduction in the current density by a factor of two only was observed. The implementation of the nano-particulate gold-based materials and the air-electrodes along with a low-cost anionic membrane in QinetiQ's tubular cell design has led to power density exceeding 28 mW cm -2 obtained at ambient temperature.

  4. A direct borohydride fuel cell with a polymer fiber membrane and non-noble metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodong; Liu, Yongning; Li, Sai; Wei, Xiaozhu; Wang, Li; Chen, Yuanzhen

    2012-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) and Pt-based catalysts are two crucial components which determine the properties and price of fuel cells. Even though, PEM faces problem of fuel crossover in liquid fuel cells such as direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC), which lowers power output greatly. Here, we report a DBFC in which a polymer fiber membrane (PFM) was used, and metal oxides, such as LaNiO₃ and MnO₂, were used as cathode catalysts, meanwhile CoO was used as anode catalyst. Peak power density of 663 mW·cm⁻² has been achieved at 65°C, which increases by a factor of 1.7-3.7 compared with classic DBFCs. This fuel cell structure can also be extended to other liquid fuel cells, such as DMFC.

  5. A direct borohydride fuel cell with a polymer fiber membrane and non-noble metal catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaodong; Liu, Yongning; Li, Sai; Wei, Xiaozhu; Wang, Li; Chen, Yuanzhen

    2012-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) and Pt-based catalysts are two crucial components which determine the properties and price of fuel cells. Even though, PEM faces problem of fuel crossover in liquid fuel cells such as direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC), which lowers power output greatly. Here, we report a DBFC in which a polymer fiber membrane (PFM) was used, and metal oxides, such as LaNiO3 and MnO2, were used as cathode catalysts, meanwhile CoO was used as anode catalyst. Peak power density of 663 mW·cm−2 has been achieved at 65°C, which increases by a factor of 1.7–3.7 compared with classic DBFCs. This fuel cell structure can also be extended to other liquid fuel cells, such as DMFC. PMID:22880160

  6. Evaluation of anode (electro)catalytic materials for the direct borohydride fuel cell: Methods and benchmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olu, Pierre-Yves; Job, Nathalie; Chatenet, Marian

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, different methods are discussed for the evaluation of the potential of a given catalyst, in view of an application as a direct borohydride fuel cell DBFC anode material. Characterizations results in DBFC configuration are notably analyzed at the light of important experimental variables which influence the performances of the DBFC. However, in many practical DBFC-oriented studies, these various experimental variables prevent one to isolate the influence of the anode catalyst on the cell performances. Thus, the electrochemical three-electrode cell is a widely-employed and useful tool to isolate the DBFC anode catalyst and to investigate its electrocatalytic activity towards the borohydride oxidation reaction (BOR) in the absence of other limitations. This article reviews selected results for different types of catalysts in electrochemical cell containing a sodium borohydride alkaline electrolyte. In particular, propositions of common experimental conditions and benchmarks are given for practical evaluation of the electrocatalytic activity towards the BOR in three-electrode cell configuration. The major issue of gaseous hydrogen generation and escape upon DBFC operation is also addressed through a comprehensive review of various results depending on the anode composition. At last, preliminary concerns are raised about the stability of potential anode catalysts upon DBFC operation.

  7. Electrocatalytic performance of Pt-Dy alloys for direct borohydride fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šljukić, Biljana; Milikić, Jadranka; Santos, Diogo M. F.; Sequeira, César A. C.; Macciò, Daniele; Saccone, Adriana

    2014-12-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of sodium borohydride (NaBH4) is systematically studied on platinum-dysprosium (Pt-Dy) alloys in alkaline media with respect to application in direct borohydride fuel cells (DBFCs). Using several different techniques, namely cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and chronopotentiometry, reaction parameters are evaluated for NaBH4 electrooxidation in 2 M NaOH supporting electrolyte. The values obtained for the number of electrons exchanged are comparable for the two alloys and close to 2.5. Dependence of Pt-Dy alloys activity for NaBH4 oxidation on the electrolyte composition and temperature is also investigated. Test fuel cell is assembled using Pt-Dy alloy as anode, reaching peak power density of 298 mW cm-2 at current density of 595 mA cm-2 and cell potential of 0.5 V at 25 °C. Pt-Dy alloys exhibit comparable behavior with pure Pt electrode at room temperature, while at higher temperature they exhibit improved Coulombic efficiency, with the advantage of significantly lower price.

  8. Performance enhancement of a direct borohydride fuel cell in practical running conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheolhwan; Kim, Kyu-Jung; Ha, Man Yeong

    To investigate the possibility of a cost-effective direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC), the performance enhancement of a single cell is investigated under practical running conditions by adopting non-precious metal for the anode. Fluorinated Zr-based AB 2-type hydrogen storage alloy with an effective area of 100 cm 2 is selected as the anode catalyst. To minimize pressure loss from the enlarged cell size, a parallel-type anode channel is designed, then the principal reasons for performance degradation are analyzed. Single-cell performance is mainly enhanced by adopting a corrugated anode design, applying an anti-corrosion coating on the cathode channel, and controlling the fuel flow-rate and air humidity. The cell performance is estimated simply by measuring the wall temperature of the cell.

  9. Depression of hydrogen evolution during operation of a direct borohydride fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. P.; Liu, B. H.; Zhu, J. K.; Suda, S.

    Hydrogen evolution from the anode usually occurs during operation of a Direct Borohydride Fuel Cell (DBFC). This would not only decrease the fuel utilization, but also lower the cell performance because hydrogen bubbles would hinder ion movement in the anolyte. In this paper, the hydrogen evolution behavior is investigated based on relations of hydrogen evolution rates versus operation currents of the DBFC. The effects of anode modification on the hydrogen evolution rate and the cell performance were investigated. It was found that hydrogen evolution was depressed by adding Pd, Ag and Au catalysts in the anode. Coating a thin Nafion film on the catalyst surfaces was another effective way to decrease the hydrogen evolution rate. Depression of the hydrogen evolution and improvement of the DBFC performance can be achieved by adding carbon supported Pd in Ni anode with a suitable content of Nafion. However, too much Nafion in the anode would degrade the DBFC performance.

  10. Investigation of the characteristics of a stacked direct borohydride fuel cell for portable applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheolhwan; Kim, Kyu-Jung; Ha, Man Yeong

    To investigate the possibility of the portable application of a direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC), weight reduction of the stack and high stacking of the cells are investigated for practical running conditions. For weight reduction, carbon graphite is adopted as the bipolar plate material even though it has disadvantages in tight stacking, which results in stacking loss from insufficient material strength. For high stacking, it is essential to have a uniform fuel distribution among cells and channels to maintain equal electric load on each cell. In particular, the design of the anode channel is important because active hydrogen generation causes non-uniformity in the fuel flow-field of the cells and channels. To reduce the disadvantages of stacking force margin and fuel maldistribution, an O-ring type-sealing system with an internal manifold and a parallel anode channel design is adopted, and the characteristics of a single and a five-cell fuel cell stack are analyzed. By adopting carbon graphite, the stack weight can be reduced by 4.2 times with 12% of performance degradation from the insufficient stacking force. When cells are stacked, the performance exceeds the single-cell performance because of the stack temperature increase from the reduction of the radiation area from the narrow stacking of cells.

  11. Sodium borohydride as an additive to enhance the performance of direct ethanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lianqin; Bambagioni, Valentina; Bevilacqua, Manuela; Bianchini, Claudio; Filippi, Jonathan; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Marchionni, Andrea; Vizza, Francesco; Fang, Xiang; Shen, Pei Kang

    The effect of adding small quantities (0.1-1 wt.%) of sodium borohydride (NaBH 4) to the anolyte solution of direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) with membrane-electrode assemblies constituted by nanosized Pd/C anode, Fe-Co cathode and anion-exchange membrane (Tokuyama A006) was investigated by means of various techniques. These include cyclic voltammetry, in situ FTIR spectroelectrochemistry, a study of the performance of monoplanar fuel cells and an analysis of the ethanol oxidation products. A comparison with fuel cells fed with aqueous solutions of ethanol proved unambiguously the existence of a promoting effect of NaBH 4 on the ethanol oxidation. Indeed, the potentiodynamic curves of the ethanol-NaBH 4 mixtures showed higher power and current densities, accompanied by a remarkable increase in the fuel consumption at comparable working time of the cell. A 13C and 11B { 1H}NMR analysis of the cell exhausts and an in situ FTIR spectroelectrochemical study showed that ethanol is converted selectively to acetate while the oxidation product of NaBH 4 is sodium metaborate (NaBO 2). The enhancement of the overall cell performance has been explained in terms of the ability of NaBH 4 to reduce the PdO layer on the catalyst surface.

  12. Intrinsic borohydride fuel cell/battery hybrid power sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jian; Fang, Bin; Wang, Chunsheng; Currie, Kenneth

    The electrochemical oxidation behaviors of NaBH 4 on Zn, Zn-MH, and MH (metal-hydride) electrodes were investigated, and an intrinsic direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC)/battery hybrid power source using MH (or Zn-MH) as the anode and MnO 2 as the cathode was tested. Borohydride cannot be effectively oxidized on Zn electrodes at the Zn oxidation potential because of the poor electrocatalytic ability of Zn for borohydride oxidation and the high overpotential, even though borohydride has the same oxidation potential of Zn in an alkaline solution. The borohydride can be electrochemically oxidized on Ni and MH electrodes through a 4e reaction at a high overpotential. Simply adding borohydride into an alkaline electrolyte of a Zn/air or MH/air battery can greatly increase the capacity, while an intrinsic DBFC/MH(or Zn)-MnO 2 battery can deliver a higher peak power than regular DBFCs.

  13. Direct synthesis of calcium borohydride

    DOEpatents

    Ronnebro, Ewa Carin Ellinor; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2009-10-27

    A method is disclosed for directly preparing an alkaline earth metal borohydride, i.e. Ca(BH.sub.4).sub.2, from the alkaline earth metal hydride and the alkaline earth metal boride. The borohydride thus prepared is doped with a small portion of a metal chloride catalyst compound, such as RuCl.sub.3, TiCl.sub.3, or a mixture of TiCl.sub.3 and palladium metal. The process provides for mechanically mixing the dry reagents under an inert atmosphere followed by charging the mixed materials with high pressure hydrogen at about 70 MPa while heating the mixture to about 400.degree. C. The method is relatively simple and inexpensive and provides reversible hydride compounds which are free of the usual contamination introduced by prior art wet chemical methods.

  14. Anodic behavior of carbon supported Cu@Ag core-shell nanocatalysts in direct borohydride fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Donghong; Liu, Huihong; You, Xiu; Wei, Huikai; Liu, Shibin

    2015-10-01

    Carbon-supported Cu@Ag core-shell nanoparticles are prepared by a successive reduction method in an aqueous solution and are used as an anode electrocatalyst for the direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell (DBHFC). The physical and electrochemical properties of the as-prepared electrocatalysts are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronopotentiometry (CP), and fuel cell tests. In situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is employed in 2 M NaOH/0.1 M NaBH4 to understand the borohydride oxidation reaction (BOR) mechanism by studying the intermediate reactions occurring on the Cu@Ag/C electrode. The TEM images show that the average size of the Cu1@Ag1/C particles is approximately 18 nm. Among the as-prepared catalysts, the Cu2@Ag1/C catalyst presents the highest catalytic activity. As shown by in situ FTIR, the oxidation reaction mechanism of BH4- is similar to that of Ag/C: BHn(OH)4-n- + 2OH- → BHn-1(OH)5-n- +H2 O + 2e . At 25 °C, the DBHFC with Cu2@Ag1/C as the anode electrocatalyst and Pt mesh (1 cm2) as the cathode electrode exhibits a maximum anodic power density of 17.27 mW mg-1 at a discharge current density of 27.8 mA mg-1.

  15. Investigation of platinum and palladium as potential anodic catalysts for direct borohydride and ammonia borane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olu, Pierre-Yves; Deschamps, Fabien; Caldarella, Giuseppe; Chatenet, Marian; Job, Nathalie

    2015-11-01

    Platinum and palladium are investigated as anodic catalysts for direct borohydride and direct ammonia borane fuel cells (DBFC and DABFC). Half-cell characterizations performed at 25 °C using NH3BH3 or NaBH4 alkaline electrolytes demonstrate the lowest open-circuit potential and highest electrocatalytic activity for the NH3BH3 alkaline electrolyte for Pd and Pt rotating disk electrodes, respectively. Voltammograms performed in fuel cell configuration at 25 °C confirm this trend: the highest open circuit voltage (1.05 V) and peak power density (181 mW·cm-2) are monitored for DABFC using Pd/C and Pt/C anodes, respectively. Increasing the temperature heightens the peak power density (that reaches 420 mW·cm-2 at 60 °C for DBFC using Pt/C anodes), but strongly generates gas from the fuel hydrolysis, hindering the overall fuel cells performances. The anode texture strongly influences the fuel cell performances, highlighting: (i) that an open anode texture is required to efficiently circulate the anolyte and (ii) the difficulty to compare potential anodic catalysts characterized using different fuel cell setups within the literature. Furthermore, TEM imaging of Pt/C and Pd/C catalysts prior/post DBFC and DABFC operation shows fast degradation of the carbon-supported nanoparticles.

  16. Direct synthesis of magnesium borohydride

    DOEpatents

    Ronnebro, Ewa Carin Ellinor; Severa, Godwin; Jensen, Craig M.

    2012-04-03

    A method is disclosed for directly preparing an alkaline earth metal borohydride, i.e. Mg(BH.sub.4).sub.2, from the alkaline earth metal boride MgB.sub.2 by hydrogenating the MgB.sub.2 at an elevated temperature and pressure. The boride may also be doped with small amounts of a metal chloride catalyst such as TiCl.sub.3 and/or NiCl.sub.2. The process provides for charging MgB.sub.2 with high pressure hydrogen above at least 70 MPa while simultaneously heating the material to about 350.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C. The method is relatively simple and inexpensive and provides a reversible hydride compound having a hydrogen capacity of at least 11 wt %.

  17. Sodium Borohydride/Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells For Space Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Deelo, M. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation examines Sodium Borohydride and Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells as they are applied to space applications. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) The Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell; 3) Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell Test Stands; 4) Fuel Cell Comparisons; 5) MEA Performance; 6) Anode Polarization; and 7) Electrode Analysis. The benefits of hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant and benefits of sodium borohydride as a fuel are also addressed.

  18. Manganese dioxide as a cathode catalyst for a direct alcohol or sodium borohydride fuel cell with a flowing alkaline electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, A.; Jha, A. K.; Basu, S.

    The oxygen reduction reaction at a manganese dioxide cathode in alkaline medium is studied using cyclic voltammetry and by measuring volume of oxygen consumed at the cathode. The performance of the manganese dioxide cathode is also determined in the presence of fuel and an alkali mixture with a standard Pt/Ni anode in a flowing alkaline-electrolyte fuel cell. The fuels tested are methanol, ethanol and sodium borohydride (1 M), while 3 M KOH is used as the electrolyte. The performance of the fuel cell is measured in terms of open-circuit voltage and current-potential characteristics. A single peak in the cyclic voltammogram suggests that a four-electron pathway mechanism prevails during oxygen reduction. This is substantiated by calculating the number of electrons involved per molecule of oxygen that are reacted at the MnO 2 cathode from the oxygen consumption data for different fuels. The results show that the power density of the fuel cell increases with increase in MnO 2 loading to a certain limit but then decreases with further loading. The maximum power density is obtained at 3 mg cm -2 of MnO 2 for each of the three different fuels.

  19. Membraneless, room-temperature, direct borohydride/cerium fuel cell with power density of over 0.25 W/cm2.

    PubMed

    Da Mota, Nicolas; Finkelstein, David A; Kirtland, Joseph D; Rodriguez, Claudia A; Stroock, Abraham D; Abruña, Héctor D

    2012-04-11

    The widespread adoption and deployment of fuel cells as an alternative energy technology have been hampered by a number of formidable technical challenges, including the cost and long-term stability of electrocatalyst and membrane materials. We present a microfluidic fuel cell that overcomes many of these obstacles while achieving power densities in excess of 250 mW/cm(2). The poisoning and sluggish reaction rate associated with CO-contaminated H(2) and methanol, respectively, are averted by employing the promising, high-energy density fuel borohydride. The high-overpotential reaction of oxygen gas at the cathode is supplanted by the high-voltage reduction of cerium ammonium nitrate. Expensive, ineffective membrane materials are replaced with laminar flow and a nonselective, porous convection barrier to separate the fuel and oxidant streams. The result is a Nafion-free, room-temperature fuel cell that has the highest power density per unit mass of Pt catalyst employed for a non-H(2) fuel cell, and exceeds the power density of a typical H(2) fuel cell by 50%.

  20. Exploiting hydrophobic borohydride-rich ionic liquids as faster-igniting rocket fuels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianlin; Qi, Xiujuan; Huang, Shi; Jiang, Linhai; Li, Jianling; Tang, Chenglong; Zhang, Qinghua

    2016-02-01

    A family of hydrophobic borohydride-rich ionic liquids was developed, which exhibited the shortest ignition delay times of 1.7 milliseconds and the lowest viscosity (10 mPa s) of hypergolic ionic fluids, demonstrating their great potential as faster-igniting rocket fuels to replace toxic hydrazine derivatives in liquid bipropellant formulations.

  1. Direct Hydrogenation Magnesium Boride to Magnesium Borohydride: Demonstration of >11 Weight Percent Reversible Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Severa, Godwin; Ronnebro, Ewa; Jensen, Craig M.

    2010-11-16

    We here for the first time demonstrate direct hydrogenation of magnesium boride, MgB2, to magnesium borohydride, Mg(BH4)2 at 900 bar H2-pressures and 400°C. Upon 14.8wt% hydrogen release, the end-decomposition product of Mg(BH4)2 is MgB2, thus, this is a unique reversible path here obtaining >11wt% H2 which implies promise for a fully reversible hydrogen storage material.

  2. Capacity enhancement of aqueous borohydride fuels for hydrogen storage in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, David; Neiner, Doinita; Bowden, Mark; Whittemore, Sean; Holladay, Jamie; Huang, Zhenguo; Autrey, Tom

    2015-10-01

    In this work we demonstrate enhanced hydrogen storage capacities through increased solubility of sodium borate product species in aqueous media achieved by adjusting the sodium (NaOH) to boron (B(OH)3) ratio, i.e., M/B, to obtain a distribution of polyborate anions. For a 1:1 mole ratio of NaOH to B(OH)3, M/B = 1, the ratio of the hydrolysis product formed from NaBH4 hydrolysis, the sole borate species formed and observed by 11B NMR is sodium metaborate, NaB(OH)4. When the ratio is 1:3 NaOH to B(OH)3, M/B = 0.33, a mixture of borate anions is formed and observed as a broad peak in the 11B NMR spectrum. The complex polyborate mixture yields a metastable solution that is difficult to crystallize. Given the enhanced solubility of the polyborate mixture formed when M/B = 0.33 it should follow that the hydrolysis of sodium octahydrotriborate, NaB3H8, can provide a greater storage capacity of hydrogen for fuel cell applications compared to sodium borohydride while maintaining a single phase. Accordingly, the hydrolysis of a 23 wt% NaB3H8 solution in water yields a solution having the same complex polyborate mixture as formed by mixing a 1:3 molar ratio of NaOH and B(OH)3 and releases >8 eq of H2. By optimizing the M/B ratio a complex mixture of soluble products, including B3O3(OH)52-, B4O5(OH)42-, B3O3(OH)4-, B5O6(OH)4- and B(OH)3, can be maintained as a single liquid phase throughout the hydrogen release process. Consequently, hydrolysis of NaB3H8 can provide a 40% increase in H2 storage density compared to the hydrolysis of NaBH4 given the decreased solubility of sodium metaborate. The authors would like to thank Jim Sisco and Paul Osenar of

  3. New direct 11B NMR-based analysis of organoboranes through their potassium borohydrides.

    PubMed

    Medina, Jesus R; Cruz, Gabriel; Cabrera, Carlos R; Soderquist, John A

    2003-06-13

    Representative organoborane mixtures were quantitatively converted to their borohydrides through their reaction with activated KH (KH), permitting their detailed analysis by (11)B NMR. Through the treatment of commercial KH with a THF solution of lithium aluminum hydride (LAH), a dramatic change in the surface morphology results as revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Energy dispersed spectroscopy (EDS) was employed to reveal that the LAH treatment deposits a significant amount of an unknown aluminum-containing species on the surface of the KH, which imparts a unique reactivity to the KH. Even highly hindered organoboranes are quantitatively converted to their borohydrides by replacing electronegative groups (e.g., OR, halogen) with hydrogen, retaining only the carbon ligation. Through this simple KH treatment, complex organoborane reaction mixtures are converted to the corresponding borohydrides whose (11)B NMR spectra normally exhibit resolved signals for the individual species present. The integration of these signals provides quantitative information on the relative amounts of each component of the mixture. New generalities for the effect of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-substituents have also been determined that provide a new, simple technique for the determination of the isomeric distribution in organoborane mixtures resulting from common organoborane processes (e.g., hydroboration). Moreover, the (1)H-coupled (11)B NMR spectra of these mixtures reveal the extent of alkylation for each species present. Representative organoboranes were examined by this new technique permitting a simple and convenient quantitative analysis of the regio- and diastereomeric composition of a variety of asymmetric organoborane processes. Previously unknown details of pinene-based hydroborations and reductions are revealed for the first time employing the KH (11)B NMR technique. PMID:12790565

  4. Three-dimensional nanostructured Ni-Cu foams for borohydride oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, D. M. F.; Eugénio, S.; Cardoso, D. S. P.; Šljukić, B.; Montemor, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanostructured nickel-copper (Ni-Cu) foams have been prepared by electrodeposition using a dynamic hydrogen template. These 3D materials were tested as electrodes for the borohydride oxidation reaction (BOR) in alkaline media for possible application as anodes of direct borohydride fuel cells. Their activity in BOR was studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and chronopotentiometry and main reaction parameters and electrodes' stability were evaluated.

  5. Hydrogen Generation Via Sodium Borohydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohring, Richard M.; Wu, Ying

    2003-07-01

    Along with the technological challenges associated with developing fuel cells and hydrogen burning engines, a major issue that must be addressed to ensure the ultimate success of a hydrogen economy is the ability to store and transport hydrogen effectively. Millennium Cell has developed and patented a proprietary system for storing and generating hydrogen gas called Hydrogen on Demand™. The system releases the hydrogen stored in fuel solutions of sodium borohydride as needed through an easily controllable catalytic process. The fuel itself is water-based, rich in hydrogen content, and non-flammable. It can be stored in plastic containers under no pressure. After the hydrogen from the fuel is consumed, the remaining product, sodium metaborate (chemically similar to borax), can be recycled back into fresh fuel. In this paper, an overview of the Hydrogen on Demand™ technology is presented along with data showing the performance characteristics of practical hydrogen generation systems. A brief discussion of sodium borohydride regeneration chemistry is also provided.

  6. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  7. Direct liquid-feed fuel cells: Thermodynamic and environmental concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, Umit B.

    The present paper briefly reviews the different direct liquid-feed fuel cells that have been regarded through the open literature. It especially focuses on thermodynamic-energetic data and toxicological-ecological hazards of the chemicals used as liquid fuels. The analysis of those two databases shows that borohydride, ethanol and 2-propanol would be the most adequate liquid fuels for the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell-type systems, even if they are inferior to hydrogen. All the fuels and also all the by-products stem from their decomposition are more or less harmful towards health and environment. More particularly, hydrazine should be avoided because it and its by-product are very dangerous. It is to note that the present paper does not intend to review and to compare the performances of those fuel cells because of great differences in the efforts devoted to each of them.

  8. Method for producing a borohydride

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.

    2010-06-22

    A method for producing a borohydride is described that includes the steps of providing a source of borate; providing a material that chemically reduces the source of the borate to produce a borohydride; and reacting the source of the borate and the material by supplying heat at a temperature that substantially effects the production of the borohydride.

  9. Method for producing a borohydride

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.

    2008-09-02

    A method for producing a borohydride is described and which includes the steps of providing a source of borate; providing a material which chemically reduces the source of the borate to produce a borohydride; and reacting the source of borate and the material by supplying heat at a temperature which substantially effects the production of the borohydride.

  10. Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through diborane

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a diborane intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

  11. Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren; Xiaoming

    2003-07-22

    A method for activating a membrane electrode assembly for a direct methanol fuel cell is disclosed. The method comprises operating the fuel cell with humidified hydrogen as the fuel followed by running the fuel cell with methanol as the fuel.

  12. The direct methanol fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Halpert, G.; Narayanan, S.R.; Frank, H.

    1995-08-01

    This presentation describes the approach and progress in the ARPA-sponsored effort to develop a Direct Methanol, Liquid-Feed Fuel Cell (DMLFFC) with a solid Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) for battery replacement in small portable applications. Using Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEAs) developed by JPL and Giner, significant voltage was demonstrated at relatively high current densities. The DMLFFC utilizes a 3 percent aqueous solution of methanol that is oxidized directly in the anode (fuel) chamber and oxygen (air) in the cathode chamber to produce water and significant power. The only products are water and CO{sub 2}. The ARPA effort is aimed at replacing the battery in the BA 5590 military radio.

  13. Direct pulverized fuel fired system

    SciTech Connect

    Musto, R.L.; Kai, N.

    1985-01-15

    A direct fired system includes pulverizer means, classifier means, burner means, as well as a defined fluid flow path that serves to interconnect the pulverizer means, and the classifier means, in fluid flow relation with the burner means. In accord with the mode of operation thereof, at the classifier means, a separation is had of the stream of the gaseous medium such that a portion of the gaseous medium is recirculated along with the oversize solid fuel particles back to the pulverizer means, while the remainder of the gaseous medium is operative to convey the solid fuel particles that are of the desired size from the classifier means, to the burner means, for burning, i.e., firing, in the latter.

  14. Catalyzed borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Au, Ming

    2012-02-28

    A hydrogen storage material and process is provided in which alkali borohydride materials are created which contain effective amounts of catalyst(s) which include transition metal oxides, halides, and chlorides of titanium, zirconium, tin, and combinations of the various catalysts. When the catalysts are added to an alkali borodydride such as a lithium borohydride, the initial hydrogen release point of the resulting mixture is substantially lowered. Additionally, the hydrogen storage material may be rehydrided with weight percent values of hydrogen at least about 9 percent.

  15. Low contaminant formic acid fuel for direct liquid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Masel, Richard I.; Zhu, Yimin; Kahn, Zakia; Man, Malcolm

    2009-11-17

    A low contaminant formic acid fuel is especially suited toward use in a direct organic liquid fuel cell. A fuel of the invention provides high power output that is maintained for a substantial time and the fuel is substantially non-flammable. Specific contaminants and contaminant levels have been identified as being deleterious to the performance of a formic acid fuel in a fuel cell, and embodiments of the invention provide low contaminant fuels that have improved performance compared to known commercial bulk grade and commercial purified grade formic acid fuels. Preferred embodiment fuels (and fuel cells containing such fuels) including low levels of a combination of key contaminants, including acetic acid, methyl formate, and methanol.

  16. Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through methyl borate

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a methyl borate intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

  17. Superaerophobic electrodes for direct hydrazine fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhiyi; Sun, Ming; Xu, Tianhao; Li, Yingjie; Xu, Wenwen; Chang, Zheng; Ding, Yi; Sun, Xiaoming; Jiang, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Direct liquid-feed fuel cells possess high energy and power densities, but suffer from severe adhesion of gas products. Here, a "superaerophobic" surface that enables a small release size and fast evolution behavior of the gas product is introduced, thereby, maximizing and stabilizing the working area. Consequently, the "superaerophobic" nanostructured Cu electrodes exhibit excellent performance as anodes in a direct hydrazine fuel cell.

  18. A stable monomeric nickel borohydride.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, Patrick J; LeLievre, Stacey; Johnson, Rosemary J; Lamb, Brian T; Phelps, Andrea L; Cordes, A W; Gu, Weiwei; Cramer, Stephen P

    2003-12-01

    A stable discrete nickel borohydride complex (Tp*NiBH(4) or Tp*NiBD(4)) was prepared using the nitrogen-donor ligand hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate (Tp*-). This complex represents one of the best characterized nickel(II) borohydrides to date. Tp*NiBH(4) and Tp*NiBD(4) are stable toward air, boiling water, and high temperatures (mp > 230 degrees C dec). X-ray crystallographic measurements for Tp*NiBH(4) showed a six-coordinate geometry for the complex, with the nickel(II) center facially coordinated by three bridging hydrogen atoms from borohydride and a tridentate Tp(-) ligand. For Tp*NiBH(4), the empirical formula is C(15)H(26)B(2)N(6)Ni, a = 13.469(9) A, b = 7.740(1) A, c = 18.851(2) A, beta = 107.605(9) degrees, the space group is monoclinic P2(1)/c, and Z = 4. Infrared measurements confirmed the presence of bridging hydrogen atoms; both nu(B[bond]H)(terminal) and nu(B[bond]H)(bridging) are assignable and shifted relative to nu(B-D) of Tp*NiBD(4) by amounts in agreement with theory. Despite their hydrolytic stability, Tp*NiBH(4) and Tp*NiBD(4) readily reduce halocarbon substrates, leading to the complete series of Tp*NiX complexes (X = Cl, Br, I). These reactions showed a pronounced hydrogen/deuterium rate dependence (k(H)/k(D) approximately 3) and sharp isosbestic points in progressive electronic spectra. Nickel K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements of a hydride-rich nickel center were obtained for Tp*NiBH(4), Tp*NiBD(4), and Tp*NiCl. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy results confirmed the similar six-coordinate geometries for Tp*NiBH(4) and Tp*NiBD(4). These contrasted with XAS results for the crystallographically characterized pseudotetrahedral Tp*NiCl complex. The stability of Tp*Ni-coordinated borohydride is significant given this ion's accelerated decomposition and hydrolysis in the presence of transition metals and simple metal salts. PMID:14632512

  19. Method of Manufacturing Micro-Disperse Particles of Sodium Borohydride

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester. Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2008-09-23

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  20. Method of generating hydrogen gas from sodium borohydride

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester, Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2007-12-11

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  1. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source.

  2. Methods of conditioning direct methanol fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Cynthia; Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2005-11-08

    Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. In a first method, an electrical current of polarity opposite to that used in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is passed through the anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly. In a second method, methanol is supplied to an anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, allowed to cross over the polymer electrolyte membrane of the membrane electrode assembly to a cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, and an electrical current of polarity opposite to that in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is drawn through the membrane electrode assembly, wherein methanol is oxidized at the cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly while the catalyst on the anode surface is reduced. Surface oxides on the direct methanol fuel cell anode catalyst of the membrane electrode assembly are thereby reduced.

  3. Chloride substitution in sodium borohydride

    SciTech Connect

    Ravnsbaek, Dorthe B.; Rude, Line H.; Jensen, Torben R.

    2011-07-15

    The dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl{sub x} is studied. The dissolution reaction is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or combination of ball milling and annealing at 300 deg. C for three days of NaBH{sub 4}-NaCl samples in molar ratios of 0.5:0.5 and 0.75:0.25. The degree of dissolution is studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD) data. The results show that dissolution of 10 mol% NaCl into NaBH{sub 4}, forming Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 0.9}Cl{sub 0.1}, takes place during ball milling. A higher degree of dissolution of NaCl in NaBH{sub 4} is obtained by annealing resulting in solid solutions containing up to 57 mol% NaCl, i.e. Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 0.43}Cl{sub 0.57}. In addition, annealing results in dissolution of 10-20 mol% NaBH{sub 4} into NaCl. The mechanism of the dissolution during annealing and the decomposition pathway of the solid solutions are studied by in situ SR-PXD. Furthermore, the stability upon hydrogen release and uptake were studied by Sieverts measurements. - Graphical Abstract: Dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl{sub x} is studied. Dissolution is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or annealing at 300 deg. C for three days of NaBH{sub 4}-NaCl samples. Sample compositions and dissolution mechanism are studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction data. Highlights: > Studies of dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other. > Solid state diffusion facilitated by mechanical and thermal treatments. > Dissolution is more efficiently induced by heating than by mechanical treatment. > Mechanism for dissolution studied by Rietveld refinement of in situ SR-PXD data.

  4. Chrysler Pentastar direct hydrogen fuel cell program

    SciTech Connect

    Kimble, M.; Deloney, D.

    1995-08-01

    The Chrysler Pentastar Electronics, Inc. Direct Hydrogen Fueled PEM Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle Program (DPHV) was initiated 1 July, 1994 with the following mission, {open_quotes}Design, fabricate, and test a Direct Hydrogen Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System including onboard hydrogen storage, an efficient lightweight fuel cell, a gas management system, peak power augmentation and a complete system controls that can be economically mass produced and comply with all safety environmental and consumer requirements for vehicle applications for the 21st century.{close_quotes} The Conceptual Design for the entire system based upon the selection of an applicable vehicle and performance requirements that are consistent with the PNGV goals will be discussed. A Hydrogen Storage system that has been selected, packaged, and partially tested in accordance with perceived Hydrogen Safety and Infrastructure requirements will be discussed in addition to our Fuel Cell approach along with design of the {open_quotes}real{close_quotes} module. The Gas Management System and the Load Leveling System have been designed and the software programs have been developed and will be discussed along with a complete fuel cell test station that has the capability to test up to a 60 kW fuel cell system.

  5. Advances in direct oxidation methanol fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, S.; Narayanan, S. R.; Vamos, E.; Frank, H.; Halpert, G.; Laconti, Anthony B.; Kosek, J.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Olah, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel cells that can operate directly on fuels such as methanol are attractive for low to medium power applications in view of their low weight and volume relative to other power sources. A liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell has been developed based on a proton exchange membrane electrolyte and Pt/Ru and Pt catalyzed fuel and air/O2 electrodes, respectively. The cell has been shown to deliver significant power outputs at temperatures of 60 to 90 C. The cell voltage is near 0.5 V at 300 mA/cm(exp 2) current density and an operating temperature of 90 C. A deterrent to performance appears to be methanol crossover through the membrane to the oxygen electrode. Further improvements in performance appear possible by minimizing the methanol crossover rate.

  6. Direct formate fuel cells: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, L.; Chen, R.

    2016-07-01

    Direct formate fuel cells (DFFC), which convert the chemical energy stored in formate directly into electricity, are recently attracting more attention, primarily because of the use of the carbon-neutral fuel and the low-cost electrocatalytic and membrane materials. As an emerging energy technology, the DFFC has made a rapid progress in recent years (currently, the state-of-the-art power density is 591 mW cm-2 at 60 °C). This article provides a review of past research on the development of this type of fuel cell, including the working principle, mechanisms and materials of the electrocatalytic oxidation of formate, singe-cell designs and performance, as well as innovative system designs. In addition, future perspectives with regard to the development of this fuel cell system are also highlighted.

  7. Lightweight Stacks of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Valdez, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    An improved design concept for direct methanol fuel cells makes it possible to construct fuel-cell stacks that can weigh as little as one-third as much as do conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks of equal power. The structural-support components of the improved cells and stacks can be made of relatively inexpensive plastics. Moreover, in comparison with conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks, the improved fuel-cell stacks can be assembled, disassembled, and diagnosed for malfunctions more easily. These improvements are expected to bring portable direct methanol fuel cells and stacks closer to commercialization. In a conventional bipolar fuel-cell stack, the cells are interspersed with bipolar plates (also called biplates), which are structural components that serve to interconnect the cells and distribute the reactants (methanol and air). The cells and biplates are sandwiched between metal end plates. Usually, the stack is held together under pressure by tie rods that clamp the end plates. The bipolar stack configuration offers the advantage of very low internal electrical resistance. However, when the power output of a stack is only a few watts, the very low internal resistance of a bipolar stack is not absolutely necessary for keeping the internal power loss acceptably low.

  8. Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Ramsey, John C.

    2005-03-08

    A stack of direct methanol fuel cells exhibiting a circular footprint. A cathode and anode manifold, tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are located within the circular footprint. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet cathode manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold, where the serpentine channels of the anode are orthogonal to the serpentine channels of the cathode. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  9. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source. Water loss from the cell is minimized by making the conductive cathode assembly hydrophobic and the conductive anode assembly hydrophilic.

  10. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2004-11-01

    This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. The operation of sub-MW hybrid Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant test facility with a Capstone C60 microturbine was initiated in March 2003. The inclusion of the C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in previous tests using a 30kW microturbine. The design of multi-MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, was initiated. A new concept was developed based on clusters of One-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. System analyses were performed, including systems for near-term deployment and power plants with long-term ultra high efficiency objectives. Preliminary assessment of the fuel cell cluster concept, including power plant layout for a 14MW power plant, was performed.

  11. Static Compression of Tetramethylammonium Borohydride

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, Douglas Allen; Somayazulu, M.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Hemley, Russell J.

    2011-11-15

    Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction are used to examine the high-pressure behavior of tetramethylammonium borohydride (TMAB) to 40 GPa at room temperature. The measurements reveal weak pressure-induced structural transitions around 5 and 20 GPa. Rietveld analysis and Le Bail fits of the powder diffraction data based on known structures of tetramethylammonium salts indicate that the transitions are mediated by orientational ordering of the BH{sub 4}{sup -} tetrahedra followed by tilting of the (CH{sub 3}){sub 4}N{sup +} groups. X-ray diffraction patterns obtained during pressure release suggest reversibility with a degree of hysteresis. Changes in the Raman spectrum confirm that these transitions are not accompanied by bonding changes between the two ionic species. At ambient conditions, TMAB does not possess dihydrogen bonding, and Raman data confirms that this feature is not activated upon compression. The pressure-volume equation of state obtained from the diffraction data gives a bulk modulus [K{sub 0} = 5.9(6) GPa, K'{sub 0} = 9.6(4)] slightly lower than that observed for ammonia borane. Raman spectra obtained over the entire pressure range (spanning over 40% densification) indicate that the intramolecular vibrational modes are largely coupled.

  12. Direct fuel cell product design improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Maru, H.C.; Farooque, M.

    1996-12-31

    Significant milestones have been attained towards the technology development field testing and commercialization of direct fuel cell power plant since the 1994 Fuel Cell Seminar. Under a 5-year cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy signed in December 1994, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has been developing the design for a MW-scale direct fuel cell power plant with input from previous technology efforts and the Santa Clara Demonstration Project. The effort encompasses product definition in consultation with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group, potential customers, as well as extensive system design and packaging. Manufacturing process improvements, test facility construction, cell component scale up, performance and endurance improvements, stack engineering, and critical balance-of-plant development are also addressed. Major emphasis of this product design improvement project is on increased efficiency, compactness and cost reduction to establish a competitive place in the market. A 2.85 MW power plant with an efficiency of 58% and a footprint of 420 m{sup 2} has been designed. Component and subsystem testing is being conducted at various levels. Planning and preparation for verification of a full size prototype unit are in progress. This paper presents the results obtained since the last fuel cell seminar.

  13. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  14. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  15. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  16. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  17. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  18. Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2008-09-30

    This report summarizes the progress made in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T system employs an indirectly heated Turbine Generator to supplement fuel cell generated power. The concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, minimal emissions, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. Proof-of-concept tests using a sub-MW-class DFC/T power plant at FuelCell Energy's (FCE) Danbury facility were conducted to validate the feasibility of the concept and to measure its potential for electric power production. A 400 kW-class power plant test facility was designed and retrofitted to conduct the tests. The initial series of tests involved integration of a full-size (250 kW) Direct FuelCell stack with a 30 kW Capstone microturbine. The operational aspects of the hybrid system in relation to the integration of the microturbine with the fuel cell, process flow and thermal balances, and control strategies for power cycling of the system, were investigated. A subsequent series of tests included operation of the sub-MW Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant with a Capstone C60 microturbine. The C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in initial tests using the 30kW microturbine. The proof-of-concept test results confirmed the stability and controllability of operating a fullsize (250 kW) fuel cell stack in combination with a microturbine. Thermal management of the system was confirmed and power plant operation, using the microturbine as the only source of fresh air supply to the

  19. Towards operating direct methanol fuel cells with highly concentrated fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, T. S.; Yang, W. W.; Chen, R.; Wu, Q. X.

    A significant advantage of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is the high specific energy of the liquid fuel, making it particularly suitable for portable and mobile applications. Nevertheless, conventional DMFCs have to be operated with excessively diluted methanol solutions to limit methanol crossover and the detrimental consequences. Operation with diluted methanol solutions significantly reduces the specific energy of the power pack and thereby prevents it from competing with advanced batteries. In view of this fact, there exists a need to improve conventional DMFC system designs, including membrane electrode assemblies and the subsystems for supplying/removing reactants/products, so that both the cell performance and the specific energy can be simultaneously maximized. This article provides a comprehensive review of past efforts on the optimization of DMFC systems that operate with concentrated methanol. Based on the discussion of the key issues associated with transport of the reactants/products, the strategies to manage the supply/removal of the reactants/products in DMFC operating with highly concentrated methanol are identified. With these strategies, the possible approaches to achieving the goal of concentrated fuel operation are then proposed. Past efforts in the management of the reactants/products for implementing each of the approaches are also summarized and reviewed.

  20. Interleaved mesoporous copper for the anode catalysis in direct ammonium borane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Auxilia, Francis M; Tanabe, Toyokazu; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Saravanan, Govindachetty; Ramesh, Gubbala V; Matsumoto, Futoshi; Ya, Xu; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Dakshanamoorthy, Arivuoli; Abe, Hideki

    2014-06-01

    Mesoporous materials with tailored microstructures are of increasing importance in practical applications particularly for energy generation and/or storage. Here we report a mesoporous copper material (MS-Cu) can be prepared in a hierarchical microstructure and exhibit high catalytic performance for the half-cell reaction of direct ammonium borane (NH3BH3) fuel cells (DABFs). Hierarchical copper oxide (CuO) nanoplates (CuO Npls) were first synthesized in a hydrothermal condition. CuO Npls were then reduced at room temperature using water solution of sodium borohydride (NaBH4) to yield the desired mesoporous copper material, MS-Cu, consisting of interleaved nanoplates with a high density of mesopores. The surface of MS-Cu comprised high-index facets, whereas a macroporous copper material (MC-Cu), which was prepared from CuO Npls at elevated temperatures in a hydrogen stream, was surrounded by low-index facets with a low density of active sites. MS-Cu exhibited a lower onset potential and improved durability for the electro-oxidation of NH3BH3 than MC-Cu or copper particles because of the catalytically active mesopores on the interleaved nanoplates.

  1. Interleaved mesoporous copper for the anode catalysis in direct ammonium borane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Auxilia, Francis M; Tanabe, Toyokazu; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Saravanan, Govindachetty; Ramesh, Gubbala V; Matsumoto, Futoshi; Ya, Xu; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Dakshanamoorthy, Arivuoli; Abe, Hideki

    2014-06-01

    Mesoporous materials with tailored microstructures are of increasing importance in practical applications particularly for energy generation and/or storage. Here we report a mesoporous copper material (MS-Cu) can be prepared in a hierarchical microstructure and exhibit high catalytic performance for the half-cell reaction of direct ammonium borane (NH3BH3) fuel cells (DABFs). Hierarchical copper oxide (CuO) nanoplates (CuO Npls) were first synthesized in a hydrothermal condition. CuO Npls were then reduced at room temperature using water solution of sodium borohydride (NaBH4) to yield the desired mesoporous copper material, MS-Cu, consisting of interleaved nanoplates with a high density of mesopores. The surface of MS-Cu comprised high-index facets, whereas a macroporous copper material (MC-Cu), which was prepared from CuO Npls at elevated temperatures in a hydrogen stream, was surrounded by low-index facets with a low density of active sites. MS-Cu exhibited a lower onset potential and improved durability for the electro-oxidation of NH3BH3 than MC-Cu or copper particles because of the catalytically active mesopores on the interleaved nanoplates. PMID:24738410

  2. Advanced direct methanol fuel cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdan, Monjid; Kosek, John A.

    1999-11-01

    The goal of the program was an advanced proton-exchange membrane (PEM) for use as the electrolyte in a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell which provides reduced methanol crossover while simultaneously providing high conductivity and low membrane water content. The approach was to use a membrane containing precross-linked fluorinated base polymer films and subsequently to graft the base film with selected materials. Over 80 different membranes were prepared. The rate of methanol crossover through the advanced membranes was reduced 90%. A 5-cell stack provided stable performance over a 100-hour life test. Preliminary cost estimates predicted a manufacturing cost at $4 to $9 per kW.

  3. Direct Carbon Fuel Cell System Utilizing Solid Carbonaceous Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Turgut Gur

    2010-04-30

    This 1-year project has achieved most of its objective and successfully demonstrated the viability of the fluidized bed direct carbon fuel cell (FB-DCFC) approach under development by Direct Carbon technologies, LLC, that utilizes solid carbonaceous fuels for power generation. This unique electrochemical technology offers high conversion efficiencies, produces proportionately less CO{sub 2} in capture-ready form, and does not consume or require water for gasification. FB-DCFC employs a specialized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement coupled to a Boudouard gasifier where the solid fuel particles are fluidized and reacted by the anode recycle gas CO{sub 2}. The resulting CO is electrochemically oxidized at the anode. Anode supported SOFC structures employed a porous Ni cermet anode layer, a dense yttria stabilized zirconia membrane, and a mixed conducting porous perovskite cathode film. Several kinds of untreated solid fuels (carbon and coal) were tested in bench scale FBDCFC prototypes for electrochemical performance and stability testing. Single cells of tubular geometry with active areas up to 24 cm{sup 2} were fabricated. The cells achieved high power densities up to 450 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C using a low sulfur Alaska coal char. This represents the highest power density reported in the open literature for coal based DCFC. Similarly, power densities up to 175 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C were demonstrated with carbon. Electrical conversion efficiencies for coal char were experimentally determined to be 48%. Long-term stability of cell performance was measured under galvanostatic conditions for 375 hours in CO with no degradation whatsoever, indicating that carbon deposition (or coking) does not pose any problems. Similar cell stability results were obtained in coal char tested for 24 hours under galvanostatic conditions with no sign of sulfur poisoning. Moreover, a 50-cell planar stack targeted for 1 kW output was fabricated and tested in 95% CO (balance CO{sub 2

  4. Aerosol feed direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Improvements to fuel cells include introduction of the fuel as an aerosol of liquid fuel droplets suspended in a gas. The particle size of the liquid fuel droplets may be controlled for optimal fuel cell performance by selection of different aerosol generators or by separating droplets based upon size using a particle size conditioner.

  5. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Aricò, Antonino S; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D'Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-11-24

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion(®) were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate-PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion(®) 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm(-2) vs. 64 mW·cm(-2)). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm(-2) equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm(-2) for Nafion(®) 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm² for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm² for Nafion(®) 115).

  6. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Aricò, Antonino S.; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D’Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion® were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate–PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion® 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm−2 vs. 64 mW·cm−2). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm−2 equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm−2 for Nafion® 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm2 for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm2 for Nafion® 115). PMID:26610582

  7. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous. The fuel cell system also comprises a fuel supplying part including a meter which meters an amount of fuel which is used by the fuel cell, and controls the supply of fuel based on said metering.

  8. Complex metal borohydrides: multifunctional materials for energy storage and conversion.

    PubMed

    Mohtadi, Rana; Remhof, Arndt; Jena, Puru

    2016-09-01

    With the limited supply of fossil fuels and their adverse effect on the climate and the environment, it has become a global priority to seek alternate sources of energy that are clean, abundant, and sustainable. While sources such as solar, wind, and hydrogen can meet the world's energy demand, considerable challenges remain to find materials that can store and/or convert energy efficiently. This topical review focuses on one such class of materials, namely, multi-functional complex metal borohydrides that not only have the ability to store sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet the needs of the transportation industry, but also can be used for a new generation of metal ion batteries and solar cells. We discuss the material challenges in all these areas and review the progress that has been made to address them, the issues that still need to be resolved and the outlook for the future. PMID:27384871

  9. Complex metal borohydrides: multifunctional materials for energy storage and conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohtadi, Rana; Remhof, Arndt; Jena, Puru

    2016-09-01

    With the limited supply of fossil fuels and their adverse effect on the climate and the environment, it has become a global priority to seek alternate sources of energy that are clean, abundant, and sustainable. While sources such as solar, wind, and hydrogen can meet the world’s energy demand, considerable challenges remain to find materials that can store and/or convert energy efficiently. This topical review focuses on one such class of materials, namely, multi-functional complex metal borohydrides that not only have the ability to store sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet the needs of the transportation industry, but also can be used for a new generation of metal ion batteries and solar cells. We discuss the material challenges in all these areas and review the progress that has been made to address them, the issues that still need to be resolved and the outlook for the future.

  10. Complex metal borohydrides: multifunctional materials for energy storage and conversion.

    PubMed

    Mohtadi, Rana; Remhof, Arndt; Jena, Puru

    2016-09-01

    With the limited supply of fossil fuels and their adverse effect on the climate and the environment, it has become a global priority to seek alternate sources of energy that are clean, abundant, and sustainable. While sources such as solar, wind, and hydrogen can meet the world's energy demand, considerable challenges remain to find materials that can store and/or convert energy efficiently. This topical review focuses on one such class of materials, namely, multi-functional complex metal borohydrides that not only have the ability to store sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet the needs of the transportation industry, but also can be used for a new generation of metal ion batteries and solar cells. We discuss the material challenges in all these areas and review the progress that has been made to address them, the issues that still need to be resolved and the outlook for the future.

  11. MODIFIED BOROHYDRIDES FOR REVERSIBLE HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Au, Ming

    2006-05-10

    This paper reports the results in the effort to destabilize lithium borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage. A number of metals, metal hydrides, metal chlorides and complex hydrides were selected and evaluated as the destabilization agents for reducing dehydriding temperature and generating dehydriding-rehydriding reversibility. It is found that some additives are effective. The Raman spectroscopic analysis shows the change of B-H binding nature.

  12. BIMETALLIC LITHIUM BOROHYDRIDES TOWARD REVERSIBLE HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Au, M.

    2010-10-21

    Borohydrides such as LiBH{sub 4} have been studied as candidates for hydrogen storage because of their high hydrogen contents (18.4 wt% for LiBH{sub 4}). Limited success has been made in reducing the dehydrogenation temperature by adding reactants such as metals, metal oxides and metal halides. However, full rehydrogenation has not been realized because of multi-step decomposition processes and the stable intermediate species produced. It is suggested that adding second cation in LiBH{sub 4} may reduce the binding energy of B-H. The second cation may also provide the pathway for full rehydrogenation. In this work, several bimetallic borohydrides were synthesized using wet chemistry, high pressure reactive ball milling and sintering processes. The investigation found that the thermodynamic stability was reduced, but the full rehydrogenation is still a challenge. Although our experiments show the partial reversibility of the bimetallic borohydrides, it was not sustainable during dehydriding-rehydriding cycles because of the accumulation of hydrogen inert species.

  13. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  14. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2011-08-16

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  15. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-01-24

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  16. Carbon Fuel Particles Used in Direct Carbon Conversion Fuel Cells

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2008-10-21

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  17. Platinum- and membrane-free swiss-roll mixed-reactant alkaline fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Aziznia, Amin; Oloman, Colin W; Gyenge, Előd L

    2013-05-01

    Eliminating the expensive and failure-prone proton exchange membrane (PEM) together with the platinum-based anode and cathode catalysts would significantly reduce the high capital and operating costs of low-temperature (<373 K) fuel cells. We recently introduced the Swiss-roll mixed-reactant fuel cell (SR-MRFC) concept for borohydride-oxygen alkaline fuel cells. We now present advances in anode electrocatalysis for borohydride electrooxidation through the development of osmium nanoparticulate catalysts supported on porous monolithic carbon fiber materials (referred to as an osmium 3D anode). The borohydride-oxygen SR-MRFC operates at 323 K and near atmospheric pressure, generating a peak power density of 1880 W m(-2) in a single-cell configuration by using an osmium-based anode (with an osmium loading of 0.32 mg cm(-2)) and a manganese dioxide gas-diffusion cathode. To the best of our knowledge, 1880 W m(-2) is the highest power density ever reported for a mixed-reactant fuel cell operating under similar conditions. Furthermore, the performance matches the highest reported power densities for conventional dual chamber PEM direct borohydride fuel cells. PMID:23589385

  18. Platinum- and membrane-free swiss-roll mixed-reactant alkaline fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Aziznia, Amin; Oloman, Colin W; Gyenge, Előd L

    2013-05-01

    Eliminating the expensive and failure-prone proton exchange membrane (PEM) together with the platinum-based anode and cathode catalysts would significantly reduce the high capital and operating costs of low-temperature (<373 K) fuel cells. We recently introduced the Swiss-roll mixed-reactant fuel cell (SR-MRFC) concept for borohydride-oxygen alkaline fuel cells. We now present advances in anode electrocatalysis for borohydride electrooxidation through the development of osmium nanoparticulate catalysts supported on porous monolithic carbon fiber materials (referred to as an osmium 3D anode). The borohydride-oxygen SR-MRFC operates at 323 K and near atmospheric pressure, generating a peak power density of 1880 W m(-2) in a single-cell configuration by using an osmium-based anode (with an osmium loading of 0.32 mg cm(-2)) and a manganese dioxide gas-diffusion cathode. To the best of our knowledge, 1880 W m(-2) is the highest power density ever reported for a mixed-reactant fuel cell operating under similar conditions. Furthermore, the performance matches the highest reported power densities for conventional dual chamber PEM direct borohydride fuel cells.

  19. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  20. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  1. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Improvements to non-acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  2. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  3. High specific power, direct methanol fuel cell stack

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, John C.; Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2007-05-08

    The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold with an integral flow restrictor to the outlet manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  4. Quaternary ammonium borohydride adsorption in mesoporous silicate MCM-48

    SciTech Connect

    Wolverton, Michael J; Daemen, Luke L; Hartl, Monika A

    2010-01-01

    Inorganic borohydrides have a high gravimetric hydrogen density but release H2 only under energetically unfavorable conditions. Surface chemistry may help in lowering thermodynamic barriers, but inclusion of inorganic borohydrides in porous silica materials has proved hitherto difficult or impossible. We show that borohydrides with a large organic cation are readily adsorbed inside mesoporous silicates, particularly after surface treatment. Thermal analysis reveals that the decomposition thermodynamics of tetraalkylammonium borohydrides are substantially affected by inclusion in MCM-48. Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) data show that the compounds adsorb on the silica surface. Evidence of pore loading is supplemented by DSC/TGA, XRD, FTIR, and BET isotherm measurements. Mass spectrometry shows significant hydrogen release at lower temperature from adsorbed borohydrides in comparison with the bulk borohydrides. INS data measured for partially decomposed samples indicates that the decomposition of the cation and anion is likely simultaneous. Additionally, these data confirm the formation of Si-H bonds on the silica surface upon decomposition of adsorbed tetramethylammonium borohydride.

  5. Economics of Direct Hydrogen Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Kathyayani

    2011-10-04

    Battelle's Economic Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems project was initiated in 2003 to evaluate the technology and markets that are near-term and potentially could support the transition to fuel cells in automotive markets. The objective of Battelle?s project was to assist the DOE in developing fuel cell systems for pre-automotive applications by analyzing the technical, economic, and market drivers of direct hydrogen PEM fuel cell adoption. The project was executed over a 6-year period (2003 to 2010) and a variety of analyses were completed in that period. The analyses presented in the final report include: Commercialization scenarios for stationary generation through 2015 (2004); Stakeholder feedback on technology status and performance status of fuel cell systems (2004); Development of manufacturing costs of stationary PEM fuel cell systems for backup power markets (2004); Identification of near-term and mid-term markets for PEM fuel cells (2006); Development of the value proposition and market opportunity of PEM fuel cells in near-term markets by assessing the lifecycle cost of PEM fuel cells as compared to conventional alternatives used in the marketplace and modeling market penetration (2006); Development of the value proposition of PEM fuel cells in government markets (2007); Development of the value proposition and opportunity for large fuel cell system application at data centers and wastewater treatment plants (2008); Update of the manufacturing costs of PEM fuel cells for backup power applications (2009).

  6. THE STABILITY AND REVERSIBILITY OF METALLIC BOROHYDRIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Au, M

    2007-07-27

    In effort to develop reversible metallic borohydrides with high hydrogen storage capacity and low dehydriding temperature, several new materials have been synthesized by modifying LiBH{sub 4} with various metal halides and hydrides. The investigation shows that the halide modification effectively reduced the dehydriding temperature through ion exchange interaction. The effective halides are TiCl{sub 3}, TiF{sub 3}, ZnF{sub 2} and AlF{sub 3}. The material LiBH{sub 4}+0.1TiF{sub 3} desorbs 3.5wt% and 8.5wt% hydrogen at 150 C and 450 C respectively. It re-absorbed 6wt% hydrogen at 500 C and 70 bar after dehydrogenation. The XRD of the rehydrided samples confirmed the formation of LiBH{sub 4}. It indicates that the materials are reversible at the conditions given. However, a number of other halides: MgF{sub 2}, MgCl{sub 2}, CaCl{sub 2}, SrCl{sub 2} and FeCl{sub 3}, did not reduce dehydriding temperature of LiBH{sub 4} significantly. TGA-RGA analysis indicated that some halide modified lithium borohydrides such as LiBH{sub 4}+0.1ZnF{sub 2} evolved diborane during dehydrogenation, but some did not such as LiBH{sub 4}+0.1TiCl{sub 3}. The formation of diborane caused unrecoverable capacity loss resulting in irreversibility. It is suggested that the lithium borohydrides modified by the halides containing the metals that can not form metal borides with boron are likely to evolve diborane during dehydriding. It was discovered that halide modification reduces sensitivity of LiBH{sub 4}. The materials such as LiBH{sub 4}+0.1TiCl{sub 3} and LiBH{sub 4}+0.5TiCl{sub 3} can be handled in open air without visible reaction.

  7. Enhanced methanol utilization in direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2001-10-02

    The fuel utilization of a direct methanol fuel cell is enhanced for improved cell efficiency. Distribution plates at the anode and cathode of the fuel cell are configured to distribute reactants vertically and laterally uniformly over a catalyzed membrane surface of the fuel cell. A conductive sheet between the anode distribution plate and the anodic membrane surface forms a mass transport barrier to the methanol fuel that is large relative to a mass transport barrier for a gaseous hydrogen fuel cell. In a preferred embodiment, the distribution plate is a perforated corrugated sheet. The mass transport barrier may be conveniently increased by increasing the thickness of an anode conductive sheet adjacent the membrane surface of the fuel cell.

  8. Lean direct wall fuel injection method and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Kyung J. (Inventor); Tacina, Robert (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A fuel combustion chamber, and a method of and a nozzle for mixing liquid fuel and air in the fuel combustion chamber in lean direct injection combustion for advanced gas turbine engines, including aircraft engines. Liquid fuel in a form of jet is injected directly into a cylindrical combustion chamber from the combustion chamber wall surface in a direction opposite to the direction of the swirling air at an angle of from about 50.degree. to about 60.degree. with respect to a tangential line of the cylindrical combustion chamber and at a fuel-lean condition, with a liquid droplet momentum to air momentum ratio in the range of from about 0.05 to about 0.12. Advanced gas turbines benefit from lean direct wall injection combustion. The lean direct wall injection technique of the present invention provides fast, uniform, well-stirred mixing of fuel and air. In addition, in order to further improve combustion, the fuel can be injected at a venturi located in the combustion chamber at a point adjacent the air swirler.

  9. On direct and indirect methanol fuel cells for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gottesfield, S.

    1996-04-01

    Research on direct oxidation methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) and polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) is discussed. Systems considered for transportation applications are addressed. The use of platinum/ruthenium anode electrocatalysts and platinum cathode electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte DMFCs has resulted in significant performance enhancements.

  10. Direct methanol fuel cell and system

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2004-10-26

    A fuel cell having an anode and a cathode and a polymer electrolyte membrane located between anode and cathode gas diffusion backings uses a methanol vapor fuel supply. A permeable polymer electrolyte membrane having a permeability effective to sustain a carbon dioxide flux equivalent to at least 10 mA/cm.sup.2 provides for removal of carbon dioxide produced at the anode by reaction of methanol with water. Another aspect of the present invention includes a superabsorpent polymer material placed in proximity to the anode gas diffusion backing to hold liquid methanol or liquid methanol solution without wetting the anode gas diffusion backing so that methanol vapor from the liquid methanol or liquid methanol-water solution is supplied to the membrane.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Methylammonium Borohydride

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Kathryn R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Kemmitt, Tim

    2011-01-06

    A new borohydride, [CH3NH3]+[BH4]-, has been synthesised by the metathesis of CH3NH3X and MBH4 in methylamine in order to determine its behaviour in comparison to ammonium borohydride [NH4]+[BH4]-. The introduction of methyl groups is expected to disrupt the hydrogen bonding network of [NH4]+[BH4]- and in turn alter the hydrogen release properties. Room temperature X-ray diffraction studies have shown that [CH3NH3]+[BH4]- adopts a tetragonal unit cell with lattice parameters of a = 4.9486 Å and b = 8.9083 Å. The room temperature structure shows considerable hydrogen mobility similar to that observed in NH3BH3. The kinetics and thermodynamics of these reactions have been investigated and show hydrogen release follows a similar pathway to that of [NH4]+[BH4]-. Both compounds decompose slowly at room temperature and rapidly at ca. 40 °C to form the diammoniate of diborane or the methylated analogue [BH2(CH3NH2)2]+BH4-. The first stage of decomposition has been further investigated by means on in-situ X-ray diffraction and solid state 11B NMR spectroscopy, and appears to occur in the absence of any detectable intermediates to form crystalline [BH2(CH3NH2)2]+BH4-. [(CH3)2NH2]+[BH4]- and [BH2{(CH3)2NH}2]+BH4- have also been synthesised by analogous routes, indicating a more general applicability of the synthetic method.

  12. Regenerative Fuel Cells for Space Power and Energy Conversion (NaBH4/H2O2 Fuel Cell Development)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Miley, George H.; Luo, Nie; Burton, Rodney; Mather, Joseph; Hawkins, Glenn; Byrd, Ethan; Gu, Lifeng; Shrestha, Prajakti Joshi

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing hydrogen peroxide and sodium borohydride development is shown. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) The Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell; 3) Fuel Cell Comparisons; 4) MEA Optimization; 5) 500-Watt Stack Testing; 6) System Modeling: Fuel Cell Power Source for Lunar Rovers; and 7) Conclusions

  13. Direct deposit of catalyst on the membrane of direct feed fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, William (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Linke, Juergen (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An improved direct liquid-feed fuel cell having a solid membrane electrolyte for electrochemical reactions of an organic fuel. Catalyst utilization and catalyst/membrane interface improvements are disclosed. Specifically, the catalyst layer is applied directly onto the membrane electrolyte.

  14. Comparative exergy analysis of direct alcohol fuel cells using fuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, Teresa J.; Raso, Miguel A.; Navarro, Emilio; Sánchez-de-la-Blanca, Emilia

    Within the last years there has been increasing interest in direct liquid fuel cells as power sources for portable devices and, in the future, power plants for electric vehicles and other transport media as ships will join those applications. Methanol is considerably more convenient and easy to use than gaseous hydrogen and a considerable work is devoted to the development of direct methanol fuel cells. But ethanol has much lower toxicity and from an ecological viewpoint ethanol is exceptional among all other types of fuel as is the only chemical fuel in renewable supply. The aim of this study is to investigate the possibility of using direct alcohol fuel cells fed with alcohol mixtures. For this purpose, a comparative exergy analysis of a direct alcohol fuel cell fed with alcohol mixtures against the same fuel cell fed with single alcohols is performed. The exergetic efficiency and the exergy loss and destruction are calculated and compared in each case. When alcohol mixtures are fed to the fuel cell, the contribution of each fuel to the fuel cell performance is weighted attending to their relative proportion in the aqueous solution. The optimum alcohol composition for methanol/ethanol mixtures has been determined.

  15. Direct oxidation of jet fuels and Pennsylvania crude oil in a solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z. F.; Gallo, C.; Pague, M. B.; Schobert, H.; Lvov, S. N.

    A Cu-ceria solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is shown to generate electric power using jet fuels and Pennsylvania crude oil through direct oxidation of the fuels. The liquid fuels contained up to 910 ppm of sulfur and were injected into the anode compartment either with or without N 2 dilution. The performance of the fuel cell was stable over 30 h for jet fuels and Pennsylvania crude oil without N 2 dilution whereas N 2 dilution prolonged the stable power generation up to 100 h for jet fuel and up to 80 h for Pennsylvania crude oil. The generated power density was about 0.1 W cm -2 for both fuels.

  16. Direct hydrogen fuel cell systems for hybrid vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Wang, X.

    Hybridizing a fuel cell system with an energy storage system offers an opportunity to improve the fuel economy of the vehicle through regenerative braking and possibly to increase the specific power and decrease the cost of the combined energy conversion and storage systems. Even in a hybrid configuration it is advantageous to operate the fuel cell system in a load-following mode and use the power from the energy storage system when the fuel cell alone cannot meet the power demand. This paper discusses an approach for designing load-following fuel cell systems for hybrid vehicles and illustrates it by applying it to pressurized, direct hydrogen, polymer-electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems for a mid-size family sedan. The vehicle level requirements relative to traction power, response time, start-up time and energy conversion efficiency are used to select the important parameters for the PEFC stack, air management system, heat rejection system and the water management system.

  17. Dynamic simulation of a direct carbonate fuel cell power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest, J.B.; Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Kush, A.K.

    1996-12-31

    Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is commercializing a 2.85 MW Direct carbonate Fuel Cell (DFC) power plant. The commercialization sequence has already progressed through construction and operation of the first commercial-scale DFC power plant on a U.S. electric utility, the 2 MW Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP), and the completion of the early phases of a Commercial Plant design. A 400 kW fuel cell stack Test Facility is being built at Energy Research Corporation (ERC), FCE`s parent company, which will be capable of testing commercial-sized fuel cell stacks in an integrated plant configuration. Fluor Daniel, Inc. provided engineering, procurement, and construction services for SCDP and has jointly developed the Commercial Plant design with FCE, focusing on the balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment outside of the fuel cell modules. This paper provides a brief orientation to the dynamic simulation of a fuel cell power plant and the benefits offered.

  18. Control of hydrogen release and uptake in amine borane molecular complexes: Thermodynamics of ammonia borane, ammonium borohydride, and the diammoniate of diborane

    SciTech Connect

    Autrey, Thomas; Bowden, Mark E.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.

    2011-05-23

    Molecular complexes of Lewis acid-base pairs can be used to activate molecular hydrogen for applications ranging from hydrogen storage for fuel cells to catalytic hydrogenation reactions. In this paper, we examine the factors that determine the thermodynamics of hydrogen activation of a Lewis acid-base pair using the pedagogical examples of ammonia borane (NH3BH3, AB) and ammonium borohydride ([NH4][BH4], ABH2). At ambient temperatures, ABH2 loses hydrogen to form the Lewis acid-base complex AB, suggesting that free energy drives the reaction to release hydrogen. However, direct measurement of the reaction enthalpy is not straightforward given the complex decomposition pathways leading to the formation of the diammoniate of diborane ([NH3BH3NH3][BH4], DADB). In this work, we compare two approaches for deriving the thermodynamic relationships among AB, DADB, and ABH2.

  19. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2003-05-27

    The subMW hybrid DFC/T power plant facility was upgraded with a Capstone C60 microturbine and a state-of-the-art full size fuel cell stack. The integration of the larger microturbine extended the capability of the hybrid power plant to operate at high power ratings with a single gas turbine without the need for supplementary air. The objectives of this phase of subMW hybrid power plant tests are to support the development of process and control and to provide the insight for the design of the packaged subMW hybrid demonstration units. The development of the ultra high efficiency multi-MW power plants was focused on the design of 40 MW power plants with efficiencies approaching 75% (LHV of natural gas). The design efforts included thermodynamic cycle analysis of key gas turbine parameters such as compression ratio.

  20. Recent advances in high-performance direct methanol fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, S.R.; Chun, W.; Valdez, T.I.

    1996-12-31

    Direct methanol fuel cells for portable power applications have been advanced significantly under DARPA- and ARO-sponsored programs over the last five years. A liquid-feed direct methanol fuel cell developed under these programs, employs a proton exchange membrane as electrolyte and operates on aqueous solutions of methanol with air or oxygen as the oxidant. Power densities as high as 320 mW/cm{sup 2} have been demonstrated. Demonstration of five-cell stack based on the liquid-feed concept have been successfully performed by Giner Inc. and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Over 2000 hours of life-testing have been completed on these stacks. These fuel cells have been also been demonstrated by USC to operate on alternate fuels such as trimethoxymethane, dimethoxymethane and trioxane. Reduction in the parasitic loss of fuel across the fuel cell, a phenomenon termed as {open_quotes}fuel crossover{close_quotes} has been achieved using polymer membranes developed at USC. As a result efficiencies as high as 40% is considered attainable with this type of fuel cell. The state-of-development has reached a point where it is now been actively considered for stationary, portable and transportation applications. The research and development issues have been the subject of several previous articles and the present article is an attempt to summarize the key advances in this technology.

  1. Gamma Ray Mirrors for Direct Measurement of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovaroff, Dr. Michael J.; Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Harrison, Mark J; Soufli, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Direct measurement of the amount of Pu and U in spent nuclear fuel represents a challenge for the safeguards community. Ideally, the characteristic gamma-ray emission lines from different isotopes provide an observable suitable for this task. However, these lines are generally lost in the fierce flux of radiation emitted by the fuel. The rates are so high that detector dead times limit measurements to only very small solid angles of the fuel. Only through the use of carefully designed view ports and long dwell times are such measurements possible. Recent advances in multilayer grazing-incidence gamma-ray optics provide one possible means of overcoming this difficulty. With a proper optical and coating design, such optics can serve as a notch filter, passing only narrow regions of the overall spectrum to a fully shielded detector that does not view the spent fuel directly. We report on the design of a mirror system and a number of experimental measurements.

  2. Alkaline direct alcohol fuel cells using an anion exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Koji; Iriyama, Yasutoshi; Abe, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Masao; Ogumi, Zempachi

    Alkaline direct alcohol fuel cells using an OH-form anion exchange membrane and polyhydric alcohols were studied. A high open circuit voltage of ca. 800 mV was obtained for a cell using Pt-Ru/C (anode) and Pt/C (cathode) at 323 K, which was about 100-200 mV higher than that for a DMFC using Nafion ®. The maximum power densities were in the order of ethylene glycol > glycerol > methanol > erythritol > xylitol. Silver catalysts were used as a cathode catalyst to fabricate alkaline fuel cells, since silver catalyst is almost inactive in the oxidation of polyhydric alcohols. Alkaline direct ethylene glycol fuel cells using silver as a cathode catalyst gave excellent performance because higher concentrations of fuel could be supplied to the anode.

  3. Methanol crossover in direct methanol fuel cell systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovar, B. S.; Bender, G.; Davey, J. R.; Zelenay, P.

    2003-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are currently being investigated for a number of different applications from several milliwatts to near kilowatt size scales (cell phones, laptops, auxiliary power units, etc .). Because methanol has a very high energy density, over 6000 W hr/kg, a DMFC can possibly have greatly extended lifetimes compared to the batteries, doesn't present the storage problems associated with hydrogen fuel cells and can possibly operate more efficiently and cleanly than internal combustion engines.

  4. A novel direct ethanol fuel cell with high power density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, L.; Zhao, T. S.; Chen, R.; Wu, Q. X.

    2011-08-01

    A new type of direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) that is composed of an alkaline anode and an acid cathode separated with a charger conducting membrane is developed. Theoretically it is shown that the voltage of this novel fuel cell is 2.52 V, while, experimentally it has been demonstrated that this fuel cell can yield an open-circuit voltage (OCV) of 1.60 V and a peak power density of 240 mW cm-2 at 60 °C, which represent the highest performance of DEFCs that has so far been reported in the open literature.

  5. Process for production of a borohydride compound

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2014-08-19

    A process for production of a borohydride compound M(BH.sub.4).sub.y. The process has three steps. The first step combines a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.yM with aluminum, hydrogen and a metallic catalyst containing at least one metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y, wherein R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group; M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg; and y is one or two; wherein the catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum. The second step combines the compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y with a borate, boroxine or borazine compound to produce M(BH.sub.4).sub.y and a byproduct mixture containing alkali metal and aluminum aryloxides. The third step separates M(BH.sub.4).sub.y from the byproduct mixture.

  6. Tuning of platinum nano-particles by Au usage in their binary alloy for direct ethanol fuel cell: Controlled synthesis, electrode kinetics and mechanistic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Abhijit; Mondal, Achintya; Datta, Jayati

    2015-06-01

    Understanding of the electrode-kinetics and mechanism of ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) is of considerable interest for optimizing electro-catalysis in direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC). This work attempts to design Pt based electro-catalyst on carbon support, tuned with gold nano-particles (NPs), for their use in DEFC operating in alkaline medium. The platinum-gold alloyed NPs are synthesized at desired compositions and size (2-10 nm) by controlled borohydride reduction method and successfully characterized by XRD, TEM, EDS and XPS techniques. The kinetic parameters along with the activation energies for the EOR are evaluated over the temperature range 20-80 °C and the oxidation reaction products estimated through ion chromatographic analysis. Compared to single Pt/C catalyst, the over potential of EOR is reduced by ca. 500 mV, at the onset during the reaction, for PtAu/C alloy with only 23% Pt content demonstrating the ability of Au and/or its surface oxides providing oxygen species at much lower potentials compared to Pt. Furthermore, a considerable increase in the peak power density (>191%) is observed in an in-house fabricated direct ethanol anion exchange membrane fuel cell, DE(AEM)FC using the best performing Au covered Pt electrode (23% Pt) compared to the monometallic Pt catalyst.

  7. A Computer Model for Direct Carbonate Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J.; Patel, P.S.; Farooque, M.; Maru, H.C.

    1997-04-01

    A 3-D computer model, describing fluid flow, heat and mass transfer, and chemical and electrochemical reaction processes, has been developed for guiding the direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) stack design. This model is able to analyze the direct internal reforming (DIR) as well as the integrated IIR (indirect internal reforming)-DIR designs. Reasonable agreements between computed and fuel cell tested results, such as flow variations, temperature distributions, cell potentials, and exhaust gas compositions as well as methane conversions, were obtained. Details of the model and comparisons of the modeling results with experimental DFC stack data are presented in the paper.

  8. High Efficiency Direct Carbon and Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Fossil Fuel Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M; Cooper, J F; Cherepy, N

    2002-01-02

    Hydrogen he1 cells have been under development for a number of years and are now nearing commercial applications. Direct carbon fuel cells, heretofore, have not reached practical stages of development because of problems in fuel reactivity and cell configuration. The carbon/air fuel cell reaction (C + O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2}) has the advantage of having a nearly zero entropy change. This allows a theoretical efficiency of 100 % at 700-800 C. The activities of the C fuel and CO{sub 2} product do not change during consumption of the fuel. Consequently, the EMF is invariant; this raises the possibility of 100% fuel utilization in a single pass. (In contrast, the high-temperature hydrogen fuel cell has a theoretical efficiency of and changes in fuel activity limit practical utilizations to 75-85%.) A direct carbon fuel cell is currently being developed that utilizes reactive carbon particulates wetted by a molten carbonate electrolyte. Pure COZ is evolved at the anode and oxygen from air is consumed at the cathode. Electrochemical data is reported here for the carbon/air cell utilizing carbons derived from he1 oil pyrolysis, purified coal, purified bio-char and petroleum coke. At 800 O C, a voltage efficiency of 80% was measured at power densities of 0.5-1 kW/m2. Carbon and hydrogen fuels may be produced simultaneously at lugh efficiency from: (1) natural gas, by thermal decomposition, (2) petroleum, by coking or pyrolysis of distillates, (3) coal, by sequential hydrogasification to methane and thermal pyrolysis of the methane, with recycle of the hydrogen, and (4) biomass, similarly by sequential hydrogenation and thermal pyrolysis. Fuel production data may be combined with direct C and H2 fuel cell operating data for power cycle estimates. Thermal to electric efficiencies indicate 80% HHV [85% LHV] for petroleum, 75.5% HHV [83.4% LHV] for natural gas and 68.3% HHV [70.8% LHV] for lignite coal. Possible benefits of integrated carbon and hydrogen fuel cell power

  9. Chemical labeling of carbohydrates by oxidation and sodium borohydride reduction.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, M

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes a collection of methods for chemical labeling of carbohydrates (free oligosaccharides or oligosaccharides conjugated to proteins, peptides, or lipids) by oxidation followed by reduction or by direct reduction. Oligosaccharides can be labeled with either radioisotopes or nonradioactive fluorescent molecules. These labelings allow one to follow the oligosaccharides during chromatography and in cells if labeled by fluorescent molecules. Selective oxidation with mild periodate followed by reduction with tritiated sodium borohydride results in selective radiolabeling of sialic acid residues on oligosaccharides or glycoproteins. Alternatively, treatment of samples with galactose oxidase results in oxidation of galactose or N-acetylgalactosamine residues at nonreducing termini, rendering these residues susceptible to labeling with NaB[3H]4. Oxidized glycoconjugates can also be labeled using the fluorescent probe lucifer yellow CH. Free oligosaccharides can be labeled by reduction with NaB[3H]4. An additional protocol describes the release and simultaneous labeling of O-glycan oligosaccharides by alkaline beta-elimination in the presence of NaB[3H]4.

  10. 76 FR 8661 - Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines, Fuel Injected Reciprocating Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ...-14-07, Amendment 39-15602 (73 FR 39574), for certain fuel injected reciprocating engines manufactured... Directives; Lycoming Engines, Fuel Injected Reciprocating Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... airworthiness directive (AD) that applies to certain fuel injected reciprocating engines manufactured...

  11. Improved Flow-Field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gurau, Bogdan

    2013-05-31

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is ideal if high energy-density liquid fuels are required. Liquid fuels have advantages over compressed hydrogen including higher energy density and ease of handling. Although state-of-the-art DMFCs exhibit manageable degradation rates, excessive fuel crossover diminishes system energy and power density. Although use of dilute methanol mitigates crossover, the concomitant lowering of the gross fuel energy density (GFED) demands a complex balance-of-plant (BOP) that includes higher flow rates, external exhaust recirculation, etc. An alternative approach is redesign of the fuel delivery system to accommodate concentrated methanol. NuVant Systems Inc. (NuVant) will maximize the GFED by design and assembly of a DMFC that uses near neat methanol. The approach is to tune the diffusion of highly concentrated methanol (to the anode catalytic layer) to the back-diffusion of water formed at the cathode (i.e. in situ generation of dilute methanol at the anode layer). Crossover will be minimized without compromising the GFED by innovative integration of the anode flow-field and the diffusion layer. The integrated flow-field-diffusion-layers (IFDLs) will widen the current and potential DMFC operating ranges and enable the use of cathodes optimized for hydrogen-air fuel cells.

  12. Methods to Stabilize and Destabilize Ammonium Borohydride

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Thomas K.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Bowden, Mark E.; Besenbacher, Fleming; Jensen, Torben R.; Autrey, Thomas

    2013-01-21

    Ammonium borohydride, NH4BH4, has a high hydrogen content of ρm = 24.5 wt% H2 and releases 18 wt% H2 below T = 160 °C. However, the half-life of bulk NH4BH4 at ambient temperatures, ~6 h, is insufficient for practical applications. The decomposition of NH4BH4 (ABH2) was studied at variable hydrogen and argon back pressures to investigate possible pressure mediated stabilization effects. The hydrogen release rate from solid ABH2 at ambient temperatures is reduced by ~16 % upon increasing the hydrogen back pressure from 5 to 54 bar. Similar results were obtained using argon pressure and the observed stabilization may be explained by a positive volume of activation in the transition state leading to hydrogen release. Nanoconfinement in mesoporous silica, MCM-41, was investigated as alternative means to stabilize NH4BH4. However, other factors appear to significantly destabilize NH4BH4 and it rapidly decomposes at ambient temperatures into [(NH3)2BH2][BH4] (DADB) in accordance with the bulk reaction scheme. The hydrogen desorption kinetics from nanoconfined [(NH3)2BH2][BH4] is moderately enhanced as evidenced by a reduction in the DSC decomposition peak temperature of ΔT = -13 °C as compared to the bulk material. Finally, we note a surprising result, storage of DADB at temperature < -30 °C transformed, reversibly, the [(NH3)2BH2][BH4] into a new low temperature polymorph as revealed by both XRD and solid state MAS 11B MAS NMR. TA & AK are thankful for support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. A portion of the research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle.

  13. Commercialization of a direct methanol fuel cell system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpert, G.; Narayanan, S. R.; Frank, H.; Kindler, A.; Valdez, T.; Chun, W.; Surampudi, S.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a major breakthrough in energy technology developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory that can be used in a wide variety of portable, remote and transportation applications without polluting the environment. The status, performance, and design considerations of the JPL non-polluting, Direct Methanol, Fuel Cell system for consumer equipment and transportation applications are reported herein. This new fuel cell technology utilizes the direct oxidation of a 3% aqueous liquid methanol solution as the fuel and air (O2) as the oxidant. The only products are CO2 and water. Therefore, because recharging can be accomplished by refueling with methanol, vehicles can enjoy unlimited range and extended use compared to battery operated devices requiring recharge time and power accessibility.

  14. Destabilized and catalyzed borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Gray, Joshua; Stowe, Ashley C.; Sivasubramanian, Premkumar

    2012-02-28

    A process of forming a hydrogen storage material, including the steps of: providing a borohydride material of the formula: M(BH.sub.4).sub.x where M is an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal and 1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.2; providing an alanate material of the formula: M.sub.1(AlH.sub.4).sub.x where M.sub.1 is an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal and 1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.2; providing a halide material of the formula: M.sub.2Hal.sub.x where M.sub.2 is an alkali metal, an alkaline earth metal or transition metal and Hal is a halide and 1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.4; combining the borohydride, alanate and halide materials such that 5 to 50 molar percent from the borohydride material is present forming a reaction product material having a lower hydrogen release temperature than the alanate material.

  15. Valveless piezoelectric micropump for fuel delivery in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Qing-Ming

    Fuel cells are being considered as an important technology that can be used for various power applications. For portable electronic devices such as laptops, digital cameras, cell phone, etc., the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is a very promising candidate as a power source. Compared with conventional batteries, DMFC can provide a higher power density with a long-lasting life and recharging which is almost instant. However, many issues related to the design, fabrication and operation of miniaturized DMFC power systems still remain unsolved. Fuel delivery is one of the key issues that will determine the performance of the DMFC. To maintain a desired performance, an efficient fuel delivery system is required to provide an adequate amount of fuel for consumption and remove carbon dioxide generated from fuel cell devices at the same time. In this paper, a novel fuel delivery system combined with a miniaturized DMFC is presented. The core component of this system is a piezoelectric valveless micropump that can convert the reciprocating movement of a diaphragm activated by a piezoelectric actuator into a pumping effect. Nozzle/diffuser elements are used to direct the flow from inlet to outlet. As for DMFC devices, the micropump system needs to meet some specific requirements: low energy consumption but a sufficient fuel flow rate. Based on theoretical analysis, the effect of piezoelectric materials properties, driving voltage, driving frequency, nozzle/diffuser dimension, and other factors on the performance of the whole fuel cell system will be discussed. As a result, a viable design of a micropump system for fuel delivery can be achieved and some simulation results will be presented as well.

  16. Direct LSC method for measurements of biofuels in fuel.

    PubMed

    Krištof, Romana; Logar, Jasmina Kožar

    2013-07-15

    Direct liquid scintillation counting (LSC) for quantification of biofuels content in fuels was implemented and validated on three liquid fossil fuel matrices-ethanol, gasoline and diesel. Fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), hydrogenated vegetable oils (HVO) and bio-ethanol were used as biofuels. The method is applicable in the range up to 100% for all tested combinations of bio components. The sensitivity and precision of the method are suitable for determination of bio component content in the blends which is appearing on the global market. The method does not require special equipment for sample preparation.

  17. A development of direct hydrazine/hydrogen peroxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Shao Jiang; Qin, Hai Ying; Ye, Li Qiang; Liu, Bin Hong; Li, Zhou Peng

    A direct hydrazine fuel cell using H 2O 2 as the oxidizer has been developed. The N 2H 4/H 2O 2 fuel cell is assembled by using Ni-Pt/C composite catalyst as the anode catalyst, Au/C as the cathode catalyst, and Nafion membrane as the electrolyte. Both anolyte and catholyte show significant influences on cell voltage and cell performance. The open-circuit voltage of the N 2H 4/H 2O 2 fuel cell reaches up to 1.75 V when using alkaline N 2H 4 solution as the anolyte and acidic H 2O 2 solution as the catholyte. A maximum power density of 1.02 W cm -2 has been achieved at operation temperature of 80 °C. The number of electrons exchanged in the H 2O 2 reduction reaction on Au/C catalyst is 2.

  18. A microfluidic direct formate fuel cell on paper.

    PubMed

    Copenhaver, Thomas S; Purohit, Krutarth H; Domalaon, Kryls; Pham, Linda; Burgess, Brianna J; Manorothkul, Natalie; Galvan, Vicente; Sotez, Samantha; Gomez, Frank A; Haan, John L

    2015-08-01

    We describe the first direct formate fuel cell on a paper microfluidic platform. In traditional membrane-less microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs), external pumping consumes power produced by the fuel cell in order to maintain co-laminar flow of the anode stream and oxidant stream to prevent mixing. However, in paper microfluidics, capillary action drives flow while minimizing stream mixing. In this work, we demonstrate a paper MFC that uses formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. Using these materials we achieve a maximum power density of nearly 2.5 mW/mg Pd. In a series configuration, our MFC achieves an open circuit voltage just over 1 V, and in a parallel configuration, short circuit of 20 mA absolute current. We also demonstrate that the MFC does not require continuous flow of fuel and oxidant to produce power. We found that we can pre-saturate the materials on the paper, stop the electrolyte flow, and still produce approximately 0.5 V for 15 min. This type of paper MFC has potential applications in point-of-care diagnostic devices and other electrochemical sensors.

  19. Direct methanol feed fuel cell with reduced catalyst loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Improvements to direct feed methanol fuel cells include new protocols for component formation. Catalyst-water repellent material is applied in formation of electrodes and sintered before application of ionomer. A membrane used in formation of an electrode assembly is specially pre-treated to improve bonding between catalyst and membrane. The improved electrode and the pre-treated membrane are assembled into a membrane electrode assembly.

  20. Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, James H.; Cox, Philip; Harrington, William J; Campbell, Joseph L

    2013-09-03

    ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOE’s R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNF’s novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel

  1. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Oei, D.; Adams, J.A.; Kinnelly, A.A.

    1997-07-01

    In partial fulfillment of the U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-ACO2-94CE50389, {open_quotes}Direct Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}, this conceptual vehicle design report addresses the design and packaging of battery augmented fuel cell powertrain vehicles. This report supplements the {open_quotes}Conceptual Vehicle Design Report - Pure Fuel Cell Powertrain Vehicle{close_quotes} and includes a cost study of the fuel cell power system. The three classes of vehicles considered in this design and packaging exercise are the same vehicle classes that were studied in the previous report: the Aspire, representing the small vehicle class; the AIV (Aluminum Intensive Vehicle) Sable, representing the mid-size vehicle; and the E-150 Econoline, representing the van-size class. A preliminary PEM fuel cell power system manufacturing cost study is also presented. As in the case of the previous report concerning the {open_quotes}Pure Fuel Cell Powertrain Vehicle{close_quotes}, the same assumptions are made for the fuel cell power system. These assumptions are fuel cell system power densities of 0.33 kW/ka and 0.33 kW/l, platinum catalyst loading of less than or equal to 0.25 mg/cm{sup 2} total, and hydrogen tanks containing compressed gaseous hydrogen under 340 atm (5000 psia) pressure. The batteries considered for power augmentation of the fuel cell vehicle are based on the Ford Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) program. These are state-of-the-art high power lead acid batteries with power densities ranging from 0.8 kW/kg to 2 kW/kg. The results reported here show that battery augmentation provides the fuel cell vehicle with a power source to meet instant high power demand for acceleration and start-up. Based on the assumptions made in this report, the packaging of the battery augmented fuel cell vehicle appears to be as feasible as the packaging of the pure fuel cell powered vehicle.

  2. Barium borohydride chlorides: synthesis, crystal structures and thermal properties.

    PubMed

    Grube, Elisabeth; Olesen, Cathrine H; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Jensen, Torben R

    2016-05-10

    Here we report the synthesis, mechanism of formation, characterization and thermal decomposition of new barium borohydride chlorides prepared by mechanochemistry and thermal treatment of MBH4-BaCl2, M = Li, Na or K in ratios 1 : 1 and 1 : 2. Initially, orthorhombic barium chloride, o-BaCl2 transforms into o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.15. Excess LiBH4 leads to continued anion substitution and a phase transformation into hexagonal barium borohydride chloride h-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, which accommodates higher amounts of borohydride, possibly x ∼ 0.85 and resembles h-BaCl2. Thus, two solid solutions are in equilibrium during mechano-chemical treatment of LiBH4-BaCl2 (1 : 1) whereas LiBH4-BaCl2 (2 : 1) converts to h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15. Upon thermal treatment at T > ∼200 °C, h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15 transforms into another orthorhombic barium borohydride chloride compound, o-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15, which is structurally similar to o-BaBr2. The samples with M = Na and K have lower reactivity and form o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.1 and a solid solution of sodium chloride dissolved in solid sodium borohydride, Na(BH4)1-xClx, x = 0.07. The new compounds and reaction mechanisms are investigated by in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), mass spectroscopy (MS) and temperature programmed photographic analysis (TPPA).

  3. 76 FR 79051 - Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines, Fuel Injected Reciprocating Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ...-AD; Amendment 39-16894; AD 2011-26-04] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines, Fuel... AD to prevent failure of the fuel injector fuel lines that would allow fuel to spray into the engine... response, any AD made applicable to TCM engines with externally mounted fuel injector lines, would have...

  4. Direct fuel cell - A high proficiency power generator for biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, P.S.; Steinfeld, G.; Baker, B.S.

    1994-12-31

    Conversion of renewable bio-based resources into energy offers significant benefits for our environment and domestic economic activity. It also improves national security by displacing fossil fuels. However, in the current economic environment, it is difficult for biofuel systems to compete with other fossil fuels. The biomass-fired power plants are typically smaller than 50 MW, lower in electrical efficiencies (<25%) and experience greater costs for handling and transporting the biomass. When combined with fuel cells such as the Direct Fuel Cell (DFC), biofuels can produce power more efficiently with negligible environmental impact. Agricultural and other waste biomass can be converted to ethanol or methane-rich biofuels for power generation use in the DFC. These DFC power plants are modular and factory assembled. Due to their electrochemical (non-combustion) conversion process, these plants are environmentally friendly, highly efficient and potentially cost effective, even in sizes as small as a few meagawatts. They can be sited closer to the source of the biomass to minimize handling and transportation costs. The high-grade waste heat available from DFC power plants makes them attractive in cogeneration applications for farming and rural communities. The DFC potentially opens up new markets for biofuels derived from wood, grains and other biomass waste products.

  5. Performance of direct methanol polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dong Ryul; Jung, Doo Hwan; Lee, Chang Hyeong; Chun, Young Gab

    1996-12-31

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) using polymer electrolyte membrane are promising candidate for application of portable power sources and transportation applications because they do not require any fuel processing equipment and can be operated at low temperature of 60{degrees}C - 130{degrees}C. Elimination of the fuel processor results in simpler design, higher operation reliability, lower weight volume, and lower capital and operating cost. However, methanol as a fuel is relatively electrochemical inert, so that kinetics of the methanol oxidation is too slow. Platinum and Pt-based binary alloy electrodes have been extensively studied for methanol electro-oxidation in acid electrolyte at ambient and elevated temperatures. Particularly, unsupported carbon Pt-Ru catalyst was found to be superior to the anode of DMFC using a proton exchange membrane electrolyte (Nafion). The objective of this study is to develop the high performance DNTC. This paper summarizes the results from half cell and single cell tests, which focus on the electrode manufacturing process, catalyst selection, and operating conditions of single cell such as methanol concentration, temperature and pressure.

  6. Direct formic acid microfluidic fuel cell design and performance evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Zuria, A.; Dector, A.; Cuevas-Muñiz, F. M.; Esquivel, J. P.; Sabaté, N.; Ledesma-García, J.; Arriaga, L. G.; Chávez-Ramírez, A. U.

    2014-12-01

    This work reports the evolution of design, fabrication and testing of direct formic acid microfluidic fuel cells (DFAμFFC), the architecture and channel dimensions are miniaturized from a thousand to few cents of micrometers. Three generations of DFAμFFCs are presented, from the initial Y-shape configuration made by a hot pressing technique; evolving into a novel miniaturized fuel cell based on microfabrication technology using SU-8 photoresist as core material; to the last air-breathing μFFC with enhanced performance and built with low cost materials and processes. The three devices were evaluated in acidic media in the presence of formic acid as fuel and oxygen/air as oxidant. Commercial Pt/C (30 wt. % E-TEK) and Pd/C XC-72 (20 wt. %, E-TEK) were used as cathode and anode electrodes respectively. The air-breathing μFFC generation, delivered up to 27.3 mW cm-2 for at least 30 min, which is a competitive power density value at the lowest fuel flow of 200 μL min-1 reported to date.

  7. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carlstrom, Charles, M., Jr.

    2009-07-07

    This report is the final technical report for DOE Program DE-FC36-04GO14301 titled “Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications”. Due to the public nature of this report some of the content reported in confidential reports and meetings to the DOE is not covered in detail in this report and some of the content has been normalized to not show actual values. There is a comparison of the projects accomplishments with the objectives, an overview of some of the key subsystem work, and a review of the three levels of prototypes demonstrated during the program. There is also a description of the eventual commercial product and market this work is leading towards. The work completed under this program has significantly increased the understanding of how Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC) can be deployed successfully to power consumer electronic devices. The prototype testing has demonstrated the benefits a direct methanol fuel cell system has over batteries typically used for powering consumer electronic devices. Three generations of prototypes have been developed and tested for performance, robustness and life. The technologies researched and utilized in the fuel cell stack and related subsystems for these prototypes are leveraged from advances in other industries such as the hydrogen fueled PEM fuel cell industry. The work under this program advanced the state of the art of direct methanol fuel cells. The system developed by MTI micro fuel cells aided by this program differs significantly from conventional DMFC designs and offers compelling advantages in the areas of performance, life, size, and simplicity. The program has progressed as planned resulting in the completion of the scope of work and available funding in December 2008. All 18 of the final P3 prototypes builds have been tested and the results showed significant improvements over P2 prototypes in build yield, initial performance, and durability. The systems have

  8. Use of cermet fueled nuclear reactors for direct nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Carlson, L.W.; Kuczen, K.D.; Hanan, N.A.; Palmer, R.G.; Von Hoomissen, J.; Chiu, W.; Haaland, R.

    1988-07-01

    There has been a renewal of interest in Direct Nuclear Propulsion (DNP) because of the Air Force Forecast II recommendation for the development of the technology. Several nuclear concepts have been proposed to meet the Direct Nuclear Propulsion challenge. In this paper we will present results of an initial study of the potential of a cermet fueled nuclear system in providing the desired DNP capabilities and featuring a set of unique safety characteristics. The concept of cermet fuel for DNP applications was first developed by ANL and GE working independently more than 20 years ago. The two organizations came to several remarkably consistent conclusions. The present work has consisted of collecting a unified set of design parameters from the set of design results produced in the earlier work. The conclusion of this exercise was that a cermet-fueled DNP design looked extremely promising from performance and safety considerations and that it deserves serious consideration when the decision to develop one or more concepts for DNP is made.

  9. Mass and heat transport in direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, A.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Daud, W. R. W.; Masdar, S.; Yosfiah, M. R.

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is a better alternative to the conventional battery. The DMFC offers several advantages, namely, faster building of potential and longer-lasting fuel, however, there are still several issues that need to be addressed to design a better DMFC system. This article is a wide-ranging review of the most up-to-date studies on mass and heat transfer in the DMFC. The discussion will be focused on the critical problems limiting the performance of DMFCs. In addition, a technique for upgrading the DMFC with an integrated system will be presented, along with existing numerical models for modeling mass and heat transfer as well as cell performance.

  10. Facile solvothermal synthesis of highly active and robust Pd1.87Cu0.11Sn electrocatalyst towards direct ethanol fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Rajkumar; Dhiman, Shikha; Peter, Sebastian C.

    2016-08-01

    Ordered intermetallic Pd1.87Cu0.11Sn ternary electrocatalyst has been synthesized by sodium borohydride reduction of precursor salts Pd(acac)2, CuCl2.2H2O and SnCl2 using one-pot solvothermal synthesis method at 220 °C with a reaction time of 24 h. To the best of our knowledge, here for the first time we report surfactant free synthesis of a novel ordered intermetallic ternary Pd1.87Cu0.11Sn nanoparticles. The ordered structure of the catalyst has been confirmed by powder x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Composition and morphology of the nanoparticles have been confirmed through field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometry and TEM. The electrocatalytic activity and stability of the ternary electrocatalyst towards ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques. The catalyst is proved to be highly efficient and stable upto 500th cycle and even better than commercially available Pd/C (20 wt%) electrocatalysts. The specific and mass activity of the as synthesized ternary catalyst are found to be ∼4.76 and ∼2.9 times better than that of commercial Pd/C. The enhanced activity and stability of the ordered ternary Pd1.87Cu0.11Sn catalyst can make it as a promising candidate for the alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell application.

  11. Analytical performance of direct-hydrogen-fueled polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems for transportation applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E. D.

    1998-06-02

    The performance of a stand-alone polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) system directly fueled by hydrogen has been evaluated for transportation vehicles. The study was carried out using a systems analysis code and a vehicle analysis code. The systems code includes models for the various PEFC components and is applicable for steady-state and transient situations. At the design point the system efficiency is above 50% for a 50-kW system. The efficiency improves under partial load and approaches 60% at 40% load, as the fuel cell operating point moves to lower current densities on the V-I polarization curve. At much lower loads, the system efficiency drops because of the deterioration in the performance of the compressor, expander, and eventually the fuel cell. The system performance suffers at lower temperatures, as the V-I characteristic curve for the fuel cell shifts downward because of the increased ohmic losses. The results of the transient analysis indicate that the hydrogen-fueled PEFC system can start rather rapidly, within seconds from ambient conditions. However, the warm-up time constant to reach the design operating temperatures is about 180 s. It is important during this period for the coolant to bypass the system radiator until the coolant temperature approaches the design temperature for the fuel cell. The systems analysis code has been applied to two mid-size vehicles: the near-term Ford AIV Sable and the future P2000 vehicle. The results of this study show that the PEFC system in these vehicles can respond well to the demands of the FUDS and Highway driving cycles, with both warm and cold starting conditions. The results also show that the fuel-cell AIV Sable vehicle has impressive gains in fuel economy over that of the internal combustion engine vehicle. However, this vehicle will not be able to meet the PNGV goal of 80 mpg. On the other hand, the P2000 vehicle approaches this goal with variable efficiency of the compressor and expander. It is expected

  12. Analytical performance of direct-hydrogen fueled polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D.; Ahluwalia, R.; Kumar, R.

    1998-07-01

    The performance of a stand-alone polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) system directly fueled by hydrogen has been evaluated for transportation vehicles. The study was carried out using a systems analysis code and a vehicle analysis code. The systems code includes models for the various PEFC components and is applicable for steady-state and transient situations. At the design point, the system efficiency is above 50% for a 50-kW system. The efficiency improves under partial load and approaches 60% at 40% load, as the fuel cell operating point moves to lower current densities on the V-I polarization curve. At much lower loads, the system efficiency drops because of the deterioration in the performance of the compressor, expander, and eventually the fuel cell. The system performance suffers at lower temperatures, as the V-I characteristic curve for the fuel cell shifts downward because of the increased ohmic losses. The results of the transient analysis indicate that the hydrogen-fueled PEFC system can start rather rapidly, within seconds from ambient conditions. However, the warm-up time constant to reach the design operating temperatures is about 180 s. It is important during this period for the coolant to bypass the system radiator until the coolant temperature approaches the design temperature for the fuel cell. The systems analysis code has been applied to two mid-size vehicles: the near-term Ford AIV Sable and the future P2000 vehicle. The results of this study show that the PEFC system in these vehicles can respond well to the demands of the FUDS and Highway driving cycles, with both warm and cold starting conditions. The results also show that the fuel-cell AIV Sable vehicle has impressive gains in fuel economy over that of the internal combustion engine vehicle. However, this vehicle will not be able to meet the PNGV goal of 80 mpg. On the other hand, the P2000 vehicle approaches this goal with variable efficiency of the compressor and expander. It is

  13. Low Fuel Convergence Path to Direct-Drive Fusion Ignition.

    PubMed

    Molvig, Kim; Schmitt, Mark J; Albright, B J; Dodd, E S; Hoffman, N M; McCall, G H; Ramsey, S D

    2016-06-24

    A new class of inertial fusion capsules is presented that combines multishell targets with laser direct drive at low intensity (2.8×10^{14}  W/cm^{2}) to achieve robust ignition. The targets consist of three concentric, heavy, metal shells, enclosing a volume of tens of μg of liquid deuterium-tritium fuel. Ignition is designed to occur well "upstream" from stagnation, with minimal pusher deceleration to mitigate interface Rayleigh-Taylor growth. Laser intensities below thresholds for laser plasma instability and cross beam energy transfer facilitate high hydrodynamic efficiency (∼10%). PMID:27391731

  14. Low Fuel Convergence Path to Direct-Drive Fusion Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molvig, Kim; Schmitt, Mark J.; Albright, B. J.; Dodd, E. S.; Hoffman, N. M.; McCall, G. H.; Ramsey, S. D.

    2016-06-01

    A new class of inertial fusion capsules is presented that combines multishell targets with laser direct drive at low intensity (2.8 ×1014 W /cm2 ) to achieve robust ignition. The targets consist of three concentric, heavy, metal shells, enclosing a volume of tens of μ g of liquid deuterium-tritium fuel. Ignition is designed to occur well "upstream" from stagnation, with minimal pusher deceleration to mitigate interface Rayleigh-Taylor growth. Laser intensities below thresholds for laser plasma instability and cross beam energy transfer facilitate high hydrodynamic efficiency (˜10 %).

  15. Novel Materials for High Efficiency Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, Stephen; Mountz, David; He, Wensheng; Zhang, Tao

    2013-12-31

    Direct methanol fuel cell membranes were developed using blends of different polyelectrolytes with PVDF. The membranes showed complex relationships between polyelectrolyte chemistry, morphology, and processing. Although the PVDF grade was found to have little effect on the membrane permselectivity, it does impact membrane conductivity and methanol permeation values. Other factors, such as varying the polyelectrolyte polarity, using varying crosslinking agents, and adjusting the equivalent weight of the membranes impacted methanol permeation, permselectivity, and areal resistance. We now understand, within the scope of the project work completed, how these inter-related performance properties can be tailored to achieve a balance of performance.

  16. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Foral, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

  17. An improved alkaline direct formate paper microfluidic fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Vicente; Domalaon, Kryls; Tang, Catherine; Sotez, Samantha; Mendez, Alex; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Purohit, Krutarth; Pham, Linda; Haan, John; Gomez, Frank A

    2016-02-01

    Paper-based microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs) are a potential replacement for traditional FCs and batteries due to their low cost, portability, and simplicity to operate. In MFCs, separate solutions of fuel and oxidant migrate through paper due to capillary action and laminar flow and, upon contact with each other and catalyst, produce electricity. In the present work, we describe an improved microfluidic paper-based direct formate FC (DFFC) employing formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. The dimensions of the lateral column, current collectors, and cathode were optimized. A maximum power density of 2.53 mW/cm(2) was achieved with a DFFC of surface area 3.0 cm(2) , steel mesh as current collector, 5% carbon to paint mass ratio for cathode electrode and, 30% hydrogen peroxide. The longevity of the MFC's detailed herein is greater than eight hours with continuous flow of streams. In a series configuration, the MFCs generate sufficient energy to power light-emitting diodes and a handheld calculator. PMID:26572774

  18. An improved alkaline direct formate paper microfluidic fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Vicente; Domalaon, Kryls; Tang, Catherine; Sotez, Samantha; Mendez, Alex; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Purohit, Krutarth; Pham, Linda; Haan, John; Gomez, Frank A

    2016-02-01

    Paper-based microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs) are a potential replacement for traditional FCs and batteries due to their low cost, portability, and simplicity to operate. In MFCs, separate solutions of fuel and oxidant migrate through paper due to capillary action and laminar flow and, upon contact with each other and catalyst, produce electricity. In the present work, we describe an improved microfluidic paper-based direct formate FC (DFFC) employing formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. The dimensions of the lateral column, current collectors, and cathode were optimized. A maximum power density of 2.53 mW/cm(2) was achieved with a DFFC of surface area 3.0 cm(2) , steel mesh as current collector, 5% carbon to paint mass ratio for cathode electrode and, 30% hydrogen peroxide. The longevity of the MFC's detailed herein is greater than eight hours with continuous flow of streams. In a series configuration, the MFCs generate sufficient energy to power light-emitting diodes and a handheld calculator.

  19. A Direct Carbon Fuel Cell with a Molten Antimony Anode

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, Abhimanyu; Kungas, Rainer; Roy, Sounak; Javadekar, Ashay; Buttrey, Douglas J.; Vohs, John M.; Gorte, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    The direct utilization of carbonaceous fuels is examined in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with a molten Sb anode at 973 K. It is demonstrated that the anode operates by oxidation of metallic Sb at the electrolyte interface, with the resulting Sb₂O₃ being reduced by the fuel in a separate step. Although the Nernst Potential for the Sb-Sb₂O₃ mixture is only 0.75 V, the electrode resistance associated with molten Sb is very low, approximately 0.06 Ωcm², so that power densities greater than 350 mW cm⁻² were achieved with an electrolyte-supported cell made from Sc-stabilized zirconia (ScSZ). Temperature programmed reaction measurements of Sb₂O₃ with sugar char, rice starch, carbon black, and graphite showed that the Sb₂O₃ is readily reduced by a range of carbonaceous solids at typical SOFC operating conditions. Finally, stable operation with a power density of 300 mW cm⁻² at a potential of 0.5 V is demonstrated for operation on sugar char.

  20. Low Crossover Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, G. K. Surya; Smart, Marshall; Atti, Anthony R.; Olah, George A.; Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T.; Surampudi, S.

    1996-01-01

    Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC's) using polymer electrolyte membranes are promising power sources for portable and vehicular applications. State of the art technology using Nafion(R) 117 membranes (Dupont) are limited by high methanol permeability and cost, resulting in reduced fuel cell efficiencies and impractical commercialization. Therefore, much research in the fuel cell field is focused on the preparation and testing of low crossover and cost efficient polymer electrolyte membranes. The University of Southern California in cooperation with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is focused on development of such materials. Interpenetrating polymer networks are an effective method used to blend polymer systems without forming chemical links. They provide the ability to modify physical and chemical properties of polymers by optimizing blend compositions. We have developed a novel interpenetrating polymer network based on poly (vinyl - difluoride)/cross-linked polystyrenesulfonic acid polymer composites (PVDF PSSA). Sulfonation of polystyrene accounts for protonic conductivity while the non-polar, PVDF backbone provides structural integrity in addition to methanol rejection. Precursor materials were prepared and analyzed to characterize membrane crystallinity, stability and degree of interpenetration. USC JPL PVDF-PSSA membranes were also characterized to determine methanol permeability, protonic conductivity and sulfur distribution. Membranes were fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) and tested for single cell performance. Tests include cell performance over a wide range of temperatures (20 C - 90 C) and cathode conditions (ambient Air/O2). Methanol crossover values are measured in situ using an in-line CO2 analyzer.

  1. SHAPE SELECTIVE NANOCATALYSTS FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Murph, S.

    2012-09-12

    While gold and platinum have long been recognized for their beauty and value, researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are working on the nano-level to use these elements for creative solutions to our nation's energy and security needs. Multiinterdisciplinary teams consisting of chemists, materials scientists, physicists, computational scientists, and engineers are exploring unchartered territories with shape-selective nanocatalysts for the development of novel, cost effective and environmentally friendly energy solutions to meet global energy needs. This nanotechnology is vital, particularly as it relates to fuel cells.SRNL researchers have taken process, chemical, and materials discoveries and translated them for technological solution and deployment. The group has developed state-of-the art shape-selective core-shell-alloy-type gold-platinum nanostructures with outstanding catalytic capabilities that address many of the shortcomings of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). The newly developed nanostructures not only busted the performance of the platinum catalyst, but also reduced the material cost and overall weight of the fuel cell.

  2. Novel Convenient Synthesis of (10)B-Enriched Sodium Borohydride.

    PubMed

    Safronov, Alexander V; Jalisatgi, Satish S; Hawthorne, M Frederick

    2016-06-01

    A convenient and efficient synthesis of (10)B-enriched sodium borohydride [Na(10)BH4] from commercially available (10)B-enriched boric acid [(10)B(OH)3] is described. The reaction sequence (10)B(OH)3 → (10)B(On-Bu)3 → (10)BH3·Et3N → Na(10)BH4 afforded the product in 60-80% yield. The reaction was successfully scaled to hundreds of gram per run. PMID:27195803

  3. Ammine Calcium and Strontium Borohydrides: Syntheses, Structures, and Properties.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Lars H; Lee, Young-Su; Černý, Radovan; Sarusie, Ram S; Cho, Young Whan; Besenbacher, Flemming; Jensen, Torben R

    2015-10-26

    A new series of solvent- and halide-free ammine strontium metal borohydrides Sr(NH3 )n (BH4 )2 (n=1, 2, and 4) and further investigations of Ca(NH3 )n (BH4 )2 (n=1, 2, 4, and 6) are presented. Crystal structures have been determined by powder XRD and optimized by DFT calculations to evaluate the strength of the dihydrogen bonds. Sr(NH3 )(BH4 )2 (Pbcn) and Sr(NH3 )2 (BH4 )2 (Pnc2) are layered structures, whereas M(NH3 )4 (BH4 )2 (M=Ca and Sr; P21 /c) are molecular structures connected by dihydrogen bonds. Both series of compounds release NH3 gas upon thermal treatment if the partial pressure of ammonia is low. Therefore, the strength of the dihydrogen bonds, the structure of the compounds, and the NH3 /BH4 (-) ratio for M(NH3 )n (BH4 )m have little influence on the composition of the released gasses. The composition of the released gas depends mainly on the thermal stability of the ammine metal borohydride and the corresponding metal borohydride.

  4. Direct fuel cell power plants: the final steps to commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, Donald R.

    Since the last paper presented at the Second Grove Fuel Cell Symposium, the Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has established two commercial subsidiaries, become a publically-held firm, expanded its facilities and has moved the direct fuel cell (DFC) technology and systems significantly closer to commercial readiness. The subsidiaries, the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) and Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) are perfecting their respective roles in the company's strategy to commercialize its DFC technology. FCE is the prime contractor for the Santa Clara Demonstration and is establishing the needed marketing, sales, engineering, and servicing functions. FCMC in addition to producing the stacks and stack modules for the Santa Clara demonstration plant is now upgrading its production capability and product yields, and retooling for the final stack scale-up for the commercial unit. ERC has built and operated the tallest and largest capacities-to-date carbonate fuel cell stacks as well as numerous short stacks. While most of these units were tested at ERC's Danbury, Connecticut (USA) R&D Center, others have been evaluated at other domestic and overseas facilities using a variety of fuels. ERC has supplied stacks to Elkraft and MTU for tests with natural gas, and RWE in Germany where coal-derived gas were used. Additional stack test activities have been performed by MELCO and Sanyo in Japan. Information from some of these activities is protected by ERC's license arrangements with these firms. However, permission for limited data releases will be requested to provide the Grove Conference with up-to-date results. Arguably the most dramatic demonstration of carbonate fuel cells in the utility-scale, 2 MW power plant demonstration unit, located in the City of Santa Clara, California. Construction of the unit's balance-of-plant (BOP) has been completed and the installed equipment has been operationally checked. Two of the four DFC stack sub-modules, each

  5. A composite of borohydride and super absorbent polymer for hydrogen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. P.; Liu, B. H.; Liu, F. F.; Xu, D.

    To develop a hydrogen source for underwater applications, a composite of sodium borohydride and super absorbent polymer (SAP) is prepared by ball milling sodium borohydride powder with SAP powder, and by dehydrating an alkaline borohydride gel. When sodium polyacrylate (NaPAA) is used as the SAP, the resulting composite exhibits a high rate of borohydride hydrolysis for hydrogen generation. A mechanism of hydrogen evolution from the NaBH 4-NaPAA composite is suggested based on structure analysis by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of water and NiCl 2 content in the precursor solution on the hydrogen evolution behavior are investigated and discussed.

  6. Design and Operation of an Electrochemical Methanol Concentration Sensor for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T. I.; Chun, W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of a 150-Watt packaged power source based on liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells is being pursued currently at the Jet propulsion Laboratory for defense applications. In our studies we find that the concentration of methanol in the fuel circulation loop affects the electrical performance and efficiency the direct methanol fuel cell systems significantly. The practical operation of direct methanol fuel cell systems, therefore, requires accurate monitoring and control of methanol concentration. The present paper reports on the principle and demonstration of an in-house developed electrochemical sensor suitable for direct methanol fuel cell systems.

  7. Improved fullerene nanofiber electrodes used in direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Miyazawa, K.; Kato, R.; Hotta, K.; Wakahara, T.

    2009-04-01

    Platinum supported on fullerene nanofibers as possible electrodes for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) were studied. Fullerene nanofiber with 20 wt% Pt loading was mixed with 5 wt% Nafion solution. The mixture paste was coated on Nafion 117 membrane and sandwiched with silicon plates. To increase the surface reaction area of catalyst, nanoimprint was used to fabricate micro-patterns in the Nafion proton exchange membrane. Nanoimprint pattern consisted of dots of 500 nm-in-diameter, 140 nm-in-depth and 1 μm-in-spacing. The nanoimprint of the treated proton exchange membrane (PEM) was carried out in a desktop thermal nanoimprint system (NI273, Nano Craft Tech. Corp., Japan) at the optimized conditions of 130 °C and pressure of 3 MPa for 6 min. Then the Pt-coated PEM was sandwiched with micro-channelled silicon plates to form a micro-DMFC. With passively feeding of 1 M methanol solution and air at room temperature, the as-prepared cell had the open circuit voltage of 0.34 V and the maximum power density of 0.30 mW/cm2. Compared with a fresh cell, the results shows that nanofibers used in nanoimprinted PEM have an improvement on the performance of micro fuel cells.

  8. MODELING AND DESIGN FOR A DIRECT CARBON FUEL CELL WITH ENTRAINED FUEL AND OXIDIZER

    SciTech Connect

    Alan A. Kornhauser; Ritesh Agarwal

    2005-04-01

    The novel molten carbonate fuel cell design described in this report uses porous bed electrodes. Molten carbonate, with carbon fuel particles and oxidizer entrained, is circulated through the electrodes. Carbon may be reacted directly, without gasification, in a molten carbonate fuel cell. The cathode reaction is 2CO{sub 2} + O{sub 2} 4e{sup -} {yields} 2CO{sub 3}{sup =}, while the anode reaction can be either C + 2CO{sub 3}{sup =} {yields} 3CO{sub 2} + 4e{sup -} or 2C + CO{sub 3}{sup =} {yields} 3CO + 2e{sup -}. The direct carbon fuel cell has an advantage over fuel cells using coal-derived synthesis gas in that it provides better overall efficiency and reduces equipment requirements. Also, the liquid electrolyte provides a means for transporting the solid carbon. The porous bed cell makes use of this carbon transport ability of the molten salt electrolyte. A one-dimensional model has been developed for predicting the performance of this cell. For the cathode, dependent variables are superficial O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes in the gas phase, superficial O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes in the liquid phase, superficial current density through the electrolyte, and electrolyte potential. The variables are related by correlations, from the literature, for gas-liquid mass transfer, liquid-solid mass transfer, cathode current density, electrode overpotential, and resistivity of a liquid with entrained gas. For the anode, dependent variables are superficial CO{sub 2} flux in the gas phase, superficial CO{sub 2} flux in the liquid phase, superficial C flux, superficial current density through the electrolyte, and electrolyte potential. The same types of correlations relate the variables as in the cathode, with the addition of a correlation for resistivity of a fluidized bed. CO production is not considered, and axial dispersion is neglected. The model shows behavior typical of porous bed electrodes used in electrochemical processes. Efficiency is comparable to that of

  9. Direct and Collisional Excitation of Automotive Fuel Components)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Allen R.; Wilson, Kyle; Sakai, Stephen; Devasher, Rebecca B.

    2010-06-01

    Adding energy directly into the vibrational modes of automotive fuel may reduce the threshold energy required for combustion, without raising the combustion charge temperature. This energy can be supplied either directly via incident laser radiation or indirectly through collision with directly excited molecules. The most common chemical in commercial gasoline, isooctane, does not absorb infrared radiation sufficiently at any wavelength for which an infrared laser is readily available. However, CO2 lasers are relatively cheap, and are available at wavelengths which are absorbed by isopropanol as well as ethanol, which is also a component of commercial gasoline. In this study, the infrared absorption of isopropanol and ethanol in balance isooctane were measured at three wavelengths (10.6 m, 10.2 m, and 9.3 m) of incident CO2 laser radiation. Additional time-resolved emission measurements were performed for these mixtures. The data support the existence of the proposed collisional pathway for energy transfer from ethanol and isopropanol to isooctane.

  10. Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell Final Program Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Thomas

    2012-01-26

    This SBIR program will result in improved LTA cell technology which is the fundamental building block of the Direct Coal ECL concept. As described below, ECL can make enormous efficiency and cost contributions to utility scale coal power. This program will improve LTA cells for small scale power generation. As described in the Commercialization section, there are important intermediate military and commercial markets for LTA generators that will provide an important bridge to the coal power application. The specific technical information from this program relating to YSZ electrolyte durability will be broadly applicable SOFC developers working on coal based SOFC generally. This is an area about which very little is currently known and will be critical for successfully applying fuel cells to coal power generation.

  11. Thin Film Catalyst Layers for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witham, C. K.; Chun, W.; Ruiz, R.; Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary obstacles to the widespread use of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is the high cost of the catalyst. Therefore, reducing the catalyst loading well below the current level of 8-12 mg/cm 2 would be important to commercialization. The current methods for preparation of catalyst layers consisting of catalyst, ionomer and sometimes a hydrophobic additive are applied by either painting, spraying, decal transfer or screen printing processes. Sputter deposition is a coating technique widely used in manufacturing and therefore particularly attractive. In this study we have begun to explore sputtering as a method for catalyst deposition. Present experiments focus on Pt-Ru catalyst layers for the anode.

  12. A novel membrane-less direct alcohol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Qingfeng; Chen, Qinghua; Yang, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Membrane-less fuel cell possesses such advantages as simplified design and lower cost. In this paper, a membrane-less direct alcohol fuel cell is constructed by using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) supported Pd and ternary PdSnNi composites as the anode catalysts and Fe/C-PANI composite, produced by direct pyrolysis of Fe-doped polyaniline precursor, as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst. The alcohols investigated in the present study are methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, iso-propanol, n-butanol, iso-butanol and sec-butanol. The cathode catalyst Fe/C-PANI is electrochemically inactive to oxidation of the alcohols. The performance of the cell with various alcohols in 1 mol L-1 NaOH solution on either Pd/MWCNT or PdSnNi/MWCNT catalyst has been evaluated. In any case, the performance of the cell using the anode catalyst PdSnNi/MWCNT is considerably better than Pd/MWCNT. For the PdSnNi/MWCNT, the maximum power densities of the cell using methanol (0.5 mol L-1), ethanol (0.5 mol L-1), n-propanol (0.5 mol L-1), iso-propanol (0.5 mol L-1), n-butanol (0.2 mol L-1), iso-butanol (0.2 mol L-1) and sec-butanol (0.2 mol L-1) are 0.34, 1.03, 1.07, 0.44, 0.50, 0.31 and 0.15 mW cm-2, respectively.

  13. Direct liquid-feed fuel cell with membrane electrolyte and manufacturing thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved direct liquid-feed fuel cell having a solid membrane electrolyte for electrochemical reactions of an organic fuel. Improvements in interfacing of the catalyst layer and the membrane and activating catalyst materials are disclosed.

  14. Improved Anode for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    A modified chemical composition has been devised to improve the performance of the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell. The main feature of the modified composition is the incorporation of hydrous ruthenium oxide into the anode structure. This modification can reduce the internal electrical resistance of the cell and increase the degree of utilization of the anode catalyst. As a result, a higher anode current density can be sustained with a smaller amount of anode catalyst. These improvements can translate into a smaller fuel-cell system and higher efficiency of conversion. Some background information is helpful for understanding the benefit afforded by the addition of hydrous ruthenium oxide. The anode of a direct methanol fuel cell sustains the electro-oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide in the reaction CH3OH + H2O--->CO2 + 6H(+) + 6e(-). An electrocatalyst is needed to enable this reaction to occur. The catalyst that offers the highest activity is an alloy of approximately equal numbers of atoms of the noble metals platinum and ruthenium. The anode is made of a composite material that includes high-surface-area Pt/Ru alloy particles and a proton-conducting ionomeric material. This composite is usually deposited onto a polymer-electrolyte (proton-conducting) membrane and onto an anode gas-diffusion/current-collector sheet that is subsequently bonded to the proton-conducting membrane by hot pressing. Heretofore, the areal density of noble-metal catalyst typically needed for high performance has been about 8 mg/cm2. However, not all of the catalyst has been utilized in the catalyzed electro-oxidation reaction. Increasing the degree of utilization of the catalyst would make it possible to improve the performance of the cell for a given catalyst loading and/or reduce the catalyst loading (thereby reducing the cost of the cell). The use of carbon and possibly other electronic conductors in the catalyst layer has been proposed for increasing the utilization of the

  15. Recent progress in alkaline direct ethylene glycol fuel cells for sustainable energy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, L.; Chen, R.

    2016-10-01

    Alkaline direct ethylene glycol fuel cells are one of the most promising power sources for portable, mobile and stationary power applications, primarily because this type of fuel cell runs on a sustainable fuel and the key materials that constitute the fuel cell are relatively inexpensive. This review article summarizes and discusses the past investigations on the development of alkaline direct ethylene glycol fuel cells, including the physical and chemical processes through the fuel cell structure, the electrocatalytic oxidation and electrocatalysts of ethylene glycol, the singe-cell performance, and innovative system designs.

  16. High-temperature passive direct methanol fuel cells operating with concentrated fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuxin; Yuan, Wenxiang; Wu, Qixing; Sun, Hongyuan; Luo, Zhongkuan; Fu, Huide

    2015-01-01

    Conventionally, passive direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) are fed with diluted methanol solutions and can hardly be operated at elevated temperatures (>120 °C) because the ionic conductivity of Nafion-type proton exchange membranes depends strongly on water content. Such a system design would limit its energy density and power density in mobile applications. In this communication, a passive vapor feed DMFC capable of operating with concentrated fuels at high temperatures is reported. The passive DMFC proposed in this work consists of a fuel reservoir, a perforated silicone sheet, a vapor chamber, two current collectors and a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) based on a phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane. The experimental results reveal that the methanol crossover through a PBI membrane is substantially low when compared with the Nafion membranes and the PBI-based passive DMFC can yield a peak power density of 37.2 mW cm-2 and 22.1 mW cm-2 at 180 °C when 16 M methanol solutions and neat methanol are used respectively. In addition, the 132 h discharge test indicates that the performance of this new DMFC is quite stable and no obvious performance degradation is observed after activation, showing its promising applications in portable power sources.

  17. Direct oxidation of waste vegetable oil in solid-oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z. F.; Kumar, R.; Thakur, S. T.; Rudnick, L. R.; Schobert, H.; Lvov, S. N.

    Solid-oxide fuel cells with ceria, ceria-Cu, and ceria-Rh anode were demonstrated to generate stable electric power with waste vegetable oil through direct oxidation of the fuel. The only pre-treatment to the fuel was a filtration to remove particulates. The performance of the fuel cell was stable over 100 h for the waste vegetable oil without dilution. The generated power was up to 0.25 W cm -2 for ceria-Rh fuel cell. This compares favorably with previously studied hydrocarbon fuels including jet fuels and Pennsylvania crude oil.

  18. Direct internal reforming of hydrocarbon fuels in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Zhongliang

    2005-07-01

    The direct operation of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) on hydrocarbon fuels is desired since it could reduce power plant size, weight and complexity. The primary challenge is to find effective means through which anode-coking could be suppressed or avoided. Throughout the research, conventional Ni-anode supported SOFCs were employed because they provide high power densities and are being actively developed for commercial applications. Various strategies were used to reduce or avoid anode-coking during the SOFC operation. Firstly, air or CO2/H2O was added to hydrocarbon fuels, such that coking was less thermodynamically favorable, and the resulting internal partial oxidation or dry/steam reforming reactions provided H 2 and CO to the fuel cell. For example, for low hydrocarbons like propane, coke-free operation was achieved on 8% yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte SOFCs via internal partial oxidation, yielding stable and high power densities, e.g. 0.7 W·cm-2 at 790°C. Secondly, a novel design for hydrocarbon fueled SOFCs was proposed, i.e. a separate supported catalyst (Ru-CeO2) layer was placed against the anode side. The catalyst layer provided good catalytic activity for the hydrocarbon reforming reactions, while the nickel-based anode was retained to provide excellent electrochemical activity for the oxidation of the hydrogen and carbon monoxide reforming products. For heavy hydrocarbons like iso-octane, the catalyst layer was crucial far allowing stable cell operation without coking. The lack of coking at the Ni-YSZ anode can be explained by reforming at the Ru-Ceria catalyst layer, which eliminated most of the hydrocarbon species before the fuel reached the anode. A key element of this strategy was the choice of a catalyst metal, Ru, that promotes hydrocarbon reforming but does not itself cause coking. Thirdly, reduced-temperature SOFCs with thin samarium-doped Ceria (SDC) electrolytes were developed; these devices have potentially improved

  19. Computational modeling of a direct propane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakdaman, H.; Bourgault, Y.; Ternan, M.

    2011-03-01

    The first two dimensional mathematical model of a complete direct propane fuel cell (DPFC) is described. The governing equations were solved using FreeFem software that uses finite element methods. Robin boundary conditions were used to couple the anode, membrane, and cathode sub-domains successfully. The model showed that a polytetrafluoroethylene membrane having its pores filled with zirconium phosphate (ZrP-PTFE), in a DPFC at 150 °C performed much the same as other electrolytes; Nafion, aqueous H3PO4, and H2SO4 doped polybenzimidazole, when they were used in DPFCs. One advantage of a ZrP-PTFE at 150 °C is that it operates without liquid phase water. As a result corrosion will be much less severe and it may be possible for non-precious metal catalysts to be used. Computational results showed that the thickness of the catalyst layer could be increased sufficiently so that the pressure drop between the reactant and product channels of the interdigitated flow fields is small. By increasing the width of the land and therefore the reactant's contact time with the catalyst it was possible to approach 100% propane conversion. Therefore fuel cell operation with a minimum concentration of propane in the product stream should be possible. Finally computations of the electrical potential in the ZrP phase, the electron flux in the Pt/C phase, and the overpotential in both the anode and cathode catalyst layers showed that serious errors in the model occurred because proton diffusion, caused by the proton concentration gradient, was neglected in the equation for the conservation of protons.

  20. Improved Cathode Structure for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    An improved cathode structure on a membrane/electrode assembly has been developed for a direct methanol fuel cell, in a continuing effort to realize practical power systems containing such fuel cells. This cathode structure is intended particularly to afford better cell performance at a low airflow rate. A membrane/electrode assembly of the type for which the improved cathode structure was developed (see Figure 1) is fabricated in a process that includes brush painting and spray coating of catalyst layers onto a polymer-electrolyte membrane and onto gas-diffusion backings that also act as current collectors. The aforementioned layers are then dried and hot-pressed together. When completed, the membrane/electrode assembly contains (1) an anode containing a fine metal black of Pt/Ru alloy, (2) a membrane made of Nafion 117 or equivalent (a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, proton-conducting ion-exchange polymer), (3) a cathode structure (in the present case, the improved cathode structure described below), and (4) the electrically conductive gas-diffusion backing layers, which are made of Toray 060(TradeMark)(or equivalent) carbon paper containing between 5 and 6 weight percent of poly(tetrafluoroethylene). The need for an improved cathode structure arises for the following reasons: In the design and operation of a fuel-cell power system, the airflow rate is a critical parameter that determines the overall efficiency, cell voltage, and power density. It is desirable to operate at a low airflow rate in order to obtain thermal and water balance and to minimize the size and mass of the system. The performances of membrane/electrode assemblies of prior design are limited at low airflow rates. Methanol crossover increases the required airflow rate. Hence, one way to reduce the required airflow rate is to reduce the effect of methanol crossover. Improvement of the cathode structure - in particular, addition of hydrophobic particles to the cathode - has been

  1. Reactivity Descriptors for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrin, Peter; Nilekar, Anand U.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2008-11-01

    We have investigated the anode reaction in direct methanol fuel cells using a database of adsorption free energies for 16 intermediates on 12 close-packed transition metal surfaces calculated with periodic, selfconsistent, density functional theory (DFT–GGA). This database, combined with a simple electrokinetic model of the methanol electrooxidation reaction, yields mechanistic insights that are consistent with previous experimental and theoretical studies on Pt, and extends these insights to a broad spectrum of other transition metals. In addition, by using linear scaling relations between the adsorption free energies of various intermediates in the reaction network, we find that the results determined with the full database of adsorption energies can be estimated by knowing only two key descriptors for each metal surface: the free energies of OH and CO on the surface. Two mechanisms for methanol oxidation to CO₂ are investigated: an indirect mechanism that goes through a CO intermediate and a direct mechanism where methanol is oxidized to CO₂ without the formation of a CO intermediate. For the direct mechanism, we find that, because of CO poisoning, only a small current will result on all non-group 11 transition metals; of these metals, Pt is predicted to be the most active. For methanol decomposition via the indirect mechanism, we find that the onset potential is limited either by the ability to activate methanol, by the ability to activate water, or by surface poisoning by CO* or OH*/O*. Among pure metals, there is no obvious candidate for a good anode catalyst, and in order to design a better catalyst, one has to look for bi-functional surfaces such as the well-studied PtRu alloy.

  2. The removal of nitrate by nanoscale iron particles produced using the sodium borohydride method.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyoung-Chan; Park, Sung Hoon; Ahn, Ho-Geun; Chung, Minchul; Kim, Byungwhan; Kim, Sun-Jae; Seo, Seong-Gyu; Jung, Sang-Chul

    2011-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate removal of nitrate by nanoscale zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles in aqueous solution. ZVI particles was produced from wasted acid that is by-products of a pickling line at a steel work. The reaction activity of ZVI particles was evaluated through decomposition experiments of NO3-N aqueous solution. Addition of a larger amount of ZVI particles resulted in a higher decomposition rate. ZVI particles showed higher decomposition efficiencies than commercially purchased ZVI particles at all pH values. Both ZVIs showed a higher decomposition rate at a lower pH. Virtually no decomposition reaction was observed at pH of 4 or higher for purchased ZVI. The ZVI particles produced directly from wasted acid by the sodium borohydride method were not easy to handle because they were very small (10-200 nm) and were oxidized easily in the air. PMID:21456267

  3. Premixed direct injection nozzle for highly reactive fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin Paul; York, William David; Uhm, Jong Ho; Zuo, Baifang

    2013-09-24

    A fuel/air mixing tube for use in a fuel/air mixing tube bundle is provided. The fuel/air mixing tube includes an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis between an inlet end and an exit end, the outer tube wall having a thickness extending between an inner tube surface having a inner diameter and an outer tube surface having an outer tube diameter. The tube further includes at least one fuel injection hole having a fuel injection hole diameter extending through the outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  4. Nano-Engineered Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myung, Nosang; Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Wiberg, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Nano-engineered catalysts, and a method of fabricating them, have been developed in a continuing effort to improve the performances of direct methanol fuel cells as candidate power sources to supplant primary and secondary batteries in a variety of portable electronic products. In order to realize the potential for high energy densities (as much as 1.5 W h/g) of direct methanol fuel cells, it will be necessary to optimize the chemical compositions and geometric configurations of catalyst layers and electrode structures. High performance can be achieved when catalyst particles and electrode structures have the necessary small feature sizes (typically of the order of nanometers), large surface areas, optimal metal compositions, high porosity, and hydrophobicity. The present method involves electrodeposition of one or more catalytic metal(s) or a catalytic-metal/polytetrafluoroethylene nanocomposite on an alumina nanotemplate. The alumina nanotemplate is then dissolved, leaving the desired metal or metal/polytetrafluoroethylene-composite catalyst layer. Unlike some prior methods of making fine metal catalysts, this method does not involve processing at elevated temperature; all processing can be done at room temperature. In addition, this method involves fewer steps and is more amenable to scaling up for mass production. Alumina nanotemplates are porous alumina membranes that have been fabricated, variously, by anodizing either pure aluminum or aluminum that has been deposited on silicon by electronbeam evaporation. The diameters of the pores (7 to 300 nm), areal densities of pores (as much as 7 x 10(exp 10)sq cm), and lengths of pores (up to about 100 nm) can be tailored by selection of fabrication conditions. In a given case, the catalytic metal, catalytic metal alloy, or catalytic metal/ polytetrafluoroethylene composite is electrodeposited in the pores of the alumina nanotemplate. The dimensions of the pores, together with the electrodeposition conditions

  5. Anode catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells utilizing directly solar light illumination.

    PubMed

    Chu, Daobao; Wang, Shuxi; Zheng, Peng; Wang, Jian; Zha, Longwu; Hou, Yuanyuan; He, Jianguo; Xiao, Ying; Lin, Huashui; Tian, Zhaowu

    2009-01-01

    Shine a light: A PtNiRu/TiO(2) anode catalyst for direct ethanol fuel cells shows photocatalytic activity. The peak current density for ethanol oxidation under solar light illumination is 2-3 times greater than that in the absence of solar light. Ethanol is oxidized by light-generated holes, and the electrons are collected by the TiO(2) support to generate the oxidation current.Novel PtNiRu/TiO(2) anode catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) were prepared from PtNiRu nanoparticles (1:1:1 atomic ratios) and a nanoporous TiO(2) film by a sol-gel and electrodeposition method. The performances of the catalysts for ethanol oxidation were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results indicate a remarkable enhancement of activity for ethanol oxidation under solar light illumination. Under solar light illumination, the generated oxidation peak current density is 24.6 mA cm(-2), which is about 2.5 times higher than that observed without solar light (9.9 mA cm(-2)). The high catalytic activity of the PtNiRu/TiO(2) complex catalyst for the electrooxidation of ethanol may be attributed to the modified metal/nanoporous TiO(2) film, and the enhanced electrooxidation of ethanol under solar light may be due to the photogeneration of holes in the modified nanoporous TiO(2) film.

  6. Exergy analysis of a passive direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, Hafez; Faghri, Amir

    An analytical, one-dimensional, steady state model is employed to solve for overpotentials at the catalyst layers along with the liquid water and methanol distributions at the anode, and oxygen transport at the cathode. An iterative method is utilized to calculate the cell temperature at each cell current density. A comprehensive exergy analysis considering all possible species inside the cell during normal operation is presented. The contributions of different types of irreversibilities including overpotentials at the anode and cathode, methanol crossover, contact resistance, and proton conductivity of the membrane are investigated. Of all losses, overpotentials in conjunction with the methanol crossover are considered as the major exergy destruction sources inside the cell during the normal operation. While the exergy losses due to electrochemical reactions are more significant at higher current densities, exergy destruction by methanol crossover at the cathode plays more important role at lower currents. It is also found that the first-law efficiency of a passive direct methanol fuel cell increases as the methanol solution in the tank increases in concentration from 1 M to 3 M. However, this is not the case with the second-law efficiency which is always decreasing as the concentration of the methanol solution in the tank increases.

  7. The direct formate fuel cell with an alkaline anion exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartrom, Amy M.; Haan, John L.

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate for the first time an operating Direct Formate Fuel Cell employing formate salts as the anode fuel, air or oxygen as the oxidant, a polymer anion exchange membrane, and metal catalysts at the anode and cathode. Operation of the DFFC at 60 °C using 1 M KOOCH and 2 M KOH as the anode fuel and electrolyte and oxygen gas at the cathode produces 144 mW cm-2 of peak power density, 181 mA cm-2 current density at 0.6 V, and an open circuit voltage of 0.931 V. This performance is competitive with alkaline Direct Liquid Fuel Cells (DLFCs) previously reported in the literature and demonstrates that formate fuel is a legitimate contender with alcohol fuels for alkaline DLFCs. A survey of the literature shows that a formate-oxygen fuel cell has a high theoretical potential, and the safe, renewable formate fuel does not poison the anode catalyst.

  8. Direct Carbon Fuel Cells: Assessment of their Potential as Solid Carbon Fuel Based Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, R

    2004-04-23

    Small-scale experimental work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has confirmed that a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) containing a molten carbonate electrolyte completely reacts solid elemental carbon with atmospheric oxygen contained in ambient air at a temperature of 650-800 C. The efficiency of conversion of the chemical energy in the fuel to DC electricity is 75-80% and is a result of zero entropy change for this reaction and the fixed chemical potentials of C and CO{sub 2}. This is about twice as efficient as other forms power production processes that utilize solid fuels such as petroleum coke or coal. These range from 30-40% for coal fired conventional subcritical or supercritical boilers to 38-42% for IGCC plants. A wide range of carbon-rich solids including activated carbons derived from natural gas, petroleum coke, raw coal, and deeply de-ashed coal have been evaluated with similar conversion results. The rate of electricity production has been shown to correlate with disorder in the carbon structure. This report provides a preliminary independent assessment of the economic potential of DCFC for competitive power generation. This assessment was conducted as part of a Director's Research Committee Review of DCFC held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on April 9, 2004. The key question that this assessment addresses is whether this technology, which appears to be very promising from a scientific standpoint, has the potential to be successfully scaled up to a system that can compete with currently available power generation systems that serve existing electricity markets. These markets span a wide spectrum in terms of the amount of power to be delivered and the competitive cost in that market. For example, DCFC technology can be used for the personal power market where the current competition for delivery of kilowatts of electricity is storage batteries, for the distributed generation market where the competition for on-site power

  9. Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

    2013-12-17

    A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

  10. Study of catalysis for solid oxide fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xirong

    Fuel cells offer the enticing promise of cleaner electricity with lower environmental impact than traditional energy conversion technologies. Driven by the interest in power sources for portable electronics, and distributed generation and automotive propulsion markets, active development efforts in the technologies of both solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) devices have achieved significant progress. However, current catalysts for fuel cells are either of low catalytic activity or extremely expensive, presenting a key barrier toward the widespread commercialization of fuel cell devices. In this thesis work, atomic layer deposition (ALD), a novel thin film deposition technique, was employed to apply catalytic Pt to SOFC, and investigate both Pt skin catalysts and Pt-Ru catalysts for methanol oxidation, a very important reaction for DMFC, to increase the activity and utilization levels of the catalysts while simultaneously reducing the catalyst loading. For SOFCs, we explored the use of ALD for the fabrication of electrode components, including an ultra-thin Pt film for use as the electrocatalyst, and a Pt mesh structure for a current collector for SOFCs, aiming for precise control over the catalyst loading and catalyst geometry, and enhancement in the current collect efficiency. We choose Pt since it has high chemical stability and excellent catalytic activity for the O2 reduction reaction and the H2 oxidation reaction even at low operating temperatures. Working SOFC fuel cells were fabricated with ALD-deposited Pt thin films as an electrode/catalyst layer. The measured fuel cell performance reveals that comparable peak power densities were achieved for ALD-deposited Pt anodes with only one-fifth of the Pt loading relative to a DC-sputtered counterpart. In addition to the continuous electrocatalyst layer, a micro-patterned Pt structure was developed via the technique of area selective ALD. By coating yttria-stabilized zirconia, a

  11. Synthesis of Borohydride and Catalytic Dehydrogenation by Hydrogel Based Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynuegri, Tugba Akkas; Karabulut, Ahmet F.; Guru, Metin

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with the synthesis of calcium borohydride (Ca(BH4)2) as hydrogen storage material. Calcium chloride salt (CaCl2), magnesium hydride (MgH2), and boron oxide (B2O3) were used as reactants in the mechanochemical synthesis of Ca(BH4)2. The mechanochemical reaction was carried out by means of Spex type ball milling without applying high pressure and temperature. Parametric studies have been established at different reaction times and for different amounts of reactants at a constant ball to powder ratio (BPR) 4:1. The best combination was determined by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) analysis. According to the FT-IR analysis, reaction time, the first reaction parameter, was found as 1600 min. After the reaction time was fixed at 1600 min, the difference of the B-H peak areas was dependent on the amount of reactant MgH2 that was investigated. The amount of the reactant (MgH2), the second reaction parameter, was measured to be 2.85 times more than the stoichiometric amount of MgH2. According to our previous studies, BPR was selected as 4:1 for all experiments. Samples were prepared in a glove box under argon atmosphere but the time that elapsed for FT-IR analysis highly affected B-H bonds. B-H peak areas clearly decreased with time because of negative effect of ambient atmosphere. A catalyst was prepared by absorbing cobalt fluoride (CoF2) in poly (acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) hydrogel matrices type and its catalytic dehydrogenation performance that has been characterized by the catalytic reaction of sodium borohydride's known hydrogen capacity in an alkaline medium. The metal amount of hydrogel catalyst was determined as 135.82 mg Co by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The specific dehydrogenation capacity of the Co active compound in the catalyst thanks to catalytic dehydrogenation of commercial sodium borohydride was measured as 1.66 mL H2/mg Co.

  12. Magnesium Borohydride as a Hydrogen Storage Material: Synthesis of Unsolvated Mg(BH4)2

    SciTech Connect

    Soloveichik, G.; Andrus, M; Gao, Y; Zhao, J; Kniajanski, S

    2009-01-01

    Different methods for preparation of unsolvated magnesium borohydride, a promising material for hydrogen storage, based on exchange reaction of MgCl2 with lithium and sodium borohydride in different solvents have been evaluated. A convenient scalable method for synthesis of pure Mg(BH4)2 by ball milling a mixture of MgCl2 and NaBH4 in diethyl ether has been developed. Crystalline stable low and high temperature phases, as well as a new metastable phase of unsolvated magnesium borohydride have been prepared.

  13. Facts and issues of direct disposal of spent fuel; Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, P.B.

    1993-10-01

    This report reviews those facts and issues that affect the direct disposal of spent reactor fuels. It is intended as a resource document for those impacted by the current Department of Energy (DOE) guidance that calls for the cessation of fuel reprocessing. It is not intended as a study of the specific impacts (schedules and costs) to the Savannah River Site (SRS) alone. Commercial fuels, other low enriched fuels, highly enriched defense-production, research, and naval reactor fuels are included in this survey, except as prevented by rules on classification.

  14. Methanol-Resistant Oxygen-Reduction Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, A. K.; Raman, R. K.

    2003-08-01

    Methanol oxidation in the cathode compartment of the fuel cell, which occurs during the oxygen-reduction reaction on Pt-based cathodes, constitutes a significant performance loss in the direct methanol fuel cells. Over the past decade, four types of methanol-resistant oxygen-reduction catalysts have been developed to circumvent this problem. Among these, transition-metal chalcogenides, and in particular RuSe, have shown effective selectivity to oxygen-reduction reaction in the presence of methanol. These catalysts not only can enhance the performance of the conventional direct methanol fuel cells but also could provide a route to develop mixed-reactants direct methanol fuel cells, which could be highly cost-effective in comparison with the conventional direct methanol fuel cells. This article is a brief update on the preparation, characterization, and implications of methanol-resistant oxygen-reduction catalysts.

  15. Engineering microbial fuels cells: recent patents and new directions.

    PubMed

    Biffinger, Justin C; Ringeisen, Bradley R

    2008-01-01

    Fundamental research into how microbes generate electricity within microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has far outweighed the practical application and large scale development of microbial energy harvesting devices. MFCs are considered alternatives to standard commercial polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology because the fuel supply does not need to be purified, ambient operating temperatures are maintained with biologically compatible materials, and the biological catalyst is self-regenerating. The generation of electricity during wastewater treatment using MFCs may profoundly affect the approach to anaerobic treatment technologies used in wastewater treatment as a result of developing this energy harvesting technology. However, the materials and engineering designs for MFCs were identical to commercial fuel cells until 2003. Compared to commercial fuel cells, MFCs will remain underdeveloped as long as low power densities are generated from the best systems. The variety of designs for MFCs has expanded rapidly in the last five years in the literature, but the patent protection has lagged behind. This review will cover recent and important patents relating to MFC designs and progress. PMID:19075862

  16. Population exposure from the fuel cycle: Review and future direction

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    The legacy of radiation exposures confronting man arises from two historical sources of energy, the sun and radioactive decay. Contemporary man continues to be dependent on these two energy sources, which include the nuclear fuel cycle. Radiation exposures from all energy sources should be examined, with particular emphasis on the nuclear fuel cycle, incidents such as Chernobyl and Three Mile Island. In addition to risk estimation, concepts such as de minimis, life shortening as a measure of risk, and competing risks as projected into the future must be considered in placing radiation exposures in perspective. The utility of these concepts is in characterizing population exposures for decision makers in a manner that the public may judge acceptable. All these viewpoints are essential in the evaluation of population exposure from the nuclear fuel cycle.

  17. Hydrogen Gas as a Fuel in Direct Injection Diesel Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanasekaran, Chinnathambi; Mohankumar, Gabriael

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen is expected to be one of the most important fuels in the near future for solving the problem caused by the greenhouse gases, for protecting environment and saving conventional fuels. In this study, a dual fuel engine of hydrogen and diesel was investigated. Hydrogen was conceded through the intake port, and simultaneously air and diesel was pervaded into the cylinder. Using electronic gas injector and electronic control unit, the injection timing and duration varied. In this investigation, a single cylinder, KIRLOSKAR AV1, DI Diesel engine was used. Hydrogen injection timing was fixed at TDC and injection duration was timed for 30°, 60°, and 90° crank angles. The injection timing of diesel was fixed at 23° BTDC. When hydrogen is mixed with inlet air, emanation of HC, CO and CO2 decreased without any emission (exhaustion) of smoke while increasing the brake thermal efficiency.

  18. Detailed Multi‐dimensional Modeling of Direct Internal Reforming Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tseronis, K.; Fragkopoulos, I.S.; Bonis, I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Fuel flexibility is a significant advantage of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and can be attributed to their high operating temperature. Here we consider a direct internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell setup in which a separate fuel reformer is not required. We construct a multidimensional, detailed model of a planar solid oxide fuel cell, where mass transport in the fuel channel is modeled using the Stefan‐Maxwell model, whereas the mass transport within the porous electrodes is simulated using the Dusty‐Gas model. The resulting highly nonlinear model is built into COMSOL Multiphysics, a commercial computational fluid dynamics software, and is validated against experimental data from the literature. A number of parametric studies is performed to obtain insights on the direct internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell system behavior and efficiency, to aid the design procedure. It is shown that internal reforming results in temperature drop close to the inlet and that the direct internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell performance can be enhanced by increasing the operating temperature. It is also observed that decreases in the inlet temperature result in smoother temperature profiles and in the formation of reduced thermal gradients. Furthermore, the direct internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell performance was found to be affected by the thickness of the electrochemically‐active anode catalyst layer, although not always substantially, due to the counter‐balancing behavior of the activation and ohmic overpotentials. PMID:27570502

  19. Nanoconfinement in activated mesoporous carbon of calcium borohydride for improved reversible hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Comănescu, Cezar; Capurso, Giovanni; Maddalena, Amedeo

    2012-09-28

    Mesoporous carbon frameworks were synthesized using the soft-template method. Ca(BH(4))(2) was incorporated into activated mesoporous carbon by the incipient wetness method. The activation of mesoporous carbon was necessary to optimize the surface area and pore size. Thermal programmed absorption measurements showed that the confinement of this borohydride into carbon nanoscaffolds improved its reversible capacity (relative to the reactive portion) and performance of hydrogen storage compared to unsupported borohydride. Hydrogen release from the supported hydride started at a temperature as low as 100 °C and the dehydrogenation rate was fast compared to the bulk borohydride. In addition, the hydrogen pressure necessary to regenerate the borohydride from the dehydrogenation products was reduced. PMID:22948563

  20. A theoretical study of the structure and stability of borohydride on 3d transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arevalo, Ryan Lacdao; Escaño, Mary Clare Sison; Gyenge, Elod; Kasai, Hideaki

    2012-12-01

    The adsorption of borohydride on 3d transition metals (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu) was studied using first principles calculations within spin-polarized density functional theory. Magnetic effect on the stability of borohydride is noted. Molecular adsorption is favorable on Co, Ni and Cu, which is characterized by the strong s-dzz hybridization of the adsorbate-substrate states. Dissociated adsorption structure yielding one or two H adatom fragments on the surface is observed for Cr, Mn and Fe.

  1. Efficiency of non-optimized direct carbon fuel cell with molten alkaline electrolyte fueled by carbonized biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacprzak, A.; Kobyłecki, R.; Włodarczyk, R.; Bis, Z.

    2016-07-01

    The direct carbon fuel cells (DCFCs) belong to new generation of energy conversion devices that are characterized by much higher efficiencies and lower emission of pollutants than conventional coal-fired power plants. In this paper the DCFC with molten hydroxide electrolyte is considered as the most promising type of the direct carbon fuel cells. Binary alkali hydroxide mixture (NaOH-LiOH, 90-10 mol%) is used as electrolyte and the biochar of apple tree origin carbonized at 873 K is applied as fuel. The performance of a lab-scale DCFC with molten alkaline electrolyte is investigated and theoretical, practical, voltage, and fuel utilization efficiencies of the cell are calculated and discussed. The practical efficiency is assessed on the basis of fuel HHV and LHV and the values are estimated at 40% and 41%, respectively. The average voltage efficiency is calculated as roughly 59% (at 0.65 V) and it is in a relatively good agreement with the values obtained by other researchers. The calculated efficiency of fuel utilization exceeds 95% thus indicating a high degree of carbon conversion into the electric power.

  2. ``Clean`` fuels: Does the new direction make environmental sense?

    SciTech Connect

    Saricks, C.L.; Wang, M.Q.

    1996-05-01

    This paper examines the ramifications of this a three-pronged energy philosophy, with special reference to its expected environmental impact if it is fully implemented as policy. To recapitulate, the three prongs are to rely on a free energy market to determine winners and losers, which could certainly include Reformulated Gasoline (RFG) if it remains relatively cheap and clean; refocus the bulk of government-sponsored transportation energy research toward a ``great leap ahead`` to fully renewable and essentially pollution-free fuels such as hydrogen and fuel cells; and discontinue AFV pump priming. Of special interest is a premise that appears common to all prongs--that none of these measures represents a retreat from environmental goals or accomplishments on record since the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 was passed.

  3. Direct production of fractionated and upgraded hydrocarbon fuels from biomass

    DOEpatents

    Felix, Larry G.; Linck, Martin B.; Marker, Terry L.; Roberts, Michael J.

    2014-08-26

    Multistage processing of biomass to produce at least two separate fungible fuel streams, one dominated by gasoline boiling-point range liquids and the other by diesel boiling-point range liquids. The processing involves hydrotreating the biomass to produce a hydrotreatment product including a deoxygenated hydrocarbon product of gasoline and diesel boiling materials, followed by separating each of the gasoline and diesel boiling materials from the hydrotreatment product and each other.

  4. Compact bipolar plate-free direct methanol fuel cell stacks.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xue; Takahashi, Motohiro; Nagao, Masahiro; Hibino, Takashi

    2011-05-14

    Fuel cells with a PtAu/C anode and a Pr-doped Mn(2)O(3)/C cathode were stacked without using a bipolar plate, and their discharge properties were investigated in a methanol aqueous solution bubbled with air. A three-cell stack exhibited a stack voltage of 2330 mV and a power output of 21 mW. PMID:21451850

  5. Direct power generation from waste coffee grounds in a biomass fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hansaem; Ocon, Joey D.; Lee, Seunghwa; Lee, Jae Kwang; Lee, Jaeyoung

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of direct power generation from waste coffee grounds (WCG) via high-temperature carbon fuel cell technology. At 900 °C, the WCG-powered fuel cell exhibits a maximum power density that is twice than carbon black. Our results suggest that the heteroatoms and hydrogen contained in WCG are crucial in providing good cell performance due to its in-situ gasification, without any need for pre-reforming. As a first report on the use of coffee as a carbon-neutral fuel, this study shows the potential of waste biomass (e.g. WCG) in sustainable electricity generation in fuel cells.

  6. Preliminary study on direct recycling of spent BWR fuel in BWR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waris, A.; Sumbono, Prayudhatama, Dythia; Novitrian, Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-06-01

    Spent fuel management is considered to be one of the main problems in energy nuclear utilization. Recycling after reprocessing is one of the options for dealing with nuclear reactor spent fuel. Reprocessing is very costly and needs remote handling since spent fuel is very hazard high level waste. On top of that, only a small number of countries can manage a reprocessing plant. If country likes Indonesia decide to "go nuclear", it should find another way to deal with the nuclear spent fuel. Korea has proposed the DUPIC (Direct Utilization of Spent PWR fuel In CANDU) concept. Nevertheless, DUPIC concept requires two types of nuclear power plants, i.e., pressurized water reactor (PWR) and CANadian Deuterium Uranium reactor (CANDU). In this study, we evaluate a scheme of direct recycling of spent BWR fuel in BWR system, under the concept that we have called as a SUPEL (Straight Utilization of sPEnt LWR fuel in LWR system) scenario. Several spent BWR fuel compositions in loaded BWR fuel has been evaluated to achieve the criticality of reactor.

  7. High-performance liquid-catalyst fuel cell for direct biomass-into-electricity conversion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Mu, Wei; Deng, Yulin

    2014-12-01

    Herein, we report high-performance fuel cells that are catalyzed solely by polyoxometalate (POM) solution without any solid metal or metal oxide. The novel design of the liquid-catalyst fuel cells (LCFC) changes the traditional gas-solid-surface heterogeneous reactions to liquid-catalysis reactions. With this design, raw biomasses, such as cellulose, starch, and even grass or wood powders can be directly converted into electricity. The power densities of the fuel cell with switchgrass (dry powder) and bush allamanda (freshly collected) are 44 mW cm(-2) and 51 mW cm(-2) respectively. For the cellulose-based biomass fuel cell, the power density is almost 3000 times higher than that of cellulose-based microbial fuel cells. Unlike noble-metal catalysts, POMs are tolerant to most organic and inorganic contaminants. Therefore, almost any raw biomass can be used directly to produce electricity without prior purification.

  8. High-performance liquid-catalyst fuel cell for direct biomass-into-electricity conversion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Mu, Wei; Deng, Yulin

    2014-12-01

    Herein, we report high-performance fuel cells that are catalyzed solely by polyoxometalate (POM) solution without any solid metal or metal oxide. The novel design of the liquid-catalyst fuel cells (LCFC) changes the traditional gas-solid-surface heterogeneous reactions to liquid-catalysis reactions. With this design, raw biomasses, such as cellulose, starch, and even grass or wood powders can be directly converted into electricity. The power densities of the fuel cell with switchgrass (dry powder) and bush allamanda (freshly collected) are 44 mW cm(-2) and 51 mW cm(-2) respectively. For the cellulose-based biomass fuel cell, the power density is almost 3000 times higher than that of cellulose-based microbial fuel cells. Unlike noble-metal catalysts, POMs are tolerant to most organic and inorganic contaminants. Therefore, almost any raw biomass can be used directly to produce electricity without prior purification. PMID:25283435

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of Direct Urea Solid Oxide Fuel Cell in combined heat and power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, F.; Dincer, I.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive steady state modelling and thermodynamic analysis of Direct Urea Solid Oxide Fuel Cell integrated with Gas Turbine power cycle (DU-SOFC/GT). The use of urea as direct fuel mitigates public health and safety risks associated with the use of hydrogen and ammonia. The integration scheme in this study covers both oxygen ion-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC-O) and hydrogen proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC-H). Parametric case studies are carried out to investigate the effects of design and operating parameters on the overall performance of the system. The results reveal that the fuel cell exhibited the highest level of exergy destruction among other system components. Furthermore, the SOFC-O based system offers better overall performance than that with the SOFC-H option mainly due to the detrimental reverse water-gas shift reaction at the SOFC anode as well as the unique configuration of the system.

  10. Implementation of direct LSC method for diesel samples on the fuel market.

    PubMed

    Krištof, Romana; Hirsch, Marko; Kožar Logar, Jasmina

    2014-11-01

    The European Union develops common EU policy and strategy on biofuels and sustainable bio-economy through several documents. The encouragement of biofuel's consumption is therefore the obligation of each EU member state. The situation in Slovenian fuel market is presented and compared with other EU countries in the frame of prescribed values from EU directives. Diesel is the most common fuel for transportation needs in Slovenia. The study was therefore performed on diesel. The sampling net was determined in accordance with the fuel consumption statistics of the country. 75 Sampling points were located on different types of roads. The quantity of bio-component in diesel samples was determined by direct LSC method through measurement of C-14 content. The measured values were in the range from 0 up to nearly 6 mass percentage of bio-component in fuel. The method has proved to be appropriate, suitable and effective for studies on the real fuel market. PMID:24792901

  11. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell system diagnosis based on the signed directed graph method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Jianfeng; Lu, Languang; Ouyang, Minggao; Li, Jianqiu; Xu, Liangfei

    The fuel-cell powered bus is becoming the favored choice for electric vehicles because of its extended driving range, zero emissions, and high energy conversion efficiency when compared with battery-operated electric vehicles. In China, a demonstration program for the fuel cell bus fleet operated at the Beijing Olympics in 2008 and the Shanghai Expo in 2010. It is necessary to develop comprehensive proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) diagnostic tools to increase the reliability of these systems. It is especially critical for fuel-cell city buses serving large numbers of passengers using public transportation. This paper presents a diagnostic analysis and implementation study based on the signed directed graph (SDG) method for the fuel-cell system. This diagnostic system was successfully implemented in the fuel-cell bus fleet at the Shanghai Expo in 2010.

  12. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications: Conceptual vehicle design report pure fuel cell powertrain vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Oei, D.; Kinnelly, A.; Sims, R.; Sulek, M.; Wernette, D.

    1997-02-01

    In partial fulfillment of the Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC02-94CE50389, {open_quotes}Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}, this preliminary report addresses the conceptual design and packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle. Three classes of vehicles are considered in this design and packaging exercise, the Aspire representing the small vehicle class, the Taurus or Aluminum Intensive Vehicle (AIV) Sable representing the mid-size vehicle and the E-150 Econoline representing the van-size class. A fuel cell system spreadsheet model and Ford`s Corporate Vehicle Simulation Program (CVSP) were utilized to determine the size and the weight of the fuel cell required to power a particular size vehicle. The fuel cell power system must meet the required performance criteria for each vehicle. In this vehicle design and packaging exercise, the following assumptions were made: fuel cell power system density of 0.33 kW/kg and 0.33 kg/liter, platinum catalyst loading less than or equal to 0.25 mg/cm{sup 2} total and hydrogen tanks containing gaseous hydrogen under 340 atm (5000 psia) pressure. The fuel cell power system includes gas conditioning, thermal management, humidity control, and blowers or compressors, where appropriate. This conceptual design of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle will help in the determination of the propulsion system requirements for a vehicle powered by a PEMFC engine in lieu of the internal combustion (IC) engine. Only basic performance level requirements are considered for the three classes of vehicles in this report. Each vehicle will contain one or more hydrogen storage tanks and hydrogen fuel for 560 km (350 mi) driving range. Under these circumstances, the packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle is increasingly difficult as the vehicle size diminishes.

  13. Direct methanol fuel cells for transportation applications. Quarterly technical report, June 1996--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, T.F.; Kunz, H.R.; Moore, R.

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this research and development effort is to advance the performance and viability of direct methanol fuel cell technology for light-duty transportation applications. For fuel cells to be an attractive alternative to conventional automotive power plants, the fuel cell stack combined with the fuel processor and ancillary systems must be competitive in terms of both performance and costs. A major advantage for the direct methanol fuel cell is that a fuel processor is not required. A direct methanol fuel cell has the potential of satisfying the demanding requirements for transportation applications, such as rapid start-up and rapid refueling. The preliminary goals of this effort are: (1) 310 W/l, (2) 445 W/kg, and (3) potential manufacturing costs of $48/kW. In the twelve month period for phase 1, the following critical areas will be investigated: (1) an improved proton-exchange membrane that is more impermeable to methanol, (2) improved cathode catalysts, and (3) advanced anode catalysts. In addition, these components will be combined to form membrane-electrode assemblies (MEA`s) and evaluated in subscale tests. Finally a conceptual design and program plan will be developed for the construction of a 5 kW direct methanol stack in phase II of the program.

  14. Combustion of Various Highly Reactive Fuels in a 3.84- by 10-inch Mach 2 Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Harrison, Jr.; Fletcher, Edward A.

    1959-01-01

    The following fuels and fuel combinations injected from the top wall of a Mach 2 wind tunnel were successfully burned and gave associated pressure rises: aluminum borohydride, pentaborane, mixtures containing up to 41 percent JP-4 fuel in aluminum borohydride, tandem injections of aluminum borohydride, tandem injections of JP-4 fuel and aluminum borohydride, trimethyl aluminum with water injections, and diethyl aluminum hydride with water injections. The following fuels could not be ignited at the tunnel conditions (static pressure, 5.6 in. Hg; static temperature, -148 F): trimethylborane, triethylborane, propylpentaborane, ethyl- decaborane, and vinylsilane. Studies in which the heated region was probed by water injections indicated that the flow downstream of the flame front is subsonic and recirculating.

  15. Promoted dehydrogenation in ammine lithium borohydride supported by carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinyi; Li, Shaofeng; Guo, Yanhui; Yu, Xuebin

    2011-10-14

    In this paper, ammine lithium borohydride (LiBH(4)·NH(3)) was successfully impregnated into multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through a melting technique. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, and density measurements were employed to confirm the formation of the nanostructured LiBH(4)·NH(3)/CNTs composites. As a consequence, it was found that the dehydrogenation of the loaded LiBH(4)·NH(3) was remarkably enhanced, showing an onset dehydrogenation at temperatures below 100 °C, together with a prominent desorption of pure hydrogen at around 280 °C, with a capacity as high as 6.7 wt.%, while only a trace of H(2) liberation was present for the pristine LiBH(4)·NH(3) in the same temperature range. Structural examination indicated that the significant modification of the thermal decomposition route of LiBH(4)·NH(3) achieved in the present study is due to the CNT-assisted formation of B-N-based hydride composite, starting at a temperature below 100 °C. It is demonstrated that the formation of this B-N-based hydride covalently stabilized the [NH] groups that were weakly coordinated on Li cations in the pristine LiBH(4)·NH(3)via strong B-N bonds, and furthermore, accounted for the substantial hydrogen desorption at higher temperatures. PMID:21850349

  16. Sodium borohydride removes aldehyde inhibitors for enhancing biohydrogen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Richen; Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Song, Wenlu; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-12-01

    To enhance biohydrogen production from glucose and xylose in the presence of aldehyde inhibitors, reducing agent (i.e., sodium borohydride) was in situ added for effective detoxification. The detoxification efficiencies of furfural (96.7%) and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF, 91.7%) with 30mM NaBH4 were much higher than those of vanillin (77.3%) and syringaldehyde (69.3%). Biohydrogen fermentation was completely inhibited without detoxification, probably because of the consumption of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) by inhibitors reduction (R-CHO+2NADH→R-CH2OH+2NAD(+)). Addition of 30mM NaBH4 provided the reducing power necessary for inhibitors reduction (4R-CHO+NaBH4+2H2O→4R-CH2OH+NaBO2). The recovered reducing power in fermentation resulted in 99.3% recovery of the hydrogen yield and 64.6% recovery of peak production rate. Metabolite production and carbon conversion after detoxification significantly increased to 63.7mM and 81.9%, respectively.

  17. Direct Utilization of Coal Syngas in High Temperature Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Celik, Ismail B.

    2014-10-30

    This EPSCoR project had two primary goals: (i) to build infrastructure and work force at WVU to support long-term research in the area of fuel cells and related sciences; (ii) study effects of various impurities found in coal-syngas on performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). As detailed in this report the WVU research team has made significant accomplishments in both of these areas. What follows is a brief summary of these accomplishments: State-of-the-art test facilities and diagnostic tools have been built and put into use. These include cell manufacturing, half-cell and full-cell test benches, XPS, XRD, TEM, Raman, EDAX, SEM, EIS, and ESEM equipment, unique in-situ measurement techniques and test benches (Environmental EM, Transient Mass-Spectrometer-MS, and IR Optical Temperature measurements). In addition, computational capabilities have been developed culminating in a multi-scale multi-physics fuel cell simulation code, DREAM-SOFC, as well as a Beowulf cluster with 64 CPU units. We have trained 16 graduate students, 10 postdoctoral fellows, and recruited 4 new young faculty members who have actively participated in the EPSCoR project. All four of these faculty members have already been promoted to the tenured associate professor level. With the help of these faculty and students, we were able to secure 14 research awards/contracts amounting to a total of circa $5.0 Million external funding in closely related areas of research. Using the facilities mentioned above, the effects of PH3, HCl, Cl2, and H2S on cell performance have been studied in detail, mechanisms have been identified, and also remedies have been proposed and demonstrated in the laboratory. For example, it has been determined that PH3 reacts rapidly with Ni to from secondary compounds which may become softer or even melt at high temperature and then induce Ni migration to the surface of the cell changing the material and micro-structural properties of the cell drastically. It is found that

  18. Synthesis, structure and gas-phase reactivity of the mixed silver hydride borohydride nanocluster [Ag3(μ3-H)(μ3-BH4)L(Ph)3]BF4 (L(Ph) = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane).

    PubMed

    Zavras, Athanasios; Ariafard, Alireza; Khairallah, George N; White, Jonathan M; Mulder, Roger J; Canty, Allan J; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2015-11-21

    Borohydrides react with silver salts to give products that span multiple scales ranging from discrete mononuclear compounds through to silver nanoparticles and colloids. The cluster cations [Ag3(H)(BH4)L3](+) are observed upon electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of solutions containing sodium borohydride, silver(I) tetrafluoroborate and bis(dimethylphosphino)methane (L(Me)) or bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (L(Ph)). By adding NaBH4 to an acetonitrile solution of AgBF4 and L(Ph), cooled to ca. -10 °C, we have been able to isolate the first mixed silver hydride borohydride nanocluster, [Ag3(μ3-H)(μ3-BH4)L(Ph)3]BF4, and structurally characterise it via X-ray crystallography. Combined gas-phase experiments (L(Me) and L(Ph)) and DFT calculations (L(Me)) reveal how loss of a ligand from the cationic complexes [Ag3(H)(BH4)L3](+) provides a change in geometry that facilitates subsequent loss of BH3 to produce the dihydride clusters, [Ag3(H)2Ln](+) (n = 1 and 2). Together with the results of previous studies (Girod et al., Chem. - Eur. J., 2014, 20, 16626), this provides a direct link between mixed silver hydride/borohydride nanoclusters, silver hydride nanoclusters, and silver nanoclusters.

  19. ERC product improvement activities for direct fuel cell power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, C.; Carlson, G.; Doyon, J.

    1995-08-01

    This program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from the current power plant demonstration status to the commercial design in an approximately five-year period. The specific objectives which will allow attainment of the overall program goal are: (1) Define market-responsive power plant requirements and specifications, (2) Establish the design for a multifuel, low-cost, modular, market-responsive power plant, (3) Resolve power plant manufacturing issues and define the design for the commercial manufacturing facility, (4) Define the stack and BOP equipment packaging arrangement and define module designs, (5) Acquire capability to support developmental testing of stacks and BOP equipment as required to prepare for commercial design, and (6) Resolve stack and BOP equipment technology issues and design, build, and field test a modular commercial prototype power plant to demonstrate readiness for commercial entry. A seven-task program, dedicated to attaining objective(s) in the areas noted above, was initiated in December 1994. Accomplishments of the first six months are discussed in this paper.

  20. ERC product improvement activities for direct fuel cell power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Maru, H.C.; Farooque, M.; Bentley, C.

    1995-12-01

    This program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from the current power plant demonstration status to the commercial design in an approximately five-year period. The specific objectives which will allow attainment of the overall program goal are: (1) Define market-responsive power plant requirements and specifications, (2) Establish the design for a multifuel, low-cost, modular, market-responsive power plant, (3) Resolve power plant manufacturing issues and define the design for the commercial manufacturing facility, (4) Define the stack and BOP equipment packaging arrangement and define module designs, (5) Acquire capability to support developmental testing of stacks and BOP equipment as required to prepare for commercial design, and (6) Resolve stack and BOP equipment technology issues and design, build, and field test a modular commercial prototype power plant to demonstrate readiness for commercial entry. A seven-task program, dedicated to attaining objective(s) in the areas noted above, was initiated in December 1994. Accomplishments of the first six months are discussed in this paper.

  1. Correlation between the ionic potential and thermal stability of metal borohydrides: First-principles investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błoński, Piotr; Łodziana, Zbigniew

    2014-08-01

    Metal borohydrides are intensively studied because of their potential applications as versatile hydrogen storage. The relation between the formation enthalpy and the Pauling electronegativity established for these materials [Phys. Rev. B 74, 045126 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevB.74.045126] led to the idea of developing mixed-cation compounds that may provide a route for tuning the thermodynamic stability of metal borohydrides. We report a systematic ab initio investigation of the single-metallic and bimetallic borohydrides, and via an examination of the Born effective charges we provide insight into the physical mechanism determining their stabilities. We show that the decreasing stability of metal borohydrides follows the increasing polarizing ability of the cationic bonding component, expressed as the square root of the cation's dynamical charge divided by its radius in coordinated anion polyhedra around the cation. The charge-to-size ratio thus provides a simple yet physically sound measure of the stabilities of metal borohydrides that can be obtained in relatively simple calculations.

  2. Direct ethanol fuel cell using hydrotalcite clay as a hydroxide ion conductive electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Tadanaga, Kiyoharu; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Akitoshi; Tatsumisago, Masahiro

    2010-10-15

    An alkaline-type direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) using a natural clay electrolyte with non-platinum catalysts is proposed. So-called hydrotalcite clay, Mg–Al layered double hydroxide intercalated with CO₃²⁻, is shown to be a hydroxide ion conductor. An alkaline-type DEFC using this natural clay as the electrolyte and aqueous solution of ethanol and potassium hydroxide as a source of fuel exhibits excellent electrochemical performance from room temperature to 80 °C.

  3. Coal fueled ported kiln direct reduction process in Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Rierson, D.W.

    1994-12-31

    Allis Mineral Systems (AMS), formerly the minerals processing group at Allis-Chalmers Corporation, developed a ported kiln process in the 1960`s specifically for the direct reduction of iron ore. The process is called ACCAR. This ported kiln technology has more recently been coupled with AMS` GRATE-KILN System for iron oxide pelletizing into the GRATE-CAR Process, for minerals reduction. The GRATE-CAR Process can handle a fine grained ore concentrate through the steps of agglomeration, induration and reduction in a single production line.

  4. Recent Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, the effects of methanol crossover and airflow rates on the cathode potential of an operating direct methanol fuel cell are explored. Techniques for quantifying methanol crossover in a fuel cell and for separating the electrical performance of each electrode in a fuel cell are discussed. The effect of methanol concentration on cathode potential has been determined to be significant. The cathode is found to be mass transfer limited when operating on low flow rate air and high concentrations of methanol. Improvements in cathode structure and operation at low methanol concentration have been shown to result in improved cell performance.

  5. Solar-induced direct biomass-to-electricity hybrid fuel cell using polyoxometalates as photocatalyst and charge carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Mu, Wei; Liu, Mengjie; Zhang, Xiaodan; Cai, Hongli; Deng, Yulin

    2014-02-01

    The current polymer-exchange membrane fuel cell technology cannot directly use biomass as fuel. Here we present a solar-induced hybrid fuel cell that is directly powered with natural polymeric biomasses, such as starch, cellulose, lignin, and even switchgrass and wood powders. The fuel cell uses polyoxometalates as the photocatalyst and charge carrier to generate electricity at low temperature. This solar-induced hybrid fuel cell combines some features of solar cells, fuel cells and redox flow batteries. The power density of the solar-induced hybrid fuel cell powered by cellulose reaches 0.72 mW cm-2, which is almost 100 times higher than cellulose-based microbial fuel cells and is close to that of the best microbial fuel cells reported in literature. Unlike most cell technologies that are sensitive to impurities, the cell reported in this study is inert to most organic and inorganic contaminants present in the fuels.

  6. Solar-induced direct biomass-to-electricity hybrid fuel cell using polyoxometalates as photocatalyst and charge carrier.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Mu, Wei; Liu, Mengjie; Zhang, Xiaodan; Cai, Hongli; Deng, Yulin

    2014-01-01

    The current polymer-exchange membrane fuel cell technology cannot directly use biomass as fuel. Here we present a solar-induced hybrid fuel cell that is directly powered with natural polymeric biomasses, such as starch, cellulose, lignin, and even switchgrass and wood powders. The fuel cell uses polyoxometalates as the photocatalyst and charge carrier to generate electricity at low temperature. This solar-induced hybrid fuel cell combines some features of solar cells, fuel cells and redox flow batteries. The power density of the solar-induced hybrid fuel cell powered by cellulose reaches 0.72 mW cm(-2), which is almost 100 times higher than cellulose-based microbial fuel cells and is close to that of the best microbial fuel cells reported in literature. Unlike most cell technologies that are sensitive to impurities, the cell reported in this study is inert to most organic and inorganic contaminants present in the fuels.

  7. Synthesis and thermal decomposition behaviors of magnesium borohydride ammoniates with controllable composition as hydrogen storage materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanjing; Liu, Yongfeng; Li, You; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2013-02-01

    An ammonia-redistribution strategy for synthesizing metal borohydride ammoniates with controllable coordination number of NH(3) was proposed, and a series of magnesium borohydride ammoniates were easily synthesized by a mechanochemical reaction between Mg(BH(4))(2) and its hexaammoniate. A strong dependence of the dehydrogenation temperature and purity of the released hydrogen upon heating on the coordination number of NH(3) was elaborated for Mg(BH(4))(2)·xNH(3) owing to the change in the molar ratio of H(δ+) and H(δ-), the charge distribution on H(δ+) and H(δ-), and the strength of the coordinate bond N:→Mg(2+). The monoammoniate of magnesium borohydride (Mg(BH(4))(2)·NH(3)) was obtained for the first time. It can release 6.5% pure hydrogen within 50 minutes at 180 °C. PMID:23192895

  8. Removal of molecular adsorbates on gold nanoparticles using sodium borohydride in water.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Siyam M; Ameer, Fathima S; Hu, Wenfang; Zou, Shengli; Pittman, Charles U; Zhang, Dongmao

    2013-03-13

    The mechanism of sodium borohydride removal of organothiols from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was studied using an experimental investigation and computational modeling. Organothiols and other AuNP surface adsorbates such as thiophene, adenine, rhodamine, small anions (Br(-) and I(-)), and a polymer (PVP, poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)) can all be rapidly and completely removed from the AuNP surfaces. A computational study showed that hydride derived from sodium borohydride has a higher binding affinity to AuNPs than organothiols. Thus, it can displace organothiols and all the other adsorbates tested from AuNPs. Sodium borohydride may be used as a hazard-free, general-purpose detergent that should find utility in a variety of AuNP applications including catalysis, biosensing, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, and AuNP recycle and reuse.

  9. Low-Pt-Content Anode Catalyst for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Whitacre, Jay

    2008-01-01

    Combinatorial experiments have led to the discovery that a nanophase alloy of Pt, Ru, Ni, and Zr is effective as an anode catalyst material for direct methanol fuel cells. This discovery has practical significance in that the electronic current densities achievable by use of this alloy are comparable or larger than those obtained by use of prior Pt/Ru catalyst alloys containing greater amounts of Pt. Heretofore, the high cost of Pt has impeded the commercialization of direct methanol fuel cells. By making it possible to obtain a given level of performance at reduced Pt content (and, hence, lower cost), the discovery may lead to reduction of the economic impediment to commercialization.

  10. Analysis of Ignition Behavior in a Turbocharged Direct Injection Dual Fuel Engine Using Propane and Methane as Primary Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Polk, A. C.; Gibson, C. M.; Shoemaker, N. T.; Srinivasan, K. K.; Krishnan, S. R.

    2013-05-24

    This paper presents experimental analyses of the ignition delay (ID) behavior for diesel-ignited propane and diesel-ignited methane dual fuel combustion. Two sets of experiments were performed at a constant speed (1800 rev/min) using a 4-cylinder direct injection diesel engine with the stock ECU and a wastegated turbocharger. First, the effects of fuel-air equivalence ratios (© pilot ¼ 0.2-0.6 and © overall ¼ 0.2-0.9) on IDs were quantified. Second, the effects of gaseous fuel percent energy substitution (PES) and brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) (from 2.5 to 10 bar) on IDs were investigated. With constant © pilot (> 0.5), increasing © overall with propane initially decreased ID but eventually led to premature propane autoignition; however, the corresponding effects with methane were relatively minor. Cyclic variations in the start of combustion (SOC) increased with increasing © overall (at constant © pilot), more significantly for propane than for methane. With increasing PES at constant BMEP, the ID showed a nonlinear (initially increasing and later decreasing) trend at low BMEPs for propane but a linearly decreasing trend at high BMEPs. For methane, increasing PES only increased IDs at all BMEPs. At low BMEPs, increasing PES led to significantly higher cyclic SOC variations and SOC advancement for both propane and methane. Finally, the engine ignition delay (EID) was also shown to be a useful metric to understand the influence of ID on dual fuel combustion.

  11. Degradation mechanisms and mitigation strategies of metal cations in recycled fuel for direct methanol fuel cell membrane electrode assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min-Jee; Park, Ka-Young; Kim, Ki-Beum; Cho, Hyejung; Choi, Hanshin; Park, Jun-Young

    2013-11-01

    Some metal contaminants, such as Al3+, Ni+2, Fe2+ and Cr3+, are produced during reactions in heat exchangers, stacks, and other fuel/water management system components. Due to the gradual build-up of these contaminants generated in the system, direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) deteriorate steadily with increasing operation time. Hence, this study systematically investigates the effects of metal cations by supplying various concentrations of metal solutions to the fuel stream at constant-current densities, with the aim of understanding the mechanism and influence of metal contamination on a DMFC MEA. Various electrochemical diagnostic techniques are used to determine the main cause of MEA degradation, including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, electrode polarization, and methanol stripping voltammetry. In addition, the critical concentration of metal cations in methanol fuel is investigated for high DMFC MEA stability. Further, various novel methods for mitigating the influence of the metal contaminants on the performance of a DMFC are suggested and verified.

  12. Hydrogen storage materials: room-temperature wet-chemistry approach toward mixed-metal borohydrides.

    PubMed

    Jaroń, Tomasz; Orłowski, Piotr A; Wegner, Wojciech; Fijałkowski, Karol J; Leszczyński, Piotr J; Grochala, Wojciech

    2015-01-19

    The poor kinetics of hydrogen evolution and the irreversibility of the hydrogen discharge hamper the use of transition metal borohydrides as hydrogen storage materials, and the drawbacks of current synthetic methods obstruct the exploration of these systems. A wet-chemistry approach, which is based on solvent-mediated metathesis reactions of precursors containing bulky organic cations and weakly coordinating anions, leads to mixed-metal borohydrides that contain only a small amount of "dead mass". The applicability of this method is exemplified by Li[Zn2(BH4)5] and M[Zn(BH4)3] salts (M=Na, K), and its extension to other systems is discussed.

  13. Direct Carbon Conversion: Application to the Efficient Conversion of Fossil Fuels to Electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J F; Cherepy, N; Berry, G; Pasternak, A; Surles, T; Steinberg, M

    2001-03-07

    We introduce a concept for efficient conversion of fossil fuels to electricity that entails the decomposition of fossil-derived hydrocarbons into carbon and hydrogen, and electrochemical conversion of these fuels in separate fuel cells. Carbon/air fuel cells have the advantages of near zero entropy change and associated heat production (allowing 100% theoretical conversion efficiency). The activities of the C fuel and CO{sub 2} product are invariant, allowing constant EMF and full utilization of fuel in single pass mode of operation. System efficiency estimates were conducted for several routes involving sequential extraction of a hydrocarbon from the fossil resource by (hydro) pyrolysis followed by thermal decomposition. The total energy conversion efficiencies of the processes were estimated to be (1) 80% for direct conversion of petroleum coke; (2) 67% HHV for CH{sub 4}; (3) 72% HHV for heavy oil (modeled using properties of decane); (4) 75.5% HHV (83% LHV) for natural gas conversion with a Rankine bottoming cycle for the H{sub 2} portion; and (5) 69% HHV for conversion of low rank coals and lignite through hydrogenation and pyrolysis of the CH{sub 4} intermediate. The cost of carbon fuel is roughly $7/GJ, based on the cost of the pyrolysis step in the industrial furnace black process. Cell hardware costs are estimated to be less than $500/kW.

  14. Measurements of the Fuel Distribution in Cryogenic D-T Direct-Drive Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, Chad J.

    In direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, a capsule filled with a mixture of deuterium and tritium ice at cryogenic temperature is irradiated by a symmetric arrangements of laser beams to compress and heat the fuel to conditions required for thermonuclear reactions. The areal density (rhoR) of the compressed fuel assembly in a cryogenic implosion is one of the fundamental parameters required to assess the target performance. The rhoR measurements presented here are achieved by measuring the complex neutron energy spectrum resulting from primary and secondary nuclear reactions within the compressed fuel assembly. Advances in neutron time-of-flight diagnostics have made it possible to infer the neutron fraction that elastically scatters off the tritons in the compressed fuel in the energy range from 3.5 -5.5 MeV which is directly proportional to the areal density. In these OMEGA cryogenic campaigns from January 2013 to August 2014, measured low-mode modulations show good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Deviations up to 40% in the cold-fuel distribution from spherical symmetry have been inferred from the scattered neutron spectrum. Understanding the mechanism for anisotropic areal density measurements is crucial to improve hydrodynamically equivalent ignition-relevant direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA.

  15. Development of CNG direct injection (CNGDI) clean fuel system for extra power in small engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Yusoff; Shamsudeen, Azhari; Abdullah, Shahrir; Mahmood, Wan Mohd Faizal Wan

    2012-06-01

    A new design of fuel system for CNG engine with direct injection (CNGDI) was developed for a demonstration project. The development of the fuel system was done on the engine with cylinder head modifications, for fuel injector and spark plug openings included in the new cylinder head. The piston was also redesigned for higher compression ratio. The fuel rails and the regulators are also designed for the direct injection system operating at higher pressure about 2.0 MPa. The control of the injection timing for the direct injectors are also controlled by the Electronic Control Unit specially designed for DI by another group project. The injectors are selected after testing with the various injection pressures and spray angles. For the best performance of the high-pressure system, selection is made from the tests on single cylinder research engine (SCRE). The components in the fuel system have to be of higher quality and complied with codes and standards to secure the safety of engine for high-pressure operation. The results of the CNGDI have shown that better power output is produced and better emissions were achieved compared to the aspirated CNG engine.

  16. Platinum and palladium nano-structured catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Nguyen Viet; Thi, Cao Minh; Yong, Yang; Nogami, Masayuki; Ohtaki, Michitaka

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we present the synthesis and characterization of Pt, Pd, Pt based bimetallic and multi-metallic nanoparticles with mixture, alloy and core-shell structure for nano-catalysis, energy conversion, and fuel cells. Here, Pt and Pd nanoparticles with modified nanostructures can be controllably synthesized via chemistry and physics for their uses as electro-catalysts. The cheap base metal catalysts can be studied in the relationship of crystal structure, size, morphology, shape, and composition for new catalysts with low cost. Thus, Pt based alloy and core-shell catalysts can be prepared with the thin Pt and Pt-Pd shell, which are proposed in low and high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). We also present the survey of the preparation of Pt and Pd based catalysts for the better catalytic activity, high durability, and stability. The structural transformations, quantum-size effects, and characterization of Pt and Pd based catalysts in the size ranges of 30 nm (1-30 nm) are presented in electro-catalysis. In the size range of 10 nm (1-10 nm), the pure Pt catalyst shows very large surface area for electro-catalysis. To achieve homogeneous size distribution, the shaped synthesis of the polyhedral Pt nanoparticles is presented. The new concept of shaping specific shapes and morphologies in the entire nano-scale from nano to micro, such as polyhedral, cube, octahedra, tetrahedra, bar, rod, and others of the nanoparticles is proposed, especially for noble and cheap metals. The uniform Pt based nanosystems of surface structure, internal structure, shape, and morphology in the nanosized ranges are very crucial to next fuel cells. Finally, the modifications of Pt and Pd based catalysts of alloy, core-shell, and mixture structures lead to find high catalytic activity, durability, and stability for nano-catalysis, energy conversion, fuel cells, especially the next large-scale commercialization of next

  17. THE ECONOMICS OF REPROCESSING vs DIRECT DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew Bunn; Steve Fetter; John P. Holdren; Bob van der Zwaan

    2003-07-01

    This report assesses the economics of reprocessing versus direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The breakeven uranium price at which reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from existing light-water reactors (LWRs) and recycling the resulting plutonium and uranium in LWRs would become economic is assessed, using central estimates of the costs of different elements of the nuclear fuel cycle (and other fuel cycle input parameters), for a wide range of range of potential reprocessing prices. Sensitivity analysis is performed, showing that the conclusions reached are robust across a wide range of input parameters. The contribution of direct disposal or reprocessing and recycling to electricity cost is also assessed. The choice of particular central estimates and ranges for the input parameters of the fuel cycle model is justified through a review of the relevant literature. The impact of different fuel cycle approaches on the volume needed for geologic repositories is briefly discussed, as are the issues surrounding the possibility of performing separations and transmutation on spent nuclear fuel to reduce the need for additional repositories. A similar analysis is then performed of the breakeven uranium price at which deploying fast neutron breeder reactors would become competitive compared with a once-through fuel cycle in LWRs, for a range of possible differences in capital cost between LWRs and fast neutron reactors. Sensitivity analysis is again provided, as are an analysis of the contribution to electricity cost, and a justification of the choices of central estimates and ranges for the input parameters. The equations used in the economic model are derived and explained in an appendix. Another appendix assesses the quantities of uranium likely to be recoverable worldwide in the future at a range of different possible future prices.

  18. Nickel-cobalt bimetallic anode catalysts for direct urea fuel cell

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Zhang, Huimin; Li, Gang; Wu, Zucheng

    2014-01-01

    Nickel is an ideal non-noble metal anode catalyst for direct urea fuel cell (DUFC) due to its high activity. However, there exists a large overpotential toward urea electrooxidation. Herein, NiCo/C bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared with various Co contents (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 wt%) to improve the activity. The best Co ratio was 10% in the aspect of cell performance, with a maximum power density of 1.57 mW cm−2 when 0.33 M urea was used as fuel, O2 as oxidant at 60°C. The effects of temperature and urea concentration on DUFC performance were investigated. Besides, direct urine fuel cell reaches a maximum power density of 0.19 mW cm−2 with an open circuit voltage of 0.38 V at 60°C. PMID:25168632

  19. Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Pem Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells using various types of Nafion membranes as the solid polymer electrolyte have been studied. The rate of fuel crossover and electrical performance has been measured for cells with Nafion membranes of various thicknesses and equivalent weights. The crossover rate is found to decrease with increasing thickness and applied current. The dependence of crossover rate on current density can be understood in terms of a simple linear diffusion model which suggests that the crossover rate can be influenced by the electrode structure in addition to the membrane. The studies suggest that Nafion EW 1500 is a very promising alternate to Nafion EW 1100 for direct methanol fuel cells.

  20. Nickel-cobalt bimetallic anode catalysts for direct urea fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Zhang, Huimin; Li, Gang; Wu, Zucheng

    2014-08-01

    Nickel is an ideal non-noble metal anode catalyst for direct urea fuel cell (DUFC) due to its high activity. However, there exists a large overpotential toward urea electrooxidation. Herein, NiCo/C bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared with various Co contents (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 wt%) to improve the activity. The best Co ratio was 10% in the aspect of cell performance, with a maximum power density of 1.57 mW cm-2 when 0.33 M urea was used as fuel, O2 as oxidant at 60°C. The effects of temperature and urea concentration on DUFC performance were investigated. Besides, direct urine fuel cell reaches a maximum power density of 0.19 mW cm-2 with an open circuit voltage of 0.38 V at 60°C.

  1. Investigation of Ruthenium Dissolution in Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cells Stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Firdosy, S.; Koel, B. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives a detailed review of the Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cell (DMFC) stack and investigates the Ruthenium that was found at the exit of the stack. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) Pathways for Cell Degradation; 3) Cell Duration Testing; 4) Duration Testing, MEA Analysis; and 5) Stack Degradation Analysis.

  2. Mesoporous silica as a membrane for ultra-thin implantable direct glucose fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Tushar; Hu, Ye; Stoller, Meryl; Feldman, Marc; Ruoff, Rodney S; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2011-07-21

    The design, fabrication and characterization of an inorganic catalyst based direct glucose fuel cell using mesoporous silica coating as a functional membrane is reported. The desired use of mesoporous silica based direct glucose fuel cell is for a blood vessel implantable device. Blood vessel implantable direct glucose fuel cells have access to higher continuous glucose concentrations. However, reduction in the implant thickness is required for application in the venous system as part of a stent. We report development of an implantable device with a platinum thin-film (thickness: 25 nm) deposited on silicon substrate (500 μm) to serve as the anode, and graphene pressed on a stainless steel mesh (175 μm) to serve as the cathode. Control experiments involved the use of a surfactant-coated polypropylene membrane (50 μm) with activated carbon (198 μm) electrodes. We demonstrate that a mesoporous silica thin film (270 nm) is capable of replacing the conventional polymer based membranes with an improvement in the power generated over conventional direct glucose fuel cells. PMID:21637881

  3. Assessment of methanol electro-oxidation for direct methanol-air fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, S.D.; Sen, R.K.

    1988-07-01

    The Office of Energy Storage and Distribution of the US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of a methanol-air fuel cell for transportation application. The approach used at Los Alamos National Laboratory converts the methanol fuel to a hydrogen-rich gas in a reformer, then operates the fuel cell on hydrogen and air. The reformer tends to be bulky (raising vehicle packaging problems), has a long startup period, and is not well suited for the transient operation required in a vehicle. Methanol, however, can be oxidized electrochemically in the fuel cell. If this process can be conducted efficiently, a direct methanol-air fuel cell can be used, which does not require a reformer. The objective of this study is to assess the potential of developing a suitable catalyst for the direct electrochemical oxidation of methanol. The primary conclusion of this study is that no acceptable catalysts exist can efficiently oxidize methanol electrochemically and have the desired cost and lifetime for vehicle applications. However, recent progress in understanding the mechanism of methanol oxidation indicates that a predictive base can be developed to search for methanol oxidation catalysts and can be used to methodically develop improved catalysts. Such an approach is strongly recommended. The study also recommends that until further progress in developing high-performance catalysts is achieved, research in cell design and testing is not warranted. 43 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Making the case for direct hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    James, B.D.; Thomas, C.E.; Baum, G.N.; Lomas, F.D. Jr.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    Three obstacles to the introduction of direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are often states: (1) inadequate onboard hydrogen storage leading to limited vehicle range; (2) lack of an hydrogen infrastructure, and (3) cost of the entire fuel cell system. This paper will address the first point with analysis of the problem/proposed solutions for the remaining two obstacles addressed in other papers. Results of a recent study conducted by Directed Technologies Inc. will be briefly presented. The study, as part of Ford Motor Company/DOE PEM Fuel Cell Program, examines multiple pure hydrogen onboard storage systems on the basis of weight, volume, cost, and complexity. Compressed gas, liquid, carbon adsorption, and metal hydride storage are all examined with compressed hydrogen storage at 5,000 psia being judged the lowest-risk, highest benefit, near-term option. These results are combined with recent fuel cell vehicle drive cycle simulations to estimate the onboard hydrogen storage requirement for full vehicle range (380 miles on the combined Federal driving schedule). The results indicate that a PNGV-like vehicle using powertrain weights and performance realistically available by the 2004 PNGV target data can achieve approximate fuel economy equivalent to 100 mpg on gasoline (100 mpg{sub eq}) and requires storage of approximately 3.6 kg hydrogen for full vehicle storage quantity allows 5,000 psia onboard storage without altering the vehicle exterior lines or appreciably encroaching on the passenger or trunk compartments.

  5. High-activity PtRuPd/C catalyst for direct dimethyl ether fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Wen, Xiaodong; Wu, Gang; Chung, Hoon T; Gao, Rui; Zelenay, Piotr

    2015-06-22

    Dimethyl ether (DME) has been considered as a promising alternative fuel for direct-feed fuel cells but lack of an efficient DME oxidation electrocatalyst has remained the challenge for the commercialization of the direct DME fuel cell. The commonly studied binary PtRu catalyst shows much lower activity in DME than methanol oxidation. In this work, guided by density functional theory (DFT) calculation, a ternary carbon-supported PtRuPd catalyst was designed and synthesized for DME electrooxidation. DFT calculations indicated that Pd in the ternary PtRuPd catalyst is capable of significantly decreasing the activation energy of the CO and CH bond scission during the oxidation process. As evidenced by both electrochemical measurements in an aqueous electrolyte and polymer-electrolyte fuel cell testing, the ternary catalyst shows much higher activity (two-fold enhancement at 0.5 V in fuel cells) than the state-of-the-art binary Pt50 Ru50 /C catalyst (HiSPEC 12100).

  6. High efficiency direct fuel cell hybrid power cycle for near term application

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.; Maru, H.C.; Sanderson, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    Direct carbonate fuel cells being developed by Energy Research Corporation can generate power at an efficiency approaching 60% LHV. This unique fuel cell technology can consume natural gas and other hydrocarbon based fuels directly without requiring an external reformer, thus providing a simpler and inherently efficient power generation system. A 2 MW power plant demonstration of this technology has been initiated at an installation in the city of Santa Clara in California. A 2.85 MW commercial configuration shown in Figure 1 is presently being developed. The complete plant includes the carbonate fuel cell modules, an inverter, transformer and switchgear, a heat recovery unit and supporting instrument air and water treatment systems. The emission levels for this 2.85 MW plant are projected to be orders of magnitude below existing or proposed standards. The 30 year levelized cost of electricity, without inflation, is projected to be approximately 5{cents}/kW-h assuming capital cost for the carbonate fuel cell system of $1000/kW.

  7. The effect of operation and design parameters on the performance of the direct methanol fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, S.F.; Cisar, A.; Franaszczuk, K.

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cell technology continues to receive considerable attention as a potential replacement for fossil fuels as a primary source of terrestrial power. Ideally, such power systems would operate at relatively low temperatures (< 100{degrees}C) which suggests strongly the use of cell technology based upon the proton exchange membrane (PEM). Without question, hydrogen is a very desirable fuel choice for these types of systems, because of its high energy density. However, the difficulties associated with the production and routine handling of hydrogen limit severely its commercial use at present. The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is a particularly attractive alternative to the use of the hydrogen/oxygen cell. Although not as high as hydrogen, the energy density of methanol is the highest among the organic fuels. Furthermore, because of the similarity in liquid handling requirements between methanol and gasoline, a significant portion of the infrastructure necessary for the marketing and distribution of the fuel is already in place. Other inherent attributes of the DMFC which include rapid start-up and operation with little or no emission or noise signature have led to an intense DMFC research effort over the past twenty years and, indeed, the DMFC has even been referred to as {open_quotes}the electrochemist`s dream{close_quotes}.

  8. Borohydride Reduction of Estrone: Demonstration of Diastereoselectivity in the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aditya, Animesh; Nichols, David E.; Loudon, G. Marc

    2008-01-01

    This experiment presents a guided-inquiry approach to the demonstration of diastereoselectivity in an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. Chiral hindered ketones such as estrone, undergo facile reduction with sodium borohydride in a highly diastereoselective manner. The diastereomeric estradiols produced in the reaction can be analyzed and…

  9. Self-Printing on Graphitic Nanosheets with Metal Borohydride Nanodots for Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongtao; Ding, Xiaoli; Zhang, Qingan

    2016-08-01

    Although the synthesis of borohydride nanostructures is sufficiently established for advancement of hydrogen storage, obtaining ultrasmall (sub-10 nm) metal borohydride nanocrystals with excellent dispersibility is extremely challenging because of their high surface energy, exceedingly strong reducibility/hydrophilicity and complicated composition. Here, we demonstrate a mechanical-force-driven self-printing process that enables monodispersed (~6 nm) NaBH4 nanodots to uniformly anchor onto freshly-exfoliated graphitic nanosheets (GNs). Both mechanical-forces and borohydride interaction with GNs stimulate NaBH4 clusters intercalation/absorption into the graphite interlayers acting as a ‘pen’ for writing, which is accomplished by exfoliating GNs with the ‘printed’ borohydrides. These nano-NaBH4@GNs exhibit favorable thermodynamics (decrease in ∆H of ~45%), rapid kinetics (a greater than six-fold increase) and stable de-/re-hydrogenation that retains a high capacity (up to ~5 wt% for NaBH4) compared with those of micro-NaBH4. Our results are helpful in the scalable fabrication of zero-dimensional complex hydrides on two-dimensional supports with enhanced hydrogen storage for potential applications.

  10. Tailoring the properties of ammine metal borohydrides for solid-state hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Lars H; Ley, Morten B; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Besenbacher, Flemming; Jensen, Torben R

    2015-04-24

    A series of halide-free ammine manganese borohydrides, Mn(BH4 )2 ⋅nNH3 , n=1, 2, 3, and 6, a new bimetallic compound Li2 Mn(BH4 )4 ⋅6NH3 , and the first ammine metal borohydride solid solution Mg1-x Mnx (BH4 )2 ⋅6NH3 are presented. Four new crystal structures have been determined by synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction and the thermal decomposition is systematically investigated for all the new compounds. The solid-gas reaction between Mn(BH4 )2 and NH3 provides Mn(BH4 )2 ⋅6NH3 . The number of NH3 per Mn has been varied by mechanochemical treatment of Mn(BH4 )2 ⋅6NH3 -Mn(BH4 )2 mixtures giving rise to increased hydrogen purity for n/m≤1 for M(BH4 )m ⋅nNH3 . The structures of Mg(BH4 )2 ⋅3NH3 and Li2 Mg(BH4 )4 ⋅6NH3 have been revisited and new structural models are presented. Finally, we demonstrate that ammonia destabilizes metal borohydrides with low electronegativity of the metal (χp <∼1.6), while metal borohydrides with high electronegativity (χp >∼1.6) are generally stabilized.

  11. Self-Printing on Graphitic Nanosheets with Metal Borohydride Nanodots for Hydrogen Storage.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; Ding, Xiaoli; Zhang, Qingan

    2016-08-03

    Although the synthesis of borohydride nanostructures is sufficiently established for advancement of hydrogen storage, obtaining ultrasmall (sub-10 nm) metal borohydride nanocrystals with excellent dispersibility is extremely challenging because of their high surface energy, exceedingly strong reducibility/hydrophilicity and complicated composition. Here, we demonstrate a mechanical-force-driven self-printing process that enables monodispersed (~6 nm) NaBH4 nanodots to uniformly anchor onto freshly-exfoliated graphitic nanosheets (GNs). Both mechanical-forces and borohydride interaction with GNs stimulate NaBH4 clusters intercalation/absorption into the graphite interlayers acting as a 'pen' for writing, which is accomplished by exfoliating GNs with the 'printed' borohydrides. These nano-NaBH4@GNs exhibit favorable thermodynamics (decrease in ∆H of ~45%), rapid kinetics (a greater than six-fold increase) and stable de-/re-hydrogenation that retains a high capacity (up to ~5 wt% for NaBH4) compared with those of micro-NaBH4. Our results are helpful in the scalable fabrication of zero-dimensional complex hydrides on two-dimensional supports with enhanced hydrogen storage for potential applications.

  12. Self-Printing on Graphitic Nanosheets with Metal Borohydride Nanodots for Hydrogen Storage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongtao; Ding, Xiaoli; Zhang, Qingan

    2016-01-01

    Although the synthesis of borohydride nanostructures is sufficiently established for advancement of hydrogen storage, obtaining ultrasmall (sub-10 nm) metal borohydride nanocrystals with excellent dispersibility is extremely challenging because of their high surface energy, exceedingly strong reducibility/hydrophilicity and complicated composition. Here, we demonstrate a mechanical-force-driven self-printing process that enables monodispersed (~6 nm) NaBH4 nanodots to uniformly anchor onto freshly-exfoliated graphitic nanosheets (GNs). Both mechanical-forces and borohydride interaction with GNs stimulate NaBH4 clusters intercalation/absorption into the graphite interlayers acting as a ‘pen’ for writing, which is accomplished by exfoliating GNs with the ‘printed’ borohydrides. These nano-NaBH4@GNs exhibit favorable thermodynamics (decrease in ∆H of ~45%), rapid kinetics (a greater than six-fold increase) and stable de-/re-hydrogenation that retains a high capacity (up to ~5 wt% for NaBH4) compared with those of micro-NaBH4. Our results are helpful in the scalable fabrication of zero-dimensional complex hydrides on two-dimensional supports with enhanced hydrogen storage for potential applications. PMID:27484735

  13. By-Product Carrying Humidified Hydrogen: An Underestimated Issue in the Hydrolysis of Sodium Borohydride.

    PubMed

    Petit, Eddy; Miele, Philippe; Demirci, Umit B

    2016-07-21

    Catalyzed hydrolysis of sodium borohydride generates up to four molecules of hydrogen, but contrary to what has been reported so far, the humidified evolved gas is not pure hydrogen. Elemental and spectroscopic analyses show, for the first time, that borate by-products pollute the stream as well as the vessel.

  14. A Guided-Inquiry Approach to the Sodium Borohydride Reduction and Grignard Reaction of Carbonyl Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    The guided-inquiry approach is applied to the reactions of sodium borohydride and phenyl magnesium bromide with benzaldehyde, benzophenone, benzoic anhydride, and ethyl benzoate. Each team of four students receives four unknowns. Students identify the unknowns and their reaction products by using the physical state of the unknown, an…

  15. A Microwave-Assisted Reduction of Cyclohexanone Using Solid-State-Supported Sodium Borohydride

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Lori L.; Kittredge, Kevin W.

    2005-01-01

    The reduction of carbonyl groups by sodium borohydride though is a well-known reaction in most organic lab texts, a difficulty for an instructor adopting this reaction in a student lab is that it is too long. Using a microwave assisted organic synthesis solves this difficulty and one such reaction, which is the microwave-assisted reduction of…

  16. Self-Printing on Graphitic Nanosheets with Metal Borohydride Nanodots for Hydrogen Storage.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; Ding, Xiaoli; Zhang, Qingan

    2016-01-01

    Although the synthesis of borohydride nanostructures is sufficiently established for advancement of hydrogen storage, obtaining ultrasmall (sub-10 nm) metal borohydride nanocrystals with excellent dispersibility is extremely challenging because of their high surface energy, exceedingly strong reducibility/hydrophilicity and complicated composition. Here, we demonstrate a mechanical-force-driven self-printing process that enables monodispersed (~6 nm) NaBH4 nanodots to uniformly anchor onto freshly-exfoliated graphitic nanosheets (GNs). Both mechanical-forces and borohydride interaction with GNs stimulate NaBH4 clusters intercalation/absorption into the graphite interlayers acting as a 'pen' for writing, which is accomplished by exfoliating GNs with the 'printed' borohydrides. These nano-NaBH4@GNs exhibit favorable thermodynamics (decrease in ∆H of ~45%), rapid kinetics (a greater than six-fold increase) and stable de-/re-hydrogenation that retains a high capacity (up to ~5 wt% for NaBH4) compared with those of micro-NaBH4. Our results are helpful in the scalable fabrication of zero-dimensional complex hydrides on two-dimensional supports with enhanced hydrogen storage for potential applications. PMID:27484735

  17. Direct Conversion of Carbon Fuels in a Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N J; Fiet, K J; Krueger, R; Jankowski, A F; Cooper, J F

    2004-01-28

    Anodes of elemental carbon may be discharged in a galvanic cell using a molten carbonate electrolyte, a nickel-foam anode-current collector, and a porous nickel air cathode to achieve power densities of 40-100 mW/cm{sup 2}. We report cell and anode polarization, surface area, primary particle size and a crystallization index for nine particulate carbon samples derived from fuel oil, methane, coal, charred biological material and petroleum coke. At 800 C, current densities of 50-125 mA/cm{sup 2} were measured at a representative cell voltage of 0.8 V. Power densities for cells with two carbon-anode materials were found to be nearly the same on scales of 2.8- and 60 cm{sup 2} active area. Constant current operation of a small cell was accompanied by constant voltage during multiple tests of 10-30 hour duration. Cell voltage fell off after the carbon inventory was consumed. Three different cathode structures are compared, indicating that an LLNL fabricated porous nickel electrode with <10 {micro}m pores provides improved rates compared with nickel foam with 100-300 {micro}m pores. Petroleum coke containing substantial sulfur and ash discharges at a slightly lower rate than purified petroleum coke. The sulfur leads to degradation of the anode current collector over time. A conceptual model for electrochemical reactivity of carbon is presented which indicates the importance of (1) bulk lattice disorder, which continually provides surface reactive sites during anodic dissolution and (2) electrical conductivity, which lowers the ohmic component of anode polarization.

  18. Promising Fuel Cycle Options for R&D – Results, Insights, and Future Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Wigeland, Roald Arnold

    2015-05-01

    The Fuel Cycle Options (FCO) campaign in the U.S. DOE Fuel Cycle Research & Development Program conducted a detailed evaluation and screening of nuclear fuel cycles. The process for this study was described at the 2014 ICAPP meeting. This paper reports on detailed insights and questions from the results of the study. The comprehensive study identified continuous recycle in fast reactors as the most promising option, using either U/Pu or U/TRU recycle, and potentially in combination with thermal reactors, as reported at the ICAPP 2014 meeting. This paper describes the examination of the results in detail that indicated that there was essentially no difference in benefit between U/Pu and U/TRU recycle, prompting questions about the desirability of pursuing the more complex U/TRU approach given that the estimated greater challenges for development and deployment. The results will be reported from the current effort that further explores what, if any, benefits of TRU recycle (minor actinides in addition to plutonium recycle) may be in order to inform decisions on future R&D directions. The study also identified continuous recycle using thorium-based fuel cycles as potentially promising, in either fast or thermal systems, but with lesser benefit. Detailed examination of these results indicated that the lesser benefit was confined to only a few of the evaluation metrics, identifying the conditions under which thorium-based fuel cycles would be promising to pursue. For the most promising fuel cycles, the FCO is also conducting analyses on the potential transition to such fuel cycles to identify the issues, challenges, and the timing for critical decisions that would need to be made to avoid unnecessary delay in deployment, including investigation of issues such as the effects of a temporary lack of plutonium fuel resources or supporting infrastructure. These studies are placed in the context of an overall analysis approach designed to provide comprehensive information to

  19. Engineering Bacteria for Efficient Fuel Production: Novel Biological Conversion of Hydrogen and Carbon Dioxide Directly into Free Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-12

    Electrofuels Project: OPX Biotechnologies is engineering a microorganism currently used in industrial biotechnology to directly produce a liquid fuel from hydrogen and carbon dioxide (CO2). The microorganism has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. OPX Biotechnologies is modifying the microorganism to divert energy and carbon away from growth and towards the production of liquid fuels in larger, commercially viable quantities. The microbial system will produce a fuel precursor that can be chemically upgraded to various hydrocarbon fuels.

  20. Direct ethanol solid oxide fuel cell operating in gradual internal reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobrega, S. D.; Galesco, M. V.; Girona, K.; de Florio, D. Z.; Steil, M. C.; Georges, S.; Fonseca, F. C.

    2012-09-01

    An electrolyte supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) using standard electrodes, doped-lanthanum manganite cathode and Ni-cermet anode, was operated with direct (anhydrous) ethanol for more than 100 h, delivering essentially the same power output as running on hydrogen. A ceria-based layer provides the catalytic activity for the gradual internal reforming, which uses the steam formed by the electrochemical oxidation of hydrogen for the decomposition of ethanol. Such a concept opens up the way for multi-fuel SOFCs using standard components and a catalytic layer.

  1. Methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst composite for direct methanol fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Zelenay, Piotr

    2006-09-05

    A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) having a methanol fuel supply, oxidant supply, and its membrane electrode assembly (MEA) formed of an anode electrode and a cathode electrode with a membrane therebetween, a methanol oxidation catalyst adjacent the anode electrode and the membrane, an oxidant reduction catalyst adjacent the cathode electrode and the membrane, comprises an oxidant reduction catalyst layer of Pt.sub.3Cr/C so that oxidation at the cathode of methanol that crosses from the anode through the membrane to the cathode is reduced with a concomitant increase of net electrical potential at the cathode electrode.

  2. Methanol-Tolerant Cathode Catalyst Composite For Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Zelenay, Piotr

    2006-03-21

    A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) having a methanol fuel supply, oxidant supply, and its membrane electrode assembly (MEA) formed of an anode electrode and a cathode electrode with a membrane therebetween, a methanol oxidation catalyst adjacent the anode electrode and the membrane, an oxidant reduction catalyst adjacent the cathode electrode and the membrane, comprises an oxidant reduction catalyst layer of a platinum-chromium alloy so that oxidation at the cathode of methanol that crosses from the anode through the membrane to the cathode is reduced with a concomitant increase of net electrical potential at the cathode electrode.

  3. Rationale for continuing R&D in direct coal conversion to produce high quality transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, R.D.; McIlvried, H.G.; Gray, D.

    1995-12-31

    For the foreseeable future, liquid hydrocarbon fuels will play a significant role in the transportation sector of both the United States and the world. Factors favoring these fuels include convenience, high energy density, and the vast existing infrastructure for their production and use. At present the U.S. consumes about 26% of the world supply of petroleum, but this situation is expected to change because of declining domestic production and increasing competition for imports from countries with developing economies. A scenario and time frame are developed in which declining world resources will generate a shortfall in petroleum supply that can be allieviated in part by utilizing the abundant domestic coal resource base. One option is direct coal conversion to liquid transportation fuels. Continued R&D in coal conversion technology will results in improved technical readiness that can significantly reduce costs so that synfuels can compete economically in a time frame to address the shortfall.

  4. Effects of NaOH addition on performance of the direct hydrazine fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wen Xia; Li, Zhou Peng; Zhu, Jing Ke; Qin, Hai Ying

    In this work, we suggested a figuration of the direct hydrazine fuel cell (DHFC) using non-precious metals as the anode catalyst, ion exchange membranes as the electrolyte and alkaline hydrazine solutions as the fuel. NaOH addition in the anolyte effectively improved the open circuit voltage and the performance of the DHFC. A power density of 84 mW cm -2 has been achieved when operating the cell at room temperature. It was found that the cell performance was mainly influenced by anode polarization when using alkaline N 2H 4 solutions with low NaOH concentrations. However, when using alkaline N 2H 4 solutions with high NaOH concentrations as the fuel, the cell performance was mainly influenced by cathode polarization.

  5. Control of variable power conditions for a membraneless direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Alfred; Wilkinson, David P.; Zhang, Jiujun

    The control of a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) operating under variable power conditions is important in the development of a commercially applicable device. Fuel cells are conventionally designed for a maximum power output. However variable load cycles can result in fuel cell operation under sub-optimal conditions. In this paper, a simple method of power management using a physical guard is presented. The guard can be used on the anode or cathode electrode, in the membraneless gap or in any combination. This design selectively deactivates specific active regions of the electrode assembly and enables the DMFC to operate at a constant voltage and current density at different absolute power conditions. The guard also serves to control excessive crossover during shutdown and low power operation.

  6. Utilization of corn cob biochar in a direct carbon fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jinshuai; Zhao, Yicheng; Li, Yongdan

    2014-12-01

    Biochar obtained from the pyrolysis of corn cob is used as the fuel of a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) employing a composite electrolyte composed of a samarium doped ceria (SDC) and a eutectic carbonate phase. An anode layer made of NiO and SDC is utilized to suppress the cathode corrosion by the molten carbonate and improves the whole cell stability. The anode off-gas of the fuel cell is analyzed with a gas chromatograph. The effect of working temperature on the cell resistance and power output is examined. The maximum power output achieves 185 mW cm-2 at a current density of 340 mA cm-2 and 750 °C. An anode reaction scheme including the Boudouard reaction is proposed.

  7. Direct numerical simulation of ignition in turbulent n-heptane liquid-fuel spray jets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Rutland, C.J.

    2007-06-15

    Direct numerical simulation was used for fundamental studies of the ignition of turbulent n-heptane liquid-fuel spray jets. A chemistry mechanism with 33 species and 64 reactions was adopted to describe the chemical reactions. The Eulerian method is employed to solve the carrier-gas flow field and the Lagrangian method is used to track the liquid-fuel droplets. Two-way coupling interaction is considered through the exchange of mass, momentum, and energy between the carrier-gas fluid and the liquid-fuel spray. The initial carrier-gas temperature was 1500 K. Six cases were simulated with different droplet radii (from 10 to 30 {mu}m) and two initial velocities (100 and 150 m/s). From the simulations, it was found that evaporative cooling and turbulence mixing play important roles in the ignition of liquid-fuel spray jets. Ignition first occurs at the edges of the jets where the fuel mixture is lean, and the scalar dissipation rate and the vorticity magnitude are very low. For smaller droplets, ignition occurs later than for larger droplets due to increased evaporative cooling. Higher initial droplet velocity enhances turbulence mixing and evaporative cooling. For smaller droplets, higher initial droplet velocity causes the ignition to occur earlier, whereas for larger droplets, higher initial droplet velocity delays the ignition time. (author)

  8. A membraneless alkaline direct liquid fuel cell (DLFC) platform developed with a catalyst-selective strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xingwen; Pascual, Emilio J.; Wauson, Joshua C.; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2016-11-01

    With a logical management of the catalyst selectivity, we present a scalable, membraneless alkaline direct liquid fuel cell (DLFC) platform. The uniqueness of this innovation is that the inexpensive (non-platinum) cathode catalysts, based on strongly coupled transition-metal-oxide nanocrystals and nano-structured carbon materials (e. g., NiCo2O4 nano-particles on a nitrogen-doped graphene and MnNiCoO4 nano-particles on a nitrogen-doped multi-wall carbon nanotube), exhibit high activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) but without activity for the anode fuel oxidation reaction (FOR). Therefore, operation of the DLFCs allows the anode fuel to freely enter the cathode. This strategy avoids the reliance on expensive or difficult-to-develop cation- or anion-exchange membranes and circumvents the scalability concerns of the conventional membraneless DLFCs that are operated under a laminar-flow principle. With proper catalyst selectivity, a variety of organic liquids can be used as anode fuels. The high power density delivered by the membraneless DLFCs with inexpensive components and safe fuels can enable the development of not only small-scale portable power sources but also large-scale energy generation systems for transportation and stationary storage.

  9. Comparison of Propane and Methane Performance and Emissions in a Turbocharged Direct Injection Dual Fuel Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, C. M.; Polk, A. C.; Shoemaker, N. T.; Srinivasan, K. K.; Krishnan, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    With increasingly restrictive NO x and particulate matter emissions standards, the recent discovery of new natural gas reserves, and the possibility of producing propane efficiently from biomass sources, dual fueling strategies have become more attractive. This paper presents experimental results from dual fuel operation of a four-cylinder turbocharged direct injection (DI) diesel engine with propane or methane (a natural gas surrogate) as the primary fuel and diesel as the ignition source. Experiments were performed with the stock engine control unit at a constant speed of 1800 rpm, and a wide range of brake mean effective pressures (BMEPs) (2.7-11.6 bars) and percent energy substitutions (PESs) of C 3 H 8 and CH 4. Brake thermal efficiencies (BTEs) and emissions (NO x, smoke, total hydrocarbons (THCs), CO, and CO 2) were measured. Maximum PES levels of about 80-95% with CH 4 and 40-92% with C 3 H 8 were achieved. Maximum PES was limited by poor combustion efficiencies and engine misfire at low loads for both C 3 H 8 and CH 4, and the onset of knock above 9 bar BMEP for C 3 H 8. While dual fuel BTEs were lower than straight diesel BTEs at low loads, they approached diesel BTE values at high loads. For dual fuel operation, NO x and smoke reductions (from diesel values) were as high as 66-68% and 97%, respectively, but CO and THC emissions were significantly higher with increasing PES at all engine loads

  10. Air-breathing direct formic acid microfluidic fuel cell with an array of cylinder anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xun; Zhang, Biao; Ye, Ding-Ding; Li, Jun; Liao, Qiang

    2014-02-01

    An air-breathing direct formic acid membraneless microfluidic fuel cell using graphite cylinder arrays as the anode is proposed. The three dimensional anode volumetrically extends the reactive surface area and improves fuel utilization. The effects of spacer configuration, fuel and electrolyte concentration as well as reactant flow rate on the species transport and cell performance are investigated. The dynamic behavior of generated CO2 bubbles is visualized and its effect on current generation is discussed. The results show that the absence of two spacers adjacent to the cathode surface improves the cell performance by reducing the proton transfer resistance. The CO2 gas bubbles are constrained within the anode array and expelled by the fluid flow periodically. Proper reactant concentration and flow rate are crucial for cell operation. At optimum conditions, a maximum current density of 118.3 mA cm-3 and a peak power density of 21.5 mW cm-3 are obtained. In addition, benefit from the volumetrically stacked anodes and enhanced fuel transfer, the maximum single pass fuel utilization rate reaches up to 87.6% at the flow rate of 1 mL h-1.

  11. Process Model of A Fusion Fuel Recovery System for a Direct Drive IFE Power Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natta, Saswathi; Aristova, Maria; Gentile, Charles

    2008-11-01

    A task has been initiated to develop a detailed representative model for the fuel recovery system (FRS) in the prospective direct drive inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor. As part of the conceptual design phase of the project, a chemical process model is developed in order to observe the interaction of system components. This process model is developed using FEMLAB Multiphysics software with the corresponding chemical engineering module (CEM). Initially, the reactants, system structure, and processes are defined using known chemical species of the target chamber exhaust. Each step within the Fuel recovery system is modeled compartmentally and then merged to form the closed loop fuel recovery system. The output, which includes physical properties and chemical content of the products, is analyzed after each step of the system to determine the most efficient and productive system parameters. This will serve to attenuate possible bottlenecks in the system. This modeling evaluation is instrumental in optimizing and closing the fusion fuel cycle in a direct drive IFE power reactor. The results of the modeling are presented in this paper.

  12. A high selectivity quaternized polysulfone membrane for alkaline direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuin, Graciela C.; Franceschini, Esteban A.; Nonjola, Patrick; Mathe, Mkhulu K.; Modibedi, Mmalewane; Corti, Horacio R.

    2015-04-01

    Alkaline membranes based on quaternized poly(arylene ether sulfone) (QPAES) were characterized in relation to their water and methanol uptake, methanol permeability, electrical conductivity, and mechanical properties. The performance of QPAES as electrolyte in alkaline direct methanol fuel cells was studied using a free-breathing single fuel cell at room temperature. Methanol uptake by QPAES membranes is lower than water, while their methanol permeability, determined in the temperature range from 30 °C to 75 °C, was much lower than for Nafion membranes. Young modulus of QPAES membranes decrease with the degree of alkalization of the membrane, although mechanical properties are still satisfactory for fuel cell applications for membrane alkalized with 2 M KOH, which additionally exhibit optimal hydroxide conductivity. Although the specific conductivity of QPAES membranes was lower than that reported for Nafion, its methanol selectivity (conductivity/methanol permeability ratio), is much higher than that reported for Nafion 117, and a commercial amminated polysulfone. In view of these results, QPAES membranes are expected to exhibit promising performance as an electrolyte in alkaline direct methanol fuel cells.

  13. Direct electrochemical conversion of carbon anode fuels in molton salt media

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N; Krueger, R; Cooper, J F

    2001-01-17

    We are conducting research into the direct electrochemical conversion of reactive carbons into electricity--with experimental evidence of total efficiencies exceeding 80% of the heat of combustion of carbon. Together with technologies for extraction of reactive carbons from broad based fossil fuels, direct carbon conversion addresses the objectives of DOE's ''21st Century Fuel Cell'' with exceptionally high efficiency (>70% based on standard heat of reaction, {Delta}H{sub std}), as well as broader objectives of managing CO{sub 2} emissions. We are exploring the reactivity of a wide range of carbons derived from diverse sources, including pyrolyzed hydrocarbons, petroleum cokes, purified coals and biochars, and relating their electrochemical reactivity to nano/microstructural characteristics.

  14. Characterization of a direct methanol fuel cell using Hilbert curve fractal current collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuan, Yean-Der; Chang, Jing-Yi; Lee, Shi-Min; Lee, Shah-Rong

    The current collector or bi-polar plate is a key component in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Current collector geometric designs have significant influence on cell performance. This paper presents a continuous type fractal geometry using the Hilbert curve applied to current collector design in a direct methanol fuel cell. The Hilbert curve fractal geometry current collector is named HFCC (Hilbert curve fractal current collector). This research designs the current collector using a first, second and third order open carved HFCC shape. The cell performances of the different current collector geometries were measured and compared. Two important factors, the free open ratio and total perimeter length of the open carved design are discussed. The results show that both the larger free open ratio and longer carved open perimeter length present higher performance.

  15. Direct alcohol fuel cells: toward the power densities of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanxin; Bellini, Marco; Bevilacqua, Manuela; Fornasiero, Paolo; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Miller, Hamish A; Wang, Lianqin; Vizza, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    A 2 μm thick layer of TiO2 nanotube arrays was prepared on the surface of the Ti fibers of a nonwoven web electrode. After it was doped with Pd nanoparticles (1.5 mgPd  cm(-2) ), this anode was employed in a direct alcohol fuel cell. Peak power densities of 210, 170, and 160 mW cm(-2) at 80 °C were produced if the cell was fed with 10 wt % aqueous solutions of ethanol, ethylene glycol, and glycerol, respectively, in 2 M aqueous KOH. The Pd loading of the anode was increased to 6 mg cm(-2) by combining four single electrodes to produce a maximum peak power density with ethanol at 80 °C of 335 mW cm(-2) . Such high power densities result from a combination of the open 3 D structure of the anode electrode and the high electrochemically active surface area of the Pd catalyst, which promote very fast kinetics for alcohol electro-oxidation. The peak power and current densities obtained with ethanol at 80 °C approach the output of H2 -fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  16. Conceptual design report for a Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell for transportation application

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-05

    This report presents the conceptual design for a Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for transportation applications. The design is based on the initial selection of the Chrysler LH sedan as the target vehicle with a 50 kW (gross) PEM Fuel Cell Stack (FCS) as the primary power source, a battery-powered Load Leveling Unit (LLU) for surge power requirements, an on-board hydrogen storage subsystem containing high pressure gaseous storage, a Gas Management Subsystem (GMS) to manage the hydrogen and air supplies for the FCS, and electronic controllers to control the electrical system. The design process has been dedicated to the use of Design-to-Cost (DTC) principles. The Direct Hydrogen-Powered PEM Fuel Cell Stack Hybrid Vehicle (DPHV) system is designed to operate on the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) and Hiway Cycles. These cycles have been used to evaluate the vehicle performance with regard to range and hydrogen usage. The major constraints for the DPHV vehicle are vehicle and battery weight, transparency of the power system and drive train to the user, equivalence of fuel and life cycle costs to conventional vehicles, and vehicle range. The energy and power requirements are derived by the capability of the DPHV system to achieve an acceleration from 0 to 60 MPH within 12 seconds, and the capability to achieve and maintain a speed of 55 MPH on a grade of seven percent. The conceptual design for the DPHV vehicle is shown in a figure. A detailed description of the Hydrogen Storage Subsystem is given in section 4. A detailed description of the FCS Subsystem and GMS is given in section 3. A detailed description of the LLU, selection of the LLU energy source, and the power controller designs is given in section 5.

  17. Performance improvement of passive direct methanol fuel cells with surface-patterned Nafion® membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Longjuan; Jiang, Jingjing; Yuan, Ting; Chai, Jieshi; Zhang, Haifeng; Zou, Zhiqing; Li, Xue-Mei; Yang, Hui

    2015-02-01

    Nafion® 115 membrane, patterned by thermal imprint lithography on the anode side, is used for passive direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The membrane roughness factor, defined as the ratio between the actual and projected membrane surface area, was investigated for its effects on the performance of the DMFCs. When the anode Pt-Ru (1:1) catalyst loading is 1.0 mg cm-2, the maximum power density of the DMFC with a surface-patterned membrane (roughness factor: 5.4) using 3.0 M methanol as the fuel at 25 ± 1 °C reaches 27.2 ± 0.3 mW cm-2, an increase of ∼57.2% in comparison to DMFC using the pristine membrane (roughness factor: ∼1.0). Further, electrochemical characterization indicates that increased roughness factor of the membrane results in increased electrochemically active surface area and reduced charge transfer resistance in the cell. These performance improvements are ascribed to the increased surface roughness which enlarges the membrane/catalyst interface, possibly facilitating mass transport of the fuel and improving anode catalyst utilization. Thus, patterned membranes have great potential in improving the performance of fuel cells and reducing catalyst loading.

  18. A NiFeCu alloy anode catalyst for direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Huaiyu; Yang, Guangming; Park, Hee Jung; Jung, Doh Won; Kwak, Chan; Shao, Zongping

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a new anode catalyst based on a NiFeCu alloy is investigated for use in direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The influence of the conductive copper introduced into the anode catalyst layer on the performance of the SOFCs is systematically studied. The catalytic activity for partial oxidation of methane and coking resistance tests are proposed with various anode catalyst layer materials prepared using different methods, including glycine nitrate process (GNP), physical mixing (PM) and impregnation (IMP). The surface conductivity tests indicate that the conductivities of the NiFe-ZrO2/Cu (PM) and NiFe-ZrO2/Cu (IMP) catalysts are considerably greater than that of NiFe-ZrO2/Cu (GNP), which is consistent with the SEM results. Among the three preparation methods, the cell containing the NiFe-ZrO2/Cu (IMP) catalyst layer performs best on CH4-O2 fuel, especially under reduced temperatures, because the coking resistance should be considered in real fuel cell conditions. The cell containing the NiFe-ZrO2/Cu (IMP) catalyst layer also delivers an excellent operational stability using CH4-O2 fuel for 100 h without any signs of decay. In summary, this work provides new alternative anode catalytic materials to accelerate the commercialization of SOFC technology.

  19. Performance prediction of scalable fuel cell systems for micro-vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Clair, Jeffrey Glen

    Miniature (< 500g) bio-inspired robotic vehicles are being developed for a variety of applications ranging from inspection of hazardous and remote areas to environmental monitoring. Their utility could be greatly improved by replacing batteries with fuel cells consuming high energy density fuels. This thesis surveys miniature fuel cell technologies and identifies direct methanol and sodium borohydride technologies as especially promising at small scales. A methodology for estimating overall system-level performance that accounts for the balance of plant (i.e. the extra components like pumps, blowers, etc. necessary to run the fuel cell system) is developed and used to quantify the performance of two direct methanol and one NaBH4 fuel cell systems. Direct methanol systems with water recirculation offer superior specific power (400 mW/g) and specific energy at powers of 20W and system masses of 150g. The NaBH4 fuel cell system is superior at low power (<5W) because of its more energetic fuel.

  20. Integration of a molten carbonate fuel cell with a direct exhaust absorption chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalef, Pere; Samuelsen, Scott

    A high market value exists for an integrated high-temperature fuel cell-absorption chiller product throughout the world. While high-temperature, molten carbonate fuel cells are being commercially deployed with combined heat and power (CHP) and absorption chillers are being commercially deployed with heat engines, the energy efficiency and environmental attributes of an integrated high-temperature fuel cell-absorption chiller product are singularly attractive for the emerging distributed generation (DG) combined cooling, heating, and power (CCHP) market. This study addresses the potential of cooling production by recovering and porting the thermal energy from the exhaust gas of a high-temperature fuel cell (HTFC) to a thermally activated absorption chiller. To assess the practical opportunity of serving an early DG-CCHP market, a commercially available direct fired double-effect absorption chiller is selected that closely matches the exhaust flow and temperature of a commercially available HTFC. Both components are individually modeled, and the models are then coupled to evaluate the potential of a DG-CCHP system. Simulation results show that a commercial molten carbonate fuel cell generating 300 kW of electricity can be effectively coupled with a commercial 40 refrigeration ton (RT) absorption chiller. While the match between the two "off the shelf" units is close and the simulation results are encouraging, the match is not ideal. In particular, the fuel cell exhaust gas temperature is higher than the inlet temperature specified for the chiller and the exhaust flow rate is not sufficient to achieve the potential heat recovery within the chiller heat exchanger. To address these challenges, the study evaluates two strategies: (1) blending the fuel cell exhaust gas with ambient air, and (2) mixing the fuel cell exhaust gases with a fraction of the chiller exhaust gas. Both cases are shown to be viable and result in a temperature drop and flow rate increase of the

  1. Summary report : direct approaches for recycling carbon dioxide into synthetic fuel.

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Ambrosini, Andrea; Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Miller, James Edward; Gelbard, Fred; Evans, Lindsey R.

    2009-01-01

    The consumption of petroleum by the transportation sector in the United States is roughly equivalent to petroleum imports into the country, which have totaled over 12 million barrels a day every year since 2004. This reliance on foreign oil is a strategic vulnerability for the economy and national security. Further, the effect of unmitigated CO{sub 2} releases on the global climate is a growing concern both here and abroad. Independence from problematic oil producers can be achieved to a great degree through the utilization of non-conventional hydrocarbon resources such as coal, oil-shale and tarsands. However, tapping into and converting these resources into liquid fuels exacerbates green house gas (GHG) emissions as they are carbon rich, but hydrogen deficient. Revolutionary thinking about energy and fuels must be adopted. We must recognize that hydrocarbon fuels are ideal energy carriers, but not primary energy sources. The energy stored in a chemical fuel is released for utilization by oxidation. In the case of hydrogen fuel the chemical product is water; in the case of a hydrocarbon fuel, water and carbon dioxide are produced. The hydrogen economy envisions a cycle in which H{sub 2}O is re-energized by splitting water into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}, by electrolysis for example. We envision a hydrocarbon analogy in which both carbon dioxide and water are re-energized through the application of a persistent energy source (e.g. solar or nuclear). This is of course essentially what the process of photosynthesis accomplishes, albeit with a relatively low sunlight-to-hydrocarbon efficiency. The goal of this project then was the creation of a direct and efficient process for the solar or nuclear driven thermochemical conversion of CO{sub 2} to CO (and O{sub 2}), one of the basic building blocks of synthetic fuels. This process would potentially provide the basis for an alternate hydrocarbon economy that is carbon neutral, provides a pathway to energy independence, and is

  2. Direct PEM fuel cell using "organic chemical hydrides" with zero-CO2 emission and low-crossover.

    PubMed

    Kariya, Nobuko; Fukuoka, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Masaru

    2006-04-14

    A series of "organic chemical hydrides" such as cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, cyclohexene, 2-propanol, and cyclohexanol were applied to the direct PEM fuel cell. High performances of the PEM fuel cell were achieved by using cyclohexane (OCV = 920 mV, PD(max) = 15 mW cm(-2)) and 2-propanol (OCV = 790 mV, PD(max) = 78 mW cm(-2)) as fuels without CO(2) emissions. The rates of fuel crossover for cyclohexane, 2-propanol, and methanol were estimated, and the rates of fuel permeation of cyclohexane and 2-propanol were lower than that of methanol. Water electrolysis and electro-reductive hydrogenation of acetone mediated by PEM were carried out and formation of 2-propanol in cathode side was observed. This system is the first example of a "rechargeable" direct fuel cell.

  3. Structure and spectroscopy of CuH prepared via borohydride reduction.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Elliot L; Wilson, Thomas; Murphy, Patrick J; Refson, Keith; Hannon, Alex C; Imberti, Silvia; Callear, Samantha K; Chass, Gregory A; Parker, Stewart F

    2015-12-01

    Copper(I) hydride (cuprous hydride, CuH) was the first binary metal hydride to be discovered (in 1844) and is singular in that it is synthesized in solution, at ambient temperature. There are several synthetic paths to CuH, one of which involves reduction of an aqueous solution of CuSO4·5H2O by borohydride ions. The product from this procedure has not been extensively characterized. Using a combination of diffraction methods (X-ray and neutron) and inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy, we show that the CuH from the borohydride route has the same bulk structure as CuH produced by other routes. Our work shows that the product consists of a core of CuH with a shell of water and that this may be largely replaced by ethanol. This offers the possibility of modifying the properties of CuH produced by aqueous routes. PMID:26634717

  4. Reversible Dehydrogenation of Magnesium Borohydride to Magnesium Triborane in the Solid State Under Moderate Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Marina; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Jalisatgi, Satish; Jensen, Craig M.

    2011-02-17

    Thermal decomposition of magnesium borohydride, Mg(BH4)2, in the solid state was studied by a combination of PCT, TGA/MS and NMR spectroscopy. Dehydrogenation of Mg(BH4)2 at 200 °C, results in the highly selective formation of magnesium triborane, Mg(B3H8)2. This process is reversible at 250 °C under 120 atm H2. Dehydrogenation at higher temperature, > 300 °C, produces a complex mixture of polyborane species. Solution phase 11B NMR spectra of the hydrolyzed decomposition products reveals the formation of the B3H8 anion, boric acid from hydrolysis of the unstable polyboranes (BnHx) (n = 3-11, x >8), and the closoborane B12H12 dianion as a minor product. A BH condensation mechanism involving metal hydride formation is proposed to explain the limited reversible hydrogen storage in magnesium borohydride.

  5. The reasons for the high power density of fuel cells fabricated with directly deposited membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vierrath, Severin; Breitwieser, Matthias; Klingele, Matthias; Britton, Benjamin; Holdcroft, Steven; Zengerle, Roland; Thiele, Simon

    2016-09-01

    In a previous study, we reported that polymer electrolyte fuel cells prepared by direct membrane deposition (DMD) produced power densities in excess of 4 W/cm2. In this study, the underlying origins that give rise to these high power densities are investigated and reported. The membranes of high power, DMD-fabricated fuel cells are relatively thin (12 μm) compared to typical benchmark, commercially available membranes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, at high current densities (2.2 A/cm2) reveals that mass transport resistance was half that of reference, catalyst-coated-membranes (CCM). This is attributed to an improved oxygen supply in the cathode catalyst layer by way of a reduced propensity of flooding, and which is facilitated by an enhancement in the back diffusion of water from cathode to anode through the thin directly deposited membrane. DMD-fabricated membrane-electrode-assemblies possess 50% reduction in ionic resistance (15 mΩcm2) compared to conventional CCMs, with contributions of 9 mΩcm2 for the membrane resistance and 6 mΩcm2 for the contact resistance of the membrane and catalyst layer ionomer. The improved mass transport is responsible for 90% of the increase in power density of the DMD fuel cell, while the reduced ionic resistance accounts for a 10% of the improvement.

  6. Catalytic hydrodechlorination of 1,2-dichloroethane using copper nanoparticles under reduction conditions of sodium borohydride.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chang-Chieh; Lo, Shang-Lien; Tsai, Shin-Mu; Lien, Hsing-Lung

    2011-09-01

    1,2-Dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) is a raw material used for the manufacture of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) and therefore has very often been detected in the groundwater nearby the VCM manufacturing plant. Zero-valent iron (ZVI) is capable of degrading a wide array of highly chlorinated contaminants; however, the reactivity of ZVI towards 1,2-DCA is very low. In this study, zero-valent copper nanoparticles have been synthesized for effective dechlorination of 1,2-DCA under reduction conditions of sodium borohydride. Copper nanoparticles consisted of mainly metallic copper (Cu(0)) with small amounts of cuprous oxide (Cu(2)O). They have surface areas of about 19.0 m(2) g(-1) and an average diameter of 15 nm. Batch experiments were conducted to test the effectiveness of copper nanoparticles for 1,2-DCA degradation using sodium borohydride as electron donors where the ORP was measured as -1100 mV. More than 80% of 1,2-DCA (30 mg L(-1)) was rapidly degraded within 2 h in the presence of both copper nanoparticles (2.5 g L(-1)) and borohydride (25 mM). No reduction of 1,2-DCA was observed when the system contained either copper nanoparticles alone or borohydride alone. The degradation intermediates included ethane and ethylene accounting for 79% and ∼1.5% of the 1,2-DCA lost, respectively. Potential environmental applications can be achieved by immobilizing copper nanoparticles onto the surface of reducing metals to form a reactive bimetallic structure.

  7. Three-dimensional anode engineering for the direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, A.; Oloman, C. W.; Gyenge, E. L.

    Catalyzed graphite felt three-dimensional anodes were investigated in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) operated with sulfuric acid supporting electrolyte. With a conventional serpentine channel flow field the preferred anode thickness was 100 μm, while a novel flow-by anode showed the best performance with a thickness of 200-300 μm. The effects of altering the methanol concentration, anolyte flow rate and operating temperature on the fuel cell superficial power density were studied by full (2 3 + 1) factorial experiments on a cell with anode area of 5 cm 2 and excess oxidant O 2 at 200 kPa(abs). For operation in the flow-by mode with 2 M methanol at 2 cm 3 min -1 and 353 K the peak power density was 2380 W m -2 with a PtRuMo anode catalyst, while a PtRu catalyst yielded 2240 W m -2 under the same conditions.

  8. Direct N2H4/H2O2 Fuel Cells Powered by Nanoporous Gold Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiuling; Meng, Fanhui; Xie, Yun; Liu, Jianguo; Ding, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Dealloyed nanoporous gold leaves (NPGLs) are found to exhibit high electrocatalytic properties toward both hydrazine (N2H4) oxidation and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) reduction. This observation allows the implementation of a direct hydrazine-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell (DHHPFC) based on these novel porous membrane catalysts. The effects of fuel and oxidizer flow rate, concentration and cell temperature on the performance of DHHPFC are systematically investigated. With a loading of ~0.1 mg cm−2 Au on each side, an open circuit voltage (OCV) of 1.2 V is obtained at 80°C with a maximum power density 195 mW cm−2, which is 22 times higher than that of commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst at the same noble metal loading. NPGLs thus hold great potential as effective and stable electrocatalysts for DHHPFCs. PMID:23230507

  9. First-principles investigations of ionic conduction in Li and Na borohydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varley, Joel; Heo, Tae-Wook; Ray, Keith; Bonev, Stanimir; Wood, Brandon

    Recent experimental studies have identified a family of alkali borohydride materials that exhibit superionic transition temperatures approaching room temperature and ionic conductivities exceeding 0.1 S/cm-1, making them highly promising solid electrolytes for next-generation batteries. Despite the rapid advances in improving the superionic conductivity in these materials, an understanding of the exact mechanisms driving the transport remains unknown. Here we use ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to address this issue by characterizing the diffusivity of the Li and Na species in a representative set of closoborane ionic conductors. We investigate both the Na and Li-containing borohydrides with icosahedral (B12H12) and double-capped square antiprism (B10H10) anion species and discuss the trends in ionic conductivity as a function of stoichiometry and the incorporation of various dopants. Our results support the borohydrides as a subset of a larger family of very promising solid electrolytes and identify strategies to improving the conductivity in these materials. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Characterization of Polyethylene-Graft-Sulfonated Polyarylsulfone Proton Exchange Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Kyu; Zhang, Gang; Nam, Changwoo; Chung, T C Mike

    2015-12-04

    This paper examines polymer film morphology and several important properties of polyethylene-graft-sulfonated polyarylene ether sulfone (PE-g-s-PAES) proton exchange membranes (PEMs) for direct methanol fuel cell applications. Due to the extreme surface energy differences between a semi-crystalline and hydrophobic PE backbone and several amorphous and hydrophilic s-PAES side chains, the PE-g-s-PAES membrane self-assembles into a unique morphology, with many proton conductive s-PAES channels embedded in the stable and tough PE matrix and a thin hydrophobic PE layer spontaneously formed on the membrane surfaces. In the bulk, these membranes show good mechanical properties (tensile strength >30 MPa, Young's modulus >1400 MPa) and low water swelling (λ < 15) even with high IEC >3 mmol/g in the s-PAES domains. On the surface, the thin hydrophobic and semi-crystalline PE layer shows some unusual barrier (protective) properties. In addition to exhibiting higher through-plane conductivity (up to 160 mS/cm) than in-plane conductivity, the PE surface layer minimizes methanol cross-over from anode to cathode with reduced fuel loss, and stops the HO• and HO₂• radicals, originally formed at the anode, entering into PEM matrix. Evidently, the thin PE surface layer provides a highly desirable protecting layer for PEMs to reduce fuel loss and increase chemical stability. Overall, the newly developed PE-g-s-PAES membranes offer a desirable set of PEM properties, including conductivity, selectivity, mechanical strength, stability, and cost-effectiveness for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  11. Characterization of Polyethylene-Graft-Sulfonated Polyarylsulfone Proton Exchange Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Kyu; Zhang, Gang; Nam, Changwoo; Chung, T.C. Mike

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines polymer film morphology and several important properties of polyethylene-graft-sulfonated polyarylene ether sulfone (PE-g-s-PAES) proton exchange membranes (PEMs) for direct methanol fuel cell applications. Due to the extreme surface energy differences between a semi-crystalline and hydrophobic PE backbone and several amorphous and hydrophilic s-PAES side chains, the PE-g-s-PAES membrane self-assembles into a unique morphology, with many proton conductive s-PAES channels embedded in the stable and tough PE matrix and a thin hydrophobic PE layer spontaneously formed on the membrane surfaces. In the bulk, these membranes show good mechanical properties (tensile strength >30 MPa, Young’s modulus >1400 MPa) and low water swelling (λ < 15) even with high IEC >3 mmol/g in the s-PAES domains. On the surface, the thin hydrophobic and semi-crystalline PE layer shows some unusual barrier (protective) properties. In addition to exhibiting higher through-plane conductivity (up to 160 mS/cm) than in-plane conductivity, the PE surface layer minimizes methanol cross-over from anode to cathode with reduced fuel loss, and stops the HO• and HO2• radicals, originally formed at the anode, entering into PEM matrix. Evidently, the thin PE surface layer provides a highly desirable protecting layer for PEMs to reduce fuel loss and increase chemical stability. Overall, the newly developed PE-g-s-PAES membranes offer a desirable set of PEM properties, including conductivity, selectivity, mechanical strength, stability, and cost-effectiveness for direct methanol fuel cell applications. PMID:26690232

  12. Mass Production Cost Estimation For Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systesm for Automotive Applications. 2010 Update

    SciTech Connect

    James, Brian D.; Kalinoski, Jeffrey A.; Baum, Kevin N.

    2010-09-30

    This report is the fourth annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing costs of complete 80 kWnet direct-hydrogen proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems suitable for powering light-duty automobiles.

  13. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications. 2009 Update

    SciTech Connect

    James, Brian D.; Kalinoski, Jeffrey A.; Baum, Kevin N.

    2010-01-01

    This report is the third annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing cost of complete 80 kWnet direct hydrogen proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems suitable for powering light duty automobiles.

  14. Instrument for layer-by-layer deposition of catalyst layers directly on proton exchange membrane for direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Wang, L; Liang, J; Liu, C

    2012-09-01

    A catalyst layer (CL) layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition instrument, consisting of an electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) device and a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fixing device, has been developed. It has been used to deposit anode CL on Nafion membrane under different working distances of 4, 5, and 6 mm. The incorporation of EHDA LbL deposition allowed the generation of the CLs with different structures, where the higher working distance produced more porous CL structure. A catalyst-coated membrane (CCM) was also produced using this EHDA LbL deposition and PEM fixing device. It was observed that the catalyst has been uniformly coated on the Nafion membrane and the CCM presents an uniform surface feature. The performance of a single direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) assembled with the deposited CCM at different working temperatures was analysed. The cell performance increased when the temperature rose. This instrument has the potential of being developed into a powerful device for controlling the deposition of CL of desired structures directly on PEM for DMFCs.

  15. Construction of a Direct Water-Injected Two-Stroke Engine for Phased Direct Fuel Injection-High Pressure Charging Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somsel, James P.

    1998-01-01

    The development of a water injected Orbital Combustion Process (OCP) engine was conducted to assess the viability of using the powerplant for high altitude NASA aircraft and General Aviation (GA) applications. An OCP direct fuel injected, 1.2 liter, three cylinder, two-stroke engine has been enhanced to independently inject water directly into the combustion chamber. The engine currently demonstrates low brake specific fuel consumption capability and an excellent power to weight ratio. With direct water injection, significant improvements can be made to engine power, to knock limits/ignition advance timing, and to engine NO(x) emissions. The principal aim of the testing was to validate a cyclic model developed by the Systems Analysis Branch at NASA Ames Research Center. The work is a continuation of Ames' investigations into a Phased Direct Fuel Injection Engine with High Pressure Charging (PDFI-ITPC).

  16. Experimental characterization of cooled EGR in a gasoline direct injection engine for reducing fuel consumption and nitrogen oxide emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-Ki; Lee, Jungkoo; Kim, Kyungcheol; Park, Seongho; Kim, Hyung-Man

    2015-11-01

    The emphasis on increasing fuel economy and reducing emissions is increasing. Attention has turned to how the performance of a gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine can be improved to achieve lower fuel consumption and NOx emission. Therefore, positive effects can reduce fuel consumption and NOx emission as well as knock suppression. The cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) ranges within the characteristic map are characterized from the experimental results at various speeds and brake mean effective pressures in a GDI engine. The results show that the application of cooled EGR system brought in 3.63 % reduction as for the fuel consumption and 4.34 % as for NOx emission.

  17. Investigation of grafted ETFE-based polymer membranes as alternative electrolyte for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, A. S.; Baglio, V.; Cretı̀, P.; Di Blasi, A.; Antonucci, V.; Brunea, J.; Chapotot, A.; Bozzi, A.; Schoemans, J.

    Low cost ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE)-based grafted membranes have been prepared by a process based on electron beam irradiation, subsequent grafting, cross-linking and sulfonation procedure. Two different grafted membranes varying by their grafting and cross-linking levels have been investigated for applications in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) operating between 90 and 130 °C. DMFC assemblies based on these membranes showed cell resistance and performance values comparable to Nafion 117. Stable electrochemical performance was recorded during 1 month of cycled operation. Tailoring of grafting and cross-linking properties allows a significant reduction of methanol cross-over while maintaining suitable conductivity and performance levels.

  18. Production and Optimization of Direct Coal Liquefaction derived Low Carbon-Footprint Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Markovich

    2010-06-30

    This report summarizes works conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-05NT42448. The work scope was divided into two categories - (a) experimental program to pretreat and refine a coal derived syncrude sample to meet transportation fuels requirements; (b) system analysis of a commercial scale direct coal liquefaction facility. The coal syncrude was derived from a bituminous coal by Headwaters CTL, while the refining study was carried out under a subcontract to Axens North America. The system analysis included H{sub 2} production cost via six different options, conceptual process design, utilities requirements, CO{sub 2} emission and overall plant economy. As part of the system analysis, impact of various H{sub 2} production options was evaluated. For consistence the comparison was carried out using the DOE H2A model. However, assumptions in the model were updated using Headwaters database. Results of Tier 2 jet fuel specifications evaluation by the Fuels & Energy Branch, US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RZPF) located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Ohio) are also discussed in this report.

  19. Direct methanol fuel cell performance using sulfonated poly (arylene ether sulfone) random copolymers as electrolytes.

    SciTech Connect

    Zawodzinski, T. A. , Jr.; Zelenay, P.; Hickner, M.; Wang, F.; McGrath, James E.; Pivovar, B. S.

    2001-01-01

    Sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) random copolymers are a new series of sulfonic acid containing polymers that have shown promise as fuel cell electrolytes. Here, we report on direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) performance of this class of polymers at sulfonation levels ranging from 40 to 60% (monomer basis). The DMFC performance of these polymers is compared to that of Nafion 117, the long standing standard in fuel cell testing. These polymers show a higher selectivity for protons over methanol for all the sulfonation levels tested, with the 40% sulfonated polymer showing 2.5 times the selectivity of Nafion. While the higher sulfonated forms (50 and 60%) did show a higher selectivity, only the lower sulfonation levels (40 and 45%) have shown improved performance in DMFC testing. The results of these experiments will be discussed in terms of the relevant test conditions, and experimentally determined membrane properties. The relevant DMFC properties of these polymers will be discussed in terms of sulfonation level and compared to those of Nafion 117.

  20. From lignin to cycloparaffins and aromatics: directional synthesis of jet and diesel fuel range biofuels using biomass.

    PubMed

    Bi, Peiyan; Wang, Jicong; Zhang, Yajing; Jiang, Peiwen; Wu, Xiaoping; Liu, Junxu; Xue, He; Wang, Tiejun; Li, Quanxin

    2015-05-01

    The continual growth in commercial aviation fuels and more strict environmental legislations have led to immense interest in developing green aviation fuels from biomass. This paper demonstrated a controllable transformation of lignin into jet and diesel fuel range hydrocarbons, involving directional production of C8-C15 aromatics by the catalytic depolymerization of lignin into C6-C8 low carbon aromatic monomers coupled with the alkylation of aromatics, and the directional production of C8-C15 cycloparaffins by the hydrogenation of aromatics. The key step, the production of the desired C8-C15 aromatics with the selectivity up to 94.3%, was achieved by the low temperature alkylation reactions of the lignin-derived monomers using ionic liquid. The synthetic biofuels basically met the main technical requirements of conventional jet fuels. The transformation potentially provides a useful way for the development of cycloparaffinic and aromatic components in jet fuels using renewable lignocellulose biomass. PMID:25710678

  1. From lignin to cycloparaffins and aromatics: directional synthesis of jet and diesel fuel range biofuels using biomass.

    PubMed

    Bi, Peiyan; Wang, Jicong; Zhang, Yajing; Jiang, Peiwen; Wu, Xiaoping; Liu, Junxu; Xue, He; Wang, Tiejun; Li, Quanxin

    2015-05-01

    The continual growth in commercial aviation fuels and more strict environmental legislations have led to immense interest in developing green aviation fuels from biomass. This paper demonstrated a controllable transformation of lignin into jet and diesel fuel range hydrocarbons, involving directional production of C8-C15 aromatics by the catalytic depolymerization of lignin into C6-C8 low carbon aromatic monomers coupled with the alkylation of aromatics, and the directional production of C8-C15 cycloparaffins by the hydrogenation of aromatics. The key step, the production of the desired C8-C15 aromatics with the selectivity up to 94.3%, was achieved by the low temperature alkylation reactions of the lignin-derived monomers using ionic liquid. The synthetic biofuels basically met the main technical requirements of conventional jet fuels. The transformation potentially provides a useful way for the development of cycloparaffinic and aromatic components in jet fuels using renewable lignocellulose biomass.

  2. Startup, testing, and operation of the Santa Clara 2MW direct carbonate fuel cell demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Skok, A.J.; Leo, A.J.; O`Shea, T.P.

    1996-12-31

    The Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is a collaboration between several utility organizations, Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE), and the U.S. Dept. Of Energy aimed at the demonstration of Energy Research Corporation`s (ERC) direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) technology. ERC has been pursuing the development of the DFC for commercialization near the end of this decade, and this project is an integral part of the ERC commercialization effort. The objective of the Santa Clara Demonstration Project is to provide the first full, commercial scale demonstration of this technology. The approach ERC has taken in the commercialization of the DFC is described in detail elsewhere. An aggressive core technology development program is in place which is focused by ongoing interaction with customers and vendors to optimize the design of the commercial power plant. ERC has selected a 2.85 MW power plant unit for initial market entry. Two ERC subsidiaries are supporting the commercialization effort: the Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) and the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE). FCMC manufactures carbonate stacks and multi-stack modules, currently from its production facility in Torrington, CT. FCE is responsible for power plant design, integration of all subsystems, sales/marketing, and client services. FCE is serving as the prime contractor for the design, construction, and testing of the SCDP Plant. FCMC has manufactured the multi-stack submodules used in the DC power section of the plant. Fluor Daniel Inc. (FDI) served as the architect-engineer subcontractor for the design and construction of the plant and provided support to the design of the multi-stack submodules. FDI is also assisting the ERC companies in commercial power plant design.

  3. Development of cesium phosphotungstate salt and chitosan composite membrane for direct methanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yanxin; Xiang, Yan; Xiu, Ruijie; Lu, Shanfu

    2013-10-15

    A novel composite membrane has been developed by doping cesium phosphotungstate salt (CsxH3-xPW12O40 (0≤x≤3), Csx-PTA) into chitosan (CTS/Csx-PTA) for application in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Uniform distribution of Csx-PTA nanoparticles has been achieved in the chitosan matrix. The proton conductivity of the composite membrane is significantly affected by the Csx-PTA content in the composite membrane as well as the Cs substitution in PTA. The highest proton conductivity for the CTS/Csx-PTA membranes was obtained with x=2 and Cs2-PTA content of 5 wt%. The value is 6×10(-3) S cm(-1) and 1.75×10(-2) S cm(-1) at 298 K and 353 K, respectively. The methanol permeability of CTS/Cs2-PTA membrane is about 5.6×10(-7), 90% lower than that of Nafion-212 membrane. The highest selectivity factor (φ) was obtained on CTS/Cs2-PTA-5 wt% composite membrane, 1.1×10(4)/Scm(-3)s. The present study indicates the promising potential of CTS/Csx-PTA composite membrane as alternative proton exchange membranes in direct methanol fuel cells.

  4. Polymer electrolytes based on sulfonated polysulfone for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lufrano, F.; Baglio, V.; Staiti, P.; Arico', A. S.; Antonucci, V.

    This paper reports the development and characterization of sulfonated polysulfone (SPSf) polymer electrolytes for direct methanol fuel cells. The synthesis of sulfonated polysulfone was performed by a post sulfonation method using trimethyl silyl chlorosulfonate as a mild sulfonating agent. Bare polysulfone membranes were prepared with two different sulfonation levels (60%, SPSf-60 and 70%, SPSf-70), whereas, a composite membrane of SPSf-60 was prepared with 5 wt% silica filler. These membranes were investigated in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) operating at low (30-40 °C) and high temperatures (100-120 °C). DMFC power densities were about 140 mW cm -2 at 100 °C with the bare SPSf-60 membrane and 180 mW cm -2 at 120 °C with the SPSf-60-SiO2 composite membrane. The best performance achieved at ambient temperature using a membrane with high degree of sulfonation (70%, SPSf-70) was 20 mW cm -2 at atmospheric pressure. This makes the polysulfone-based DMFC suitable for application in portable devices.

  5. Development of cesium phosphotungstate salt and chitosan composite membrane for direct methanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yanxin; Xiang, Yan; Xiu, Ruijie; Lu, Shanfu

    2013-10-15

    A novel composite membrane has been developed by doping cesium phosphotungstate salt (CsxH3-xPW12O40 (0≤x≤3), Csx-PTA) into chitosan (CTS/Csx-PTA) for application in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Uniform distribution of Csx-PTA nanoparticles has been achieved in the chitosan matrix. The proton conductivity of the composite membrane is significantly affected by the Csx-PTA content in the composite membrane as well as the Cs substitution in PTA. The highest proton conductivity for the CTS/Csx-PTA membranes was obtained with x=2 and Cs2-PTA content of 5 wt%. The value is 6×10(-3) S cm(-1) and 1.75×10(-2) S cm(-1) at 298 K and 353 K, respectively. The methanol permeability of CTS/Cs2-PTA membrane is about 5.6×10(-7), 90% lower than that of Nafion-212 membrane. The highest selectivity factor (φ) was obtained on CTS/Cs2-PTA-5 wt% composite membrane, 1.1×10(4)/Scm(-3)s. The present study indicates the promising potential of CTS/Csx-PTA composite membrane as alternative proton exchange membranes in direct methanol fuel cells. PMID:23987340

  6. Proton exchange membrane materials for the advancement of direct methanol fuel-cell technology

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, Christopher J.

    2006-04-04

    A new class of hybrid organic-inorganic materials, and methods of synthesis, that can be used as a proton exchange membrane in a direct methanol fuel cell. In contrast with Nafion.RTM. PEM materials, which have random sulfonation, the new class of materials have ordered sulfonation achieved through self-assembly of alternating polyimide segments of different molecular weights comprising, for example, highly sulfonated hydrophilic PDA-DASA polyimide segment alternating with an unsulfonated hydrophobic 6FDA-DAS polyimide segment. An inorganic phase, e.g., 0.5 5 wt % TEOS, can be incorporated in the sulfonated polyimide copolymer to further improve its properties. The new materials exhibit reduced swelling when exposed to water, increased thermal stability, and decreased O.sub.2 and H.sub.2 gas permeability, while retaining proton conductivities similar to Nafion.RTM.. These improved properties may allow direct methanol fuel cells to operate at higher temperatures and with higher efficiencies due to reduced methanol crossover.

  7. Enhancement of direct urea-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell performance by three-dimensional porous nickel-cobalt anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fen; Cao, Dianxue; Du, Mengmeng; Ye, Ke; Wang, Guiling; Zhang, Wenping; Gao, Yinyi; Cheng, Kui

    2016-03-01

    A novel three-dimensional (3D) porous nickel-cobalt (Ni-Co) film on nickel foam is successfully prepared and further used as an efficient anode for direct urea-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell (DUHPFC). By varying the cobalt/nickel mole ratios into 0%, 20%, 50%, 80% and 100%, the optimized Ni-Co/Ni foam anode with a ratio of 80% is obtained in terms of the best cell performance among five anodes. Effects of the KOH and urea concentrations, the flow rate and operation temperature on the fuel cell performance are investigated. Results show DUHPFC with the 3D Ni-Co/Ni foam anode exhibits a higher performance than those reported direct urea fuel cells. The cell gives an open circuit voltage of 0.83 V and a peak power density as high as 17.4 and 31.5 mW cm-2 at 20 °C and 70 °C, respectively, when operating on 7.0 mol L-1 KOH and 0.5 mol L-1 urea as the fuel at a flow rate of 15 mL min-1. Besides, when the human urine is directly fed as the fuel, direct urine-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell reaches a maximum power density of 7.5 mW cm-2 with an open circuit voltage of 0.80 V at 20 °C, showing a good application prospect in wastewater treatment.

  8. Power generation performance of direct flame fuel cell (DFFC) impinged by small jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yuji; Endo, Shota

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigated the effect of cell temperature and product species concentration induced by a small jet flame on the power generation performance of a direct flame fuel cell (DFFC). The cell is placed above the small-scale jet flame and the heated product’s gases are impinged toward it. This system is considered to be the simplest and smallest unit of such power generation devices to have been developed. Methane is used as fuel and an equivalence ratio (φ ) of the mixture (with oxygen) and the distance between the cell and the burner surface (d) are considered as the experimental parameters. It turns out that open circuit voltage increases linearly with the increase of temperature in a wide range of equivalence ratios. However, it increases drastically to the point at which the equivalence ratio becomes small enough (φ   ⩽  2.0 in the present study) within the specific distance range to bring about the appearance of an inner flame. This could provide sufficient heat and oxygen for the anode, contributing to the generation of the cell’s high electric potential. It is also noted that the appearance of the inner flame does not promise to better the performance unless the preferred conditions (high temperature, low oxygen, rich fuel) near the cell are achieved. The Nernst equation works well for predicting the open circuit voltage under the conditions studied. Systematic design of the entire power generation system is preferable when a miniaturized power generation system is considered by applying DFFC.

  9. Synthesis, Structure, and Reactivity of Co(II) and Ni(II) PCP Pincer Borohydride Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The 15e square-planar complexes [Co(PCPMe-iPr)Cl] (2a) and [Co(PCP-tBu)Cl] (2b), respectively, react readily with NaBH4 to afford complexes [Co(PCPMe-iPr)(η2-BH4)] (4a) and [Co(PCP-tBu)(η2-BH4)] (4b) in high yields, as confirmed by IR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and elemental analysis. The borohydride ligand is symmetrically bound to the cobalt center in η2-fashion. These compounds are paramagnetic with effective magnetic moments of 2.0(1) and 2.1(1) μB consistent with a d7 low-spin system corresponding to one unpaired electron. None of these complexes reacted with CO2 to give formate complexes. For structural and reactivity comparisons, we prepared the analogous Ni(II) borohydride complex [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)(η2-BH4)] (5) via two different synthetic routes. One utilizes [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)Cl] (3) and NaBH4, the second one makes use of the hydride complex [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)H] (6) and BH3·THF. In both cases, 5 is obtained in high yields. In contrast to 4a and 4b, the borohydride ligand is asymmetrically bound to the nickel center but still in an η2-mode. [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)(η2-BH4)] (5) loses readily BH3 at elevated temperatures in the presence of NEt3 to form 6. Complexes 5 and 6 are both diamagnetic and were characterized by a combination of 1H, 13C{1H}, and 31P{1H} NMR, IR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. Additionally, the structure of these compounds was established by X-ray crystallography. Complexes 5 and 6 react with CO2 to give the formate complex [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)(OC(C=O)H] (7). The extrusion of BH3 from [Co(PCPMe-iPr)(η2-BH4)] (4a) and [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)(η2-BH4)] (5) with the aid of NH3 to yield the respective hydride complexes [Co(PCPMe-iPr)H] and [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)H] (6) and BH3NH3 was investigated by DFT calculations showing that formation of the Ni hydride is thermodynamically favorable, whereas the formation of the Co(II) hydride, in agreement with the experiment, is unfavorable. The electronic structures and the bonding of the borohydride ligand in [Co

  10. Alkali metal – yttrium borohydrides: The link between coordination of small and large rare-earth

    SciTech Connect

    Sadikin, Yolanda; Stare, Katarina; Schouwink, Pascal; Brix Ley, Morten; Jensen, Torben R.; Meden, Anton; Černý, Radovan

    2015-05-15

    The system Li–A–Y–BH{sub 4} (A=K, Rb, Cs) is found to contain five new compounds and four further ones known from previous work on the homoleptic borohydrides. Crystal structures have been solved and refined from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, thermal stability of new compounds have been investigated and ionic conductivity measured for selected samples. Significant coordination flexibility for Y{sup 3+} is revealed, which allows the formation of both octahedral frameworks and tetrahedral complex anions with the tetrahydroborate anion BH{sub 4} both as a linker and terminal ligand. Bi- and trimetallic cubic double-perovskites c-A{sub 3}Y(BH{sub 4}){sub 6} or c-A{sub 2}LiY(BH{sub 4}){sub 6} (A=Rb, Cs) form in all the investigated systems, with the exception of the Li–K–Y system. The compounds with the stoichiometry AY(BH{sub 4}){sub 4} crystallize in all investigated systems with a great variety of structure types which find their analog amongst metal oxides. In-situ formation of a new borohydride – closo-borane is observed during decomposition of all double perovskites. - Graphical abstract: The system Li–A–Y–BH{sub 4} (A=K, Rb, Cs) is found to contain five novel compounds and four further ones previously reported. Significant coordination flexibility of Y{sup 3+} is revealed, which can be employed to form both octahedral frameworks and tetrahedral complex anions, very different structural topologies. Versatility is also manifested in three different simultaneously occurring coordination modes of borohydrides for one metal cation, as proposed by DFT optimization of the monoclinic KY(BH{sub 4}){sub 4} structural model observed by powder diffraction. - Highlights: • The system Li-A-Y-BH{sub 4} (A=K, Rb, Cs) contains nine compounds in total. • Y{sup 3+} forms octahedral frameworks and tetrahedral complex anions. • Bi- and trimetallic double-perovskites crystallize in most systems. • Various AY(BH{sub 4}){sub 4} crystallize with

  11. Analysis on the design and property of flow field plates of innovative direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ho; Kao, Mu-Jung; Chen, Chih-Hao; Kuo, Chin-Guo; Lee, Kuang-Ying

    2014-10-01

    The paper uses technology of lithography process to etch flow fields on single side of a printed circuit board (PCB), and combines flow field plate with collector plate to make innovative anode flow field plates and cathode flow field plates required in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), and meanwhile makes membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and methanol fuel plate. The flow field plates are designed to be in the form of serpentine flow field. The paper measured the assembled DMFC to achieve the overall efficiency of DMFC under the conditions of different screw torques and different concentration, flow rate and temperature of methanol. Experimental results show that when the flow field width of flow field plate is 1 mm, the screw torque is 16 kgf/cm, and the concentration, flow rate and temperature of methanol-water are 1 M, 180 ml/h and 50 degrees C respectively, the prepared DMFC can have better power density of 5.5 mW/cm2, 5.4 mW/cm2, 11.2 mW/cm2 and 11.8 mW/cm2. Besides, the volume of the DMFC designed and assembled by the study is smaller than the generally existing DMFC by 40%. PMID:25942924

  12. Highly active nitrogen-doped nanocarbon electrocatalysts for alkaline direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruusenberg, Ivar; Ratso, Sander; Vikkisk, Merilin; Kanninen, Petri; Kallio, Tanja; Kannan, Arunachala M.; Tammeveski, Kaido

    2015-05-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells are assembled and evaluated using Fumatech FAA3 alkaline anion exchange membrane. Two novel metal-free cathode catalysts are synthesised, investigated and compared with the commercial Pt-based catalyst. In this work nitrogen-doped few-layer graphene/multi-walled carbon nanotube (N-FLG/MWCNT) composite and nitrogen-doped MWCNT (N-MWCNT) catalyst are prepared by pyrolysing the mixture of dicyandiamide (DCDA) and carbon nanomaterials at 800 °C. The resulting cathode catalyst material shows a remarkable electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M KOH solution employing the rotating disk electrode (RDE) method. Fuel cell tests are performed by using 1 M methanol as anode and pure oxygen gas cathode feed. The maximum power density obtained with the N-FLG/MWCNT material (0.72 mW cm-2) is similar to that of the Pt/C catalyst (0.72 mW cm-2), whereas the N-MWCNT material shows higher peak power density (0.92 mW cm-2) than the commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  13. Artificial Intelligence Techniques for the Estimation of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasiloglu, Abdulsamet; Aras, Ömür; Bayramoglu, Mahmut

    2016-04-01

    Artificial neural networks and neuro-fuzzy inference systems are well known artificial intelligence techniques used for black-box modelling of complex systems. In this study, Feed-forward artificial neural networks (ANN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) are used for modelling the performance of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Current density (I), fuel cell temperature (T), methanol concentration (C), liquid flow-rate (q) and air flow-rate (Q) are selected as input variables to predict the cell voltage. Polarization curves are obtained for 35 different operating conditions according to a statistically designed experimental plan. In modelling study, various subsets of input variables and various types of membership function are considered. A feed -forward architecture with one hidden layer is used in ANN modelling. The optimum performance is obtained with the input set (I, T, C, q) using twelve hidden neurons and sigmoidal activation function. On the other hand, first order Sugeno inference system is applied in ANFIS modelling and the optimum performance is obtained with the input set (I, T, C, q) using sixteen fuzzy rules and triangular membership function. The test results show that ANN model estimates the polarization curve of DMFC more accurately than ANFIS model.

  14. Composite anodes for improved performance of a direct carbon fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giddey, S.; Kulkarni, A.; Munnings, C.; Badwal, S. P. S.

    2015-06-01

    Direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) technology has the potential to double the electric efficiency and halve the CO2 emissions compared with conventional coal fired power plants. The anode performance, long term stability and cell scalability, in addition to fuel feed mechanism, are the major issues for the development of this technology. In this study, lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) - silver composite anode was evaluated in a scalable version of the DCFC tubular cell in a bed of carbon powder. Ag was added to increase lateral conductivity of the anode and reduce ohmic losses. The cell was operated for 100 h during which it was twice thermally cycled. The performance degradation was studied by employing electrochemical and structural characterisation techniques. The composite anode, in comparison to LSCF anode, produced a 60% improvement in the power density. The sources of performance degradation of the cell were found to be the partial decomposition of the perovskite phase and anode microstructure changes as revealed by XRD and SEM analysis in addition to the loss of carbon contact to the anode resulting from the continuous carbon consumption in the cell.

  15. On the actual cathode mixed potential in direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zago, M.; Bisello, A.; Baricci, A.; Rabissi, C.; Brightman, E.; Hinds, G.; Casalegno, A.

    2016-09-01

    Methanol crossover is one of the most critical issues hindering commercialization of direct methanol fuel cells since it leads to waste of fuel and significantly affects cathode potential, forming a so-called mixed potential. Unfortunately, due to the sluggish anode kinetics, it is not possible to obtain a reliable estimation of cathode potential by simply measuring the cell voltage. In this work we address this limitation, quantifying the mixed potential by means of innovative open circuit voltage (OCV) tests with a methanol-hydrogen mixture fed to the anode. Over a wide range of operating conditions, the resulting cathode overpotential is between 250 and 430 mV and is strongly influenced by methanol crossover. We show using combined experimental and modelling analysis of cathode impedance that the methanol oxidation at the cathode mainly follows an electrochemical pathway. Finally, reference electrode measurements at both cathode inlet and outlet provide a local measurement of cathode potential, confirming the reliability of the innovative OCV tests and permitting the evaluation of cathode potential up to typical operating current. At 0.25 A cm-2 the operating cathode potential is around 0.85 V and the Ohmic drop through the catalyst layer is almost 50 mV, which is comparable to that in the membrane.

  16. Gold nanoparticles: novel catalyst for the preparation of direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Kuralkar, Mayuri; Ingle, Avinash; Gaikwad, Swapnil; Gade, Aniket; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-04-01

    The authors report the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) using plant pathogenic Phoma glomerata (MTCC 2210). The synthesis of nanoparticles was characterised by visual observation followed UV-visible spectrophotometric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoparticle tracking analysis. Later, direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) was constructed using two chambers (anodic chamber and cathodic chamber). These Au-NPs as catalysts have various advantages over the other catalysts that are used in the DMFC. Most importantly, it is cheaper as compared with other catalysts like platinum, and showed higher catalytic activity because of its effective surface structure. Being nano in size, it provides more surface area for the attachment of reactant molecules (methanol molecules). The DMFC catalysed by Au-NPs are found to be suitable to replace lithium ion battery technology in consumer electronics like cell phones, laptops and so on due to the fact that they can produce a high amount of energy in a small space. As long as fuel and air are supplied to the DMFC, it will continue to produce power, so it does not need to be recharged. The use of Au-NPs as catalyst in DMFC has not been reported in the past; it is reported here the first time.

  17. Conversion of solar energy into electricity by using duckweed in Direct Photosynthetic Plant Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Hubenova, Yolina; Mitov, Mario

    2012-10-01

    In the present study we demonstrate for the first time the possibility for conversion of solar energy into electricity on the principles of Direct Photosynthetic Plant Fuel Cell (DPPFC) technology by using aquatic higher plants. Lemna minuta duckweed was grown autotrophically in specially constructed fuel cells under sunlight irradiation and laboratory lighting. Current and power density up to 1.62±0.10 A.m(-2) and 380±19 mW.m(-2), respectively, were achieved under sunlight conditions. The influence of the temperature, light intensity and day/night sequencing on the current generation was investigated. The importance of the light intensity was demonstrated by the higher values of generated current (at permanently connected resistance) during daytime than those through the nights, indicating the participation of light-dependent photosynthetic processes. The obtained DPPFC outputs in the night show the contribution of light-independent reactions (respiration). The electron transfer in the examined DPPFCs is associated with a production of endogenous mediator, secreted by the duckweed. The plants' adaptive response to the applied polarization is also connected with an enhanced metabolism resulting in an increase of the protein and carbohydrate intracellular content. Further investigations aiming at improvement of the DPPFC outputs and elucidation of the electron transfer mechanism are required for practical application.

  18. Passive cathodic water/air management device for micro-direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hsien-Chih; Chen, Po-Hon; Chen, Hung-Wen; Chieng, Ching-Chang; Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Pan, Chin; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    A high efficient passive water/air management device (WAMD) is proposed and successfully demonstrated in this paper. The apparatus consists of cornered micro-channels and air-breathing windows with hydrophobicity arrangement to regulate liquids and gases to flow on their predetermined pathways. A high performance water/air separation with water removal rate of about 5.1 μl s -1 cm -2 is demonstrated. The performance of the proposed WAMD is sufficient to manage a cathode-generated water flux of 0.26 μl s -1 cm -2 in the micro-direct methanol fuel cells (μDMFCs) which are operated at 100 mW cm -2 or 400 mA cm -2. Furthermore, the condensed vapors can also be collected and recirculated with the existing micro-channels which act as a passive water recycling system for μDMFCs. The durability testing shows that the fuel cells equipped with WAMD exhibit improved stability and higher current density.

  19. Development of Anodic Flux and Temperature Controlling System for Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. M.; Liu, C.; Liang, J. S.; Wu, C. B.; Xu, Z.

    2006-10-01

    Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (μDMFC) is a kind of newly developed power sources, which effective apparatus for its performance evaluation is still in urgent need at present. In this study, a testing system was established for the purpose of testing the continuous working performance such as micro flux and temperature of μDMFC. In view of the temperature controlling for micro-flux liquid fuel, a heating block with labyrinth-like single pass channel inside for heating up the methanol solution was fabricated. A semiconductorrefrigerating chip was utilized to heat and cool the liquid flow during testing procedures. On the other hand, the two channels of a high accuracy double-channel syringe pump that can suck and pump in turn so as to transport methanol solution continuously was adopted. Based on the requirements of wide-ranged temperature and micro flux controlling, the solenoid valves and the correlative component were used. A hydraulic circuit, which can circulate the fed methanol cold to hot in turn, has also been constructed to test the fatigue life of the μDMFC. The automatic control was actualized by software module written with Visual C++. Experimental results show that the system is perfect in stability and it may provide an important and advanced evaluation apparatus to satisfy the needs for real time performance testing of μDMFC.

  20. Direct conversion of spent fuel to High-Level-Waste (HLW) glass

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.

    1994-09-20

    The Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS) is a recently invented process for the direct, single-step conversion of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to high-level waste (HLW) glass. GMODS converts metals, ceramics, organics, and amorphous solids to glass in a single step. Conventional vitrification technology can not accept feeds containing metals or carbon. The GMODS has the potential to solve several issues associated with the disposal of various US Department of Energy (DOE) miscellaneous SNFs: (1) chemical forms unacceptable for repository disposal; (2) high cost of qualifying small quantities of particular SNFs for disposal; (3) limitations imposed by high-enriched SNF in a repository because of criticality and safeguards issues; and (4) classified design information. Conversion of such SNFs to glass eliminates these concerns. A description of the GMODS, {open_quotes}strawman{close_quotes} product criteria, experimental work to date, and product characteristics are included herein.

  1. Polymeric nanocomposite proton exchange membranes prepared by radiation-induced polymerization for direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Seok; Seo, Kwang-Seok; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The vinyl group-modified montmorillonite clay (F-MMT), vinyl group-modified graphene oxide (F-GO), and vinyl group-modified multi-walled carbon nanotube (F-MWNT) were first prepared by ion exchange reaction of 1-[(4-ethylphenyl)methyl]-3-butyl-imidazolium chloride in order to use the materials for protection against methanol cross-over in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) membrane. Then polymeric nanocomposite membranes with F-MMT, F-GO, and F-MWNT were prepared by the solvent casting method after radiation-induced polymerization of vinyl monomers in water-methanol mixture solvents. The proton conductivity, water uptake, ion-exchange capacity, methanol permeability, and DMFC performance of the polymeric nanocomposite membranes with F-MMT, F-GO, and F-MWNT were evaluated.

  2. A one-compartment fructose/air biological fuel cell based on direct electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuee; Zhao, Feng; Varcoe, John R; Thumser, Alfred E; Avignone-Rossa, Claudio; Slade, Robert C T

    2009-10-15

    The construction and characterization of a one-compartment fructose/air biological fuel cell (BFC) based on direct electron transfer is reported. The BFC employs bilirubin oxidase and d-fructose dehydrogenase adsorbed on a cellulose-multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) matrix, reconstituted with an ionic liquid, as the biocathode and the bioanode for oxygen reduction and fructose oxidation reactions, respectively. The performance of the bioelectrode was investigated by chronoamperometric and cyclic voltammetric techniques in a standard three-electrode cell, and the polarization and long-term stability of the BFC was tested by potentiostatic discharge. An open circuit voltage of 663 mV and a maximum power density of 126 microWcm(-2) were obtained in buffer at pH 5.0. Using this regenerated cellulose-MWCNT matrix as the immobilization platform, this BFC has shown a relatively high performance and long-term stability compared with previous studies.

  3. A mixed-reactants solid-polymer-electrolyte direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, K.; Shukla, A. K.; Jackson, C. L.; Meuleman, W. R. A.

    Mixed-reactants solid-polymer-electrolyte direct methanol fuel cells (SPE-DMFCs) with a PtRu/C anode and a methanol-tolerant oxygen-reduction cathode catalyst have been assembled and have been subjected to galvanostatic polarisation studies. The oxygen-reduction cathode was either of the FeTMPP/C, CoTMPP/C, FeCoTMPP/C and RuSe/C. It was found that the SPE-DMFC with the RuSe/C cathode yielded the best performance. It has been possible to achieve power densities of approximately 50 and 20 mW/cm 2 while operating a mixed-reactants SPE-DMFC at 90 °C with oxygen and air fed cathodes, respectively. Interestingly, these SPE-DMFCs exhibit no parasitic oxidation of methanol with oxygen.

  4. Microbial fuel cells for direct electrical energy recovery from urban wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Capodaglio, A G; Molognoni, D; Dallago, E; Liberale, A; Cella, R; Longoni, P; Pantaleoni, L

    2013-01-01

    Application of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to wastewater treatment for direct recovery of electric energy appears to provide a potentially attractive alternative to traditional treatment processes, in an optic of costs reduction, and tapping of sustainable energy sources that characterizes current trends in technology. This work focuses on a laboratory-scale, air-cathode, and single-chamber MFC, with internal volume of 6.9 L, operating in batch mode. The MFC was fed with different types of substrates. This study evaluates the MFC behaviour, in terms of organic matter removal efficiency, which reached 86% (on average) with a hydraulic retention time of 150 hours. The MFC produced an average power density of 13.2 mW/m(3), with a Coulombic efficiency ranging from 0.8 to 1.9%. The amount of data collected allowed an accurate analysis of the repeatability of MFC electrochemical behaviour, with regards to both COD removal kinetics and electric energy production.

  5. A study of the direct dimethyl ether fuel cell using alkaline anolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kan; Lao, Shao Jiang; Qin, Hai Ying; Liu, Bin Hong; Li, Zhou Peng

    The electrooxidation behavior of dimethyl ether (DME) dissolved in acidic, neutral or alkaline anolyte has been studied. The cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that DME in alkaline anolyte demonstrates higher electrooxidation reactivity than that in acidic or neutral anolyte. With increasing the NaOH concentration in the anolyte, the electrooxidation reactivity of DME can be further improved. Direct dimethyl ether fuel cells (DDFCs) are assembled by using Nafion membrane as the electrolyte, Pt/C as the cathode catalyst, and Pt-Ru/C as the anode catalyst. It is found that the use of alkaline anolyte can significantly improve the performance of DDFCs. A maximum power density of 60 mW cm -2 has been achieved when operating the DDFC at 80 °C under ambient pressure.

  6. Electrocatalytic activity of ZnS nanoparticles in direct ethanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredol, Michael; Kaczmarek, Michał; Wiemhöfer, Hans-Dieter

    2014-06-01

    Low temperature fuel cells consuming ethanol without reformation would be a major step toward the use of renewable energy sources from biomass. However, the necessary electrodes and electrocatalysts still are far from being perfect and suffer from various poisoning and deactivation processes. This work describes investigations on systems using carbon/ZnS-based electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation in complete membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). MEAs were built on Nafion membranes with active masses prepared from ZnS nanoparticles and Vulcan carbon support. Under operation, acetic acid and acetaldehyde were identified and quantified as soluble oxidation products, whereas the amount of CO2 generated could not be quantified directly. Overall conversion efficiencies of up to 25% were estimated from cells operated over prolonged time. From polarization curves, interrupt experiments and analysis of reaction products, mass transport problems (concentration polarization) and breakthrough losses were found to be the main deficiencies of the ethanol oxidation electrodes fabricated so far.

  7. Catalyst inks and method of application for direct methanol fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Davey, John; Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon; Thomas, Sharon C.

    2004-02-24

    Inks are formulated for forming anode and cathode catalyst layers and applied to anode and cathode sides of a membrane for a direct methanol fuel cell. The inks comprise a Pt catalyst for the cathode and a Pt--Ru catalyst for the anode, purified water in an amount 4 to 20 times that of the catalyst by weight, and a perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer in an amount effective to provide an ionomer content in the anode and cathode surfaces of 20% to 80% by volume. The inks are prepared in a two-step process while cooling and agitating the solutions. The final solution is placed in a cooler and continuously agitated while spraying the solution over the anode or cathode surface of the membrane as determined by the catalyst content.

  8. SHAPE SELECTIVE NANO-CATALYSTS: TOWARD DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Murph, S.

    2010-06-16

    A series of bimetallic core-shell-alloy type Au-Pt nanomaterials with various morphologies, aspect ratios and compositions, were produced in a heterogenous epitaxial fashion. Gold nanoparticles with well-controlled particle size and shape, e.g. spheres, rods and cubes, were used as 'seeds' for platinum growth in the presence of a mild reducing agent, ascorbic acid and a cationic surfactant cethyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). The reactions take place in air and water, and are quick, economical and amenable for scaling up. The synthesized nanocatalysts were characterized by electron microscopy techniques and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Nafion membranes were embedded with the Au-Pt nanomaterials and analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for their potential in direct methanol fuel cells applications.

  9. Methane-free biogas for direct feeding of solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, P.; Lanzini, A.; Santarelli, M.; Calì, M.; Sagnelli, F.; Boulanger, A.; Scaletta, A.; Zitella, P.

    This paper deals with the experimental analysis of the performance and degradation issues of a Ni-based anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell fed by a methane-free biogas from dark-anaerobic digestion of wastes by pastry and fruit shops. The biogas is produced by means of an innovative process where the biomass is fermented with a pre-treated bacteria inoculum (Clostridia) able to completely inhibit the methanization step during the fermentation process and to produce a H 2/CO 2 mixture instead of conventional CH 4/CO 2 anaerobic digested gas (bio-methane). The proposed biogas production route leads to a biogas composition which avoids the need of introducing a reformer agent into or before the SOFC anode in order to reformate it. In order to analyse the complete behaviour of a SOFC with the bio-hydrogen fuel, an experimental session with several H 2/CO 2 synthetic mixtures was performed on an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell with a Ni-based anode. It was found that side reactions occur with such mixtures in the typical thermodynamic conditions of SOFCs (650-800 °C), which have an effect especially at high currents, due to the shift to a mixture consisting of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and water. However, cells operated with acceptable performance and carbon deposits (typical of a traditional hydrocarbon-containing biogas) were avoided after 50 h of cell operation even at 650 °C. Experiments were also performed with traditional bio-methane from anaerobic digestion with 60/40 vol% of composition. It was found that the cell performance dropped after few hours of operation due to the formation of carbon deposits. A short-term test with the real as-produced biogas was also successfully performed. The cell showed an acceptable power output (at 800 °C, 0.35 W cm -2 with biogas, versus 0.55 W cm -2 with H 2) although a huge quantity of sulphur was present in the feeding fuel (hydrogen sulphide at 103 ppm and mercaptans up to 10 ppm). Therefore, it

  10. X-ray absorption and electrochemical studies of direct methanol fuel cell catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Zurawski, D.J.; Aldykiewicz, A.J. Jr.; Baxter, S.F.; Krumpelt, M.

    1996-12-31

    In order for polymer electrolyte fuel cells to operate directly on methanol instead of hydrogen, a distinct advantage for portable applications, methanol oxidation must be catalyzed effectively in the acidic environment of the cell. Platinum-ruthenium and platinum-ruthenium oxide are generally considered to be the most active catalysts for this purpose. The presence of ruthenium significantly enhances the activity of platinum in these catalysts, for reasons not yet fully understood. We are using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and electrochemical techniques to evaluate the mechanisms proposed to account for this enhancement in order to further improve the catalyst`s activity. We are considering three enhancement mechanisms. An intermediate in the oxidation of methanol on platinum is carbon monoxide and its oxidation is the rate-determining step in the overall oxidation mechanism. It has been proposed that ruthenium facilitates the removal of carbon monoxide from the platinum surface. First, it has been proposed that ruthenium decreases the strength of the platinum-carbon monoxide bond. Carbon monoxide bonds to the catalyst by interacting with the d-band of platinum, therefore a change in the d-band occupancy of platinum as a result of alloying may influence the bond strength of carbon monoxide. Another proposed enhancement mechanism involves lowering of the potential for the formation of the CO-oxidizing species. Finally, the binary catalysts may have a structure which is more conducive to the methanol dehydrogenation and carbon monoxide reactions. Based on these three proposed enhancement mechanisms, a goal of this study is to correlate catalyst electronic properties, structure, and oxidation state with the performance of proton-exchange membrane (Nafion) direct methanol fuel cells.

  11. Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) on Mono-uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J; Ebbinghaus, B; Meiers, T; Ahn, J

    2006-02-09

    The US National Energy Policy of 2001 advocated the development of advanced fuel and fuel cycle technologies that are cleaner, more efficient, less waste-intensive, and more proliferation resistant. The need for advanced fuel development is emphasized in on-going DOE-supported programs, e.g., Global Nuclear Energy Initiative (GNEI), Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and GEN-IV Technology Development. The Directorates of Energy & Environment (E&E) and Chemistry & Material Sciences (C&MS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are interested in advanced fuel research and manufacturing using its multi-disciplinary capability and facilities to support a design concept of a small, secure, transportable, and autonomous reactor (SSTAR). The E&E and C&MS Directorates co-sponsored this Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) Project on Mono-Uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications. In fact, three out of the six GEN-IV reactor concepts consider using the nitride-based fuel, as shown in Table 1. SSTAR is a liquid-metal cooled, fast reactor. It uses nitride fuel in a sealed reactor vessel that could be shipped to the user and returned to the supplier having never been opened in its long operating lifetime. This sealed reactor concept envisions no fuel refueling nor on-site storage of spent fuel, and as a result, can greatly enhance proliferation resistance. However, the requirement for a sealed, long-life core imposes great challenges to research and development of the nitride fuel and its cladding. Cladding is an important interface between the fuel and coolant and a barrier to prevent fission gas release during normal and accidental conditions. In fabricating the nitride fuel rods and assemblies, the cladding material should be selected based on its the coolant-side corrosion properties, the chemical/physical interaction with the nitride fuel, as well as their thermal and neutronic properties. The US NASA space reactor, the

  12. Basic laws of the processes and the principle of minimum energy consumption during pneumatic transport and distribution of pulverized fuel in direct pulverized fuel preparation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leykin, V. Z.

    2015-08-01

    The paper presents analysis of the basic laws and a calculation-based investigation of processes related to the low-concentration pneumatic transport and the distribution of finely dispersed pulverized fuel in direct pulverized fuel preparation systems of boiler units. Based on the principle of the minimum energy consumption, it is shown that, at high (standard) velocities of the turbulent gas flow—of 25-30 m/s, which is by 1.5-2 times higher than the critical speeds—the finely dispersed pulverized fuel can be transported simultaneously in the form of a low-concentration flow in pipelines and a concentrated, to 30% of the flow rate, thin layer on the pipeline walls with the height of the layer equal to 0.02-0.04 of the pipe radius. Consideration of this phenomenon is of great significance in terms of securing the efficient operation of pulverized fuel distribution units. The basic characteristics of the process have been determined and validated by test bench investigations using both model systems and pulverized fuel distribution systems of a number of power-generating units. The obtained results underlie a methodological approach to developing high-efficiency adjustable pulverized fuel distribution units. Also, results of industrial testing are presented that confirm the results of the analysis and of experimental studies.

  13. Application of proton exchange membrane fuel cells for the monitoring and direct usage of biohydrogen produced by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oncel, S.; Vardar-Sukan, F.

    Photo-biologically produced hydrogen by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is integrated with a proton exchange (PEM) fuel cell for online electricity generation. To investigate the fuel cell efficiency, the effect of hydrogen production on the open circuit fuel cell voltage is monitored during 27 days of batch culture. Values of volumetric hydrogen production, monitored by the help of the calibrated water columns, are related with the open circuit voltage changes of the fuel cell. From the analysis of this relation a dead end configuration is selected to use the fuel cell in its best potential. After the open circuit experiments external loads are tested for their effects on the fuel cell voltage and current generation. According to the results two external loads are selected for the direct usage of the fuel cell incorporating with the photobioreactors (PBR). Experiments with the PEM fuel cell generate a current density of 1.81 mA cm -2 for about 50 h with 10 Ω load and 0.23 mA cm -2 for about 80 h with 100 Ω load.

  14. Improvement of the periodate-borohydride surface-labeling method for human blood platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, B.; Clemetson, K.J.; Luescher, E.F.

    1983-01-01

    The periodate/sodium boro(/sup 3/H)hydride ((/sup 3/H)-NaBH4) method is extensively used for the specific labeling of cell surface glycoproteins. Reduction with tritiated borohydride is also used in other surface-labeling techniques, the neuraminidase/galactose oxidase/(/sup 3/H)-NaBH4 method (specific for terminal galactose and N-acetyl-galactosamine residues) and the pyridoxal phosphate/(/sup 3/H)-NaBH4 method (specific for protein). By modification of the reaction conditions during the periodate-oxidation and borohydride-reduction, the ratio of the incorporated to the total added radioactivity could be increased by a factor of 50, while the specific activity of the labeled material was twice as high as in the original method. Alternatively, by another modification, the specific activity of the labeled material could be increased about 10-fold. The influence of the most important parameters was investigated in detail. Sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis and fluorography demonstrate that the labeling pattern of the membrane glycoproteins is the same as with the conventional method.

  15. [Effect of reduction by sodium borohydride on the structural characteristics of brown-rotted lignin].

    PubMed

    Li, Gai-yun; Sun, Qi-ning; Qin, Te-fu; Huang, Luo-hua

    2010-07-01

    The FTIR, UV-Visible, 1H NMR and GPC were used to study structural changes of brown-rotted lignin after sodium borohydride reduction. FTIR spectra showed that, after reduction, the band at 1,677 cm(-1) attributed to the conjugated carbonyl groups disappeared, and the band intensity at 1,715 cm(-1) attributed to the nonconjugated carbonyl groups decreased. On the other hand, the band at 1,509 and 1,603 cm(-1) attributed to aromatic skeletal vibration remained almost unchanged. UV spectra showed the decreased absorptions at 288 nm and 300-400 nm after reduction. 1H NMR spectra showed that, after reduction, the number of aromatic methoxyl and aromatic hydroxyls decreased, the number of aliphatic hydroxyls and the proton number attributed to many linkage structures connecting the phenylpropane units increased. GPC results showed that the molecular weight of reduced brown-rotted lignin increased and the molecular distribution got wider, as a consequence of the large molecular weight molecules generated during the reduction reaction. Our results suggest that the conjugated carbonyl groups can be totally reduced to the hydroxyl groups, but only some nonconjugated carbonyl groups can be reduced to the hydroxyl groups. The chemical structure of the brown-rotted lignin changed, but the benzyl ring kept stable. The condensation reaction took place during the sodium borohydride reduction process. PMID:20828002

  16. A new family of metal borohydride guanidinate complexes: Synthesis, structures and hydrogen-storage properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hui; Zhou, Xiuquan; Rodriguez, Efrain E.; Zhou, Wei; Udovic, Terrence J.; Yildirim, Taner; Rush, John J.

    2016-10-01

    We report on a new class of complex hydrides: borohydride guanidinate complexes (MBH4·nCN3H5, M=Li, Mg, and Ca). They can be prepared via facile solid-state synthesis routes. Their crystal structures were successfully determined using a combination of X-ray diffraction, first-principles calculations and neutron vibrational spectroscopy. Among these compounds, Mg(BH4)2·6CN3H5 is composed of large complex Mg[CN3H5]62+ cations and surrounding BH4- ions, while Ca(BH4)2·2CN3H5 possesses layers of corner-sharing Ca[BH4]4(CN3H5)2 octahedra. Our dehydrogenation results show that ≈10 wt% hydrogen can be released from MBH4·nCN3H5 (M=Li, Mg, and Ca) at moderate temperatures with minimal ammonia and diborane contamination thanks to the synergistic effect of C-N bonds from guanidine and hydridic H from borohydrides leading to a weakening of the N-H bonds, thus impeding ammonia gas liberation. Further tuning the dehydrogenation with different cation species indicates that Mg(BH4)2·nCN3H5 can exhibit the optimum properties with nearly thermally neutral dehydrogenation and very high purity hydrogen release.

  17. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications. Hydrogen vehicle safety report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.E.

    1997-05-01

    This report reviews the safety characteristics of hydrogen as an energy carrier for a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), with emphasis on high pressure gaseous hydrogen onboard storage. The authors consider normal operation of the vehicle in addition to refueling, collisions, operation in tunnels, and storage in garages. They identify the most likely risks and failure modes leading to hazardous conditions, and provide potential countermeasures in the vehicle design to prevent or substantially reduce the consequences of each plausible failure mode. They then compare the risks of hydrogen with those of more common motor vehicle fuels including gasoline, propane, and natural gas.

  18. Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Membrane Hydration by Direct Liquid Water Contact

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1998-11-01

    An effective means of providing direct liquid hydration of the membrane tends to improve performance particularly of cells with thicker membranes or at elevated temperatures. Supplying the water to the membrane from the anode flow-field through the anode backing via wicks would appear to have advantages over delivering the water through the thickness of the membrane with regards to the uniformity and stability of the supply and the use of off-the-shelf membranes or MEAs. In addition to improving cell performance, an important contribution of direct liquid hydration approaches may be that the overall fuel cell system becomes simpler and more effective. The next steps in the evolution of this approach are a demonstration of the effectiveness of this technique with larger active area cells as well as the implementation of an internal flow-field water reservoir (to eliminate the injection method). Scale-up to larger cell sizes and the use of separate water channels within the anode flow-field is described.

  19. Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett, Gregory A.; Gerdes, Kirk; Song, Xueyan; Chen, Yun; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Engelhard, Mark; Zhu, Zihua; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Gemmen, Randall

    2012-09-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are being developed for integrated gasification power plants that generate electricity from coal at 50+% efficiency. The interaction of trace metals in coal syngas with Ni-based SOFC anodes is being investigated through thermodynamic analyses and in laboratory experiments, but test data from direct coal syngas exposure are sparsely available. This effort evaluates the significance of performance losses associated with exposure to direct coal syngas. Specimen are operated in a unique mobile test skid that is deployed to the research gasifier at NCCC in Wilsonville, AL. The test skid interfaces with a gasifier slipstream to deliver hot syngas to a parallel array of twelve SOFCs. During the 500 h test period, all twelve cells are monitored for performance at four current densities. Degradation is attributed to syngas exposure and trace material attack on the anode structure that is accelerated at increasing current densities. Cells that are operated at 0 and 125 mA cm-2 degrade at 9.1 and 10.7% per 1000 h, respectively, while cells operated at 250 and 375 mA cm-2 degrade at 18.9 and 16.2% per 1000 h, respectively. Spectroscopic analysis of the anodes showed carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus deposits; no secondary Ni-metal phases were found.

  20. Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operaated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, G.; Gerdes, K.; Song, X.; Chen, Y.; Shutthanandan, V.; Englehard, M.; Zhu, Z.; Thevuthasan, S.; Gemmen, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are being developed for integrated gasification power plants that generate electricity from coal at 50% efficiency. The interaction of trace metals in coal syngas with Ni-based SOFC anodes is being investigated through thermodynamic analyses and in laboratory experiments, but test data from direct coal syngas exposure are sparsely available. This effort evaluates the significance of performance losses associated with exposure to direct coal syngas. Specimen are operated in a unique mobile test skid that is deployed to the research gasifier at NCCC in Wilsonville, AL. The test skid interfaces with a gasifier slipstream to deliver hot syngas to a parallel array of twelve SOFCs. During the 500 h test period, all twelve cells are monitored for performance at four current densities. Degradation is attributed to syngas exposure and trace material attack on the anode structure that is accelerated at increasing current densities. Cells that are operated at 0 and 125 mA cm{sup 2} degrade at 9.1 and 10.7% per 1000 h, respectively, while cells operated at 250 and 375 mA cm{sup 2} degrade at 18.9 and 16.2% per 1000 h, respectively. Spectroscopic analysis of the anodes showed carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus deposits; no secondary Ni-metal phases were found.

  1. Laboratory endurance test of sunflower methyl esters for direct injected diesel engine fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, K.; Ziejewski, M.

    1983-12-01

    A methyl ester of sunflower oil was durability tested using the test cycle recommended by the Alternate Fuels Committee of the Engine Manufacturer's Association. The results are compared to a baseline test using diesel fuel. Based on the results, the methyl ester fuel successfully completed the 200-hour durability test.

  2. New approaches towards novel composite and multilayer membranes for intermediate temperature-polymer electrolyte fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, Carolina Musse; Sharma, Surbhi; de Camargo Forte, Maria Madalena; Steinberger-Wilckens, Robert

    2016-06-01

    This review analyses the current and existing literature on novel composite and multilayer membranes for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell applications, including intermediate temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell (IT-PEFC) and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) systems. It provides a concise scrutiny of the vast body of literature available on organic and inorganic filler based polymer membranes and links it to the new emerging trend towards novel combinations of multilayered polymer membranes for applications in DMFC and IT-PEFC. The paper carefully explores the advantages and disadvantages of the most common preparation techniques reported for multilayered membranes such as hot-pressing, casting and dip-coating and also summarises various other fresh and unique techniques employed for multilayer membrane preparation.

  3. SPOUTED BED ELECTRODES (SBE) FOR DIRECT UTILIZATION OF CARBON IN FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Calo

    2004-12-01

    This Phase I project was focused on an investigation of spouted bed particulate electrodes for the direct utilization of solid carbon in fuel cells. This approach involves the use of a circulating carbon particle/molten carbonate slurry in the cell that provides a few critical functions: it (1) fuels the cell continuously with entrained carbon particles; (2) brings particles to the anode surfaces hydrodynamically; (3) removes ash from the anode surfaces and the cell hydrodynamically; (4) provides a facile means of cell temperature control due to its large thermal capacitance; (5) provides for electrolyte maintenance and control in the electrode separator(s); and (6) can (potentially) improve carbon conversion rates by ''pre-activating'' carbon particle surfaces via formation of intermediate oxygen surface complexes in the bulk molten carbonate. The approach of this scoping project was twofold: (1) adaptation and application of a CFD code, originally developed to simulate particle circulation in spouted bed electrolytic reactors, to carbon particle circulation in DCFC systems; and (2) experimental investigation of the hydrodynamics of carbon slurry circulation in DCFC systems using simulated slurry mixtures. The CFD model results demonstrated that slurry recirculation can be used to hydrodynamically feed carbon particles to anode surfaces. Variations of internal configurations were investigated in order to explore effects on contacting. It was shown that good contacting with inclined surfaces could be achieved even when the particles are of the same density as the molten carbonate. The use of CO{sub 2} product gas from the fuel cell as a ''lift-gas'' to circulate the slurry was also investigated with the model. The results showed that this is an effective method of slurry circulation; it entrains carbon particles more effectively in the draft duct and produces a somewhat slower recirculation rate, and thus higher residence times on anode surfaces, and can be

  4. Skeletal mechanism generation for surrogate fuels using directed relation graph with error propagation and sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Niemeyer, Kyle E.; Sung, Chih-Jen; Raju, Mandhapati P.

    2010-09-15

    A novel implementation for the skeletal reduction of large detailed reaction mechanisms using the directed relation graph with error propagation and sensitivity analysis (DRGEPSA) is developed and presented with examples for three hydrocarbon components, n-heptane, iso-octane, and n-decane, relevant to surrogate fuel development. DRGEPSA integrates two previously developed methods, directed relation graph-aided sensitivity analysis (DRGASA) and directed relation graph with error propagation (DRGEP), by first applying DRGEP to efficiently remove many unimportant species prior to sensitivity analysis to further remove unimportant species, producing an optimally small skeletal mechanism for a given error limit. It is illustrated that the combination of the DRGEP and DRGASA methods allows the DRGEPSA approach to overcome the weaknesses of each, specifically that DRGEP cannot identify all unimportant species and that DRGASA shields unimportant species from removal. Skeletal mechanisms for n-heptane and iso-octane generated using the DRGEP, DRGASA, and DRGEPSA methods are presented and compared to illustrate the improvement of DRGEPSA. From a detailed reaction mechanism for n-alkanes covering n-octane to n-hexadecane with 2115 species and 8157 reactions, two skeletal mechanisms for n-decane generated using DRGEPSA, one covering a comprehensive range of temperature, pressure, and equivalence ratio conditions for autoignition and the other limited to high temperatures, are presented and validated. The comprehensive skeletal mechanism consists of 202 species and 846 reactions and the high-temperature skeletal mechanism consists of 51 species and 256 reactions. Both mechanisms are further demonstrated to well reproduce the results of the detailed mechanism in perfectly-stirred reactor and laminar flame simulations over a wide range of conditions. The comprehensive and high-temperature n-decane skeletal mechanisms are included as supplementary material with this article

  5. Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, Gregory A.; Gerdes, Kirk R.; Song, Xueyan; Chen, Yun; Shutthanandan, V.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Gemmen, Randall

    2012-09-15

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are presently being developed for gasification integrated power plants that generate electricity from coal at 50+% efficiency. The interaction of trace metals in coal syngas with the Ni-based SOFC anodes is being investigated through thermodynamic analyses and in laboratory experiments, but direct test data from coal syngas exposure are sparsely available. This research effort evaluates the significance of SOFC performance losses associated with exposure of a SOFC anode to direct coal syngas. SOFC specimen of industrially relevant composition are operated in a unique mobile test skid that was deployed to the research gasifier at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, AL. The mobile test skid interfaces with a gasifier slipstream to deliver hot syngas (up to 300°C) directly to a parallel array of 12 button cell specimen, each of which possesses an active area of approximately 2 cm2. During the 500 hour test period, all twelve cells were monitored for performance at four discrete operating current densities, and all cells maintained contact with a data acquisition system. Of these twelve, nine demonstrated good performance throughout the test, while three of the cells were partially compromised. Degradation associated with the properly functioning cells was attributed to syngas exposure and trace material attack on the anode structure that was accelerated at increasing current densities. Cells that were operated at 0 and 125 mA/cm² degraded at 9.1 and 10.7% per 1000 hours, respectively, while cells operated at 250 and 375 mA/cm² degraded at 18.9 and 16.2% per 1000 hours, respectively. Post-trial spectroscopic analysis of the anodes showed carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus deposits; no secondary Ni-metal phases were found.

  6. Optimizing membrane electrode assembly of direct methanol fuel cells for portable power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fuqiang

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) for portable power applications require high power density, high-energy conversion efficiency and compactness. These requirements translate to fundamental properties of high methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction kinetics, as well as low methanol and water crossover. In this thesis a novel membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for direct methanol fuel cells has been developed, aiming to improve these fundamental properties. Firstly, methanol oxidation kinetics has been enhanced and methanol crossover has been minimized by proper control of ionomer crystallinity and its swelling in the anode catalyst layer through heat-treatment. Heat-treatment has a major impact on anode characteristics. The short-cured anode has low ionomer crystallinity, and thus swells easily when in contact with methanol solution to create a much denser anode structure, giving rise to higher methanol transport resistance than the long-cured anode. Variations in interfacial properties in the anode catalyst layer (CL) during cell conditioning were also characterized, and enhanced kinetics of methanol oxidation and severe limiting current phenomenon were found to be caused by a combination of interfacial property variations and swelling of ionomer over time. Secondly, much effort has been expended to develop a cathode CL suitable for operation under low air stoichiometry. The effects of fabrication procedure, ionomer content, and porosity distribution on the microstructure and cathode performance under low air stoichiometry are investigated using electrochemical and surface morphology characterizations to reveal the correlation between microstructure and electrochemical behavior. At the same time, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of DMFC cathodes have been developed to theoretically interpret the experimental results, to investigate two-phase transport, and to elucidate mechanism of cathode mixed potential due to methanol crossover. Thirdly, a MEA with low

  7. Application of infiltrated LSCM-GDC oxide anode in direct carbon/coal fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiangling; Arenillas, Ana; Irvine, John T S

    2016-08-15

    Hybrid direct carbon/coal fuel cells (HDCFCs) utilise an anode based upon a molten carbonate salt with an oxide conducting solid electrolyte for direct carbon/coal conversion. They can be fuelled by a wide range of carbon sources, and offer higher potential chemical to electrical energy conversion efficiency and have the potential to decrease CO2 emissions compared to coal-fired power plants. In this study, the application of (La, Sr)(Cr, Mn)O3 (LSCM) and (Gd, Ce)O2 (GDC) oxide anodes was explored in a HDCFC system running with two different carbon fuels, an organic xerogel and a raw bituminous coal. The electrochemical performance of the HDCFC based on a 1-2 mm thick 8 mol% yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and the GDC-LSCM anode fabricated by wet impregnation procedures was characterized and discussed. The infiltrated oxide anode showed a significantly higher performance than the conventional Ni-YSZ anode, without suffering from impurity formation under HDCFC operation conditions. Total polarisation resistance (Rp) reached 0.8-0.9 Ω cm(2) from DCFC with an oxide anode on xerogel and bituminous coal at 750 °C, with open circuit voltage (OCV) values in the range 1.1-1.2 V on both carbon forms. These indicated the potential application of LSCM-GDC oxide anode in HDCFCs. The chemical compatibility of LSCM/GDC with carbon/carbonate investigation revealed the emergence of an A2BO4 type oxide in place of an ABO3 perovskite structure in the LSCM in a reducing environment, due to Li attack as a result of intimate contact between the LSCM and Li2CO3, with GDC being stable under identical conditions. Such reaction between LSCM and Li2CO3 was not observed on a LSCM-YSZ pellet treated with Li-K carbonate in 5% H2/Ar at 700 °C, nor on a GDC-LSCM anode after HDCFC operation. The HDCFC durability tests of GDC-LSCM oxide on a xerogel and on raw bituminous coal were performed under potentiostatic operation at 0.7 V at 750 °C. The degradation mechanisms were

  8. Fuel-blending stocks from the hydrotreatment of a distillate formed by direct coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Andile B. Mzinyati

    2007-09-15

    The direct liquefaction of coal in the iron-catalyzed Suplex process was evaluated as a technology complementary to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. A distinguishing feature of the Suplex process, from other direct liquefaction processes, is the use of a combination of light- and heavy-oil fractions as the slurrying solvent. This results in a product slate with a small residue fraction, a distillate/naphtha mass ratio of 6, and a 65.8 mass % yield of liquid fuel product on a dry, ash-free coal basis. The densities of the resulting naphtha (C{sub 5}-200{sup o}C) and distillate (200-400{sup o}C) fractions from the hydroprocessing of the straight-run Suplex distillate fraction were high (0.86 and 1.04 kg/L, respectively). The aromaticity of the distillate fraction was found to be typical of coal liquefaction liquids, at 60-65%, with a Ramsbottom carbon residue content of 0.38 mass %. Hydrotreatment of the distillate fraction under severe conditions (200{sup o}C, 20.3 MPa, and 0.41 g{sub feed} h{sup -1} g{sub catalyst}{sup -1}) with a NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst gave a product with a phenol content of {lt}1 ppm, a nitrogen content {lt}200 ppm, and a sulfur content {lt}25 ppm. The temperature was found to be the main factor affecting diesel fraction selectivity when operating at conditions of WHSV = 0.41 g{sub feed} h{sup -1} g{sub catalyst}{sup -1} and PH{sub 2} = 20.3 MPa, with excessively high temperatures (T {gt} 420{sup o}C) leading to a decrease in diesel selectivity. The fuels produced by the hydroprocessing of the straight-run Suplex distillate fraction have properties that make them desirable as blending components, with the diesel fraction having a cetane number of 48 and a density of 0.90 kg/L. The gasoline fraction was found to have a research octane number (RON) of 66 and (N + 2A) value of 100, making it ideal as a feedstock for catalytic reforming and further blending with Fischer-Tropsch liquids. 44 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. Application of infiltrated LSCM-GDC oxide anode in direct carbon/coal fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiangling; Arenillas, Ana; Irvine, John T S

    2016-08-15

    Hybrid direct carbon/coal fuel cells (HDCFCs) utilise an anode based upon a molten carbonate salt with an oxide conducting solid electrolyte for direct carbon/coal conversion. They can be fuelled by a wide range of carbon sources, and offer higher potential chemical to electrical energy conversion efficiency and have the potential to decrease CO2 emissions compared to coal-fired power plants. In this study, the application of (La, Sr)(Cr, Mn)O3 (LSCM) and (Gd, Ce)O2 (GDC) oxide anodes was explored in a HDCFC system running with two different carbon fuels, an organic xerogel and a raw bituminous coal. The electrochemical performance of the HDCFC based on a 1-2 mm thick 8 mol% yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and the GDC-LSCM anode fabricated by wet impregnation procedures was characterized and discussed. The infiltrated oxide anode showed a significantly higher performance than the conventional Ni-YSZ anode, without suffering from impurity formation under HDCFC operation conditions. Total polarisation resistance (Rp) reached 0.8-0.9 Ω cm(2) from DCFC with an oxide anode on xerogel and bituminous coal at 750 °C, with open circuit voltage (OCV) values in the range 1.1-1.2 V on both carbon forms. These indicated the potential application of LSCM-GDC oxide anode in HDCFCs. The chemical compatibility of LSCM/GDC with carbon/carbonate investigation revealed the emergence of an A2BO4 type oxide in place of an ABO3 perovskite structure in the LSCM in a reducing environment, due to Li attack as a result of intimate contact between the LSCM and Li2CO3, with GDC being stable under identical conditions. Such reaction between LSCM and Li2CO3 was not observed on a LSCM-YSZ pellet treated with Li-K carbonate in 5% H2/Ar at 700 °C, nor on a GDC-LSCM anode after HDCFC operation. The HDCFC durability tests of GDC-LSCM oxide on a xerogel and on raw bituminous coal were performed under potentiostatic operation at 0.7 V at 750 °C. The degradation mechanisms were

  10. Exploratory fuel-cell research: I. Direct-hydrocarbon polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. II. Mathematical modeling of fuel-cell cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.L.; McLarnon, F.R.; Newman, J.S.; Cairns, E.J.

    1996-12-01

    A strong need exists today for more efficient energy-conversion systems. Our reliance on limited fuel resources, such as petroleum for the majority of our energy needs makes it imperative that we utilize these resources as efficiently as possible. Higher-efficiency energy conversion also means less pollution, since less fuel is consumed and less exhaust created for the same energy output. Additionally, for many industrialized nations, such as the United States which must rely on petroleum imports, it is also imperative from a national-security standpoint to reduce the consumption of these precious resources. A substantial reduction of U.S. oil imports would result in a significant reduction of our trade deficit, as well as costly military spending to protect overseas petroleum resources. Therefore, energy-conversion devices which may utilize alternative fuels are also in strong demand. This paper describes research on fuel cells for transportation.

  11. Microbial Fuel Cells for Direct Electrical Energy Recovery from Urban Wastewaters

    PubMed Central

    Capodaglio, A. G.; Molognoni, D.; Dallago, E.; Liberale, A.; Cella, R.; Longoni, P.; Pantaleoni, L.

    2013-01-01

    Application of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to wastewater treatment for direct recovery of electric energy appears to provide a potentially attractive alternative to traditional treatment processes, in an optic of costs reduction, and tapping of sustainable energy sources that characterizes current trends in technology. This work focuses on a laboratory-scale, air-cathode, and single-chamber MFC, with internal volume of 6.9 L, operating in batch mode. The MFC was fed with different types of substrates. This study evaluates the MFC behaviour, in terms of organic matter removal efficiency, which reached 86% (on average) with a hydraulic retention time of 150 hours. The MFC produced an average power density of 13.2 mW/m3, with a Coulombic efficiency ranging from 0.8 to 1.9%. The amount of data collected allowed an accurate analysis of the repeatability of MFC electrochemical behaviour, with regards to both COD removal kinetics and electric energy production. PMID:24453885

  12. Direct conversion of methane to C sub 2 's and liquid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, B.K.; Campbell, K.D.

    1989-11-22

    Objectives of the project are to discover and evaluate novel catalytic systems for the conversion of methane or by-product light hydrocarbon gases either indirectly (through intermediate light gases rich in C{sub 2}'s) or directly to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, and to evaluate, from an engineering perspective, different conceptualized schemes. The approach is to carry out catalyst testing on several specific classes of potential catalysts for the conversion of methane selectively to C{sub 2} products. Promoted metal oxide catalysts were tested. Several of these exhibited similar high ethylene to ethane ratios and low carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide ratios observed for the NaCl/{alpha}-alumina catalyst system reported earlier. Research on catalysts containing potentially activated metals began with testing of metal molecular sieves. Silver catalysts were shown to be promising as low temperature catalysts. Perovskites were tested as potential methane coupling catalysts. A layered perovskite (K{sub 2}La{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 10}) gave the highest C{sub 2} yield. Work continued on the economic evaluation of a hypothetical process converting methane to ethylene. An engineering model of the methane coupling system has been prepared. 47 refs., 17 figs., 57 tabs.

  13. Reliability and availability analysis of low power portable direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisworahardjo, N. S.; Alam, M. S.; Aydinli, G.

    This paper presents a methodology for modeling and calculating the reliability and availability of low power portable direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). System reliability and availability are critical factors for improving market acceptance and for determining the competitiveness of the low power DMFC. Two techniques have been used for analyzing the system reliability and availability requirements for various system components. Reliability block diagram (RBD) is formed based on the failure rates of irreparable system components. A state-space method is developed to calculate system availability using the Markov model (MM). The state-space method incorporates three different states-operational, derated, and fully faulted states. Since most system components spend their lifetime in performing normal functional task, this research is focused mainly on this operational period. The failure and repair rates for repairable DMFC systems are estimated on the basis of a homogeneous Poisson process (HPP) and exponential distribution. Extensive analytical modeling and simulation study has been performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  14. Nafion/PTFE composite membranes for direct methanol fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsiu-Li; Yu, T. Leon; Huang, Li-Ning; Chen, Li-Chung; Shen, Kun-Sheng; Jung, Guo-Bin

    Using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscope (SEM), it is shown that a high-carbon-number alcohol/water, i.e., 2-propanol/water, mixed solvent is more effective than low-carbon-number alcohol/water, i.e., ethanol/water and methanol/water, mixed solvents in dispersing Nafion molecules. Thus, it is a better solvent for the preparation of Nafion/PTFE (poly(tetrafluoroethylene)) composite membranes. The performance of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) with a Nafion/PTFE composite membrane, which was prepared in-house, a commercial Nafion-117 membrane, or a commercial Nafion-112 membrane were investigated by feeding various concentrations, i.e., 2-5 M, of methanol to the anode. The Nafion/PTFE composite membrane gave a better DMFC performance than that obtained with Nafion-117 or Nafion-112 membranes. Using a DMFC model and varying the methanol concentration at the anode, cell voltage data were analyzed with respect to methanol concentration and cell current. The results indicate that inserting porous PTFE into Nafion polymer causes a reduction not only in methanol diffusion cross-over but also in the electro-osmosis of methanol cross-over in the membrane.

  15. Numerical simulation of internal and near-nozzle flow of a gasoline direct injection fuel injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Kaushik; Som, Sibendu; Battistoni, Michele; Li, Yanheng; Quan, Shaoping; Senecal, Peter Kelly

    2015-12-01

    A numerical study of two-phase flow inside the nozzle holes and the issuing spray jets for a multi-hole direct injection gasoline injector has been presented in this work. The injector geometry is representative of the Spray G nozzle, an eight-hole counterbore injector, from, the Engine Combustion Network (ECN). Simulations have been carried out for the fixed needle lift. Effects of turbulence, compressibility and, non-condensable gases have been considered in this work. Standard k—ɛ turbulence model has been used to model the turbulence. Homogeneous Relaxation Model (HRM) coupled with Volume of Fluid (VOF) approach has been utilized to capture the phase change phenomena inside and outside the injector nozzle. Three different boundary conditions for the outlet domain have been imposed to examine non-flashing and evaporative, non-flashing and non-evaporative, and flashing conditions. Inside the nozzle holes mild cavitation-like and in the near-nozzle region flash boiling phenomena have been predicted in this study when liquid fuel is subjected to superheated ambiance. Noticeable hole to hole variation has been also observed in terms of mass flow rates for all the holes under both flashing and non-flashing conditions.

  16. Basic model for membrane electrode assembly design for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krewer, Ulrike; Yoon, Hae-Kwon; Kim, Hee-Tak

    This research proposes a model that predicts the effect of the anode diffusion layer and membrane properties on the electrochemical performance and methanol crossover of a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) membrane electrode assembly (MEA). It is an easily extensible, lumped DMFC model. Parameters used in this design model are experimentally obtainable, and some of the parameters are indicative of material characteristics. The quantification of these material parameters builds up a material database. Model parameters for various membranes and diffusion layers are determined by using various techniques such as polarization, mass balance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and interpretation of the response of the cell to step changes in current. Since the investigation techniques cover different response times of the DMFC, processes in the cell such as transport, reaction and charge processes can be investigated separately. Properties of single layers of the MEA are systematically varied, and subsequent analysis enables identification of the influence of the layer's properties on the electrochemical performance and methanol crossover. Finally, a case study indicates that the use of a membrane with lower methanol diffusivity and a thicker anode micro-porous layer (MPL) yields MEAs with lower methanol crossover but similar power density.

  17. TUNING OF SIZE AND SHAPE OF AU-PT NANOCATALYST FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Murph, S.

    2011-04-20

    In this paper, we report the precise control of the size, shape and surface morphology of Au-Pt nanocatalysts (cubes, blocks, octahedrons and dogbones) synthesized via a seed-mediated approach. Gold 'seeds' of different aspect ratios (1 to 4.2), grown by a silver-assisted approach, were used as templates for high-yield production of novel Au-Pt nanocatalysts at a low temperature (40 C). Characterization by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), UV-Vis spectroscopy, zeta-potential (surface charge), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to better understand their physico-chemical properties, preferred reactivities and underlying nanoparticle growth mechanism. A rotating disk electrode was used to evaluate the Au-Pt nanocatalysts electrochemical performance in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) of direct methanol fuel cells. The results indicate the Au-Pt dogbones are partially and in some cases completely unaffected by methanol poisoning during the evaluation of the ORR. The ORR performance of the octahedron particles in the absence of MeOH is superior to that of the Au-Pt dogbones and Pt-black, however its performance is affected by the presence of MeOH.

  18. Ion pair reinforced semi-interpenetrating polymer network for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chunliu; Julius, David; Tay, Siok Wei; Hong, Liang; Lee, Jim Yang

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of ion-pair-reinforced semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (SIPNs) as proton exchange membranes (PEMs) for the direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Specifically, sulfonated poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (SPPO), a linear polymer proton source, was immobilized in a brominated PPO (BPPO) network covalently cross-linked by ethylenediamine (EDA). The immobilization of SPPO in the SIPN network was accomplished not only by the usual means of mechanical interlocking but also by ion pair formation between the sulfonic acid groups of SPPO and the amine moieties formed during the cross-linking reaction of BPPO with EDA. Through the ion pair interactions, the immobilization of SPPO polymer in the BPPO network was made more effective, resulting in a greater uniformity of sulfonic acid cluster distribution in the membrane. The hydrophilic amine-containing cross-links also compensated for some of the decrease in proton conductivity caused by ion pair formation. The SIPN membranes prepared as such showed good proton conductivity, low methanol permeability, good mechanical properties, and dimensional stability. Consequently, the PPO based SIPN membranes were able to deliver a higher maximum power density than Nafion, demonstrating the potential of the SIPN structure for PEM designs.

  19. Methanol Oxidation on Pt3Sn(111) for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells: Methanol Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Deng, Zhigang; Guo, Chen; Wang, Weili; Wei, Shuxian; Ng, Siu-Pang; Chen, Xiangfeng; Ding, Ning; Guo, Wenyue; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2016-05-18

    PtSn alloy, which is a potential material for use in direct methanol fuel cells, can efficiently promote methanol oxidation and alleviate the CO poisoning problem. Herein, methanol decomposition on Pt3Sn(111) was systematically investigated using periodic density functional theory and microkinetic modeling. The geometries and energies of all of the involved species were analyzed, and the decomposition network was mapped out to elaborate the reaction mechanisms. Our results indicated that methanol and formaldehyde were weakly adsorbed, and the other derivatives (CHxOHy, x = 1-3, y = 0-1) were strongly adsorbed and preferred decomposition rather than desorption on Pt3Sn(111). The competitive methanol decomposition started with the initial O-H bond scission followed by successive C-H bond scissions, (i.e., CH3OH → CH3O → CH2O → CHO → CO). The Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relations and energy barrier decomposition analyses identified the C-H and O-H bond scissions as being more competitive than the C-O bond scission. Microkinetic modeling confirmed that the vast majority of the intermediates and products from methanol decomposition would escape from the Pt3Sn(111) surface at a relatively low temperature, and the coverage of the CO residue decreased with an increase in the temperature and decrease in partial methanol pressure.

  20. Development of Polymer Electrolyte Mambrane (PEM) from Bisphonol S for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changkhamchom, Sairung

    2009-03-01

    The currently used Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) in a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) is Nafion^, an excellent proton conductor in a fully hydrated membrane. However, it has major drawbacks, such as very high cost, and loss of conductivity at elevated temperature and low humidity. In this work, a novel PEM based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (S-PEEK). Poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) was synthesized by the nucleophilic aromatic substitution polycondensation of Bisphonol-S and 4,4'-difluorobenzophenone for system A, and Bisphenol S and 4,4'-dichlorobenzophenone for system B. Bisphenol-S helps to increase the thermal stability due to its high melting point (245^oC). The post-sulfonation reaction was performed by using concentrated sulfuric acid. Sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (S-PEEK) samples were characterized by FTIR and ^1H-NMR to confirm the chemical structure of the S-PEEK, and by TGA to investigate the thermal property.

  1. Direct Investigations of the Immobilization of Radionuclides in the Alteration Products of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Peter C. Burns; Robert J. Finch; David J. Wronkiewicz

    2004-12-27

    Safe disposal of the nation's nuclear waste in a geological repository involves unique scientific and engineering challenges owing to the very long-lived radioactivity of the waste. The repository must retain a variety of radionuclides that have vastly different chemical characters for several thousand years. Most of the radioactivity that will be housed in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain will be associated with spent nuclear fuel, much of which is derived from commercial reactors. DOE is custodian of approximately 8000 tons of spent nuclear fuel that is also intended for eventual disposal in a geological repository. Unlike the spent fuel from commercial reactors, the DOE fuel is diverse in composition with more than 250 varieties. Safe disposal of spent fuel requires a detailed knowledge of its long-term behavior under repository conditions, as well as the fate of radionuclides released from the spent fuel as waste containers are breached.

  2. Electrode design for low temperature direct-hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Fanglin; Zhao, Fei; Liu, Qiang

    2015-10-06

    In certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The solid oxide fuel cell includes a hierarchically porous cathode support having an impregnated cobaltite cathode deposited thereon, an electrolyte, and an anode support. The anode support includes hydrocarbon oxidation catalyst deposited thereon, wherein the cathode support, electrolyte, and anode support are joined together and wherein the solid oxide fuel cell operates a temperature of 600.degree. C. or less.

  3. Electrode Design for Low Temperature Direct-Hydrocarbon Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Fanglin (Inventor); Zhao, Fei (Inventor); Liu, Qiang (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    In certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The solid oxide fuel cell includes a hierarchically porous cathode support having an impregnated cobaltite cathode deposited thereon, an electrolyte, and an anode support. The anode support includes hydrocarbon oxidation catalyst deposited thereon, wherein the cathode support, electrolyte, and anode support are joined together and wherein the solid oxide fuel cell operates a temperature of 600.degree. C. or less.

  4. Anion- or Cation-Exchange Membranes for NaBH4/H2O2 Fuel Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Šljukić, Biljana; Morais, Ana L.; Santos, Diogo M. F.; Sequeira, César A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Direct borohydride fuel cells (DBFC), which operate on sodium borohydride (NaBH4) as the fuel, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as the oxidant, are receiving increasing attention. This is due to their promising use as power sources for space and underwater applications, where air is not available and gas storage poses obvious problems. One key factor to improve the performance of DBFCs concerns the type of separator used. Both anion- and cation-exchange membranes may be considered as potential separators for DBFC. In the present paper, the effect of the membrane type on the performance of laboratory NaBH4/H2O2 fuel cells using Pt electrodes is studied at room temperature. Two commercial ion-exchange membranes from Membranes International Inc., an anion-exchange membrane (AMI-7001S) and a cation-exchange membrane (CMI-7000S), are tested as ionic separators for the DBFC. The membranes are compared directly by the observation and analysis of the corresponding DBFC’s performance. Cell polarization, power density, stability, and durability tests are used in the membranes’ evaluation. Energy densities and specific capacities are estimated. Most tests conducted, clearly indicate a superior performance of the cation-exchange membranes over the anion-exchange membrane. The two membranes are also compared with several other previously tested commercial membranes. For long term cell operation, these membranes seem to outperform the stability of the benchmark Nafion membranes but further studies are still required to improve their instantaneous power load. PMID:24958292

  5. μPIV measurements of two-phase flows of an operated direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgmann, Sebastian; Blank, Mirja; Panchenko, Olha; Wartmann, Jens

    2013-05-01

    In direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), two-phase flows appear in the channels of the anode side (CO2 bubbles in a liquid water-methanol environment) as well as of the cathode side (water droplets or films in an ambient air flow). CO2 bubbles or water droplets may almost completely fill the cross-section of a channel. The instantaneous effect of the formation of two-phase flows on the cell performance has not been investigated in detail, yet. In the current project, the micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV) technique is used to elucidate the corresponding flow phenomena on the anode as well as on the cathode side of a DMFC and to correlate those phenomena with the performance of the cell. A single-channel DMFC with optical access at the anode and the cathode side is constructed and assembled that allows for μPIV measurements at both sides as well as a detailed time-resolved cell voltage recording. The appearance and evolution of CO2 bubbles on the anode side is qualitatively and quantitatively investigated. The results clearly indicate that the cell power increases when the free cross-section area of the channel is decreased by huge bubbles. Methanol is forced into the porous gas diffusion layer (GDL) between the channels and the membrane is oxidized to CO2, and hence, the fuel consumption is increased and the cell performance rises. Eventually, a bubble forms a moving slug that effectively cleans the channel from CO2 bubbles on its way downstream. The blockage effect is eliminated; the methanol flow is not forced into the GDL anymore. The remaining amount of methanol in the GDL is oxidized. The cell power decreases until enough CO2 is produced to eventually form bubbles again and the process starts again. On the other hand under the investigated conditions, water on the cathode side only forms liquid films on the channels walls rather than channel-filling droplets. Instantaneous changes of the cell power due to liquid water formation could not be observed. The

  6. THE HYDROLYSIS AND OXIDATION BEHAVIOR OF LITHIUM BOROHYDRIDE AND MAGNESIUM HYDRIDE DETERMINED BY CALORIMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, K; Donald Anton, D; Joshua Gray, J; Bruce Hardy, B

    2008-03-13

    Lithium borohydride, magnesium hydride and the 2:1 'destabilized' ball milled mixtures (2LiBH{sub 4}:MgH{sub 2}) underwent liquid phase hydrolysis, gas phase hydrolysis and air oxidation reactions monitored by isothermal calorimetry. The experimentally determined heats of reaction and resulting products were compared with those theoretically predicted using thermodynamic databases. Results showed a discrepancy between the predicted and observed hydrolysis and oxidation products due to both kinetic limitations and to the significant amorphous character of observed reaction products. Gas phase and liquid phase hydrolysis were the dominant reactions in 2LiBH{sub 4}:MgH{sub 2} with approximately the same total energy release and reaction products; liquid phase hydrolysis displayed the maximum heat flow for likely environmental exposure with a peak energy release of 6 (mW/mg).

  7. Optical Characterization of a Multipoint Lean Direct Injector for Gas Turbine Combustors: Velocity and Fuel Drop Size Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Christopher M.; Anderson, Robert C.; Locke, Randy J.; Hicks, Yolanda R.

    2010-01-01

    Performance of a multipoint, lean direct injection (MP-LDI) strategy for low emission aero-propulsion systems has been tested in a Jet-A fueled, lean flame tube combustion rig. Operating conditions for the series of tests included inlet air temperatures between 672 and 828 K, pressures between 1034 and 1379 kPa and total equivalence ratios between 0.41 and 0.45, resulting in equilibrium flame temperatures approaching 1800 K. Ranges of operation were selected to represent the spectrum of subsonic and supersonic flight conditions projected for the next-generation of commercial aircraft. This document reports laser-based measurements of in situ fuel velocities and fuel drop sizes for the NASA 9-point LDI hardware arranged in a 3 3 square grid configuration. Data obtained represent a region of the flame tube combustor with optical access that extends 38.1-mm downstream of the fuel injection site. All data were obtained within reacting flows, without particle seeding. Two diagnostic methods were employed to evaluate the resulting flow path. Three-component velocity fields have been captured using phase Doppler interferometry (PDI), and two-component velocity distributions using planar particle image velocimetry (PIV). Data from these techniques have also offered insight into fuel drop size and distribution, fuel injector spray angle and pattern, turbulence intensity, degree of vaporization and extent of reaction. This research serves to characterize operation of the baseline NASA 9- point LDI strategy for potential use in future gas-turbine combustor applications. An additional motive is the compilation of a comprehensive database to facilitate understanding of combustor fuel injector aerodynamics and fuel vaporization processes, which in turn may be used to validate computational fluid dynamics codes, such as the National Combustor Code (NCC), among others.

  8. Activity of platinum/carbon and palladium/carbon catalysts promoted by Ni2 P in direct ethanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqiang; Feng, Ligang; Chang, Jinfa; Wickman, Björn; Grönbeck, Henrik; Liu, Changpeng; Xing, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol is an alternative fuel for direct alcohol fuel cells, in which the electrode materials are commonly based on Pt or Pd. Owing to the excellent promotion effect of Ni2 P that was found in methanol oxidation, we extended the catalyst system of Pt or Pd modified by Ni2 P in direct ethanol fuel cells. The Ni2 P-promoted catalysts were compared to commercial catalysts as well as to reference catalysts promoted with only Ni or only P. Among the studied catalysts, Pt/C and Pd/C modified by Ni2 P (30 wt %) showed both the highest activity and stability. Upon integration into the anode of a homemade direct ethanol fuel cell, the Pt-Ni2 P/C-30 % catalyst showed a maximum power density of 21 mW cm(-2) , which is approximately two times higher than that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst. The Pd-Ni2 P/C-30 % catalyst exhibited a maximum power density of 90 mW cm(-2) . This is approximately 1.5 times higher than that of a commercial Pd/C catalyst. The discharge stability on both two catalysts was also greatly improved over a 12 h discharge operation.

  9. Efficient Conversion of Lignin to Electricity Using a Novel Direct Biomass Fuel Cell Mediated by Polyoxometalates at Low Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuebing; Zhu, J Y

    2016-01-01

    A novel polyoxometalates (POMs) mediated direct biomass fuel cell (DBFC) was used in this study to directly convert lignin to electricity at low temperatures with high power output and Faradaic efficiency. When phosphomolybdic acid H3 PMo12 O40 (PMo12) was used as the electron and proton carrier in the anode solution with a carbon electrode, and O2 was directly used as the final electron acceptor under the catalysis of Pt, the peak power density reached 0.96 mW cm(-2), 560 times higher than that of phenol-fueled microbial fuel cells (MFCs). When the cathode reaction was catalyzed by PMo12, the power density could be greatly enhanced to 5 mW cm(-2). Continuous operation demonstrated that this novel fuel cell was promising as a stable electrochemical power source. Structure analysis of the lignin indicated that the hydroxyl group content was reduced whereas the carbonyl group content increased. Both condensation and depolymerization takes place during the PMo12 oxidation of lignin.

  10. Efficient Conversion of Lignin to Electricity Using a Novel Direct Biomass Fuel Cell Mediated by Polyoxometalates at Low Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuebing; Zhu, J Y

    2016-01-01

    A novel polyoxometalates (POMs) mediated direct biomass fuel cell (DBFC) was used in this study to directly convert lignin to electricity at low temperatures with high power output and Faradaic efficiency. When phosphomolybdic acid H3 PMo12 O40 (PMo12) was used as the electron and proton carrier in the anode solution with a carbon electrode, and O2 was directly used as the final electron acceptor under the catalysis of Pt, the peak power density reached 0.96 mW cm(-2), 560 times higher than that of phenol-fueled microbial fuel cells (MFCs). When the cathode reaction was catalyzed by PMo12, the power density could be greatly enhanced to 5 mW cm(-2). Continuous operation demonstrated that this novel fuel cell was promising as a stable electrochemical power source. Structure analysis of the lignin indicated that the hydroxyl group content was reduced whereas the carbonyl group content increased. Both condensation and depolymerization takes place during the PMo12 oxidation of lignin. PMID:26692572

  11. Direct fired reciprocating engine and bottoming high temperature fuel cell hybrid

    DOEpatents

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Holcombe, Norman T.

    2006-02-07

    A system of a fuel cell bottoming an internal combustion engine. The engine exhaust gas may be combined in varying degrees with air and fed as input to a fuel cell. Reformer and oxidizers may be combined with heat exchangers to accommodate rich and lean burn conditions in the engine in peaking and base load conditions without producing high concentrations of harmful emissions.

  12. Thermal decomposition of alkane hydrocarbons inside a porous Ni anode for fuel supply of direct carbon fuel cell: Effects of morphology and crystallinity of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengguo; Yi, Hakgyu; Jalalabadi, Tahereh; Lee, Donggeun

    2015-10-01

    This study improved the physical contact between anode and fuel in a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) by directly generating carbon in a porous Ni anode through thermal decomposition of three kinds of hydrocarbons (CH4, C2H6, C3H8). From electron microscope observations of the carbon particles generated from each hydrocarbon, carbon spheres (CS), carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanofibers (CNF) were identified with increasing carbon number. Raman scattering analysis was performed to determine the crystallinity of the carbon samples. As a result, the carbon samples (CS, CNT, and CNF) produced from CH4, C2H6 and C3H8 were found to be less crystalline and more flexible with increasing the carbon number. DCFC performance was measured at 700 °C for the anode fueled with the same mass of the carbon sample. It was found that the 1-dimensional CNT and CNF were more active to produce 148% and 210% times higher power density than the CS. The difference was partly attributed to the finding that the less-crystalline CNT and CNF had much lower charge transfer resistances than the CS. A lifetime test found that the CNT and CNF, which are capable of transporting electrons for much longer periods, maintained the power density much longer, as compared to the CS which can lose their point contacts between the particles shortly at high current density.

  13. Performance, methanol tolerance and stability of Fe-aminobenzimidazole derived catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastián, David; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Aricò, Antonino S.; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2016-07-01

    Highly active and durable non-platinum group metals (non-PGM) catalyst based on iron-nitrogen-carbon (Fe-N-C) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) derived from pyrolyzed Fe-aminobenzimidazole (Fe-ABZIM) was synthesized by sacrificial support method (SSM), and characterized by several physical-chemical techniques: scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In half-cell electrochemical configuration, the Fe-ABZIM catalyst presented a significant improvement of ORR activity with respect to a recently reported non-PGM formulation based on Fe-aminoantipyrine, with an enhancement of half-wave potential of about 85 mV in O2-saturated sulfuric acid solution. To the moment, the gap with respect to a benchmark Pt/C catalyst was about 90 mV. The Fe-ABZIM catalyst showed a remarkably high tolerance to methanol, resulting in superior ORR performance compared to Pt/C at methanol concentrations higher than 0.02 M. In direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) good performances were also obtained. A durability test (100 h) at 90 °C, feeding 5 M methanol, was carried out. A certain decrease of performance was recorded, amounting to -0.20 mW cm-2 h-1 at the very beginning of test and -0.05 mW cm-2 h-1 at the end. However, the Fe-ABZIM is more adequate than previously reported formulations in terms of both ORR activity and stability.

  14. Nafion/PTFE/silicate composite membranes for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Li-Ning; Chen, Li-Chun; Yu, T. Leon; Lin, Hsiu-Li

    Poly(tetrafluoro ethylene) (PTFE)/Nafion composite membranes (PN composite membranes) were prepared by impregnating micro-porous PTFE membranes in Nafion/2-propanol/water solutions. The PN composite membranes were then further impregnated with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) solutions to prepare PTFE/Nafion/silicate (PNS) composite membranes. The influence of hybridizing silicate into the PN membranes on their direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) performance and methanol crossover was investigated. Silicate in PN membranes causes reduction both in proton conductivity and methanol crossover of membranes. Thus PNS had a higher voltage than PN at low current densities due to the lower methanol crossover of PNS. However, at high current densities, PNS had a lower voltage than PN due to the higher resistance to proton transference of PNS. The range of lower current densities where PNS had a higher voltage than PN was i = 0-120 mA cm -2 when the methanol feed concentration was 2 M. This lower current density range became broader as the methanol feed concentration was increased, and it was broadened to i = 0-190 mA cm -2 as the methanol feed concentration was increased to 5 M. A comparison of the methanol crossover on the DMFC performance of PN and PNS with Nafion-112 was also studied. We showed that Nafion-112 exhibits higher methanol electro-osmosis than PN and PNS. Thus at a high current density, the higher methanol crossover via electro-osmosis caused Nafion-112 to have a lower voltage than PN and PNS.

  15. A modified Nafion membrane with in situ polymerized polypyrrole for the direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, M. A.; Ocampo, A. L.; Espinosa-Medina, M. A.; Sebastián, P. J.

    Nafion membranes were modified by the in situ electrodeposition of polypyrrole inside the membrane pores and on the anode side only, in order to prevent the cross-over of methanol in the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Pretreated Nafion membranes were first immersed in 0.1 M sulphuric acid containing the pyrrole monomer and subsequently removed from this solution and placed in a two-electrode solid-state electrochemical cell, where the polypyrrole was formed galvanostatically. The modified membranes were studied in terms of morphology, electrochemical characteristics and methanol permeability. FTIR and SEM confirmed the presence of the polypyrrole on the anode side of the Nafion membrane. SEM shows the polymer to be present both on the membrane surface and inside the membrane pores. It was found to be deposited as small grains, with two distinct sizes, the smallest particles have a diameter of around 100 nm, while the larger particles have diameters of around 700 nm. Methanol permeability was determined electrochemically and was shown to be effectively reduced. Cyclic voltammetry was performed in sulphuric acid, in pure methanol and in 50 vol.% methanol. The untreated Nafion membrane showed CV curves which were similar in all electrolytes with electroactivity only at the extreme ends of the curve. The Nafion/Ppy membrane showed typical polypyrrole curves, with current densities lowest in sulphuric acid, and highest in the 50 vol.% methanol, respectively. For the methanol containing electrolytes, an additional oxidative peak appears in the CV, which may be related to electrocatalytic activity of the polypyrrole for methanol oxidation.

  16. Direct conversion of methane to C sub 2 's and liquid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, B.K.; Campbell, K.D.; Matherne, J.L.; Kinkade, N.E.

    1990-03-12

    The objectives of the project are to discover and evaluate novel catalytic systems for the conversion of methane or by-product light hydrocarbon gases either indirectly (through intermediate light gases rich in C{sub 2}'s) or directly to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, and to evaluate, from an engineering perspective, different conceptualized schemes. The approach is to carry out catalyst testing on several specific classes of potential catalysts for the conversion of methane selectively to C{sub 2} products. The behavior of alkaline earth/metal oxide/halide catalysts containing strontium was found to be different from the behavior of catalysts containing barium. Two approaches were pursued to avoid the heterogeneous/homogeneous mechanism in order to achieve higher C{sub 2} selectivity/methane conversion combinations. One approach was to eliminate or minimize the typical gas phase combustion chemistry and make more of the reaction occur on the surface of the catalyst by using silver. Another approach was to change the gas phase chemistry to depart from the typical combustion reaction network by using vapor-phase catalysts. The layered perovskite K{sub 2}La{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 10} was further studied. Modifications of process and catalyst variables for LaCaMnCoO{sub 6} catalysts resulted in catalysts with superior performance. Results obtained with a literature catalyst Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11} were better than those obtained with NaCO{sub 3}/Pr-Ce oxide or Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/Ag-Pr-Ce oxide. 52 refs., 15 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. Characterization of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications with H 2SO 4 modified chitosan membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osifo, Peter O.; Masala, Aluwani

    Chitosan (Chs) flakes were prepared from chitin materials that were extracted from the exoskeleton of Cape rock lobsters in South Africa. The Chs flakes were prepared into membranes and the Chs membranes were modified by cross-linking with H 2SO 4. The cross-linked Chs membranes were characterized for the application in direct methanol fuel cells. The Chs membrane characteristics such as water uptake, thermal stability, proton resistance and methanol permeability were compared to that of high performance conventional Nafion 117 membranes. Under the temperature range studied 20-60 °C, the membrane water uptake for Chs was found to be higher than that of Nafion. Thermal analysis revealed that Chs membranes could withstand temperature as high as 230 °C whereas Nafion 117 membranes were stable to 320 °C under nitrogen. Nafion 117 membranes were found to exhibit high proton resistance of 284 s cm -1 than Chs membranes of 204 s cm -1. The proton fluxes across the membranes were 2.73 mol cm -2 s -1 for Chs- and 1.12 mol cm -2 s -1 Nafion membranes. Methanol (MeOH) permeability through Chs membrane was less, 1.4 × 10 -6 cm 2 s -1 for Chs membranes and 3.9 × 10 -6 cm 2 s -1 for Nafion 117 membranes at 20 °C. Chs and Nafion membranes were fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MAE) and their performances measure in a free-breathing commercial single cell DMFC. The Nafion membranes showed a better performance as the power density determined for Nafion membranes of 0.0075 W cm -2 was 2.7 times higher than in the case of Chs MEA.

  18. The electrolyte challenge for a direct methanol-air polymer electrolyte fuel cell operating at temperatures up to 200 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savinell, Robert; Yeager, Ernest; Tryk, Donald; Landau, Uziel; Wainright, Jesse; Gervasio, Dominic; Cahan, Boris; Litt, Morton; Rogers, Charles; Scherson, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    Novel polymer electrolytes are being evaluated for use in a direct methanol-air fuel cell operating at temperatures in excess of 100 C. The evaluation includes tests of thermal stability, ionic conductivity, and vapor transport characteristics. The preliminary results obtained to date indicate that a high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell is feasible. For example, Nafion 117 when equilibrated with phosphoric acid has a conductivity of at least 0.4 Omega(exp -1)cm(exp -1) at temperatures up to 200 C in the presence of 400 torr of water vapor and methanol vapor cross over equivalent to 1 mA/cm(exp 2) under a one atmosphere methanol pressure differential at 135 C. Novel polymers are also showing similar encouraging results. The flexibility to modify and optimize the properties by custom synthesis of these novel polymers presents an exciting opportunity to develop an efficient and compact methanol fuel cell.

  19. OPTIM: Computer program to generate a vertical profile which minimizes aircraft fuel burn or direct operating cost. User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A profile of altitude, airspeed, and flight path angle as a function of range between a given set of origin and destination points for particular models of transport aircraft provided by NASA is generated. Inputs to the program include the vertical wind profile, the aircraft takeoff weight, the costs of time and fuel, certain constraint parameters and control flags. The profile can be near optimum in the sense of minimizing: (1) fuel, (2) time, or (3) a combination of fuel and time (direct operating cost (DOC)). The user can also, as an option, specify the length of time the flight is to span. The theory behind the technical details of this program is also presented.

  20. The Discovery-Oriented Approach to Organic Chemistry. 6. Selective Reduction in Organic Chemistry: Reduction of Aldehydes in the Presence of Esters Using Sodium Borohydride

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baru, Ashvin R.; Mohan, Ram S.

    2005-01-01

    A discovery-oriented lab experiment is developed that illustrates the chemoselective nature of reductions using sodium borohydride. Products are of sufficient purity to allow analysis by spectroscopy without further purification.

  1. Perspective use of direct human blood as an energy source in air-breathing hybrid microfluidic fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dector, A.; Escalona-Villalpando, R. A.; Dector, D.; Vallejo-Becerra, V.; Chávez-Ramírez, A. U.; Arriaga, L. G.; Ledesma-García, J.

    2015-08-01

    This work presents a flexible and light air-breathing hybrid microfluidic fuel cell (HμFC) operated under biological conditions. A mixture of glucose oxidase, glutaraldehyde, multi-walled carbon nanotubes and vulcan carbon (GOx/VC-MWCNT-GA) was used as the bioanode. Meanwhile, integrating an air-exposed electrode (Pt/C) as the cathode enabled direct oxygen delivery from air. The microfluidic fuel cell performance was evaluated using glucose obtained from three different sources as the fuel: 5 mM glucose in phosphate buffer, human serum and human blood. For the last fuel, an open circuit voltage and maximum power density of 0.52 V and 0.20 mW cm-2 (at 0.38 V) were obtained respectively; meanwhile the maximum current density was 1.1 mA cm-2. Furthermore, the stability of the device was measured in terms of recovery after several polarization curves, showing excellent results. Although this air-breathing HμFC requires technological improvements before being tested in a biomedical device, it represents the best performance to date for a microfluidic fuel cell using human blood as glucose source.

  2. Preparation of nano-sized nickel as anode catalyst for direct urea and urine fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Rong; Tao, Shanwen

    Nano-sized nickel with primary particle size of 2-3 nm has been successfully prepared for use as efficient anode catalysts in urea and urine fuel cells. XRD, SEM and TEM were used for characterisation of nano-sized nickel. Based on the previous communication, the performance of urea and urine fuel cells has been further improved when the relative humidity at the cathode was 100%. A maximum power density of 14.2 mW cm -2 was achieved when 1 M urea was used as fuel, humidified air as oxidant. The performance of urine fuel cells operating above room temperature was also reported for the first time and a power density of 4.23 mW cm -2 was achieved at 60 °C indicating potential application in urea-rich waste water treatment.

  3. Sinusoidal potential cycling operation of a direct ethanol fuel cell to improving carbon dioxide yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Pasha; Pickup, Peter G.

    2014-12-01

    A direct ethanol fuel cell has been operated under sinusoidal (AC) potential cycling conditions in order to increase the yield of carbon dioxide and thereby increase cell efficiency relative to operation at a fixed potential. At 80 °C, faradaic yields of CO2 as high as 25% have been achieved with a PtRu anode catalyst, while the maximum CO2 production at constant potential was 13%. The increased yields under cycling conditions have been attributed to periodic oxidative stripping of adsorbed CO. These results will be important in the optimization of operating conditions for direct ethanol fuel cells, where the benefits of potential cycling are projected to increase as catalysts that produce CO2 more efficiently are implemented.

  4. Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, James, P.

    2010-05-26

    Funding from DoE grant # FG0204-ER63721, Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO2, supposed several postdoctoral fellows and research activities at MBARI related to ocean CO2 disposal and the biological consequences of high ocean CO2 levels on marine organisms. Postdocs supported on the project included Brad Seibel, now an associate professor at the University of Rhode Island, Jeff Drazen, now an associate professor at the University of Hawaii, and Eric Pane, who continues as a research associate at MBARI. Thus, the project contributed significantly to the professional development of young scientists. In addition, we made significant progress in several research areas. We continued several deep-sea CO2 release experiments using support from DoE and MBARI, along with several collaborators. These CO2 release studies had the goal of broadening our understanding of the effects of high ocean CO2 levels on deep sea animals in the vicinity of potential release sites for direct deep-ocean carbon dioxide sequestration. Using MBARI ships and ROVs, we performed these experiments at depths of 3000 to 3600 m, where liquid CO2 is heavier than seawater. CO2 was released into small pools (sections of PVC pipe) on the seabed, where it dissolved and drifted downstream, bathing any caged animals and sediments in a CO2-rich, low-pH plume. We assessed the survival of organisms nearby. Several publications arose from these studies (Barry et al. 2004, 2005; Carman et al. 2004; Thistle et al. 2005, 2006, 2007; Fleeger et al. 2006, 2010; Barry and Drazen 2007; Bernhard et al. 2009; Sedlacek et al. 2009; Ricketts et al. in press; Barry et al, in revision) concerning the sensitivity of animals to low pH waters. Using funds from DoE and MBARI, we designed and fabricated a hyperbaric trap-respirometer to study metabolic rates of deep-sea fishes under high CO2 conditions (Drazen et al, 2005), as well as a gas-control aquarium system to support laboratory studies of the

  5. Simultaneous desorption behavior of M borohydrides and Mg2FeH6 reactive hydride composites (M = Mg, then Li, Na, K, Ca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Anna-Lisa; Li, Guanqiao; Matsuo, Motoaki; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Deledda, Stefano; Sørby, Magnus H.; Hauback, Bjørn C.; Pistidda, Claudio; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Combinations of complex metal borohydrides ball milled with the transition metal complex hydride, Mg2FeH6, are analysed and compared. Initially, the Reactive Hydride Composite (RHC) of Mg2+ cation mixtures of Mg2FeH6 and γ-Mg(BH4)2 is combined in a range of molar ratios and heated to a maximum of 450 °C. For the molar ratio of 6 Mg2FeH6 + Mg(BH4)2, simultaneous desorption of the two hydrides occurred, which resulted in a single event of hydrogen release. This single step desorption occurred at temperatures between those of Mg2FeH6 and γ-Mg(BH4)2. Keeping this anionic ratio constant, the desorption behavior of four other borohydrides, Li-, Na-, K-, and Ca-borohydrides was studied by using materials ball milled with Mg2FeH6 applying the same milling parameters. The mixtures containing Mg-, Li-, and Ca-borohydrides also released hydrogen in a single event. The Mass Spectrometry (MS) results show a double step reaction within a narrow temperature range for both the Na- and K-borohydride mixtures. This phenomenon, observed for the RHC systems at the same anionic ratio with all five light metal borohydride mixtures, can be described as simultaneous hydrogen desorption within a narrow temperature range centered around 300 °C.

  6. Ni2P Makes Application of the PtRu Catalyst Much Stronger in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jinfa; Feng, Ligang; Liu, Changpeng; Xing, Wei

    2015-10-12

    PtRu is regarded as the best catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells, but the performance decay resulting from the loss of Ru seriously hinders commercial applications. Herein, we demonstrated that the presence of Ni2 P largely reduces Ru loss, which thus makes the application of PtRu much stronger in direct methanol fuel cells. Outstanding catalytic activity and stability were observed by cyclic voltammetry. Upon integrating the catalyst material into a practical direct methanol fuel cell, the highest maximum power density was achieved on the PtRu-Ni2P/C catalyst among the reference catalysts at different temperatures. A maximum power density of 69.9 mW cm(-2) at 30 °C was obtained on PtRu-Ni2P/C, which is even higher than the power density of the state-of-the-art commercial PtRu catalyst at 70 °C (63.1 mW cm(-2)). Moreover, decay in the performance resulting from Ru loss was greatly reduced owing to the presence of Ni2 P, which is indicative of very promising applications.

  7. High volume hydrogen production from the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride using a cobalt catalyst supported on a honeycomb matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchionni, Andrea; Bevilacqua, Manuela; Filippi, Jonathan; Folliero, Maria G.; Innocenti, Massimo; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Miller, Hamish A.; Pagliaro, Maria V.; Vizza, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen storage and distribution will be two very important aspects of any renewable energy infrastructure that uses hydrogen as energy vector. The chemical storage of hydrogen in compounds like sodium borohydride (NaBH4) could play an important role in overcoming current difficulties associated with these aspects. Sodium borohydride is a very attractive material due to its high hydrogen content. In this paper, we describe a reactor where a stable cobalt based catalyst supported on a commercial Cordierite Honeycomb Monolith (CHM) is employed for the hydrolysis of alkaline stabilized NaBH4 (SBH) aqueous solutions. The apparatus is able to operate at up to 5 bar and 130 °C, providing a hydrogen generation rate of up to 32 L min-1.

  8. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Power Supply For All-Day True Wireless Mobile Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Wells

    2008-11-30

    PolyFuel has developed state-of-the-art portable fuel cell technology for the portable computing market. A novel approach to passive water recycling within the MEA has led to significant system simplification and size reduction. Miniature stack technology with very high area utilization and minimalist seals has been developed. A highly integrated balance of plant with very low parasitic losses has been constructed around the new stack design. Demonstration prototype systems integrated with laptop computers have been shown in recent months to leading OEM computer manufacturers. PolyFuel intends to provide this technology to its customers as a reference design as a means of accelerating the commercialization of portable fuel cell technology. The primary goal of the project was to match the energy density of a commercial lithium ion battery for laptop computers. PolyFuel made large strides against this goal and has now demonstrated 270 Wh/liter compared with lithium ion energy densities of 300 Wh/liter. Further, more incremental, improvements in energy density are envisioned with an additional 20-30% gains possible in each of the next two years given further research and development.

  9. Progress on Establishing the Feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy for Direct Measurement of Plutonium in Used Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Casella, Andrew M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Smith, L. E.; Gavron, A.; Devlin, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Haight, R. C.; Danon, Yaron; Becker, Bjorn; Imel, G. R.; Beller, D.

    2012-07-19

    Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) of next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT continues to support a multi-institutional collaboration to address the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS) as an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today’s confirmatory assay methods. An LSDS is comprised of a stack of lead (typically 1-6 m3) in which materials to be measured are placed in the lead and a pulse of neutrons is injected. The neutrons in this pulse lose energy due to inelastic and (subsequently) elastic scattering and the average energy of the neutrons decreases as the time increases by a well-defined relationship. In the interrogation energy region (~0.1-1000 eV) the neutrons have little energy spread (~30%) about the average neutron energy. Due to this characteristic, the energy of the (assay) neutrons can then be determined by measuring the time elapsed since the neutron pulse. By measuring the induced fission neutrons emitted from the used fuel, it is possible to determine isotopic-mass content by unfolding the unique structure of isotopic resonances across the interrogation energy region. This paper will present efforts on the development of time-spectral analysis algorithms, fast neutron detector advances, and validation and testing measurements.

  10. Ceria coated Ni as anodes for direct utilization of methane in low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Xia, Changrong; Fan, Jue; Peng, Ranran; Meng, Guangyao

    A new type of anode, a Ni framework coated with Sm-doped ceria (SDC), was developed for direct utilization of methane fuel in low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with thin-film SDC electrolytes. The coated SDC was prepared with an ion impregnating method and the electrolyte films were fabricated with a co-pressing and co-firing technique. The impregnating process produced an ideal anode microstructure where nickel particles were effectively connected and uniformly covered with nanosized SDC. This anode microstructure was believed to enlarge the triple-phase boundaries and therefore enhance the anode performance. The cell performance was much higher than that of a conventional fuel cell with a Ni-SDC composite anode. In addition, the performance increased with impregnated SDC loading up to a maximum at 20 mg cm -2, indicating that the coated SDC is the contributing factor for the enhanced fuel cell performance. Power density as high as 571 and 353 mW cm -2 were obtained at 600 °C when humidified hydrogen and methane were used as fuels, respectively. The stability of the cell also increased with the SDC loading. No significant degradation was observed for anodes coated with 20 and 25 mg cm -2 SDC. This verifies that the coated SDC electrodes are very effective in suppressing catalytic carbon formation by blocking methane from approaching the Ni, which is catalytically active towards methane pyrolysis. The high performance of this anode shows high promise in the developing field of direct hydrocarbon SOFCs.

  11. Tailpipe emissions from gasoline direct injection (GDI) and port fuel injection (PFI) vehicles at both low and high ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rencheng; Hu, Jingnan; Bao, Xiaofeng; He, Liqiang; Lai, Yitu; Zu, Lei; Li, Yufei; Su, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Vehicle emissions are greatly influenced by various factors that are related to engine technology and driving conditions. Only the fuel injection method and ambient temperature are investigated in this research. Regulated gaseous and particulate matter (PM) emissions from two advanced gasoline-fueled vehicles, one with direct fuel injection (GDI) and the other with port fuel injection (PFI), are tested with conventional gasoline and ethanol-blended gasoline (E10) at both -7 °C and 30 °C. The total particle number (PN) concentrations and size distributions are monitored with an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI(+)). The solid PN concentrations are measured with a condensation particle counter (CPC) after removing volatile matters through the particle measurement program (PMP) system. The results indicate that decreasing the ambient temperature from 30 °C to -7 °C significantly increases the fuel consumption and all measured emissions except for NOx. The GDI vehicle exhibits lower fuel consumption than the PFI vehicle but emits more total hydrocarbons (THC), PM mass and solid PN emissions at 30 °C. The adaptability of GDI technology appears to be better than that of PFI technology at low ambient temperature. For example, the CO, THC and PM mass emission factors of the PFI vehicle are higher than those of the GDI vehicle and the solid PN emission factors are comparable in the cold-start tests at -7 °C. Specifically, during start-up the particulate matter emissions of the PFI are much higher than the GDI. In most cases, the geometric mean diameter (GMD) of the accumulation mode particles is 58-86 nm for both vehicles, and the GMD of the nucleation mode particles is 10-20 nm. The results suggest that the gaseous and particulate emissions from the PFI vehicle should not be neglected compared to those from the GDI vehicle especially in a cold environment. PMID:27267738

  12. Effects of piston surface treatments on performance and emissions of a methanol-fueled, direct injection, stratified charge engine

    SciTech Connect

    West, B.; Green, J.B.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of thermal barrier coatings and/or surface treatments on the performance and emissions of a methanol-fueled, direct-injection, stratified-charge (DISC) engine. A Ricardo Hydra Mark III engine was used for this work and in previous experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary focus of the study was to examine the effects of various piston insert surface treatments on hydrocarbon (HC) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions. Previous studies have shown that engines of this class have a tendency to perform poorly at low loads and have high unburned fuel emissions. A blank aluminum piston was modified to employ removable piston bowl inserts. Four different inserts were tested in the experiment: aluminum, stainless steel with a 1.27-mm (0.050-in.) air gap (to act as a thermal barrier), and two stainless steel/air-gap inserts with coatings. Two stainless steel inserts were dimensionally modified to account for the coating thickness (1.27-mm) and coated identically with partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ). One of the coated inserts then had an additional seal-coat applied. The coated inserts were otherwise identical to the stainless steel/air-gap insert (i.e., they employed the same 1.27-mm air gap). Thermal barrier coatings were employed in an attempt to increase combustion chamber surface temperatures, thereby reducing wall quenching and promoting more complete combustion of the fuel in the quench zone. The seal-coat was applied to the zirconia to reduce the surface porosity; previous research suggested that despite the possibly higher surface temperatures obtainable with a ceramic coating, the high surface area of a plasma-sprayed coating may actually allow fuel to adhere to the surface and increase the unburned fuel emissions and fuel consumption.

  13. Tailpipe emissions from gasoline direct injection (GDI) and port fuel injection (PFI) vehicles at both low and high ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rencheng; Hu, Jingnan; Bao, Xiaofeng; He, Liqiang; Lai, Yitu; Zu, Lei; Li, Yufei; Su, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Vehicle emissions are greatly influenced by various factors that are related to engine technology and driving conditions. Only the fuel injection method and ambient temperature are investigated in this research. Regulated gaseous and particulate matter (PM) emissions from two advanced gasoline-fueled vehicles, one with direct fuel injection (GDI) and the other with port fuel injection (PFI), are tested with conventional gasoline and ethanol-blended gasoline (E10) at both -7 °C and 30 °C. The total particle number (PN) concentrations and size distributions are monitored with an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI(+)). The solid PN concentrations are measured with a condensation particle counter (CPC) after removing volatile matters through the particle measurement program (PMP) system. The results indicate that decreasing the ambient temperature from 30 °C to -7 °C significantly increases the fuel consumption and all measured emissions except for NOx. The GDI vehicle exhibits lower fuel consumption than the PFI vehicle but emits more total hydrocarbons (THC), PM mass and solid PN emissions at 30 °C. The adaptability of GDI technology appears to be better than that of PFI technology at low ambient temperature. For example, the CO, THC and PM mass emission factors of the PFI vehicle are higher than those of the GDI vehicle and the solid PN emission factors are comparable in the cold-start tests at -7 °C. Specifically, during start-up the particulate matter emissions of the PFI are much higher than the GDI. In most cases, the geometric mean diameter (GMD) of the accumulation mode particles is 58-86 nm for both vehicles, and the GMD of the nucleation mode particles is 10-20 nm. The results suggest that the gaseous and particulate emissions from the PFI vehicle should not be neglected compared to those from the GDI vehicle especially in a cold environment.

  14. High-speed fuel tracer fluorescence and OH radical chemiluminescence imaging in a spark-ignition direct-injection engine.

    PubMed

    Smith, James D; Sick, Volker

    2005-11-01

    An innovative technique has been demonstrated to achieve crank-angle-resolved planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of fuel followed by OH* chemiluminescence imaging in a firing direct-injected spark-ignition engine. This study used two standard KrF excimer lasers to excite toluene for tracking fuel distribution. The intensified camera system was operated at single crank-angle resolution at 2000 revolutions per minute (RPM) for 500 consecutive cycles. Through this work, it has been demonstrated that toluene and OH* can be imaged through the same optical setup while similar signal levels are obtained from both species, even at these high rates. The technique is useful for studying correlations between fuel distribution and subsequent ignition and flame propagation without the limitations of phase-averaging imaging approaches. This technique is illustrated for the effect of exhaust gas recirculation on combustion and will be useful for studies of misfire causes. Finally, a few general observations are presented as to the effect of preignition fuel distribution on subsequent combustion.

  15. Optimization of a permeation-based microfluidic direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC).

    PubMed

    Erickson, Evan M; Mitrovski, Svetlana M; Gewirth, Andrew A; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2011-04-01

    A design for a passive, air-breathing microfluidic fuel cell utilizing formic acid (FA) as a fuel is described and its performance characterized. The fuel cell integrates high surface area platinum (cathode) and palladium-platinum (anode) alloy electrodes within a PDMS microfluidic network that keeps them fully immersed in a liquid electrolyte. The polymer network that comprises the device also serves as a self-supporting membrane through which FA and oxygen are supplied to the alloy anode and cathode, respectively, by passive permeation from external sources. The cell is based on a planar form-factor and in its operation exploits FA concentration gradients that form across the PDMS membrane. These latter gradients allow the device to operate stably, producing a nearly constant limiting power density of ~0.2 mW/cm², without driven laminar flow of fluids or the incorporation of an in-channel separator between the anodic and the cathodic compartments. The power output of this elementary device in air is subject to electrolyte mass transport impacts, which can be reduced for a given design rule by decreasing the internal ohmic resistance of the cell. The results suggest that operational stability can be improved by decreasing the kinetic losses imposed on the cathode side of the cell due to FA crossover and modalities for doing so, such as by increasing the efficiency of fuel capture at the anode.

  16. Direction on characterization of fuel debris for defueling process in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Kimihiko; Kitagaki, Toru; Ikeuchi, Hirotomo; Wakui, Ryohei; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Kaji, Naoya; Koizumi, Kenji; Washiya, Tadahiro

    2013-07-01

    For the decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (1F), defueling of the fuel debris in the reactor core of Units 1-3 is planned to start within 10 years. Preferential items in the characterization of the fuel debris were identified for this work, in which the procedure and handling tools were assumed on the basis of information on 1F and experience after the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. The candidates for defueling tools for 1F were selected from among the TMI- 2 defueling tools. It was found that they could be categorized into six groups according to their operating principles. The important properties of the fuel debris for defueling were selected considering the effect of the target materials on the tool performance. The selected properties are shape, size, density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, melting point, hardness, elastic modulus, and fracture toughness. Of these properties, the mechanical properties (hardness, elastic modulus, fracture toughness) were identified as preferential items, because too few data on these characteristics of fuel debris are available in past severe accident studies. (authors)

  17. Electrode and interconnect for miniature fuel cells using direct methanol feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Clara, Filiberto (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An improved system for interconnects in a fuel cell. In one embodiment, the membranes are located in parallel with one another, and current flow between them is facilitated by interconnects. In another embodiment, all of the current flow is through the interconnects which are located on the membranes. The interconnects are located between two electrodes.

  18. Ni modified ceramic anodes for direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Xiao, Guoliang; Chen, Fanglin

    2016-01-19

    In accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a method for fabricating a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The method includes synthesizing a composition having a perovskite present therein. The method further includes applying the composition on an electrolyte support to form an anode and applying Ni to the composition on the anode.

  19. Power conversion and quality of the Santa Clara 2 MW direct carbonate fuel cell demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Skok, A.J.; Abueg, R.Z.; Schwartz, P.

    1996-12-31

    The Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is the first application of a commercial-scale carbonate fuel cell power plant on a US electric utility system. It is also the largest fuel cell power plant ever operated in the United States. The 2MW plant, located in Santa Clara, California, utilizes carbonate fuel cell technology developed by Energy Research Corporation (ERC) of Danbury, Connecticut. The ultimate goal of a fuel cell power plant is to deliver usable power into an electrical distribution system. The power conversion sub-system does this for the Santa Clara Demonstration Plant. A description of this sub-system and its capabilities follows. The sub-system has demonstrated the capability to deliver real power, reactive power and to absorb reactive power on a utility grid. The sub-system can be operated in the same manner as a conventional rotating generator except with enhanced capabilities for reactive power. Measurements demonstrated the power quality from the plant in various operating modes was high quality utility grade power.

  20. Alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell performance using alkali-impregnated polyvinyl alcohol/functionalized carbon nano-tube solid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Yi; Lin, Jia-Shiun; Pan, Wen-Han; Shih, Chao-Ming; Liu, Ying-Ling; Lue, Shingjiang Jessie

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the application of a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/functionalized carbon nano-tubes (m-CNTs) composite in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells (ADEFC). The m-CNTs are functionalized with PVA using the ozone mediation method, and the PVA composite containing the modified CNTs is prepared. Adding m-CNT into the PVA matrix enhances the alkaline uptake and the ionic conductivity of the KOH-doped electrolyte. Meanwhile, the m-CNT-containing membrane exhibited a lower swelling ratio and suppressed ethanol permeability compared to the pristine PVA film. The optimal condition for the ADEFC is determined to be under operation at an anode feed of 3 M ethanol in a 5 M KOH solution (at a flow rate of 5 cm3 min-1) with a cathode feed of moisturized oxygen (with a flow rate of 100 cm3 min-1) and the KOH-doped PVA/m-CNT electrolyte. We achieved a peak power density value of 65 mW cm-2 at 60 °C, which is the highest among the ADEFC literature data and several times higher than the proton-exchange direct ethanol fuel cells using sulfonated membrane electrolytes. Therefore, the KOH-doped PVA/m-CNT electrolyte is a suitable solid electrolyte for ADEFCs and has potential for commercialization in alkaline fuel cell applications.

  1. Biobutanol as Fuel for Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells-Investigation of Sn-Modified Pt Catalyst for Butanol Electro-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Puthiyapura, Vinod Kumar; Brett, Dan J L; Russell, Andrea E; Lin, Wen-Feng; Hardacre, Christopher

    2016-05-25

    Direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs) mostly use low molecular weight alcohols such as methanol and ethanol as fuels. However, short-chain alcohol molecules have a relative high membrane crossover rate in DAFCs and a low energy density. Long chain alcohols such as butanol have a higher energy density, as well as a lower membrane crossover rate compared to methanol and ethanol. Although a significant number of studies have been dedicated to low molecular weight alcohols in DAFCs, very few studies are available for longer chain alcohols such as butanol. A significant development in the production of biobutanol and its proposed application as an alternative fuel to gasoline in the past decade makes butanol an interesting candidate fuel for fuel cells. Different butanol isomers were compared in this study on various Pt and PtSn bimetallic catalysts for their electro-oxidation activities in acidic media. Clear distinctive behaviors were observed for each of the different butanol isomers using cyclic voltammetry (CV), indicating a difference in activity and the mechanism of oxidation. The voltammograms of both n-butanol and iso-butanol showed similar characteristic features, indicating a similar reaction mechanism, whereas 2-butanol showed completely different features; for example, it did not show any indication of poisoning. Ter-butanol was found to be inactive for oxidation on Pt. In situ FTIR and CV analysis showed that OHads was essential for the oxidation of primary butanol isomers which only forms at high potentials on Pt. In order to enhance the water oxidation and produce OHads at lower potentials, Pt was modified by the oxophilic metal Sn and the bimetallic PtSn was studied for the oxidation of butanol isomers. A significant enhancement in the oxidation of the 1° butanol isomers was observed on addition of Sn to the Pt, resulting in an oxidation peak at a potential ∼520 mV lower than that found on pure Pt. The higher activity of PtSn was attributed to the

  2. Biobutanol as Fuel for Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells-Investigation of Sn-Modified Pt Catalyst for Butanol Electro-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Puthiyapura, Vinod Kumar; Brett, Dan J L; Russell, Andrea E; Lin, Wen-Feng; Hardacre, Christopher

    2016-05-25

    Direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs) mostly use low molecular weight alcohols such as methanol and ethanol as fuels. However, short-chain alcohol molecules have a relative high membrane crossover rate in DAFCs and a low energy density. Long chain alcohols such as butanol have a higher energy density, as well as a lower membrane crossover rate compared to methanol and ethanol. Although a significant number of studies have been dedicated to low molecular weight alcohols in DAFCs, very few studies are available for longer chain alcohols such as butanol. A significant development in the production of biobutanol and its proposed application as an alternative fuel to gasoline in the past decade makes butanol an interesting candidate fuel for fuel cells. Different butanol isomers were compared in this study on various Pt and PtSn bimetallic catalysts for their electro-oxidation activities in acidic media. Clear distinctive behaviors were observed for each of the different butanol isomers using cyclic voltammetry (CV), indicating a difference in activity and the mechanism of oxidation. The voltammograms of both n-butanol and iso-butanol showed similar characteristic features, indicating a similar reaction mechanism, whereas 2-butanol showed completely different features; for example, it did not show any indication of poisoning. Ter-butanol was found to be inactive for oxidation on Pt. In situ FTIR and CV analysis showed that OHads was essential for the oxidation of primary butanol isomers which only forms at high potentials on Pt. In order to enhance the water oxidation and produce OHads at lower potentials, Pt was modified by the oxophilic metal Sn and the bimetallic PtSn was studied for the oxidation of butanol isomers. A significant enhancement in the oxidation of the 1° butanol isomers was observed on addition of Sn to the Pt, resulting in an oxidation peak at a potential ∼520 mV lower than that found on pure Pt. The higher activity of PtSn was attributed to the

  3. Structure determination of ultra dense magnesium borohydride: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jing; Duan, Defang; Jin, Xilian; Bao, Kuo; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2013-06-01

    Magnesium borohydride (Mg(BH4)2) is one of the potential hydrogen storage materials. Recently, two experiments [Y. Filinchuk, B. Richter, T. R. Jensen, V. Dmitriev, D. Chernyshov, and H. Hagemann, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 50, 11162 (2011);, 10.1002/anie.201100675 L. George, V. Drozd, and S. K. Saxena, J. Phys. Chem. C 113, 486 (2009), 10.1021/jp807842t] found that α-Mg(BH4)2 can irreversibly be transformed to an ultra dense δ-Mg(BH4)2 under high pressure. Its volumetric hydrogen content at ambient pressure (147 g/cm3) exceeds twice of DOE's (U.S. Department of Energy) target (70 g/cm3) and that of α-Mg(BH4)2 (117 g/cm3) by 20%. In this study, the experimentally proposed P42nm structure of δ-phase has been found to be dynamically unstable. A new Fddd structure has been reported as a good candidate of δ-phase instead. Its enthalpy from 0 to 12 GPa is much lower than P42nm structure and the simulated X-ray diffraction spectrum is in satisfied agreement with previous experiments. In addition, the previously proposed P-3m1 structure, which is denser than Fddd, is found to be a candidate of ɛ-phase due to the agreement of Raman shifts.

  4. Aqueous sodium borohydride induced thermally stable porous zirconium oxide for quick removal of lead ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Nadiya B.; Nayak, Bibhuti B.

    2016-03-01

    Aqueous sodium borohydride (NaBH4) is well known for its reducing property and well-established for the development of metal nanoparticles through reduction method. In contrary, this research paper discloses the importance of aqueous NaBH4 as a precipitating agent towards development of porous zirconium oxide. The boron species present in aqueous NaBH4 play an active role during gelation as well as phase separated out in the form of boron complex during precipitation, which helps to form boron free zirconium hydroxide [Zr(OH)4] in the as-synthesized condition. Evolved in-situ hydrogen (H2) gas-bubbles also play an important role to develop as-synthesized loose zirconium hydroxide and the presence of intra-particle voids in the loose zirconium hydroxide help to develop porous zirconium oxide during calcination process. Without any surface modification, this porous zirconium oxide quickly adsorbs almost hundred percentages of toxic lead ions from water solution within 15 minutes at normal pH condition. Adsorption kinetic models suggest that the adsorption process was surface reaction controlled chemisorption. Quick adsorption was governed by surface diffusion process and the adsorption kinetic was limited by pore diffusion. Five cycles of adsorption-desorption result suggests that the porous zirconium oxide can be reused efficiently for removal of Pb (II) ions from aqueous solution.

  5. Aqueous sodium borohydride induced thermally stable porous zirconium oxide for quick removal of lead ions

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Nadiya B.; Nayak, Bibhuti B.

    2016-01-01

    Aqueous sodium borohydride (NaBH4) is well known for its reducing property and well-established for the development of metal nanoparticles through reduction method. In contrary, this research paper discloses the importance of aqueous NaBH4 as a precipitating agent towards development of porous zirconium oxide. The boron species present in aqueous NaBH4 play an active role during gelation as well as phase separated out in the form of boron complex during precipitation, which helps to form boron free zirconium hydroxide [Zr(OH)4] in the as-synthesized condition. Evolved in-situ hydrogen (H2) gas-bubbles also play an important role to develop as-synthesized loose zirconium hydroxide and the presence of intra-particle voids in the loose zirconium hydroxide help to develop porous zirconium oxide during calcination process. Without any surface modification, this porous zirconium oxide quickly adsorbs almost hundred percentages of toxic lead ions from water solution within 15 minutes at normal pH condition. Adsorption kinetic models suggest that the adsorption process was surface reaction controlled chemisorption. Quick adsorption was governed by surface diffusion process and the adsorption kinetic was limited by pore diffusion. Five cycles of adsorption-desorption result suggests that the porous zirconium oxide can be reused efficiently for removal of Pb (II) ions from aqueous solution. PMID:26980545

  6. Aqueous sodium borohydride induced thermally stable porous zirconium oxide for quick removal of lead ions.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Nadiya B; Nayak, Bibhuti B

    2016-03-16

    Aqueous sodium borohydride (NaBH4) is well known for its reducing property and well-established for the development of metal nanoparticles through reduction method. In contrary, this research paper discloses the importance of aqueous NaBH4 as a precipitating agent towards development of porous zirconium oxide. The boron species present in aqueous NaBH4 play an active role during gelation as well as phase separated out in the form of boron complex during precipitation, which helps to form boron free zirconium hydroxide [Zr(OH)4] in the as-synthesized condition. Evolved in-situ hydrogen (H2) gas-bubbles also play an important role to develop as-synthesized loose zirconium hydroxide and the presence of intra-particle voids in the loose zirconium hydroxide help to develop porous zirconium oxide during calcination process. Without any surface modification, this porous zirconium oxide quickly adsorbs almost hundred percentages of toxic lead ions from water solution within 15 minutes at normal pH condition. Adsorption kinetic models suggest that the adsorption process was surface reaction controlled chemisorption. Quick adsorption was governed by surface diffusion process and the adsorption kinetic was limited by pore diffusion. Five cycles of adsorption-desorption result suggests that the porous zirconium oxide can be reused efficiently for removal of Pb (II) ions from aqueous solution.

  7. Radiation-initiated conversion of paraffins to engine fuel: Direct and indirect initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metreveli, A. K.; Ponomarev, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    Formation of gasoline and diesel fuel has been investigated using three various radiation-induced ways: (1) cracking of wax, (2) synthesis from methane, (3) high-temperature conversion of wax dilute solution in methane. The wax, synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch method, initially contained a mixture of C17-C120 linear paraffins. The yield of wax conversion to liquid mixture (C4-C27 alkenes and 61.5% alkanes) via mode (1) was 0.83±0.09 μmole/J, whereas yield of gas conversion to liquid mixture (C5-C13 alkanes) via mode (2) was 0.95±0.02 μmole/J. In the dilute solution wax underwent indirect action of radiation. In comparison with (1) the mode (3) produces similar amount of lighter fuel containing 80% of alkanes (C5-C15). At the same time degree of methane fixation is almost three times higher.

  8. Application of green chemistry techniques to prepare electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kenichi; Wang, Joanna S; Wai, Chien M

    2010-03-25

    A series of green techniques for synthesizing carbon nanotube-supported platinum nanoparticles and their high electrocatalytic activity toward methanol fuel cell applications are reported. The techniques utilize either the supercritical fluid carbon dioxide or water as a medium for depositing platinum nanoparticles on surfaces of multiwalled or single-walled carbon nanotubes. The catalytic properties of the carbon nanotubes-supported Pt nanoparticle catalysts prepared by four different techniques are compared for anodic oxidation of methanol and cathodic reduction of oxygen using cyclic voltammetry. One technique using galvanic exchange of Pt(2+) in water with zerovalent iron present on the surfaces of as-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes produces a Pt catalyst that shows an unusually high catalytic activity for reduction of oxygen but a negligible activity for oxidation of methanol. This fuel-selective catalyst may have a unique application as a cathode catalyst in methanol fuel cells to alleviate the problems caused by crossover of methanol through the polymer electrolyte membrane. PMID:19827801

  9. A Direct Approach for Minimum Fuel Maneuvers of Distributed Spacecraft in Multiple Flight Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Steven P; Cooley, D. S.; Guzman, Jose J.

    2004-01-01

    In this work we present a method to solve the impulsive minimum fuel maneuver problem for a distributed set of spacecraft. We develop the method assuming a fully non-linear dynamics model and parameterize the problem to allow the method to be applicable to any flight regime. Furthermore, the approach is not limited by the inter-spacecraft separation distances and is applicable to both small formations as well as constellations. We assume that the desired relative motion is driven by mission requirements and has been determined a-priori. The goal of this work is to develop a technique to achieve the desired relative motion in a minimum fuel manner. To permit applicability to multiple flight regimes, we have chosen to parameterize the cost function in terms of the maneuver times expressed in a useful time system and the maneuver locations expressed in their Cartesian vector representations. We also include as an independent variable the initial reference orbit to solve for the optimal injection orbit to minimize and equalize the fuel expenditure of distributed sets of spacecraft with large inter-spacecraft separations. In this work we derive the derivatives of the cost and constraints with respect to all of the independent variables.

  10. Application of green chemistry techniques to prepare electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kenichi; Wang, Joanna S; Wai, Chien M

    2010-03-25

    A series of green techniques for synthesizing carbon nanotube-supported platinum nanoparticles and their high electrocatalytic activity toward methanol fuel cell applications are reported. The techniques utilize either the supercritical fluid carbon dioxide or water as a medium for depositing platinum nanoparticles on surfaces of multiwalled or single-walled carbon nanotubes. The catalytic properties of the carbon nanotubes-supported Pt nanoparticle catalysts prepared by four different techniques are compared for anodic oxidation of methanol and cathodic reduction of oxygen using cyclic voltammetry. One technique using galvanic exchange of Pt(2+) in water with zerovalent iron present on the surfaces of as-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes produces a Pt catalyst that shows an unusually high catalytic activity for reduction of oxygen but a negligible activity for oxidation of methanol. This fuel-selective catalyst may have a unique application as a cathode catalyst in methanol fuel cells to alleviate the problems caused by crossover of methanol through the polymer electrolyte membrane.

  11. Effect of the level of unsaturation and of alcohol modifications of plant oil fuels on the long-term performance of a direct injected diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Ziejewski, M.

    1985-01-01

    A 200-hour durability screening test recommended by the Engine Manufacturers Association was adopted to study the effects of four alternate fuels on the long-term performance of a four cylinder, direct injected diesel engine. Tested fuels included diesel fuel (control), a 25-75 blend by volume of alkali-refined sunflower oil and diesel fuel, a 25-75 blend by volume of high oleic safflower oil and diesel fuel, a nonionic sunflower oil-aqueous ethanol microemulsion, and a methyl ester of sunflower oil. Least squares regression procedures were used to analyze the long term effects of the test fuels on engine performance and to compare the test fuels. Time of the engine operation had a significant effect only on exhaust temperature. For all other response variables, time was not a factor. However, significant differences between tested fuels were observed. An analysis of variance was employed to compare CRC carbon and lacquer ratings, as well as wear of engine parts. The carbon deposits produced by the microemulsion and the 25-75 sunflower oil blend were significantly heavier than those generated by the other tested fuels. None of the fuels produced excessive engine wear. The 25-75 sunflower oil blend and the microemulsion caused problems with the fuel injection system.

  12. Effect of fuel density and heating value on ram-jet airplane range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henneberry, Hugh M

    1952-01-01

    An analytical investigation of the effects of fuel density and heating value on the cruising range of a ram-jet airplane was made. Results indicate that with present-day knowledge of chemical fuels, neither very high nor very low fuel densities have any advantages for long-range flight. Of the fuels investigated, the borohydrides and metallic boron have the greatest range potential. Aluminum and aluminum hydrocarbon slurries were inferior to pure hydrocarbon fuel and boron-hydrocarbon slurries were superior on a range basis. It was concluded that the practical difficulties associated with the use of liquid hydrogen fuel cannot be justified on a range basis.

  13. Improved performance of Pd electrocatalyst supported on three-dimensional nickel foam for direct ethanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, You-Ling; Zhao, Yong-Qing; Xu, Cai-Ling; Zhao, Dan-Dan; Xu, Mao-Wen; Su, Zhong-Xing; Li, Hu-Lin

    To improve the performance of direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs), a three-dimensional (3D), hierarchically structured Pd electrode has been successfully fabricated by directly electrodepositing Pd nanoparticles on the nickel foam (referred as Pd/Nickel foam electrode hereinafter). The electrochemical properties of the as-prepared electrode for ethanol oxidation have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The results show that the oxidation peak current density of the Pd/Nickel foam electrode is 107.7 mA cm -2, above 8 times than that of Pd film electrode at the same Pd loading (0.11 mg cm -2), and a 90 mV negative shift of the onset potential is found on the Pd/Nickel foam electrode compared with the Pd film electrode. Furthermore, the peak current density of the 500th cycle remains 98.1% of the maximum value for the Pd/Nickel foam electrode after a 500-cycle test, whereas it is only 14.2% for the Pd film. The improved electrocatalytic activity and excellent stability of the Pd/Nickel foam electrode make it a favorable platform for direct ethanol fuel cell applications.

  14. Recovery Act. Demonstration of a Pilot Integrated Biorefinery for the Efficient, Direct Conversion of Biomass to Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetzle, Dennis; Tamblyn, Greg; Caldwell, Matt; Hanbury, Orion; Schuetzle, Robert; Rodriguez, Ramer; Johnson, Alex; Deichert, Fred; Jorgensen, Roger; Struble, Doug

    2015-05-12

    The Renewable Energy Institute International, in collaboration with Greyrock Energy and Red Lion Bio-Energy (RLB) has successfully demonstrated operation of a 25 ton per day (tpd) nameplate capacity, pilot, pre-commercial-scale integrated biorefinery (IBR) plant for the direct production of premium, “drop-in”, synthetic fuels from agriculture and forest waste feedstocks using next-generation thermochemical and catalytic conversion technologies. The IBR plant was built and tested at the Energy Center, which is located in the University of Toledo Medical Campus in Toledo, Ohio.

  15. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Quarterly technical status report No. 11 for thrid quarter FY 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Foral, M.J.

    1990-12-31

    The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

  16. Fuel cell and lithium iron phosphate battery hybrid powertrain with an ultracapacitor bank using direct parallel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changjun; Xu, Xinyi; Bujlo, Piotr; Shen, Di; Zhao, Hengbing; Quan, Shuhai

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a novel fuel cell-Li-ion battery hybrid powertrain using a direct parallel structure with an ultracapacitor bank is presented. In addition, a fuzzy logic controller is designed for the energy management of hybrid powertrain aimed at adjusting and stabilizing the DC bus voltage via a bidirectional DC/DC converter. To validate the Fuel cell-Li-ion battery-Ultracapacitor (FC-LIB-UC) hybrid powertrain and energy management strategies developed in this study, a test station powered by a 1 kW fuel cell system, a 2.8 kWh Li-ion battery pack and a 330 F/48.6 V ultracapacitor bank is designed and constructed on the basis of stand-alone module. Finally, an Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule cycle is performed on this station and the experimental results show that: (i) the power distribution of FC system is narrowest and the power distribution of UC bank is widest during a cycle, and (ii) the FC system is controlled to satisfy the slow dynamic variation in this hybrid powertrain and the output of the LIB pack and UC bank is adjusted to meet fast dynamic load requirements. As a result, the proposed FC-LIB-UC hybrid powertrain can take full advantage of three kinds of energy sources.

  17. A SnO2-samarium doped ceria additional anode layer in a direct carbon fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Baolong; Zhao, Yicheng; Li, Yongdan

    2016-02-01

    The role of a SnO2-samarium doped ceria (SDC) additional anode layer in a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) with SDC-(Li0.67Na0.33)2CO3 composite electrolyte and lithiated NiO-SDC-(Li0.67Na0.33)2CO3 composite cathode is investigated and compared with a NiO-SDC extra anode layer. Catalytic grown carbon fiber mixed with (Li0.67Na0.33)2CO3 is used as a fuel. At 750 °C, the maximum power outputs of 192 and 143 mW cm-2 are obtained by the cells with SnO2-SDC and NiO-SDC layers, respectively. In the SnO2-SDC layer, the reduction of SnO2 and the oxidation of Sn happen simultaneously during the cell operation, and the Sn/SnO2 redox cycle provides an additional route for fuel conversion. The formation of an insulating dense interlayer between the anode and electrolyte layers, which usually happens in DCFCs with metal anodes, is avoided in the cell with the SnO2-SDC layer, and the stability of the cell is improved consequently.

  18. Fuel-Optimal Altitude Maintenance of Low-Earth-Orbit Spacecrafts by Combined Direct/Indirect Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-Ha; Park, Chandeok; Park, Sang-Young

    2015-12-01

    This work presents fuel-optimal altitude maintenance of Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) spacecrafts experiencing non-negligible air drag and J2 perturbation. A pseudospectral (direct) method is first applied to roughly estimate an optimal fuel consumption strategy, which is employed as an initial guess to precisely determine itself. Based on the physical specifications of KOrea Multi-Purpose SATellite-2 (KOMPSAT-2), a Korean artificial satellite, numerical simulations show that a satellite ascends with full thrust at the early stage of the maneuver period and then descends with null thrust. While the thrust profile is presumably bang-off, it is difficult to precisely determine the switching time by using a pseudospectral method only. This is expected, since the optimal switching epoch does not coincide with one of the collocation points prescribed by the pseudospectral method, in general. As an attempt to precisely determine the switching time and the associated optimal thrust history, a shooting (indirect) method is then employed with the initial guess being obtained through the pseudospectral method. This hybrid process allows the determination of the optimal fuel consumption for LEO spacecrafts and their thrust profiles efficiently and precisely.

  19. Consideration of critically when directly disposing highly enriched spent nuclear fuel in unsaturated tuff: Bounding estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Rechard, R.P.; Tierney, M.S.; Sanchez, L.C.; Martell, M.-A.

    1996-05-01

    This report presents one of 2 approaches (bounding calculations) which were used in a 1994 study to examine the possibility of a criticality in a repository. Bounding probabilities, although rough, point to the difficulty of creating conditions under which a critical mass could be assembled (container corrosion, separation of neutron absorbers from fissile material, collapse or precipitation of fissile material) and how significant the geochemical and hydrologic phenomena are. The study could not conceive of a mechanism consistent with conditions under which an atomic explosion could occur. Should a criticality occur in or near a container in the future, boundary consequence calculations showed that fissions from one critical event (<10{sup 20} fissions, if similar to aqueous and metal accidents and experiments) are quite small compared to the amount of fissions represented by the spent fuel itself. If it is assumed that the containers necessary to hold the highly enriched spent fuel went critical once per day for 1 million years, creating an energy release of about 10{sup 20} fissions, the number of fissions equals about 10{sup 28}, which corresponds to only 1% of the fission inventory in a repository containing 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal, the expected size for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  20. Characterization of the non-uniqueness of used nuclear fuel burnup signatures through a Mesh-Adaptive Direct Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skutnik, Steven E.; Davis, David R.

    2016-05-01

    The use of passive gamma and neutron signatures from fission indicators is a common means of estimating used fuel burnup, enrichment, and cooling time. However, while characteristic fission product signatures such as 134Cs, 137Cs, 154Eu, and others are generally reliable estimators for used fuel burnup within the context where the assembly initial enrichment and the discharge time are known, in the absence of initial enrichment and/or cooling time information (such as when applying NDA measurements in a safeguards/verification context), these fission product indicators no longer yield a unique solution for assembly enrichment, burnup, and cooling time after discharge. Through the use of a new Mesh-Adaptive Direct Search (MADS) algorithm, it is possible to directly probe the shape of this "degeneracy space" characteristic of individual nuclides (and combinations thereof), both as a function of constrained parameters (such as the assembly irradiation history) and unconstrained parameters (e.g., the cooling time before measurement and the measurement precision for particular indicator nuclides). In doing so, this affords the identification of potential means of narrowing the uncertainty space of potential assembly enrichment, burnup, and cooling time combinations, thereby bounding estimates of assembly plutonium content. In particular, combinations of gamma-emitting nuclides with distinct half-lives (e.g., 134Cs with 137Cs and 154Eu) in conjunction with gross neutron counting (via 244Cm) are able to reasonably constrain the degeneracy space of possible solutions to a space small enough to perform useful discrimination and verification of fuel assemblies based on their irradiation history.

  1. Investigation of nano Pt and Pt-based alloys electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells and their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo, Chunguang; Zhang, Wenbin; Shi, Xinghua; Ma, Chuxia

    2014-03-01

    The electrocatalysts used in micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC), such as Pt/C and Pt alloy/C, prepared by liquid-phase NaBH4 reduction method have been investigated. XC-72 (Cobalt corp. Company, U.S.A) is chosen as the activated carrier for the electrocatalysts to keep the catalysts powder in the range of several nanometers. The XRD, SEM, EDX analyses indicated that the catalysts had small particle size in several nanometers, in excellent dispersed phase and the molar ratio of the precious metals was found to be optimal. The performances of the DMFCs using cathodic catalyst with Pt percentage of 30wt% and different anodic catalysts (Pt-Ru, Pt-Ru-Mo) were tested. The polarization curves and power density curves of the cells were measured to determine the optimal alloy composition and condition for the electrocatalysts. The results showed that the micro direct methanol fuel cell with 30wt% Pt/C as the cathodic catalyst and n(Pt):n(Ru):n(Mo) = 3:2:2 PtRuMo/C as the anodic catalyst at room temperature using 2.0mol/L methanol solution has the best performances.

  2. Phosphorus-doped glass proton exchange membranes for low temperature direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Shruti; Mustain, William E.; Park, SeongHo; Kohl, Paul A.

    Phosphorus-doped silicon dioxide thin films were used as ion exchange membranes in low temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Phosphorus-doped silicon dioxide glass (PSG) was deposited via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The plasma deposition of PSG films allows for low temperature fabrication that is compatible with current microelectronic industrial processing. SiH 4, PH 3 and N 2O were used as the reactant gases. The effect of plasma deposition parameters, substrate temperature, RF power, and chamber pressure, on the ionic conductivity of the PSG films is elucidated. PSG conductivities as high as 2.54 × 10 -4 S cm -1 were realized, which is 250 times higher than the conductivity of pure SiO 2 films (1 × 10 -6 S cm -1) under identical deposition conditions. The higher conductivity films were deposited at low temperature, moderate pressure, limited reactant gas flow rate, and high RF power.

  3. Chiral Compounds and Green Chemistry in Undergraduate Organic Laboratories: Reduction of a Ketone by Sodium Borohydride and Baker's Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Nicola; Clague, Allen; Schwarz, Kimberly

    2002-06-01

    We describe an integrated set of experiments for the undergraduate organic laboratory that allows students to compare and contrast biological and chemical means of introducing chirality into a molecule. The racemic reduction of ethyl acetoacetate with sodium borohydride and the same reduction in the presence of a tartaric acid ligand are described, and a capillary gas chromatography column packed with a chiral material for product analysis is introduced. The results of these two hydride reactions are compared with the results of a common undergraduate experiment, the baker's yeast reduction of ethyl acetoacetate.

  4. Direct electron transfer with yeast cells and construction of a mediatorless microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Prasad, D; Arun, S; Murugesan, M; Padmanaban, S; Satyanarayanan, R S; Berchmans, Sheela; Yegnaraman, V

    2007-05-15

    The direct electron transfer exhibited by the yeast cells, Hansenula anomala has been demonstrated using the electrochemical technique cyclic voltammetry by immobilizing the microorganisms by two different methods viz., physical adsorption and covalent linkage. The analysis of redox enzymes present in the outer membrane of the microorganisms has been carried out in this work. This paper demonstrates that yeast cells with redox enzymes present in their outer membrane are capable of communicating directly with the electrode surface and contribute to current generation in a mediatorless biofuel cells. The efficiency of current generation has been evaluated using three anode materials.

  5. Direct sulfation of limestone based on oxy-fuel combustion technology

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.M.; Zhao, C.S.; Liu, S.T.; Wang, C.B.

    2009-10-15

    With limestone as the sorbent, the sulfation reaction can proceed via two different routes depending on whether calcination of the limestone takes place under the given reaction conditions. The direct sulfation reaction is defined as the sulfation reaction between sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and limestone in an uncalcined state. This reaction, based on oxyfuel combustion technology, was studied by thermogravimetric analysis. Surface morphologies of the limestone particles after sulfation were examined by a scanning electron microscope. Results show that there are more pores or gaps in the product layer formed by direct sulfation of limestone than by indirect sulfation, which can be attributed to the generation of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) at a reaction interface. Compared with indirect sulfation, direct sulfation of limestone can yield much higher conversion and has a much higher reaction rate. For direct sulfation, the greater porosity in the product layer greatly reduces the solid-state ion diffusion distance, resulting in a higher reaction rate and higher conversion.

  6. Directly applicable microbial fuel cells in aeration tank for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jaehwan; Choi, Soojung; Yu, Hana; Kim, Hyosoo; Kim, Changwon

    2010-04-01

    The application of microbial fuel cell (MFC) for wastewater treatment is a promising strategy for the simultaneous treatment of pollutants and generation of electricity. However, for practical application, there are several limitations to the MFC that involve biological and engineering aspects. In this study, a single-chambered MFC able to submerge into the aeration tank of the activated sludge process was developed to optimize the cell configuration and electrode materials. Among four MFCs with different electrode materials, the MFC with a graphite felt (GF) anode and a GF cathode showed the highest power density of 16.7 W m(-3) and the lowest internal resistance of 17 Omega. When the blower was stopped to evaluate the effect of mixing intensity, the concentration of dissolved oxygen nevertheless remained at 8 mg O2 L(-1), and the cell voltage of MFCs dropped rapidly and reached 30 mV. However, the cell voltage immediately returned to around 200 mV after the blowing of air. The MFCs with a GF cathode were sensitive to mixing intensity. At the very low concentration of 0.2 mg O2 L(-1), the cell voltage remained at a high level of 200 mV when the oxygen close to the cathode remained and mixing was sufficient.

  7. Development of Enterobacter aerogenes fuel cells: from in situ biohydrogen oxidization to direct electroactive biofilm.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Li; Zhou, Shungui; Yuan, Yong; Liu, Tinglin; Wu, Zhifeng; Cheng, Jiong

    2011-01-01

    This study described an Enterobacter aerogenes-catalyzed microbial fuel cell (MFC) with a carbon-based anode that exhibited a maximum power density of 2.51 W/m(3) in the absence of artificial electron mediators. The MFC was started up rapidly, within hours, and the current generation in the early stage was demonstrated to result from in situ oxidation of biohydrogen produced by E. aerogenes during glucose fermentation. Over periodic replacement of substrate, both planktonic biomass in the culture liquid and hydrogen productivity decreased, while increased power density and coulombic efficiency and decreased internal resistance were unexpectedly observed. Using scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry, it was found that the enhanced MFC performance was associated with the development of electroactive biofilm on the anodic surface, proposed to involve an acclimation and selection process of E. aerogenes cells under electrochemical tension. The significant advantage of rapid start-up and the ability to develop an electroactive biofilm identifies E. aerogenes as a suitable biocatalyst for MFC applications.

  8. Reconstruction of limited computed tomography data of fuel cell components using Direct Iterative Reconstruction of Computed Tomography Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Axel; Kupsch, Andreas; Hentschel, Manfred P.; Manke, Ingo; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Arlt, Tobias; Grothausmann, Roman

    CT (computed tomography) reconstructions of fuel cell components of a yet unrivaled spatial resolution and quality are presented. This is achieved by application of the novel DIRECTT (Direct Iterative Reconstruction of Computed Tomography Trajectories) algorithm. We focus on two different key issues which essentially rule the fuel cell's durability on different length scales and physical interactions. On the resolution scale of some 100 μm agglomerations of condensed water in flow-field channels are detected by means of quasi- in situ neutron CT (after operation). Five orders of magnitude below nanometer sized Ru catalyst particles on carbon black support are visualized by electron tomography. Both types of experiments are especially adapted to the type of material involved but they are accompanied by severe deviations from ideal CT measuring conditions, as well. In order to overcome the tremendous reconstruction artifacts of standard algorithms, we employ DIRECTT which is described in detail. Comparisons of DIRECTT reconstructions to the conventional filtered back projection, prove the significant improvements in both experimental methods.

  9. Direct ceramic inkjet printing of yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte layers for anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomov, R. I.; Krauz, M.; Jewulski, J.; Hopkins, S. C.; Kluczowski, J. R.; Glowacka, D. M.; Glowacki, B. A.

    Electromagnetic drop-on-demand direct ceramic inkjet printing (EM/DCIJP) was employed to fabricate dense yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte layers on a porous NiO-YSZ anode support from ceramic suspensions. Printing parameters including pressure, nozzle opening time and droplet overlapping were studied in order to optimize the surface quality of the YSZ coating. It was found that moderate overlapping and multiple coatings produce the desired membrane quality. A single fuel cell with a NiO-YSZ/YSZ (∼6 μm)/LSM + YSZ/LSM architecture was successfully prepared. The cell was tested using humidified hydrogen as the fuel and ambient air as the oxidant. The cell provided a power density of 170 mW cm -2 at 800 °C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a highly coherent dense YSZ electrolyte layer with no open porosity. These results suggest that the EM/DCIJP inkjet printing technique can be successfully implemented to fabricate electrolyte coatings for SOFC thinner than 10 μm and comparable in quality to those fabricated by more conventional ceramic processing methods.

  10. Nickel-based anode with water storage capability to mitigate carbon deposition for direct ethanol solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Su, Chao; Ran, Ran; Zhao, Bote; Shao, Zongping; Tade, Moses O; Liu, Shaomin

    2014-06-01

    The potential to use ethanol as a fuel places solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) as a sustainable technology for clean energy delivery because of the renewable features of ethanol versus hydrogen. In this work, we developed a new class of anode catalyst exemplified by Ni+BaZr0.4Ce0.4Y0.2O3 (Ni+BZCY) with a water storage capability to overcome the persistent problem of carbon deposition. Ni+BZCY performed very well in catalytic efficiency, water storage capability and coking resistance tests. A stable and high power output was well maintained with a peak power density of 750 mW cm(-2) at 750 °C. The SOFC with the new robust anode performed for seven days without any sign of performance decay, whereas SOFCs with conventional anodes failed in less than 2 h because of significant carbon deposition. Our findings indicate the potential applications of these water storage cermets as catalysts in hydrocarbon reforming and as anodes for SOFCs that operate directly on hydrocarbons.

  11. Emerging methanol-tolerant AlN nanowire oxygen reduction electrocatalyst for alkaline direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, M.; Wang, J.; Li, J. R.; Wang, Y. G.; Tang, H. L.; Wang, W. J.

    2014-08-01

    Replacing precious and nondurable Pt catalysts with cheap materials is a key issue for commercialization of fuel cells. In the case of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), the methanol tolerance is also an important concern. Here, we develop AlN nanowires with diameters of about 100-150 nm and the length up to 1 mm through crystal growth method. We find it is electrochemically stable in methanol-contained alkaline electrolyte. This novel material exhibits pronounced electrocatalytic activity with exchange current density of about 6.52 × 10-8 A/cm2. The single cell assembled with AlN nanowire cathodic electrode achieves a power density of 18.9 mW cm-2. After being maintained at 100 mA cm-2 for 48 h, the AlN nanowire-based single cell keeps 92.1% of the initial performance, which is in comparison with 54.5% for that assembled with Pt/C cathode. This discovery reveals a new type of metal nitride ORR catalyst that can be cheaply produced from crystal growth method.

  12. Palladium and palladium-tin supported on multi wall carbon nanotubes or carbon for alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldes, Adriana Napoleão; Furtunato da Silva, Dionisio; Martins da Silva, Júlio César; Antonio de Sá, Osvaldo; Spinacé, Estevam Vitório; Neto, Almir Oliveira; Coelho dos Santos, Mauro

    2015-02-01

    Pd and PdSn (Pd:Sn atomic ratios of 90:10), supported on Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) or Carbon (C), are prepared by an electron beam irradiation reduction method. The obtained materials are characterized by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), Transmission electron Microscopy (TEM) and Cyclic Voltammetry (CV). The activity for ethanol electro-oxidation is tested in alkaline medium, at room temperature, using Cyclic Voltammetry and Chronoamperometry (CA) and in a single alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC), in the temperature range of 60-90 °C. CV analysis finds that Pd/MWCNT and PdSn/MWCNT presents onset potentials changing to negative values and high current values, compared to Pd/C and PdSn/C electrocatalysts. ATR-FTIR analysis, performed during the CV, identifies acetate and acetaldehyde as principal products formed during the ethanol electro-oxidation, with low conversion to CO2. In single fuel cell tests, at 85 °C, using 2.0 mol L-1 ethanol in 2.0 mol L-1 KOH solutions, the electrocatalysts supported on MWCNT, also, show higher power densities, compared to the materials supported on carbon: PdSn/MWCNT, presents the best result (36 mW cm-2). The results show that the use of MWCNT, instead of carbon, as support, plus the addition of small amounts of Sn to Pd, improves the electrocatalytic activity for Ethanol Oxidation Reaction (EOR).

  13. Moisturized anode and water management in a passive vapor-feed direct methanol fuel cell operated with neat methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaochun; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Aoyu; Yan, Zhiguo; Tang, Yong; Tang, Kairui

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the moisturized anode and water management of a vapor-feed direct methanol fuel cell operated with neat methanol. Three methods of water management are experimentally compared, including water storage in a fuel reservoir, active water vapor supply and water recovery from the cathode to the anode. A water management layer for water recovery is introduced to the cathode, which is made of a quasi-superhydrophobic sintered porous metal plate (SPMP) to enhance water back diffusion (WBD). Results prove that each of these methods can improve the cell performance. WBD enhancement based on the use of a SPMP is proven to be the most effective way. It is also found that combination of different methods may more promote the cell performance. Using a WBD enhancement layer under the condition of active water vapor supply can completely eliminate performance decline in the early stage of constant-load discharging. For fully-passive operation, a higher catalyst loading at the cathode helps retain stable performance when a WBD enhancement layer is used. Based on this design, the passive vapor-feed DMFC fed with neat methanol can achieve a maximum power density of 21 mW cm-2.

  14. Synthesis and structure of six-coordinate iron borohydride complexes supported by PNP ligands.

    PubMed

    Koehne, Ingo; Schmeier, Timothy J; Bielinski, Elizabeth A; Pan, Cassie J; Lagaditis, Paraskevi O; Bernskoetter, Wesley H; Takase, Michael K; Würtele, Christian; Hazari, Nilay; Schneider, Sven

    2014-02-17

    The preparation of a number of iron complexes supported by ligands of the type HN{CH2CH2(PR2)}2 [R = isopropyl (((i)Pr)PNP) or cyclohexyl ((Cy)PNP)] is reported. This is the first time this important bifunctional ligand has been coordinated to iron. The iron(II) complexes (((i)Pr)PNP)FeCl2(CO) (1a) and ((Cy)PNP)FeCl2(CO) (1b) were synthesized through the reaction of the appropriate free ligand and FeCl2 in the presence of CO. The iron(0) complex (((i)Pr)PNP)Fe(CO)2 (2a) was prepared through the reaction of Fe(CO)5 with ((i)Pr)PNP, while irradiating with UV light. Compound 2a is unstable in CH2Cl2 and is oxidized to 1a via the intermediate iron(II) complex [(((i)Pr)PNP)FeCl(CO)2]Cl (3a). The reaction of 2a with HCl generated the related complex [(((i)Pr)PNP)FeH(CO)2]Cl (4a), while the neutral iron hydrides (((i)Pr)PNP)FeHCl(CO) (5a) and ((Cy)PNP)FeHCl(CO) (5b) were synthesized through the reaction of 1a or 1b with 1 equiv of (n)Bu4NBH4. The related reaction between 1a and excess NaBH4 generated the unusual η(1)-HBH3 complex (((i)Pr)PNP)FeH(η(1)-HBH3)(CO) (6a). This complex features a bifurcated intramolecular dihydrogen bond between two of the hydrogen atoms associated with the η(1)-HBH3 ligand and the N-H proton of the pincer ligand, as well as intermolecular dihydrogen bonding. The protonation of 6a with 2,6-lutidinium tetraphenylborate resulted in the formation of the dimeric complex [{(((i)Pr)PNP)FeH(CO)}2(μ2,η(1):η(1)-H2BH2)][BPh4] (7a), which features a rare example of a μ2,η(1):η(1)-H2BH2 ligand. Unlike all previous examples of complexes with a μ2,η(1):η(1)-H2BH2 ligand, there is no metal-metal bond and additional bridging ligand supporting the borohydride ligand in 7a; however, it is proposed that two dihydrogen-bonding interactions stabilize the complex. Complexes 1a, 2a, 3a, 4a, 5a, 6a, and 7a were characterized by X-ray crystallography.

  15. Fuel cell-fuel cell hybrid system

    DOEpatents

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-09-23

    A device for converting chemical energy to electricity is provided, the device comprising a high temperature fuel cell with the ability for partially oxidizing and completely reforming fuel, and a low temperature fuel cell juxtaposed to said high temperature fuel cell so as to utilize remaining reformed fuel from the high temperature fuel cell. Also provided is a method for producing electricity comprising directing fuel to a first fuel cell, completely oxidizing a first portion of the fuel and partially oxidizing a second portion of the fuel, directing the second fuel portion to a second fuel cell, allowing the first fuel cell to utilize the first portion of the fuel to produce electricity; and allowing the second fuel cell to utilize the second portion of the fuel to produce electricity.

  16. Tin-oxide-coated single-walled carbon nanotube bundles supporting platinum electrocatalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ryan S; Higgins, Drew; Chen, Zhongwei

    2010-04-23

    Novel tin-oxide (SnO(2))-coated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles supporting platinum (Pt) electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation were developed for direct ethanol fuel cells. SnO(2)-coated SWNT (SnO(2)-SWNT) bundles were synthesized by a simple chemical-solution route. SnO(2)-SWNT bundles supporting Pt (Pt/SnO(2)-SWNTs) electrocatalysts and SWNT-supported Pt (Pt/SWNT) electrocatalysts were prepared by an ethylene glycol reduction method. The catalysts were physically characterized using TGA, XRD and TEM and electrochemically evaluated through cyclic voltammetry experiments. The Pt/SnO(2)-SWNTs showed greatly enhanced electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation in acid medium, compared to the Pt/SWNT. The optimal SnO(2) loading of Pt/SnO(2)-SWNT catalysts with respect to specific catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation was also investigated.

  17. The Fabrication of Flow Field Plates for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Using Lithography and Radio Frequency Sputtering.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ho; Kao, Mu-Jung; Chen, Chih-Hao; Cho, Kun-Ching; Hsu, Chun-Yao; Chen, Zhi-Lun

    2015-08-01

    This study uses lithography to etch flow fields on a single side of a printed circuit board (PCB) and combines a flow field plate with a collector plate to make innovative anode flow field plates and cathode flow field plates for a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). TiO2 thin film is also sputtered on the anode flow field plate using radio frequency (RF) sputtering. The experimental results show that the prepared DMFC has a better maximum power density of 11.928 mW/cm2. Furthermore, when a TiO2 thin film is sputtered on the flow field plate of the assembled DMFC, the maximum power density is 14.426 mW/cm2, which is actually 21% more than that for a DMFC with no TiO2 thin film coated on the flow field plate.

  18. A durable PtRu/C catalyst with a thin protective layer for direct methanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Yuzuru; Hayasaka, Sho; Koyama, Tsubasa; Nagao, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Konno, Mikio

    2010-11-15

    A methanol oxidation catalyst with improved durability in acidic environments is reported. The catalyst consists of PtRu alloy nanoparticles on a carbon support that were stabilized with a silane-coupling agent. The catalyst was prepared by reducing ions of Pt and Ru in the presence of a carbon support and the silane-coupling agent. The careful choice of preparatory conditions such as the concentration of the silane-coupling agent and solution pH resulted in the preparation of catalyst in which the PtRu nanoparticles were dispersively adsorbed onto the carbon support. The catalytic activity was similar to that of a commercial catalyst and was unchanged after immersion in sulfuric acid solution for 1000 h, suggesting the high durability of the PtRu catalyst for the anode of direct methanol fuel cells.

  19. Analysis of the electrochemical characteristics of a direct methanol fuel cell based on a Pt-Ru/C anode catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Arico, A.S.; Creti, P.; Mantegna, R.

    1996-12-31

    This paper deals with a vapour-feed direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) based on a Nafion 117{reg_sign} solid polymer electrolyte. Pt-Ru/C and Pt/C catalysts were employed for methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction, respectively. Structure and surface chemistry of catalysts were investigated by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Membrane/electrode assembly (M&E) was prepared by using a {open_quotes}paste process{close_quotes} method. Electrical power densities of about 150 mW cm{sup -2} were obtained at 95{degrees} C with Pt loadings of 0.8 and 0.5 mg cm{sup -2} at anode and cathode respectively.

  20. Enhanced metabolic and redox activity of vascular aquatic plant Lemna valdiviana under polarization in Direct Photosynthetic Plant Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Hubenova, Yolina; Mitov, Mario

    2015-12-01

    In this study, duckweed species Lemna valdiviana was investigated as a photoautotrophycally grown biocatalyst in recently developed Direct Photosynthetic Plant Fuel Cell. Stable current outputs, reaching maximum of 226±11 mА/m(2), were achieved during the operating period. The electricity production is associated with electrons generated through the light-dependent reactions in the chloroplasts as well as the respiratory processes in the mitochondria and transferred to the anode via endogenous electron shuttle, synthesized by the plants as a specific response to the polarization. In parallel, a considerable increase in the content of proteins (47%) and reserve carbohydrates (44%) of duckweeds grown under polarization conditions was established by means of biochemical analyses. This, combined with the electricity generation, makes the technology a feasible approach for the duckweed farming.

  1. Enhanced metabolic and redox activity of vascular aquatic plant Lemna valdiviana under polarization in Direct Photosynthetic Plant Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Hubenova, Yolina; Mitov, Mario

    2015-12-01

    In this study, duckweed species Lemna valdiviana was investigated as a photoautotrophycally grown biocatalyst in recently developed Direct Photosynthetic Plant Fuel Cell. Stable current outputs, reaching maximum of 226±11 mА/m(2), were achieved during the operating period. The electricity production is associated with electrons generated through the light-dependent reactions in the chloroplasts as well as the respiratory processes in the mitochondria and transferred to the anode via endogenous electron shuttle, synthesized by the plants as a specific response to the polarization. In parallel, a considerable increase in the content of proteins (47%) and reserve carbohydrates (44%) of duckweeds grown under polarization conditions was established by means of biochemical analyses. This, combined with the electricity generation, makes the technology a feasible approach for the duckweed farming. PMID:25129413

  2. Cross-linked polyelectrolyte for direct methanol fuel cells applications based on a novel sulfonated cross-linker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingyu; Zhang, Gang; Xu, Shuai; Zhao, Chengji; Han, Miaomiao; Zhang, Liyuan; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Zhongguo; Na, Hui

    2014-06-01

    A novel type of cross-linked proton exchange membrane of lower methanol permeation and high proton conductivity is prepared, based on a newly synthesized sulfonated cross-linker: carboxyl terminated benzimidazole trimer bearing sulfonic acid groups (s-BI). Compared to membranes cross-linked with non-sulfonated cross-linker (BI), SPEEK/s-BI-n membranes show higher IEC values and proton conductivities. Meanwhile, oxidative stability and mechanical property of SPEEK/s-BI-n membranes are obviously improved. Among SPEEK/s-BI-n membranes, SPEEK/s-BI-2 exhibits high proton conductivity, low swelling ratio (0.122 S cm-1 and 15.2% at 60 °C, respectively) and low methanol permeability coefficient. These results imply that the cross-linked membranes prepared with the newly sulfonated cross-linker are promising for the direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) application.

  3. Intermolecular ionic cross-linked sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) membranes containing diazafluorene for direct methanol fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yu; Gong, Chenliang; Qi, Zhigang; Li, Hui; Wu, Zhongying; Zhang, Yakui; Zhang, Shujiang; Li, Yanfeng

    2015-06-01

    A series of novel ionic cross-linking sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) membranes containing the diazafluorene functional group are synthesized to reduce the swelling ratio and methanol permeability for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications. The ionic cross-linking is realized by the interaction between sulfonic acid groups and pyridyl in diazafluorene. The prepared membranes exhibit good mechanical properties, adequate thermal stability, good oxidative stability, appropriate water uptake and low swelling ratio. Moreover, the ionic cross-linked membranes exhibit lower methanol permeability in the range between 0.56 × 10-7 cm2 s-1 and 1.8 × 10-7 cm2 s-1, which is lower than Nafion 117, and they exhibit higher selectivity than Nafion 117 at 30 °C on the basis of applicable proton conductivity.

  4. Deuterated analogues as internal reference compounds for the direct determination of benzo(a)pyrene and perylene in liquid fuels by laser-excited Shpol'skii spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yen Yang

    1981-11-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content of coal liquefaction products and other liquid fuels is usually assessed by measuring the benzo(a)pyrene content. In Shpol'skii effect spectrometry, PAHs and their deuterated analogues exhibit adequately resolved characteristic quasi-line spectra. The authors have used deuterated benzo(a)pyrene and perylene as externally added internal reference compounds to facilitate the direct determination of benzo(a)pyrene and perylene in liquid fuels.

  5. Performance of composite Nafion/PVA membranes for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollá, Sergio; Compañ, Vicente

    2011-03-01

    This work has been focused on the characterization of the methanol permeability and fuel cell performance of composite Nafion/PVA membranes in function of their thickness, which ranged from 19 to 97 μm. The composite membranes were made up of Nafion® polymer deposited between polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers. The resistance to methanol permeation of the Nafion/PVA membranes shows a linear variation with the thickness. The separation between apparent and true permeability permits to give an estimated value of 4.0 × 10-7 cm2 s-1 for the intrinsic or true permeability of the bulk phase at the composite membranes. The incorporation of PVA nanofibers causes a remarkable reduction of one order of magnitude in the methanol permeability as compared with pristine Nafion® membranes. The DMFC performances of membrane-electrode assemblies prepared from Nafion/PVA and pristine Nafion® membranes were tested at 45, 70 and 95 °C under various methanol concentrations, i.e., 1, 2 and 3 M. The nanocomposite membranes with thicknesses of 19 μm and 47 μm reached power densities of 211 mW cm-2 and 184 mW cm-2 at 95 °C and 2 M methanol concentration. These results are comparable to those found for Nafion® membranes with similar thickness at the same conditions, which were 210 mW cm-2 and 204 mW cm-2 respectively. Due to the lower amount of Nafion® polymer present within the composite membranes, it is suggested a high degree of utilization of Nafion® as proton conductive material within the Nafion/PVA membranes, and therefore, significant savings in the consumed amount of Nafion® are potentially able to be achieved. In addition, the reinforcement effect caused by the PVA nanofibers offers the possibility of preparing membranes with very low thickness and good mechanical properties, while on the other hand, pristine Nafion® membranes are unpractical below a thickness of 50 μm.

  6. Hydro*Star: A Directed Water-Cooled DD-Fueled IFE Fusion-Chamber Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C D

    2001-04-01

    We introduce a new IFE fusion-chamber concept called Hydro*Star that uses DT-ignited DD targets and a water blanket. The driver can be either a 13 to 16-MJ diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) with fast ignition, or a 4-MJ heavy-ion accelerator operating at a reprate 10 times faster than the fusion chamber to accumulate sufficient energy in storage rings to direct 40 MJ at the target. The driver employs a prepulse system to burn an ionized path through the ambient fusion-chamber vapors, whose operating pressure is about 20 atm. We assume that the targets, which have a yield of about 2800 MJ, can be indirectly driven with two-sided illumination. The blanket, which is 1 to 2-m thick and placed immediately inside the structural wall, is operated just over 100 C either in a liquid or frothed-liquid state, the latter being preferred to reduce stresses in the structural wall. The structural wall, at a radius of 4 to 5 m, is composed of low-carbon steels to avoid the stress-corrosion cracking problems that have plagued certain light-water-reactor (LWR) systems. The functions of the blanket are (1) to shield the structural wall and exterior components from neutron and gamma-ray target emissions, and (2) to supply water for the direct generation of steam. Each fusion pulse vaporizes nearly one-half centimeter of the inside surface of the water blanket, thereby creating hot steam which is vented directly from the fusion chamber into ordinary steam turbines. Thus, Hydro*Star operates just like a simple steam engine, with a basic reprate of only 0.8 Hz per GWe of net output. Because the steam temperature is 900 to 1200 K, the plant thermal efficiency is nearly 50%. This efficiency is much better than the typical 35-40% now being achieved in commercial reactors, and much better than the efficiencies estimated for previous fusion-chamber concepts except CASCADE (55%). Other advantages for the new concept include reduced plant radioactivity (reduced radionuclides inventory

  7. Direct numerical simulation of temporally evolving luminous jet flames with detailed fuel and soot chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Ramanan

    2011-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of 2D temporally-evolving luminous turbulent ethylene-air jet diffusion flames are performed using a high-order compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The simulations use a reduced mechanism derived from a detailed ethylene-air chemical kinetic mechanism that includes the reaction pathways for the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The gas-phase chemistry is coupled with a detailed soot particle model based on the method of moments with interpolative closure that accounts for soot nucleation, coagulation, surface growth through HACA mechanism, and oxidation. Radiative heat transfer of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and soot is treated by solving the radiative transfer equation using the discrete transfer method. This work presents preliminary results of radiation effects on soot dynamics at the tip of a jet diffusion flame with a particular focus on soot formation/oxidation.

  8. Fuel-air mixing and distribution in a direct-injection stratified-charge rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, J.; Bracco, F. V.

    1989-01-01

    A three-dimensional model for flows and combustion in reciprocating and rotary engines is applied to a direct-injection stratified-charge rotary engine to identify the main parameters that control its burning rate. It is concluded that the orientation of the six sprays of the main injector with respect to the air stream is important to enhance vaporization and the production of flammable mixture. In particular, no spray should be in the wake of any other spray. It was predicted that if such a condition is respected, the indicated efficiency would increase by some 6 percent at higher loads and 2 percent at lower loads. The computations led to the design of a new injector tip that has since yielded slightly better efficiency gains than predicted.

  9. Final Progress Report: Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO2.

    SciTech Connect

    James P. Barry; Peter G. Brewer

    2004-05-25

    OAK-B135 This report summarizes activities and results of investigations of the potential environmental consequences of direct injection of carbon dioxide into the deep-sea as a carbon sequestration method. Results of field experiments using small scale in situ releases of liquid CO2 are described in detail. The major conclusions of these experiments are that mortality rates of deep sea biota will vary depending on the concentrations of CO2 in deep ocean waters that result from a carbon sequestration project. Large changes in seawater acidity and carbon dioxide content near CO2 release sites will likely cause significant harm to deep-sea marine life. Smaller changes in seawater chemistry at greater distances from release sites will be less harmful, but may result in significant ecosystem changes.

  10. Direct numerical simulation of temporally evolving turbulent luminous jet flames with detailed fuel and soot chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoustre, Vivien; Arias, Paul; Roy, Somesh; Wang, Wei; Luo, Zhaoyu; Haworth, Dan; Im, Hong; Lu, Tianfeng; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Sankaran, Ramanan; Trouve, Arnaud

    2011-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of 2D temporally-evolving luminous turbulent ethylene-air jet diffusion flames are performed using a high-order compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The simulations use a reduced mechanism derived from a detailed ethylene-air chemical kinetic mechanism that includes the reaction pathways for the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The gas-phase chemistry is coupled with a detailed soot particle model based on the method of moments with interpolative closure that accounts for soot nucleation, coagulation, surface growth through HACA mechanism, and oxidation. Radiative heat transfer of CO2, H2O, and soot is treated by solving the radiative transfer equation using the discrete transfer method. This work presents preliminary results of radiation effects on soot dynamics at the tip of a jet diffusion flame with a particular focus on soot formation/oxidation.

  11. Genome and Transcriptome of Clostridium phytofermentans, Catalyst for the Direct Conversion of Plant Feedstocks to Fuels

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Elsa; Coppi, Maddalena V.; Hayes, James C.; Tolonen, Andrew C.; Warnick, Thomas; Latouf, William G.; Amisano, Danielle; Biddle, Amy; Mukherjee, Supratim; Ivanova, Natalia; Lykidis, Athanassios; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos; Henrissat, Bernard; Lau, Joanne; Schnell, Danny J.; Church, George M.; Leschine, Susan B.; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium phytofermentans was isolated from forest soil and is distinguished by its capacity to directly ferment plant cell wall polysaccharides into ethanol as the primary product, suggesting that it possesses unusual catabolic pathways. The objective of the present study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of biomass conversion to ethanol in a single organism, Clostridium phytofermentans, by analyzing its complete genome and transcriptome during growth on plant carbohydrates. The saccharolytic versatility of C. phytofermentans is reflected in a diversity of genes encoding ATP-binding cassette sugar transporters and glycoside hydrolases, many of which may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. These genes are frequently organized as operons that may be controlled individually by the many transcriptional regulators identified in the genome. Preferential ethanol production may be due to high levels of expression of multiple ethanol dehydrogenases and additional pathways maximizing ethanol yield. The genome also encodes three different proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments with the capacity to compartmentalize pathways that divert fermentation intermediates to various products. These characteristics make C. phytofermentans an attractive resource for improving the efficiency and speed of biomass conversion to biofuels. PMID:26035711

  12. Genome and Transcriptome of Clostridium phytofermentans, Catalyst for the Direct Conversion of Plant Feedstocks to Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Elsa; Coppi, Maddalena V.; Hayes, James C.; Tolonen, Andrew C.; Warnick, Thomas; Latouf, William G.; Amisano, Danielle; Biddle, Amy; Mukherjee, Supratim; Ivanova, Natalia; Lykidis, Athanassios; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos; Henrissat, Bernard; Lau, Joanne; Schnell, Danny J.; Church, George M.; Leschine, Susan B.; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2015-06-02

    Clostridium phytofermentans was isolated from forest soil and is distinguished by its capacity to directly ferment plant cell wall polysaccharides into ethanol as the primary product, suggesting that it possesses unusual catabolic pathways. The objective of our present study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of biomass conversion to ethanol in a single organism, Clostridium phytofermentans, by analyzing its complete genome and transcriptome during growth on plant carbohydrates. The saccharolytic versatility of C. phytofermentans is reflected in a diversity of genes encoding ATP-binding cassette sugar transporters and glycoside hydrolases, many of which may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. These genes are frequently organized as operons that may be controlled individually by the many transcriptional regulators identified in the genome. Preferential ethanol production may be due to high levels of expression of multiple ethanol dehydrogenases and additional pathways maximizing ethanol yield. The genome also encodes three different proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments with the capacity to compartmentalize pathways that divert fermentation intermediates to various products. Lastly, these characteristics make C. phytofermentans an attractive resource for improving the efficiency and speed of biomass conversion to biofuels.

  13. Genome and Transcriptome of Clostridium phytofermentans, Catalyst for the Direct Conversion of Plant Feedstocks to Fuels

    DOE PAGES

    Petit, Elsa; Coppi, Maddalena V.; Hayes, James C.; Tolonen, Andrew C.; Warnick, Thomas; Latouf, William G.; Amisano, Danielle; Biddle, Amy; Mukherjee, Supratim; Ivanova, Natalia; et al

    2015-06-02

    Clostridium phytofermentans was isolated from forest soil and is distinguished by its capacity to directly ferment plant cell wall polysaccharides into ethanol as the primary product, suggesting that it possesses unusual catabolic pathways. The objective of our present study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of biomass conversion to ethanol in a single organism, Clostridium phytofermentans, by analyzing its complete genome and transcriptome during growth on plant carbohydrates. The saccharolytic versatility of C. phytofermentans is reflected in a diversity of genes encoding ATP-binding cassette sugar transporters and glycoside hydrolases, many of which may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer.more » These genes are frequently organized as operons that may be controlled individually by the many transcriptional regulators identified in the genome. Preferential ethanol production may be due to high levels of expression of multiple ethanol dehydrogenases and additional pathways maximizing ethanol yield. The genome also encodes three different proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments with the capacity to compartmentalize pathways that divert fermentation intermediates to various products. Lastly, these characteristics make C. phytofermentans an attractive resource for improving the efficiency and speed of biomass conversion to biofuels.« less

  14. Integrated low emission cleanup system for direct coal-fueled turbines (electrostatic agglomeration)

    SciTech Connect

    Quimby, J.M.; Kumar, K.S.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this contract was to investigate the removal of SO[sub x] and particulate matter from direct coal fired combustion gas streams at high temperature and high pressure conditions. This investigation was to be accomplished through a bench scale testing and evaluation program for SO[sub x] removal and the innovative particulate collection concept of particulate growth through electrostatic agglomeration followed by high efficiency mechanical collection. The process goal was to achieve control better than that required by 1979 New Source Performance Standards. During Phase I, the designs of the combustor and gas cleanup apparatus were successfully completed. Hot gas cleanup was designed to be accomplished at temperature levels between 1800[degrees] and 2500[degrees]F at pressures up to 15 atmospheres. The combustor gas flow rate could be varied between 0.2--0.5 pounds per second. The electrostatic agglomerator residence time could be varied between 0.25 to 3 seconds. In Phase II, all components were fabricated, and erected successfully. Test data from shakedown testing was obtained. Unpredictable difficulties in pilot plant erection and shakedown consumed more budget resources than was estimated and as a consequence DOE, METC, decided ft was best to complete the contract at the end of Phase II. Parameters studied in shakedown testing revealed that high-temperature high pressure electrostatics offers an alternative to barrier filtration in hot gas cleanup but more research is needed in successful system integration between the combustor and electrostatic agglomerator.

  15. Polymer-directed Hybrid Nanostructures for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity and Solar Fuel Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Ha; Jang, Yoon Hee; Lee, Ji-Eun; Quan, Li Na; Jang, Yu Jin; Polymer Nanohybrid Materials Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    In this presentation, we introduce a comprehensive approach to the design and fabrication of hybrid nanostructures directed by functional polymers for photovoltaic, phoelectrochemical and electrocatalytic properties. A unique strategy to generate core-shell nanoparticles based on AuNPs decorated with PANI shell with uniformly distributed alloy metal NPs in the PANI shells was developed. We systematically investigate the structural alteration during the sequential synthetic process and compared the electrocatalytic performance with respect to Pt-decorated AuNP-PANI structures in terms of the oxygen reduction reaction. Aimed for an alternative photoanodes, hierarchical mesoporous carbon-TiO2 inverse opal nanostructures were synthesized by complementary colloid and block copolymer (BCP) self-assembly, where the triblock copolymer P123 acts simultaneously as template and carbon source. Analytical studies show that incorporation of carbon moieties into TiO2 creates a new energy level above the valence band of TiO2, resulting in an effective decrease in the band gap. A significant enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity was demonstrated in terms of the degradation of p-nitrophenol (~ 79 %) and photoelectrochemical water splitting.

  16. Genome and Transcriptome of Clostridium phytofermentans, Catalyst for the Direct Conversion of Plant Feedstocks to Fuels.

    PubMed

    Petit, Elsa; Coppi, Maddalena V; Hayes, James C; Tolonen, Andrew C; Warnick, Thomas; Latouf, William G; Amisano, Danielle; Biddle, Amy; Mukherjee, Supratim; Ivanova, Natalia; Lykidis, Athanassios; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos; Henrissat, Bernard; Lau, Joanne; Schnell, Danny J; Church, George M; Leschine, Susan B; Blanchard, Jeffrey L

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium phytofermentans was isolated from forest soil and is distinguished by its capacity to directly ferment plant cell wall polysaccharides into ethanol as the primary product, suggesting that it possesses unusual catabolic pathways. The objective of the present study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of biomass conversion to ethanol in a single organism, Clostridium phytofermentans, by analyzing its complete genome and transcriptome during growth on plant carbohydrates. The saccharolytic versatility of C. phytofermentans is reflected in a diversity of genes encoding ATP-binding cassette sugar transporters and glycoside hydrolases, many of which may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. These genes are frequently organized as operons that may be controlled individually by the many transcriptional regulators identified in the genome. Preferential ethanol production may be due to high levels of expression of multiple ethanol dehydrogenases and additional pathways maximizing ethanol yield. The genome also encodes three different proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments with the capacity to compartmentalize pathways that divert fermentation intermediates to various products. These characteristics make C. phytofermentans an attractive resource for improving the efficiency and speed of biomass conversion to biofuels.

  17. A review on durability issues and restoration techniques in long-term operations of direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, Asad; Scibioh, M. Aulice; Prabhuram, Joghee; An, Myung-Gi; Ha, Heung Yong

    2015-11-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) remain attractive among advanced energy conversion technologies due to their high energy density and simple system configuration. Although they made an early market entry but failed to attain a large-scale commercialization mainly because of their inferior performance sustainment in lifetime operations and high production costs. There have been lots of R&D efforts made to upgrade the long-term durability of DMFCs to a commercially acceptable standard. These rigorous efforts have been useful in gaining insights about various degradation mechanisms and their origins. This review first briefly describes the recent progress in lifetime enhancement of DMFC technology reported by various groups in academia and industry. Then, it is followed by comprehensive discussions on the major performance degradation routes and associated physico-chemical origins, and influence of operational parameters, together with the methods which have been employed to alleviate and restore the performance losses. Finally, a brief summary of the presented literature survey is provided in conjunction with some possible future research directions.

  18. High performance nano-Ni/Graphite electrode for electro-oxidation in direct alkaline ethanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Ahmed B.; Abdel-Samad, Hesham S.; Abdel Rehim, Sayed S.; Ahmed, Mohamed A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.

    2016-09-01

    Ni/Graphite electrocatalysts (Ni/G) are successfully prepared through electrodeposition of Ni from acidic (pH = 0.8) and feebly acidic (pH = 5.5) aqueous Ni (II) baths. The efficiencies of such electrodes are investigated as anodes for direct alkaline ethanol fuel cells through their ethanol electrooxidation cyclic voltammetric (CV) response in alkaline medium. A direct proportionality between the amount of the electrodeposited Ni and its CV response is found. The amounts of the deposited Ni from the two baths are recorded using the Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance (eQCM). The Ni/G electrodes prepared from the feebly acidic bath show a higher electrocatalytic response than those prepared from the acidic bath. Surface morphology of the Ni particles electrodeposited from feebly acidic bath appears in a nano-scale dimension. Various electrochemical experiments are conducted to confirm that the Ni/G ethanol electrooxidation CV response greatly depends on the pH rather than nickel ion concentration of the deposition bath. The eQCM technique is used to detect the crystalline phases of nickel as α-Ni(OH)2/γ-NiOOH and β-Ni(OH)2/β-NiOOH and their in-situ inter-transformations during the potentiodynamic polarization.

  19. Design rules for electrode arrangement in an air-breathing alkaline direct methanol laminar flow fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorson, Michael R.; Brushett, Fikile R.; Timberg, Chris J.; Kenis, Paul J. A.

    2012-11-01

    The influence of electrode length on performance is investigated in an air-breathing alkaline direct methanol laminar flow fuel cell (LFFC). Depletion of methanol at the electrode surface along the direction of flow hinders reaction kinetics and consequently also cell performance. Reducing the electrode length can decrease the influence of boundary layer depletion, and thereby, improve both the current and power densities. Here, the effect of boundary layer depletion was found to play a significant effect on performance within the first 18 mm of an electrode length. To further utilize the increased power densities provided by shorter electrode lengths, alternative electrode aspect ratios (electrode length-to-width) and electrode arrangements were explored experimentally. Furthermore, by fitting an empirical model based on experimentally obtained data, we demonstrate that a configuration comprised of a series of short electrodes and operated at low flow rates can achieve higher current and power outputs. The analysis of optimal electrode aspect ratio and electrode arrangements can also be applied to other microfluidic reactor designs in which reaction depletion boundary layers occur due to surface reactions.

  20. Efficient conversion of vicinal diols to alkenes by treatment of the corresponding dimesylates with a catalytic, minimally fluorous, recoverable diaryl diselenide and sodium borohydride

    PubMed

    Crich; Neelamkavil; Sartillo-Piscil

    2000-12-14

    In conjunction with sodium borohydride as stoichiometric reagent a catalytic quantity of bis(4-perfluorohexylphenyl) diselenide converts vicinal dimesylates to the corresponding alkenes in good yield on warming in ethanol. The diselenide is recovered in high yield by continuous fluorous extraction.

  1. Organic derivatives of Mg(BH4)2 as precursors towards MgB2 and novel inorganic mixed-cation borohydrides.

    PubMed

    Wegner, W; Jaroń, T; Dobrowolski, M A; Dobrzycki, Ł; Cyrański, M K; Grochala, W

    2016-09-28

    A series of organic derivatives of magnesium borohydride, including Mg(BH4)2·1.5DME (DME = 1,2-dimethoxyethane) and Mg(BH4)2·3THF (THF = tetrahydrofuran) solvates and three mixed-cation borohydrides, [Cat]2[Mg(BH4)4], [Cat] = [Me4N], [nBu4N], [Ph4P], have been characterized. The phosphonium derivative has been tested as a precursor for synthesis of inorganic mixed-metal borohydrides of magnesium, Mx[Mg(BH4)2+x], M = Li-Cs, via a metathetic method. The synthetic procedure has yielded two new derivatives of heavier alkali metals M3Mg(BH4)5 (M = Rb, Cs) mixed with amorphous Mg(BH4)2. Thermal decomposition has been studied for both the organic and inorganic magnesium borohydride derivatives. Amorphous MgB2 has been detected among the products of the thermal decomposition of the solvates studied, together with organic and inorganic impurities.

  2. Temperature-mediated phase transformation, pore geometry and pore hysteresis transformation of borohydride derived in-born porous zirconium hydroxide nanopowders

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Nadiya B.; Nayak, Bibhuti B.

    2016-01-01

    Development of in-born porous nature of zirconium hydroxide nanopowders through a facile hydrogen (H2) gas-bubbles assisted borohydride synthesis route using sodium borohydride (NaBH4) and novel information on the temperature-mediated phase transformation, pore geometry as well as pore hysteresis transformation of in-born porous zirconium hydroxide nanopowders with the help of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) isotherm and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images are the main theme of this research work. Without any surfactants or pore forming agents, the borohydride derived amorphous nature of porous powders was stable up to 500 °C and then the seed crystals start to develop within the loose amorphous matrix and trapping the inter-particulate voids, which led to develop the porous nature of tetragonal zirconium oxide at 600 °C and further sustain this porous nature as well as tetragonal phase of zirconium oxide up to 800 °C. The novel hydrogen (H2) gas-bubbles assisted borohydride synthesis route led to develop thermally stable porous zirconium hydroxide/oxide nanopowders with an adequate pore size, pore volume, and surface area and thus these porous materials are further suggested for promising use in different areas of applications. PMID:27198738

  3. Temperature-mediated phase transformation, pore geometry and pore hysteresis transformation of borohydride derived in-born porous zirconium hydroxide nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Nadiya B.; Nayak, Bibhuti B.

    2016-05-01

    Development of in-born porous nature of zirconium hydroxide nanopowders through a facile hydrogen (H2) gas-bubbles assisted borohydride synthesis route using sodium borohydride (NaBH4) and novel information on the temperature-mediated phase transformation, pore geometry as well as pore hysteresis transformation of in-born porous zirconium hydroxide nanopowders with the help of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) isotherm and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images are the main theme of this research work. Without any surfactants or pore forming agents, the borohydride derived amorphous nature of porous powders was stable up to 500 °C and then the seed crystals start to develop within the loose amorphous matrix and trapping the inter-particulate voids, which led to develop the porous nature of tetragonal zirconium oxide at 600 °C and further sustain this porous nature as well as tetragonal phase of zirconium oxide up to 800 °C. The novel hydrogen (H2) gas-bubbles assisted borohydride synthesis route led to develop thermally stable porous zirconium hydroxide/oxide nanopowders with an adequate pore size, pore volume, and surface area and thus these porous materials are further suggested for promising use in different areas of applications.

  4. Effect of CO and CO 2 impurities on performance of direct hydrogen polymer-electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Wang, X.

    Mechanisms by which trace amounts of CO and CO 2 impurities in fuel may affect the performance of direct hydrogen polymer-electrolyte fuel cell stacks have been investigated. It is found that the available data on CO-related polarization losses for Pt electrodes could be explained on the basis of CO adsorption on bridge sites, if the CO concentration is less than about 100 ppm, together with electrochemical oxidation of adsorbed CO at high overpotentials. The literature data on voltage degradation due to CO 2 is consistent with CO production by the reverse water-gas shift reaction between the gas phase CO 2 and the H 2 adsorbed on active Pt sites. The effect of oxygen crossover and air bleed in "cleaning" of poisoned sites could be modeled by considering competitive oxidation of adsorbed CO and H by gas phase O 2. A model has been developed to determine the buildup of CO and CO 2 impurities due to anode gas recycle. It indicates that depending on H 2 utilization, oxygen crossover and current density, anode gas recycle can enrich the recirculating gas with CO impurity but recycle always leads to buildup of CO 2 in the anode channels. The buildup of CO and CO 2 impurities can be controlled by purging a fraction of the spent anode gas. There is an optimum purge fraction at which the degradation in the stack efficiency is the smallest. At a purge rate higher than the optimum, the stack efficiency is reduced due to excessive loss of H 2 in purge gas. At a purge rate lower than the optimum, the stack efficiency is reduced due to the decrease in cell voltage caused by the excessive buildup of CO and CO 2. It is shown that the poisoning model can be used to determine the limits of CO and CO 2 impurities in fuel H 2 for a specified maximum acceptable degradation in cell voltage and stack efficiency. The impurity limits are functions of operating conditions, such as pressure and temperature, and stack design parameters, such as catalyst loading and membrane thickness.

  5. Impact of the European Union vehicle waste directive on end-of-life options for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, C.; Brandon, N. P.; van der Vorst, R.

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) may well be powering millions of cars by 2020. At its end-of-life, each car will have a redundant PEMFC stack. The EU vehicle waste directive sets tough recycling and re-use requirements for the cars of the future. The criteria for assessing the end-of-life options are based on technical, economic and environmental feasibility. The optimum strategy will require stack dismantling and separation of the major components. Steel and aluminium parts can enter the general recycling stream, but the membrane electrode assembly and bipolar plates will require a specialised recycling process. One option is to shred the MEA, dissolve and recover the membrane, burn off the carbon, and recycle the platinum and ruthenium catalysts using solvent extraction. The heaviest part of the PEMFC stack is the bipolar plates. If carbon fibre based, the bipolar plates could enter a fluidised bed recovery process where the constituent materials are recovered for re-use. The EU vehicle waste directive sets high recycling targets based on weight, and thus it is strongly advisable for the relatively heavy bipolar plates to be recycled, even though energy recovery by incineration may be a cheaper and possible more environmentally benign option. The EU vehicle directive will put pressure on the end-of-life options for the PEMFC stack to be weighted towards recycling and re-use; it will have a significant impact on the design and end-of-life options for the PEMFC. The overall effect of this pressure on the end-of-life treatment of the PEMFC and the consequential contribution to environmental life cycle impacts is discussed. It is concluded that a range of external pressures influence the selection of a suitable end-of-life management strategy, and while opportunities for re-use of components are limited, all components of the PEMFC stack could in principle be recycled.

  6. Microscale Interface Synthesis of Ni-B Amorphous Nanoparticles from NiSO4 by Sodium Borohydride Reduction in Microreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Peng, Jinhui; Meng, Binfang; Li, Wei; Liu, Bingguo; Luo, Huilong

    2016-09-01

    Amorphous nanoparticles have attracted a large amount of interest due to their superior catalytic activity and unique selectivity. The Ni-B amorphous nanoparticles were synthesized from aqueous reduction of NiSO4 by sodium borohydride in microscale interface at room temperature. The size, morphology, elemental compositions, and the chemical composition on the surface of Ni-B amorphous nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). All the results showed that the synthesized particles are Ni-B amorphous nanoparticles with uniform in size distribution and having good dispersion. The mean particle diameter of Ni-B amorphous nanoparticles was around 9 nm. The present work provides an alternative synthesis route for the Ni-B amorphous nanoparticles.

  7. Electrochemical and catalytic properties of Ni/BaCe0.75Y0.25O3-δ anode for direct ammonia-fueled solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Molouk, Ahmed Fathi Salem; Okanishi, Takeou; Muroyama, Hiroki; Matsui, Toshiaki; Eguchi, Koichi

    2015-04-01

    In this study, Ni/BaCe0.75Y0.25O3-δ (Ni/BCY25) was investigated as an anode for direct ammonia-fueled solid oxide fuel cells. The catalytic activity of Ni/BCY25 for ammonia decomposition was found to be remarkably higher than Ni/8 mol % Y2O3-ZrO2 and Ni/Ce0.90Gd0.10O1.95. The poisoning effect of water and hydrogen on ammonia decomposition reaction over Ni/BCY25 was evaluated. In addition, an electrolyte-supported SOFC employing BaCe0.90Y0.10O3-δ (BCY10) electrolyte and Ni/BCY25 anode was fabricated, and its electrochemical performance was investigated at 550-650 °C with supply of ammonia and hydrogen fuel gases. The effect of water content in anode gas on the cell performance was also studied. Based on these results, it was concluded that Ni/BCY25 was a promising anode for direct ammonia-fueled SOFCs. An anode-supported single cell denoted as Ni/BCY25|BCY10|Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3-δ was also fabricated, and maximum powder density of 216 and 165 mW cm(-2) was achieved at 650 and 600 °C, for ammonia fuel, respectively.

  8. Position dependent analysis of membrane electrode assembly degradation of a direct methanol fuel cell via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter; Zamel, Nada; Gerteisen, Dietmar

    2013-11-01

    The performance of a direct methanol fuel cell MEA degraded during an operational period of more than 3000 h in a stack is locally examined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Therefore, after disassembling the MEA is cut into small pieces and analyzed in a 1 cm2 test cell. Using a reference electrode, we were capable of measuring the anode and cathode spectra separately. The spectra of the segments at different positions do not follow a specified trend from methanol inlet to outlet of the stack flow field. The anode spectra were analyzed with an equivalent circuit simulation. The conductance of the charge transfer was found to increase with current density up to a point where a raising limitation process of the complex methanol oxidation dominates, which is not a bottleneck at low current density. Further, an increase of the double layer capacitance with current density was observed. The diffusion resistance was calculated as an effective diffusion coefficient in the order of 10-10 m2 s-1; implying that the diffusion limitation is not the bulk diffusion in the backing layer. Finally, the degree of poisoning of the catalysts by carbon monoxide was measured as a pseudo inductive arc and decreases with increasing current.

  9. Tuning the performance of direct methanol fuel cell membranes by embedding multifunctional inorganic submicrospheres into polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingtao; Zhang, Han; Jiang, Zhongyi; Yang, Xinlin; Xiao, Lulu

    A series of surface functionalized silica submicrospheres by distillation-precipitation polymerization were embedded into chitosan (CS) matrix to fabricate the hybrid membranes for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). SEM characterization indicated that the submicrospheres could disperse homogenously within the CS matrix via tuning the polymer/particle and particle/particle interfacial interactions. The incorporation of sulfonated silica and carboxylated silica led to the reduced fractional free volume (FFV), whereas the incorporation of quaternary aminated silica resulted in increased FFV in the hybrid membranes, which was confirmed by the free volume characteristics analysis using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The correlation between methanol crossover and FFV was established: the hybrid membranes with lower FFV displayed higher methanol resistance. Meanwhile, the correlation between the proton acceptor/donor capability and proton conductivity in the hybrid membranes was established. Compared with sulfonated silica and quaternary aminated silica, carboxylated silica possessed the optimum matching in proton acceptor and donor capabilities. Therefore, the membrane embedded with carboxylated silica displayed the highest proton conductivity. In particular, embedding carboxylated silica simultaneously reduced the methanol permeability by 63% and increased the proton conductivity by 40% in comparison with pure CS membrane.

  10. Nafion ® nanocomposite membranes: Effect of fluorosurfactants on hydrophobic silica nanoparticle dispersion and direct methanol fuel cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chi Hoon; Kim, Hong Keon; Lee, Chang Hyun; Park, Ho Bum; Lee, Young Moo

    Nafion ®-silica nanocomposite membranes are successfully prepared by adding hydrophobic silica nanoparticles to a Nafion ® solution. To distribute these nanoparticles evenly in the Nafion ® matrix, various fluorosurfactants of different ionic character are employed. Fluorosurfactants with acid groups such as phosphonic acid and sulfonic acid play an important role in simultaneously increasing the homogeneous dispersion of silica nanoparticles, enhancing proton conductivity, and reducing the methanol permeability of the nanocomposite membranes. Therefore, the dispersion properties of inorganic fillers such as silica can significantly affect nanocomposite performance in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications, whereas surfactants, if used properly, can improve the nanocomposite membrane properties. In particular, a commercial fluorosurfactant containing a sulfonic acid group (Zonyl ® TBS) at the end of the surfactant chain exhibits better miscibility with the Nafion ® ionomer. This feature results in a reduction in the dimensional change of the nanocomposite membrane due to relatively lower water swelling and significantly reduced methanol permeability through the membrane. A membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) prepared from a Nafion ®-silica nanocomposite membrane with TBS shows the highest DMFC performance in terms of voltage vs. current density (V- I) and power density vs. current density (P- I). The current densities at 0.4 V and 90 °C are 342, 508, and 538 mA cm -2 with 1, 3 and 5 M methanol being fed at the anode side, respectively.

  11. Methanol electro-oxidation on platinum modified tungsten carbides in direct methanol fuel cells: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Tian; Lin, Xiao; Chen, Zhao-Yang; Hu, P; Sun, Shi-Gang; Chu, You-Qun; Ma, Chun-An; Lin, Wen-Feng

    2015-10-14

    In exploration of low-cost electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), Pt modified tungsten carbide (WC) materials are found to be great potential candidates for decreasing Pt usage whilst exhibiting satisfactory reactivity. In this work, the mechanisms, onset potentials and activity for electrooxidation of methanol were studied on a series of Pt-modified WC catalysts where the bare W-terminated WC(0001) substrate was employed. In the surface energy calculations of a series of Pt-modified WC models, we found that the feasible structures are mono- and bi-layer Pt-modified WCs. The tri-layer Pt-modified WC model is not thermodynamically stable where the top layer Pt atoms tend to accumulate and form particles or clusters rather than being dispersed as a layer. We further calculated the mechanisms of methanol oxidation on the feasible models via methanol dehydrogenation to CO involving C-H and O-H bonds dissociating subsequently, and further CO oxidation with the C-O bond association. The onset potentials for the oxidation reactions over the Pt-modified WC catalysts were determined thermodynamically by water dissociation to surface OH* species. The activities of these Pt-modified WC catalysts were estimated from the calculated kinetic data. It has been found that the bi-layer Pt-modified WC catalysts may provide a good reactivity and an onset oxidation potential comparable to pure Pt and serve as promising electrocatalysts for DMFCs with a significant decrease in Pt usage. PMID:26351805

  12. Synthesis and characterization of Pt-MoO x -TiO2 electrodes for direct ethanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiu-Yu; Zhang, Jing-Chang; Cao, Xu-Dong; Jiang, Yuan-Sheng; Zhu, Hong

    2011-10-01

    To enhance the CO-tolerance performance of anode catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells, carbon nanotubes were modified by titanium dioxide (donated as CNTs@TiO2) and subsequently served as the support for the preparation of Pt/CNTs@TiO2 and Pt-Mo/CNTs@TiO2 electrocatalysts via a UV-photoreduction method. The physicochemical characterizations of the catalysts were carried out by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed probe ammonia molecules. The electrocatalytic properties of the catalysts for methanol oxidation were investigated by the cyclic voltammetry technique. The results show that Pt-Mo/CNTs@TiO2 electrode exhibits the highest performance in all the electrodes. It is explained that, the structure, the oxidation states, and the acid-base properties of the catalysts are influenced due to the strong interaction between Ti and Mo species by adding TiO2 and MoO x to the Pt-based catalysts.

  13. Microspheres assembled by KMn8O16 nanorods and their catalytic oxygen reduction activity in direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yuan; Yang, Xiaodong; Wang, Li; Liu, Yongning

    2014-12-01

    Microspheres assembled using cryptomelane-type KMn8O16 nanorods are synthesized via a facile template-free, single-step hydrothermal technique. The synthesized KMn8O16 generates nanorods 10-20 nm in diameter and approximately 300-1000 nm long. The rods self-assemble to form microspheres of 2-6 μm in diameters. The electron transfer number for KMn8O16 during the ORR is approximately 3.98 at 0.5 V vs. Hg/HgO, and the H2O2 percentage is 0.66%. Moreover, a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is built using KMn8O16 as cathodic catalyst, PtRu/C alloy as the anodic catalyst and a polymer fiber membrane (PFM) instead of a conventional polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM). The peak power densities (43.3 mW cm-2 and 153.9 mW cm-2) have been achieved at 25 °C and 70 °C, respectively. KMn8O16 shows good electrocatalytic activity and stability during oxygen reduction in alkaline solutions and demonstrates tolerance toward methanol poisoning.

  14. Open- and closed-circuit study of an intermediate temperature SOFC directly fueled with simulated biogas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yentekakis, Ioannis V.

    An intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) based on a gadolinia doped ceria (GDC) solid electrolyte, a Ni(Au)-GDC cermet anode and a La 0.54Sr 0.46MnO 3 perovskite cathode was tested at 600 and 640 °C on direct feed of simulated biogas mixtures. The catalytic (open-circuit) rate of the methane dry (CO 2)-reforming reaction over Ni(Au)-GDC anode was found to be maximized at about equimolar CH 4/CO 2 feed ratio. Cell power density up to 60 mW cm -2, at a cell voltage of 445 mV and a current density of 135 mA cm -2 at 640 °C, has been obtained under closed-circuit cell operation at this optimal feed ratio. Carbon deposition was found not to downgrade cell output characteristics under closed-circuit conditions at constant external loads for ∼120 h, preceded by open- or closed-circuit operation for ∼100 additional hours.

  15. An algebraic model on the performance of a direct methanol fuel cell with consideration of methanol crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ken-Ming

    An algebraic one-dimensional model on the membrane-electrode-assembly (MEA) of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is proposed. Non-linear regression procedure was imposed on the model to retrieve important parameters: solid polymer electrolyte conductivity κ m, exchange current density of methanol electro-oxidation at anode catalyst surface i oM,ref, and mass diffusivity of methanol in aqueous phase within the porous electrode D a that correspond to the experimentally measured polarization curves. Although numerical iteration is required for a complete solution, the explicit relationships of methanol concentration, methanol crossover rate, oxygen concentration and cell discharge current density do provide a clear picture of the mass transport and electrochemical kinetics within the various porous media in the MEA. It is shown the cathode mixed potential induced by the parallel reactions of oxygen reduction and oxidation of crossover methanol elucidates the potential drop of the cathode and the decrease of the cell open circuit voltage (OCV). Methanol transport in the membrane is described by the diffusion, electro-osmosis, and pressure induced convection. Detailed accounts of the effects of anode methanol and cathode oxygen feed concentrations on the cell discharge performance are given with correlation to the physical structure and chemical compositions of the catalyst layers (CLs).

  16. Pt/Carbon Nanofiber Nanocomposites as Electrocatalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells: Prominent Effects of Carbon Nanofiber Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhizhou; Cui, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xinsheng; Wang, Qingfei; Shao, Yuyan; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-04-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with different microstructures, including platelet-CNFs (PCNFs), fish-bone-CNFs, and tube-CNFs, were synthesized, characterized and evaluated toward methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The CNFs studied here showed several structures in which various stacked morphologies as well as the ordering of their size and graphite layers can be well controlled. Platinum nanoparticles have been electrodeposited on CNFs surfaces, and their electrocatalytic activities toward MOR have been studied by using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and linear sweep voltammograms. Morphologies, textural properties, and the crystalline structure of the CNFs supports and catalysts have been characterized with transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The comparative tests conclude that Pt/PCNFs have the best electrocatalytic performance and good stability at room temperature. The high electrocatalytic activity and stability can be attributed to the specific microstructure of PCNFs, which have large numbers of edge-active carbon atoms on the surface of the CNFs as well as synergistic effects between CNFs and the platinum nanoparticles. The results suggest that PCNFs are excellent potential candidates as catalyst supports in direct methanol fuel cells.

  17. Direct electricity recovery from Canna indica by an air-cathode microbial fuel cell inoculated with rumen microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Zang, Guo-Long; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Xian-Wei; Teng, Shao-Xiang; Li, Wen-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2010-04-01

    Aquatic plants are widely used for phytoremediation, and effective disposal methods should be pursued for their utilization and to avoid further environmental pollution problems. This study demonstrated that, using an air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) inoculated with rumen microorganisms, electricity could be directly produced with a maximum power density of 0.405 W/m(3) from Canna indica (canna), a lignocellulosic aquatic plant rich in cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, without pretreatment. The mechanisms of the Canna indica degradation in the MFC were elucidated through analyzing the changes of canna structure and intermediates, that is, soluble sugars and volatile fatty acids (VFAs), in the electricity generation process. The results showed that lignin was partially removed and more cellulose became exposed on the sample surface during the electricity generation in the MFC. The electron transfer in this MFC was mainly completed through electron shuttling via self-produced mediators. This work presents an attempt to understand how complex substrates like aquatic plants are decomposed in an MFC during electricity generation. It might, hopefully, provide a promising way to utilize lignocellulosic biomass for energy generation.

  18. Polyol-synthesized PtRu/C and PtRu black for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Junsong; Sun, Gongquan; Shiguo, Sun; Shiyou, Yan; Weiqian, Yang; Jing, Qi; Yushan, Yan; Qin, Xin

    PtRu/C and PtRu black catalysts with nominal Pt:Ru atomic ratio of 1:1 are prepared by a modified polyol process (co-reduction of metal precursor salts) as anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Without the carbon support, PtRu nanoparticles tend to agglomerate, while the PtRu nanoparticles in PtRu/C have a good dispersion as shown by TEM. Both PtRu black and PtRu/C have the almost same alloy degree indicated by XRD, but PtRu supported on carbon could improve the influence of Ru on Pt toward methanol oxidization as shown by cyclic voltammetry. The microstructure of PtRu/C is further studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and the results indicate that the lattice constant of Pt in PtRu electrocatalyst has contracted despite a few parts of Pt not alloyed with Ru due to the lattice constant of Pt without contracting, which is further proved by the results of temperature-programmed reduction (TPR). Such parts of unalloyed Ru are further proved to have ability to reduce the methanol oxidation potential on Pt by comparing the catalytic behaviors of Pt/C and Pt + Ru/C prepared by mixing carbon with separately prepared Pt and Ru colloids. Moreover, the catalytic behaviors of PtRu black and PtRu/C are also compared with those of commercial ones.

  19. Facile synthesis of Pt-Pd@Silicon nanostructure as an advanced electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Jafari-Asl, M.; Rezaei, B.; Abarghoui, M. Mokhtari; Farrokhpour, H.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, platinum-palladium (Pt-Pd) is assembled in-situ on the surface of porous silicon flour (PSiF) through chemical reduction of PtCl62-/PdCl42- and oxidation of the precursor solution SiF64-. The components and the morphological properties of the Pt-Pd on PSiF is investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction techniques. In the next stage, screen printed graphene electrode (SPGE) is prepared by electro-reduction of exfoliated graphene oxide at the surface of a screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE), which is subsequently characterized by FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, FE-SEM, and electrochemical methods. Finally, a combination of Pt-Pd@PSi nanostructure and SPGE is used for the electro-oxidation of methanol in direct methanol fuel cell. The electrochemical results demonstrate that the Pt-Pd@PSiF-SPGE exhibits an excellent electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation. In addition, the electron transfer kinetic of methanol oxidation on Pt-Pd@PSiF-SPGE is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed that the surface of Pt-Pd@PSiF-SPGE is not affected (poisoned) by intermediate products such as CO.

  20. Preparation and properties of hybrid direct methanol fuel cell membranes by embedding organophosphorylated titania submicrospheres into a chitosan polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hong; Hou, Weiqiang; Wang, Jingtao; Xiao, Lulu; Jiang, Zhongyi

    Organophosphorylated titania submicrospheres (OPTi) are prepared and incorporated into a chitosan (CS) matrix to fabricate hybrid membranes with enhanced methanol resistance and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). The pristine monodispersed titania submicrospheres (TiO 2) of controllable particle size are synthesized through a modified sol-gel method and then phosphorylated by amino trimethylene phosphonic acid (ATMP) via chemical adsorption, which is confirmed by XPS, FTIR and TGA. The morphology and thermal property of the hybrid membranes are explored by SEM and TGA. The ionic cross-linking between the -PO 3H 2 groups on OPTi and the -NH 2 groups on CS lead to better compatibility between the inorganic fillers and the polymer matrix, as well as a decreased fractional free volume (FFV), which is verified by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The effects of particle size and content on the methanol permeability, proton conductivity, swelling and FFV of the membranes are investigated. Compared to pure CS membrane, the hybrid membranes exhibit an increased proton conductivity to an acceptable level of 0.01 S cm -1 for DMFC application and a reduced methanol permeability of 5 × 10 -7 cm 2 s -1 at a 2 M methanol feed.

  1. Enhancing the methanol tolerance of platinum nanoparticles for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells through a geometric design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yan; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Mastery over the structure of nanoparticles might be an effective way to enhance their performance for a given application. Herein we demonstrate the design of cage-bell nanostructures to enhance the methanol tolerance of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles while remaining their catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell-shell nanoparticles with Pt and silver (Ag) residing respectively in the core and inner shell regions, which are then agitated with saturated sodium chloride (NaCl) solution to eliminate the Ag component from the inner shell region, leading to the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a metal shell with nano-channels, which exhibit superior methanol-tolerant property in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction due to the different diffusion behaviour of methanol and oxygen in the porous metal shell of cage-bell structured nanoparticles. In particular, the use of remarkably inexpensive chemical agent (NaCl) to promote the formation of cage-bell structured particles containing a wide spectrum of metal shells highlights its engineering merit to produce highly selective electrocatalysts on a large scale for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells.

  2. Nickel and cobalt electrodeposited on carbon fiber cloth as the anode of direct hydrogen peroxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Cheng, Kui; Xiao, Xue; Yin, Jinling; Wang, Guiling; Cao, Dianxue

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fiber cloth (CFC) supported Ni and Co electrodes are prepared by electrodeposition (Ni/CFC and Co/CFC). Their catalytic performance for H2O2 electrooxidation in KOH solution is investigated and compared with Au/CFC electrode. Ni/CFC electrode exhibits higher catalytic activity than Au/CFC and Co/CFC electrodes. The performance of a direct peroxide-peroxide fuel cell (DPPFC) with Ni/CFC anode and Pd/CFC cathode is examined. The cell shows a peak power density of 21.6 mW cm-2 at 20 °C and 53.8 mW cm-2 at 50 °C. The cell performance is improved with the increase of anolyte and catholyte flow rate and operation temperature. Results indicates that the performance of DPPFC with low-cost Ni/CFC anodes is comparable with those using precious metal anodes, e.g., Au/CFC and Pd/CFC.

  3. Development and performance analysis of a metallic micro-direct methanol fuel cell for high-performance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yufeng; He, Hong; Li, Jianmin; Yuan, Zhenyu; Na, Chaoran; Liu, Xiaowei

    As a promising candidate for conventional micro-power sources, the micro-direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC) is currently attracting increased attention due to its various advantages and prospective suitability for portable applications. This paper reports the design, fabrication and analysis of a high-performance μDMFC with two metal current collectors. Employing micro-stamping technology, the current collectors are fabricated on 300-μm-thick stainless steel plates. The flow fields for both cathode and anode are uniform in shape and size. Two sheets of stainless steel mesh are added between the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and current collectors in order to improve cell performance. To avoid electrochemical corrosion, titanium nitride (TiN) layers with thickness of 500 nm are deposited onto the surface of current collectors and stainless steel mesh. The performance of this metallic μDMFC is thoroughly studied by both simulation and experimental methods. The results show that all the parameters investigated, including current collector material, stainless steel mesh, anode feeding mode, methanol concentration, anode flow rate, and operating temperature have significant effects on cell performance. Moreover, the results show that under optimal operating conditions, the metallic μDMFC exhibits promising performance, yielding a maximum power density of 65.66 mW cm -2 at 40 °C and 115.0 mW cm -2 at 80 °C.

  4. Preparation and characterization of novel nickel-palladium electrodes supported by silicon microchannel plates for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Fengjuan; Tao, Bairui; Sun, Li; Liu, Tao; You, Jinchuan; Wang, Lianwei; Chu, Paul K.

    A novel anode structure based on the three-dimensional silicon microchannel plates (Si-MCP) is proposed for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Ni-Pd nanoparticles produced by electroless plating onto the Si-MCP inner sidewalls and followed by annealing at 300 °C under argon serve as the catalyst. In order to evaluate the electroactivity of the nanocomposites, Ni-Pd/silicon composites synthesized by the same method are compared. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electrochemical methods are employed to investigate the Ni-Pd/Si-MCP anode materials. As a result of the synergetic effects rendered by the MCP and Ni-Pd nanoparticles, the Ni-Pd/Si-MCP nanocomposites exhibit superior electrocatalytic properties towards methanol electro-oxidation in alkaline solutions, as manifested by the negative onset potential and strong current response to methanol even during long-term cyclical oxidation of methanol. This new structure possesses unique and significant advantages such as low cost and integratability with silicon-based devices.

  5. Microwave assisted synthesis of surfactant stabilized platinum/carbon nanotube electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, M.; Schlange, A.; Kunz, U.; Turek, T.

    Platinum electrocatalysts deposited on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) with high loading were prepared using a microwave-assisted polyol reduction method and employed for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). A zwitterionic surfactant was used as a stabilizing agent for the formation of Pt nanoparticles. A uniform and narrow size distribution of highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles could be achieved by adjusting the weight ratio of surfactant to Pt precursor allowing for Pt loadings of up to 60 wt%. The heating time and the temperature for the ethylene glycol (EG) oxidation were found to be the key factors for depositing Pt nanoparticles homogeneously on carbon nanotubes. The smallest average particle diameter of 1.8 nm was obtained through microwave heating to 140 °C in 50 s. The structure, amount and morphology of the electrocatalysts were characterized with XRD, TGA, and TEM, respectively. Single cell DMFC measurements were performed in a membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) with 5 cm 2 active area and very low catalyst loading (0.25 mg cm -2 of noble metal on both anode and cathode). The DMFC performance of the surfactant stabilized cathode catalyst obtained by the new method described here revealed that the power density was three times higher than for a commercial catalyst used for comparison and two times higher than for an unstabilized CNT supported catalyst.

  6. Enhancing the methanol tolerance of platinum nanoparticles for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells through a geometric design

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yan; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Mastery over the structure of nanoparticles might be an effective way to enhance their performance for a given application. Herein we demonstrate the design of cage-bell nanostructures to enhance the methanol tolerance of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles while remaining their catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell-shell nanoparticles with Pt and silver (Ag) residing respectively in the core and inner shell regions, which are then agitated with saturated sodium chloride (NaCl) solution to eliminate the Ag component from the inner shell region, leading to the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a metal shell with nano-channels, which exhibit superior methanol-tolerant property in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction due to the different diffusion behaviour of methanol and oxygen in the porous metal shell of cage-bell structured nanoparticles. In particular, the use of remarkably inexpensive chemical agent (NaCl) to promote the formation of cage-bell structured particles containing a wide spectrum of metal shells highlights its engineering merit to produce highly selective electrocatalysts on a large scale for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells. PMID:26578100

  7. Design, fabrication and testing of an air-breathing micro direct methanol fuel cell with compound anode flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luwen; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhao, Youran; An, Zijiang; Zhou, Zhiping; Liu, Xiaowei

    2011-10-01

    An air-breathing micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC) with a compound anode flow field structure (composed of the parallel flow field and the perforated flow field) is designed, fabricated and tested. To better analyze the effect of the compound anode flow field on the mass transfer of methanol, the compound flow field with different open ratios (ratio of exposure area to total area) and thicknesses of current collectors is modeled and simulated. Micro process technologies are employed to fabricate the end plates and current collectors. The performances of the μDMFC with a compound anode flow field are measured under various operating parameters. Both the modeled and the experimental results show that, comparing the conventional parallel flow field, the compound one can enhance the mass transfer resistance of methanol from the flow field to the anode diffusion layer. The results also indicate that the μDMFC with an anode open ratio of 40% and a thickness of 300 µm has the optimal performance under the 7 M methanol which is three to four times higher than conventional flow fields. Finally, a 2 h stability test of the μDMFC is performed with a methanol concentration of 7 M and a flow velocity of 0.1 ml min-1. The results indicate that the μDMFC can work steadily with high methanol concentration.

  8. Corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel as a function of methanol concentration for direct methanol fuel cell bipolar plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lixia; Kang, Bin; Gao, Na; Du, Xiao; Jia, Linan; Sun, Juncai

    2014-05-01

    The corrosion behaviour of an AISI 304 stainless steel (304 SS) is investigated in aqueous acid methanol solutions (0.5 M H2SO4 + 2 ppm HF + x M CH3OH, x = 0, 1, 5, 10 and 20) at 50 °C to simulate the varied anodic operating conditions of direct methanol fuel cells. Electrochemical measurements including potentiodynamic polarisation, potentiostatic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests, are employed to analyse the corrosion behaviour. The results reveal that the corrosion resistance of 304 SS is enhanced in solutions with higher methanol content. Scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry data indicate that the surface corrosion on 304 SS is alleviated when the methanol concentration is increased. According to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Mott-Schottky analyses, the passive films formed on the 304 SS after potentiostatic tests in all the test solutions are composed of a duplex electronic structure with an external n-type semiconductor layer and an internal p-type semiconductor layer. Further analyses of the surface conductivity conducted by measuring the interfacial contact resistance between the 304 SS and carbon paper reveal that the passive film formed in the solution with higher methanol content exhibits lower conductivity.

  9. Fuel Effects on Combustion and Emissions of a Direct-Inection Diesel Engine Operating at Moderate to High Engine Speed and Load

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, James P; Szymkowicz, Patrick G.; Northrop, William F

    2012-01-01

    It is advantageous to increase the specific power output of diesel engines and to operate them at higher load for a greater portion of a driving cycle to achieve better thermal efficiency and thus reduce vehicle fuel consumption. Such operation is limited by excessive smoke formation at retarded injection timing and high rates of cylinder pressure rise at more advanced timing. Given this window of operation, it is desired to understand the influence of fuel properties such that optimum combustion performance and emissions can be retained over the range of fuels commonly available in the marketplace. It has been shown in previous studies that varying cetane number (CN) of diesel fuel has little effect on ignition delay at high engine load due to the domination of high cylinder temperature on ignition kinetics. The work here experimentally confirms that finding but also shows that emissions and combustion performance vary according to fuel reactivity. Data are examined from a direct-injection single cylinder research engine for eight common diesel fuels including soy-based biodiesel blends at two high load operating points with no exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and at a moderate load with four levels of EGR. It is shown in the work that at high engine load where combustion is controlled by mixing processes, CN and other fuel properties have little effect on engine performance, although lower CN fuels produce a small increase in noise, smoke and CO emissions. Biodiesel blends increase NOX emissions and decreases CO and smoke emissions at high load, but otherwise have little effect on performance. At moderate load, higher CN fuels are more tolerant to EGR due to their better chemical reactivity at retarded injection timing, but all fuels produce comparable thermal efficiency at advanced combustion phasing regardless of EGR. In contrast to the high load conditions, there was no increase in NOX emissions for biodiesel at the moderate load condition. It is concluded that

  10. Doped CeO2-LaFeO3 composite oxide as an active anode for direct hydrocarbon-type solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Tae Ho; Ida, Shintaro; Ishihara, Tatsumi

    2011-12-01

    Direct utilization of hydrocarbon and other renewable fuels is one of the most important issues concerning solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Mixed ionic and electronic conductors (MIECs) have been explored as anode materials for direct hydrocarbon-type SOFCs. However, electrical conductivity of the most often reported MIEC oxide electrodes is still not satisfactory. As a result, mixed-conducting oxides with high electrical conductivity and catalytic activity are attracting considerable interest as an alternative anode material for noncoke depositing anodes. In this study, we examine the oxide composite Ce(Mn,Fe)O(2)-La(Sr)Fe(Mn)O(3) for use as an oxide anode in direct hydrocarbon-type SOFCs. High performance was demonstrated for this composite oxide anode in direct hydrocarbon-type SOFCs, showing high maximum power density of approximately 1 W cm(-2) at 1073 K when propane and butane were used as fuel. The high power density of the cell results from the high electrical conductivity of the composite oxide in hydrocarbon and the high surface activity in relation to direct hydrocarbon oxidation.

  11. Undoped and boron doped diamond nanoparticles as platinum and platinum-ruthenium catalyst support for direct methanol fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Torre Riveros, Lyda

    electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive analysis (EDX), infrared spectroscopy (IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In order to demonstrate the utility of the catalyst obtained, the samples were tested in an electrochemical cell using methanol as a probe solution. As was performed with the undoped DNPs and BDDNPs, the ink paste method was used to prepare the electrodes with Pt/DNP, Pt-Ru/DNP, Pt/BDDNP and Pt-Ru/BDDNP catalytic systems, to perform the electrochemical experiments. The Pt and Pt-Ru modified diamond electrodes were tested with cyclic voltammetry in 0.5 M H2SO4 as electrolyte support showing hydrogen adsorption/desorption at platinum surfaces. CO gas adsorption/desorption experiments were also performed to determine the active surface area of Pt when Ru is present. Methanol oxidation current peaks were obtained when the electrodes were tested in a 1.0 M methanol/0.5 M H2SO4 solution. The experimental results demonstrated that diamond nanoparticles are useful as an electrode material. A fuel cell is a device which transforms the chemical energy of a fuel directly into electrical energy. As previously mentioned, the aim of this research is to demonstrate the utility of undoped DNPs and BDDNPs as catalytic supports, which was performed by testing the catalytic systems obtained in a single fuel cell station at different temperatures to observe the cell performance.

  12. Direct determination of sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium in biodiesel fuel by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dancsak, Stacia E; Silva, Sidnei G; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Jones, Bradley T; Donati, George L

    2014-01-01

    High levels of sodium and potassium can be present in biodiesel fuel and contribute to corrosion, reduced performance and shorter engine lifetime. On the other hand, trace amounts of chromium and vanadium can increase the emission of pollutants during biodiesel combustion. Sample viscosity, immiscibility with aqueous solutions and high carbon content can compromise biodiesel analyzes. In this work, tungsten filaments extracted from microscope light bulbs are used to successively decompose biodiesel's organic matrix, and atomize and excite the analytes to determine sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES). No sample preparation other than simple dilution in methanol or ethanol is required. Direct analysis of 10-μL sample aliquots using heating cycles with less than 150 s results in limits of detection (LOD) as low as 20, 70, 70 and 90 μg kg(-1) for Na, K, Cr and V, respectively. The procedure's accuracy is checked by determining Na and K in a biodiesel reference sample and carrying out spike experiments for Cr and V. No statistically significant differences were observed between reference and determined values for all analytes at a 95% confidence level. The procedure was applied to three different biodiesel samples and concentrations between 6.08 and 95.6 mg kg(-1) for Na and K, and between 0.22 and 0.43 mg kg(-1) for V were obtained. The procedure is simple, fast and environmentally friendly. Small volumes of reagents, samples and gases are used and no residues are generated. Powers of detection are comparable to other traditional methods.

  13. Ignition assist systems for direct-injected, diesel cycle, medium-duty alternative fuel engines: Final report phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, A.K.

    2000-02-23

    This report is a summary of the results of Phase 1 of this contract. The objective was to evaluate the potential of assist technologies for direct-injected alternative fuel engines vs. glow plug ignition assist. The goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of an ignition system life of 10,000 hours and a system cost of less than 50% of the glow plug system, while meeting or exceeding the engine thermal efficiency obtained with the glow plug system. There were three tasks in Phase 1. Under Task 1, a comprehensive review of feasible ignition options for DING engines was completed. The most promising options are: (1) AC and the ''SmartFire'' spark, which are both long-duration, low-power (LDLP) spark systems; (2) the short-duration, high-power (SDHP) spark system; (3) the micropilot injection ignition; and (4) the stratified charge plasma ignition. Efforts concentrated on investigating the AC spark, SmartFire spark, and short-duration/high-power spark systems. Using proprietary pricing information, the authors predicted that the commercial costs for the AC spark, the short-duration/high-power spark and SmartFire spark systems will be comparable (if not less) to the glow plug system. Task 2 involved designing and performing bench tests to determine the criteria for the ignition system and the prototype spark plug for Task 3. The two most important design criteria are the high voltage output requirement of the ignition system and the minimum electrical insulation requirement for the spark plug. Under Task 3, all the necessary hardware for the one-cylinder engine test was designed. The hardware includes modified 3126 cylinder heads, specially designed prototype spark plugs, ignition system electronics, and parts for the system installation. Two 3126 cylinder heads and the SmartFire ignition system were procured, and testing will begin in Phase 2 of this subcontract.

  14. Sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)/clay-SO 3H hybrid proton exchange membranes for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tiezhu; Cui, Zhiming; Zhong, Shuangling; Shi, Yuhua; Zhao, Chengji; Zhang, Gang; Shao, Ke; Na, Hui; Xing, Wei

    A new type of sulfonated clay (clay-SO 3H) was prepared by the ion exchange method with the sulfanilic acid as the surfactant agent. The grafted amount of sulfanilic acid in clay-SO 3H was 51.8 mequiv. (100 g) -1, which was measured by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK)/clay-SO 3H hybrid membranes which composed of SPEEK and different weight contents of clay-SO 3H, were prepared by a solution casting and evaporation method. For comparison, the SPEEK/clay hybrid membranes were produced with the same method. The performances of hybrid membranes for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) in terms of mechanical and thermal properties, water uptake, water retention, methanol permeability and proton conductivity were investigated. The mechanical and thermal properties of the SPEEK membranes had been improved by introduction of clay and clay-SO 3H, obviously. The water desorption coefficients of the SPEEK and hybrid membranes were studied at 80 °C. The results showed that the addition of the inorganic part into SPEEK membrane enhanced the water retention of the membrane. Both methanol permeability and proton conductivity of the hybrid membranes decreased in comparison to the pristine SPEEK membrane. However, it was worth noting that higher selectivity defined as ratio of proton conductivity to methanol permeability of the SPEEK/clay-SO 3H-1 hybrid membrane with 1 wt.% clay-SO 3H was obtained than that of the pristine SPEEK membrane. These results showed that the SPEEK/clay-SO 3H hybrid membrane with 1 wt.% clay-SO 3H had potential usage of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) for DMFCs.

  15. Alkaline sodium borohydride gel as a hydrogen source for PEMFC or an energy carrier for NaBH 4-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. H.; Li, Z. P.; Chen, L. L.

    In this preliminary study, we tried to use sodium polyacrylate as the super absorbent polymer to form alkaline NaBH 4 gel and explored its possibilities for borohydride hydrolysis and borohydride electro-oxidation. It was found that the absorption capacity of sodium polyacrylate decreased with increasing NaBH 4 concentration. The formed gel was rather stable in the sealed vessel but tended to slowly decompose in open air. Hydrogen generation from the gel was carried out using CoCl 2 catalyst precursor solutions. Hydrogen generation rate from the alkaline NaBH 4 gel was found to be higher and impurities in hydrogen were less than that from the alkaline NaBH 4 solution. The NaBH 4 gel also successfully powered a NaBH 4-air battery.

  16. Samaria-doped Ceria Modified Ni/YSZ Anode for Direct Methane Fuel in Tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cells by Impregnation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Long-shan; Gao, Jian-feng; Tian, Rui-fen; Xia, Chang-rong

    2009-08-01

    A porous NiO/yttria-stabilized zirconia anode substrate for tubular solid oxide fuel cells was prepared by gel casting technique. Nano-scale samaria-doped ceria (SDC) particles were formed onto the anode substrate to modify the anode microstructure by the impregnation of solution of Sm(NO3)3 and Ce(NO3)3. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, current-voltage and current-powder curves of the cells were measured using an electrochemical workstation. Scanning electron microcopy was used to observe the microstructure. The results indicate that the stability of the performance of the cell operated on humidified methane can be significantly improved by incorporating the nano-structured SDC particles, compared with the unmodified cell. This verifies that the coated SDC electrodes are very effective in suppressing catalytic carbon formation by blocking methane from approaching the Ni, which is catalytically active towards methane pyrolysis. In addition, it was found that a small amount of deposited carbon is beneficial to the performance of the anode. The cell showed a peak power density of 225 mW/cm2 when it was fed with H2 fuel at 700 °C, but the power density increased to 400 mW/cm2 when the fuel was switched from hydrogen to methane at the same flow rate. Methane conversion achieved about 90%, measured by gas chromatogram with a 10.0 mL/min flow rate of fuel at 700 °C. Although the carbon deposition was not suppressed absolutely, some deposited carbon was beneficial for performance improvement.

  17. Chemical composition and source of fine and nanoparticles from recent direct injection gasoline passenger cars: Effects of fuel and ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fushimi, Akihiro; Kondo, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Shinji; Fujitani, Yuji; Saitoh, Katsumi; Takami, Akinori; Tanabe, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Particle number, mass, and chemical compositions (i.e., elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), elements, ions, and organic species) of fine particles emitted from four of the recent direct injection spark ignition (DISI) gasoline passenger cars and a port fuel injection (PFI) gasoline passenger car were measured under Japanese official transient mode (JC08 mode). Total carbon (TC = EC + OC) dominated the particulate mass (90% on average). EC dominated the TC for both hot and cold start conditions. The EC/TC ratios were 0.72 for PFI and 0.88-1.0 (average = 0.92) for DISI vehicles. A size-resolved chemical analysis of a DISI car revealed that the major organic components were the C20-C28 hydrocarbons for both the accumulation-mode particles and nanoparticles. Contribution of engine oil was estimated to be 10-30% for organics and the sum of the measured elements. The remaining major fraction likely originated from gasoline fuel. Therefore, it is suggested that soot (EC) also mainly originated from the gasoline. In experiments using four fuels at three ambient temperatures, the emission factors of particulate mass were consistently higher with regular gasoline than with premium gasoline. This result suggest that the high content of less-volatile compounds in fuel increase particulate emissions. These results suggest that focusing on reducing fuel-derived EC in the production process of new cars would effectively reduce particulate emission from DISI cars.

  18. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Oei, D.

    1995-08-03

    This is the fourth Technical Progress Report for DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-94CE50389 awarded to Ford Motor Company on July 1, 1994. The overall objective of this contract is to advance the Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology for automotive applications. Specifically, the objectives resulting from this contract are to: (1) Develop and demonstrate on a laboratory propulsion system within 2-1/2 years a fully functional PEM Fuel Cell Power System (including fuel cell peripherals, peak power augmentation and controls). This propulsion system will achieve, or will be shown to have the growth potential to achieve, the weights, volumes, and production costs which are competitive with those same attributes of equivalently performing internal combustion engine propulsion systems; (2) Select and demonstrate a baseline onboard hydrogen storage method with acceptable weight, volume, cost, and safety features and analyze future alternatives; and (3) Analyze the hydrogen infrastructure components to ensure that hydrogen can be safely supplied to vehicles at geographically widespread convenient sites and at prices which are less than current gasoline prices per vehicle-mile; (4) Identify any future R&D needs for a fully integrated vehicle and for achieving the system cost and performance goals.

  19. Layered oxygen-deficient double perovskite as an efficient and stable anode for direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sengodan, Sivaprakash; Choi, Sihyuk; Jun, Areum; Shin, Tae Ho; Ju, Young-Wan; Jeong, Hu Young; Shin, Jeeyoung; Irvine, John T S; Kim, Guntae

    2015-02-01

    Different layered perovskite-related oxides are known to exhibit important electronic, magnetic and electrochemical properties. Owing to their excellent mixed-ionic and electronic conductivity and fast oxygen kinetics, cation layered double perovskite oxides such as PrBaCo2O5 in particular have exhibited excellent properties as solid oxide fuel cell oxygen electrodes. Here, we show for the first time that related layered materials can be used as high-performance fuel electrodes. Good redox stability with tolerance to coking and sulphur contamination from hydrocarbon fuels is demonstrated for the layered perovskite anode PrBaMn2O5+δ (PBMO). The PBMO anode is fabricated by in situ annealing of Pr0.5Ba0.5MnO3-δ in fuel conditions and actual fuel cell operation is demonstrated. At 800 °C, layered PBMO shows high electrical conductivity of 8.16 S cm(-1) in 5% H2 and demonstrates peak power densities of 1.7 and 1.3 W cm(-2) at 850 °C using humidified hydrogen and propane fuels, respectively.

  20. Corrigendum to "Sinusoidal potential cycling operation of a direct ethanol fuel cell to improving carbon dioxide yields" [J. Power Sources 268 (5 December 2014) 439-442

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Pasha; Pickup, Peter G.

    2016-09-01

    The authors regret that Equation (5) is incorrect and has resulted in errors in Fig. 4 and the efficiencies stated on p. 442. The corrected equation, figure and text are presented below. In addition, the title should be 'Sinusoidal potential cycling operation of a direct ethanol fuel cell to improve carbon dioxide yields', and the reversible cell potential quoted on p. 441 should be 1.14 V. The authors would like to apologise for any inconvenience caused.

  1. Emissions of Water and Carbon Dioxide from Fossil-Fuel Combustion Contribute Directly to Ocean Mass and Volume Increases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuce, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    The direct, non-climate, contribution of carbon dioxide and water emissions from fossil-fuel (FF) combustion to the volume and mass of the oceans has been omitted from estimates of sea-level rise (SLR) in IPCC reports. Following the method of Gornitz et al. (1997), H2O emissions are estimated using carbon emissions from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, along with typical carbon and hydrogen contents of FF. Historic H2O emissions from 1750 to 2010 amount to 430 ±50 PgH2O, equivalent to 1.2 ±0.2 mmSLR. Sometime in this decade the volume of H2O from historic FF combustion will exceed the volume of Lake Erie (480 km3). CO2 dissolved in the ocean increases the seawater volume by 31-33 mL mol-1 CO2. From 1750 to 2010, 370 ±70 PgCO2 from FF combustion has dissolved in the oceans, causing 0.7 ±0.2 mmSLR. Combined H2O+CO2emissions from FF have therefore added 1.9 ±0.4 mm to sea levels in the Industrial Era. Combustion of FF in 2010 resulted in emissions of 32 PgCO2 and 12 ±1 PgH2O. SLR contributions for that year from FF emissions were 0.033 ±0.005 mm from H2O and 0.011±0.003 mm from dissolved CO2, a total rate of 0.044 ±0.008 mm yr-1. Emissions incorporated in socio-economic models underlying the RCP 8.5 and 2.6 scenarios are used along with concentration-driven CMIP5 Earth System Models results to estimate future sea-level rise from FF combustion. From 2010 to 2100, RCP8.5 and 2.6 models respectively produce 9 ±2 mmSLR and 5 ±1 mmSLR from FF H2O+CO2. For perspective, these amounts are larger than the modelled contributions from loss of glaciers in the Andes. The direct contribution of FF emissions to SLR is small (1-2%) relative to current rates and projected estimates under RCP scenarios up to 2100. The magnitude is similar to SLR estimates from other minor sources such as the melting of floating ice, land-use emissions and produced water from oil operations, none of which are currently included in SLR assessments. As uncertainties in

  2. A Stability Study of Ni/Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Anode for Direct Ammonia Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Molouk, Ahmed Fathi Salem; Okanishi, Takeou; Muroyama, Hiroki; Matsui, Toshiaki; Eguchi, Koichi

    2015-12-30

    In recent years, solid oxide fuel cells fueled with ammonia have been attracting intensive attention. In this work, ammonia fuel was supplied to the Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) cermet anode at 600 and 700 °C, and the change of electrochemical performance and microstructure under the open-circuit state was studied in detail. The influence of ammonia exposure on the microstructure of Ni was also investigated by using Ni/YSZ powder and Ni film deposited on a YSZ disk. The obtained results demonstrated that Ni in the cermet anode was partially nitrided under an ammonia atmosphere, which considerably roughened the Ni surface. Moreover, the destruction of the anode support layer was confirmed for the anode-supported cell upon the temperature cycling test between 600 and 700 °C because of the nitriding phenomenon of Ni, resulting in severe performance degradation.

  3. Pt and Ru dispersed on LiCoO 2 for hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaolin; Guo, Bing; Chan, Siew Hwa; Tang, Ee Ho; Hong, Liang

    Nano-sized platinum and ruthenium dispersed on the surface LiCoO 2 as catalysts for borohydride hydrolysis are prepared by microwave-assisted polyol process. The catalysts are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Very uniform Pt and Ru nanoparticles with sizes of <10 nm are dispersed on the surface of LiCoO 2. XRD patterns show that the Pt/LiCoO 2 and Ru/LiCoO 2 catalysts only display the characteristic diffraction peaks of a LiCoO 2 crystal structure. Results obtained from XPS analysis reveal that the Pt/LiCoO 2 and Ru/LiCoO 2 catalysts contain mostly Pt(0) and Ru(0), with traces of Pt(IV) and Ru(IV), respectively. The hydrogen generation rates using low noble metal loading catalysts, 1 wt.% Pt/LiCoO 2 and 1 wt.% Ru/LiCoO 2, are very high. The hydrogen generation rate using Ru/LiCoO 2 as a catalyst is slightly higher compared with that of Pt/LiCoO 2.

  4. Development of a New Class of Low Cost, High Frequency Link Direct DC to AC Converters for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC)

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad Enjeti; J.W. Howze

    2003-12-01

    This project proposes to design and develop a new class of power converters (direct DC to AC) to drastically improve performance and optimize the cost, size, weight and volume of the DC to AC converter in SOFC systems. The proposed topologies employ a high frequency link; direct DC to AC conversion approach. The direct DC to AC conversion approach is more efficient and operates without an intermediate dc-link stage. The absence of the dc-link, results in the elimination of bulky, aluminum electrolytic capacitors, which in turn leads to a reduction in the cost, volume, size and weight of the power electronic converter. The feasibility of two direct DC to AC converter topologies and their suitability to meet SECA objectives will be investigated. Laboratory proto-type converters (3-5kW) will be designed and tested in Phase-1. A detailed design trade-off study along with the test results will be available in the form of a report for the evaluation of SECA Industrial partners. This project proposes to develop a new and innovative power converter technology suitable for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power systems in accordance with SECA objectives. The proposed fuel cell inverter (FCI) employs state of the art power electronic devices configured in two unique topologies to achieve direct conversion of DC power (24-48V) available from a SOFC to AC power (120/240V, 60Hz) suitable for utility interface and powering stand alone loads. The primary objective is to realize cost effective fuel cell converter, which operates under a wide input voltage range, and output load swings with high efficiency and improved reliability.

  5. A High-Performing Sulfur-Tolerant and Redox-Stable Layered Perovskite Anode for Direct Hydrocarbon Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hanping; Tao, Zetian; Liu, Shun; Zhang, Jiujun

    2015-12-09

    Development of alternative ceramic oxide anode materials is a key step for direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Several lanthanide based layered perovskite-structured oxides demonstrate outstanding oxygen diffusion rate, favorable electronic conductivity, and good oxygen surface exchange kinetics, owing to A-site ordered structure in which lanthanide and alkali-earth ions occupy alternate (001) layers and oxygen vacancies are mainly located in [LnOx] planes. Here we report a nickel-free cation deficient layered perovskite, (PrBa)0.95(Fe0.9Mo0.1)2O5 + δ (PBFM), for SOFC anode, and this anode shows an outstanding performance with high resistance against both carbon build-up and sulfur poisoning in hydrocarbon fuels. At 800 °C, the layered PBFM showed high electrical conductivity of 59.2 S cm(-1) in 5% H2 and peak power densities of 1.72 and 0.54 W cm(-2) using H2 and CH4 as fuel, respectively. The cell exhibits a very stable performance under a constant current load of 1.0 A cm(-2). To our best knowledge, this is the highest performance of ceramic anodes operated in methane. In addition, the anode is structurally stable at various fuel and temperature conditions, suggesting that it is a feasible material candidate for high-performing SOFC anode.

  6. A High-Performing Sulfur-Tolerant and Redox-Stable Layered Perovskite Anode for Direct Hydrocarbon Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hanping; Tao, Zetian; Liu, Shun; Zhang, Jiujun

    2015-01-01

    Development of alternative ceramic oxide anode materials is a key step for direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Several lanthanide based layered perovskite-structured oxides demonstrate outstanding oxygen diffusion rate, favorable electronic conductivity, and good oxygen surface exchange kinetics, owing to A-site ordered structure in which lanthanide and alkali-earth ions occupy alternate (001) layers and oxygen vacancies are mainly located in [LnOx] planes. Here we report a nickel-free cation deficient layered perovskite, (PrBa)0.95(Fe0.9Mo0.1)2O5 + δ (PBFM), for SOFC anode, and this anode shows an outstanding performance with high resistance against both carbon build-up and sulfur poisoning in hydrocarbon fuels. At 800 °C, the layered PBFM showed high electrical conductivity of 59.2 S cm−1 in 5% H2 and peak power densities of 1.72 and 0.54 W cm−2 using H2 and CH4 as fuel, respectively. The cell exhibits a very stable performance under a constant current load of 1.0 A cm−2. To our best knowledge, this is the highest performance of ceramic anodes operated in methane. In addition, the anode is structurally stable at various fuel and temperature conditions, suggesting that it is a feasible material candidate for high-performing SOFC anode. PMID:26648509

  7. A High-Performing Sulfur-Tolerant and Redox-Stable Layered Perovskite Anode for Direct Hydrocarbon Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hanping; Tao, Zetian; Liu, Shun; Zhang, Jiujun

    2015-01-01

    Development of alternative ceramic oxide anode materials is a key step for direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Several lanthanide based layered perovskite-structured oxides demonstrate outstanding oxygen diffusion rate, favorable electronic conductivity, and good oxygen surface exchange kinetics, owing to A-site ordered structure in which lanthanide and alkali-earth ions occupy alternate (001) layers and oxygen vacancies are mainly located in [LnOx] planes. Here we report a nickel-free cation deficient layered perovskite, (PrBa)0.95(Fe0.9Mo0.1)2O5 + δ (PBFM), for SOFC anode, and this anode shows an outstanding performance with high resistance against both carbon build-up and sulfur poisoning in hydrocarbon fuels. At 800 °C, the layered PBFM showed high electrical conductivity of 59.2 S cm(-1) in 5% H2 and peak power densities of 1.72 and 0.54 W cm(-2) using H2 and CH4 as fuel, respectively. The cell exhibits a very stable performance under a constant current load of 1.0 A cm(-2). To our best knowledge, this is the highest performance of ceramic anodes operated in methane. In addition, the anode is structurally stable at various fuel and temperature conditions, suggesting that it is a feasible material candidate for high-performing SOFC anode. PMID:26648509

  8. A High-Performing Sulfur-Tolerant and Redox-Stable Layered Perovskite Anode for Direct Hydrocarbon Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hanping; Tao, Zetian; Liu, Shun; Zhang, Jiujun

    2015-12-01

    Development of alternative ceramic oxide anode materials is a key step for direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Several lanthanide based layered perovskite-structured oxides demonstrate outstanding oxygen diffusion rate, favorable electronic conductivity, and good oxygen surface exchange kinetics, owing to A-site ordered structure in which lanthanide and alkali-earth ions occupy alternate (001) layers and oxygen vacancies are mainly located in [LnOx] planes. Here we report a nickel-free cation deficient layered perovskite, (PrBa)0.95(Fe0.9Mo0.1)2O5 + δ (PBFM), for SOFC anode, and this anode shows an outstanding performance with high resistance against both carbon build-up and sulfur poisoning in hydrocarbon fuels. At 800 °C, the layered PBFM showed high electrical conductivity of 59.2 S cm-1 in 5% H2 and peak power densities of 1.72 and 0.54 W cm-2 using H2 and CH4 as fuel, respectively. The cell exhibits a very stable performance under a constant current load of 1.0 A cm-2. To our best knowledge, this is the highest performance of ceramic anodes operated in methane. In addition, the anode is structurally stable at various fuel and temperature conditions, suggesting that it is a feasible material candidate for high-performing SOFC anode.

  9. Engineered Cellulosic Yeast for Direct Production of Energy-Dense, Infrastructure-Compatible Fuels from CO2 and Cellulosic Sugars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strains of yeast expressing novel lipase will be engineered to produce two energy-dense liquid fuels using an improved column-based process for production of biodiesel and alcohol was developed using a column containing a strongly basic anion-exchange resin in sequence with a column containing a res...

  10. Early direct-injection, low-temperature combustion of diesel fuel in an optical engine utilizing a 15-hole, dual-row, narrow-included-angle nozzle.

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrke, Christopher R.; Radovanovic, Michael S.; Milam, David M.; Martin, Glen C.; Mueller, Charles J.

    2008-04-01

    Low-temperature combustion of diesel fuel was studied in a heavy-duty, single-cylinder optical engine employing a 15-hole, dual-row, narrow-included-angle nozzle (10 holes x 70/mD and 5 holes x 35/mD) with 103-/gmm-diameter orifices. This nozzle configuration provided the spray targeting necessary to contain the direct-injected diesel fuel within the piston bowl for injection timings as early as 70/mD before top dead center. Spray-visualization movies, acquired using a high-speed camera, show that impingement of liquid fuel on the piston surface can result when the in-cylinder temperature and density at the time of injection are sufficiently low. Seven single- and two-parameter sweeps around a 4.82-bar gross indicated mean effective pressure load point were performed to map the sensitivity of the combustion and emissions to variations in injection timing, injection pressure, equivalence ratio, simulated exhaust-gas recirculation, intake temperature, intake boost pressure, and load. High-speed movies of natural luminosity were acquired by viewing through a window in the cylinder wall and through a window in the piston to provide quasi-3D information about the combustion process. These movies revealed that advanced combustion phasing resulted in intense pool fires within the piston bowl, after the end of significant heat release. These pool fires are a result of fuel-films created when the injected fuel impinged on the piston surface. The emissions results showed a strong correlation with pool-fire activity. Smoke and NO/dx emissions rose steadily as pool-fire intensity increased, whereas HC and CO showed a dramatic increase with near-zero pool-fire activity.

  11. A Low-cost, High-yield Process for the Direct Productin of High Energy Density Liquid Fuel from Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Rakesh

    2014-02-21

    The primary objective and outcome of this project was the development and validation of a novel, low-cost, high-pressure fast-hydropyrolysis/hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) process (H{sub 2}Bioil) using supplementary hydrogen (H{sub 2}) to produce liquid hydrocarbons from biomass. The research efforts under the various tasks of the project have culminated in the first experimental demonstration of the H2Bioil process, producing 100% deoxygenated >C4+ hydrocarbons containing 36-40% of the carbon in the feed of pyrolysis products from biomass. The demonstrated H{sub 2}Bioil process technology (i.e. reactor, catalyst, and downstream product recovery) is scalable to a commercial level and is estimated to be economically competitive for the cases when supplementary H{sub 2} is sourced from coal, natural gas, or nuclear. Additionally, energy systems modeling has revealed several process integration options based on the H{sub 2}Bioil process for energy and carbon efficient liquid fuel production. All project tasks and milestones were completed or exceeded. Novel, commercially-scalable, high-pressure reactors for both fast-hydropyrolysis and hydrodeoxygenation were constructed, completing Task A. These reactors were capable of operation under a wide-range of conditions; enabling process studies that lead to identification of optimum process conditions. Model compounds representing biomass pyrolysis products were studied, completing Task B. These studies were critical in identifying and developing HDO catalysts to target specific oxygen functional groups. These process and model compound catalyst studies enabled identification of catalysts that achieved 100% deoxygenation of the real biomass feedstock, sorghum, to form hydrocarbons in high yields as part of Task C. The work completed during this grant has identified and validated the novel and commercially scalable H2Bioil process for production of hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Studies on model compounds as well as real biomass

  12. Micro fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Zook, L.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Hockaday, R.

    1998-12-31

    An ambient temperature, liquid feed, direct methanol fuel cell device is under development. A metal barrier layer was used to block methanol crossover from the anode to the cathode side while still allowing for the transport of protons from the anode to the cathode. A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an electrochemical engine that converts chemical energy into clean electrical power by the direct oxidation of methanol at the fuel cell anode. This direct use of a liquid fuel eliminates the need for a reformer to convert the fuel to hydrogen before it is fed into the fuel cell.

  13. Direct conversion of surplus fissile materials, spent nuclear fuel, and other materials to high-level-waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Elam, K.R.

    1995-01-31

    With the end of the cold war the United States, Russia, and other countries have excess plutonium and other materials from the reductions in inventories of nuclear weapons. The United States Academy of Sciences (NAS) has recommended that these surplus fissile materials (SFMs) be processed so they are no more accessible than plutonium in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This spent fuel standard, if adopted worldwide, would prevent rapid recovery of SFMs for the manufacture of nuclear weapons. The NAS recommended investigation of three sets of options for disposition of SFMs while meeting the spent fuel standard: (1) incorporate SFMs with highly radioactive materials and dispose of as waste, (2) partly burn the SFMs in reactors with conversion of the SFMs to SNF for disposal, and (3) dispose of the SFMs in deep boreholes. The US Government is investigating these options for SFM disposition. A new method for the disposition of SFMs is described herein: the simultaneous conversion of SFMs, SNF, and other highly radioactive materials into high-level-waste (HLW) glass. The SFMs include plutonium, neptinium, americium, and {sup 233}U. The primary SFM is plutonium. The preferred SNF is degraded SNF, which may require processing before it can be accepted by a geological repository for disposal.

  14. Reduction of carbon dioxide gas formation at the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell using chemically enhanced solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, Michael D.; McCready, Mark J.

    The production of CO 2 gas at the DMFC anode leads to dramatic increases in pumping power requirements and reduced power output because of mass transfer limitations as bubble trains form in the channels of larger stacks. Experimental observations taken in a 5 cm 2 DMFC test cell operated at 60 °C, 1 atm, and with a methanol/water fuel flow rates of 5-10 cm 3 min -1 indicate that the rate of bubble formation can be reduced by increasing the fuel flow because more liquid is available for the CO 2 to dissolve in. Further observations indicate that KOH and LiOH added to the fuel eliminates CO 2 gas formation in situ at low concentrations because of the greatly increased solubility that results. A mathematical model for the volumetric rate of CO 2 gas production that includes effects of temperature and solubility is developed and extended to include the effects of hydroxide ions in solution. The model is used to predict the onset location of gas formation in the flow field as well as the void fraction at any point in the flow field. Predictions from the model agree very well with our experiments. Model predictions explain differences in the initial location of bubble formation for fuel solutions pre-saturated with CO 2 as opposed to CO 2-free solutions. Experiments with KOH and LiOH added to fuel solutions confirm the validity of the model extension that includes solubility that is enhanced by chemical reaction. Experiments with LiOH, KOH, and ammonium hydroxide show that the long-term durability of standard Pt-Ru/Nafion ®/Pt membrane electrode assemblies is compromised because of the presence of lithium, potassium, and ammonium cations that interact with the Nafion ® membrane and result in increasing the ohmic limitations of the polymer electrolyte membrane. Experiments with Ca(OH) 2, while reducing gas formation, precipitate the product CaCO 3 out of solution too rapidly for downstream filtering, blocking channels in the flow field.

  15. Transformation and composition evolution of nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) synthesized by borohydride reduction in static water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Airong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Wei-Xian

    2015-01-01

    The reactivity of nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) toward targeted contaminants is affected by the initial nZVI composition and the iron oxides formed during the aging process in aquatic systems. In this paper, the aging effects of nZVI, prepared using a borohydride reduction method in static water over a period of 90 days (d), are investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the corrosion products of nZVI. Results show that both the structures and the compositions of the corrosion products change with the process of aging. The products of nZVI aged for 5 d in static water media are mainly magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), accompanied by lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH). For products aged 10 d, XRD data show the formation of ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. When aged up to 90 d, the products are mainly γ-FeOOH mixed with small amounts of Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3. Transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) images show that the core-shell structure forms into a hollow spherical shape after 30 d of aging in aquatic media. The results indicate first that iron ions in the Fe(0) core diffuse outwardly toward the shell, and hollowed-out iron oxide shells emerge. Then, the iron oxide shell collapses and becomes a flaky, acicular-shaped structure. The type and the crystal phase of second iron oxide minerals are vastly different at various aging times. This study helps to explain the patterns of occurrence of specific iron oxides in different natural conditions.

  16. The main directions in technology investigation of soid oxide fuel cell in Russian Federal Research Center Institute of Physics & Power Engineering (IPPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Ievleva, J.I.; Kolesnikov, V.P.; Mezhertisky, G.S.

    1996-04-01

    The main direction of science investigations for creation of efficient solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) in IPPE are considered in this work. The development program of planar SOFC with thin-film electrolyte is shown. General design schemes of experimental SOFC units are presented. The flow design schemes of processes for initial materials and electrodes fabrication are shown. The results of investigations for creation thin-film solid oxide electrolyte at porous cathode by magnetron sputtering from complex metal target in oxidative environment are presented.

  17. Atomic layer deposition of ruthenium surface-coating on porous platinum catalysts for high-performance direct ethanol solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Heon Jae; Kim, Jun Woo; Jang, Dong Young; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2015-09-01

    Pt-Ru bi-metallic catalysts are synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Ru surface-coating on sputtered Pt mesh. The catalysts are evaluated in direct ethanol solid oxide fuel cells (DESOFCs) in the temperature range of 300-500 °C. Island-growth of the ALD Ru coating is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. The performance of the DESOFCs is evaluated based on the current-voltage output and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Genuine reduction of the polarization impedance, and enhanced power output with improved surface kinetics are achieved with the optimized ALD Ru surface-coating compared to bare Pt. The chemical composition of the Pt/ALD Ru electrode surface after fuel cell operation is analyzed via XPS. Enhanced cell performance is clearly achieved, attributed to the effective Pt/ALD Ru bi-metallic catalysis, including oxidation of Cdbnd O by Ru, and de-protonation of ethanol and cleavage of C-C bonds by Pt, as supported by surface morphology analysis which confirms formation of a large amount of carbon on bare Pt after the ethanol-fuel-cell test.

  18. Screening of electrocatalysts for direct ammonia fuel cell: Ammonia oxidation on PtMe (Me: Ir, Rh, Pd, Ru) and preferentially oriented Pt(1 0 0) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal-Iglesias, F. J.; Solla-Gullón, J.; Montiel, V.; Feliu, J. M.; Aldaz, A.

    Ammonia has attracted attention as a possible fuel for direct fuel cells since it is easy to handle and to transport as liquid or as concentrated aqueous solution. However, on noble metal electrodes ammonia oxidation is a sluggish reaction and the electrocatalyst needs to be improved for developing efficient ammonia fuel cells. In this work, ammonia electrooxidation reaction on 3-4-nm bimetallic PtMe (Ir, Rh, Pd, Ru) and on preferentially oriented Pt(1 0 0) nanoparticles is reported. PtMe nanoparticles have been prepared by using water-in-oil microemulsions to obtain a narrow size distribution whereas preferentially oriented Pt nanoparticles have been prepared through colloidal routes. Among all the bimetallic samples tested, only Pt 75Ir 25 and Pt 75Rh 25 nanoparticles show, at the low potential range, an enhancement of the oxidation density current with respect to the behaviour found for pure platinum nanoparticles prepared by the same method. In addition, two Pt(1 0 0) preferentially oriented nanoparticles of different particle size (4 and 9 nm) have been also studied. These oriented nanoparticles show higher current densities than polycrystalline Pt nanoparticles due to the sensitivity of ammonia oxidation toward the presence of surface sites with square symmetry. The reactivity of the different 4-nm nanoparticles parallels well with that expected from bulk PtMe alloys and Pt single crystal electrodes.

  19. Demonstration of Fuel Hot-Spot Pressure in Excess of 50 Gbar for Direct-Drive, Layered Deuterium-Tritium Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Cao, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Davis, A. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Janezic, R.; Karasik, M.; Keck, R. L.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Kosc, T. Z.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Obenschain, S. P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Radha, P. B.; Rice, B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Shoup, M. J.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Ulreich, J.; Wittman, M. D.; Woo, K. M.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2016-07-01

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure Phs=56 ±7 Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility, these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ˜60 % of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, LM15119ER (2016)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is approximately 40% lower. Three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance.

  20. Demonstration of fuel hot-spot pressure in excess of 50 Gbar for direct-drive, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on OMEGA

    DOE PAGES

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Cao, D.; et al

    2016-07-07

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure Phs = 56±7 Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium–tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ~60% of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E (in press)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is ~40%more » lower. Furthermore, three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance.« less