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Sample records for direct brain communication

  1. Direct brain control and communication in paralysis.

    PubMed

    Birbaumer, Niels; Gallegos-Ayala, Guillermo; Wildgruber, Moritz; Silvoni, Stefano; Soekadar, Surjo R

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable growth in the field of brain-computer or brain-machine interface (BCI/BMI) research reflected in several hundred publications each year, little progress was made to enable patients in complete locked-in state (CLIS) to reliably communicate using their brain activity. Independent of the invasiveness of the BCI systems tested, no sustained direct brain control and communication was demonstrated in a patient in CLIS so far. This suggested a more fundamental theoretical problem of learning and attention in brain communication with BCI/BMI, formulated in the extinction-of-thought hypothesis. While operant conditioning and goal-directed thinking seems impaired in complete paralysis, classical conditioning of brain responses might represent the only alternative. First experimental studies in CLIS using semantic conditioning support this assumption. Evidence that quality-of-life in locked-in-state is not as limited and poor as generally believed draise doubts that "patient wills" or "advanced directives"signed long-before the locked-in-state are useful. On the contrary, they might be used as an excuse to shorten anticipated long periods of care for these patients avoiding associated financial and social burdens. Current state and availability of BCI/BMI systems urge a broader societal discourse on the pressing ethical challenges associated with the advancements in neurotechnology and BCI/BMI research.

  2. Brain-Computer Interfaces and communication in paralysis: extinction of goal directed thinking in completely paralysed patients?

    PubMed Central

    Kübler, A.; Birbaumer, N.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between physical impairment and brain-computer interface (BCI) performance. Method We present a meta-analysis of 29 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 6 with other severe neurological diseases in different stages of physical impairment who were trained with a BCI. In most cases voluntary regulation of slow cortical potentials has been used as input signal for BCI control. More recently sensorimotor rhythms and the P300 event-related brain potential were recorded. Results A strong correlation has been found between physical impairment and BCI performance, indicating that performance worsens as impairment increases. Seven patients were in the complete locked-in state (CLIS) with no communication possible. After removal of these patients from the analysis, the relationship between physical impairment and BCI performance disappeared. The lack of a relation between physical impairment and BCI performance was confirmed when adding BCI data of patients from other BCI research groups. Conclusions Basic communication (yes/no) was not restored in any of the CLIS patients with a BCI. Whether locked-in patients can transfer learned brain control to the CLIS remains an open empirical question. Significance Voluntary brain regulation for communication is possible in all stages of paralysis except the CLIS. PMID:18824406

  3. Communication Networks in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lovinger, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Nerve cells (i.e., neurons) communicate via a combination of electrical and chemical signals. Within the neuron, electrical signals driven by charged particles allow rapid conduction from one end of the cell to the other. Communication between neurons occurs at tiny gaps called synapses, where specialized parts of the two cells (i.e., the presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons) come within nanometers of one another to allow for chemical transmission. The presynaptic neuron releases a chemical (i.e., a neurotransmitter) that is received by the postsynaptic neuron’s specialized proteins called neurotransmitter receptors. The neurotransmitter molecules bind to the receptor proteins and alter postsynaptic neuronal function. Two types of neurotransmitter receptors exist—ligand-gated ion channels, which permit rapid ion flow directly across the outer cell membrane, and G-protein–coupled receptors, which set into motion chemical signaling events within the cell. Hundreds of molecules are known to act as neurotransmitters in the brain. Neuronal development and function also are affected by peptides known as neurotrophins and by steroid hormones. This article reviews the chemical nature, neuronal actions, receptor subtypes, and therapeutic roles of several transmitters, neurotrophins, and hormones. It focuses on neurotransmitters with important roles in acute and chronic alcohol effects on the brain, such as those that contribute to intoxication, tolerance, dependence, and neurotoxicity, as well as maintained alcohol drinking and addiction. PMID:23584863

  4. Flow of affective information between communicating brains.

    PubMed

    Anders, Silke; Heinzle, Jakob; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Ethofer, Thomas; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2011-01-01

    When people interact, affective information is transmitted between their brains. Modern imaging techniques permit to investigate the dynamics of this brain-to-brain transfer of information. Here, we used information-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the flow of affective information between the brains of senders and perceivers engaged in ongoing facial communication of affect. We found that the level of neural activity within a distributed network of the perceiver's brain can be successfully predicted from the neural activity in the same network in the sender's brain, depending on the affect that is currently being communicated. Furthermore, there was a temporal succession in the flow of affective information from the sender's brain to the perceiver's brain, with information in the perceiver's brain being significantly delayed relative to information in the sender's brain. This delay decreased over time, possibly reflecting some 'tuning in' of the perceiver with the sender. Our data support current theories of intersubjectivity by providing direct evidence that during ongoing facial communication a 'shared space' of affect is successively built up between senders and perceivers of affective facial signals.

  5. Brain mechanisms underlying human communication.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, Matthijs L; Newman-Norlund, Sarah E; de Ruiter, Jan Peter; Hagoort, Peter; Levinson, Stephen C; Toni, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Human communication has been described as involving the coding-decoding of a conventional symbol system, which could be supported by parts of the human motor system (i.e. the "mirror neurons system"). However, this view does not explain how these conventions could develop in the first place. Here we target the neglected but crucial issue of how people organize their non-verbal behavior to communicate a given intention without pre-established conventions. We have measured behavioral and brain responses in pairs of subjects during communicative exchanges occurring in a real, interactive, on-line social context. In two fMRI studies, we found robust evidence that planning new communicative actions (by a sender) and recognizing the communicative intention of the same actions (by a receiver) relied on spatially overlapping portions of their brains (the right posterior superior temporal sulcus). The response of this region was lateralized to the right hemisphere, modulated by the ambiguity in meaning of the communicative acts, but not by their sensorimotor complexity. These results indicate that the sender of a communicative signal uses his own intention recognition system to make a prediction of the intention recognition performed by the receiver. This finding supports the notion that our communicative abilities are distinct from both sensorimotor processes and language abilities.

  6. Brain Mechanisms Underlying Human Communication

    PubMed Central

    Noordzij, Matthijs L.; Newman-Norlund, Sarah E.; de Ruiter, Jan Peter; Hagoort, Peter; Levinson, Stephen C.; Toni, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Human communication has been described as involving the coding-decoding of a conventional symbol system, which could be supported by parts of the human motor system (i.e. the “mirror neurons system”). However, this view does not explain how these conventions could develop in the first place. Here we target the neglected but crucial issue of how people organize their non-verbal behavior to communicate a given intention without pre-established conventions. We have measured behavioral and brain responses in pairs of subjects during communicative exchanges occurring in a real, interactive, on-line social context. In two fMRI studies, we found robust evidence that planning new communicative actions (by a sender) and recognizing the communicative intention of the same actions (by a receiver) relied on spatially overlapping portions of their brains (the right posterior superior temporal sulcus). The response of this region was lateralized to the right hemisphere, modulated by the ambiguity in meaning of the communicative acts, but not by their sensorimotor complexity. These results indicate that the sender of a communicative signal uses his own intention recognition system to make a prediction of the intention recognition performed by the receiver. This finding supports the notion that our communicative abilities are distinct from both sensorimotor processes and language abilities. PMID:19668699

  7. A Direct Brain-to-Brain Interface in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rajesh P. N.; Stocco, Andrea; Bryan, Matthew; Sarma, Devapratim; Youngquist, Tiffany M.; Wu, Joseph; Prat, Chantel S.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the first direct brain-to-brain interface in humans and present results from experiments involving six different subjects. Our non-invasive interface, demonstrated originally in August 2013, combines electroencephalography (EEG) for recording brain signals with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for delivering information to the brain. We illustrate our method using a visuomotor task in which two humans must cooperate through direct brain-to-brain communication to achieve a desired goal in a computer game. The brain-to-brain interface detects motor imagery in EEG signals recorded from one subject (the “sender”) and transmits this information over the internet to the motor cortex region of a second subject (the “receiver”). This allows the sender to cause a desired motor response in the receiver (a press on a touchpad) via TMS. We quantify the performance of the brain-to-brain interface in terms of the amount of information transmitted as well as the accuracies attained in (1) decoding the sender’s signals, (2) generating a motor response from the receiver upon stimulation, and (3) achieving the overall goal in the cooperative visuomotor task. Our results provide evidence for a rudimentary form of direct information transmission from one human brain to another using non-invasive means. PMID:25372285

  8. A direct brain-to-brain interface in humans.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rajesh P N; Stocco, Andrea; Bryan, Matthew; Sarma, Devapratim; Youngquist, Tiffany M; Wu, Joseph; Prat, Chantel S

    2014-01-01

    We describe the first direct brain-to-brain interface in humans and present results from experiments involving six different subjects. Our non-invasive interface, demonstrated originally in August 2013, combines electroencephalography (EEG) for recording brain signals with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for delivering information to the brain. We illustrate our method using a visuomotor task in which two humans must cooperate through direct brain-to-brain communication to achieve a desired goal in a computer game. The brain-to-brain interface detects motor imagery in EEG signals recorded from one subject (the "sender") and transmits this information over the internet to the motor cortex region of a second subject (the "receiver"). This allows the sender to cause a desired motor response in the receiver (a press on a touchpad) via TMS. We quantify the performance of the brain-to-brain interface in terms of the amount of information transmitted as well as the accuracies attained in (1) decoding the sender's signals, (2) generating a motor response from the receiver upon stimulation, and (3) achieving the overall goal in the cooperative visuomotor task. Our results provide evidence for a rudimentary form of direct information transmission from one human brain to another using non-invasive means.

  9. Silent communication: toward using brain signals.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xiaomei; Hill, Jeremy; Schalk, Gerwin

    2012-01-01

    From the 1980s movie Firefox to the more recent Avatar, popular science fiction has speculated about the possibility of a persons thoughts being read directly from his or her brain. Such braincomputer interfaces (BCIs) might allow people who are paralyzed to communicate with and control their environment, and there might also be applications in military situations wherever silent user-to-user communication is desirable. Previous studies have shown that BCI systems can use brain signals related to movements and movement imagery or attention-based character selection. Although these systems have successfully demonstrated the possibility to control devices using brain function, directly inferring which word a person intends to communicate has been elusive. A BCI using imagined speech might provide such a practical, intuitive device. Toward this goal, our studies to date addressed two scientific questions: (1) Can brain signals accurately characterize different aspects of speech? (2) Is it possible to predict spoken or imagined words or their components using brain signals?

  10. Probabilistic direct counterfactual quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sheng

    2017-02-01

    It is striking that the quantum Zeno effect can be used to launch a direct counterfactual communication between two spatially separated parties, Alice and Bob. So far, existing protocols of this type only provide a deterministic counterfactual communication service. However, this counterfactuality should be payed at a price. Firstly, the transmission time is much longer than a classical transmission costs. Secondly, the chained-cycle structure makes them more sensitive to channel noises. Here, we extend the idea of counterfactual communication, and present a probabilistic-counterfactual quantum communication protocol, which is proved to have advantages over the deterministic ones. Moreover, the presented protocol could evolve to a deterministic one solely by adjusting the parameters of the beam splitters. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61300203).

  11. Quantum direct communication with authentication

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hwayean; Lim, Jongin; Yang, HyungJin

    2006-04-15

    We propose two quantum direct communication (QDC) protocols with user authentication. Users can identify each other by checking the correlation of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states. Alice can directly send a secret message to Bob without any previously shared secret using the remaining GHZ states after authentication. Our second QDC protocol can be used even though there is no quantum link between Alice and Bob. The security of the transmitted message is guaranteed by properties of entanglement of GHZ states.

  12. Directional Communication in Evolved Multiagent Teams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-10

    only a fraction of the observable state of the environment. In such tasks, communication facilitates sharing information among team members to...architecture is becoming increasingly important for evolving autonomous multiagent systems. Directional reception of signals, a design feature of communication ...Title ABSTRACT How to best design a communication architecture is becoming increasingly important for evolving autonomous multiagent systems. Directional

  13. Wireless communication links for brain-machine interface applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, L.

    2016-05-01

    Recent technological developments have given neuroscientists direct access to neural signals in real time, with the accompanying ability to decode the resulting information and control various prosthetic devices and gain insight into deeper aspects of cognition. These developments - along with deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease and the possible use of electro-stimulation for other maladies - leads to the conclusion that the widespread use electronic brain interface technology is a long term possibility. This talk will summarize the various technical challenges and approaches that have been developed to wirelessly communicate with the brain, including technology constraints, dc power limits, compression and data rate issues.

  14. Guidelines for Better Communication with Brain Impaired Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home Guidelines for Better Communication with Brain Impaired Adults Printer-friendly version Communicating with a loved one with a brain disorder can indeed be challenging. Finding the right ...

  15. Brain basis of communicative actions in language.

    PubMed

    Egorova, Natalia; Shtyrov, Yury; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2016-01-15

    Although language is a key tool for communication in social interaction, most studies in the neuroscience of language have focused on language structures such as words and sentences. Here, the neural correlates of speech acts, that is, the actions performed by using language, were investigated with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants were shown videos, in which the same critical utterances were used in different communicative contexts, to Name objects, or to Request them from communication partners. Understanding of critical utterances as Requests was accompanied by activation in bilateral premotor, left inferior frontal and temporo-parietal cortical areas known to support action-related and social interactive knowledge. Naming, however, activated the left angular gyrus implicated in linking information about word forms and related reference objects mentioned in critical utterances. These findings show that understanding of utterances as different communicative actions is reflected in distinct brain activation patterns, and thus suggest different neural substrates for different speech act types.

  16. Predictors of successful self control during brain-computer communication

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, N; Birbaumer, N

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Direct brain-computer communication uses self regulation of brain potentials to select letters, words, or symbols from a computer menu to re-establish communication in severely paralysed patients. However, not all healthy subjects, or all paralysed patients acquire the skill to self regulate their brain potentials, and predictors of successful learning have not been found yet. Predictors are particularly important, because only successful self regulation will in the end lead to efficient brain-computer communication. This study investigates the question whether initial performance in the self regulation of slow cortical potentials of the brain (SCPs) may be positively correlated to later performance and could thus be used as a predictor. Methods: Five severely paralysed patients diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis were trained to produce SCP amplitudes of negative and positive polarity by means of visual feedback and operant conditioning strategies. Performance was measured as percentage of correct SCP amplitude shifts. To determine the relation between initial and later performance in SCP self regulation, Spearman's rank correlations were calculated between maximum and mean performance at the beginning of training (runs 1–30) and mean performance at two later time points (runs 64–93 and 162–191). Results: Spearman's rank correlations revealed a significant relation between maximum and mean performance in runs 1–30 and mean performance in runs 64–93 (r= 0.9 and 1.0) and maximum and mean performance in runs 1–30 and mean performance in runs 162–191 (r=1.0 and 1.0). Conclusions: Initial performance in the self regulation of SCP is positively correlated with later performance in severely paralysed patients, and thus represents a useful predictor for efficient brain-computer communication. PMID:12876247

  17. Sex differences in brain organization: implications for human communication.

    PubMed

    Hanske-Petitpierre, V; Chen, A C

    1985-12-01

    This article reviews current knowledge in two major research domains: sex differences in neuropsychophysiology, and in human communication. An attempt was made to integrate knowledge from several areas of brain research with human communication and to clarify how such a cooperative effort may be beneficial to both fields of study. By combining findings from the area of brain research, a communication paradigm was developed which contends that brain-related sex differences may reside largely in the area of communication of emotion.

  18. Brain basis of communicative actions in language

    PubMed Central

    Egorova, Natalia; Shtyrov, Yury; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    Although language is a key tool for communication in social interaction, most studies in the neuroscience of language have focused on language structures such as words and sentences. Here, the neural correlates of speech acts, that is, the actions performed by using language, were investigated with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants were shown videos, in which the same critical utterances were used in different communicative contexts, to Name objects, or to Request them from communication partners. Understanding of critical utterances as Requests was accompanied by activation in bilateral premotor, left inferior frontal and temporo-parietal cortical areas known to support action-related and social interactive knowledge. Naming, however, activated the left angular gyrus implicated in linking information about word forms and related reference objects mentioned in critical utterances. These findings show that understanding of utterances as different communicative actions is reflected in distinct brain activation patterns, and thus suggest different neural substrates for different speech act types. PMID:26505303

  19. Cerebro, lenguaje y comunicacion (Brain, Language, and Communication).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strejilevich, Leonardo

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between the brain, language, and communication in the following sections: (1) combining words, (2) language as a system, (3) language as a function of the brain, (4) the science of communication, and (5) language as a social institution. (NCR)

  20. Obesity Surgery and Gut-Brain Communication

    PubMed Central

    Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf; Shin, Andrew C.; Zheng, Huiyuan

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity, and the cluster of serious metabolic diseases it is associated with, continues to rise globally, and hopes for effective treatment with drugs have been considerably set back. Thus, success with bariatric surgeries to induce sustained body weight loss and effectively cure most of the associated co-morbidities appears almost “miraculous” and systematic investigation of the mechanisms at work has gained momentum. Here, we will discuss the basic organization of gut-brain communication and review clinical and pre-clinical investigations on the potential mechanisms by which gastric bypass surgery leads to its beneficial effects on energy balance and glucose homeostasis. Although a lot has been learned regarding changes in energy intake and expenditure, secretion of gut hormones, and improvement in glucose homeostasis, there has not yet been the “breakthrough observation” of identifying a key signaling component common to the beneficial effects of the surgery. However, given the complexity and redundancy of gut-brain signaling and gut signaling to other relevant organs, it is perhaps more realistic to expect a number of key signaling changes that act in concert to bring about the “miracle”. PMID:21315095

  1. Conscious perception of brain states: mental strategies for brain-computer communication.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Nicola; Kübler, Andrea; Kaiser, Jochen; Hinterberger, Thilo; Birbaumer, Niels

    2003-01-01

    Direct brain-computer communication utilises self-regulation of brain potentials to select letters, words or symbols from a computer menu. In this study a completely paralysed (locked-in) patient learnt to produce slow cortical potential (SCP) shifts to operate a binary spelling device. After hundreds of training sessions he gave a detailed description of his mental strategies for self-regulation. His cognitive strategies matched with the electrocortical changes perfectly. Thus he produced a contingent negative variation (CNV) with images of preparation such as an arrow being drawn on a bow. To produce a positive potential shift he imagined the arrow shooting up from the bow. To suppress potential shifts he tried to stop thinking. The study demonstrates that patients become sensitive for their brain states with increasing self-regulation practice. The use of conscious cognitive strategies may, however, be incompatible with the complete automatization of the self-regulation skill.

  2. Using Direct Instruction with Brain Injured Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glang, Ann; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This article describes two case studies of children, ages 6 and 8, with severe traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in which direct instruction programs were used to teach a variety of academic skills. Following an initial evaluation, the teacher began individualized instruction 2 to 3 times per week for 6 weeks. After approximately 12 hourly…

  3. Future directions in brain injury research.

    PubMed

    Gennarelli, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the potential future directions that are important for brain injury research, especially with regard to concussion. The avenues of proposed research are categorized according to current concepts of concussion, types of concussion, and a global schema for globally reducing the burden of concussion.

  4. Communicative Impairment in Traumatic Brain Injury: A Complete Pragmatic Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angeleri, R.; Bosco, F. M.; Zettin, M.; Sacco, K.; Colle, L.; Bara, B. G.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the communicative abilities of traumatic brain injury patients (TBI). We wish to provide a complete assessment of their communicative ability/disability using a new experimental protocol, the "Assessment Battery of Communication," ("ABaCo") comprising five scales--linguistic, extralinguistic,…

  5. Direct Communication to Earth from Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, Scott J.; Folkner, William M.; Abraham, Douglas S.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on outer planetary probe communications to Earth is shown. The topics include: 1) Science Rational for Atmospheric Probes to the Outer Planets; 2) Controlling the Scientific Appetite; 3) Learning more about Jupiter before we send more probes; 4) Sample Microwave Scan From Juno; 5) Jupiter s Deep Interior; 6) The Square Kilometer Array (SKA): A Breakthrough for Radio Astronomy; 7) Deep Space Array-based Network (DSAN); 8) Probe Direct-to-Earth Data Rate Calculations; 9) Summary; and 10) Enabling Ideas.

  6. Directional Navigation Improves Opportunistic Communication for Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Kokuti, Andras.; Gelenbe, Erol.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel direction based shortest path search algorithm to guide evacuees during an emergency. It uses opportunistic communications (oppcomms) with low-cost wearable mobile nodes that can exchange packets at close range of a few to some tens of meters without help of an infrastructure. The algorithm seeks the shortest path to exits which are safest with regard to a hazard, and is integrated into an autonomous Emergency Support System (ESS) to guide evacuees in a built environment. The algorithm proposed that ESSs are evaluated with the DBES (Distributed Building Evacuation Simulator) by simulating a shopping centre where fire is spreading. The results show that the directional path finding algorithm can offer significant improvements for the evacuees. PMID:25140633

  7. The Directive Communication of Australian Primary School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Nobile, John

    2015-01-01

    Directive communication is a key leadership practise in schools. However, very little direct attention has been given to this important feature of the school communication system. The purpose of the research reported here was to produce a richer description of directive communication in the context of Australian primary schools, and in so doing,…

  8. Cognitive rehabilitation in non-communicative brain-damaged patients.

    PubMed

    Trojano, Luigi; Moretta, Pasquale; Cozzolino, Autilia; Saltalamacchia, Annamaria; Estraneo, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Conscious patients with severe motor and speech disorders have great difficulty interacting with the environment and communicating with other people. Several augmentative communication devices are now available to exploit these patients' expressive potential, but their use often demands considerable cognitive effort. Non-communicative patients with severe brain lesions may have, in addition, specific cognitive deficits that hinder the efficient use of augmentative communication methods. Some neuropsychological batteries are now available for testing these patients. On the basis of such cognitive assessments, cognitive rehabilitation training can now be applied, but we underline that this training must be tailored to single patients in order to allow them to communicate autonomously and efficiently.

  9. Communicative versus strategic rationality: Habermas theory of communicative action and the social brain.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Michael; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Rotte, Michael; Denke, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    In the philosophical theory of communicative action, rationality refers to interpersonal communication rather than to a knowing subject. Thus, a social view of rationality is suggested. The theory differentiates between two kinds of rationality, the emancipative communicative and the strategic or instrumental reasoning. Using experimental designs in an fMRI setting, recent studies explored similar questions of reasoning in the social world and linked them with a neural network including prefrontal and parietal brain regions. Here, we employed an fMRI approach to highlight brain areas associated with strategic and communicative reasoning according to the theory of communicative action. Participants were asked to assess different social scenarios with respect to communicative or strategic rationality. We found a network of brain areas including temporal pole, precuneus, and STS more activated when participants performed communicative reasoning compared with strategic thinking and a control condition. These brain regions have been previously linked to moral sensitivity. In contrast, strategic rationality compared with communicative reasoning and control was associated with less activation in areas known to be related to moral sensitivity, emotional processing, and language control. The results suggest that strategic reasoning is associated with reduced social and emotional cognitions and may use different language related networks. Thus, the results demonstrate experimental support for the assumptions of the theory of communicative action.

  10. Communicative versus Strategic Rationality: Habermas Theory of Communicative Action and the Social Brain

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Michael; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Rotte, Michael; Denke, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    In the philosophical theory of communicative action, rationality refers to interpersonal communication rather than to a knowing subject. Thus, a social view of rationality is suggested. The theory differentiates between two kinds of rationality, the emancipative communicative and the strategic or instrumental reasoning. Using experimental designs in an fMRI setting, recent studies explored similar questions of reasoning in the social world and linked them with a neural network including prefrontal and parietal brain regions. Here, we employed an fMRI approach to highlight brain areas associated with strategic and communicative reasoning according to the theory of communicative action. Participants were asked to assess different social scenarios with respect to communicative or strategic rationality. We found a network of brain areas including temporal pole, precuneus, and STS more activated when participants performed communicative reasoning compared with strategic thinking and a control condition. These brain regions have been previously linked to moral sensitivity. In contrast, strategic rationality compared with communicative reasoning and control was associated with less activation in areas known to be related to moral sensitivity, emotional processing, and language control. The results suggest that strategic reasoning is associated with reduced social and emotional cognitions and may use different language related networks. Thus, the results demonstrate experimental support for the assumptions of the theory of communicative action. PMID:23734238

  11. Secure direct communication based on secret transmitting order of particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Aidong; Zhang Shou; Xia Yan; Fan Qiubo

    2006-02-15

    We propose the schemes of quantum secure direct communication based on a secret transmitting order of particles. In these protocols, the secret transmitting order of particles ensures the security of communication, and no secret messages are leaked even if the communication is interrupted for security. This strategy of security for communication is also generalized to a quantum dialogue. It not only ensures the unconditional security but also improves the efficiency of communication.

  12. Two Quantum Direct Communication Protocols Based on Quantum Search Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shu-Jiang; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Wang, Lian-Hai; Niu, Xin-Xin; Yang, Yi-Xian

    2015-07-01

    Based on the properties of two-qubit Grover's quantum search algorithm, we propose two quantum direct communication protocols, including a deterministic secure quantum communication and a quantum secure direct communication protocol. Secret messages can be directly sent from the sender to the receiver by using two-qubit unitary operations and the single photon measurement with one of the proposed protocols. Theoretical analysis shows that the security of the proposed protocols can be highly ensured.

  13. Communication between Brain Areas Based on Nested Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Kastner, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Unraveling how brain regions communicate is crucial for understanding how the brain processes external and internal information. Neuronal oscillations within and across brain regions have been proposed to play a crucial role in this process. Two main hypotheses have been suggested for routing of information based on oscillations, namely communication through coherence and gating by inhibition. Here, we propose a framework unifying these two hypotheses that is based on recent empirical findings. We discuss a theory in which communication between two regions is established by phase synchronization of oscillations at lower frequencies (<25 Hz), which serve as temporal reference frame for information carried by high-frequency activity (>40 Hz). Our framework, consistent with numerous recent empirical findings, posits that cross-frequency interactions are essential for understanding how large-scale cognitive and perceptual networks operate. PMID:28374013

  14. Secure direct communication with a quantum one-time pad

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Fuguo; Long Guilu

    2004-05-01

    Quantum secure direct communication is the direct communication of secret messages without first producing a shared secret key. It may be used in some urgent circumstances. Here we propose a quantum secure direct communication protocol using single photons. The protocol uses batches of single photons prepared randomly in one of four different states. These single photons serve as a one-time pad which is used directly to encode the secret messages in one communication process. We also show that it is unconditionally secure. The protocol is feasible with present-day technique.

  15. Smart plants: Memory and communication without brains

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, A Carl

    2014-01-01

    The immobility of plants is consistent with their principal function: collecting light to provide photosynthetic substrate for the biological system. Their immobility does impose limitations on some basic requirements, such as the need for pollination, for seed dispersal, and for protection against herbivores. Meeting these 3 needs will logically necessitate some ability for plant communication – at least a capability for beneficial adaptive behavior. Three types of plant behavior provide evidence of memory and communication abilities: a capability for memory, a capability for measuring time, and extensive evidence of chemical signaling systems. These may provide benefits for genetic outcrossing, seed dispersal and protection – beneficial adaptive behaviors. The chemical signaling system constitutes a wireless communication network that draws mobile animals into assisting plant functions that require mobility. Plants share their chemical signaling systems most frequently with insects and birds. These beneficial adaptable behaviors may be interpreted as some type of consciousness. PMID:25482811

  16. Smart Plants: Memory and Communication without Brains.

    PubMed

    Carl Leopold, A

    2014-08-08

    The immobility of plants is consistent with their principal function: collecting light to provide photosynthetic substrate for the biological system. Their immobility does impose limitations on some basic requirements, such as the need for pollination, for seed dispersal, and for protection against herbivores. Meeting these three needs will logically necessitate some ability for plant communication - at least a capability for beneficial adaptive behavior. Three types of plant behavior provide evidence of memory and communication abilities: a capability for memory, a capability for measuring time, and extensive evidence of chemical signaling systems. These may provide benefits for genetic outcrossing, seed dispersal and protection - beneficial adaptive behaviors. The chemical signaling system constitutes a wireless communication network that draws mobile animals into assisting plant functions that require mobility. Plants share their chemical signaling systems most frequently with insects and birds. These beneficial adaptable behaviors may be interpreted as some type of consciousness.

  17. Smart plants: memory and communication without brains.

    PubMed

    Leopold, A Carl

    2014-01-01

    The immobility of plants is consistent with their principal function: collecting light to provide photosynthetic substrate for the biological system. Their immobility does impose limitations on some basic requirements, such as the need for pollination, for seed dispersal, and for protection against herbivores. Meeting these 3 needs will logically necessitate some ability for plant communication - at least a capability for beneficial adaptive behavior. Three types of plant behavior provide evidence of memory and communication abilities: a capability for memory, a capability for measuring time, and extensive evidence of chemical signaling systems. These may provide benefits for genetic outcrossing, seed dispersal and protection - beneficial adaptive behaviors. The chemical signaling system constitutes a wireless communication network that draws mobile animals into assisting plant functions that require mobility. Plants share their chemical signaling systems most frequently with insects and birds. These beneficial adaptable behaviors may be interpreted as some type of consciousness.

  18. Communicative competence and the architecture of the mind/brain.

    PubMed

    Tirassa, M

    1999-07-01

    Cognitive pragmatics is concerned with the mental processes involved in intentional communication. I discuss a few issues that may help clarify the relationship between this area and the broader cognitive science and the contribution that they give, or might give, to each other. Rather than dwelling on the many technicalities of the various theories of communication that have been advanced, I focus on the different conceptions of the nature and the architecture of the mind/brain that underlie them. My aims are, first, to introduce and defend mentalist views of communication in general; second, to defend one such view, namely that communication is a cognitive competence, that is, a faculty, and the underlying idea that the architecture of the mind/brain is domain-specific; and, third, to review the (scarce) neuropsychological evidence that bears on these issues.

  19. Cognitive rehabilitation in non-communicative brain-damaged patients

    PubMed Central

    Trojano, Luigi; Moretta, Pasquale; Cozzolino, Autilia; Saltalamacchia, Annamaria; Estraneo, Anna

    Summary Conscious patients with severe motor and speech disorders have great difficulty interacting with the environment and communicating with other people. Several augmentative communication devices are now available to exploit these patients’ expressive potential, but their use often demands considerable cognitive effort. Non-communicative patients with severe brain lesions may have, in addition, specific cognitive deficits that hinder the efficient use of augmentative communication methods. Some neuropsychological batteries are now available for testing these patients. On the basis of such cognitive assessments, cognitive rehabilitation training can now be applied, but we underline that this training must be tailored to single patients in order to allow them to communicate autonomously and efficiently. PMID:21693090

  20. Functional communication screening in individuals with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Sakina S; Boss, Michelle R

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of a novel instrument, the Functional Communication Scale (FCS), was determined for individuals with moderate-to-mild cognitive-communication deficits secondary to traumatic brain injury (TBI). A group design including 30 adults with confirmed diagnosis and communication problems was utilized. Conversational samples with each participant were videotaped and rated for 13 FCS items. Three raters with diverse clinical experiences rated the elicited samples. Results identified significant and positive relationships between the cognitive-communication severities and the total FCS scores. Significant inter- and intra-rater reliability scores were found for the three raters. The FCS also determined significant differences between individuals with and without concurrent aphasia or dysarthria. No obvious differences were found between males and females nor between individuals with the primary diagnosis of TBI vs other neurological aetiologies. These findings have implications for assessing the adequacy of functional communication of individuals who are candidates for community re-entry.

  1. Communication in Mind, Brain, and Education: Making Disciplinary Differences Explicit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalra, Priya; O'Keeffe, Jamie K.

    2011-01-01

    Difficulties in communication within Mind, Brain, and Education (MBE) can arise from several sources. One source is differences in orientation among the areas of research, policy, and practice. Another source is lack of understanding of the entrenched and unspoken differences across research disciplines in MBE--that is, recognition that research…

  2. Brain-computer interfaces for communication with nonresponsive patients.

    PubMed

    Naci, Lorina; Monti, Martin M; Cruse, Damian; Kübler, Andrea; Sorger, Bettina; Goebel, Rainer; Kotchoubey, Boris; Owen, Adrian M

    2012-09-01

    A substantial number of patients who survive severe brain injury progress to a nonresponsive state of wakeful unawareness, referred to as a vegetative state (VS). They appear to be awake, but show no signs of awareness of themselves, or of their environment in repeated clinical examinations. However, recent neuroimaging research demonstrates that some VS patients can respond to commands by willfully modulating their brain activity according to instruction. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) may allow such patients to circumvent the barriers imposed by their behavioral limitations and communicate with the outside world. However, although such devices would undoubtedly improve the quality of life for some patients and their families, developing BCI systems for behaviorally nonresponsive patients presents substantial technical and clinical challenges. Here we review the state of the art of BCI research across noninvasive neuroimaging technologies, and propose how such systems should be developed further to provide fully fledged communication systems for behaviorally nonresponsive populations.

  3. Conscious Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans Using Non-Invasive Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Carles; Ginhoux, Romuald; Riera, Alejandro; Nguyen, Thanh Lam; Chauvat, Hubert; Berg, Michel; Amengual, Julià L.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Ruffini, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Human sensory and motor systems provide the natural means for the exchange of information between individuals, and, hence, the basis for human civilization. The recent development of brain-computer interfaces (BCI) has provided an important element for the creation of brain-to-brain communication systems, and precise brain stimulation techniques are now available for the realization of non-invasive computer-brain interfaces (CBI). These technologies, BCI and CBI, can be combined to realize the vision of non-invasive, computer-mediated brain-to-brain (B2B) communication between subjects (hyperinteraction). Here we demonstrate the conscious transmission of information between human brains through the intact scalp and without intervention of motor or peripheral sensory systems. Pseudo-random binary streams encoding words were transmitted between the minds of emitter and receiver subjects separated by great distances, representing the realization of the first human brain-to-brain interface. In a series of experiments, we established internet-mediated B2B communication by combining a BCI based on voluntary motor imagery-controlled electroencephalographic (EEG) changes with a CBI inducing the conscious perception of phosphenes (light flashes) through neuronavigated, robotized transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), with special care taken to block sensory (tactile, visual or auditory) cues. Our results provide a critical proof-of-principle demonstration for the development of conscious B2B communication technologies. More fully developed, related implementations will open new research venues in cognitive, social and clinical neuroscience and the scientific study of consciousness. We envision that hyperinteraction technologies will eventually have a profound impact on the social structure of our civilization and raise important ethical issues. PMID:25137064

  4. Conscious brain-to-brain communication in humans using non-invasive technologies.

    PubMed

    Grau, Carles; Ginhoux, Romuald; Riera, Alejandro; Nguyen, Thanh Lam; Chauvat, Hubert; Berg, Michel; Amengual, Julià L; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Ruffini, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Human sensory and motor systems provide the natural means for the exchange of information between individuals, and, hence, the basis for human civilization. The recent development of brain-computer interfaces (BCI) has provided an important element for the creation of brain-to-brain communication systems, and precise brain stimulation techniques are now available for the realization of non-invasive computer-brain interfaces (CBI). These technologies, BCI and CBI, can be combined to realize the vision of non-invasive, computer-mediated brain-to-brain (B2B) communication between subjects (hyperinteraction). Here we demonstrate the conscious transmission of information between human brains through the intact scalp and without intervention of motor or peripheral sensory systems. Pseudo-random binary streams encoding words were transmitted between the minds of emitter and receiver subjects separated by great distances, representing the realization of the first human brain-to-brain interface. In a series of experiments, we established internet-mediated B2B communication by combining a BCI based on voluntary motor imagery-controlled electroencephalographic (EEG) changes with a CBI inducing the conscious perception of phosphenes (light flashes) through neuronavigated, robotized transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), with special care taken to block sensory (tactile, visual or auditory) cues. Our results provide a critical proof-of-principle demonstration for the development of conscious B2B communication technologies. More fully developed, related implementations will open new research venues in cognitive, social and clinical neuroscience and the scientific study of consciousness. We envision that hyperinteraction technologies will eventually have a profound impact on the social structure of our civilization and raise important ethical issues.

  5. Language, Communication, and Culture: Current Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ting-Toomey, Stella, Ed.; Korzenny, Felipe, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Dealing with the relationships among language, communication, and culture, the 12 papers in this collection are divided into three parts. The first part deals with the critical issues related to language acquisition, context, and cognition. The second part presents an array of perspectives in analyzing the role of language in comparative…

  6. Cancer communication: status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Bradford W

    2009-01-01

    On November 7, 2005, the directors of the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Comprehensive Cancer Centers met to identify ways of accelerating success against cancer using current knowledge. Not surprisingly, cancer communication was identified as a focal point of research that needed to be conducted to extend the benefits of cancer knowledge throughout the population. There were three foci of communication research identified by the directors: (a) research designed to extend awareness of prevention and early detection, (b) research designed to improve the accuracy and usability of cancer science as portrayed in national news media, and (c) research designed to support behavior through individual and community-level interventions. Each of these foci takes on new meaning when considered in the context of a rapidly changing communication environment. Behavioral science must evolve to keep up with these changes and to offer new evidence-based approaches for extending the reach, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer communication in order to do its part in accelerating successes against the disease.

  7. Connections that Count: Brain-Computer Interface Enables the Profoundly Paralyzed to Communicate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Connections that Count: Brain-Computer Interface Enables the Profoundly Paralyzed to Communicate ... of this page please turn Javascript on. A brain-computer interface (BCI) system This brain-computer interface ( ...

  8. Advanced Technology Direction and Control Communications Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-16

    WORK UN4IT NUMBERS The MITRE Corporation ’ 1820 flolley Madison Blvd. Work Unit 2214G McLean, VJ rginia 22102 Ii. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS...Satellite communications using low power technique. A spread spectrum system being developed by The MITRE Corporation for the Maritime Commission. vI I,: I...300-3000 MHz; SHF (super high frequency), 3-30 GHz; EHF (extra high frequency), 30-300 GHz. 3-3 The MITRE Corporation prepared a survey of

  9. Controlled Bidirectional Quantum Secure Direct Communication

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Yao-Hsin; Lin, Yu-Ting; Zeng, Guo-Jyun; Lin, Fang-Jhu; Chen, Chi-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel protocol for controlled bidirectional quantum secure communication based on a nonlocal swap gate scheme. Our proposed protocol would be applied to a system in which a controller (supervisor/Charlie) controls the bidirectional communication with quantum information or secret messages between legitimate users (Alice and Bob). In this system, the legitimate users must obtain permission from the controller in order to exchange their respective quantum information or secret messages simultaneously; the controller is unable to obtain any quantum information or secret messages from the decoding process. Moreover, the presence of the controller also avoids the problem of one legitimate user receiving the quantum information or secret message before the other, and then refusing to help the other user decode the quantum information or secret message. Our proposed protocol is aimed at protecting against external and participant attacks on such a system, and the cost of transmitting quantum bits using our protocol is less than that achieved in other studies. Based on the nonlocal swap gate scheme, the legitimate users exchange their quantum information or secret messages without transmission in a public channel, thus protecting against eavesdroppers stealing the secret messages. PMID:25006596

  10. Brain-computer interfaces: communication and restoration of movement in paralysis.

    PubMed

    Birbaumer, Niels; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2007-03-15

    The review describes the status of brain-computer or brain-machine interface research. We focus on non-invasive brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) and their clinical utility for direct brain communication in paralysis and motor restoration in stroke. A large gap between the promises of invasive animal and human BCI preparations and the clinical reality characterizes the literature: while intact monkeys learn to execute more or less complex upper limb movements with spike patterns from motor brain regions alone without concomitant peripheral motor activity usually after extensive training, clinical applications in human diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and paralysis from stroke or spinal cord lesions show only limited success, with the exception of verbal communication in paralysed and locked-in patients. BCIs based on electroencephalographic potentials or oscillations are ready to undergo large clinical studies and commercial production as an adjunct or a major assisted communication device for paralysed and locked-in patients. However, attempts to train completely locked-in patients with BCI communication after entering the complete locked-in state with no remaining eye movement failed. We propose that a lack of contingencies between goal directed thoughts and intentions may be at the heart of this problem. Experiments with chronically curarized rats support our hypothesis; operant conditioning and voluntary control of autonomic physiological functions turned out to be impossible in this preparation. In addition to assisted communication, BCIs consisting of operant learning of EEG slow cortical potentials and sensorimotor rhythm were demonstrated to be successful in drug resistant focal epilepsy and attention deficit disorder. First studies of non-invasive BCIs using sensorimotor rhythm of the EEG and MEG in restoration of paralysed hand movements in chronic stroke and single cases of high spinal cord lesions show some promise, but need extensive

  11. Self-portraits of the brain: cognitive science, data visualization, and communicating brain structure and function.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, Robert L; Pestilli, Franco; Börner, Katy

    2015-08-01

    With several large-scale human brain projects currently underway and a range of neuroimaging techniques growing in availability to researchers, the amount and diversity of data relevant for understanding the human brain is increasing rapidly. A complete understanding of the brain must incorporate information about 3D neural location, activity, timing, and task. Data mining, high-performance computing, and visualization can serve as tools that augment human intellect; however, the resulting visualizations must take into account human abilities and limitations to be effective tools for exploration and communication. In this feature review, we discuss key challenges and opportunities that arise when leveraging the sophisticated perceptual and conceptual processing of the human brain to help researchers understand brain structure, function, and behavior.

  12. Trends and Challenges in Neuroengineering: Toward "Intelligent" Neuroprostheses through Brain-"Brain Inspired Systems" Communication.

    PubMed

    Vassanelli, Stefano; Mahmud, Mufti

    2016-01-01

    Future technologies aiming at restoring and enhancing organs function will intimately rely on near-physiological and energy-efficient communication between living and artificial biomimetic systems. Interfacing brain-inspired devices with the real brain is at the forefront of such emerging field, with the term "neurobiohybrids" indicating all those systems where such interaction is established. We argue that achieving a "high-level" communication and functional synergy between natural and artificial neuronal networks in vivo, will allow the development of a heterogeneous world of neurobiohybrids, which will include "living robots" but will also embrace "intelligent" neuroprostheses for augmentation of brain function. The societal and economical impact of intelligent neuroprostheses is likely to be potentially strong, as they will offer novel therapeutic perspectives for a number of diseases, and going beyond classical pharmaceutical schemes. However, they will unavoidably raise fundamental ethical questions on the intermingling between man and machine and more specifically, on how deeply it should be allowed that brain processing is affected by implanted "intelligent" artificial systems. Following this perspective, we provide the reader with insights on ongoing developments and trends in the field of neurobiohybrids. We address the topic also from a "community building" perspective, showing through a quantitative bibliographic analysis, how scientists working on the engineering of brain-inspired devices and brain-machine interfaces are increasing their interactions. We foresee that such trend preludes to a formidable technological and scientific revolution in brain-machine communication and to the opening of new avenues for restoring or even augmenting brain function for therapeutic purposes.

  13. Quantum authencryption: one-step authenticated quantum secure direct communications for off-line communicants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tzonelih; Luo, Yi-Ping; Yang, Chun-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Han

    2014-04-01

    This work proposes a new direction in quantum cryptography called quantum authencryption. Quantum authencryption (QA), a new term to distinguish from authenticated quantum secure direct communications, is used to describe the technique of combining quantum encryption and quantum authentication into one process for off-line communicants. QA provides a new way of quantum communications without the presence of a receiver on line, and thus makes many applications depending on secure one-way quantum communications, such as quantum E-mail systems, possible. An example protocol using single photons and one-way hash functions is presented to realize the requirements on QA.

  14. The brain's silent messenger: using selective attention to decode human thought for brain-based communication.

    PubMed

    Naci, Lorina; Cusack, Rhodri; Jia, Vivian Z; Owen, Adrian M

    2013-05-29

    The interpretation of human thought from brain activity, without recourse to speech or action, is one of the most provoking and challenging frontiers of modern neuroscience. In particular, patients who are fully conscious and awake, yet, due to brain damage, are unable to show any behavioral responsivity, expose the limits of the neuromuscular system and the necessity for alternate forms of communication. Although it is well established that selective attention can significantly enhance the neural representation of attended sounds, it remains, thus far, untested as a response modality for brain-based communication. We asked whether its effect could be reliably used to decode answers to binary (yes/no) questions. Fifteen healthy volunteers answered questions (e.g., "Do you have brothers or sisters?") in the fMRI scanner, by selectively attending to the appropriate word ("yes" or "no"). Ninety percent of the answers were decoded correctly based on activity changes within the attention network. The majority of volunteers conveyed their answers with less than 3 min of scanning, suggesting that this technique is suited for communication in a reasonable amount of time. Formal comparison with the current best-established fMRI technique for binary communication revealed improved individual success rates and scanning times required to detect responses. This novel fMRI technique is intuitive, easy to use in untrained participants, and reliably robust within brief scanning times. Possible applications include communication with behaviorally nonresponsive patients.

  15. Brain communication in the locked-in state.

    PubMed

    De Massari, Daniele; Ruf, Carolin A; Furdea, Adrian; Matuz, Tamara; van der Heiden, Linda; Halder, Sebastian; Silvoni, Stefano; Birbaumer, Niels

    2013-06-01

    Patients in the completely locked-in state have no means of communication and they represent the target population for brain-computer interface research in the last 15 years. Although different paradigms have been tested and different physiological signals used, to date no sufficiently documented completely locked-in state patient was able to control a brain-computer interface over an extended time period. We introduce Pavlovian semantic conditioning to enable basic communication in completely locked-in state. This novel paradigm is based on semantic conditioning for online classification of neuroelectric or any other physiological signals to discriminate between covert (cognitive) 'yes' and 'no' responses. The paradigm comprised the presentation of affirmative and negative statements used as conditioned stimuli, while the unconditioned stimulus consisted of electrical stimulation of the skin paired with affirmative statements. Three patients with advanced amyotrophic lateral sclerosis participated over an extended time period, one of which was in a completely locked-in state, the other two in the locked-in state. The patients' level of vigilance was assessed through auditory oddball procedures to study the correlation between vigilance level and the classifier's performance. The average online classification accuracies of slow cortical components of electroencephalographic signals were around chance level for all the patients. The use of a non-linear classifier in the offline classification procedure resulted in a substantial improvement of the accuracy in one locked-in state patient achieving 70% correct classification. A reliable level of performance in the completely locked-in state patient was not achieved uniformly throughout the 37 sessions despite intact cognitive processing capacity, but in some sessions communication accuracies up to 70% were achieved. Paradigm modifications are proposed. Rapid drop of vigilance was detected suggesting attentional

  16. Three-step semiquantum secure direct communication protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, XiangFu; Qiu, DaoWen

    2014-09-01

    Quantum secure direct communication is the direct communication of secret messages without need for establishing a shared secret key first. In the existing schemes, quantum secure direct communication is possible only when both parties are quantum. In this paper, we construct a three-step semiquantum secure direct communication (SQSDC) protocol based on single photon sources in which the sender Alice is classical. In a semiquantum protocol, a person is termed classical if he (she) can measure, prepare and send quantum states only with the fixed orthogonal quantum basis {|0>, |1>}. The security of the proposed SQSDC protocol is guaranteed by the complete robustness of semiquantum key distribution protocols and the unconditional security of classical one-time pad encryption. Therefore, the proposed SQSDC protocol is also completely robust. Complete robustness indicates that nonzero information acquired by an eavesdropper Eve on the secret message implies the nonzero probability that the legitimate participants can find errors on the bits tested by this protocol. In the proposed protocol, we suggest a method to check Eves disturbing in the doves returning phase such that Alice does not need to announce publicly any position or their coded bits value after the photons transmission is completed. Moreover, the proposed SQSDC protocol can be implemented with the existing techniques. Compared with many quantum secure direct communication protocols, the proposed SQSDC protocol has two merits: firstly the sender only needs classical capabilities; secondly to check Eves disturbing after the transmission of quantum states, no additional classical information is needed.

  17. Distributed Load Shedding over Directed Communication Networks with Time Delays

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tao; Wu, Di

    2016-07-25

    When generation is insufficient to support all loads under emergencies, effective and efficient load shedding needs to be deployed in order to maintain the supply-demand balance. This paper presents a distributed load shedding algorithm, which makes efficient decision based on the discovered global information. In the global information discovery process, each load only communicates with its neighboring load via directed communication links possibly with arbitrarily large but bounded time varying communication delays. We propose a novel distributed information discovery algorithm based on ratio consensus. Simulation results are used to validate the proposed method.

  18. Possible existence of optical communication channels in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sourabh; Boone, Kristine; Tuszyński, Jack; Barclay, Paul; Simon, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Given that many fundamental questions in neuroscience are still open, it seems pertinent to explore whether the brain might use other physical modalities than the ones that have been discovered so far. In particular it is well established that neurons can emit photons, which prompts the question whether these biophotons could serve as signals between neurons, in addition to the well-known electro-chemical signals. For such communication to be targeted, the photons would need to travel in waveguides. Here we show, based on detailed theoretical modeling, that myelinated axons could serve as photonic waveguides, taking into account realistic optical imperfections. We propose experiments, both in vivo and in vitro, to test our hypothesis. We discuss the implications of our results, including the question whether photons could mediate long-range quantum entanglement in the brain. PMID:27819310

  19. Possible existence of optical communication channels in the brain.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sourabh; Boone, Kristine; Tuszyński, Jack; Barclay, Paul; Simon, Christoph

    2016-11-07

    Given that many fundamental questions in neuroscience are still open, it seems pertinent to explore whether the brain might use other physical modalities than the ones that have been discovered so far. In particular it is well established that neurons can emit photons, which prompts the question whether these biophotons could serve as signals between neurons, in addition to the well-known electro-chemical signals. For such communication to be targeted, the photons would need to travel in waveguides. Here we show, based on detailed theoretical modeling, that myelinated axons could serve as photonic waveguides, taking into account realistic optical imperfections. We propose experiments, both in vivo and in vitro, to test our hypothesis. We discuss the implications of our results, including the question whether photons could mediate long-range quantum entanglement in the brain.

  20. Possible existence of optical communication channels in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sourabh; Boone, Kristine; Tuszyński, Jack; Barclay, Paul; Simon, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    Given that many fundamental questions in neuroscience are still open, it seems pertinent to explore whether the brain might use other physical modalities than the ones that have been discovered so far. In particular it is well established that neurons can emit photons, which prompts the question whether these biophotons could serve as signals between neurons, in addition to the well-known electro-chemical signals. For such communication to be targeted, the photons would need to travel in waveguides. Here we show, based on detailed theoretical modeling, that myelinated axons could serve as photonic waveguides, taking into account realistic optical imperfections. We propose experiments, both in vivo and in vitro, to test our hypothesis. We discuss the implications of our results, including the question whether photons could mediate long-range quantum entanglement in the brain.

  1. Plasticity of the aging brain: new directions in cognitive neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Gutchess, Angela

    2014-10-31

    Cognitive neuroscience has revealed aging of the human brain to be rich in reorganization and change. Neuroimaging results have recast our framework around cognitive aging from one of decline to one emphasizing plasticity. Current methods use neurostimulation approaches to manipulate brain function, providing a direct test of the ways that the brain differently contributes to task performance for younger and older adults. Emerging research into emotional, social, and motivational domains provides some evidence for preservation with age, suggesting potential avenues of plasticity, alongside additional evidence for reorganization. Thus, we begin to see that aging of the brain, amidst interrelated behavioral and biological changes, is as complex and idiosyncratic as the brain itself, qualitatively changing over the life span.

  2. Channel simulation for direct-detection optical communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tycz, M.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for simulating the random modulation imposed by atmospheric scintillation and transmitter pointing jitter on a direct-detection optical communication system. The system is capable of providing signal fading statistics which obey log-normal, beta, Rayleigh, Ricean, or chi-square density functions. Experimental tests of the performance of the channel simulator are presented.

  3. Future Directions in Distance Learning and Communication Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Timothy; Hung, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Future Directions in Distance Learning and Communication Technologies presents theoretical studies and practical solutions for engineers, educational professionals, and graduate students in the research areas of e-learning, distance education, and instructional design. This book provides readers with cutting-edge solutions and research directions…

  4. Channel simulation for direct detection optical communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tycz, M.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for simulating the random modulation imposed by atmospheric scintillation and transmitter pointing jitter on a direct detection optical communication system. The system is capable of providing signal fading statistics which obey log normal, beta, Rayleigh, Ricean or chi-squared density functions. Experimental tests of the performance of the Channel Simulator are presented.

  5. New Voices in the Workplace: Research Directions in Multicultural Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Marlene G.

    1991-01-01

    Develops a two-step framework (resistance to privileged discourse followed by harmonic discourse) for understanding multicultural communication in organizations based on the assumption of cultural difference. Suggests four directions for future research to create the data base that would allow development of a model of multicultural communication…

  6. Mapping blood flow directionality in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Hong; Do, Won-Joon; Choi, Seung Hong; Zhao, Tiejun; Bae, Kyongtae Ty

    2016-07-01

    Diffusion properties of tissue are often expressed on the basis of directional variance, i.e., diffusion tensor imaging. In comparison, common perfusion-weighted imaging such as arterial spin labeling yields perfusion in a scalar quantity. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of mapping cerebral blood flow directionality using alternate ascending/descending directional navigation (ALADDIN), a recently-developed arterial spin labeling technique with sensitivity to blood flow directions. ALADDIN was applied along 3 orthogonal directions to assess directional blood flow in a vector form and also along 6 equally-spaced directions to extract blood flow tensor matrix (P) based on a blood flow ellipsoid model. Tensor elements (eigenvalues, eigenvectors, etc) were calculated to investigate characteristics of the blood flow tensor, in comparison with time-of-flight MR angiogram. While the directions of the main eigenvectors were heterogeneous throughout the brain, regional clusters of blood flow directionality were reproducible across subjects. The technique could show heterogeneous blood flow directionality within and around brain tumor, which was different from that of the contralateral normal side. The proposed method is deemed to provide information of blood flow directionality, which has not been demonstrated before. The results warrant further studies to assess changes in the directionality map as a function of scan parameters, to understand the signal sources, to investigate the possibility of mapping local blood perfusion directionality, and to evaluate its usefulness for clinical diagnosis.

  7. Quantum secure direct communication with frequency coding scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xue-Liang; Ruan, Dong

    2016-11-01

    Quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) is an important branch of quantum cryptography. It can transmit secret information directly without establishing a key first, unlike quantum key distribution which requires this precursive event. One of the most highlighted QSDC protocol is the Two-step protocol. This paper will focus on proposing a frequency coding scheme in the Two-step protocol, while retaining other contents of the QSDC protocol. This new coding scheme will significantly increase the protocol's ability against channel noise and loss, and provides an efficient protocol for secure direct quantum communication in a noisy environment. Besides, the frequency coding technology is also easy to understand and highly practical. After numerically simulating the performance of the protocol in a noisy channel, the results showed that the scheme was robust against channel noise and loss.

  8. Variable mode bi-directional and uni-directional computer communication system

    DOEpatents

    Cornett, Frank N.; Jenkins, Philip N.; Bowman, Terrance L.; Placek, Joseph M.; Thorson, Gregory M.

    2004-12-14

    A variable communication systems comprising a plurality of transceivers and a control circuit connected to the transceivers to configure the transceivers to operate in a bi-directional mode and a uni-directional mode at different times using different transfer methods to transfer data.

  9. Estimating direction in brain-behavior interactions: Proactive and reactive brain states in driving.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Javier O; Brooks, Justin; Kerick, Scott; Johnson, Tony; Mullen, Tim R; Vettel, Jean M

    2017-02-22

    Conventional neuroimaging analyses have ascribed function to particular brain regions, exploiting the power of the subtraction technique in fMRI and event-related potential analyses in EEG. Moving beyond this convention, many researchers have begun exploring network-based neurodynamics and coordination between brain regions as a function of behavioral parameters or environmental statistics; however, most approaches average evoked activity across the experimental session to study task-dependent networks. Here, we examined on-going oscillatory activity as measured with EEG and use a methodology to estimate directionality in brain-behavior interactions. After source reconstruction, activity within specific frequency bands (delta: 2-3Hz; theta: 4-7Hz; alpha: 8-12Hz; beta: 13-25Hz) in a priori regions of interest was linked to continuous behavioral measurements, and we used a predictive filtering scheme to estimate the asymmetry between brain-to-behavior and behavior-to-brain prediction using a variant of Granger causality. We applied this approach to a simulated driving task and examined directed relationships between brain activity and continuous driving performance (steering behavior or vehicle heading error). Our results indicated that two neuro-behavioral states may be explored with this methodology: a Proactive brain state that actively plans the response to the sensory information and is characterized by delta-beta activity, and a Reactive brain state that processes incoming information and reacts to environmental statistics primarily within the alpha band.

  10. Olfactory perception, communication, and the nose-to-brain pathway.

    PubMed

    Stockhorst, Ursula; Pietrowsky, Reinhard

    2004-10-30

    The present paper's aim is of to give an overview about the basic knowledge as well as actual topics of olfaction--with a special regard on behavior. We summarize different functions of the nose and the olfactory system in human physiology and psychology. We will first describe the functional anatomy of the olfactory system in man. Afterwards, the function of the olfactory system will be viewed from an evolutionary and phylogenetic perspective. We will further outline the main features of olfactory perception, and will show how olfactory perception is influenced by learning. Olfactory signals are relevant stimuli that affect communication. Consequently, the role of the olfactory system in social interaction and mood will be described and gender differences will be addressed. Finally, the function of the nose as an interface to the brain, including implications for pharmacology, will be discussed.

  11. Noninvasive brain-computer interfaces for augmentative and alternative communication.

    PubMed

    Akcakaya, Murat; Peters, Betts; Moghadamfalahi, Mohammad; Mooney, Aimee R; Orhan, Umut; Oken, Barry; Erdogmus, Deniz; Fried-Oken, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) promise to provide a novel access channel for assistive technologies, including augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems, to people with severe speech and physical impairments (SSPI). Research on the subject has been accelerating significantly in the last decade and the research community took great strides toward making BCI-AAC a practical reality to individuals with SSPI. Nevertheless, the end goal has still not been reached and there is much work to be done to produce real-world-worthy systems that can be comfortably, conveniently, and reliably used by individuals with SSPI with help from their families and care givers who will need to maintain, setup, and debug the systems at home. This paper reviews reports in the BCI field that aim at AAC as the application domain with a consideration on both technical and clinical aspects.

  12. Brain dynamics in the genesis of trust as the basis for communication by representations

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, W.J.

    1996-12-31

    A theory of brain dynamics is proposed according to which brains construct external representations by actions into the world for communication. The prior brain patterns constitute meanings, not representations of meanings. The representations have no meaning in themselves. They are shaped in accordance with meaning inside transmitting brains, and they can elicit the construction of meaning inside receiving brains, provided that trust has been established between the transmitters and the receivers through appropriate neurochemical changes.

  13. Directed Progression Brain Networks in Alzheimer's Disease: Properties and Classification

    PubMed Central

    Young, Karl; Asif, Danial; Jutla, Inderjit; Liang, Michael; Wilson, Scott; Landsberg, Adam S.; Schuff, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article introduces a new approach in brain connectomics aimed at characterizing the temporal spread in the brain of pathologies like Alzheimer's disease (AD). The main instrument is the development of “directed progression networks” (DPNets), wherein one constructs directed edges between nodes based on (weakly) inferred directions of the temporal spreading of the pathology. This stands in contrast to many previously studied brain networks where edges represent correlations, physical connections, or functional progressions. In addition, this is one of a few studies showing the value of using directed networks in the study of AD. This article focuses on the construction of DPNets for AD using longitudinal cortical thickness measurements from magnetic resonance imaging data. The network properties are then characterized, providing new insights into AD progression, as well as novel markers for differentiating normal cognition (NC) and AD at the group level. It also demonstrates the important role of nodal variations for network classification (i.e., the significance of standard deviations, not just mean values of nodal properties). Finally, the DPNets are utilized to classify subjects based on their global network measures using a variety of data-mining methodologies. In contrast to most brain networks, these DPNets do not show high clustering and small-world properties. PMID:24901258

  14. Brain-computer interfaces for communication and control.

    PubMed

    Wolpaw, Jonathan R; Birbaumer, Niels; McFarland, Dennis J; Pfurtscheller, Gert; Vaughan, Theresa M

    2002-06-01

    For many years people have speculated that electroencephalographic activity or other electrophysiological measures of brain function might provide a new non-muscular channel for sending messages and commands to the external world - a brain-computer interface (BCI). Over the past 15 years, productive BCI research programs have arisen. Encouraged by new understanding of brain function, by the advent of powerful low-cost computer equipment, and by growing recognition of the needs and potentials of people with disabilities, these programs concentrate on developing new augmentative communication and control technology for those with severe neuromuscular disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brainstem stroke, and spinal cord injury. The immediate goal is to provide these users, who may be completely paralyzed, or 'locked in', with basic communication capabilities so that they can express their wishes to caregivers or even operate word processing programs or neuroprostheses. Present-day BCIs determine the intent of the user from a variety of different electrophysiological signals. These signals include slow cortical potentials, P300 potentials, and mu or beta rhythms recorded from the scalp, and cortical neuronal activity recorded by implanted electrodes. They are translated in real-time into commands that operate a computer display or other device. Successful operation requires that the user encode commands in these signals and that the BCI derive the commands from the signals. Thus, the user and the BCI system need to adapt to each other both initially and continually so as to ensure stable performance. Current BCIs have maximum information transfer rates up to 10-25bits/min. This limited capacity can be valuable for people whose severe disabilities prevent them from using conventional augmentative communication methods. At the same time, many possible applications of BCI technology, such as neuroprosthesis control, may require higher information transfer

  15. Treatment Efficacy: Cognitive-Communicative Disorders Resulting from Traumatic Brain Injury in Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Carl A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses adults with brain injuries and resulting cognitive communicative disorders. The incidence of brain injuries, the effects of cognitive-communication disorders, the role of the speech-language pathologist, the benefits of treatment, and the effects of different treatments are discussed. Charts are included that summarize…

  16. Brain-immune communication psychoneuroimmunology of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kern, S; Ziemssen, T

    2008-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) and the immune system are two extremely complex and highly adaptive systems. In the face of a real or anticipated threat, be it physical (eg, infection) or psychological (eg, psychosocial stress) in nature, the two systems act in concert to provide optimal adaptation to the demanding internal or environmental conditions. During instances of well being, the communication between these two systems is well tuned and balanced. However, a disturbed crosstalk between the CNS and the immune system is thought to play a major role in a wide series of disorders characterized by a hyporesponsive or hyperresponsive immune system. In multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease, an excess of inflammatory processes seems to be a hallmark and there is growing evidence for a disturbed communication between the CNS and the immune system as a crucial pathogenic factor. While the exact mechanisms for these phenomena are still poorly understood, the young discipline of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI), which focuses on the mechanism underlying the brain to immune crosstalk, might offer some insights into the existing pathogenic mechanisms. Findings from the field of PNI might also help to gain a better understanding regarding the origin and course of MS clinical symptoms such as fatigue and depression.

  17. Transcranial brain stimulation: clinical applications and future directions.

    PubMed

    Najib, Umer; Bashir, Shahid; Edwards, Dylan; Rotenberg, Alexander; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2011-04-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation is a valuable investigative tool and has potential therapeutic applications in cognitive neuroscience, neurophysiology, psychiatry, and neurology. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is particularly useful to establish and map causal brain-behavior relations in motor and nonmotor cortical areas. Neuronavigated TMS is able to provide precise information related to the individual's functional anatomy that can be visualized and used during surgical interventions and critically aid in presurgical planning, reducing the need for riskier and more cumbersome intraoperative or invasive mapping procedures. This article reviews methodological aspects, clinical applications, and future directions of TMS-based mapping.

  18. Fostering science communication via direct outreach by scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viñas, M.; Weiss, P. L.; O'Neil, K.; Richardson, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    While the bread-and-butter of the press operation at the American Geophysical Union remains issuing press releases and organizing press conferences for mainstream media, the implosion of specialized science coverage in print media, TV, and radio, and the heated public debates on science issues require us to find other ways to get science and scientists into the public eye. This means getting volunteers--small armies of scientists interested in and able to communicate with the public. At AGU, we have three programs to foster direct communication between scientists and the public: (1) A suite of blogs launched in Fall 2010, written by external Earth and space science bloggers for an audience of scientists and lay public. We will report on whom the bloggers are, their motivations, who makes up their audiences, what incentives AGU uses to encourage them to participate in this project, blog network traffic, and resources needed to support them. (2) "The Plainspoken Scientist", a science communication-oriented blog for an audience of scientists, was launched in spring 2010 and is a mixture of guest posts and in-house articles. We will report on the response to and effects of the science communication blog, how we obtain and use guest posts from volunteers, and traffic. (3) We began professional development workshops at scientific meetings in spring 2009 to help scientists brush up on how to communicate with the media and the public. We will report on the motivations and interests of the participants in the professional development workshops, impacts, and the lessons we have learned about how to provide useful workshops.

  19. Is non-directive communication in genetic counseling possible?

    PubMed

    Pennacchini, M; Pensieri, C

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, over 560,000 genetic tests were performed in Italy. However, only 70,154 genetic counseling sessions were conducted. Some say that non-directive counseling is necessary so that the patient understands the test results and the different options available and that the physician should not influence the patient's free choice. We need to clarify the meaning of non-directive consultation and if it is in fact possible. Each doctor has his own values and, in order to achieve the intended purpose, he will give information that, with his verbal, para-verbal and body language will guide the patient to one decision or another. Taking into account the axiom of effective communication "You can't NOT communicate", non-directive counseling is very difficult or even impossible. In genetic counseling, the knowledge that the patient receives of the correct diagnosis and related medical facts and of the applicable genetic considerations is basic to the entire process. Nonetheless, such knowledge in itself is not sufficient if it cannot be appropriately imparted to the interested person or persons. We think "persuasion" is not the right method, but instead "convince" meaning "co-win", "win together" may be the best approach to a problem of such great importance. The counselor will have achieved the desired goal with his patient if he is able to channel the emotion towards a mutually beneficial objective. The primary goal is not to persuade but to win-together (convince) with the patient and the unborn child.

  20. Movement: How the Brain Communicates with the World

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Voluntary movement is a result of signals transmitted through a communication channel that links the internal world in our minds to the physical world around us. Intention can be considered the desire to effect change on our environment, and this is contained in the signals from the brain, passed through the nervous system to converge on muscles that generate displacements and forces on our surroundings. The resulting changes in the world act to generate sensations that feed back to the nervous system, closing the control loop. This Perspective discusses the experimental and theoretical underpinnings of current models of movement generation and the way they are modulated by external information. Movement systems embody intentionality and prediction, two factors that are propelling a revolution in engineering. Development of movement models that include the complexities of the external world may allow a better understanding of the neuronal populations regulating these processes, as well as the development of solutions for autonomous vehicles and robots, and neural prostheses for those who are motor impaired. PMID:26967280

  1. Omni-directional L-band antenna for mobile communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, C. S.; Moldovan, N.; Kijesky, J.

    1988-01-01

    The principle and design of an L-band omni-directional mobile communication antenna are discussed. The antenna is a circular wave guide aperture with hybrid circuits attached to higher order mode excitation. It produces polarized and symmetric two split beams in elevation. The circular waveguide is fed by eight probes with a 90 degree phase shift between their inputs. Radiation pattern characteristics are controlled by adjusting the aperture diameter and mode excitation. This antenna satisfies gain requirements as well as withstanding the harsh environment.

  2. A chronic generalized bi-directional brain-machine interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouse, A. G.; Stanslaski, S. R.; Cong, P.; Jensen, R. M.; Afshar, P.; Ullestad, D.; Gupta, R.; Molnar, G. F.; Moran, D. W.; Denison, T. J.

    2011-06-01

    A bi-directional neural interface (NI) system was designed and prototyped by incorporating a novel neural recording and processing subsystem into a commercial neural stimulator architecture. The NI system prototype leverages the system infrastructure from an existing neurostimulator to ensure reliable operation in a chronic implantation environment. In addition to providing predicate therapy capabilities, the device adds key elements to facilitate chronic research, such as four channels of electrocortigram/local field potential amplification and spectral analysis, a three-axis accelerometer, algorithm processing, event-based data logging, and wireless telemetry for data uploads and algorithm/configuration updates. The custom-integrated micropower sensor and interface circuits facilitate extended operation in a power-limited device. The prototype underwent significant verification testing to ensure reliability, and meets the requirements for a class CF instrument per IEC-60601 protocols. The ability of the device system to process and aid in classifying brain states was preclinically validated using an in vivo non-human primate model for brain control of a computer cursor (i.e. brain-machine interface or BMI). The primate BMI model was chosen for its ability to quantitatively measure signal decoding performance from brain activity that is similar in both amplitude and spectral content to other biomarkers used to detect disease states (e.g. Parkinson's disease). A key goal of this research prototype is to help broaden the clinical scope and acceptance of NI techniques, particularly real-time brain state detection. These techniques have the potential to be generalized beyond motor prosthesis, and are being explored for unmet needs in other neurological conditions such as movement disorders, stroke and epilepsy.

  3. A Chronic Generalized Bi-directional Brain-Machine Interface

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Adam; Stanslaski, Scott; Cong, Peng; Jensen, Randy; Afshar, Pedram; Ullestad, Dave; Moran, Dan; Denison, Tim

    2011-01-01

    A bi-directional neural interface (NI) system was designed and built by incorporating a novel neural recording and processing subsystem into a commercially approved neural stimulator. The NI system prototype leverages the system infrastructure from a market-approved neurostimulator to ensure reliable operation in a chronic implantation environment. In addition to providing approved therapy capabilities, the device adds key elements to facilitate chronic clinical research, such as four channels of ECoG/LFP amplification and spectral analysis, a three axis accelerometer, algorithm processing, event-based data logging, and wireless telemetry for data uploads and algorithm/configuration updates. The custom integrated micropower sensor and interface circuits facilitate extended operation in a power-limited device. The prototype underwent significant verification testing to ensure reliability, and meets the requirements for a class CF instrument per IEC-60601 protocols. The ability of the device system to process and aid in classifying brain states was preclinically validated using an in-vivo non-human primate model for brain control of a computer cursor (i.e., brain machine interface or BMI). The primate BMI model was chosen for its ability to quantitatively measure signal decoding performance from brain activity that is similar in both amplitude and spectral content to other biomarkers used to detect disease states (e.g. Parkinson’s). A key goal of this research prototype is to help broaden the clinical scope and acceptance of NI techniques, particularly real-time brain state detection. These techniques can be generalized beyond motor prosthesis, to include significant unmet needs in other neurological conditions such as movement disorders, stroke, and epilepsy. PMID:21543839

  4. Sentence translation in proficient bilinguals: a direct electrostimulation brain mapping.

    PubMed

    Borius, Pierre-Yves; Giussani, Carlo; Draper, Louisa; Roux, Franck-Emmanuel

    2012-05-01

    Direct cortical electrostimulation was used to study cortical areas hypothetically involved in translation in bilinguals during brain tumour resections, with a view to sparing these functional areas. A series of seven proficient bilingual patients was studied: two left-handed and five right-handed individuals with no pre-existing language deficit. Hemispheric cortex (on the side contralateral to the patient's hand-dominance) was directly stimulated whilst the patient performed naming and reading tasks in both languages and a translation task (of a written text from their second 'learned' language to their first or 'native' language). Of the 147 different cortical sites studied, 26 'language functional sites' were detected, where electrostimulation affected reading and/or naming in the patient's native and/or second learned language. Of these, 8 sites (in 4 patients) were "task-specific" and "language-specific" i.e., affecting only naming or reading in only one of the patient's languages. Of the 26 "language sites", only 3 produced any interferences in translation. All of these were located in frontal regions. Electrostimulation at these sites caused the patient to stop translating abruptly, but no language switching or other translation-related phenomenon was observed. No site was found that was involved only in translation and not other language tasks. Overall, in contrast to other language tasks, cortical structures of the convexity were rarely involved in translation. We suggest that translation interference could be more readily detected by subcortical stimulations. This spatial dissociation within the brain of translation function versus other language functions could explain the cases of dissociated language impairments observed in some bilingual patients with brain lesions. On a practical level, because the cortical sites found by translation tasks are few and related with other cortical language sites, we think that translation tasks provide little

  5. Comparison of direct and heterodyne detection optical intersatellite communication links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. C.; Gardner, C. S.

    1987-01-01

    The performance of direct and heterodyne detection optical intersatellite communication links are evaluated and compared. It is shown that the performance of optical links is very sensitive to the pointing and tracking errors at the transmitter and receiver. In the presence of random pointing and tracking errors, optimal antenna gains exist that will minimize the required transmitter power. In addition to limiting the antenna gains, random pointing and tracking errors also impose a power penalty in the link budget. This power penalty is between 1.6 to 3 dB for a direct detection QPPM link, and 3 to 5 dB for a heterodyne QFSK system. For the heterodyne systems, the carrier phase noise presents another major factor of performance degradation that must be considered. In contrast, the loss due to synchronization error is small. The link budgets for direct and heterodyne detection systems are evaluated. It is shown that, for systems with large pointing and tracking errors, the link budget is dominated by the spatial tracking error, and the direct detection system shows a superior performance because it is less sensitive to the spatial tracking error. On the other hand, for systems with small pointing and tracking jitters, the antenna gains are in general limited by the launch cost, and suboptimal antenna gains are often used in practice. In which case, the heterodyne system has a slightly higher power margin because of higher receiver sensitivity.

  6. Intention processing in communication: a common brain network for language and gestures.

    PubMed

    Enrici, Ivan; Adenzato, Mauro; Cappa, Stefano; Bara, Bruno G; Tettamanti, Marco

    2011-09-01

    Human communicative competence is based on the ability to process a specific class of mental states, namely, communicative intention. The present fMRI study aims to analyze whether intention processing in communication is affected by the expressive means through which a communicative intention is conveyed, that is, the linguistic or extralinguistic gestural means. Combined factorial and conjunction analyses were used to test two sets of predictions: first, that a common brain network is recruited for the comprehension of communicative intentions independently of the modality through which they are conveyed; second, that additional brain areas are specifically recruited depending on the communicative modality used, reflecting distinct sensorimotor gateways. Our results clearly showed that a common neural network is engaged in communicative intention processing independently of the modality used. This network includes the precuneus, the left and right posterior STS and TPJ, and the medial pFC. Additional brain areas outside those involved in intention processing are specifically engaged by the particular communicative modality, that is, a peri-sylvian language network for the linguistic modality and a sensorimotor network for the extralinguistic modality. Thus, common representation of communicative intention may be accessed by modality-specific gateways, which are distinct for linguistic versus extralinguistic expressive means. Taken together, our results indicate that the information acquired by different communicative modalities is equivalent from a mental processing standpoint, in particular, at the point at which the actor's communicative intention has to be reconstructed.

  7. Perceptions of communicative competence after traumatic brain injury: implications for ecologically-driven intervention targets.

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, Michael; Allen, Elizabeth M; Prelock, Patricia

    2011-12-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between non-verbal behaviours and perceptions of the communication abilities of an individual with anomia secondary to traumatic brain injury (TBI). Thirty-four university students studying Communication Sciences and Disorders were randomly assigned to watch or listen to six short clips of an individual with TBI engaged in conversation. Participants rated the individual on communication parameters from a modified version of the Pragmatic Protocol and four other dependent measures of communicative competence. A significant positive correlation was identified between perceptions of gestures and ratings of overall communicative competence, and between perceptions of hand and arm movements and ratings of overall communicative competence. Participant raters who viewed the individual's movements as inappropriate also rated her overall communication abilities less favourably. This finding highlights individuality in perception of communication competence and the importance of assessing communication partners' perceptions in a client's environment to determine socially relevant treatment goals.

  8. [Instrumental, directive, and affective communication in hospital leaflets].

    PubMed

    Vasconcellos-Silva, Paulo Roberto; Uribe Rivera, Francisco Javier; Castiel, Luis David

    2003-01-01

    This study focuses on the typical semantic systems extracted from hospital staff communicative resources which attempt to validate information as an "object" to be transferred to patients. We describe the models of textual communication in 58 patient information leaflets from five hospital units in Brazil, gathered from 1996 to 2002. Three categories were identified, based on the theory of speech acts (Austin, Searle, and Habermas): 1) cognitive-instrumental utterances: descriptions by means of technical terms validated by self-referred, incomplete, or inaccessible argumentation, with an implicit educational function; 2) technical-directive utterances: self-referred (to the context of the source domains), with a shifting of everyday acts to a technical terrain with a disciplinary function and impersonal features; and 3) expressive modulations: need for inter-subjective connections to strengthen bonds of trust and a tendency to use childish arguments. We conclude that the three categories displayed: fragmentary sources; assumption of univocal messages and invariable use of information (idealized motivations and interests, apart from individualized perspectives); and assumption of universal interests as generators of knowledge.

  9. Eye-gaze independent EEG-based brain-computer interfaces for communication.

    PubMed

    Riccio, A; Mattia, D; Simione, L; Olivetti, M; Cincotti, F

    2012-08-01

    The present review systematically examines the literature reporting gaze independent interaction modalities in non-invasive brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) for communication. BCIs measure signals related to specific brain activity and translate them into device control signals. This technology can be used to provide users with severe motor disability (e.g. late stage amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); acquired brain injury) with an assistive device that does not rely on muscular contraction. Most of the studies on BCIs explored mental tasks and paradigms using visual modality. Considering that in ALS patients the oculomotor control can deteriorate and also other potential users could have impaired visual function, tactile and auditory modalities have been investigated over the past years to seek alternative BCI systems which are independent from vision. In addition, various attentional mechanisms, such as covert attention and feature-directed attention, have been investigated to develop gaze independent visual-based BCI paradigms. Three areas of research were considered in the present review: (i) auditory BCIs, (ii) tactile BCIs and (iii) independent visual BCIs. Out of a total of 130 search results, 34 articles were selected on the basis of pre-defined exclusion criteria. Thirteen articles dealt with independent visual BCIs, 15 reported on auditory BCIs and the last six on tactile BCIs, respectively. From the review of the available literature, it can be concluded that a crucial point is represented by the trade-off between BCI systems/paradigms with high accuracy and speed, but highly demanding in terms of attention and memory load, and systems requiring lower cognitive effort but with a limited amount of communicable information. These issues should be considered as priorities to be explored in future studies to meet users' requirements in a real-life scenario.

  10. Eye-gaze independent EEG-based brain-computer interfaces for communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, A.; Mattia, D.; Simione, L.; Olivetti, M.; Cincotti, F.

    2012-08-01

    The present review systematically examines the literature reporting gaze independent interaction modalities in non-invasive brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) for communication. BCIs measure signals related to specific brain activity and translate them into device control signals. This technology can be used to provide users with severe motor disability (e.g. late stage amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); acquired brain injury) with an assistive device that does not rely on muscular contraction. Most of the studies on BCIs explored mental tasks and paradigms using visual modality. Considering that in ALS patients the oculomotor control can deteriorate and also other potential users could have impaired visual function, tactile and auditory modalities have been investigated over the past years to seek alternative BCI systems which are independent from vision. In addition, various attentional mechanisms, such as covert attention and feature-directed attention, have been investigated to develop gaze independent visual-based BCI paradigms. Three areas of research were considered in the present review: (i) auditory BCIs, (ii) tactile BCIs and (iii) independent visual BCIs. Out of a total of 130 search results, 34 articles were selected on the basis of pre-defined exclusion criteria. Thirteen articles dealt with independent visual BCIs, 15 reported on auditory BCIs and the last six on tactile BCIs, respectively. From the review of the available literature, it can be concluded that a crucial point is represented by the trade-off between BCI systems/paradigms with high accuracy and speed, but highly demanding in terms of attention and memory load, and systems requiring lower cognitive effort but with a limited amount of communicable information. These issues should be considered as priorities to be explored in future studies to meet users’ requirements in a real-life scenario.

  11. Topological computation based on direct magnetic logic communication

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shilei; Baker, Alexander A.; Komineas, Stavros; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Non-uniform magnetic domains with non-trivial topology, such as vortices and skyrmions, are proposed as superior state variables for nonvolatile information storage. So far, the possibility of logic operations using topological objects has not been considered. Here, we demonstrate numerically that the topology of the system plays a significant role for its dynamics, using the example of vortex-antivortex pairs in a planar ferromagnetic film. Utilising the dynamical properties and geometrical confinement, direct logic communication between the topological memory carriers is realised. This way, no additional magnetic-to-electrical conversion is required. More importantly, the information carriers can spontaneously travel up to ~300 nm, for which no spin-polarised current is required. The derived logic scheme enables topological spintronics, which can be integrated into large-scale memory and logic networks capable of complex computations. PMID:26508375

  12. Explaining Pragmatic Performance in Traumatic Brain Injury: A Process Perspective on Communicative Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosco, Francesca M.; Angeleri, Romina; Sacco, Katiuscia; Bara, Bruno G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to investigate the pragmatic abilities of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Several studies in the literature have previously reported communicative deficits in individuals with TBI, however such research has focused principally on communicative deficits in general, without providing an…

  13. Return to Work and Social Communication Ability Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Jacinta M.; Bracy, Christine A.; Snow, Pamela C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Return to competitive employment presents a major challenge to adults who survive traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study was undertaken to better understand factors that shape employment outcome by comparing the communication profiles and self-awareness of communication deficits of adults who return to and maintain employment with those…

  14. An Evidence-Based Systematic Review on Communication Treatments for Individuals with Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Margaret Lehman; Frymark, Tobi; Venedictov, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this review is to evaluate and summarize the research evidence related to the treatment of individuals with right hemisphere communication disorders. Method: A comprehensive search of the literature using key words related to right hemisphere brain damage and communication treatment was conducted in 27 databases (e.g.,…

  15. Nanoparticles for direct nose-to-brain delivery of drugs.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Alpesh; Stolnik, Snjezana; Illum, Lisbeth

    2009-09-08

    This review aims to evaluate the evidence for the existence of a direct nose-to-brain delivery route for nanoparticles administered to the nasal cavity and transported via the olfactory epithelium and/or via the trigeminal nerves directly to the CNS. This is relevant in the field of drug delivery as well as for new developments in nanotechnology. Experiments in animal models have shown that nano-sized drug delivery systems can enhance nose-to-brain delivery of drugs compared to equivalent drug solutions formulations. Protection of the drug from degradation and/or efflux back into the nasal cavity may partly be the reason for this effect of nanoparticles. It is uncertain, however, whether drug from the nanoparticles is being released in the nasal cavity or the nanoparticles carrying the drug are transported via the olfactory system or the trigeminal nerves into the CNS where the drug is released. Furthermore, toxicity of nanoparticulate drug delivery systems in the nasal cavity and/or in the CNS has not been extensively studied and needs to be considered carefully.

  16. Trends and Challenges in Neuroengineering: Toward “Intelligent” Neuroprostheses through Brain-“Brain Inspired Systems” Communication

    PubMed Central

    Vassanelli, Stefano; Mahmud, Mufti

    2016-01-01

    Future technologies aiming at restoring and enhancing organs function will intimately rely on near-physiological and energy-efficient communication between living and artificial biomimetic systems. Interfacing brain-inspired devices with the real brain is at the forefront of such emerging field, with the term “neurobiohybrids” indicating all those systems where such interaction is established. We argue that achieving a “high-level” communication and functional synergy between natural and artificial neuronal networks in vivo, will allow the development of a heterogeneous world of neurobiohybrids, which will include “living robots” but will also embrace “intelligent” neuroprostheses for augmentation of brain function. The societal and economical impact of intelligent neuroprostheses is likely to be potentially strong, as they will offer novel therapeutic perspectives for a number of diseases, and going beyond classical pharmaceutical schemes. However, they will unavoidably raise fundamental ethical questions on the intermingling between man and machine and more specifically, on how deeply it should be allowed that brain processing is affected by implanted “intelligent” artificial systems. Following this perspective, we provide the reader with insights on ongoing developments and trends in the field of neurobiohybrids. We address the topic also from a “community building” perspective, showing through a quantitative bibliographic analysis, how scientists working on the engineering of brain-inspired devices and brain-machine interfaces are increasing their interactions. We foresee that such trend preludes to a formidable technological and scientific revolution in brain-machine communication and to the opening of new avenues for restoring or even augmenting brain function for therapeutic purposes. PMID:27721741

  17. Expressive electronic journal writing: freedom of communication for survivors of acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fraas, Michael; Balz, Magdalen A

    2008-03-01

    In addition to the impaired ability to effectively communicate, adults with acquired brain injury (ABI) also experience high incidences of depression, social isolation, and decreased quality of life. Expressive writing programs have been shown to be effective in alleviating these concomitant impairments in other populations including incarcerated inmates (Lane, Writing as a road to self-discovery, F & W, Cincinnati 1993). In addition, computer applications such as email have been suggested as an effective means of improving communication and social isolation in adults with brain injury (Sohlberg et al. [2003]. Brain Injury, 17(7), 609-629). This investigation examines the effects of on-line expressive journal writing on the communication, emotional status, social integration and quality of life of individuals with brain injury.

  18. Single-chip microprocessor that communicates directly using light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chen; Wade, Mark T.; Lee, Yunsup; Orcutt, Jason S.; Alloatti, Luca; Georgas, Michael S.; Waterman, Andrew S.; Shainline, Jeffrey M.; Avizienis, Rimas R.; Lin, Sen; Moss, Benjamin R.; Kumar, Rajesh; Pavanello, Fabio; Atabaki, Amir H.; Cook, Henry M.; Ou, Albert J.; Leu, Jonathan C.; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Asanović, Krste; Ram, Rajeev J.; Popović, Miloš A.; Stojanović, Vladimir M.

    2015-12-01

    Data transport across short electrical wires is limited by both bandwidth and power density, which creates a performance bottleneck for semiconductor microchips in modern computer systems—from mobile phones to large-scale data centres. These limitations can be overcome by using optical communications based on chip-scale electronic-photonic systems enabled by silicon-based nanophotonic devices8. However, combining electronics and photonics on the same chip has proved challenging, owing to microchip manufacturing conflicts between electronics and photonics. Consequently, current electronic-photonic chips are limited to niche manufacturing processes and include only a few optical devices alongside simple circuits. Here we report an electronic-photonic system on a single chip integrating over 70 million transistors and 850 photonic components that work together to provide logic, memory, and interconnect functions. This system is a realization of a microprocessor that uses on-chip photonic devices to directly communicate with other chips using light. To integrate electronics and photonics at the scale of a microprocessor chip, we adopt a ‘zero-change’ approach to the integration of photonics. Instead of developing a custom process to enable the fabrication of photonics, which would complicate or eliminate the possibility of integration with state-of-the-art transistors at large scale and at high yield, we design optical devices using a standard microelectronics foundry process that is used for modern microprocessors. This demonstration could represent the beginning of an era of chip-scale electronic-photonic systems with the potential to transform computing system architectures, enabling more powerful computers, from network infrastructure to data centres and supercomputers.

  19. Single-chip microprocessor that communicates directly using light.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chen; Wade, Mark T; Lee, Yunsup; Orcutt, Jason S; Alloatti, Luca; Georgas, Michael S; Waterman, Andrew S; Shainline, Jeffrey M; Avizienis, Rimas R; Lin, Sen; Moss, Benjamin R; Kumar, Rajesh; Pavanello, Fabio; Atabaki, Amir H; Cook, Henry M; Ou, Albert J; Leu, Jonathan C; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Asanović, Krste; Ram, Rajeev J; Popović, Miloš A; Stojanović, Vladimir M

    2015-12-24

    Data transport across short electrical wires is limited by both bandwidth and power density, which creates a performance bottleneck for semiconductor microchips in modern computer systems--from mobile phones to large-scale data centres. These limitations can be overcome by using optical communications based on chip-scale electronic-photonic systems enabled by silicon-based nanophotonic devices. However, combining electronics and photonics on the same chip has proved challenging, owing to microchip manufacturing conflicts between electronics and photonics. Consequently, current electronic-photonic chips are limited to niche manufacturing processes and include only a few optical devices alongside simple circuits. Here we report an electronic-photonic system on a single chip integrating over 70 million transistors and 850 photonic components that work together to provide logic, memory, and interconnect functions. This system is a realization of a microprocessor that uses on-chip photonic devices to directly communicate with other chips using light. To integrate electronics and photonics at the scale of a microprocessor chip, we adopt a 'zero-change' approach to the integration of photonics. Instead of developing a custom process to enable the fabrication of photonics, which would complicate or eliminate the possibility of integration with state-of-the-art transistors at large scale and at high yield, we design optical devices using a standard microelectronics foundry process that is used for modern microprocessors. This demonstration could represent the beginning of an era of chip-scale electronic-photonic systems with the potential to transform computing system architectures, enabling more powerful computers, from network infrastructure to data centres and supercomputers.

  20. Wireless intra-brain communication for image transmission through mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Matsuda, Takashi; Davis, Peter; Zhang, Bing; Li, Keren; Kobayashi, Takuma; Noda, Toshihiko; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate wireless image data transmission through a mouse brain. The transmission characteristics of mouse brain is measured. By inserting electrodes into the brain, the transmission efficiency is drastically increased. An AM signal modulated with the image data from an implantable image sensor was launched into the brain and the received signal was demodulated. The data was successfully transmitted through the brain and the image was reproduced.

  1. A brain-computer interface for potential non-verbal facial communication based on EEG signals related to specific emotions.

    PubMed

    Kashihara, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Unlike assistive technology for verbal communication, the brain-machine or brain-computer interface (BMI/BCI) has not been established as a non-verbal communication tool for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. Face-to-face communication enables access to rich emotional information, but individuals suffering from neurological disorders, such as ALS and autism, may not express their emotions or communicate their negative feelings. Although emotions may be inferred by looking at facial expressions, emotional prediction for neutral faces necessitates advanced judgment. The process that underlies brain neuronal responses to neutral faces and causes emotional changes remains unknown. To address this problem, therefore, this study attempted to decode conditioned emotional reactions to neutral face stimuli. This direction was motivated by the assumption that if electroencephalogram (EEG) signals can be used to detect patients' emotional responses to specific inexpressive faces, the results could be incorporated into the design and development of BMI/BCI-based non-verbal communication tools. To these ends, this study investigated how a neutral face associated with a negative emotion modulates rapid central responses in face processing and then identified cortical activities. The conditioned neutral face-triggered event-related potentials that originated from the posterior temporal lobe statistically significantly changed during late face processing (600-700 ms) after stimulus, rather than in early face processing activities, such as P1 and N170 responses. Source localization revealed that the conditioned neutral faces increased activity in the right fusiform gyrus (FG). This study also developed an efficient method for detecting implicit negative emotional responses to specific faces by using EEG signals. A classification method based on a support vector machine enables the easy classification of neutral faces that trigger specific individual emotions. In

  2. Direct and indirect cellular effects of aspartame on the brain.

    PubMed

    Humphries, P; Pretorius, E; Naudé, H

    2008-04-01

    The use of the artificial sweetener, aspartame, has long been contemplated and studied by various researchers, and people are concerned about its negative effects. Aspartame is composed of phenylalanine (50%), aspartic acid (40%) and methanol (10%). Phenylalanine plays an important role in neurotransmitter regulation, whereas aspartic acid is also thought to play a role as an excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Glutamate, asparagines and glutamine are formed from their precursor, aspartic acid. Methanol, which forms 10% of the broken down product, is converted in the body to formate, which can either be excreted or can give rise to formaldehyde, diketopiperazine (a carcinogen) and a number of other highly toxic derivatives. Previously, it has been reported that consumption of aspartame could cause neurological and behavioural disturbances in sensitive individuals. Headaches, insomnia and seizures are also some of the neurological effects that have been encountered, and these may be accredited to changes in regional brain concentrations of catecholamines, which include norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine. The aim of this study was to discuss the direct and indirect cellular effects of aspartame on the brain, and we propose that excessive aspartame ingestion might be involved in the pathogenesis of certain mental disorders (DSM-IV-TR 2000) and also in compromised learning and emotional functioning.

  3. Brain Scans Let 'Locked-In' ALS Patients Communicate

    MedlinePlus

    ... suffered strokes, not just those with ALS. The study was published online Jan. 31 in the journal PLOS Biology . SOURCES: Marie-Christine Nizzi, Ph.D., psychology instructor, Mind, Brain and Behavior Initiative, Harvard University, and associate ...

  4. Communication efficiency and congestion of signal traffic in large-scale brain networks.

    PubMed

    Mišić, Bratislav; Sporns, Olaf; McIntosh, Anthony R

    2014-01-01

    The complex connectivity of the cerebral cortex suggests that inter-regional communication is a primary function. Using computational modeling, we show that anatomical connectivity may be a major determinant for global information flow in brain networks. A macaque brain network was implemented as a communication network in which signal units flowed between grey matter nodes along white matter paths. Compared to degree-matched surrogate networks, information flow on the macaque brain network was characterized by higher loss rates, faster transit times and lower throughput, suggesting that neural connectivity may be optimized for speed rather than fidelity. Much of global communication was mediated by a "rich club" of hub regions: a sub-graph comprised of high-degree nodes that are more densely interconnected with each other than predicted by chance. First, macaque communication patterns most closely resembled those observed for a synthetic rich club network, but were less similar to those seen in a synthetic small world network, suggesting that the former is a more fundamental feature of brain network topology. Second, rich club regions attracted the most signal traffic and likewise, connections between rich club regions carried more traffic than connections between non-rich club regions. Third, a number of rich club regions were significantly under-congested, suggesting that macaque connectivity actively shapes information flow, funneling traffic towards some nodes and away from others. Together, our results indicate a critical role of the rich club of hub nodes in dynamic aspects of global brain communication.

  5. Implications of immune-to-brain communication for sickness and pain

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Linda R.; Maier, Steven F.

    1999-01-01

    This review presents a view of hyperalgesia and allodynia not typical of the field as a whole. That is, exaggerated pain is presented as one of many natural consequences of peripheral infection and injury. The constellation of changes that results from such immune challenges is called the sickness response. This sickness response results from immune-to-brain communication initiated by proinflammatory cytokines released by activated immune cells. In response to signals it receives from the immune system, the brain orchestrates the broad array of physiological, behavioral, and hormonal changes that comprise the sickness response. The neurocircuitry and neurochemistry of sickness-induced hyperalgesia are described. One focus of this discussion is on the evidence that spinal cord microglia and astrocytes are key mediators of sickness-induced hyperalgesia. Last, evidence is presented that hyperalgesia and allodynia also result from direct immune activation, rather than neural activation, of these same spinal cord glia. Such glial activation is induced by viruses such as HIV-1 that are known to invade the central nervous system. Implications of exaggerated pain states created by peripheral and central immune activation are discussed. PMID:10393885

  6. 26 CFR 56.4911-3 - Expenditures for direct and/or grass roots lobbying communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Expenditures for direct and/or grass roots....4911-3 Expenditures for direct and/or grass roots lobbying communications. (a) Definition of term... lobbying communication's costs is a direct lobbying expenditure, what portion is a grass roots...

  7. 26 CFR 56.4911-3 - Expenditures for direct and/or grass roots lobbying communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Expenditures for direct and/or grass roots....4911-3 Expenditures for direct and/or grass roots lobbying communications. (a) Definition of term... lobbying communication's costs is a direct lobbying expenditure, what portion is a grass roots...

  8. 26 CFR 56.4911-3 - Expenditures for direct and/or grass roots lobbying communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Expenditures for direct and/or grass roots....4911-3 Expenditures for direct and/or grass roots lobbying communications. (a) Definition of term... lobbying communication's costs is a direct lobbying expenditure, what portion is a grass roots...

  9. A little more conversation – the influence of communicative context on syntactic priming in brain and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Schoot, Lotte; Menenti, Laura; Hagoort, Peter; Segaert, Katrien

    2014-01-01

    We report on an functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) syntactic priming experiment in which we measure brain activity for participants who communicate with another participant outside the scanner. We investigated whether syntactic processing during overt language production and comprehension is influenced by having a (shared) goal to communicate. Although theory suggests this is true, the nature of this influence remains unclear. Two hypotheses are tested: (i) syntactic priming effects (fMRI and behavioral) are stronger for participants in the communicative context than for participants doing the same experiment in a non-communicative context, and (ii) syntactic priming magnitude (behavioral) is correlated with the syntactic priming magnitude of the speaker’s communicative partner. Results showed that across conditions, participants were faster to produce sentences with repeated syntax, relative to novel syntax. This behavioral result converged with the fMRI data: we found repetition suppression effects in the left insula extending into left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 47/45), left middle temporal gyrus (BA 21), left inferior parietal cortex (BA 40), left precentral gyrus (BA 6), bilateral precuneus (BA 7), bilateral supplementary motor cortex (BA 32/8), and right insula (BA 47). We did not find support for the first hypothesis: having a communicative intention does not increase the magnitude of syntactic priming effects (either in the brain or in behavior) per se. We did find support for the second hypothesis: if speaker A is strongly/weakly primed by speaker B, then speaker B is primed by speaker A to a similar extent. We conclude that syntactic processing is influenced by being in a communicative context, and that the nature of this influence is bi-directional: speakers are influenced by each other. PMID:24672499

  10. Communication and Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRuyter, Frank; Donoghue, Kathleen A.

    1989-01-01

    A case study of a difficult to manage nonspeaking young man with brain injury is presented. Assessment and intervention indicated severe cognitive-linguistic deficits, severe physical involvement of all extremities, extensive surgical management, visual perceptual and acuity deficits, and behavioral problems. (Author/DB)

  11. Direct Signaling from Astrocytes to Neurons in Cultures of Mammalian Brain Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedergaard, Maiken

    1994-03-01

    Although astrocytes have been considered to be supportive, rather than transmissive, in the adult nervous system, recent studies have challenged this assumption by demonstrating that astrocytes possess functional neurotransmitter receptors. Astrocytes are now shown to directly modulate the free cytosolic calcium, and hence transmission characteristics, of neighboring neurons. When a focal electric field potential was applied to single astrocytes in mixed cultures of rat forebrain astrocytes and neurons, a prompt elevation of calcium occurred in the target cell. This in turn triggered a wave of calcium increase, which propagated from astrocyte to astrocyte. Neurons resting on these astrocytes responded with large increases in their concentration of cytosolic calcium. The gap junction blocker octanol attenuated the neuronal response, which suggests that the astrocytic-neuronal signaling is mediated through intercellular connections rather than synaptically. This neuronal response to local astrocytic stimulation may mediate local intercellular communication within the brain.

  12. Inflammatory transcription factors as activation markers and functional readouts in immune-to-brain communication.

    PubMed

    Rummel, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Immune-to-brain communication pathways involve humoral mediators, including cytokines, central modulation by neuronal afferents and immune cell trafficking to the brain. During systemic inflammation these pathways contribute to mediating brain-controlled sickness symptoms including fever. Experimentally, activation of these signaling pathways can be mimicked and studied when injecting animals with pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPS). One central component of the brain inflammatory response, which leads, for example, to fever induction, is transcriptional activation of brain cells via cytokines and PAMPS. We and others have studied the spatiotemporal activation and the physiological significance of transcription factors for the induction of inflammation within the brain and the manifestation of fever. Evidence has revealed a role of nuclear factor (NF)κB in the initiation, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 in the maintenance and NF-interleukin (IL)6 in the maintenance or even termination of brain-inflammation and fever. Moreover, psychological stressors, such as exposure to a novel environment, leads to increased body core temperature and genomic NF-IL6-activation, suggesting a potential use of NF-IL6-immunohistochemistry as a multimodal brain cell activation marker and a role for NF-IL6 for differential brain activity. In addition, the nutritional status, as reflected by circulating levels of the cytokine-like hormone leptin, influence immune-to-brain communication and age-dependent changes in LPS-induced fever. Overall, transcription factors remain therapeutically important targets for the treatment of brain-inflammation and fever induction during infectious/non-infectious inflammatory and psychological stress. However, the exact physiological role and significance of these transcription factors requires to be further investigated.

  13. New Directions in the Study of Organizational Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farace, Richard V.; MacDonald, Donald

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe important concepts for analyzing communication processes in organizations, and to point out some of the methodological developments related to these concepts. (Author)

  14. How networks communicate: propagation patterns in spontaneous brain activity.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Anish; Raichle, Marcus E

    2016-10-05

    Initially regarded as 'noise', spontaneous (intrinsic) activity accounts for a large portion of the brain's metabolic cost. Moreover, it is now widely known that infra-slow (less than 0.1 Hz) spontaneous activity, measured using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal, is correlated within functionally defined resting state networks (RSNs). However, despite these advances, the temporal organization of spontaneous BOLD fluctuations has remained elusive. By studying temporal lags in the resting state BOLD signal, we have recently shown that spontaneous BOLD fluctuations consist of remarkably reproducible patterns of whole brain propagation. Embedded in these propagation patterns are unidirectional 'motifs' which, in turn, give rise to RSNs. Additionally, propagation patterns are markedly altered as a function of state, whether physiological or pathological. Understanding such propagation patterns will likely yield deeper insights into the role of spontaneous activity in brain function in health and disease.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting blood oxygen level-dependent: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'.

  15. Lossless quantum data compression and secure direct communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boström, Kim

    2004-07-01

    This thesis deals with the encoding and transmission of information through a quantum channel. A quantum channel is a quantum mechanical system whose state is manipulated by a sender and read out by a receiver. The individual state of the channel represents the message. The two topics of the thesis comprise 1) the possibility of compressing a message stored in a quantum channel without loss of information and 2) the possibility to communicate a message directly from one party to another in a secure manner, that is, a third party is not able to eavesdrop the message without being detected. The main results of the thesis are the following. A general framework for variable-length quantum codes is worked out. These codes are necessary to make lossless compression possible. Due to the quantum nature of the channel, the encoded messages are in general in a superposition of different lengths. It is found to be impossible to compress a quantum message without loss of information if the message is not apriori known to the sender. In the other case it is shown that lossless quantum data compression is possible and a lower bound on the compression rate is derived. Furthermore, an explicit compression scheme is constructed that works for arbitrarily given source message ensembles. A quantum cryptographic protocol - the “ping-pong protocol” - is presented that realizes the secure direct communication of classical messages through a quantum channel. The security of the protocol against arbitrary eavesdropping attacks is proven for the case of an ideal quantum channel. In contrast to other quantum cryptographic protocols, the ping-pong protocol is deterministic and can thus be used to transmit a random key as well as a composed message. The protocol is perfectly secure for the transmission of a key, and it is quasi-secure for the direct transmission of a message. The latter means that the probability of successful eavesdropping exponentially decreases with the length

  16. A Contingency Approach to Communication Skill Importance: The Impact of Occupation, Direction, and Position.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Salvo, Vincent S.; Larsen, Janet K.

    1987-01-01

    Examines the impact of direction and occupation on the importance of communication skills for entry-level positions in finance, management, engineering, and law. Results substantiate a three-dimensional model (based on direction, occupation, and position) for the examination and application of communication skill importance in organization. (JD)

  17. Word pair classification during imagined speech using direct brain recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Stephanie; Brunner, Peter; Iturrate, Iñaki; Millán, José Del R.; Schalk, Gerwin; Knight, Robert T.; Pasley, Brian N.

    2016-05-01

    People that cannot communicate due to neurological disorders would benefit from an internal speech decoder. Here, we showed the ability to classify individual words during imagined speech from electrocorticographic signals. In a word imagery task, we used high gamma (70–150 Hz) time features with a support vector machine model to classify individual words from a pair of words. To account for temporal irregularities during speech production, we introduced a non-linear time alignment into the SVM kernel. Classification accuracy reached 88% in a two-class classification framework (50% chance level), and average classification accuracy across fifteen word-pairs was significant across five subjects (mean = 58% p < 0.05). We also compared classification accuracy between imagined speech, overt speech and listening. As predicted, higher classification accuracy was obtained in the listening and overt speech conditions (mean = 89% and 86%, respectively; p < 0.0001), where speech stimuli were directly presented. The results provide evidence for a neural representation for imagined words in the temporal lobe, frontal lobe and sensorimotor cortex, consistent with previous findings in speech perception and production. These data represent a proof of concept study for basic decoding of speech imagery, and delineate a number of key challenges to usage of speech imagery neural representations for clinical applications.

  18. Word pair classification during imagined speech using direct brain recordings

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Stephanie; Brunner, Peter; Iturrate, Iñaki; Millán, José del R.; Schalk, Gerwin; Knight, Robert T.; Pasley, Brian N.

    2016-01-01

    People that cannot communicate due to neurological disorders would benefit from an internal speech decoder. Here, we showed the ability to classify individual words during imagined speech from electrocorticographic signals. In a word imagery task, we used high gamma (70–150 Hz) time features with a support vector machine model to classify individual words from a pair of words. To account for temporal irregularities during speech production, we introduced a non-linear time alignment into the SVM kernel. Classification accuracy reached 88% in a two-class classification framework (50% chance level), and average classification accuracy across fifteen word-pairs was significant across five subjects (mean = 58%; p < 0.05). We also compared classification accuracy between imagined speech, overt speech and listening. As predicted, higher classification accuracy was obtained in the listening and overt speech conditions (mean = 89% and 86%, respectively; p < 0.0001), where speech stimuli were directly presented. The results provide evidence for a neural representation for imagined words in the temporal lobe, frontal lobe and sensorimotor cortex, consistent with previous findings in speech perception and production. These data represent a proof of concept study for basic decoding of speech imagery, and delineate a number of key challenges to usage of speech imagery neural representations for clinical applications. PMID:27165452

  19. Functional Assessment of the Brain Damaged Physically Handicapped Child: Cognitive, Communication, and Motor Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langley, Beth

    Existing instruments for assessing brain damaged physically handicapped children are examined, and research on test modifications in the cognitive, communication, and motor performance domains is reviewed. Noted is the lack of tests standardized on a physically handicapped population. Cautions and criticisms are cited for modifications which have…

  20. Expressive Electronic Journal Writing: Freedom of Communication for Survivors of Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraas, Michael; Balz, Magdalen A.

    2008-01-01

    In addition to the impaired ability to effectively communicate, adults with acquired brain injury (ABI) also experience high incidences of depression, social isolation, and decreased quality of life. Expressive writing programs have been shown to be effective in alleviating these concomitant impairments in other populations including incarcerated…

  1. Perspectives on Treatment for Communication Deficits Associated with Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Margaret Lehman

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the current treatment research for communication (prosodic, discourse, and pragmatic) deficits associated with right hemisphere brain damage and to provide suggestions for treatment selection given the paucity of evidence specifically for this population. Method: The discussion covers (a) clinical decision processes and…

  2. Left and Right Hemisphere Brain Functions and Symbolic vs. Spontaneous Communication Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Ross

    Recent findings on the communicative functions of the left versus the right hemisphere of the brain may suggest that there is a distinction between the intentional use of symbols for the sending of specific messages or propositions (language, signing, pantomime) and spontaneous expressive behaviors that signal their meaning through a natural…

  3. Multilingual Communication and Language Acquisition: New Research Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canagarajah, A. Suresh; Wurr, Adrian J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we outline the differences between a monolingual and multilingual orientation to language and language acquisition. The increasing contact between languages in the context of globalization motivates such a shift of paradigms. Multilingual communicative practices have remained vibrant in non-western communities for a long time. We…

  4. More Thoughts on New Directions in Mass Communication Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James A.

    A clearer understanding of the capacity of research and researchers in the mass communication field is needed. In the past, when statistical researchers have found they cannot meet criteria, they have devised a new set of test characteristics. For example, when validity cannot be measured, researchers measure reliability, despite the fact that…

  5. Perspectives on Individual Differences Affecting Therapeutic Change in Communication Disorders. New Directions in Communication Disorders Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Amy L., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume examines the ramifications of individual differences in therapy outcomes for a wide variety of communication disorders. In an era where evidence-based practice is the clinical profession's watchword, each chapter attacks this highly relevant issue from a somewhat different perspective. In some areas of communication disorders,…

  6. Adaptation of the communicative brain to post-lingual deafness. Evidence from functional imaging.

    PubMed

    Lazard, Diane S; Innes-Brown, Hamish; Barone, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Not having access to one sense profoundly modifies our interactions with the environment, in turn producing changes in brain organization. Deafness and its rehabilitation by cochlear implantation offer a unique model of brain adaptation during sensory deprivation and recovery. Functional imaging allows the study of brain plasticity as a function of the times of deafness and implantation. Even long after the end of the sensitive period for auditory brain physiological maturation, some plasticity may be observed. In this way the mature brain that becomes deaf after language acquisition can adapt to its modified sensory inputs. Oral communication difficulties induced by post-lingual deafness shape cortical reorganization of brain networks already specialized for processing oral language. Left hemisphere language specialization tends to be more preserved than functions of the right hemisphere. We hypothesize that the right hemisphere offers cognitive resources re-purposed to palliate difficulties in left hemisphere speech processing due to sensory and auditory memory degradation. If cochlear implantation is considered, this reorganization during deafness may influence speech understanding outcomes positively or negatively. Understanding brain plasticity during post-lingual deafness should thus inform the development of cognitive rehabilitation, which promotes positive reorganization of the brain networks that process oral language before surgery. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Human Auditory Neuroimaging.

  7. Reply to 'Comment on 'Secure direct communication with a quantum one-time-pad''

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Fuguo; Long Guilu

    2005-07-15

    We reply to the preceding comment which focused on whether there exists a quantum privacy amplification technique for purifying the unknown single-photon states transmitted. In this Reply, we will show that quantum privacy amplification is principally possible, and a specific scheme for direct communication protocol based on single photons has been constructed and will be published elsewhere. Then the secure direct quantum communication is secure against the attack strategy in the preceding comment by using quantum privacy amplification directly.

  8. What's next for science communication? Promising directions and lingering distractions.

    PubMed

    Nisbet, Matthew C; Scheufele, Dietram A

    2009-10-01

    In this essay, we review research from the social sciences on how the public makes sense of and participates in societal decisions about science and technology. We specifically highlight the role of the media and public communication in this process, challenging the still dominant assumption that science literacy is both the problem and the solution to societal conflicts. After reviewing the cases of evolution, climate change, food biotechnology, and nanotechnology, we offer a set of detailed recommendations for improved public engagement efforts on the part of scientists and their organizations. We emphasize the need for science communication initiatives that are guided by careful formative research; that span a diversity of media platforms and audiences; and that facilitate conversations with the public that recognize, respect, and incorporate differences in knowledge, values, perspectives, and goals.

  9. Brain estrogen signaling and acute modulation of acoustic communication behaviors: a working hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Remage-Healey, Luke

    2013-01-01

    Summary Although estrogens are widely considered circulating ‘sex steroid hormones’ typically associated with female reproduction, recent evidence suggests that estrogens can act as local modulators of brain circuits in both males and females. Functional implications of this newly-characterized estrogen signaling system have begun to emerge. This essay summarizes evidence in support of the hypothesis that the rapid production of estrogens in brain circuits can drive acute changes in both the production and perception of acoustic communication behaviors. These studies reveal two fundamental neurobiological concepts: 1) estrogens can be produced locally in brain circuits independent of levels in nearby circuits and in the circulation, and 2) estrogens can have very rapid effects within these brain circuits to modulate social vocalizations, acoustic processing, and sensorimotor integration. This research relies on a vertebrate-wide span of investigations, including vocalizing fishes, amphibians and birds, emphasizing the importance of comparative model systems in understanding principles of neurobiology. PMID:23065844

  10. Advance directive communications practices:social worker's contributions to the interdisciplinary health care team.

    PubMed

    Black, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a comparative study about social workers' interdisciplinary advance directive communication practices with patients at several hospitals located in upstate New York. The sample consisted of physicians (n=32), nurses (n=74), and social workers (n=29). The research surveyed advance directive communication practices by discipline utilizing a self-administered questionnaire. Advance directive communication was operationalized as a cumulative process incorporating the following phases that were measured as scales: initiation of the topic, disclosure of information, identification of a surrogate decision-maker, discussion of treatment options, elicitation of patient values, interaction with family members, and collaboration with other health care professionals. Results suggest that social workers offer distinct skills in their advance directive communication practices and discuss advance directives more frequently than either physicians or nurses.

  11. Towards a Communication Brain Computer Interface Based on Semantic Relations

    PubMed Central

    Geuze, Jeroen; Farquhar, Jason; Desain, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates a possible Brain Computer Interface (BCI) based on semantic relations. The BCI determines which prime word a subject has in mind by presenting probe words using an intelligent algorithm. Subjects indicate when a presented probe word is related to the prime word by a single finger tap. The detection of the neural signal associated with this movement is used by the BCI to decode the prime word. The movement detector combined both the evoked (ERP) and induced (ERD) responses elicited with the movement. Single trial movement detection had an average accuracy of 67%. The decoding of the prime word had an average accuracy of 38% when using 100 probes and 150 possible targets, and 41% after applying a dynamic stopping criterium, reducing the average number of probes to 47. The article shows that the intelligent algorithm used to present the probe words has a significantly higher performance than a random selection of probes. Simulations demonstrate that the BCI also works with larger vocabulary sizes, and the performance scales logarithmically with vocabulary size. PMID:24516552

  12. Connectomic Analysis of Brain Networks: Novel Techniques and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Cazemier, J. Leonie; Clascá, Francisco; Tiesinga, Paul H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Brain networks, localized or brain-wide, exist only at the cellular level, i.e., between specific pre- and post-synaptic neurons, which are connected through functionally diverse synapses located at specific points of their cell membranes. “Connectomics” is the emerging subfield of neuroanatomy explicitly aimed at elucidating the wiring of brain networks with cellular resolution and a quantified accuracy. Such data are indispensable for realistic modeling of brain circuitry and function. A connectomic analysis, therefore, needs to identify and measure the soma, dendrites, axonal path, and branching patterns together with the synapses and gap junctions of the neurons involved in any given brain circuit or network. However, because of the submicron caliber, 3D complexity, and high packing density of most such structures, as well as the fact that axons frequently extend over long distances to make synapses in remote brain regions, creating connectomic maps is technically challenging and requires multi-scale approaches, Such approaches involve the combination of the most sensitive cell labeling and analysis methods available, as well as the development of new ones able to resolve individual cells and synapses with increasing high-throughput. In this review, we provide an overview of recently introduced high-resolution methods, which researchers wanting to enter the field of connectomics may consider. It includes several molecular labeling tools, some of which specifically label synapses, and covers a number of novel imaging tools such as brain clearing protocols and microscopy approaches. Apart from describing the tools, we also provide an assessment of their qualities. The criteria we use assess the qualities that tools need in order to contribute to deciphering the key levels of circuit organization. We conclude with a brief future outlook for neuroanatomic research, computational methods, and network modeling, where we also point out several outstanding issues

  13. "Bio-communication" between mother and offspring: lessons from animals and new perspectives for brain science.

    PubMed

    Tozuka, Yusuke; Wada, Etsuko; Wada, Keiji

    2009-06-01

    Early brain development has a tremendous impact on the success of humans throughout their lives. During early development, neural circuit formation proceeds in a strictly regulated manner. In addition to genetic and epigenetic programs, recent studies using animal models have demonstrated that certain maternal bio-active agents are essential for normal neural development, with deficiencies adversely affecting offspring brain function and behavior. On the basis of these findings, we propose a new viewpoint: that maternal bio-active substances support the development of the fetal and neonatal brain, and the subsequent expression and maintenance of higher brain functions. We term these molecular-based biological conversations between mother and offspring "bio-communications". Based on findings obtained primarily from animal models, we review the effects of maternal substances on the neural developments and functions. Clarifying the regulatory mechanisms of "bio-communications" will help improve understanding of the mechanisms of human brain functioning and neural development. In addition, these findings will be applied to elucidate the mechanisms of developmental disorders and to explore new medical therapies to treat them.

  14. Personalising exercise recommendations for brain health: considerations and future directions.

    PubMed

    Barha, Cindy K; Galea, Liisa A; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S; Erickson, Kirk I; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2017-04-01

    The societal value of strategies that delay the onset and progression of dementia cannot be overstated. Physical activity-unstructured and structured-is a promising, cost-effective strategy for the promotion of brain health. However, a large degree of variation exists in its efficacy. Therefore, to increase its utility as 'medication' for healthy cognitive ageing, it is imperative to identify key moderators and mediators of the positive effects of targeted exercise training on brain health. In this commentary, we focus on the type of targeted exercise training, the determinants of individual variation, including biological sex and genotypic factors, and the mechanisms by which exercise exerts its influence on the brain. We argue that a better understanding of these factors will allow for evidence-based, personalised, tailored exercise recommendations that go beyond the one-size-fits-all approach to successfully combat dementia.

  15. Multimodal communication in animals, humans and robots: an introduction to perspectives in brain-inspired informatics.

    PubMed

    Wermter, S; Page, M; Knowles, M; Gallese, V; Pulvermüller, F; Taylor, J

    2009-03-01

    Recent years have seen convergence in research on brain mechanisms and neurocomputational approaches, culminating in the creation of a new generation of robots whose artificial "brains" respect neuroscience principles and whose "cognitive" systems venture into higher cognitive domains such as planning and action sequencing, complex object and concept processing, and language. The present article gives an overview of selected projects in this general multidisciplinary field. The work reviewed centres on research funded by the EU in the context of the New and Emergent Science and Technology, NEST, funding scheme highlighting the topic "What it means to be human". Examples of such projects include learning by imitation (Edici project), examining the origin of human rule-based reasoning (Far), studying the neural origins of language (Neurocom), exploring the evolutionary origins of the human mind (Pkb140404), researching into verbal and non-verbal communication (Refcom), using and interpreting signs (Sedsu), characterising human language by structural complexity (Chlasc), and representing abstract concepts (Abstract). Each of the communication-centred research projects revealed individual insights; however, there had been little overall analysis of results and hypotheses. In the Specific Support Action Nestcom, we proposed to analyse some NEST projects focusing on the central question "What it means to communicate" and to review, understand and integrate the results of previous communication-related research, in order to develop and communicate multimodal experimental hypotheses for investigation by future projects. The present special issue includes a range of papers on the interplay between neuroinformatics, brain science and robotics in the general area of higher cognitive functions and multimodal communication. These papers extend talks given at the NESTCOM workshops, at ICANN (http://www.his.sunderland.ac.uk/nestcom/workshop/icann.html) in Porto and at the first

  16. Nutrient Sensor in the Brain Directs the Action of the Brain-Gut Axis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dus, Monica; Sih-Yu Lai, Jason; Gunapala, Keith M.; Min, Soohong; Tayler, Timothy D.; Hergarden, Anne C.; Geraud, Eliot; Joseph, Christina M.; Suh, Greg S. B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Animals can detect and consume nutritive sugars without the influence of taste. However, the identity of the taste-independent nutrient sensor and the mechanism by which animals respond to the nutritional value of sugar are unclear. Here, we report that six neurosecretory cells in the Drosophila brain that produce Diuretic hormone 44 (Dh44), a homologue of the mammalian corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), were specifically activated by nutritive sugars. Flies in which the activity of these neurons or the expression of Dh44 was disrupted failed to select nutritive sugars. Manipulation of the function of Dh44 receptors had a similar effect. Notably, artificial activation of Dh44 receptor-1 neurons resulted in proboscis extensions, and frequent episodes of excretion. Conversely, reduced Dh44 activity led to decreased excretion. Together, these actions facilitate ingestion and digestion of nutritive foods. We propose that the Dh44 system directs the detection and consumption of nutritive sugars through a positive feedback loop. PMID:26074004

  17. Oscillatory multiplexing of population codes for selective communication in the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Akam, Thomas; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian brains exhibit population oscillations whose structures vary in time and space according to behavioural state. A proposed function of these oscillations is to control the flow of signals among anatomically connected networks. However, the nature of neural coding that may support oscillatory selective communication has received relatively little attention. Here we consider the role of multiplexing, whereby multiple information streams share a common neural substrate. We suggest that multiplexing implemented through periodic modulation of firing rate population codes enables flexible reconfiguration of effective connectivity among brain areas. PMID:24434912

  18. 26 CFR 56.4911-3 - Expenditures for direct and/or grass roots lobbying communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... lobbying communications. 56.4911-3 Section 56.4911-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... an employee's services attributable to the direct or grass roots lobbying communication, and the... the following examples. Example 1. Organization R makes the services of E, one of its paid...

  19. Quantum secure direct communication protocol with blind polarization bases and particles' transmitting order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jie; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a modified secure direct communication protocol by using the blind polarization bases and particles' random transmitting order. In our protocol, a sender (Alice) encodes secret messages by rotating a random polarization angle of particle and then the receiver (Bob) sends back these particles as a random sequence. This ensures the security of communication.

  20. Inquiry, Investigation, and Communication in the Student-Directed Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janners, Martha Y.

    1988-01-01

    Describes how to organize a student-directed laboratory investigation which is based on amphibian metamorphosis, lasts for nearly a term, and involves extensive group effort. Explains the assignment, student response and opinion, formal paper, and instructor responsibilities. (RT)

  1. Directions for Mind, Brain, and Education: Methods, Models, and Morality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Zachary; Fischer, Kurt W.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we frame a set of important issues in the emerging field of Mind, Brain, and Education in terms of three broad headings: methods, models, and morality. Under the heading of methods we suggest that the need for synthesis across scientific and practical disciplines entails the pursuit of usable knowledge via a catalytic symbiosis…

  2. Mind, brain, and teaching: Some directions for future research.

    PubMed

    Pasquinelli, Elena; Zalla, Tiziana; Gvodzic, Katarina; Potier-Watkins, Cassandra; Piazza, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    In line with Kline's taxonomy, highlighting teaching as an array of behaviors with different cognitive underpinnings, we advocate the expansion of a specific line of research on mind, brain, and teaching. This research program is devoted to the understanding of the neurocognitive mechanisms and the evolutionary determinants of teaching skills, with the ultimate goal of helping teachers improve teaching quality.

  3. Algebraic Topology of Multi-Brain Connectivity Networks Reveals Dissimilarity in Functional Patterns during Spoken Communications

    PubMed Central

    Tadić, Bosiljka; Andjelković, Miroslav; Boshkoska, Biljana Mileva; Levnajić, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Human behaviour in various circumstances mirrors the corresponding brain connectivity patterns, which are suitably represented by functional brain networks. While the objective analysis of these networks by graph theory tools deepened our understanding of brain functions, the multi-brain structures and connections underlying human social behaviour remain largely unexplored. In this study, we analyse the aggregate graph that maps coordination of EEG signals previously recorded during spoken communications in two groups of six listeners and two speakers. Applying an innovative approach based on the algebraic topology of graphs, we analyse higher-order topological complexes consisting of mutually interwoven cliques of a high order to which the identified functional connections organise. Our results reveal that the topological quantifiers provide new suitable measures for differences in the brain activity patterns and inter-brain synchronisation between speakers and listeners. Moreover, the higher topological complexity correlates with the listener’s concentration to the story, confirmed by self-rating, and closeness to the speaker’s brain activity pattern, which is measured by network-to-network distance. The connectivity structures of the frontal and parietal lobe consistently constitute distinct clusters, which extend across the listener’s group. Formally, the topology quantifiers of the multi-brain communities exceed the sum of those of the participating individuals and also reflect the listener’s rated attributes of the speaker and the narrated subject. In the broader context, the presented study exposes the relevance of higher topological structures (besides standard graph measures) for characterising functional brain networks under different stimuli. PMID:27880802

  4. Quantum secure direct communication of digital and analog signals using continuum coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Antônio Geovan de Araújo Holanda; Rios, Francisco Franklin Sousa; Ramos, Rubens Viana

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we present optical schemes for secure direct quantum communication of digital and analog signals using continuum coherent states and frequency-dependent phase modulation. The main advantages of the proposed schemes are that they do not use entangled states and they can be implemented with today technology. The theory of quantum interference of continuum coherent state is described, and the optical setups for secure direct communication are presented and their securities are discussed.

  5. Destination directed packet switch architecture for a geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, W. D.; Shalkhauser, M. J.; Bobinsky, E. A.; Soni, N. J.; Quintana, J. A.; Kim, H.; Wagner, P.; Vanderaar, M.

    1992-01-01

    A major effort at NASA/Lewis is to identify and develop critical digital technologies and components that enable new commercial missions or significantly improve the performance, cost efficiency, and/or reliability of existing and planned space comunications systems. NASA envisions the need for low data rate, direct to the user communications services, for data, facsimile, voice, and video conferencing. A report that focuses on destination directed packet switching architectures for geostationary communication satellites is presented.

  6. Destination directed packet switch architecture for a geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancic, W. D.; Shalkhauser, M. J.; Bobinsky, E. A.; Soni, N. J.; Quintana, J. A.; Kim, H.; Wagner, P.; Vanderaar, M.

    1992-08-01

    A major effort at NASA/Lewis is to identify and develop critical digital technologies and components that enable new commercial missions or significantly improve the performance, cost efficiency, and/or reliability of existing and planned space comunications systems. NASA envisions the need for low data rate, direct to the user communications services, for data, facsimile, voice, and video conferencing. A report that focuses on destination directed packet switching architectures for geostationary communication satellites is presented.

  7. Brain-computer interface and semantic classical conditioning of communication in paralysis.

    PubMed

    De Massari, Daniele; Matuz, Tamara; Furdea, Adrian; Ruf, Carolin A; Halder, Sebastian; Birbaumer, Niels

    2013-02-01

    We propose a classical semantic conditioning procedure to allow basic yes-no communication in the completely locked-in state as an alternative to instrumental-operant learning of brain responses, which is the common approach in brain-computer interface research. More precisely, it was intended to establish cortical responses to the trueness of a statement irrespective of the particular constituent words and letters or sounds of the words. As unconditioned stimulus short aversive stimuli consisting of 1-ms electrical pulses were used. True and false statements were presented acoustically and only the true statements were immediately followed by electrical stimuli. 15 healthy participants and one locked-in ALS patient underwent the experiment. Three different classifiers were employed in order to differentiate between the two cortical responses by means of electroencephalographic recordings. The offline analysis revealed that semantic classical conditioning can be applied successfully to enable basic communication using a non-muscular channel.

  8. Study of orbiter/payload interface communications configuration control board directive from an operational perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addis, A. W.; Tatosian, C. G.; Lidsey, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Orbiter/payload data and communications interface was examined. It was found that the Configuration Control Board Directive (CCBD) greatly increases the capability of the orbiter to communicate with a wide variety of projected shuttle payloads. Rather than being derived from individual payload communication requirements, the CCBD appears to be based on an operational philosophy that requires the orbiter to duplicate or augment the ground network/payload communication links. It is suggested that the implementation of the CCBD be reviewed and compared with the Level 1 Program Requirements Document, differences reconciled, and interface characteristics defined.

  9. A novel EPON architecture for supporting direct communication between ONUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liqian; Chen, Xue; Wang, Zhen

    2008-11-01

    In the traditional EPON network, optical signal from one ONU can not reach other ONUs. So ONUs can not directly transmit packets to other ONUs .The packets must be transferred by the OLT and it consumes both upstream bandwidth and downstream bandwidth. The bandwidth utilization is low and becomes lower when there are more packets among ONUs. When the EPON network carries P2P (Peer-to-Peer) applications and VPN applications, there would be a great lot of packets among ONUs and the traditional EPON network meets the problem of low bandwidth utilization. In the worst situation the bandwidth utilization of traditional EPON only is 50 percent. This paper proposed a novel EPON architecture and a novel medium access control protocol to realize direct packets transmission between ONUs. In the proposed EPON we adopt a novel circled architecture in the splitter. Due to the circled-splitter, optical signals from an ONU can reach the other ONUs and packets could be directly transmitted between two ONUs. The traffic between two ONUs only consumes upstream bandwidth and the bandwidth cost is reduced by 50 percent. Moreover, this kind of directly transmission reduces the packet's latency.

  10. Is there a role for immune-to-brain communication in schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Khandaker, Golam M; Dantzer, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Schizophrenia is characterised by hallucinations, delusions, depression-like so-called negative symptoms, cognitive dysfunction, impaired neurodevelopment and neurodegeneration. Epidemiological and genetic studies strongly indicate a role of inflammation and immunity in the pathogenesis of symptoms of schizophrenia. Evidence accrued over the last two decades has demonstrated that there are a number of pathways through which systemic inflammation can exert profound influence on the brain leading to changes in mood, cognition and behaviour. The peripheral immune system-to-brain communication pathways have been studied extensively in the context of depression where inflammatory cytokines are thought to play a key role. In this review, we highlight novel evidence suggesting an important role of peripheral immune-to-brain communication pathways in schizophrenia. We discuss recent population-based longitudinal studies that report an association between elevated levels of circulating inflammatory cytokines and subsequent risk of psychosis. We discuss emerging evidence indicating potentially important role of blood-brain barrier endothelial cells in peripheral immune-to-brain communication, which may be also relevant for schizophrenia. Drawing on clinical and preclinical studies, we discuss whether immune-mediated mechanisms could help to explain some of the clinical and pathophysiological features of schizophrenia. We discuss implication of these findings for approaches to diagnosis, treatment and research in future. Finally, pointing towards links with early-life adversity, we consider whether persistent low-grade activation of the innate immune response, as a result of impaired foetal or childhood development, could be a common mechanism underlying the high comorbidity between certain neuropsychiatric and physical illnesses, such as schizophrenia, depression, heart disease and type-two diabetes.

  11. 26 CFR 56.4911-2 - Lobbying expenditures, direct lobbying communications, and grass roots lobbying communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... research (see paragraph (c)(1) of this section). (2) Grass roots lobbying communication—(i) Definition. A... respect to legislation may be within the exception for nonpartisan analysis, study or research (se... lobbying use of nonlobbying communications or research materials—(A) Limited effect of application....

  12. 26 CFR 56.4911-2 - Lobbying expenditures, direct lobbying communications, and grass roots lobbying communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... research (see paragraph (c)(1) of this section). (2) Grass roots lobbying communication—(i) Definition. A... respect to legislation may be within the exception for nonpartisan analysis, study or research (se... lobbying use of nonlobbying communications or research materials—(A) Limited effect of application....

  13. Bottlenecks to clinical translation of direct brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Serruya, Mijail D

    2014-01-01

    Despite several decades of research into novel brain-implantable devices to treat a range of diseases, only two-cochlear implants for sensorineural hearing loss and deep brain stimulation for movement disorders-have yielded any appreciable clinical benefit. Obstacles to translation include technical factors (e.g., signal loss due to gliosis or micromotion), lack of awareness of current clinical options for patients that the new therapy must outperform, traversing between federal and corporate funding needed to support clinical trials, and insufficient management expertise. This commentary reviews these obstacles preventing the translation of promising new neurotechnologies into clinical application and suggests some principles that interdisciplinary teams in academia and industry could adopt to enhance their chances of success.

  14. Bottlenecks to clinical translation of direct brain-computer interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Serruya, Mijail D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite several decades of research into novel brain-implantable devices to treat a range of diseases, only two—cochlear implants for sensorineural hearing loss and deep brain stimulation for movement disorders—have yielded any appreciable clinical benefit. Obstacles to translation include technical factors (e.g., signal loss due to gliosis or micromotion), lack of awareness of current clinical options for patients that the new therapy must outperform, traversing between federal and corporate funding needed to support clinical trials, and insufficient management expertise. This commentary reviews these obstacles preventing the translation of promising new neurotechnologies into clinical application and suggests some principles that interdisciplinary teams in academia and industry could adopt to enhance their chances of success. PMID:25520632

  15. Using brain-computer interfaces to overcome the extinction of goal-directed thinking in minimally conscious state patients.

    PubMed

    Liberati, Giulia; Birbaumer, Niels

    2012-08-01

    Minimally conscious state (MCS) is a condition of severely altered consciousness, in which patients appear to be wakeful and exhibit fluctuating but reproducible signs of awareness. MCS patients do not respond and are therefore dependent on others. In agreement with the embodied cognition assumption that motor actions influence our cognition, the absence of movement and the decrease in consequences for any type of covert or overt response may cause an extinction of goal-directed thinking. Brain-computer interfaces, which allow a direct output without muscular involvement, may be used to promote goal-directed thinking by allowing the performance of spatial and motor imagery tasks and could facilitate the interaction of MCS patients with their environment, possibly regaining some degree of communication and autonomy.

  16. Direct cortical stimulation but not transcranial electrical stimulation motor evoked potentials detect brain ischemia during brain tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Li, Fenghua; Deshaies, Eric M; Allott, Geoffrey; Canute, Gregory; Gorji, Reza

    2011-09-01

    Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by both direct cortical stimulation (DCS) and transcranial electrical stimulation are used during brain tumor resection. Parallel use of direct cortical stimulation motor evoked potentials (DCS-MEPs) and transcranial electrical stimulation motor evoked potentials (TCeMEPs) has been practiced during brain tumor resection. We report that DCS-MEPs elicited by direct subdural grid stimulation, but not TCeMEPs, detected brain ischemia during brain tumor resection. Following resection of a brainstem high-grade glioma in a 21-year-old, the threshold of cortical motor-evoked-potentials (cMEPs) increased from 13 mA to 20 mA while amplitudes decreased. No changes were noted in transcranial motor evoked potentials (TCMEPs), somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs), auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), anesthetics, or hemodynamic parameters. Our case showed the loss of cMEPs and SSEPs, but not TCeMEPs. Permanent loss of DCS-MEPs and SSEPs was correlated with permanent left hemiplegia in our patient even when appropriate action was taken. Parallel use of DCS- and TCeMEPs with SSEPs improves sensitivity of intraoperative detection of motor impairment. DCS may be superior to TCeMEPs during brain tumor resection.

  17. Breaking the silence: brain-computer interfaces (BCI) for communication and motor control.

    PubMed

    Birbaumer, Niels

    2006-11-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) allow control of computers or external devices with regulation of brain activity alone. Invasive BCIs, almost exclusively investigated in animal models using implanted electrodes in brain tissue, and noninvasive BCIs using electrophysiological recordings in humans are described. Clinical applications were reserved with few exceptions for the noninvasive approach: communication with the completely paralyzed and locked-in syndrome with slow cortical potentials, sensorimotor rhythm and P300, and restoration of movement and cortical reorganization in high spinal cord lesions and chronic stroke. It was demonstrated that noninvasive EEG-based BCIs allow brain-derived communication in paralyzed and locked-in patients but not in completely locked-in patients. At present no firm conclusion about the clinical utility of BCI for the control of voluntary movement can be made. Invasive multielectrode BCIs in otherwise healthy animals allowed execution of reaching, grasping, and force variations based on spike patterns and extracellular field potentials. The newly developed fMRI-BCIs and NIRS-BCIs, like EEG BCIs, offer promise for the learned regulation of emotional disorders and also disorders of young children.

  18. Communicative functions of directional verbal probabilities: Speaker's choice, listener's inference, and reference points.

    PubMed

    Honda, Hidehito; Yamagishi, Kimihiko

    2016-09-09

    Verbal probabilities have directional communicative functions, and most can be categorized as positive (e.g., "it is likely") or negative (e.g., "it is doubtful"). We examined the communicative functions of verbal probabilities based on the reference point hypothesis According to this hypothesis, listeners are sensitive to and can infer a speaker's reference points based on the speaker's selected directionality. In four experiments (two of which examined speakers' choice of directionality and two of which examined listeners' inferences about a speaker's reference point), we found that listeners could make inferences about speakers' reference points based on the stated directionality of verbal probability. Thus, the directionality of verbal probabilities serves the communicative function of conveying information about a speaker's reference point.

  19. Brain-Computer Interface-Based Communication in the Completely Locked-In State.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Ujwal; Xia, Bin; Silvoni, Stefano; Cohen, Leonardo G; Birbaumer, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Despite partial success, communication has remained impossible for persons suffering from complete motor paralysis but intact cognitive and emotional processing, a state called complete locked-in state (CLIS). Based on a motor learning theoretical context and on the failure of neuroelectric brain-computer interface (BCI) communication attempts in CLIS, we here report BCI communication using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and an implicit attentional processing procedure. Four patients suffering from advanced amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-two of them in permanent CLIS and two entering the CLIS without reliable means of communication-learned to answer personal questions with known answers and open questions all requiring a "yes" or "no" thought using frontocentral oxygenation changes measured with fNIRS. Three patients completed more than 46 sessions spread over several weeks, and one patient (patient W) completed 20 sessions. Online fNIRS classification of personal questions with known answers and open questions using linear support vector machine (SVM) resulted in an above-chance-level correct response rate over 70%. Electroencephalographic oscillations and electrooculographic signals did not exceed the chance-level threshold for correct communication despite occasional differences between the physiological signals representing a "yes" or "no" response. However, electroencephalogram (EEG) changes in the theta-frequency band correlated with inferior communication performance, probably because of decreased vigilance and attention. If replicated with ALS patients in CLIS, these positive results could indicate the first step towards abolition of complete locked-in states, at least for ALS.

  20. Analysing discourse in the traumatic brain injury population: telephone interactions with different communication partners.

    PubMed

    Togher, L; Hand, L; Code, C

    1997-03-01

    A range of discourse analyses are effective in identifying features which are aberrant following traumatic brain injury (TBI). We examined the exchanges of five traumatically brain-injured subjects and five matched controls across four speaking situations which included speaking to a therapist, to the bus timetable information service, to the police, and to their mothers on the telephone. Transcripts were analysed using the exchange structure analysis of systemic functional grammar. This analysis provided an indication of information giving (K1 moves per minute); information requesting and receiving (K2 moves per minute) and the amount of negotiation that was needed for the messages to be conveyed (dynamic moves per minute). Results indicated that the TBI subjects performed differently across the four conditions, and were differentiated from the matched controls on a number of measures. The role of different communication partners is also addressed. Communication partners were noted to interact differently with TBI subjects when compared with controls. This included increased information-giving to control subjects; more requests for information by police from TBI subjects and a greater use of dynamic moves by therapists with controls. The potential of exchange structure analysis is discussed as a useful way of examining the discourse of TBI subjects and their communication partners. Exchange structure analysis highlighted the dynamic nature of information exchange and the subtle ways speakers responded to familiarity and power imbalance in social interaction. This study has implications for family and community education regarding communication with people with TBI.

  1. Directional antenna array (DAA) for communications, control, and data link protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, Pavlo A.; Contarino, Vincent M.

    2013-06-01

    A next generation of Smart antennas with point-to-point communication and jam, spoof protection capability by verification of spatial position is offered. A directional antenna array (DAA) with narrow irradiation beam provides counter terrorism protection for communications, data link, control and GPS. Communications are "invisible" to guided missiles because of 20 dB smaller irradiation outside the beam and spatial separation. This solution can be implemented with current technology. Directional antennas have higher gain and can be multi-frequency or have wide frequency band in contrast to phase antenna arrays. This multi-directional antenna array provides a multi-functional communication network and simultaneously can be used for command control, data link and GPS.

  2. Infant-directed communication in lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla): do older animals scaffold communicative competence in infants?

    PubMed

    Luef, Eva Maria; Liebal, Katja

    2012-09-01

    Infant-directed speech is a linguistic phenomenon in which adults adapt their language when addressing infants in order to provide them with more salient linguistic information and aid them in language acquisition. Adult-directed language differs from infant-directed language in various aspects, including speech acoustics, syntax, and semantics. The existence of a "gestural motherese" in interaction with infants, demonstrates that not only spoken language but also nonvocal modes of communication can become adapted when infants are recipients. Rhesus macaques are so far the only nonhuman primates where a similar phenomenon to "motherese" has been discovered: the acoustic spectrum of a particular vocalization of adult females may be altered when the addressees are infants. The present paper describes how gorillas adjust their communicative strategies when directing intentional, nonvocal play signals at infants in the sense of a "nonvocal motherese." Animals of ages above infancy use a higher rate of repetitions and sequences of the tactile sensory modality when negotiating play with infants. This indicates that gorillas employ a strategy of infant-specific communication.

  3. Preferences of referring physicians regarding the role of radiologists as direct communicators of test results

    PubMed Central

    Erdoğan, Nuri; İmamoğlu, Hakan; Görkem, Süreyya Burcu; Doğan, Serap; Şenol, Serkan; Öztürk, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE Currently, there is a growing need for patient-centered radiology in which radiologists communicate with patients directly. The aim of this study is to investigate the preferences of referring physicians (RPs) regarding direct communication between radiologists and patients. METHODS This study was conducted in a single academic hospital using a survey form. The survey items investigated the preferences of RPs regarding: 1. who should be the communicator of test results when a patient with abnormal findings requests information (the options were the radiologist; another health professional with communication skills training (CST); and the RP with CST); and 2. how the communication activity should be conducted if the radiologist is obliged (or chooses) to communicate with the patient directly (the options were that the disclosure should be limited to the findings in the radiology report; the radiologist should emphasize that the RP is the primary physician; and the communication activity should be conducted in accordance with guidelines established by consensus). The respondents were 101 RPs from various fields of specialty; they were asked to rate the items using a 5-point Likert scale. The effects of age, sex, field of specialty (surgical vs. nonsurgical), and total years of experience as a medical specialist on the ratings were statistically compared. RESULTS Most RPs preferred that the radiologist transmit the information to the RP without communicating directly with the patient (89.1%). Although 69.3% of the RPs declared that health professionals with CST have priority in communication, 86.1% declared that the RP should be the person who received CST. If the radiologist communicates with patients directly, the RPs favored that 1. the disclosure should be limited to the findings in the radiology report (95%); 2. the communication activity should include an emphasis on the RP as the patient’s primary agent (84.1%); and 3. communication should be

  4. Adaptive array antenna for satellite cellular and direct broadcast communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, Charles R.; Abend, Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive phased-array antennas provide cost-effective implementation of large, light weight apertures with high directivity and precise beamshape control. Adaptive self-calibration allows for relaxation of all mechanical tolerances across the aperture and electrical component tolerances, providing high performance with a low-cost, lightweight array, even in the presence of large physical distortions. Beam-shape is programmable and adaptable to changes in technical and operational requirements. Adaptive digital beam-forming eliminates uplink contention by allowing a single electronically steerable antenna to service a large number of receivers with beams which adaptively focus on one source while eliminating interference from others. A large, adaptively calibrated and fully programmable aperture can also provide precise beam shape control for power-efficient direct broadcast from space. Advanced adaptive digital beamforming technologies are described for: (1) electronic compensation of aperture distortion, (2) multiple receiver adaptive space-time processing, and (3) downlink beam-shape control. Cost considerations for space-based array applications are also discussed.

  5. Mother-Child Communication about Location: Giving and Following Directions for Finding Hidden Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumert, Jodie M.; Haggerty, Kathryn A.; Mickunas, Andrew; Herzog, Lauren; Shadrick, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    We conducted 2 experiments to examine how mothers structure directions to young children for finding hidden objects and how young children use these directions to guide their searches. In Experiment 1, we examined the reference frames mothers use to communicate with their 2.5-, 3-, and 3.5-year-old children about location by asking mothers to…

  6. Non-verbal emotion communication training induces specific changes in brain function and structure.

    PubMed

    Kreifelts, Benjamin; Jacob, Heike; Brück, Carolin; Erb, Michael; Ethofer, Thomas; Wildgruber, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    The perception of emotional cues from voice and face is essential for social interaction. However, this process is altered in various psychiatric conditions along with impaired social functioning. Emotion communication trainings have been demonstrated to improve social interaction in healthy individuals and to reduce emotional communication deficits in psychiatric patients. Here, we investigated the impact of a non-verbal emotion communication training (NECT) on cerebral activation and brain structure in a controlled and combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and voxel-based morphometry study. NECT-specific reductions in brain activity occurred in a distributed set of brain regions including face and voice processing regions as well as emotion processing- and motor-related regions presumably reflecting training-induced familiarization with the evaluation of face/voice stimuli. Training-induced changes in non-verbal emotion sensitivity at the behavioral level and the respective cerebral activation patterns were correlated in the face-selective cortical areas in the posterior superior temporal sulcus and fusiform gyrus for valence ratings and in the temporal pole, lateral prefrontal cortex and midbrain/thalamus for the response times. A NECT-induced increase in gray matter (GM) volume was observed in the fusiform face area. Thus, NECT induces both functional and structural plasticity in the face processing system as well as functional plasticity in the emotion perception and evaluation system. We propose that functional alterations are presumably related to changes in sensory tuning in the decoding of emotional expressions. Taken together, these findings highlight that the present experimental design may serve as a valuable tool to investigate the altered behavioral and neuronal processing of emotional cues in psychiatric disorders as well as the impact of therapeutic interventions on brain function and structure.

  7. Non-verbal emotion communication training induces specific changes in brain function and structure

    PubMed Central

    Kreifelts, Benjamin; Jacob, Heike; Brück, Carolin; Erb, Michael; Ethofer, Thomas; Wildgruber, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    The perception of emotional cues from voice and face is essential for social interaction. However, this process is altered in various psychiatric conditions along with impaired social functioning. Emotion communication trainings have been demonstrated to improve social interaction in healthy individuals and to reduce emotional communication deficits in psychiatric patients. Here, we investigated the impact of a non-verbal emotion communication training (NECT) on cerebral activation and brain structure in a controlled and combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and voxel-based morphometry study. NECT-specific reductions in brain activity occurred in a distributed set of brain regions including face and voice processing regions as well as emotion processing- and motor-related regions presumably reflecting training-induced familiarization with the evaluation of face/voice stimuli. Training-induced changes in non-verbal emotion sensitivity at the behavioral level and the respective cerebral activation patterns were correlated in the face-selective cortical areas in the posterior superior temporal sulcus and fusiform gyrus for valence ratings and in the temporal pole, lateral prefrontal cortex and midbrain/thalamus for the response times. A NECT-induced increase in gray matter (GM) volume was observed in the fusiform face area. Thus, NECT induces both functional and structural plasticity in the face processing system as well as functional plasticity in the emotion perception and evaluation system. We propose that functional alterations are presumably related to changes in sensory tuning in the decoding of emotional expressions. Taken together, these findings highlight that the present experimental design may serve as a valuable tool to investigate the altered behavioral and neuronal processing of emotional cues in psychiatric disorders as well as the impact of therapeutic interventions on brain function and structure. PMID:24146641

  8. Measures for characterizing directionality specific volume changes in TBM of brain growth

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia; Habas, Piotr A.; Kim, Kio; Corbett-Detig, James; Rousseau, Francois; Glenn, Orit A.; Barkovich, A. James; Studholme, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Tensor based morphology (TBM) is a powerful approach to analyze local structural changes in brain anatomy. However, conventional scalar TBM methods are unable to present direction-specific analysis of volume changes required to model complex changes such as those during brain growth. In this paper, we describe novel TBM descriptors for studying direction-specific changes in a subject population which can be used in conjunction with scalar TBM to analyze local patterns in directionality of volume change during brain development. We illustrate the use of these methods by studying brain developmental patterns in fetuses. Results show that this approach detects early changes local growth that are related to the early stages of sulcal and gyral formation. PMID:20879333

  9. Direction of CRT waste glass processing: electronics recycling industry communication.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Julia R; Boehm, Michael W; Drummond, Charles

    2012-08-01

    Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source) then the reuse of CRT glass can be increased.

  10. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis progression and stability of brain-computer interface communication.

    PubMed

    Silvoni, Stefano; Cavinato, Marianna; Volpato, Chiara; Ruf, Carolin A; Birbaumer, Niels; Piccione, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    Our objective was to investigate the relationship between brain-computer interface (BCI) communication skill and disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We sought also to assess stability of BCI communication performance over time and whether it is related to the progression of neurological impairment before entering the locked-in state. A three years follow-up, BCI evaluation in a group of ALS patients (n = 24) was conducted. For a variety of reasons only three patients completed the three years follow-up. BCI communication skill and disability level, using the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale-Revised, were assessed at admission and at each of the three follow-ups. Multiple non-parametric statistical methods were used to ensure reliability of the dependent variables: correlations, paired test and factor analysis of variance. Results demonstrated no significant relationship between BCI communication skill (BCI-CS) and disease evolution. The patients who performed the follow-up evaluations preserved their BCI-CS over time. Patients' age at admission correlated positively with the ability to achieve control over a BCI. In conclusion, disease evolution in ALS does not affect the ability to control a BCI for communication. BCI performance can be maintained in the different stages of the illness.

  11. Direct measurement of fluence rate in the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Rusina, Tatyana V.; Denisov, Nikolay A.; Dets, Sergiy M.; Steiner, Rudolf W.; Rozumenko, Vladimir D.

    1996-01-01

    Fluence rate was measured in normal and cancerous (glioma) human brain samples using a multichannel detector. Detector consisted of 8 isotrope fiber probes positioned around the central irradiating probe. Detecting probes were displaced one from other at a step 0.5 mm along the central irradiating fiber. Bare ends of detecting fibers were coupled with photodiode array. He-Ne (633 nm) or Nd:YAG (1064 nm) lasers were coupled with irradiating probe. Fluence rate was measured in each of 8 points in the depth range 5 mm. Measured mean penetration depths of 633 nm light were 0.70 mm, 0.50 mm and 0.40 mm for white matter, grey matter and glioma, respectively. For Nd:YAG laser, penetration depth was about 2.3 mm for normal tissue and glioma. Multichannel computerized detector allows to provide a small invasive real-time measurements of fluence rate in different tissues.

  12. Direction of CRT waste glass processing: Electronics recycling industry communication

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Julia R.; Boehm, Michael W.; Drummond, Charles

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Given a large flow rate of CRT glass {approx}10% of the panel glass stream will be leaded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The supply of CRT waste glass exceeded demand in 2009. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclers should use UV-light to detect lead oxide during the separation process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling market analysis techniques and results are given for CRT glass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Academic initiatives and the necessary expansion of novel product markets are discussed. - Abstract: Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source

  13. Reduced electrical bandwidth receivers for direct detection 4-ary PPM optical communication intersatellite links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Frederic M.; Sun, Xiaoli

    1993-01-01

    One of the major sources of noise in a direct detection optical communication receiver is the shot noise due to the quantum nature of the photodetector. The shot noise is signal dependent and is neither Gaussian nor wide sense stationary. When a photomultiplier tube (PMT) or an avalanche photodiode (APD) is used, there is also a multiplicative excess noise due to the randomness of the internal photodetector gain. Generally speaking, the radio frequency (RF) communication theory cannot be applied to direct detection optical communication systems because noise in RF communication systems is usually additive and Gaussian. A receiver structure which is mathematically optimal for signal dependent shot noise is derived. Several suboptimal receiver structures are discussed and compared with the optimal receiver. The objective is to find a receiver structure which is easy to implement and gives close to optimal performance.

  14. Job stability in skilled work and communication ability after moderate-severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbroek, Peter; Turkstra, Lyn S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Communication deficits may play a critical role in maintaining employment after traumatic brain injury (TBI), but links between specific communication deficits and employment outcomes have not been determined. This study identified communication measures that distinguished stably employed versus unstably employed adults with TBI. Methods Participants were 31 adults with moderate-severe TBI who were employed full-time for at least 12 consecutive months before injury in skilled jobs and had attempted return to skilled jobs after injury. Sixteen had achieved stable employment (SE) post-injury, defined as full-time employment for ≥12 consecutive months; and 15 had unstable (UE) employment. Participants completed a battery of communication tests identified in a prior qualitative study of communication skills required for skilled work. Results Measures of spoken language comprehension, verbal reasoning, social inference, reading, and politeness in spoken discourse significantly discriminated between SE and UE groups. Two nested models were completed and compared. The first model excluded discourse data because of missing data for two UE and one SE participant. This model revealed that measures of verbal reasoning speed (β = −0.18, p = 0.05) and social inference (β = 0.19, p = 0.05) were predictive independent of the overall model. The second model included discourse data and was a better overall predictor of group membership (Likelihood ratio test, Model 1: 3.824, Model 2: 2.865). Conclusion Communication measures were positively associated with stable employment in skilled jobs after TBI. Clinicians should include assessment of communication for adults attempting return to work after TBI, paying specific attention to social inference and speed of verbal reasoning skills. PMID:25958999

  15. Sociosexual and Communication Deficits after Traumatic Injury to the Developing Murine Brain

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Bridgette D.; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.; Jun Kwon, Yong; Sam, Pingdewinde N.; Gibson, A. Matt; Grissom, Sarah; Brown, Sienna; Adahman, Zahra; Hollingsworth, Christopher A.; Kwakye, Alexander; Gimlin, Kayleen; Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Hanten, Gerri; Levin, Harvey S.; Schenk, A. Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Despite the life-long implications of social and communication dysfunction after pediatric traumatic brain injury, there is a poor understanding of these deficits in terms of their developmental trajectory and underlying mechanisms. In a well-characterized murine model of pediatric brain injury, we recently demonstrated that pronounced deficits in social interactions emerge across maturation to adulthood after injury at postnatal day (p) 21, approximating a toddler-aged child. Extending these findings, we here hypothesized that these social deficits are dependent upon brain maturation at the time of injury, and coincide with abnormal sociosexual behaviors and communication. Age-dependent vulnerability of the developing brain to social deficits was addressed by comparing behavioral and neuroanatomical outcomes in mice injured at either a pediatric age (p21) or during adolescence (p35). Sociosexual behaviors including social investigation and mounting were evaluated in a resident-intruder paradigm at adulthood. These outcomes were complemented by assays of urine scent marking and ultrasonic vocalizations as indices of social communication. We provide evidence of sociosexual deficits after brain injury at p21, which manifest as reduced mounting behavior and scent marking towards an unfamiliar female at adulthood. In contrast, with the exception of the loss of social recognition in a three-chamber social approach task, mice that received TBI at adolescence were remarkably resilient to social deficits at adulthood. Increased emission of ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) as well as preferential emission of high frequency USVs after injury was dependent upon both the stimulus and prior social experience. Contrary to the hypothesis that changes in white matter volume may underlie social dysfunction, injury at both p21 and p35 resulted in a similar degree of atrophy of the corpus callosum by adulthood. However, loss of hippocampal tissue was greater after p21 compared to p35

  16. Quantum Secure Direct Communication in a noisy environment: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Gui Lu

    Quantum communication holds promise for absolutely security in secret message transmission. Quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) is an important branch of the quantum communication in which secret messages are sent directly over a quantum channel with security[Phys. Rev. A 65 , 032302 (2002)]. QSDC offers higher security and is instantaneous in communication, and is a great improvement to the classical communication mode. It is also a powerful basic quantum communication primitive for constructing many other quantum communication tasks such as quantum bidding, quantum signature and quantum dialogue and so on. Since the first QSDC protocol proposed in 2000, it has become one of the extensive research focuses. In this talk, the basic ideas of QSDC will be reviewed, and major QSDC protocols will be described, such as the efficient-QSDC protocol, the two-step QSDC protocol, the one-time-pad QSDC protocol, the high-dimensional QSDC protocol and so on. Experimental progress is also developing steadily, and will also be reviewed. In particular, the quantum one-time-pad QSDC protocol has recently been successfully demonstrated experimentally[arXiv:1503.00451]. Work supported by China National Natural Science Foundation, the Ministry of Science and Technology of China.

  17. Cognitive Impairment by Antibiotic-Induced Gut Dysbiosis: Analysis of Gut Microbiota-Brain Communication

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Esther E.; Farzi, Aitak; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Reichmann, Florian; Jačan, Angela; Wagner, Bernhard; Zinser, Erwin; Bordag, Natalie; Magnes, Christoph; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Kashofer, Karl; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Holzer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that disruption of the gut microbial community (dysbiosis) impairs mental health. Germ-free mice and antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis are two approaches to establish causality in gut microbiota-brain relationships. However, both models have limitations, as germ-free mice display alterations in blood-brain barrier and brain ultrastructure and antibiotics may act directly on the brain. We hypothesized that the concerns related to antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis can only adequately be addressed if the effect of intragastric treatment of adult mice with multiple antibiotics on (i) gut microbial community, (ii) metabolite profile in the colon, (iii) circulating metabolites, (iv) expression of neuronal signaling molecules in distinct brain areas and (v) cognitive behavior is systematically investigated. Of the antibiotics used (ampicillin, bacitracin, meropenem, neomycin, vancomycin), ampicillin had some oral bioavailability but did not enter the brain. 16S rDNA sequencing confirmed antibiotic-induced microbial community disruption, and metabolomics revealed that gut dysbiosis was associated with depletion of bacteria-derived metabolites in the colon and alterations of lipid species and converted microbe-derived molecules in the plasma. Importantly, novel object recognition, but not spatial, memory was impaired in antibiotic-treated mice. This cognitive deficit was associated with brain region-specific changes in the expression of cognition-relevant signaling molecules, notably brain-derived neurotrophic factor, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B, serotonin transporter and neuropeptide Y system. We conclude that circulating metabolites and the cerebral neuropeptide Y system play an important role in the cognitive impairment and dysregulation of cerebral signaling molecules due to antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis. PMID:26923630

  18. Cognitive impairment by antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis: Analysis of gut microbiota-brain communication.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Esther E; Farzi, Aitak; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Reichmann, Florian; Jačan, Angela; Wagner, Bernhard; Zinser, Erwin; Bordag, Natalie; Magnes, Christoph; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Kashofer, Karl; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Holzer, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that disruption of the gut microbial community (dysbiosis) impairs mental health. Germ-free mice and antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis are two approaches to establish causality in gut microbiota-brain relationships. However, both models have limitations, as germ-free mice display alterations in blood-brain barrier and brain ultrastructure and antibiotics may act directly on the brain. We hypothesized that the concerns related to antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis can only adequately be addressed if the effect of intragastric treatment of adult mice with multiple antibiotics on (i) gut microbial community, (ii) metabolite profile in the colon, (iii) circulating metabolites, (iv) expression of neuronal signaling molecules in distinct brain areas and (v) cognitive behavior is systematically investigated. Of the antibiotics used (ampicillin, bacitracin, meropenem, neomycin, vancomycin), ampicillin had some oral bioavailability but did not enter the brain. 16S rDNA sequencing confirmed antibiotic-induced microbial community disruption, and metabolomics revealed that gut dysbiosis was associated with depletion of bacteria-derived metabolites in the colon and alterations of lipid species and converted microbe-derived molecules in the plasma. Importantly, novel object recognition, but not spatial, memory was impaired in antibiotic-treated mice. This cognitive deficit was associated with brain region-specific changes in the expression of cognition-relevant signaling molecules, notably brain-derived neurotrophic factor, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 2B, serotonin transporter and neuropeptide Y system. We conclude that circulating metabolites and the cerebral neuropeptide Y system play an important role in the cognitive impairment and dysregulation of cerebral signaling molecules due to antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis.

  19. Social communication features in children following moderate to severe acquired brain injury: a cross-sectional pilot study.

    PubMed

    Breau, Lynn M; Clark, Brenda; Scott, Ori; Wilkes, Courtney; Reynolds, Shawn; Ricci, Florencia; Sonnenberg, Lyn; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Rashid, Marghalara; Goez, Helly R

    2015-04-01

    We compared the social communication deficits of children with moderate to severe acquired brain injury or autism spectrum disorder, while accounting for the role of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms. Parents of 20 children aged 6 to 10 years (10 acquired brain injury; 10 autism spectrum disorder) completed the Social Communication Questionnaire, and Conners 3 Parent Short. A multivariate analysis of covariance revealed significant differences between groups in Social Communication Questionnaire restricted repetitive behavior scores, but not reciprocal social interaction or social communication. Multiple linear regressions indicated diagnosis did not predict reciprocal social interaction or social communication scores and that Conners 3 Parent Short Form hyperactivity scores were the strongest predictor of Social Communication Questionnaire reciprocal social interaction scores after accounting for age and Intelligence Quotient. The lack of difference in social communication deficits between groups may help in understanding the pathophysiology underlying the behavioral consequences of acquired brain injury. The link between hyperactivity and reciprocal interaction suggests that targeting hyperactivity may improve social outcomes in children following acquired brain injury.

  20. Critical issues using brain-computer interfaces for augmentative and alternative communication.

    PubMed

    Hill, Katya; Kovacs, Thomas; Shin, Sangeun

    2015-03-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) may potentially be of significant practical value to patients in advanced stages of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and locked-in syndrome for whom conventional augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems, which require some measure of consistent voluntary muscle control, are not satisfactory options. However, BCIs have primarily been used for communication in laboratory research settings. This article discusses 4 critical issues that should be addressed as BCIs are translated out of laboratory settings to become fully functional BCI/AAC systems that may be implemented clinically. These issues include (1) identification of primary, secondary, and tertiary system features; (2) integrating BCI/AAC systems in the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework; (3) implementing language-based assessment and intervention; and (4) performance measurement. A clinical demonstration project is presented as an example of research beginning to address these critical issues.

  1. Direct brain recordings reveal hippocampal rhythm underpinnings of language processing

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kristopher L.; Lin, Jack J.; Dewar, Callum; Parvizi, Josef; Dronkers, Nina F.; Knight, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Language is classically thought to be supported by perisylvian cortical regions. Here we provide intracranial evidence linking the hippocampal complex to linguistic processing. We used direct recordings from the hippocampal structures to investigate whether theta oscillations, pivotal in memory function, track the amount of contextual linguistic information provided in sentences. Twelve participants heard sentences that were either constrained (“She locked the door with the”) or unconstrained (“She walked in here with the”) before presentation of the final word (“key”), shown as a picture that participants had to name. Hippocampal theta power increased for constrained relative to unconstrained contexts during sentence processing, preceding picture presentation. Our study implicates hippocampal theta oscillations in a language task using natural language associations that do not require memorization. These findings reveal that the hippocampal complex contributes to language in an active fashion, relating incoming words to stored semantic knowledge, a necessary process in the generation of sentence meaning. PMID:27647880

  2. [Interest of EEG recording during direct electrical stimulation for brain mapping function in surgery].

    PubMed

    Trebuchon, A; Guye, M; Tcherniack, V; Tramoni, E; Bruder, N; Metellus, P

    2012-06-01

    Brain tumor surgery is at risk when lesions are located in eloquent areas. The interindividual anatomo-functional variability of the central nervous system implies that brain surgery within eloquent regions may induce neurological sequelae. Brain mapping using intraoperative direct electrical stimulation in awake patients has been for long validated as the standard for functional brain mapping. Direct electrical stimulation inducing a local transient electrical and functional disorganization is considered positive if the task performed by the patient is disturbed. The brain area stimulated is then considered as essential for the function tested. However, the exactitude of the information provided by this technique is cautious because the actual impact of cortical direct electrical stimulation is not known. Indeed, the possibility of false negative (insufficient intensity of the stimulation due to the heterogeneity of excitability threshold of different cortical areas) or false positive (current spread, interregional signal propagation responsible for remote effects, which make difficult the interpretation of positive or negative behavioural effects) constitute a limitation of this technique. To improve the sensitivity and specificity of this technique, we used an electrocorticographic recording system allowing a real time visualization of the local. We provide here evidence that direct cortical stimulation combined with electrocorticographic recording could be useful to detect remote after discharge and to adjust stimulation parameters. In addition this technique offers new perspective to better assess connectivity of cerebral networks.

  3. Better Glasgow outcome score, cerebral perfusion pressure and focal brain oxygenation in severely traumatized brain following direct regional brain hypothermia therapy: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Zenian, Mohd Sofan; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Hamid, Wan Zuraida Wan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Induced hypothermia for treatment of traumatic brain injury is controversial. Since many pathways involved in the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury are temperature dependent, regional brain hypothermia is thought capable to mitigate those processes. The objectives of this study are to assess the therapeutic effects and complications of regional brain cooling in severe head injury with Glasgow coma scale (GCS) 6-7. Materials and Methods: A prospective randomized controlled pilot study involving patients with severe traumatic brain injury with GCS 6 and 7 who required decompressive craniectomy. Patients were randomized into two groups: Cooling and no cooling. For the cooling group, analysis was made by dividing the group into mild and deep cooling. Brain was cooled by irrigating the brain continuously with cold Hartmann solution for 24-48 h. Main outcome assessments were a dichotomized Glasgow outcome score (GOS) at 6 months posttrauma. Results: A total of 32 patients were recruited. The cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling. There were 63.2% of patients in cooling group attained good GOS at 6 months compared to only 15.4% in noncooling group (P = 0.007). Interestingly, the analysis at 6 months post-trauma disclosed mild-cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling (70% vs. 15.4% attained good GOS, P = 0.013) and apparently, the deep-cooling-treated patients failed to be better than either no cooling (P = 0.074) or mild cooling group (P = 0.650). Conclusion: Data from this pilot study imply direct regional brain hypothermia appears safe, feasible and maybe beneficial in treating severely head-injured patients. PMID:25685201

  4. Direct nose-brain transport of benzoylecgonine following intranasal administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Chow, H H; Anavy, N; Villalobos, A

    2001-11-01

    In our previous research, cocaine applied intranasally in rats diffused or was transported directly from the nasal cavity to the brain. However, the direct nose-brain cocaine transport only contributes to an initial increase in the relative cocaine brain exposure. In this study, we have determined the nose-brain transport of a polar metabolite of cocaine, benzoylecgonine, to help understand factors affecting drug transport via this novel pathway. The nasal cavity of male Sprague-Dawley rats was isolated to prevent drainage of nasally applied dosing solution to non-nasal regions. Benzoylecgonine was then administered, either by intranasal administration or by intravenous (iv) injection. At different times postdose, blood and tissues from different regions of the brain were collected from groups of rats (n = 4 for each collection time) and benzoylecgonine concentrations in these samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Benzoylecgonine concentrations in plasma were at maximal levels immediately after iv dosing and declined as a function of time. Following intranasal administration, benzoylecgonine concentrations in plasma reached maximal levels between 15 and 30 min after dosing and declined as a function of time. To allow comparison of brain benzoylecgonine content after iv and intranasal administration, brain benzoylecgonine contents were normalized by plasma benzoylecgonine concentrations. The ratios of the area under the benzoylecgonine concentration-time curve (AUC) between the olfactory bulb and plasma following intranasal administration were 10-100 times higher than those obtained after iv dosing. The olfactory tract-to-plasma benzoylecgonine AUC ratios after intranasal administration were significantly higher than those after iv dosing up to 120 min following dosing. The brain tissue-to-plasma AUC ratios in cerebellum, brain stem, and cerebral cortex after intranasal administration were significantly higher than the corresponding ratios

  5. The Unlock Project: a Python-based framework for practical brain-computer interface communication "app" development.

    PubMed

    Brumberg, Jonathan S; Lorenz, Sean D; Galbraith, Byron V; Guenther, Frank H

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a framework for reducing the development time needed for creating applications for use in non-invasive brain-computer interfaces (BCI). Our framework is primarily focused on facilitating rapid software "app" development akin to current efforts in consumer portable computing (e.g. smart phones and tablets). This is accomplished by handling intermodule communication without direct user or developer implementation, instead relying on a core subsystem for communication of standard, internal data formats. We also provide a library of hardware interfaces for common mobile EEG platforms for immediate use in BCI applications. A use-case example is described in which a user with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis participated in an electroencephalography-based BCI protocol developed using the proposed framework. We show that our software environment is capable of running in real-time with updates occurring 50-60 times per second with limited computational overhead (5 ms system lag) while providing accurate data acquisition and signal analysis.

  6. Single-Word Reading: Behavioral and Biological Perspectives. New Directions in Communication Disorders Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigorenko, Elena L., Ed.; Naples, Adam J., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    As the first title in the new series, "New Directions in Communication Disorders Research: Integrative Approaches", this volume discusses a unique phenomenon in cognitive science, single-word reading, which is an essential element in successful reading competence. Single-word reading is an interdisciplinary area of research that incorporates…

  7. A Multicomponent Intervention to Increase Peer-Directed Communication in Head Start Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton-Chapman, Tina L.; Kaiser, Ann P.; Vijay, Prathibha; Chapman, Carol

    2008-01-01

    The effects of a multicomponent intervention strategy to increase peer-directed social communication in eight Head Start children at risk for poor language and social skill development were examined. The intervention consisted of three components: (a) a planning period, including reading a storybook that illustrated the play theme and use of the…

  8. Parents' Child-Directed Communication and Child Language Development: A Longitudinal Study with Italian Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majorano, Marinella; Rainieri, Chiara; Corsano, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The present study focuses on the characteristics of parental child-directed communication and its relationship with child language development. For this purpose, thirty-six toddlers (18 males and 18 females) and their parents were observed in a laboratory during triadic free play at ages 1;3 and 1;9. The characteristics of the maternal and…

  9. Health Care Professionals' Death Attitudes, Experiences, and Advance Directive Communication Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    The study surveyed 135 health care professionals (74 nurses, 32 physicians, and 29 social workers) to examine their personal death attitudes and experiences in relation to their reported advance directive communication practice behavior. Negative correlations were found between collaborating with other health care professionals regarding the…

  10. Direct nose-to-brain delivery of lamotrigine following intranasal administration to mice.

    PubMed

    Serralheiro, Ana; Alves, Gilberto; Fortuna, Ana; Falcão, Amílcar

    2015-07-25

    Pharmacoresistance is considered one of the major causes underlying the failure of the anticonvulsant therapy, demanding the development of alternative and more effective therapeutic approaches. Due to the particular anatomical features of the nasal cavity, intranasal administration has been explored as a means of preferential drug delivery to the brain. The purpose of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of lamotrigine administered by the intranasal route to mice, and to investigate whether a direct transport of the drug from nose to brain could be involved. The high bioavailability achieved for intranasally administered lamotrigine (116.5%) underscored the fact that a substantial fraction of the drug has been absorbed to the systemic circulation. Nonetheless, the heterogeneous biodistribution of lamotrigine in different brain regions, with higher concentration levels attained in the olfactory bulb comparatively to the frontal cortex and the remaining portion of the brain, strongly suggest that lamotrigine was directly transferred to the brain via the olfactory neuronal pathway, circumventing the blood-brain barrier. Therefore, it seems that intranasal route can be assumed as a suitable and valuable drug delivery strategy for the chronic treatment of epilepsy, also providing a promising alternative approach for a prospective management of pharmacoresistance.

  11. Intranasal administration of carbamazepine to mice: a direct delivery pathway for brain targeting.

    PubMed

    Serralheiro, Ana; Alves, Gilberto; Fortuna, Ana; Falcão, Amílcar

    2014-08-18

    The currently available antiepileptic drugs are typically administered via oral or intravenous (IV) routes which commonly exhibit high systemic distribution into non-targeted tissues, leading to peripheral adverse effects and limited brain uptake. In order to improve the efficacy and tolerability of the antiepileptic drug therapy, alternative administration strategies have been investigated. The purpose of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine administered via intranasal (IN) and IV routes to mice, and to investigate whether a direct transport of the drug from nose to brain could be involved. The similar pharmacokinetic profiles obtained in all matrices following both administration routes indicate that, after IN delivery, carbamazepine reaches quickly and extensively the bloodstream, achieving the brain predominantly via systemic circulation. However, the uneven biodistribution of carbamazepine through the brain regions with higher concentrations in the olfactory bulb and frontal cortex following IN instillation, in comparison with the homogenous brain distribution pattern after IV injection, strongly suggests the involvement of a direct transport of carbamazepine from nose to brain. Therefore, it seems that IN delivery represents a suitable and promising alternative route to administer carbamazepine not only for the chronically use of the drug but also in emergency conditions.

  12. Social communication in young children with traumatic brain injury: relations with corpus callosum morphometry.

    PubMed

    Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Prasad, Mary R; Swank, Paul; Kramer, Larry; Mendez, Donna; Treble, Amery; Payne, Christa; Bachevalier, Jocelyne

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to characterize the relations of specific social communication behaviors, including joint attention, gestures, and verbalization, with surface area of midsagittal corpus callosum (CC) subregions in children who sustained traumatic brain injury (TBI) before 7 years of age. Participants sustained mild (n=10) or moderate-severe (n=26) noninflicted TBI. The mean age at injury was 33.6 months; mean age at MRI was 44.4 months. The CC was divided into seven subregions. Relative to young children with mild TBI, those with moderate-severe TBI had smaller surface area of the isthmus. A semi-structured sequence of social interactions between the child and an examiner was videotaped and coded for specific social initiation and response behaviors. Social responses were similar across severity groups. Even though the complexity of their language was similar, children with moderate-severe TBI used more gestures than those with mild TBI to initiate social overtures; this may indicate a developmental lag or deficit as the use of gestural communication typically diminishes after age 2. After controlling for age at scan and for total brain volume, the correlation of social interaction response and initiation scores with the midsagittal surface area of the CC regions was examined. For the total group, responding to a social overture using joint attention was significantly and positively correlated with surface area of all regions, except the rostrum. Initiating joint attention was specifically and negatively correlated with surface area of the anterior midbody. Use of gestures to initiate a social interaction correlated significantly and positively with surface area of the anterior and posterior midbody. Social response and initiation behaviors were selectively related to regional callosal surface areas in young children with TBI. Specific brainbehavior relations indicate early regional specialization of anterior and posterior CC for social

  13. General relationship of global topology, local dynamics, and directionality in large-scale brain networks.

    PubMed

    Moon, Joon-Young; Lee, UnCheol; Blain-Moraes, Stefanie; Mashour, George A

    2015-04-01

    The balance of global integration and functional specialization is a critical feature of efficient brain networks, but the relationship of global topology, local node dynamics and information flow across networks has yet to be identified. One critical step in elucidating this relationship is the identification of governing principles underlying the directionality of interactions between nodes. Here, we demonstrate such principles through analytical solutions based on the phase lead/lag relationships of general oscillator models in networks. We confirm analytical results with computational simulations using general model networks and anatomical brain networks, as well as high-density electroencephalography collected from humans in the conscious and anesthetized states. Analytical, computational, and empirical results demonstrate that network nodes with more connections (i.e., higher degrees) have larger amplitudes and are directional targets (phase lag) rather than sources (phase lead). The relationship of node degree and directionality therefore appears to be a fundamental property of networks, with direct applicability to brain function. These results provide a foundation for a principled understanding of information transfer across networks and also demonstrate that changes in directionality patterns across states of human consciousness are driven by alterations of brain network topology.

  14. Destination-directed, packet-switched architecture for a geostationary communications satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO; Bobinsky, Eric A.; Soni, Nitin J.; Quintana, Jorge A.; Kim, Heechul; Wager, Paul; Vanderaar, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A major goal of the Digital Systems Technology Branch at the NASA Lewis Research Center is to identify and develop critical digital components and technologies that either enable new commercial missions or significantly enhance the performance, cost efficiency, and/or reliability of existing and planned space communications systems. NASA envisions a need for low-data-rate, interactive, direct-to-the-user communications services for data, voice, facsimile, and video conferencing. The network would provide enhanced very-small-aperture terminal (VSAT) communications services and be capable of handling data rates of 64 kbps through 2.048 Mbps in 64-kbps increments. Efforts have concentrated heavily on the space segment; however, the ground segment has been considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints. The focus of current space segment developments is a flexible, high-throughput, fault-tolerant onboard information-switching processor (ISP) for a geostationary satellite communications network. The Digital Systems Technology Branch is investigating both circuit and packet architectures for the ISP. Destination-directed, packet-switched architectures for geostationary communications satellites are addressed.

  15. New Methods for Direct Delivery of Chemotherapy for Treating Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Andrew J.; Piepmeier, Joseph M.; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2007-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnostic imaging and drug discovery, primary malignant brain tumors remain fatal. Median survival for patients with the most severe forms is rarely past eight months. The severity of the disease and the lack of substantial improvement in patient survival demand that new approaches be explored in drug delivery to brain tumors. Recently, local delivery of chemotherapy to brain tumors has provided a way to circumvent the blood-brain barrier, allowing delivery of chemotherapy drugs directly to malignant cells in the brain. Two methods of local delivery have been developed: polymeric-controlled release and convection-enhanced delivery. Controlled release utilizes degradable or non-degradable polymers as carriers of chemotherapy; polymer implants or microparticles are implanted locally to introduce a sustained source of drug for periods of days or months. Convection-enhanced delivery employs the bulk flow of drugs dissolved in fluid, which is introduced intracranially using a catheter and pump. The convective fluid flow is capable of delivering drugs great distances within the brain, potentially treating invasive cells at a distance from the catheter infusion site. These two new delivery strategies are capable of delivering both standard chemotherapeutic drugs and new methods of anti-cancer therapy. Taken individually, or used in tandem, they represent a potential revolution in brain cancer treatment. PMID:17940624

  16. Weighted and directed interactions in evolving large-scale epileptic brain networks.

    PubMed

    Dickten, Henning; Porz, Stephan; Elger, Christian E; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2016-10-06

    Epilepsy can be regarded as a network phenomenon with functionally and/or structurally aberrant connections in the brain. Over the past years, concepts and methods from network theory substantially contributed to improve the characterization of structure and function of these epileptic networks and thus to advance understanding of the dynamical disease epilepsy. We extend this promising line of research and assess-with high spatial and temporal resolution and using complementary analysis approaches that capture different characteristics of the complex dynamics-both strength and direction of interactions in evolving large-scale epileptic brain networks of 35 patients that suffered from drug-resistant focal seizures with different anatomical onset locations. Despite this heterogeneity, we find that even during the seizure-free interval the seizure onset zone is a brain region that, when averaged over time, exerts strongest directed influences over other brain regions being part of a large-scale network. This crucial role, however, manifested by averaging on the population-sample level only - in more than one third of patients, strongest directed interactions can be observed between brain regions far off the seizure onset zone. This may guide new developments for individualized diagnosis, treatment and control.

  17. Review of language organisation in bilingual patients: what can we learn from direct brain mapping?

    PubMed

    Giussani, C; Roux, F-E; Lubrano, V; Gaini, S M; Bello, L

    2007-11-01

    Although the majority of people worldwide are bilingual, the brain representation of language in bilingual persons is still a matter of debate. Since the beginning of the studies conducted on bilinguals, most authors denied that learning a new language requires a new semantic processing or the involvement of new cortical areas. In this paper, we review neurosurgical studies using direct electrocortical or subcortical stimulation techniques for brain mapping in bilingual subjects and compare this data with that obtained from other brain mapping methods. The authors focused on the most controversial issue whether multiple languages are represented in common or distinct cerebral areas. Seven direct brain mapping studies from different teams focused on bilingualism and multilingualism. All these studies showed that even if cerebral representation of language in multilingual patients could be grossly located in the same cortical region, it was possible to individualise distinct language-specific areas by direct cortical stimulation in the dominant frontal and temporo-parietal regions. Task- and language-specific sites were also described, demonstrating an important specialisation of some cortical areas. Using subcortical stimulation, some authors were able to find specific white matter tracts for different languages. Finally, all authors recommend in bilingual patients who need brain mapping for neurosurgical purpose to test all languages in which the subjects are fluent.

  18. Weighted and directed interactions in evolving large-scale epileptic brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickten, Henning; Porz, Stephan; Elger, Christian E.; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    Epilepsy can be regarded as a network phenomenon with functionally and/or structurally aberrant connections in the brain. Over the past years, concepts and methods from network theory substantially contributed to improve the characterization of structure and function of these epileptic networks and thus to advance understanding of the dynamical disease epilepsy. We extend this promising line of research and assess—with high spatial and temporal resolution and using complementary analysis approaches that capture different characteristics of the complex dynamics—both strength and direction of interactions in evolving large-scale epileptic brain networks of 35 patients that suffered from drug-resistant focal seizures with different anatomical onset locations. Despite this heterogeneity, we find that even during the seizure-free interval the seizure onset zone is a brain region that, when averaged over time, exerts strongest directed influences over other brain regions being part of a large-scale network. This crucial role, however, manifested by averaging on the population-sample level only – in more than one third of patients, strongest directed interactions can be observed between brain regions far off the seizure onset zone. This may guide new developments for individualized diagnosis, treatment and control.

  19. Weighted and directed interactions in evolving large-scale epileptic brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Dickten, Henning; Porz, Stephan; Elger, Christian E.; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy can be regarded as a network phenomenon with functionally and/or structurally aberrant connections in the brain. Over the past years, concepts and methods from network theory substantially contributed to improve the characterization of structure and function of these epileptic networks and thus to advance understanding of the dynamical disease epilepsy. We extend this promising line of research and assess—with high spatial and temporal resolution and using complementary analysis approaches that capture different characteristics of the complex dynamics—both strength and direction of interactions in evolving large-scale epileptic brain networks of 35 patients that suffered from drug-resistant focal seizures with different anatomical onset locations. Despite this heterogeneity, we find that even during the seizure-free interval the seizure onset zone is a brain region that, when averaged over time, exerts strongest directed influences over other brain regions being part of a large-scale network. This crucial role, however, manifested by averaging on the population-sample level only – in more than one third of patients, strongest directed interactions can be observed between brain regions far off the seizure onset zone. This may guide new developments for individualized diagnosis, treatment and control. PMID:27708381

  20. Changes of the directional brain networks related with brain plasticity in patients with long-term unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G-Y; Yang, M; Liu, B; Huang, Z-C; Li, J; Chen, J-Y; Chen, H; Zhang, P-P; Liu, L-J; Wang, J; Teng, G-J

    2016-01-28

    Previous studies often report that early auditory deprivation or congenital deafness contributes to cross-modal reorganization in the auditory-deprived cortex, and this cross-modal reorganization limits clinical benefit from cochlear prosthetics. However, there are inconsistencies among study results on cortical reorganization in those subjects with long-term unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL). It is also unclear whether there exists a similar cross-modal plasticity of the auditory cortex for acquired monaural deafness and early or congenital deafness. To address this issue, we constructed the directional brain functional networks based on entropy connectivity of resting-state functional MRI and researched changes of the networks. Thirty-four long-term USNHL individuals and seventeen normally hearing individuals participated in the test, and all USNHL patients had acquired deafness. We found that certain brain regions of the sensorimotor and visual networks presented enhanced synchronous output entropy connectivity with the left primary auditory cortex in the left long-term USNHL individuals as compared with normally hearing individuals. Especially, the left USNHL showed more significant changes of entropy connectivity than the right USNHL. No significant plastic changes were observed in the right USNHL. Our results indicate that the left primary auditory cortex (non-auditory-deprived cortex) in patients with left USNHL has been reorganized by visual and sensorimotor modalities through cross-modal plasticity. Furthermore, the cross-modal reorganization also alters the directional brain functional networks. The auditory deprivation from the left or right side generates different influences on the human brain.

  1. A generalized architecture of quantum secure direct communication for N disjointed users with authentication

    PubMed Central

    Farouk, Ahmed; Zakaria, Magdy; Megahed, Adel; Omara, Fatma A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we generalize a secured direct communication process between N users with partial and full cooperation of quantum server. So, N − 1 disjointed users u1, u2, …, uN−1 can transmit a secret message of classical bits to a remote user uN by utilizing the property of dense coding and Pauli unitary transformations. The authentication process between the quantum server and the users are validated by EPR entangled pair and CNOT gate. Afterwards, the remained EPR will generate shared GHZ states which are used for directly transmitting the secret message. The partial cooperation process indicates that N − 1 users can transmit a secret message directly to a remote user uN through a quantum channel. Furthermore, N − 1 users and a remote user uN can communicate without an established quantum channel among them by a full cooperation process. The security analysis of authentication and communication processes against many types of attacks proved that the attacker cannot gain any information during intercepting either authentication or communication processes. Hence, the security of transmitted message among N users is ensured as the attacker introduces an error probability irrespective of the sequence of measurement. PMID:26577473

  2. Parents' child-directed communication and child language development: a longitudinal study with Italian toddlers.

    PubMed

    Majorano, Marinella; Rainieri, Chiara; Corsano, Paola

    2013-09-01

    The present study focuses on the characteristics of parental child-directed communication and its relationship with child language development. For this purpose, thirty-six toddlers (18 males and 18 females) and their parents were observed in a laboratory during triadic free play at ages 1 ; 3 and 1 ; 9. The characteristics of the maternal and paternal child-directed language (characteristics of communicative functions and lexicon as reported in psycholinguistic norms for Italian language) were coded during free play. Child language development was assessed during free play and at ages 2 ; 6 and 3 ; 0 using the Italian version of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory (2 ; 6) and the revised Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT-R) (3 ; 0). Data analysis indicated differences between mothers and fathers in the quantitative characteristics of communicative functions and language, such as the mean length of utterances (MLU), and the number of tokens and types. Mothers also produced the more frequent nouns in the child lexicon. There emerged a relation between the characteristics of parental child-directed language and child language development.

  3. Insights into direct nose to brain delivery: current status and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Deepti; Ali, Asgar; Md, Shadab; Baboota, Sanjula; Sahni, Jasjeet K; Ali, Javed

    2014-03-01

    Now a day's intranasal (i.n) drug delivery is emerging as a reliable method to bypass the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and deliver a wide range of therapeutic agents including both small and large molecules, growth factors, viral vectors and even stem cells to the brain and has shown therapeutic effects in both animals and humans. This route involves the olfactory or trigeminal nerve systems which initiate in the brain and terminate in the nasal cavity at the olfactory neuroepithelium or respiratory epithelium. They are the only externally exposed portions of the central nervous system (CNS) and therefore represent the most direct method of noninvasive entry into the brain. This approach has been primarily used to explore therapeutic avenues for neurological diseases. The potential for treatment possibilities with olfactory transfer of drugs will increase as more effective formulations and delivery devices are developed. Recently, the apomorphine hydrochloride dry powders have been developed for i.n. delivery (Apomorphine nasal, Lyonase technology, Britannia Pharmaceuticals, Surrey, UK). The results of clinical trial Phase III suggested that the prepared formulation had clinical effect equivalent to subcutaneously administered apomorphine. In coming years, intranasal delivery of drugs will demand more complex and automated delivery devices to ensure accurate and repeatable dosing. Thus, new efforts are needed to make this noninvasive route of delivery more efficient and popular, and it is also predicted that in future a range of intranasal products will be used in diagnosis as well as treatment of CNS diseases. This review will embark the existing evidence of nose-to-brain transport. It also provides insights into the most relevant pre-clinical studies of direct nose-brain delivery and delivery devices which will provide relative success of intranasal delivery system. We have, herein, outlined the relevant aspects of CNS drugs given intranasally to direct the brain in

  4. Brain Mechanisms for Processing Direct and Averted Gaze in Individuals with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitskel, Naomi B.; Bolling, Danielle Z.; Hudac, Caitlin M.; Lantz, Stephen D.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Vander Wyk, Brent C.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

    2011-01-01

    Prior studies have indicated brain abnormalities underlying social processing in autism, but no fMRI study has specifically addressed the differential processing of direct and averted gaze, a critical social cue. Fifteen adolescents and adults with autism and 14 typically developing comparison participants viewed dynamic virtual-reality videos…

  5. Modeling brain injury response for rotational velocities of varying directions and magnitudes.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Ashley A; Danelson, Kerry A; Stitzel, Joel D

    2012-09-01

    An estimated 1.7 million people in the United States sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) annually. To investigate the effects of rotational motions on TBI risk and location, this study modeled rotational velocities of five magnitudes and 26 directions of rotation using the Simulated Injury Monitor finite element brain model. The volume fraction of the total brain exceeding a predetermined strain threshold, the Cumulative Strain Damage Measure (CSDM), was investigated to evaluate global model response. To evaluate regional response, this metric was computed relative to individual brain structures and termed the Structure Cumulative Strain Damage Measure (SCSDM). CSDM increased as input magnitude increased and varied with the direction of rotation. CSDM was 0.55-1.7 times larger in simulations with transverse plane rotation compared to those without transverse plane rotation. The largest SCSDM in the cerebrum and brainstem occurred with rotations in the transverse and sagittal planes, respectively. Velocities causing medial rotation of the cerebellum resulted in the largest SCSDM in this structure. For velocities of the same magnitude, injury risk calculated from CSDM varied from 0 to 97% with variations in the direction of rotation. These findings demonstrate injury risk, as estimated by CSDM and SCSDM, is affected by the direction of rotation and input magnitude, and these may be important considerations for injury prediction.

  6. Affective-Motivational Brain Responses to Direct Gaze in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kylliainen, Anneli; Wallace, Simon; Coutanche, Marc N.; Leppanen, Jukka M.; Cusack, James; Bailey, Anthony J.; Hietanen, Jari K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is unclear why children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) tend to be inattentive to, or even avoid eye contact. The goal of this study was to investigate affective-motivational brain responses to direct gaze in children with ASD. To this end, we combined two measurements: skin conductance responses (SCR), a robust arousal…

  7. High performance communication by people with paralysis using an intracortical brain-computer interface

    PubMed Central

    Pandarinath, Chethan; Nuyujukian, Paul; Blabe, Christine H; Sorice, Brittany L; Saab, Jad; Willett, Francis R; Hochberg, Leigh R

    2017-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have the potential to restore communication for people with tetraplegia and anarthria by translating neural activity into control signals for assistive communication devices. While previous pre-clinical and clinical studies have demonstrated promising proofs-of-concept (Serruya et al., 2002; Simeral et al., 2011; Bacher et al., 2015; Nuyujukian et al., 2015; Aflalo et al., 2015; Gilja et al., 2015; Jarosiewicz et al., 2015; Wolpaw et al., 1998; Hwang et al., 2012; Spüler et al., 2012; Leuthardt et al., 2004; Taylor et al., 2002; Schalk et al., 2008; Moran, 2010; Brunner et al., 2011; Wang et al., 2013; Townsend and Platsko, 2016; Vansteensel et al., 2016; Nuyujukian et al., 2016; Carmena et al., 2003; Musallam et al., 2004; Santhanam et al., 2006; Hochberg et al., 2006; Ganguly et al., 2011; O’Doherty et al., 2011; Gilja et al., 2012), the performance of human clinical BCI systems is not yet high enough to support widespread adoption by people with physical limitations of speech. Here we report a high-performance intracortical BCI (iBCI) for communication, which was tested by three clinical trial participants with paralysis. The system leveraged advances in decoder design developed in prior pre-clinical and clinical studies (Gilja et al., 2015; Kao et al., 2016; Gilja et al., 2012). For all three participants, performance exceeded previous iBCIs (Bacher et al., 2015; Jarosiewicz et al., 2015) as measured by typing rate (by a factor of 1.4–4.2) and information throughput (by a factor of 2.2–4.0). This high level of performance demonstrates the potential utility of iBCIs as powerful assistive communication devices for people with limited motor function. Clinical Trial No: NCT00912041 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18554.001 PMID:28220753

  8. High performance communication by people with paralysis using an intracortical brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Pandarinath, Chethan; Nuyujukian, Paul; Blabe, Christine H; Sorice, Brittany L; Saab, Jad; Willett, Francis R; Hochberg, Leigh R; Shenoy, Krishna V; Henderson, Jaimie M

    2017-02-21

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have the potential to restore communication for people with tetraplegia and anarthria by translating neural activity into control signals for assistive communication devices. While previous pre-clinical and clinical studies have demonstrated promising proofs-of-concept (Serruya et al., 2002; Simeral et al., 2011; Bacher et al., 2015; Nuyujukian et al., 2015; Aflalo et al., 2015; Gilja et al., 2015; Jarosiewicz et al., 2015; Wolpaw et al., 1998; Hwang et al., 2012; Spüler et al., 2012; Leuthardt et al., 2004; Taylor et al., 2002; Schalk et al., 2008; Moran, 2010; Brunner et al., 2011; Wang et al., 2013; Townsend and Platsko, 2016; Vansteensel et al., 2016; Nuyujukian et al., 2016; Carmena et al., 2003; Musallam et al., 2004; Santhanam et al., 2006; Hochberg et al., 2006; Ganguly et al., 2011; O'Doherty et al., 2011; Gilja et al., 2012), the performance of human clinical BCI systems is not yet high enough to support widespread adoption by people with physical limitations of speech. Here we report a high-performance intracortical BCI (iBCI) for communication, which was tested by three clinical trial participants with paralysis. The system leveraged advances in decoder design developed in prior pre-clinical and clinical studies (Gilja et al., 2015; Kao et al., 2016; Gilja et al., 2012). For all three participants, performance exceeded previous iBCIs (Bacher et al., 2015; Jarosiewicz et al., 2015) as measured by typing rate (by a factor of 1.4-4.2) and information throughput (by a factor of 2.2-4.0). This high level of performance demonstrates the potential utility of iBCIs as powerful assistive communication devices for people with limited motor function.Clinical Trial No: NCT00912041.

  9. Leader-following control of multiple nonholonomic systems over directed communication graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenjie; Djapic, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    This paper considers the leader-following control problem of multiple nonlinear systems with directed communication topology and a leader. If the state of each system is measurable, distributed state feedback controllers are proposed using neighbours' state information with the aid of Lyapunov techniques and properties of Laplacian matrix for time-invariant communication graph and time-varying communication graph. It is shown that the state of each system exponentially converges to the state of a leader. If the state of each system is not measurable, distributed observer-based output feedback control laws are proposed. As an application of the proposed results, formation control of wheeled mobile robots is studied. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed results.

  10. [Communication, language and the brain: from past anterior to near future].

    PubMed

    Joanette, Y; Ansaldo, A I; Carbonnel, S; Ska, B; Kahlaoui, K; Nespoulous, J-L

    2008-05-01

    The goal of this article is to share some reflection on the astonishing evolution of the ideas in communication neuroscience and neurolinguistics over the last 30 years, since the founding of the société de neuropsychologie de langue française. in particular, a number of conceptual and methodological advancements have characterized this period, many of which have been lead or heavily contributed by french-speaking research groups in that field. among the advances discussed, are (a) the widening to discourse and pragmatic components of the concept of language, as well as the theoretical and clinical implication of this conceptual extension, (b) the unique contribution of anatomical and functional neuroimaging, (c) the massive impact of the cognitive revolution on theoretical frameworks of language components, and its influence on therapy, (d) the disappearance and the re-appearance of the brain in the main stream research on language over this period, (e) the new perspectives offered though attention put on social aspects of language and the social participation of the individual with language disorders, (f) the emergence of a genuine science of aphasia rehabilitation, and (g) the rediscovery of inter-individual characteristics both genetically- and environmentally- determined. The authors then risk themselves in trying to envision what could characterize the evolution in the field for the next 30 years. Though perilous, this speculative exercise allowed to pinpoint to a number of anticipated advancements including (a) a probable reconciliation between cognitive and connectionist models to the benefit of both visions, (b) an increased contribution of social and emotional neurosciences, (c) some inescapable technological advancements, including light portable neuroimaging devices which will allow to study the neurobiological bases of communication in natural contexts, (d) the integration between communication and aging in cognitive neuroscience and (e) the

  11. NASA space communications R and D (Research and Development): Issues, derived benefits, and future directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Space communication is making immense strides since ECHO was launched in 1962. It was a simple passive reflector of signals that demonstrated the concept. Today, satellites incorporating transponders, sophisticated high-gain antennas, and stabilization systems provide voice, video, and data communications to millions of people nationally and worldwide. Applications of emerging technology, typified by NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1992, will use newer portions of the frequency spectrum (the Ka-band at 30/20 GHz), along with antennas and signal-processing that could open yet new markets and services. Government programs, directly or indirectly, are responsible for many space communications accomplishments. They are sponsored and funded in part by NASA and the U.S. Department of Defense since the early 1950s. The industry is growing rapidly and is achieving international preeminence under joint private and government sponsorship. Now, however, the U.S. space communications industry - satellite manufacturers and users, launch services providers, and communications services companies - are being forced to adapt to a different environment. International competition is growing, and terrestrial technologies such as fiber optics are claiming markets until recently dominated by satellites. At the same time, advancing technology is opening up opportunities for new applications and new markets in space exploration, for defense, and for commercial applications of several types. Space communications research, development, and applications (RD and A) programs need to adjust to these realities, be better coordinated and more efficient, and be more closely attuned to commercial markets. The programs must take advantage of RD and A results in other agencies - and in other nations.

  12. NASA space communications R and D (Research and Development): Issues, derived benefits, and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-02-01

    Space communication is making immense strides since ECHO was launched in 1962. It was a simple passive reflector of signals that demonstrated the concept. Today, satellites incorporating transponders, sophisticated high-gain antennas, and stabilization systems provide voice, video, and data communications to millions of people nationally and worldwide. Applications of emerging technology, typified by NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1992, will use newer portions of the frequency spectrum (the Ka-band at 30/20 GHz), along with antennas and signal-processing that could open yet new markets and services. Government programs, directly or indirectly, are responsible for many space communications accomplishments. They are sponsored and funded in part by NASA and the U.S. Department of Defense since the early 1950s. The industry is growing rapidly and is achieving international preeminence under joint private and government sponsorship. Now, however, the U.S. space communications industry - satellite manufacturers and users, launch services providers, and communications services companies - are being forced to adapt to a different environment. International competition is growing, and terrestrial technologies such as fiber optics are claiming markets until recently dominated by satellites. At the same time, advancing technology is opening up opportunities for new applications and new markets in space exploration, for defense, and for commercial applications of several types. Space communications research, development, and applications (RD and A) programs need to adjust to these realities, be better coordinated and more efficient, and be more closely attuned to commercial markets. The programs must take advantage of RD and A results in other agencies - and in other nations.

  13. Artificial brains. A million spiking-neuron integrated circuit with a scalable communication network and interface.

    PubMed

    Merolla, Paul A; Arthur, John V; Alvarez-Icaza, Rodrigo; Cassidy, Andrew S; Sawada, Jun; Akopyan, Filipp; Jackson, Bryan L; Imam, Nabil; Guo, Chen; Nakamura, Yutaka; Brezzo, Bernard; Vo, Ivan; Esser, Steven K; Appuswamy, Rathinakumar; Taba, Brian; Amir, Arnon; Flickner, Myron D; Risk, William P; Manohar, Rajit; Modha, Dharmendra S

    2014-08-08

    Inspired by the brain's structure, we have developed an efficient, scalable, and flexible non-von Neumann architecture that leverages contemporary silicon technology. To demonstrate, we built a 5.4-billion-transistor chip with 4096 neurosynaptic cores interconnected via an intrachip network that integrates 1 million programmable spiking neurons and 256 million configurable synapses. Chips can be tiled in two dimensions via an interchip communication interface, seamlessly scaling the architecture to a cortexlike sheet of arbitrary size. The architecture is well suited to many applications that use complex neural networks in real time, for example, multiobject detection and classification. With 400-pixel-by-240-pixel video input at 30 frames per second, the chip consumes 63 milliwatts.

  14. Regional and directional anisotropy of apparent diffusion coefficient in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hoehn-Berlage, M; Eis, M; Schmitz, B

    1999-02-01

    Quantitative diffusion maps were recorded in normal rat brain. In multi-slice sections covering the whole brain, strong variation of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was observed depending on slice position at constant gradient direction. Furthermore, a varying difference between apparent diffusion coefficients depending on gradient direction was found, reaching 32% in the cortex of the ventral-most horizontal sections while showing equal ADC on the dorsal cortex side. The regional variation and directional anisotropy of the ADC was not restricted to white matter but was described for both cortical and subcortical brain tissue. From diffusion coefficients along the three major field gradient directions (ADCx, ADCy, ADCz), the average ADC (ADCaverage) was determined from the trace of the diffusion tensor (D) as 653+/-28 microm2/s for parietal cortex and 671+/-32 microm2/s for lateral cortex, independent of position along the sagittal direction. From these observations about the regional diffusion anisotropy, a more stringent protocol for the description of ischemic ADC changes is proposed.

  15. ConnectX-2 CORE-Direct Enabled Asynchronous Broadcast Collective Communications

    SciTech Connect

    Gorentla Venkata, Manjunath; Graham, Richard L; Ladd, Joshua S; Shamis, Pavel; Rabinovitz, Ishai; Filipov, Vasily; Shainer, Gilad

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of InfiniBand (IB) CORE-Direct based blocking and nonblocking broadcast operations within the Cheetah collective operation framework. It describes a novel approach that fully ofFLoads collective operations and employs only user-supplied buffers. For a 64 rank communicator, the latency of CORE-Direct based hierarchical algorithm is better than production-grade Message Passing Interface (MPI) implementations, 150% better than the default Open MPI algorithm and 115% better than the shared memory optimized MVAPICH implementation for a one kilobyte (KB) message, and for eight mega-bytes (MB) it is 48% and 64% better, respectively. Flat-topology broadcast achieves 99.9% overlap in a polling based communication-computation test, and 95.1% overlap for a wait based test, compared with 92.4% and 17.0%, respectively, for a similar Central Processing Unit (CPU) based implementation.

  16. An efficient controlled quantum secure direct communication and authentication by using four particle cluster states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanvakenari, Milad; Houshmand, Monireh

    In this paper, a three-party controlled quantum secure direct communication and authentication (QSDCA) protocol is proposed by using four particle cluster states via a quantum one-time pad and local unitary operations. In the present scheme, only under the permission of the controller, the sender and the receiver can implement secure direct communication successfully. But under any circumstances, Charlie cannot obtain the secret message. Eavesdropping detection and identity authentication are achieved with the help of the previously shared reusable base identity strings of users. This protocol is unconditionally secure in both ideal and practical noisy cases. In one transmission, a qubit of each four particle cluster state is used as controller’s permission and the same qubit with another qubit are used to recover two classical bits of information. In the proposed scheme, the efficiency is improved compared with the previous works.

  17. Glia: A Neglected Player in Non-invasive Direct Current Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gellner, Anne-Kathrin; Reis, Janine; Fritsch, Brita

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive electrical brain stimulation by application of direct current (DCS) promotes plasticity in neuronal networks in vitro and in in vivo. This effect has been mainly attributed to the direct modulation of neurons. Glia represents approximately 50% of cells in the brain. Glial cells are electrically active and participate in synaptic plasticity. Despite of that, effects of DCS on glial structures and on interaction with neurons are only sparsely investigated. In this perspectives article we review the current literature, present own dose response data and provide a framework for future research from two points of view: first, the direct effects of DCS on glia and second, the contribution of glia to DCS related neuronal plasticity. PMID:27551261

  18. Immunotherapy of brain cancers: the past, the present, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Ge, Lisheng; Hoa, Neil; Bota, Daniela A; Natividad, Josephine; Howat, Andrew; Jadus, Martin R

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of brain cancers, especially high grade gliomas (WHO stage III and IV) is slowly making progress, but not as fast as medical researchers and the patients would like. Immunotherapy offers the opportunity to allow the patient's own immune system a chance to help eliminate the cancer. Immunotherapy's strength is that it efficiently treats relatively small tumors in experimental animal models. For some patients, immunotherapy has worked for them while not showing long-term toxicity. In this paper, we will trace the history of immunotherapy for brain cancers. We will also highlight some of the possible directions that this field may be taking in the immediate future for improving this therapeutic option.

  19. Star on the Horizon: The Emergence of the Direct Broadcast Satellite in American Mass Communications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-21

    communications Satellites, regulation ass media , regulation C 20. AmSrRACI s (myEtue er ’ fl if m a Identify by block number) W. C- we’"The purpose of this thesis...domestic broadcasting industry and media regulation. It is hoped that this thesis will help future scholars who .Benno Signitzer, Regulation of Direct... cultural or political intrusion by other countries. Satellite signals crossing national boundaries either 16 V% _ Z . . .. .. Z .. . .Z. Z! . DBS would be

  20. Performance assessment in brain-computer interface-based augmentative and alternative communication.

    PubMed

    Thompson, David E; Blain-Moraes, Stefanie; Huggins, Jane E

    2013-05-16

    A large number of incommensurable metrics are currently used to report the performance of brain-computer interfaces (BCI) used for augmentative and alterative communication (AAC). The lack of standard metrics precludes the comparison of different BCI-based AAC systems, hindering rapid growth and development of this technology. This paper presents a review of the metrics that have been used to report performance of BCIs used for AAC from January 2005 to January 2012. We distinguish between Level 1 metrics used to report performance at the output of the BCI Control Module, which translates brain signals into logical control output, and Level 2 metrics at the Selection Enhancement Module, which translates logical control to semantic control. We recommend that: (1) the commensurate metrics Mutual Information or Information Transfer Rate (ITR) be used to report Level 1 BCI performance, as these metrics represent information throughput, which is of interest in BCIs for AAC; 2) the BCI-Utility metric be used to report Level 2 BCI performance, as it is capable of handling all current methods of improving BCI performance; (3) these metrics should be supplemented by information specific to each unique BCI configuration; and (4) studies involving Selection Enhancement Modules should report performance at both Level 1 and Level 2 in the BCI system. Following these recommendations will enable efficient comparison between both BCI Control and Selection Enhancement Modules, accelerating research and development of BCI-based AAC systems.

  1. Chemosensory danger detection in the human brain: Body odor communicating aggression modulates limbic system activation.

    PubMed

    Mutic, Smiljana; Brünner, Yvonne F; Rodriguez-Raecke, Rea; Wiesmann, Martin; Freiherr, Jessica

    2017-02-28

    Although the sense of smell is involved in numerous survival functions, the processing of body odor emitted by dangerous individuals is far from understood. The aim of the study was to explore how human fight chemosignals communicating aggression can alter brain activation related to an attentional bias and danger detection. While the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) was seen involved in processing threat-related emotional information, danger detection and error evaluation, it still remains unknown whether human chemosignals communicating aggression can potentially modulate this activation. In the fMRI experiment, healthy male and female normosmic odor recipients (n=18) completed a higher-order processing task (emotional Stroop task with the word categories anger, anxiety, happiness and neutral) while exposed to aggression and exercise chemosignals (collected from a different group of healthy male donors; n=16). Our results provide first evidence that aggression chemosignals induce a time-sensitive attentional bias in chemosensory danger detection and modulate limbic system activation. During exposure to aggression chemosignals compared to exercise chemosignals, functional imaging data indicates an enhancement of thalamus, hypothalamus and insula activation (p<.05, FWE-corrected). Together with the thalamus, the ACC was seen activated in response to threat-related words (p<.001). Chemosensory priming and habituation to body odor signals are discussed.

  2. Conversational synchrony in the communicative interactions of individuals with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Rupa Gupta; Rigon, Arianna; Duff, Melissa C.

    2016-01-01

    Primary Objective To assess conversational synchrony in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Conversational synchrony, assessed by the similarity and coordination of words and words per turn, allows for effective and efficient communication and enhances the development of rapport. Research Design Eighteen participants with TBI (7 females) and nineteen healthy comparison participants (CP; 8 females) engaged in a 10-minute conversation with an unfamiliar partner. Methods and Procedures Conversational synchrony was assessed in these conversations by measuring the degree to which the participants’ productions of words and words per turn became more similar to one another over the course of the session Main Outcomes and Results Significantly more sessions with participants with TBI (11/18 for words, 9/18 for words per turn) compared to CP sessions (5/19 for words, 4/19 for words per turns) did not display conversational synchrony. Likewise, synchrony was significantly correlated with subjective ratings of the interaction from raters who were blind to participant status and the study hypotheses. Conclusions These results suggest that TBI can disrupt conversational synchrony and can, in turn, negatively impact social perceptions. The relationship between impaired conversational synchrony and other social communicative deficits in TBI warrants further study. PMID:26083049

  3. Directional visible light communication signal enhancement using a varifocal micromirror with four degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Jessica; Rahaim, Michael; Miao, Yun; Imboden, Matthias; Little, Thomas D. C.; Koomson, Valencia; Bishop, David J.

    2016-09-01

    We present the use of a micromirror to dynamically improve an optical wireless communications link. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is improved by directing the output of a 675 nm laser diode modulated at 10 MHz toward a receiver and by varying the divergence of the output beam using a varifocal, tip-tilt-piston micromirror. The SNR has a dynamic range of 30 dB for a diffuse source, all by optimizing the overall shape and direction of the mirror.

  4. The Epidemic Spreading Model and the Direction of Information Flow in Brain Networks.

    PubMed

    Meier, J; Zhou, X; Hillebrand, A; Tewarie, P; Stam, C J; Mieghem, P Van

    2017-02-04

    The interplay between structural connections and emerging information flow in the human brain remains an open research problem. A recent study observed global patterns of directional information flow in empirical data using the measure of transfer entropy. For higher frequency bands, the overall direction of information flow was from posterior to anterior regions whereas an anterior-to-posterior pattern was observed in lower frequency bands. In this study, we applied a simple Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) epidemic spreading model on the human connectome with the aim to reveal the topological properties of the structural network that give rise to these global patterns. We found that direct structural connections induced higher transfer entropy between two brain regions and that transfer entropy decreased with increasing distance between nodes (in terms of hops in the structural network). Applying the SIS model, we were able to confirm the empirically observed opposite information flow patterns and posterior hubs in the structural network seem to play a dominant role in the network dynamics. For small time scales, when these hubs acted as strong receivers of information, the global pattern of information flow was in the posterior-to-anterior direction and in the opposite direction when they were strong senders. Our analysis suggests that these global patterns of directional information flow are the result of an unequal spatial distribution of the structural degree between posterior and anterior regions and their directions seem to be linked to different time scales of the spreading process.

  5. MIF Maintains the Tumorigenic Capacity of Brain Tumor-Initiating Cells by Directly Inhibiting p53.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, Raita; Ohta, Shigeki; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Sugihara, Eiji; Okano, Hideyuki; Saya, Hideyuki; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kawase, Takeshi; Yoshida, Kazunari; Toda, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Tumor-initiating cells thought to drive brain cancer are embedded in a complex heterogeneous histology. In this study, we isolated primary cells from 21 human brain tumor specimens to establish cell lines with high tumorigenic potential and to identify the molecules enabling this capability. The morphology, sphere-forming ability upon expansion, and differentiation potential of all cell lines were indistinguishable in vitro However, testing for tumorigenicity revealed two distinct cell types, brain tumor-initiating cells (BTIC) and non-BTIC. We found that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was highly expressed in BTIC compared with non-BTIC. MIF bound directly to both wild-type and mutant p53 but regulated p53-dependent cell growth by different mechanisms, depending on glioma cell line and p53 status. MIF physically interacted with wild-type p53 in the nucleus and inhibited its transcription-dependent functions. In contrast, MIF bound to mutant p53 in the cytoplasm and abrogated transcription-independent induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, MIF knockdown inhibited BTIC-induced tumor formation in a mouse xenograft model, leading to increased overall survival. Collectively, our findings suggest that MIF regulates BTIC function through direct, intracellular inhibition of p53, shedding light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the tumorigenicity of certain malignant brain cells. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2813-23. ©2016 AACR.

  6. Decoding of four movement directions using hybrid NIRS-EEG brain-computer interface

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Jawad; Hong, Melissa Jiyoun; Hong, Keum-Shik

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid brain-computer interface (BCI)'s multimodal technology enables precision brain-signal classification that can be used in the formulation of control commands. In the present study, an experimental hybrid near-infrared spectroscopy-electroencephalography (NIRS-EEG) technique was used to extract and decode four different types of brain signals. The NIRS setup was positioned over the prefrontal brain region, and the EEG over the left and right motor cortex regions. Twelve subjects participating in the experiment were shown four direction symbols, namely, “forward,” “backward,” “left,” and “right.” The control commands for forward and backward movement were estimated by performing arithmetic mental tasks related to oxy-hemoglobin (HbO) changes. The left and right directions commands were associated with right and left hand tapping, respectively. The high classification accuracies achieved showed that the four different control signals can be accurately estimated using the hybrid NIRS-EEG technology. PMID:24808844

  7. Brain activation related to combinations of gaze position, visual input, and goal-directed hand movements.

    PubMed

    Bédard, Patrick; Wu, Min; Sanes, Jerome N

    2011-06-01

    Humans reach to and acquire objects by transforming visual targets into action commands. How the brain integrates goals specified in a visual framework to signals into a suitable framework for an action plan requires clarification whether visual input, per se, interacts with gaze position to formulate action plans. To further evaluate brain control of visual-motor integration, we assessed brain activation, using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Humans performed goal-directed movements toward visible or remembered targets while fixating gaze left or right from center. We dissociated movement planning from performance using a delayed-response task and manipulated target visibility by its availability throughout the delay or blanking it 500 ms after onset. We found strong effects of gaze orientation on brain activation during planning and interactive effects of target visibility and gaze orientation on movement-related activation during performance in parietal and premotor cortices (PM), cerebellum, and basal ganglia, with more activation for rightward gaze at a visible target and no gaze modulation for movements directed toward remembered targets. These results demonstrate effects of gaze position on PM and movement-related processes and provide new information how visual signals interact with gaze position in transforming visual inputs into motor goals.

  8. [The Support System for Diabetic Patients at Home with Bi-Directional IT Communication].

    PubMed

    Kubota, Masakazu; Hosoda, Kiminori; Eguchi, Kyoko; Nishijima, Yuki; Nakao, Kazuwa; Kinoshita, Ayae

    2010-12-01

    The present study analyzed the effects of bi-directional IT communication on the purpose of preventing diabetes progression and to reduce a caregiver burden. Diabetic patients were informed of the nature and purpose of the study before giving their voluntary consents to participate in the study. For the period of 12 weeks, a diabetic patient and his caregiver were communicated with a nurse through the TV telephone for 30 minutes once a week. Medical staff checked the list of weight change, compliance check, exercise habit, and attached pictures of the plate with a diabetic patient through the TV telephone in real time. We encouraged a diabetic patient to eat properly based on the diet record. The 12-week TV telephone communication resulted in the body weight decrease and HbA1c. There was a consciousness change about their daily eating habit. In the present study, the 12-week TV telephone communication once a week might be useful as an auxiliary therapy for changing a bad daily habit to a good daily habit for a diabetic patient at home.

  9. Direct-to-Earth communications with Mars Science Laboratory during Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano, M.; Finley, S.; Fort, D.; Schratz, B.; Ilott, P.; Mukai, R.; Estabrook, P.; Oudrhiri, K.; Kahan, D.; Satorius, E.

    Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) undergoes extreme heating and acceleration during Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) on Mars. Unknown dynamics lead to large Doppler shifts, making communication challenging. During EDL, a special form of Multiple Frequency Shift Keying (MFSK) communication is used for Direct-To-Earth (DTE) communication. The X-band signal is received by the Deep Space Network (DSN) at the Canberra Deep Space Communication complex, then down-converted, digitized, and recorded by open-loop Radio Science Receivers (RSR), and decoded in real-time by the EDL Data Analysis (EDA) System. The EDA uses lock states with configurable Fast Fourier Transforms to acquire and track the signal. RSR configuration and channel allocation is shown. Testing prior to EDL is discussed including software simulations, test bed runs with MSL flight hardware, and the in-flight end-to-end test. EDA configuration parameters and signal dynamics during pre-entry, entry, and parachute deployment are analyzed. RSR and EDA performance during MSL EDL is evaluated, including performance using a single 70-meter DSN antenna and an array of two 34-meter DSN antennas as a back up to the 70-meter antenna.

  10. Direct-to-Earth Communications with Mars Science Laboratory During Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soriano, Melissa; Finley, Susan; Fort, David; Schratz, Brian; Ilott, Peter; Mukai, Ryan; Estabrook, Polly; Oudrhiri, Kamal; Kahan, Daniel; Satorius, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) undergoes extreme heating and acceleration during Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) on Mars. Unknown dynamics lead to large Doppler shifts, making communication challenging. During EDL, a special form of Multiple Frequency Shift Keying (MFSK) communication is used for Direct-To-Earth (DTE) communication. The X-band signal is received by the Deep Space Network (DSN) at the Canberra Deep Space Communication complex, then down-converted, digitized, and recorded by open-loop Radio Science Receivers (RSR), and decoded in real-time by the EDL Data Analysis (EDA) System. The EDA uses lock states with configurable Fast Fourier Transforms to acquire and track the signal. RSR configuration and channel allocation is shown. Testing prior to EDL is discussed including software simulations, test bed runs with MSL flight hardware, and the in-flight end-to-end test. EDA configuration parameters and signal dynamics during pre-entry, entry, and parachute deployment are analyzed. RSR and EDA performance during MSL EDL is evaluated, including performance using a single 70-meter DSN antenna and an array of two 34-meter DSN antennas as a back up to the 70-meter antenna.

  11. Asymmetric Directional Multicast for Capillary Machine-to-Machine Using mmWave Communications.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jung-Hyok; Kim, Eui-Jik

    2016-04-11

    The huge demand for high data rate machine-to-machine (M2M) services has led to the use of millimeter Wave (mmWave) band communications with support for a multi-Gbps data rate through the use of directional antennas. However, unnecessary sector switching in multicast transmissions with directional antennas results in a long delay, and consequently a low throughput. We propose asymmetric directional multicast (ADM) for capillary M2M to address this problem in mmWave communications. ADM provides asymmetric sectorization that is optimized for the irregular deployment pattern of mulicast group members. In ADM, an M2M gateway builds up asymmetric sectors with a beamwidth of a different size to cover all multicast group members with the minimum number of directional transmissions. The performance of ADM under various simulation environments is evaluated through a comparison with legacy mmWave multicast. The results of the simulation indicate that ADM achieves a better performance in terms of the transmission sectors, the transmission time, and the aggregate throughput when compared with the legacy multicast method.

  12. Asymmetric Directional Multicast for Capillary Machine-to-Machine Using mmWave Communications

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jung-Hyok; Kim, Eui-Jik

    2016-01-01

    The huge demand for high data rate machine-to-machine (M2M) services has led to the use of millimeter Wave (mmWave) band communications with support for a multi-Gbps data rate through the use of directional antennas. However, unnecessary sector switching in multicast transmissions with directional antennas results in a long delay, and consequently a low throughput. We propose asymmetric directional multicast (ADM) for capillary M2M to address this problem in mmWave communications. ADM provides asymmetric sectorization that is optimized for the irregular deployment pattern of mulicast group members. In ADM, an M2M gateway builds up asymmetric sectors with a beamwidth of a different size to cover all multicast group members with the minimum number of directional transmissions. The performance of ADM under various simulation environments is evaluated through a comparison with legacy mmWave multicast. The results of the simulation indicate that ADM achieves a better performance in terms of the transmission sectors, the transmission time, and the aggregate throughput when compared with the legacy multicast method. PMID:27077859

  13. Event-Triggered Distributed Average Consensus Over Directed Digital Networks With Limited Communication Bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaqing; Chen, Guo; Huang, Tingwen; Dong, Zhaoyang; Zhu, Wei; Gao, Lan

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we consider the event-triggered distributed average-consensus of discrete-time first-order multiagent systems with limited communication data rate and general directed network topology. In the framework of digital communication network, each agent has a real-valued state but can only exchange finite-bit binary symbolic data sequence with its neighborhood agents at each time step due to the digital communication channels with energy constraints. Novel event-triggered dynamic encoder and decoder for each agent are designed, based on which a distributed control algorithm is proposed. A scheme that selects the number of channel quantization level (number of bits) at each time step is developed, under which all the quantizers in the network are never saturated. The convergence rate of consensus is explicitly characterized, which is related to the scale of network, the maximum degree of nodes, the network structure, the scaling function, the quantization interval, the initial states of agents, the control gain and the event gain. It is also found that under the designed event-triggered protocol, by selecting suitable parameters, for any directed digital network containing a spanning tree, the distributed average consensus can be always achieved with an exponential convergence rate based on merely one bit information exchange between each pair of adjacent agents at each time step. Two simulation examples are provided to illustrate the feasibility of presented protocol and the correctness of the theoretical results.

  14. Abnormal brain activation during directed forgetting of negative memory in depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenjing; Chen, Qunlin; Liu, Peiduo; Cheng, Hongsheng; Cui, Qian; Wei, Dongtao; Zhang, Qinglin; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-01-15

    The frequent occurrence of uncontrollable negative thoughts and memories is a troubling aspect of depression. Thus, knowledge on the mechanism underlying intentional forgetting of these thoughts and memories is crucial to develop an effective emotion regulation strategy for depressed individuals. Behavioral studies have demonstrated that depressed participants cannot intentionally forget negative memories. However, the neural mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study, participants completed the directed forgetting task in which they were instructed to remember or forget neutral or negative words. Standard univariate analysis based on the General Linear Model showed that the depressed participants have higher activation in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), superior frontal gyrus (SFG), superior parietal gyrus (SPG), and inferior temporal gyrus (ITG) than the healthy individuals. The results indicated that depressed participants recruited more frontal and parietal inhibitory control resources to inhibit the TBF items, but the attempt still failed because of negative bias. We also used the Support Vector Machine to perform multivariate pattern classification based on the brain activation during directed forgetting. The pattern of brain activity in directed forgetting of negative words allowed correct group classification with an overall accuracy of 75% (P=0.012). The brain regions which are critical for this discrimination showed abnormal activation when depressed participants were attempting to forget negative words. These results indicated that the abnormal neural circuitry when depressed individuals tried to forget the negative words might provide neurobiological markers for depression.

  15. High speed QPPM direct detection optical communication receivers for FSDD intersatellite links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Frederic M.; Sun, Xiaoli

    1993-01-01

    This final report consists of four separate reports, one for each project involved in this contract. The first report is entitled '325 Mbps QPPM (quaternary pulse position modulation) Direct Detection Free Space Optical Communication Encoder and Receiver,' which was our primary work. The second report is entitled 'Test Results of the 325 Mbps QPPM High Speed Data Transmission GaAs ASICs,' which describes our work in connection with Galaxy Microsystems, Inc. who produced these ASICs for NASA. The third report, 'Receiver Performance Analysis of BPPM Optical Communication Systems Using 1.3 micron Wavelength Transmitter and InGaAs PIN Photodiodes,' was prepared at the request of the NASA/Photonics Branch for their efforts in upgrading the 1773 optical fiber data bus. The fourth report, 'Photomultiplier Tubes for Use at 1.064 micron Wavelength,' was also prepared at the request of the NASA/Photonics Branch as a research project.

  16. NASA/GSFC program in direct detection optical communications for intersatellite links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzmaurice, M.; Bruno, R.

    1989-10-01

    NASA-Goddard has undertaken the development of direct-detection optical communications for space applications at the Gbps data rate channel capability level. The primary challenges to optical communications designers lie in the development of reliable optical power sources, as well as of high performance pointing/acquisition/tracking systems required by the narrow widths of the transmitted optical beams. GaAlAs diodes and their arrays are currently the most attractive technology for optical transmitters; pioneering work has also been conducted on dichroic and grating techniques for combining the power of several laser diodes. Attention is given to the performance obtained for an optical link acquisition and submicroradian tracking/pointing system.

  17. NASA/GSFC program in direct detection optical communications for intersatellite links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzmaurice, M.; Bruno, R.

    1989-01-01

    NASA-Goddard has undertaken the development of direct-detection optical communications for space applications at the Gbps data rate channel capability level. The primary challenges to optical communications designers lie in the development of reliable optical power sources, as well as of high performance pointing/acquisition/tracking systems required by the narrow widths of the transmitted optical beams. GaAlAs diodes and their arrays are currently the most attractive technology for optical transmitters; pioneering work has also been conducted on dichroic and grating techniques for combining the power of several laser diodes. Attention is given to the performance obtained for an optical link acquisition and submicroradian tracking/pointing system.

  18. Direct-detection optical communication with color coded pulse position modulation signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.

    1985-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a direct-detection optical communication system which is based on a laser transmitter which produces single light pulses at selected nonoverlapping optical center frequencies are discussed. The signal format, called color coded pulse position modulation (CCPPM), uses more of the total available response bandwidth characteristics of the photodetector than does ordinary PPM signaling. The advantages of CCPPM signaling are obtained at the expense of an increased optical bandwidth of the transmitted signal and a more complicated transmitter and receiver structure. When the signal format is used in conjunction with block length Reed-Solomon codes, high data rates and reliable high-speed optical communications under conditions of optimal energy efficiency are obtained.

  19. An online brain-machine interface using decoding of movement direction from the human electrocorticogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milekovic, Tomislav; Fischer, Jörg; Pistohl, Tobias; Ruescher, Johanna; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Aertsen, Ad; Rickert, Jörn; Ball, Tonio; Mehring, Carsten

    2012-08-01

    A brain-machine interface (BMI) can be used to control movements of an artificial effector, e.g. movements of an arm prosthesis, by motor cortical signals that control the equivalent movements of the corresponding body part, e.g. arm movements. This approach has been successfully applied in monkeys and humans by accurately extracting parameters of movements from the spiking activity of multiple single neurons. We show that the same approach can be realized using brain activity measured directly from the surface of the human cortex using electrocorticography (ECoG). Five subjects, implanted with ECoG implants for the purpose of epilepsy assessment, took part in our study. Subjects used directionally dependent ECoG signals, recorded during active movements of a single arm, to control a computer cursor in one out of two directions. Significant BMI control was achieved in four out of five subjects with correct directional decoding in 69%-86% of the trials (75% on average). Our results demonstrate the feasibility of an online BMI using decoding of movement direction from human ECoG signals. Thus, to achieve such BMIs, ECoG signals might be used in conjunction with or as an alternative to intracortical neural signals.

  20. East-West differences in perception of brain death. Review of history, current understandings, and directions for future research.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing; Miller, Geoffrey

    2015-06-01

    The concept of brain death as equivalent to cardiopulmonary death was initially conceived following developments in neuroscience, critical care, and transplant technology. It is now a routine part of medicine in Western countries, including the United States. In contrast, Eastern countries have been reluctant to incorporate brain death into legislation and medical practice. Several countries, most notably China, still lack laws recognizing brain death and national medical standards for making the diagnosis. The perception is that Asians are less likely to approve of brain death or organ transplant from brain dead donors. Cultural and religious traditions have been referenced to explain this apparent difference. In the West, the status of the brain as home to the soul in Enlightenment philosophy, combined with pragmatism and utilitarianism, supports the concept of brain death. In the East, the integration of body with spirit and nature in Buddhist and folk beliefs, along with the Confucian social structure that builds upon interpersonal relationships, argues against brain death. However, it is unclear whether these reasoning strategies are explicitly used when families and medical providers are faced with acknowledging brain death. Their decisions are more likely to involve a prioritization of values and a rationalization of intuitive responses. Why and whether there might be differences between East and West in the acceptance of the brain death concept requires further empirical testing, which would help inform policy-making and facilitate communication between providers and patients from different cultural and ethnic backgrounds.

  1. Communication of brain network core connections altered in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia but possibly preserved in early-onset Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Mendez, Mario F.; Bartzokis, George; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusion imaging and brain connectivity analyses can assess white matter deterioration in the brain, revealing the underlying patterns of how brain structure declines. Fiber tractography methods can infer neural pathways and connectivity patterns, yielding sensitive mathematical metrics of network integrity. Here, we analyzed 1.5-Tesla wholebrain diffusion-weighted images from 64 participants - 15 patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 19 with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD), and 30 healthy elderly controls. Using whole-brain tractography, we reconstructed structural brain connectivity networks to map connections between cortical regions. We evaluated the brain's networks focusing on the most highly central and connected regions, also known as hubs, in each diagnostic group - specifically the "high-cost" structural backbone used in global and regional communication. The high-cost backbone of the brain, predicted by fiber density and minimally short pathways between brain regions, accounted for 81-92% of the overall brain communication metric in all diagnostic groups. Furthermore, we found that the set of pathways interconnecting high-cost and high-capacity regions of the brain's communication network are globally and regionally altered in bvFTD, compared to healthy participants; however, the overall organization of the high-cost and high-capacity networks were relatively preserved in EOAD participants, relative to controls. Disruption of the major central hubs that transfer information between brain regions may impair neural communication and functional integrity in characteristic ways typical of each subtype of dementia.

  2. Brain mechanisms of acoustic communication in humans and nonhuman primates: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Hermann; Hage, Steffen R; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2014-12-01

    Any account of "what is special about the human brain" (Passingham 2008) must specify the neural basis of our unique ability to produce speech and delineate how these remarkable motor capabilities could have emerged in our hominin ancestors. Clinical data suggest that the basal ganglia provide a platform for the integration of primate-general mechanisms of acoustic communication with the faculty of articulate speech in humans. Furthermore, neurobiological and paleoanthropological data point at a two-stage model of the phylogenetic evolution of this crucial prerequisite of spoken language: (i) monosynaptic refinement of the projections of motor cortex to the brainstem nuclei that steer laryngeal muscles, presumably, as part of a "phylogenetic trend" associated with increasing brain size during hominin evolution; (ii) subsequent vocal-laryngeal elaboration of cortico-basal ganglia circuitries, driven by human-specific FOXP2 mutations.;>This concept implies vocal continuity of spoken language evolution at the motor level, elucidating the deep entrenchment of articulate speech into a "nonverbal matrix" (Ingold 1994), which is not accounted for by gestural-origin theories. Moreover, it provides a solution to the question for the adaptive value of the "first word" (Bickerton 2009) since even the earliest and most simple verbal utterances must have increased the versatility of vocal displays afforded by the preceding elaboration of monosynaptic corticobulbar tracts, giving rise to enhanced social cooperation and prestige. At the ontogenetic level, the proposed model assumes age-dependent interactions between the basal ganglia and their cortical targets, similar to vocal learning in some songbirds. In this view, the emergence of articulate speech builds on the "renaissance" of an ancient organizational principle and, hence, may represent an example of "evolutionary tinkering" (Jacob 1977).

  3. Advance Directives and Communication Skills of Prehospital Physicians Involved in the Care of Cardiovascular Patients.

    PubMed

    Gigon, Fabienne; Merlani, Paolo; Ricou, Bara

    2015-12-01

    Advance directives (AD) were developed to respect patient autonomy. However, very few patients have AD, even in cases when major cardiovascular surgery is to follow. To understand the reasons behind the low prevalence of AD and to help decision making when patients are incompetent, it is necessary to focus on the impact of prehospital practitioners, who may contribute to an increase in AD by discussing them with patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate self-rated communication skills and the attitudes of physicians potentially involved in the care of cardiovascular patients toward AD.Self-administered questionnaires were sent to general practitioners, cardiologists, internists, and intensivists, including the Quality of Communication Score, divided into a General Communication score (QOCgen 6 items) and an End-of-life Communication score (QOCeol 7 items), as well as questions regarding opinions and practices in terms of AD.One hundred sixty-four responses were received. QOCgen (mean (±SD)): 9.0/10 (1.0); QOCeol: 7.2/10 (1.7). General practitioners most frequently start discussions about AD (74/149 [47%]) and are more prone to designate their own specialty (30/49 [61%], P < 0.0001). Overall, only 57/159 (36%) physicians designated their own specialty; 130/158 (82%) physicians ask potential cardiovascular patients if they have AD and 61/118 (52%) physicians who care for cardiovascular patients talk about AD with some of them.The characteristics of physicians who do not talk about AD with patients were those who did not personally have AD and those who work in private practices.One hundred thirty-three (83%) physicians rated the systematic mention of patients' AD in the correspondence between physicians as good, while 114 (71%) at the patients' first registration in the private practice.Prehospital physicians rated their communication skills as good, whereas end-of-life communication was rated much lower. Only half of those surveyed speak about AD

  4. A Dynamic Directional Model for Effective Brain Connectivity using Electrocorticographic (ECoG) Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tingting; Li, Fan

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a dynamic directional model (DDM) for studying brain effective connectivity based on intracranial electrocorticographic (ECoG) time series. The DDM consists of two parts: a set of differential equations describing neuronal activity of brain components (state equations), and observation equations linking the underlying neuronal states to observed data. When applied to functional MRI or EEG data, DDMs usually have complex formulations and thus can accommodate only a few regions, due to limitations in spatial resolution and/or temporal resolution of these imaging modalities. In contrast, we formulate our model in the context of ECoG data. The combined high temporal and spatial resolution of ECoG data result in a much simpler DDM, allowing investigation of complex connections between many regions. To identify functionally segregated sub-networks, a form of biologically economical brain networks, we propose the Potts model for the DDM parameters. The neuronal states of brain components are represented by cubic spline bases and the parameters are estimated by minimizing a log-likelihood criterion that combines the state and observation equations. The Potts model is converted to the Potts penalty in the penalized regression approach to achieve sparsity in parameter estimation, for which a fast iterative algorithm is developed. The methods are applied to an auditory ECoG dataset. PMID:25983358

  5. Direct Measurements of Laser Communication Point-Ahead Angles from the ARTEMIS Geostationary Satellite Through Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzkov, V.; Sodnik, Z.; Kuzkov, S.

    2017-01-01

    Laser experiments with ARTEMIS geostationary satellite have been performed in partly cloudy weather using the developed system for the telescope. It has been found that the part of the laser beam is observed simultaneously at the points in direction of the velocity vector where the satellite would arrive at when the laser light reaches the telescope. These results agree with the theory of relativity for light aberration in transition from fixed to moving coordinate system.Observation results open the way for research and development of systems to compensate atmospheric turbulence in laser communications between ground stations and satellites through the atmosphere.

  6. Multiparty controlled quantum secure direct communication based on quantum search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Shih-Hung; Hwang, Tzonelih

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a new controlled quantum secure direct communication (CQSDC) protocol using the quantum search algorithm as the encoding function is proposed. The proposed protocol is based on the multi-particle Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger entangled state and the one-step quantum transmission strategy. Due to the one-step transmission of qubits, the proposed protocol can be easily extended to a multi-controller environment, and is also free from the Trojan horse attacks. The analysis shows that the use of quantum search algorithm in the construction of CQSDC appears very promising.

  7. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stouffer, Donald D.

    1990-01-01

    Communication in its many forms is a critical component for an effective Space Grant Program. Good communication is needed within individual Space Grant College/Consortia, for example between consortium affiliates and the consortium program office. Effective communication between the several programs, NASA Headquarters, and NASA field centers also is required. Further, communication among the above program elements, industry, local and state government, and the public also are necessary for meeting program objectives.

  8. Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Alan

    An informal introduction to the study of communication deals with the major topics in the field. It presents basic theories of communication and language, reviews how language takes on meaning, explains the stimulus-response and Piaget theories of learning, and presents major theories dealing with communications and society. These theories include…

  9. Wild Orangutan Males Plan and Communicate Their Travel Direction One Day in Advance

    PubMed Central

    van Schaik, Carel P.; Damerius, Laura; Isler, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The ability to plan for the future beyond immediate needs would be adaptive to many animal species, but is widely thought to be uniquely human. Although studies in captivity have shown that great apes are capable of planning for future needs, it is unknown whether and how they use this ability in the wild. Flanged male Sumatran orangutans (Pongo abelii) emit long calls, which females use to maintain earshot associations with them. We tested whether long calls serve to communicate a male's ever-changing predominant travel direction to facilitate maintaining these associations. We found that the direction in which a flanged male emits his long calls predicts his subsequent travel direction for many hours, and that a new call indicates a change in his main travel direction. Long calls given at or near the night nest indicate travel direction better than random until late afternoon on the next day. These results show that male orangutans make their travel plans well in advance and announce them to conspecifics. We suggest that such a planning ability is likely to be adaptive for great apes, as well as in other taxa. PMID:24040357

  10. Design and implementation of omni-directional light source and receiving system used in underwater wireless optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Jionghui; Yao, Wenming; Chen, Nannan

    2013-08-01

    Underwater wireless optical communication is a communication mode which uses light as an information carrier and water as transmission medium. As a result of the inherent characteristics of the light waves, underwater wireless optical communication has the advantages of high transmission rate, good security, and strong anti-interference ability. It is suitable for high-speed, short-range communication between underwater mobile vehicles. Underwater optical wireless communication system designed in this paper is composed of the omni-directional communication light source and the receiving system. In the omni-directional communication light source, the laser beams with small divergence angle of 532nm wavelength produced by modulated laser are expanded through a combination refraction-reflection solid and then obtain more than 2π space divergence angle. The paper use TRACEPRO simulation tool to help design a combination solid composed of the lens, conical reflector and parabolic reflector, and test in the air and underwater, the result shows that the effect is fine. Unlike in the air, light attenuation is heavy in the water and a large range of variations in light intensity at different distances appear during underwater optical communication. In order to overcome this problem, the paper use a small photomultiplier as the detection device, design the receiving system using the automatic gain control technique. Underwater wireless optical communication system designed in this paper has the characteristics of small size, low power dissipation and the omni-directional communication function, it is suitable for application in the UUV, AUV, Swimmer Delivery Vehicle (SDV) and other underwater mobile platform, it realizes point-to-point communications and point-to-multipoint communications.

  11. Star on the horizon: The emergence of the direct broadcast satellite in American mass communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J. H.

    1984-12-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to describe the concept of broadcasting from satellites directly to the viewer equipped with a small, inexpensive receiving antenna, and the evolution of this technology as a means of commercial broadcast. Emphasis is placed on the problems of developing a regulatory framework for DBS by the Federal Communications Commission. The opposition of the existing broadcasters to the unregulated development of direct broadcast satellite (DBS) is explored in light of the possible effect that DBS may have on the economic base, audience, and advertising revenue of existing broadcasters. The information for this study was obtained from government documents, legal journals, books and the popular press. Two basic conclusions are drawn from this study: First, that the existing broadcasters have opposed the marketplace development of DBS, and second, that DBS does not pose as great a threat, at least in the near term, as the broadcasters fear.

  12. Control of communicable diseases: foreign; scope and definitions. Direct final rule and request for comments.

    PubMed

    2012-12-26

    Through this Direct Final Rule, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), located within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is updating and reorganizing the Scope and Definitions for foreign quarantine regulations and add a new section to contain definitions for Importations. This Direct Final Rule (DFR) will update the scope and definitions to reflect modern terminology and plain language used globally by industry and public health partners. As part of the update, we are updating five existing definitions; adding thirteen new definitions to help clarify existing provisions; creating a new scope and definitions section for Importations under a new section by reorganizing existing definitions into this new section; and updating regulations to reflect the language used by the most recent Executive Order regarding quarantinable communicable diseases.

  13. Combining Partial Directed Coherence and Graph Theory to Analyse Effective Brain Networks of Different Mental Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dengfeng; Ren, Aifeng; Shang, Jing; Lei, Qiao; Zhang, Yun; Yin, Zhongliang; Li, Jun; von Deneen, Karen M.; Huang, Liyu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to qualify the network properties of the brain networks between two different mental tasks (play task or rest task) in a healthy population. Methods and Materials: EEG signals were recorded from 19 healthy subjects when performing different mental tasks. Partial directed coherence (PDC) analysis, based on Granger causality (GC), was used to assess the effective brain networks during the different mental tasks. Moreover, the network measures, including degree, degree distribution, local and global efficiency in delta, theta, alpha, and beta rhythms were calculated and analyzed. Results: The local efficiency is higher in the beta frequency and lower in the theta frequency during play task whereas the global efficiency is higher in the theta frequency and lower in the beta frequency in the rest task. Significance: This study reveals the network measures during different mental states and efficiency measures may be used as characteristic quantities for improvement in attentional performance. PMID:27242495

  14. Immunotherapy of Brain Cancers: The Past, the Present, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lisheng; Hoa, Neil; Bota, Daniela A.; Natividad, Josephine; Howat, Andrew; Jadus, Martin R.

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of brain cancers, especially high grade gliomas (WHO stage III and IV) is slowly making progress, but not as fast as medical researchers and the patients would like. Immunotherapy offers the opportunity to allow the patient's own immune system a chance to help eliminate the cancer. Immunotherapy's strength is that it efficiently treats relatively small tumors in experimental animal models. For some patients, immunotherapy has worked for them while not showing long-term toxicity. In this paper, we will trace the history of immunotherapy for brain cancers. We will also highlight some of the possible directions that this field may be taking in the immediate future for improving this therapeutic option. PMID:21437175

  15. Brain mechanisms associated with internally directed attention and self-generated thought

    PubMed Central

    Benedek, Mathias; Jauk, Emanuel; Beaty, Roger E.; Fink, Andreas; Koschutnig, Karl; Neubauer, Aljoscha C.

    2016-01-01

    Internal cognition like imagination and prospection require sustained internally directed attention and involve self-generated thought. This fMRI study aimed to disentangle the brain mechanisms associated with attention-specific and task-specific processes during internally directed cognition. The direction of attention was manipulated by either keeping a relevant stimulus visible throughout the task, or by masking it, so that the task had to be performed “in the mind’s eye”. The level of self-directed thought was additionally varied between a convergent and a divergent thinking task. Internally directed attention was associated with increased activation in the right anterior inferior parietal lobe (aIPL), bilateral lingual gyrus and the cuneus, as well as with extended deactivations of superior parietal and occipital regions representing parts of the dorsal attention network. The right aIPL further showed increased connectivity with occipital regions suggesting an active top-down mechanism for shielding ongoing internal processes from potentially distracting sensory stimulation in terms of perceptual decoupling. Activation of the default network was not related to internally directed attention per se, but rather to a higher level of self-generated thought. The findings hence shed further light on the roles of inferior and superior parietal cortex for internally directed cognition. PMID:26960259

  16. Cerebral perfusion pressure directed therapy following traumatic brain injury and hypotension in swine.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Ajai K; Schweitzer, John B; Fox, Jerry L; Fabian, Timothy C; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2003-09-01

    There is a paucity of studies, clinical and experimental, attesting to the benefit of cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) directed pressor therapy following traumatic brain injury (TBI). The current study evaluates this therapy in a swine model of TBI and hypotension. Forty-five anesthetized and ventilated swine received TBI followed by a 45% blood volume bleed. After 1 h, all animals were resuscitated with 0.9% sodium chloride equal to three times the shed blood volume. The experimental group (PHE) received phenylephrine to maintain CPP > 80 mm Hg; the control group (SAL) did not. Outcomes in the first phase (n = 33) of the study were as follows: cerebro-venous oxygen saturation (S(cv)O(2)), cerebro-vascular carbon dioxide reactivity (DeltaS(cv)O(2)), and brain structural damage (beta-amyloid precursor protein [betaAPP] immunoreactivity). In the second phase (n = 12) of the study, extravascular blood free water (EVBFW) was measured in the brain and lung. After resuscitation, intracranial and mean arterial pressures were >15 and >80 mm Hg, respectively, in both groups. CPP declined to 64 +/- 5 mm Hg in the SAL group, despite fluid supplements. CPP was maintained at >80 mm Hg with pressors in the PHE group. PHE animals maintained better S(cv)O(2) (p < 0.05 at 180, 210, 240, 270, and 300 min post-TBI). At baseline, 5% CO(2) evoked a 16 +/- 4% increase in S(cv)O(2), indicating cerebral vasodilatation and luxury perfusion. By 240 min, this response was absent in SAL animals and preserved in PHE animals (p < 0.05). Brain EVBFW was higher in SAL animals; however, lung EVBFW was higher in PHE animals. There was no difference in betaAPP immunoreactivity between the SAL and PHE groups (p > 0.05). In this swine model of TBI and hypotension, CPP directed pressor therapy improved brain oxygenation and maintained cerebro-vascular CO(2) reactivity. Brain edema was lower, but lung edema was greater, suggesting a higher propensity for pulmonary complications.

  17. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication.

    PubMed

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses.

  18. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication

    PubMed Central

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses. PMID:27651759

  19. Direct injection of venom by a predatory wasp into cockroach brain.

    PubMed

    Haspel, Gal; Rosenberg, Lior Ann; Libersat, Frederic

    2003-09-05

    In this article, we provide direct evidence for injection of venom by a wasp into the central nervous system of its cockroach prey. Venomous predators use neurotoxins that generally act at the neuromuscular junction, resulting in different types of prey paralysis. The sting of the parasitoid wasp Ampulex compressa is unusual, as it induces grooming behavior, followed by a long-term lethargic state of its insect prey, thus ultimately providing a living meal for the newborn wasp larvae. These behavioral modifications are induced only when a sting is inflicted into the head. These unique effects of the wasp venom on prey behavior suggest that the venom targets the insect's central nervous system. The mechanism by which behavior modifying compounds in the venom transverse the blood-brain barrier to induce these central and long-lasting effects has been the subject of debate. In this article, we demonstrate that the wasp stings directly into the target ganglia in the head of its prey. To prove this assertion, we produced "hot" wasps by injecting them with (14)C radiolabeled amino acids and used a combination of liquid scintillation and light microscopy autoradiography to trace radiolabeled venom in the prey. To our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence documenting targeted delivery of venom by a predator into the brain of its prey.

  20. Direction of Biological Motion Affects Early Brain Activation: A Link with Social Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Pegna, Alan John; Gehring, Elise; Meyer, Georg; Del Zotto, Marzia

    2015-01-01

    A number of EEG studies have investigated the time course of brain activation for biological movement over this last decade, however the temporal dynamics of processing are still debated. Moreover, the role of direction of movement has not received much attention even though it is an essential component allowing us to determine the intentions of the moving agent, and thus permitting the anticipation of potential social interactions. In this study, we examined event-related responses (ERPs) in 15 healthy human participants to light point walkers and their scrambled counterparts, whose movements occurred either in the radial or in the lateral plane. Compared to scrambled motion (SM), biological motion (BM) showed an enhanced negativity between 210 and 360ms. A source localization algorithm (sLORETA) revealed that this was due to an increase in superior and middle temporal lobe activity. Regarding direction, we found that radial BM produced an enhanced P1 compared to lateral BM, lateral SM and radial SM. This heightened P1 was due to an increase in activity in extrastriate regions, as well as in superior temporal, medial parietal and medial prefrontal areas. This network is known to be involved in decoding the underlying intentionality of the movement and in the attribution of mental states. The social meaning signaled by the direction of biological motion therefore appears to trigger an early response in brain activity. PMID:26121591

  1. Functional connections between optic flow areas and navigationally responsive brain regions during goal-directed navigation.

    PubMed

    Sherrill, Katherine R; Chrastil, Elizabeth R; Ross, Robert S; Erdem, Uğur M; Hasselmo, Michael E; Stern, Chantal E

    2015-09-01

    Recent computational models suggest that visual input from optic flow provides information about egocentric (navigator-centered) motion and influences firing patterns in spatially tuned cells during navigation. Computationally, self-motion cues can be extracted from optic flow during navigation. Despite the importance of optic flow to navigation, a functional link between brain regions sensitive to optic flow and brain regions important for navigation has not been established in either humans or animals. Here, we used a beta-series correlation methodology coupled with two fMRI tasks to establish this functional link during goal-directed navigation in humans. Functionally defined optic flow sensitive cortical areas V3A, V6, and hMT+ were used as seed regions. fMRI data was collected during a navigation task in which participants updated position and orientation based on self-motion cues to successfully navigate to an encoded goal location. The results demonstrate that goal-directed navigation requiring updating of position and orientation in the first person perspective involves a cooperative interaction between optic flow sensitive regions V3A, V6, and hMT+ and the hippocampus, retrosplenial cortex, posterior parietal cortex, and medial prefrontal cortex. These functional connections suggest a dynamic interaction between these systems to support goal-directed navigation.

  2. The Use of Post-Purchase Communication to Reduce Dissonance and Improve Direct Marketing Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milliman, Ronald E.; Decker, Phillip J.

    1990-01-01

    Demonstrates the use and potentially positive effects of postpurchase communication on order refund requests and reorder rates. Finds that dissonance was effectively reduced through postpurchase communication. (MG)

  3. Systemic and direct nose-to-brain transport pharmacokinetic model for remoxipride after intravenous and intranasal administration.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jasper; Ploeger, Bart A; van der Graaf, Piet H; Danhof, Meindert; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2011-12-01

    Intranasal (IN) administration could be an attractive mode of delivery for drugs targeting the central nervous system, potentially providing a high bioavailability because of avoidance of a hepatic first-pass effect and rapid onset of action. However, controversy remains whether a direct transport route from the nasal cavity into the brain exists. Pharmacokinetic modeling is proposed to identify the existence of direct nose-to-brain transport in a quantitative manner. The selective dopamine-D2 receptor antagonist remoxipride was administered at different dosages, in freely moving rats, by the IN and intravenous (IV) route. Plasma and brain extracellular fluid (ECF) concentration-time profiles were obtained and simultaneously analyzed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Brain ECF/plasma area under the curve ratios were 0.28 and 0.19 after IN and IV administration, respectively. A multicompartment pharmacokinetic model with two absorption compartments (nose-to-systemic and nose-to-brain) was found to best describe the observed pharmacokinetic data. Absorption was described in terms of bioavailability and rate. Total bioavailability after IN administration was 89%, of which 75% was attributed to direct nose-to brain transport. Direct nose-to-brain absorption rate was slow, explaining prolonged brain ECF exposure after IN compared with IV administration. These studies explicitly provide separation and quantitation of systemic and direct nose-to-brain transport after IN administration of remoxipride in the rat. Describing remoxipride pharmacokinetics at the target site (brain ECF) in a semiphysiology-based manner would allow for better prediction of pharmacodynamic effects.

  4. Wireless image-data transmission from an implanted image sensor through a living mouse brain by intra body communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Hajime; Takehara, Hiroaki; Nagata, Kengo; Haruta, Makito; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Intra body communication technology allows the fabrication of compact implantable biomedical sensors compared with RF wireless technology. In this paper, we report the fabrication of an implantable image sensor of 625 µm width and 830 µm length and the demonstration of wireless image-data transmission through a brain tissue of a living mouse. The sensor was designed to transmit output signals of pixel values by pulse width modulation (PWM). The PWM signals from the sensor transmitted through a brain tissue were detected by a receiver electrode. Wireless data transmission of a two-dimensional image was successfully demonstrated in a living mouse brain. The technique reported here is expected to provide useful methods of data transmission using micro sized implantable biomedical sensors.

  5. Adaptive optics confocal fluorescence microscopy with direct wavefront sensing for brain tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xiaodong; Fernandez, Bautista; Chen, Diana C.; Azucena, Oscar; Fu, Min; Zuo, Yi; Kubby, Joel

    2011-03-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in deep tissue imaging for the study of neurons. Unfortunately, because of the inhomogeneous refractive index of the tissue, the aberrations degrade the resolution and brightness of the final image. In this paper, we describe an adaptive optics confocal fluorescence microscope (AOCFM) which can correct aberrations based on direct wavefront measurements using a point source reference beacon and a Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor (SHWS). Mouse brain tissues with different thicknesses are tested. After correction, both the signal intensity and contrast of the image are improved.

  6. Poverty, Stress, and Brain Development: New Directions for Prevention and Intervention.

    PubMed

    Blair, Clancy; Raver, C Cybele

    2016-04-01

    We review some of the growing evidence of the costs of poverty to children's neuroendocrine function, early brain development, and cognitive ability. We underscore the importance of addressing the negative consequences of poverty-related adversity early in children's lives, given evidence supporting the plasticity of executive functions and associated physiologic processes in response to early intervention and the importance of higher order cognitive functions for success in school and in life. Finally, we highlight some new directions for prevention and intervention that are rapidly emerging at the intersection of developmental science, pediatrics, child psychology and psychiatry, and public policy.

  7. Rapid P300 brain-computer interface communication with a head-mounted display

    PubMed Central

    Käthner, Ivo; Kübler, Andrea; Halder, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Visual ERP (P300) based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) allow for fast and reliable spelling and are intended as a muscle-independent communication channel for people with severe paralysis. However, they require the presentation of visual stimuli in the field of view of the user. A head-mounted display could allow convenient presentation of visual stimuli in situations, where mounting a conventional monitor might be difficult or not feasible (e.g., at a patient's bedside). To explore if similar accuracies can be achieved with a virtual reality (VR) headset compared to a conventional flat screen monitor, we conducted an experiment with 18 healthy participants. We also evaluated it with a person in the locked-in state (LIS) to verify that usage of the headset is possible for a severely paralyzed person. Healthy participants performed online spelling with three different display methods. In one condition a 5 × 5 letter matrix was presented on a conventional 22 inch TFT monitor. Two configurations of the VR headset were tested. In the first (glasses A), the same 5 × 5 matrix filled the field of view of the user. In the second (glasses B), single letters of the matrix filled the field of view of the user. The participant in the LIS tested the VR headset on three different occasions (glasses A condition only). For healthy participants, average online spelling accuracies were 94% (15.5 bits/min) using three flash sequences for spelling with the monitor and glasses A and 96% (16.2 bits/min) with glasses B. In one session, the participant in the LIS reached an online spelling accuracy of 100% (10 bits/min) using the glasses A condition. We also demonstrated that spelling with one flash sequence is possible with the VR headset for healthy users (mean: 32.1 bits/min, maximum reached by one user: 71.89 bits/min at 100% accuracy). We conclude that the VR headset allows for rapid P300 BCI communication in healthy users and may be a suitable display option for severely

  8. The Morphological and Molecular Changes of Brain Cells Exposed to Direct Current Electric Field Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Simon J.; Lagacé, Marie; St-Amour, Isabelle; Arsenault, Dany; Cisbani, Giulia; Chabrat, Audrey; Fecteau, Shirley; Lévesque, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The application of low-intensity direct current electric fields has been experimentally used in the clinic to treat a number of brain disorders, predominantly using transcranial direct current stimulation approaches. However, the cellular and molecular changes induced by such treatment remain largely unknown. Methods: Here, we tested various intensities of direct current electric fields (0, 25, 50, and 100V/m) in a well-controlled in vitro environment in order to investigate the responses of neurons, microglia, and astrocytes to this type of stimulation. This included morphological assessments of the cells, viability, as well as shape and fiber outgrowth relative to the orientation of the direct current electric field. We also undertook enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and western immunoblotting to identify which molecular pathways were affected by direct current electric fields. Results: In response to direct current electric field, neurons developed an elongated cell body shape with neurite outgrowth that was associated with a significant increase in growth associated protein-43. Fetal midbrain dopaminergic explants grown in a collagen gel matrix also showed a reorientation of their neurites towards the cathode. BV2 microglial cells adopted distinct morphological changes with an increase in cyclooxygenase-2 expression, but these were dependent on whether they had already been activated with lipopolysaccharide. Finally, astrocytes displayed elongated cell bodies with cellular filopodia that were oriented perpendicularly to the direct current electric field. Conclusion: We show that cells of the central nervous system can respond to direct current electric fields both in terms of their morphological shape and molecular expression of certain proteins, and this in turn can help us to begin understand the mechanisms underlying the clinical benefits of direct current electric field. PMID:25522422

  9. Magnetostimulation of vision: direct noninvasive stimulation of the retina and the visual brain.

    PubMed

    Marg, E

    1991-06-01

    The history of magnetophosphenes and their closely related predecessor, electrophosphenes, is described from the mid-18th century to the present time. The current era of magnetic stimulation started in 1985 with the development of a practical capacitor-discharge electromagnetic stimulator by Barker and his colleagues at the University of Sheffield, and their application of it to the brain with Merton and Morton at the National Hospital, London. The safety of magnetostimulation of the brain is discussed as well as the advantages of magnetostimulation over electrostimulation. Principles of magnetostimulation of nerves and magnetic measurement are considered. Effects on motor and sensory systems of the brain are described including magnetic perceptual suppression in the visual cortex and other pioneering work of Amassian, Cracco and Maccabee at SUNY Health, Brooklyn. Magnetophosphenes from retinal and cortical magnetostimulation are distinguished. Now that visual cortical stimulation is possible with the strong magnetic pulses generated by capacitor-discharge instruments, the functional viability of the visual cortex may be tested directly and noninvasively.

  10. Direct visualization of fungal infection in brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Pisa, Diana; Alonso, Ruth; Juarranz, Angeles; Rábano, Alberto; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have reported the presence of fungal infections in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accordingly, fungal proteins and DNA were found in brain samples, demonstrating the existence of infection in the central nervous system. In the present work, we raised antibodies to specific fungal species and performed immunohistochemistry to directly visualize fungal components inside neurons from AD patients. Mice infected with Candida glabrata were initially used to assess whether yeast can be internalized in mammalian tissues. Using polyclonal rabbit antibodies against C. glabrata, rounded immunopositive cells could be detected in the cytoplasm of cells from liver, spleen, and brain samples in infected, but not uninfected, mice. Immunohistochemical analyses of tissue from the frontal cortex of AD patients revealed the presence of fungal material in a small percentage (~10%) of cells, suggesting the presence of infection. Importantly, this immunopositive material was absent in control samples. Confocal microscopy indicated that this fungal material had an intracellular localization. The specific morphology of this material varied between patients; in some instances, disseminated material was localized to the cytoplasm, whereas small punctate bodies were detected in other patients. Interestingly, fungal material could be revealed using different anti-fungal antibodies, suggesting multiple infections. In summary, fungal infection can only be observed using specific anti-fungal antibodies and only a small percentage of cells contain fungi. Our findings provide an explanation for the hitherto elusive detection of fungi in AD brains, and are consistent with the idea that fungal cells are internalized inside neurons.

  11. Real-time in vivo imaging reveals the ability of neutrophils to remove Cryptococcus neoformans directly from the brain vasculature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingshun; Sun, Donglei; Liu, Gongguan; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Hong; Shi, Meiqing

    2016-03-01

    Although neutrophils are typically the first immune cells attracted to an infection site, little is known about how neutrophils dynamically interact with invading pathogens in vivo. Here, with the use of intravital microscopy, we demonstrate that neutrophils migrate to the arrested Cryptococcus neoformans, a leading agent to cause meningoencephalitis, in the brain microvasculature. Following interactions with C. neoformans, neutrophils were seen to internalize the organism and then circulate back into the bloodstream, resulting in a direct removal of the organism from the endothelial surface before its transmigration into the brain parenchyma. C. neoformans infection led to enhanced expression of adhesion molecules macrophage 1 antigen on neutrophils and ICAM-1 on brain endothelial cells. Depletion of neutrophils enhanced the brain fungal burden. Complement C3 was critically involved in the recognition of C. neoformans by neutrophils and subsequent clearance of the organism from the brain. Together, our finding of the direct removal of C. neoformans by neutrophils from its arrested site may represent a novel mechanism of host defense in the brain, in addition to the known, direct killing of microorganisms at the infection sites. These data are the first to characterize directly the dynamic interactions of leukocytes with a microbe in the brain of a living animal.

  12. Linear Narratives, Arbitrary Relationships: Arbitrary Relationships: Mimesis and Direct Communication for Effectively Representing Engineering Realities Multimodally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeyaraj, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Engineers communicate multimodally using written and visual communication, but there is not much theorizing on why they do so and how. This essay, therefore, examines why engineers communicate multimodally, what, in the context of representing engineering realities, are the strengths and weaknesses of written and visual communication, and how,…

  13. The effect of gaze direction on three-dimensional face recognition in infant brain activity.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Wakayo; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2012-09-12

    In three-dimensional face recognition studies, it is well known that viewing rotating faces enhance face recognition. For infants, our previous study indicated that 8-month-old infants showed recognition of three-dimensional rotating faces with a direct gaze, and they did not learn with an averted gaze. This suggests that gaze direction may affect three-dimensional face recognition in infants. In this experiment, we used near-infrared spectroscopy to measure infants' hemodynamic responses to averted gaze and direct gaze. We hypothesized that infants would show different neural activity for averted and direct gazes. The responses were compared with the baseline activation during the presentation of non-face objects. We found that the concentration of oxyhemoglobin increased in the temporal cortex on both sides only during the presentation of averted gaze compared with that of the baseline period. This is the first study to show that infants' brain activity in three-dimensional face processing is different between averted gaze and direct gaze.

  14. Using the combination refraction-reflection solid to design omni-directional light source used in underwater wireless optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Jionghui; Yao, Wenming; Wen, Linqiang

    2015-10-01

    Underwater wireless optical communication is a communication technology which uses laser as an information carrier and transmits data through water. Underwater wireless optical communication has some good features such as broader bandwidth, high transmission rate, better security, anti—interference performance. Therefore, it is promising to be widely used in the civil and military communication domains. It is also suitable for high-speed, short-range communication between underwater mobile vehicles. This paper presents a design approach of omni-directional light source used in underwater wireless optical communication, using TRACEPRO simulation tool to help design a combination solid composed of the lens, conical reflector and parabolic reflector, and using the modulated DPSS green laser in the transmitter module to output the laser beam in small divergence angles, after expanded by the combination refraction-reflection solid, the angle turns into a space divergence angle of 2π, achieving the omni-directional light source of hemisphere space, and test in the air and underwater, the result shows that the effect is fine. This paper analyzes the experimental test in the air and water, in order to make further improvement of the uniformity of light distribution, we optimize the reflector surface parameters of combination refraction-reflection solid and test in the air and water. The result shows that omni-directional light source used in underwater wireless optical communication optimized could achieve the uniformity of light distribution of underwater space divergence angle of 2π. Omni-directional light source used in underwater wireless optical communication designed in this paper has the characteristics of small size and uniformity of light distribution, it is suitable for application between UUVs, AUVs, Swimmer Delivery Vehicles (SDVs) and other underwater vehicle fleet, it realizes point-to-multipoint communications.

  15. Duplex communicable implanted antenna for magnetic direct feeding method: Functional electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kentaro; Matsuki, Hidetoshi; Sato, Fumihiro; Satoh, Tadakuni; Handa, Nobuyasu

    2009-04-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is the therapy used for the rehabilitation of lost movement function by applying electrical stimulation (ES) to paralyzed extremities. To realize ES, we adapted the implanted direct feeding method (DFM). In this method, small implanted stimulators are placed under the skin at a depth of 10-20 mm and stimulus energy and signals for controlling devices are applied to them by a mounted system using magnetic coupling. This method has the merits of having no percutaneous points and high-precision stimulation. However, since the mounted system and implanted elements are separated, it is necessary to add feedback information from inside the body to confirm the system operation for safety therapy or to rehabilitate motor function smoothly. Satisfying both restrictions, we propose the magnetic connective dual resonance (MCDR) antenna, which has two resonance circuits. Adding the LC serial circuit to the LC parallel circuit gives the sending function. In this paper, we report the principle of the MCDR antenna and verify its duplex communication ability through communication experiment. This antenna enables DFM of FES to rehabilitate more complex movements.

  16. Communicate!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Stuart

    This ten chapter book is designed to provide high school students with an understanding of basic communication processes. The first five chapters include discussions of language development, function, and acquisition in relation to both human and non-human communication. The sixth chapter contains specimen linguistic analyses of speech and…

  17. Investigation of the best model to characterize diffuse correlation spectroscopy measurements acquired directly on the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdecchia, K.; Diop, M.; St. Lawrence, K.

    2015-03-01

    Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) is a non-invasive optical technique capable of monitoring tissue perfusion changes, particularly in the brain. The normalized temporal intensity autocorrelation function generated by DCS is typically characterized by assuming that the movement of erythrocytes can be modeled as a Brownian diffusion-like process instead of the expected random flow model. Carp et al. [Biomedical Optics Express, 2011] proposed a hybrid model, referred to as the hydrodynamic diffusion model, to capture both the random ballistic and diffusive nature of erythrocyte motion. The purpose of this study was to compare how well the Brownian diffusion and the hydrodynamic diffusion models characterized DCS data acquired directly on the brain, avoiding the confounding effects of scalp and skull. Data were acquired from seven pigs during normocapnia (39.9 +/- 0.7 mmHg) and hypocapnia (22.1 +/- 1.6 mmHg) with the DCS fibers placed 7 mm apart, directly on the cerebral cortex. The hydrodynamic diffusion model was found to provide a consistently better fit to the autocorrelation functions compared to the Brownian diffusion model and was less sensitive to the chosen start and end time points used in the fitting. However, the decrease in cerebral blood flow from normocapnia to hypocapnia determined was similar for the two models (-42.6 +/- 8.6 % for the Brownian model and -42.2 +/- 10.2 % for the hydrodynamic model), suggesting that the latter is reasonable for monitoring flow changes.

  18. High-capacity quantum secure direct communication using hyper-entanglement of photonic qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jiarui; Pan, Ziwen; Wang, Tie-Jun; Wang, Sihai; Wang, Chuan

    2016-11-01

    Hyper-entanglement is a system constituted by photons entangled in multiple degrees of freedom (DOF), being considered as a promising way of increasing channel capacity and guaranteeing powerful eavesdropping safeguard. In this work, we propose a coding scheme based on a 3-particle hyper-entanglement of polarization and orbital angular momentum (OAM) system and its application as a quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) protocol. The OAM values are specially encoded by Fibonacci sequence and the polarization carries information by defined unitary operations. The internal relations of the secret message enhances security due to principle of quantum mechanics and Fibonacci sequence. We also discuss the coding capacity and security property along with some simulation results to show its superiority and extensibility.

  19. Improving the security of secure direct communication based on the secret transmitting order of particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xihan; Deng Fuguo; Zhou Hongyu

    2006-11-15

    We analyzed the security of the secure direct communication protocol based on the secret transmitting order of particles recently proposed by Zhu, Xia, Fan, and Zhang[Phys. Rev. A 73, 022338 (2006)] and found that this scheme is insecure if an eavesdropper, say Eve, wants to steal the secret message with Trojan horse attack strategies. The vital loophole in this scheme is that the two authorized users check the security of their quantum channel only once. Eve can insert another spy photon, an invisible photon, or a delay one in each photon which the sender Alice sends to the receiver Bob, and capture the spy photon when it returns from Bob to Alice. After the authorized users check the security, Eve can obtain the secret message according to the information about the transmitting order published by Bob. Finally, we present a possible improvement of this protocol.

  20. Monolithic integration of nitride light emitting diodes and photodetectors for bi-directional optical communication.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhenyu; Atalla, Mahmoud R M; You, Guanjun; Wang, Li; Li, Xiaoyun; Liu, Jie; Elahi, Asim M; Wei, Lai; Xu, Jian

    2014-10-01

    Design and fabrication of monolithically integrated III-nitride visible light-emitting-diodes (LEDs) and ultraviolet Schottky barrier-photodetectors (SB-PDs) have been proposed and demonstrated. Responsivity up to 0.2  AW(-1) at 365 nm for GaN SB-PDs has been achieved. It is shown that those UV SB-PDs were capable of sensitive UV light detection down to 7.16×10(-4)  W/cm2 at 365 nm, whereas simultaneous operation of on-chip blue LEDs has produced negligible crosstalk at practical illumination brightness. Monolithically integrated LEDs and SB-PDs can function as transmitters to emit visible light signals, and as receivers to analyze incoming UV signals, respectively; this offers the potential of using such devices for bi-directional optical wireless communication applications.

  1. Plans for a STRV-2 to AMOS High Data Rate Bi-Directional Optical Communications Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K. E.; Kenny, J.; Moynihan, P.

    2000-01-01

    The Ballistic Missile Defense Organization has developed a high-data rate (155 Mbps - 1 Gbps) optical communications terminal that will be flown on the STRV-2 satellite. The satellite is scheduled for launch in November 1999, and NASA/JPL has been asked to investigate the use of the AMOS facility as a backup ground terminal to a small transportable terminal constructed by Astroterra Corporation of San Diego. The ground terminal built by Astroterra is designed to support a links out to 2000 km, and will be located at the Table Mountain Facility in Wrightwood, California. Subject to BMDO approval, the demonstration from AMOS will begin in early 2000. For the demonstration, the beam-director tracker will serve as the uplink transmitter, and the 1.6-m telescope as the downlink receiver. It will support bi-directional links out to the 3500-km maximum slant range of the satellite's pass.

  2. A Study of an Optical Lunar Surface Communications Network with High Bandwidth Direct to Earth Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K.; Biswas, A.; Schoolcraft, J.

    2011-01-01

    Analyzed optical DTE (direct to earth) and lunar relay satellite link analyses, greater than 200 Mbps downlink to 1-m Earth receiver and greater than 1 Mbps uplink achieved with mobile 5-cm lunar transceiver, greater than 1Gbps downlink and greater than 10 Mpbs uplink achieved with 10-cm stationary lunar transceiver, MITLL (MIT Lincoln Laboratory) 2013 LLCD (Lunar Laser Communications Demonstration) plans to demonstrate 622 Mbps downlink with 20 Mbps uplink between lunar orbiter and ground station; Identified top five technology challenges to deploying lunar optical network, Performed preliminary experiments on two of challenges: (i) lunar dust removal and (ii)DTN over optical carrier, Exploring opportunities to evaluate DTN (delay-tolerant networking) over optical link in a multi-node network e.g. Desert RATS.

  3. Alamouti-Type Space-Time Coding for Free-Space Optical Communication with Direct Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, M. K.; Vilnrotter, V.

    2003-11-01

    In optical communication systems employing direct detection at the receiver, intensity modulations such as on-off keying (OOK) or pulse-position modulation (PPM) are commonly used to convey the information. Consider the possibility of applying space-time coding in such a scenario, using, for example, an Alamouti-type coding scheme [1]. Implicit in the Alamouti code is the fact that the modulation that defines the signal set is such that it is meaningful to transmit and detect both the signal and its negative. While modulations such as phase-shift keying (PSK) and quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) naturally fall into this class, OOK and PPM do not since the signal polarity (phase) would not be detected at the receiver. We investigate a modification of the Alamouti code to be used with such modulations that has the same desirable properties as the conventional Alamouti code but does not rely on the necessity of transmitting the negative of a signal.

  4. Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, James

    2010-01-01

    NASA s communication work for the UAS Command and Control area will build upon work currently being conducted under NASA Recovery Act funds. Communication portions of UAS NextGen ConOps, Stateof- the-Art assessment, and Gap Analysis. Preliminary simulations for UAS CNPC link scalability assessment. Surrogate UAS aircraft upgrades. This work will also leverage FY10 in-guide funding for communication link model development. UAS are currently managed through exceptions and are operating using DoD frequencies for line-of-sight (LOS) and satellite-based communications links, low-power LOS links in amateur bands, or unlicensed Instrument/Scientific/Medical (ISM) frequencies. None of these frequency bands are designated for Safety and Regularity of Flight. No radio-frequency (RF) spectrum has been allocated by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) specifically for UAS command and control links, for either LOS or Beyond LOS (BLOS) communication.

  5. Two-Person Neuroscience and Naturalistic Social Communication: The Role of Language and Linguistic Variables in Brain-Coupling Research

    PubMed Central

    García, Adolfo M.; Ibáñez, Agustín

    2014-01-01

    Social cognitive neuroscience (SCN) seeks to understand the brain mechanisms through which we comprehend others’ emotions and intentions in order to react accordingly. For decades, SCN has explored relevant domains by exposing individual participants to predesigned stimuli and asking them to judge their social (e.g., emotional) content. Subjects are thus reduced to detached observers of situations that they play no active role in. However, the core of our social experience is construed through real-time interactions requiring the active negotiation of information with other people. To gain more relevant insights into the workings of the social brain, the incipient field of two-person neuroscience (2PN) advocates the study of brain-to-brain coupling through multi-participant experiments. In this paper, we argue that the study of online language-based communication constitutes a cornerstone of 2PN. First, we review preliminary evidence illustrating how verbal interaction may shed light on the social brain. Second, we advance methodological recommendations to design experiments within language-based 2PN. Finally, we formulate outstanding questions for future research. PMID:25249986

  6. "Optical communication with brain cells by means of an implanted duplex micro-device with optogenetics and Ca(2+) fluoroimaging".

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takuma; Haruta, Makito; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Matsumata, Miho; Eizumi, Kawori; Kitsumoto, Chikara; Motoyama, Mayumi; Maezawa, Yasuyo; Ohta, Yasumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Tokuda, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Ohta, Jun

    2016-02-16

    To better understand the brain function based on neural activity, a minimally invasive analysis technology in a freely moving animal is necessary. Such technology would provide new knowledge in neuroscience and contribute to regenerative medical techniques and prosthetics care. An application that combines optogenetics for voluntarily stimulating nerves, imaging to visualize neural activity, and a wearable micro-instrument for implantation into the brain could meet the abovementioned demand. To this end, a micro-device that can be applied to the brain less invasively and a system for controlling the device has been newly developed in this study. Since the novel implantable device has dual LEDs and a CMOS image sensor, photostimulation and fluorescence imaging can be performed simultaneously. The device enables bidirectional communication with the brain by means of light. In the present study, the device was evaluated in an in vitro experiment using a new on-chip 3D neuroculture with an extracellular matrix gel and an in vivo experiment involving regenerative medical transplantation and gene delivery to the brain by using both photosensitive channel and fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator. The device succeeded in activating cells locally by selective photostimulation, and the physiological Ca(2+) dynamics of neural cells were visualized simultaneously by fluorescence imaging.

  7. Transracial Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Arthur L.

    This book explores and explains communication among different racial groups within the scope of existing communication theory. Following a brief introduction, chapters cover "Directions in Transracial Communication" (definitions, process, structurization, and purpose); "Culture and Transracial Communication" (a viewpoint on…

  8. Acoustic Noise Alters Selective Attention Processes as Indicated by Direct Current (DC) Brain Potential Changes

    PubMed Central

    Trimmel, Karin; Schätzer, Julia; Trimmel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic environmental noise, even of low to moderate intensity, is known to adversely affect information processing in animals and humans via attention mechanisms. In particular, facilitation and inhibition of information processing are basic functions of selective attention. Such mechanisms can be investigated by analyzing brain potentials under conditions of externally directed attention (intake of environmental information) versus internally directed attention (rejection of environmental stimuli and focusing on memory/planning processes). This study investigated brain direct current (DC) potential shifts—which are discussed to represent different states of cortical activation—of tasks that require intake and rejection of environmental information under noise. It was hypothesized that without background noise rejection tasks would show more positive DC potential changes compared to intake tasks and that under noise both kinds of tasks would show positive DC shifts as an expression of cortical inhibition caused by noise. DC potential shifts during intake and rejection tasks were analyzed at 16 standard locations in 45 persons during irrelevant speech or white noise vs. control condition. Without noise, rejection tasks were associated with more positive DC potential changes compared to intake tasks. During background noise, however, this difference disappeared and both kinds of tasks led to positive DC shifts. Results suggest—besides some limitations—that noise modulates selective attention mechanisms by switching to an environmental information processing and noise rejection mode, which could represent a suggested “attention shift”. Implications for fMRI studies as well as for public health in learning and performance environments including susceptible persons are discussed. PMID:25264675

  9. Acoustic noise alters selective attention processes as indicated by direct current (DC) brain potential changes.

    PubMed

    Trimmel, Karin; Schätzer, Julia; Trimmel, Michael

    2014-09-26

    Acoustic environmental noise, even of low to moderate intensity, is known to adversely affect information processing in animals and humans via attention mechanisms. In particular, facilitation and inhibition of information processing are basic functions of selective attention. Such mechanisms can be investigated by analyzing brain potentials under conditions of externally directed attention (intake of environmental information) versus internally directed attention (rejection of environmental stimuli and focusing on memory/planning processes). This study investigated brain direct current (DC) potential shifts-which are discussed to represent different states of cortical activation-of tasks that require intake and rejection of environmental information under noise. It was hypothesized that without background noise rejection tasks would show more positive DC potential changes compared to intake tasks and that under noise both kinds of tasks would show positive DC shifts as an expression of cortical inhibition caused by noise. DC potential shifts during intake and rejection tasks were analyzed at 16 standard locations in 45 persons during irrelevant speech or white noise vs. control condition. Without noise, rejection tasks were associated with more positive DC potential changes compared to intake tasks. During background noise, however, this difference disappeared and both kinds of tasks led to positive DC shifts. Results suggest-besides some limitations-that noise modulates selective attention mechanisms by switching to an environmental information processing and noise rejection mode, which could represent a suggested "attention shift". Implications for fMRI studies as well as for public health in learning and performance environments including susceptible persons are discussed.

  10. Optimal control of directional deep brain stimulation in the parkinsonian neuronal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Denggui; Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Qingyun

    2016-07-01

    The effect of conventional deep brain stimulation (DBS) on debilitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease can be limited because it can only yield the spherical field. And, some side effects are clearly induced with influencing their adjacent ganglia. Recent experimental evidence for patients with Parkinson's disease has shown that a novel DBS electrode with 32 independent stimulation source contacts can effectively optimize the clinical therapy by enlarging the therapeutic windows, when it is applied on the subthalamic nucleus (STN). This is due to the selective activation in clusters of various stimulation contacts which can be steered directionally and accurately on the targeted regions of interest. In addition, because of the serious damage to the neural tissues, the charge-unbalanced stimulation is not typically indicated and the real DBS utilizes charge-balanced bi-phasic (CBBP) pulses. Inspired by this, we computationally investigate the optimal control of directional CBBP-DBS from the proposed parkinsonian neuronal network of basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuit. By appropriately tuning stimulation for different neuronal populations, it can be found that directional steering CBBP-DBS paradigms are superior to the spherical case in improving parkinsonian dynamical properties including the synchronization of neuronal populations and the reliability of thalamus relaying the information from cortex, which is in a good agreement with the physiological experiments. Furthermore, it can be found that directional steering stimulations can increase the optimal stimulation intensity of desynchronization by more than 1 mA compared to the spherical case. This is consistent with the experimental result with showing that there exists at least one steering direction that can allow increasing the threshold of side effects by 1 mA. In addition, we also simulate the local field potential (LFP) and dominant frequency (DF) of the STN neuronal population induced by the activation

  11. Research Directions in Family Communication: Proceedings of the Family Communication Research Conference (Evanston, Illinois, September 6-8, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerby, Janet, Ed.

    In a conference focusing on issues in research methods, family theory, and family therapy as they relate to family communication and on future research needs, this document consists of papers presented by the 12 participants. Specific titles and speakers were as follows: "Kinship Relationships," by Mary Anne Fitzpatrick; "Research Potentials in…

  12. Pointing, acquisition, and tracking considerations for mobile directional wireless communications systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzasa, John; Ertem, Mehmet Can; Davis, Christopher C.

    2013-09-01

    High capacity directional wireless communications networks are an active research area because of their Gb/s or greater data rates over link lengths of many kilometers, providing fiber-like networks through the air. Their high data rates arise partly from their very high carrier frequencies (<60GHz for RF, and ~1550nm for free-space optical (FSO)) and partly because of their very narrow beamwidths. This second characteristic requires that transceivers be pointed precisely to their counterparts. In almost all cases this means that the transceiver aperture is mechanically pointed by a rotation stage, commonly known as a gimbal. How these platforms initially point at a target, acquire the signal, and then stay locked on the signal is known as pointing, acquisition, and tracking (PAT). Approaches for PAT in both RF and FSO have some similarities, but require overall divergent solutions, especially if the platforms are moving. This paper elaborates on the various considerations required for designing and implementing a successful PAT system for both directional RF and FSO systems. Approaches for GPS or beacon based pointing, types of acquisition scans, and the effects of platform vibration are analyzed. The acquisition time for a spiral scan of a given radius with an initial pointing error has been measured experimentally for a gimbal pointing system.

  13. Quantity, Quality, and Variety of Pupil Responses during an Open-Communication Structured Group Directed Reading-Thinking Activity and a Closed Communication Structured Group Directed Reading Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petre, Richard M.

    The quality, quantity, and variety of pupil responses while using two different group directed reading activities, the Directed Reading Activity (DRA), and the Directed Reading-Thinking Activity (DRTA) were investigated in this study. The subjects, all fourth graders in two nearby communities, were grouped into above-grade-level, at-grade-level,…

  14. 76 FR 62321 - Airworthiness Directives; Aviation Communication & Surveillance Systems (ACSS) Traffic Alert and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... Communication & Surveillance Systems (ACSS) Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) Units AGENCY... certain Aviation Communication & Surveillance Systems (ACSS) traffic alert and collision avoidance system...) traffic alert and collision avoidance system (TCAS) units with part numbers identified in ACSS...

  15. Transport of thyroxine across the blood-brain barrier is directed primarily from brain to blood in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, W.A.; Kastin, A.J.; Michals, E.A.

    1985-12-23

    The role of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the transport of thyroxine was examined in mice. Radioiodinated (hot thyroxine (hT/sub 4/) administered icv had a half-time disappearance from the brain of 30 min. This increased to 60 min (p < 0.001) when administered with 211 pmole/mouse of unlabeled (cold) thyroxine (cT/sub 4/). The Km for this inhibition of hT/sub 4/ transport out of the brain by cT/sub 4/ was 9.66 pmole/brain. Unlabeled 3,3',5 triiodothyronine (cT/sub 3/) was unable to inhibit transport of hT/sub 4/ out of the brain, although both cT/sub 3/ (p < 0.05) and cT/sub 4/ (p < 0.05) did inhibit transport of radioiodinated 3,3',5 triiodothyronine (hT/sub 3/) to a small degree. Entry of hT/sub 4/ into the brain after peripheral administration was negligible and was not affected by either cT/sub 4/ nor cT/sub 3/. By contrast, the entry of hT/sub 3/ into the brain after peripheral administration was inhibited by cT/sub 3/ (p < 0.001) and was increased by cT/sub 4/ (p < 0.01). The levels of the unlabeled thyroid hormones administered centrally in these studies did not affect bulk flow, as assessed by labeled red blood cells (/sup 99m/Tc-RBC), or the carrier mediated transport of iodide out of the brain. Likewise, the vascular space of the brain and body, as assessed by /sup 99m/Tc-RBC, was unchanged by the levels of peripherally administered unlabeled thyroid hormones. Therefore, the results of these studies are not due to generalized effects of thyroid hormones on BBB transport. The results indicate that in the mouse the major carrier-mediated system for thyroxine in the BBB transports thyroxine out of the brain, while the major system for triiodothyronine transports hormone into the brain. 14 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Awake dynamics and brain-wide direct inputs of hypothalamic MCH and orexin networks

    PubMed Central

    González, J. Antonio; Iordanidou, Panagiota; Strom, Molly; Adamantidis, Antoine; Burdakov, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The lateral hypothalamus (LH) controls energy balance. LH melanin-concentrating-hormone (MCH) and orexin/hypocretin (OH) neurons mediate energy accumulation and expenditure, respectively. MCH cells promote memory and appropriate stimulus-reward associations; their inactivation disrupts energy-optimal behaviour and causes weight loss. However, MCH cell dynamics during wakefulness are unknown, leaving it unclear if they differentially participate in brain activity during sensory processing. By fiberoptic recordings from molecularly defined populations of LH neurons in awake freely moving mice, we show that MCH neurons generate conditional population bursts. This MCH cell activity correlates with novelty exploration, is inhibited by stress and is inversely predicted by OH cell activity. Furthermore, we obtain brain-wide maps of monosynaptic inputs to MCH and OH cells, and demonstrate optogenetically that VGAT neurons in the amygdala and bed nucleus of stria terminalis inhibit MCH cells. These data reveal cell-type-specific LH dynamics during sensory integration, and identify direct neural controllers of MCH neurons. PMID:27102565

  17. Monetary reward magnitude effects on behavior and brain function during goal-directed behavior.

    PubMed

    Rosell-Negre, P; Bustamante, J C; Fuentes-Claramonte, P; Costumero, V; Benabarre, S; Barrós-Loscertales, A

    2016-07-29

    Reward may modulate the cognitive processes required for goal achievement, while individual differences in personality may affect reward modulation. Our aim was to test how different monetary reward magnitudes modulate brain activation and performance during goal-directed behavior, and whether individual differences in reward sensitivity affect this modulation. For this purpose, we scanned 37 subjects with a parametric design in which we varied the magnitude of monetary rewards (€0, €0.01, €0.5, €1 or €1.5) in a blocked fashion while participants performed an interference counting-Stroop condition. The results showed that the brain activity of left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the striatum were modulated by increasing and decreasing reward magnitudes, respectively. Behavioral performance improved as the magnitude of monetary reward increased while comparing the non reward (€0) condition to any other reward condition, or the lower €0.01 to any other reward condition, and this improvement was related with individual differences in reward sensitivity. In conclusion, the locus of influence of monetary incentives overlaps the activity of the regions commonly involved in cognitive control.

  18. Direct and Indirect Effects of Brain Volume, Socioeconomic Status and Family Stress on Child IQ

    PubMed Central

    Marcus Jenkins, Jade V; Woolley, Donald P; Hooper, Stephen R; De Bellis, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    1.1. Background A large literature documents the detrimental effects of socioeconomic disparities on intelligence and neuropsychological development. Researchers typically measure environmental factors such as socioeconomic status (SES), using income, parent's occupation and education. However, SES is more complex, and this complexity may influence neuropsychological outcomes. 1.2. Methods This studyused principal components analysis to reduce 14 SES and 28 family stress indicators into their core dimensions (e.g. community and educational capital, financial resources, marital conflict). Core dimensions were used in path analyses to examine their relationships with parent IQ and cerebral volume (white matter, grey matter and total brain volume), to predict child IQ in a sample of typically developing children. 1.3. Results Parent IQ affected child IQ directly and indirectly through community and educational capital, demonstrating how environmental factors interact with familial factors in neuro-development. There were no intervening effects of cerebral white matter, grey matter, or total brain volume. 1.4. Conclusions Findings may suggest that improving community resources can foster the intellectual development of children. PMID:24533427

  19. Communication Options for Persons with Severe and Profound Disabilities: State of the Art and Future Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirenda, Pat; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The paper reviews literature on communication augmentation for individuals with severe/profound intellectual disabilities, within the framework of the "Participation Model." The discussion covers communication opportunity, communication access, strategies for facilitating the use of natural speech, overview of unaided and aided…

  20. Affirming Commonalities--Curriculum Directions To Support the Study of All Contexts of Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Jeffrey M.

    A number of reasons could no doubt be found for why the study of communication has been so fragmented over the years. R. Blanchard and W. Christ have indicated that when mass communication courses were first developed, those courses were generally located in departments "offering vocationally based instruction." Speech communication and…

  1. Dynamic (2, 3) Threshold Quantum Secret Sharing of Secure Direct Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Hong; Orgun, A. Mehmet; Xiao, Jing-Hua; Pieprzyk, Josef; Xue, Li-Yin

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we show that a (2, 3) discrete variable threshold quantum secret sharing scheme of secure direct communication can be achieved based on recurrence using the same devices as in BB84. The scheme is devised by first placing the shares of smaller secret pieces into the shares of the largest secret piece, converting the shares of the largest secret piece into corresponding quantum state sequences, inserting nonorthogonal state particles into the quantum state sequences with the purpose of detecting eavesdropping, and finally sending the new quantum state sequences to the three participants respectively. Consequently, every particle can on average carry up to 1.5-bit messages due to the use of recurrence. The control codes are randomly prepared using the way to generate fountain codes with pre-shared source codes between Alice and Bob, making three participants can detect eavesdropping by themselves without sending classical messages to Alice. Due to the flexible encoding, our scheme is also dynamic, which means that it allows the participants to join and leave freely. Supported in part by an International Macquarie University Research Excellence Scholarship (iMQRES), Australian Research Council Grant DP0987734. This work is also supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) under Grant No. 2010CB923200, the National Natural Science Foundation of China under No. 61377067, Fund of State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China, National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 61202362, 61262057, 61472433, and China Postdoctora Science Foundation under Grant No. 2013M542560

  2. The Representation of Object-Directed Action and Function Knowledge in the Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quanjing; Garcea, Frank E; Mahon, Bradford Z

    2016-04-01

    The appropriate use of everyday objects requires the integration of action and function knowledge. Previous research suggests that action knowledge is represented in frontoparietal areas while function knowledge is represented in temporal lobe regions. Here we used multivoxel pattern analysis to investigate the representation of object-directed action and function knowledge while participants executed pantomimes of familiar tool actions. A novel approach for decoding object knowledge was used in which classifiers were trained on one pair of objects and then tested on a distinct pair; this permitted a measurement of classification accuracy over and above object-specific information. Region of interest (ROI) analyses showed that object-directed actions could be decoded in tool-preferring regions of both parietal and temporal cortex, while no independently defined tool-preferring ROI showed successful decoding of object function. However, a whole-brain searchlight analysis revealed that while frontoparietal motor and peri-motor regions are engaged in the representation of object-directed actions, medial temporal lobe areas in the left hemisphere are involved in the representation of function knowledge. These results indicate that both action and function knowledge are represented in a topographically coherent manner that is amenable to study with multivariate approaches, and that the left medial temporal cortex represents knowledge of object function.

  3. Directed evolution of brain-derived neurotrophic factor for improved folding and expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Burns, Michael L; Malott, Thomas M; Metcalf, Kevin J; Hackel, Benjamin J; Chan, Jonah R; Shusta, Eric V

    2014-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in nervous system function and has therapeutic potential. Microbial production of BDNF has resulted in a low-fidelity protein product, often in the form of large, insoluble aggregates incapable of binding to cognate TrkB or p75 receptors. In this study, employing Saccharomyces cerevisiae display and secretion systems, it was found that BDNF was poorly expressed and partially inactive on the yeast surface and that BDNF was secreted at low levels in the form of disulfide-bonded aggregates. Thus, for the purpose of increasing the compatibility of yeast as an expression host for BDNF, directed-evolution approaches were employed to improve BDNF folding and expression levels. Yeast surface display was combined with two rounds of directed evolution employing random mutagenesis and shuffling to identify BDNF mutants that had 5-fold improvements in expression, 4-fold increases in specific TrkB binding activity, and restored p75 binding activity, both as displayed proteins and as secreted proteins. Secreted BDNF mutants were found largely in the form of soluble homodimers that could stimulate TrkB phosphorylation in transfected PC12 cells. Site-directed mutagenesis studies indicated that a particularly important mutational class involved the introduction of cysteines proximal to the native cysteines that participate in the BDNF cysteine knot architecture. Taken together, these findings show that yeast is now a viable alternative for both the production and the engineering of BDNF.

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging of dolphin brains reveals direct auditory pathway to temporal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Berns, Gregory S.; Cook, Peter F.; Foxley, Sean; Jbabdi, Saad; Miller, Karla L.; Marino, Lori

    2015-01-01

    The brains of odontocetes (toothed whales) look grossly different from their terrestrial relatives. Because of their adaptation to the aquatic environment and their reliance on echolocation, the odontocetes' auditory system is both unique and crucial to their survival. Yet, scant data exist about the functional organization of the cetacean auditory system. A predominant hypothesis is that the primary auditory cortex lies in the suprasylvian gyrus along the vertex of the hemispheres, with this position induced by expansion of ‘associative′ regions in lateral and caudal directions. However, the precise location of the auditory cortex and its connections are still unknown. Here, we used a novel diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequence in archival post-mortem brains of a common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) and a pantropical dolphin (Stenella attenuata) to map their sensory and motor systems. Using thalamic parcellation based on traditionally defined regions for the primary visual (V1) and auditory cortex (A1), we found distinct regions of the thalamus connected to V1 and A1. But in addition to suprasylvian-A1, we report here, for the first time, the auditory cortex also exists in the temporal lobe, in a region near cetacean-A2 and possibly analogous to the primary auditory cortex in related terrestrial mammals (Artiodactyla). Using probabilistic tract tracing, we found a direct pathway from the inferior colliculus to the medial geniculate nucleus to the temporal lobe near the sylvian fissure. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of post-mortem DTI in archival specimens to answer basic questions in comparative neurobiology in a way that has not previously been possible and shows a link between the cetacean auditory system and those of terrestrial mammals. Given that fresh cetacean specimens are relatively rare, the ability to measure connectivity in archival specimens opens up a plethora of possibilities for investigating neuroanatomy in cetaceans and other species

  5. Mice genetically depleted of brain serotonin display social impairments, communication deficits and repetitive behaviors: possible relevance to autism.

    PubMed

    Kane, Michael J; Angoa-Peréz, Mariana; Briggs, Denise I; Sykes, Catherine E; Francescutti, Dina M; Rosenberg, David R; Kuhn, Donald M

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired reciprocal social interaction, communication deficits and repetitive behaviors. A very large number of genes have been linked to autism, many of which encode proteins involved in the development and function of synaptic circuitry. However, the manner in which these mutated genes might participate, either individually or together, to cause autism is not understood. One factor known to exert extremely broad influence on brain development and network formation, and which has been linked to autism, is the neurotransmitter serotonin. Unfortunately, very little is known about how alterations in serotonin neuronal function might contribute to autism. To test the hypothesis that serotonin dysfunction can contribute to the core symptoms of autism, we analyzed mice lacking brain serotonin (via a null mutation in the gene for tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2)) for behaviors that are relevant to this disorder. Mice lacking brain serotonin (TPH2-/-) showed substantial deficits in numerous validated tests of social interaction and communication. These mice also display highly repetitive and compulsive behaviors. Newborn TPH2-/- mutant mice show delays in the expression of key developmental milestones and their diminished preference for maternal scents over the scent of an unrelated female is a forerunner of more severe socialization deficits that emerge in weanlings and persist into adulthood. Taken together, these results indicate that a hypo-serotonin condition can lead to behavioral traits that are highly characteristic of autism. Our findings should stimulate new studies that focus on determining how brain hyposerotonemia during critical neurodevelopmental periods can alter the maturation of synaptic circuits known to be mis-wired in autism and how prevention of such deficits might prevent this disorder.

  6. Effects of a psycho-educational intervention on direct care workers' communicative behaviors with residents with dementia.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Ana; Marques, Alda; Sousa, Liliana; Nolan, Mike; Figueiredo, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of a person-centered care-based psycho-educational intervention on direct care workers' communicative behaviors with people with dementia living in aged-care facilities. An experimental study with a pretest-posttest control-group design was conducted in four aged-care facilities. Two experimental facilities received an 8-week psycho-educational intervention aiming to develop workers' knowledge about dementia, person-centered care competences, and tools for stress management. Control facilities received education only, with no support to deal with stress. In total, 332 morning care sessions, involving 56 direct care workers (female, mean age 44.72 ± 9.02 years), were video-recorded before and 2 weeks after the intervention. The frequency and duration of a list of verbal and nonverbal communicative behaviors were analyzed. Within the experimental group there was a positive change from pre- to posttest on the frequency of all workers' communicative behaviors. Significant treatment effects in favor of the experimental group were obtained for the frequency of inform (p < .01, η(2)partial = 0.09) and laugh (p < .01, η(2)partial = 0.18). Differences between groups emerged mainly in nonverbal communicative behaviors. The findings suggest that a person-centered care-based psycho-educational intervention can positively affect direct care workers' communicative behaviors with residents with dementia. Further research is required to determine the extent of the benefits of this approach.

  7. An analysis of bi-directional use of frequencies for satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, W. A., Jr.; Miller, E. F.; Sullivan, T.; Miller, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The bi-directional use of frequencies allocated for space communications has the potential to double the orbit/spectrum capacity available. The technical feasibility of reverse band use (RBU) at C-band (4 GHz uplinks and 6 GHz downlinks) is studied. The analysis identifies the constraints under which both forward and reverse band use satellite systems can share the same frequencies with terrestrial, line of sight transmission systems. The results of the analysis show that RBU satellite systems can be similarly sized to forward band use (FBU) satellite systems. In addition, the orbital separation requirements between RBU and FBU satellite systems are examined. The analysis shows that a carrier to interference ratio of 45 dB can be maintianed between RBU and FBU satellites separated by less than 0.5 deg., and that a carrier to interference ratio of 42 dB can be maintained in the antipodal case. Rain scatter propagation analysis shows that RBU and FBU Earth stations require separation distances fo less than 10 km at a rain rate of 13.5 mm/hr escalating to less than 100 km at a rain rate of 178 mm/hr for Earth station antennas in the 3 to 10 m range.

  8. Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailenson, Jeremy; Buzzanell, Patrice; Deetz, Stanley; Tewksbury, David; Thompson, Robert J.; Turow, Joseph; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Bishop, M. J.; Gayeski, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of communications were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Jeremy Bailenson, Patrice Buzzanell, Stanley Deetz, David Tewksbury, Robert J. Thompson, and…

  9. Advanced Insights into Functional Brain Connectivity by Combining Tensor Decomposition and Partial Directed Coherence

    PubMed Central

    Leistritz, Lutz; Witte, Herbert; Schiecke, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of functional connectivity in physiological networks is frequently performed by means of time-variant partial directed coherence (tvPDC), based on time-variant multivariate autoregressive models. The principle advantage of tvPDC lies in the combination of directionality, time variance and frequency selectivity simultaneously, offering a more differentiated view into complex brain networks. Yet the advantages specific to tvPDC also cause a large number of results, leading to serious problems in interpretability. To counter this issue, we propose the decomposition of multi-dimensional tvPDC results into a sum of rank-1 outer products. This leads to a data condensation which enables an advanced interpretation of results. Furthermore it is thereby possible to uncover inherent interaction patterns of induced neuronal subsystems by limiting the decomposition to several relevant channels, while retaining the global influence determined by the preceding multivariate AR estimation and tvPDC calculation of the entire scalp. Finally a comparison between several subjects is considerably easier, as individual tvPDC results are summarized within a comprehensive model equipped with subject-specific loading coefficients. A proof-of-principle of the approach is provided by means of simulated data; EEG data of an experiment concerning visual evoked potentials are used to demonstrate the applicability to real data. PMID:26046537

  10. Differential effects of social and physical environmental enrichment on brain plasticity, cognition, and ultrasonic communication in rats.

    PubMed

    Brenes, Juan C; Lackinger, Martin; Höglinger, Günter U; Schratt, Gerhard; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Wöhr, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) exerts beneficial effects on brain plasticity, cognition, and anxiety/depression, leading to a brain that can counteract deficits underlying various brain disorders. Because the complexity of the EE commonly used makes it difficult to identify causal aspects, we examined possible factors using a 2 × 2 design with social EE (two vs. six rats) and physical EE (physically enriched vs. nonenriched). For the first time, we demonstrate that social and physical EE have differential effects on brain plasticity, cognition, and ultrasonic communication. Expectedly, physical EE promoted neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation, but not in the subventricular zone, and, as a novel finding, affected microRNA expression levels, with the activity-dependent miR-124 and miR-132 being upregulated. Concomitant improvements in cognition were observed, yet social deficits were seen in the emission of prosocial 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) paralleled by a lack of social approach in response to them, consistent with the intense world syndrome/theory of autism. In contrast, social EE had only minor effects on brain plasticity and cognition, but led to increased prosocial 50-kHz USV emission rates and enhanced social approach behavior. Importantly, social deficits following physical EE were prevented by additional social EE. The finding that social EE has positive whereas physical EE has negative effects on social behavior indicates that preclinical studies focusing on EE as a potential treatment in models for neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by social deficits, such as autism, should include social EE in addition to physical EE, because its lack might worsen social deficits.

  11. Paternal Retrieval Behavior Regulated by Brain Estrogen Synthetase (Aromatase) in Mouse Sires that Engage in Communicative Interactions with Pairmates.

    PubMed

    Akther, Shirin; Huang, Zhiqi; Liang, Mingkun; Zhong, Jing; Fakhrul, Azam A K M; Yuhi, Teruko; Lopatina, Olga; Salmina, Alla B; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Higashida, Chiharu; Tsuji, Takahiro; Matsuo, Mie; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Parental behaviors involve complex social recognition and memory processes and interactive behavior with children that can greatly facilitate healthy human family life. Fathers play a substantial role in child care in a small but significant number of mammals, including humans. However, the brain mechanism that controls male parental behavior is much less understood than that controlling female parental behavior. Fathers of non-monogamous laboratory ICR mice are an interesting model for examining the factors that influence paternal responsiveness because sires can exhibit maternal-like parental care (retrieval of pups) when separated from their pups along with their pairmates because of olfactory and auditory signals from the dams. Here we tested whether paternal behavior is related to femininity by the aromatization of testosterone. For this purpose, we measured the immunoreactivity of aromatase [cytochrome P450 family 19 (CYP19)], which synthesizes estrogen from androgen, in nine brain regions of the sire. We observed higher levels of aromatase expression in these areas of the sire brain when they engaged in communicative interactions with dams in separate cages. Interestingly, the number of nuclei with aromatase immunoreactivity in sires left together with maternal mates in the home cage after pup-removing was significantly larger than that in sires housed with a whole family. The capacity of sires to retrieve pups was increased following a period of 5 days spent with the pups as a whole family after parturition, whereas the acquisition of this ability was suppressed in sires treated daily with an aromatase inhibitor. The results demonstrate that the dam significantly stimulates aromatase in the male brain and that the presence of the pups has an inhibitory effect on this increase. These results also suggest that brain aromatization regulates the initiation, development, and maintenance of paternal behavior in the ICR male mice.

  12. Paternal Retrieval Behavior Regulated by Brain Estrogen Synthetase (Aromatase) in Mouse Sires that Engage in Communicative Interactions with Pairmates

    PubMed Central

    Akther, Shirin; Huang, Zhiqi; Liang, Mingkun; Zhong, Jing; Fakhrul, Azam A. K. M.; Yuhi, Teruko; Lopatina, Olga; Salmina, Alla B.; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Higashida, Chiharu; Tsuji, Takahiro; Matsuo, Mie; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Parental behaviors involve complex social recognition and memory processes and interactive behavior with children that can greatly facilitate healthy human family life. Fathers play a substantial role in child care in a small but significant number of mammals, including humans. However, the brain mechanism that controls male parental behavior is much less understood than that controlling female parental behavior. Fathers of non-monogamous laboratory ICR mice are an interesting model for examining the factors that influence paternal responsiveness because sires can exhibit maternal-like parental care (retrieval of pups) when separated from their pups along with their pairmates because of olfactory and auditory signals from the dams. Here we tested whether paternal behavior is related to femininity by the aromatization of testosterone. For this purpose, we measured the immunoreactivity of aromatase [cytochrome P450 family 19 (CYP19)], which synthesizes estrogen from androgen, in nine brain regions of the sire. We observed higher levels of aromatase expression in these areas of the sire brain when they engaged in communicative interactions with dams in separate cages. Interestingly, the number of nuclei with aromatase immunoreactivity in sires left together with maternal mates in the home cage after pup-removing was significantly larger than that in sires housed with a whole family. The capacity of sires to retrieve pups was increased following a period of 5 days spent with the pups as a whole family after parturition, whereas the acquisition of this ability was suppressed in sires treated daily with an aromatase inhibitor. The results demonstrate that the dam significantly stimulates aromatase in the male brain and that the presence of the pups has an inhibitory effect on this increase. These results also suggest that brain aromatization regulates the initiation, development, and maintenance of paternal behavior in the ICR male mice. PMID:26696812

  13. Destination-directed, packet-switching architecture for 30/20-GHz FDMA/TDM geostationary communications satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO

    1992-01-01

    A destination-directed packet switching architecture for a 30/20-GHz frequency division multiple access/time division multiplexed (FDMA/TDM) geostationary satellite communications network is discussed. Critical subsystems and problem areas are identified and addressed. Efforts have concentrated heavily on the space segment; however, the ground segment has been considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints.

  14. Teaching Children with Autism to Engage in Peer-Directed Mands Using a Picture Exchange Communication System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paden, Amber R.; Kodak, Tiffany; Fisher, Wayne W.; Gawley-Bullington, Elizabeth M.; Bouxsein, Kelly J.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) plus prompting to increase peer-directed mands for preferred items using a picture exchange communication system (PECS). Two nonvocal individuals with autism participated. Independent mands with a peer increased with the implementation of DRA plus prompting for both…

  15. Behavioral and Physiological Responses to Child-Directed Speech as Predictors of Communication Outcomes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Linda R.; Baranek, Grace T.; Roberts, Jane E.; David, Fabian J.; Perryman, Twyla Y.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the extent to which behavioral and physiological responses during child-directed speech (CDS) correlate concurrently and predictively with communication skills in young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Method: Twenty-two boys with ASD (initial mean age: 35 months) participated in a longitudinal study. At entry,…

  16. Destination directed packet switch architecture for a 30/20 GHz FDMA/TDM geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO

    1991-01-01

    Emphasis is on a destination directed packet switching architecture for a 30/20 GHz frequency division multiplex access/time division multiplex (FDMA/TDM) geostationary satellite communication network. Critical subsystems and problem areas are identified and addressed. Efforts have concentrated heavily on the space segment; however, the ground segment was considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints.

  17. Linking Contextual Factors with Rhetorical Pattern Shift: Direct and Indirect Strategies Recommended in English Business Communication Textbooks in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Junhua; Zhu, Pinfan

    2011-01-01

    Scholars have consistently claimed that rhetorical patterns are culturally bound, and indirectness is a defining characteristic of Chinese writing. Through examining how the rhetorical mechanism of directness and indirectness is presented in 29 English business communication textbooks published in China, we explore how English business…

  18. Automated segmentation of ventricles from serial brain MRI for the quantification of volumetric changes associated with communicating hydrocephalus in patients with brain tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pura, John A.; Hamilton, Allison M.; Vargish, Geoffrey A.; Butman, John A.; Linguraru, Marius George

    2011-03-01

    Accurate ventricle volume estimates could improve the understanding and diagnosis of postoperative communicating hydrocephalus. For this category of patients, associated changes in ventricle volume can be difficult to identify, particularly over short time intervals. We present an automated segmentation algorithm that evaluates ventricle size from serial brain MRI examination. The technique combines serial T1- weighted images to increase SNR and segments the means image to generate a ventricle template. After pre-processing, the segmentation is initiated by a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm to find the seeds used in a combination of fast marching methods and geodesic active contours. Finally, the ventricle template is propagated onto the serial data via non-linear registration. Serial volume estimates were obtained in an automated robust and accurate manner from difficult data.

  19. Visual and tactile interfaces for bi-directional human robot communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Daniel; Lackey, Stephanie; Reinerman-Jones, Lauren; Hudson, Irwin

    2013-05-01

    Seamless integration of unmanned and systems and Soldiers in the operational environment requires robust communication capabilities. Multi-Modal Communication (MMC) facilitates achieving this goal due to redundancy and levels of communication superior to single mode interaction using auditory, visual, and tactile modalities. Visual signaling using arm and hand gestures is a natural method of communication between people. Visual signals standardized within the U.S. Army Field Manual and in use by Soldiers provide a foundation for developing gestures for human to robot communication. Emerging technologies using Inertial Measurement Units (IMU) enable classification of arm and hand gestures for communication with a robot without the requirement of line-of-sight needed by computer vision techniques. These devices improve the robustness of interpreting gestures in noisy environments and are capable of classifying signals relevant to operational tasks. Closing the communication loop between Soldiers and robots necessitates them having the ability to return equivalent messages. Existing visual signals from robots to humans typically require highly anthropomorphic features not present on military vehicles. Tactile displays tap into an unused modality for robot to human communication. Typically used for hands-free navigation and cueing, existing tactile display technologies are used to deliver equivalent visual signals from the U.S. Army Field Manual. This paper describes ongoing research to collaboratively develop tactile communication methods with Soldiers, measure classification accuracy of visual signal interfaces, and provides an integration example including two robotic platforms.

  20. Pilot Evaluation of a Palliative and End-of-Life Communication Intervention for Parents of Children With a Brain Tumor.

    PubMed

    Hendricks-Ferguson, Verna L; Pradhan, Kamnesh; Shih, Chie-Schin; Gauvain, Karen M; Kane, Javier R; Liu, Jingxia; Haase, Joan E

    2016-12-04

    Providing timely palliative and end-of-life care (PC/EOL) information to parents of children with a serious illness is a national health care priority. The goals of this study were to determine feasibility, acceptability, and parent responses related to a PC/EOL communication intervention, titled "Communication Plan: Early through End of Life (COMPLETE)" to parents of children with a brain tumor. The study was a 2-site prospective, single-group pilot study targeting parents' stress and coping outcomes. The sample included 13 parents of 11 children (ie, 11 families). During the first 6 months postdiagnosis, we evaluated parent outcomes at 4 time points (baseline and 3 post-sessions). Our findings included significant decline in decision regret (P = .0089); strong, significantly increased hope (P ≤ .0001); and significantly decreased uncertainty (P = .04). Over time, more than half of the parents (61.5%) preferred to receive information about their child's current condition and PC/EOL options. Our findings provide evidence to suggest that the COMPLETE intervention is feasible and acceptable and produces promising effects on 3 parent outcomes (ie, decision regret, hope, and uncertainty) in parents of children with a brain tumor. Further research is indicated to evaluate COMPLETE with a larger sample of parents of children with cancer and with a control group.

  1. Sources of Variation Influencing Concordance between Functional MRI and Direct Cortical Stimulation in Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Melanie A.; Tam, Fred; Garavaglia, Marco M.; Hare, Gregory M. T.; Cusimano, Michael D.; Schweizer, Tom A.; Das, Sunit; Graham, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Object: Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) remains a promising method to aid in the surgical management of patients diagnosed with brain tumors. For patients that are candidates for awake craniotomies, surgical decisions can potentially be improved by fMRI but this depends on the level of concordance between preoperative brain maps and the maps provided by the gold standard intraoperative method, direct cortical stimulation (DCS). There have been numerous studies of the concordance between fMRI and DCS using sensitivity and specificity measures, however the results are variable across studies and the key factors influencing variability are not well understood. Thus, the present work addresses the influence of technical factors on fMRI and DCS concordance. Methods: Motor and language mapping data were collected for a group of glioma patients (n = 14) who underwent both preoperative fMRI and intraoperative DCS in an awake craniotomy procedure for tumor removal. Normative fMRI data were also acquired in a healthy control group (n = 12). The fMRI and DCS mapping data were co-registered; true positive (TP), true negative (TN), false positive (FP), and false negative (FN) occurrences were tabulated over the exposed brain surface. Sensitivity and specificity were measured for the total group, and for the motor and language sub-groups. The influence of grid placement, fMRI statistical thresholding, and task standardization were assessed. Correlations between proportions of agreement and error were also carefully scrutinized to evaluate concordance in more detail. Results: Concordance was significantly better for motor vs. language mapping. There was an inverse relationship between TP and TN with increasing statistical threshold, and FP dominated the total error. Sensitivity and specificity were reduced when tasks were not standardized across fMRI and DCS. Conclusions: Although the agreement between fMRI and DCS is good, variability is introduced by

  2. Transcranial direct current stimulation transiently increases the blood-brain barrier solute permeability in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Da Wi; Khadka, Niranjan; Fan, Jie; Bikson, Marom; Fu, Bingmei M.

    2016-03-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive electrical stimulation technique investigated for a broad range of medical and performance indications. Whereas prior studies have focused exclusively on direct neuron polarization, our hypothesis is that tDCS directly modulates endothelial cells leading to transient changes in blood-brain-barrier (BBB) permeability (P) that are highly meaningful for neuronal activity. For this, we developed state-of-the-art imaging and animal models to quantify P to various sized solutes after tDCS treatment. tDCS was administered using a constant current stimulator to deliver a 1mA current to the right frontal cortex of rat (approximately 2 mm posterior to bregma and 2 mm right to sagittal suture) to obtain similar physiological outcome as that in the human tDCS application studies. Sodium fluorescein (MW=376), or FITC-dextrans (20K and 70K), in 1% BSA mammalian Ringer was injected into the rat (SD, 250-300g) cerebral circulation via the ipsilateral carotid artery by a syringe pump at a constant rate of ~3 ml/min. To determine P, multiphoton microscopy with 800-850 nm wavelength laser was applied to take the images from the region of interest (ROI) with proper microvessels, which are 100-200 micron below the pia mater. It shows that the relative increase in P is about 8-fold for small solute, sodium fluorescein, ~35-fold for both intermediate sized (Dex-20k) and large (Dex-70k) solutes, 10 min after 20 min tDCS pretreatment. All of the increased permeability returns to the control after 20 min post treatment. The results confirmed our hypothesis.

  3. New Directions in Mass Communications Policy: Implications for Citizen Education and Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Larry

    This paper, the second in a series of five on the current state of citizen education, focuses on mass communication. The following topics are discussed: communications today; the system of freedom of expression; social science research on the media (includes the audience and public information); minorities and the media; public broadcasting;…

  4. 75 FR 81512 - Airworthiness Directives; Various Aviation Communication & Surveillance Systems (ACSS) Traffic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... Communication & Surveillance Systems (ACSS) Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) Units AGENCY... received reports of anomalies with the Aviation Communication & Surveillance Systems (ACSS) Traffic Alert...) Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) units with the part numbers (P/Ns) specified in...

  5. Usability Instruction in Technical Communication Programs: New Directions in Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breuch, Lee-Ann M. Kastman; Zachry, Mark; Spinuzzi, Clay

    2001-01-01

    Asserts that technical communication programs are particularly well positioned to adopt usability testing and research in their curricula because of inherent connections between usability and technical communication, such as their mutual emphases on audience analysis, technology, and information design. Describes approaches to implementation of…

  6. Social communication with virtual agents: The effects of body and gaze direction on attention and emotional responding in human observers.

    PubMed

    Marschner, Linda; Pannasch, Sebastian; Schulz, Johannes; Graupner, Sven-Thomas

    2015-08-01

    In social communication, the gaze direction of other persons provides important information to perceive and interpret their emotional response. Previous research investigated the influence of gaze by manipulating mutual eye contact. Therefore, gaze and body direction have been changed as a whole, resulting in only congruent gaze and body directions (averted or directed) of another person. Here, we aimed to disentangle these effects by using short animated sequences of virtual agents posing with either direct or averted body or gaze. Attention allocation by means of eye movements, facial muscle response, and emotional experience to agents of different gender and facial expressions were investigated. Eye movement data revealed longer fixation durations, i.e., a stronger allocation of attention, when gaze and body direction were not congruent with each other or when both were directed towards the observer. This suggests that direct interaction as well as incongruous signals increase the demands of attentional resources in the observer. For the facial muscle response, only the reaction of muscle zygomaticus major revealed an effect of body direction, expressed by stronger activity in response to happy expressions for direct compared to averted gaze when the virtual character's body was directed towards the observer. Finally, body direction also influenced the emotional experience ratings towards happy expressions. While earlier findings suggested that mutual eye contact is the main source for increased emotional responding and attentional allocation, the present results indicate that direction of the virtual agent's body and head also plays a minor but significant role.

  7. Bromocriptine loaded chitosan nanoparticles intended for direct nose to brain delivery: pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic and scintigraphy study in mice model.

    PubMed

    Md, Shadab; Khan, Rashid A; Mustafa, Gulam; Chuttani, Krishna; Baboota, Sanjula; Sahni, Jasjeet K; Ali, Javed

    2013-02-14

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the potential use of chitosan nanoparticles as a delivery system to enhance the brain targeting efficiency of bromocriptine (BRC) following intranasal (i.n.) administration. The BRC loaded chitosan nanoparticles (CS NPs) were prepared by ionic gelation of CS with tripolyphosphate anions. These NPs had a mean size (161.3 ± 4. 7 nm), zeta potential (+40.3 ± 2.7 mV), loading capacity (37.8% ± 1.8%) and entrapment efficiency (84.2% ± 3.5%). The oral administration of haloperidol (2mg/kg) to mice produced typical Parkinson (PD) symptoms. Catalepsy and akinesia outcomes in animals receiving BRC either in solution or within CS NPs showed a reversal in catalepsy and akinesia behavior when compared to haloperidol treated mice, this reversal being specially pronounced in mice receiving BRC loaded CS NPs. Biodistribution of BRC formulations in the brain and blood of mice following i.n. and intravenous (i.v.) administration was performed using optimized technetium labeled (99mTc-labeled) BRC formulations. The brain/blood ratio of 0.47 ± 0.04, 0.69 ± 0.031, and 0.05 ± 0.01 for BRC solution (i.n.), BRC loaded CS NPs (i.n.) and (i.v.) respectively, at 0.5h are suggestive of direct nose to brain transport bypassing the blood-brain barrier. Gamma scintigraphy imaging of mice brain following i.v. and i.n. administrations were performed to determine the localization of drug in brain. The drug targeting index and direct transport percentage for BRC loaded CS NPs following i.n. route were 6.3 ± 0.8 and 84.2% ± 1.9%. These encouraging results confirmed the development of a novel non-invasive nose to brain delivery system of BRC for the treatment of PD.

  8. Labeled choline and phosphorylcholine: body distribution and brain autoradiography: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Mathis, C.A.; Budinger, T.F.; Moyer, B.R.; Rosen, M.

    1983-09-01

    Following intravenous injection of labeled choline or phosphorylcholine in rats and mice, the brain uptake as percent injected dose was less than 0.2% with 6-12% going to kidney and 3-6% to liver. A study of (/sup 14/C)choline autoradiography in a stump-tailed macaque demonstrated a five- to sixfold greater uptake in gray matter than in white matter. Dynamic positron imaging of (/sup 11/C)choline in a rhesus monkey demonstrated rapid brain uptake followed by rapid washout, with heavy late uptake in muscle. The use of labeled choline and choline analogs as imaging agents in human studies is constrained by the low brain uptake relative to extracerebral tissues.

  9. Labeled choline and phosphorylcholine: body distribution and brain autoradiography: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Mathis, C.A.; Budinger, T.F.; Moyer, B.R.; Rosen, M.

    1983-09-01

    Following intravenous injection of labeled choline or phosphorylcholine in rats and mice, the brain uptake as percent injected dose was less than 0.2% with 6 to 12% going to kidney and 3 to 6% to liver. A study of (/sup 14/C)choline autoradiography in a stump-tailed macaque demonstrated a five- to sixfold greater uptake in gray matter than in white matter. Dynamic positron imaging of (/sup 11/C) choline in a rhesus monkey demonstrated rapid brain uptake followed by rapid washout, with heavy late uptake in muscle. The use of labeled choline and choline analogs as imaging agents in human studies is constrained by the low brain uptake relative to extracerebral tissues.

  10. Coordinated orbit-tracking control of second-order non-linear agents with directed communication topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-Y.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, C.-L.; Wei, P.

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with two-dimensional and three-dimensional cooperative control of multiple agents formation tracking a set of given closed orbits, where each agent has intrinsic second-order non-linear dynamics and the communication topology among agents is directed. By using our previous curve extension method, the cooperative control system can be regarded as a cascade system composed of the orbit-tracking subsystem and the formation subsystem with the orbit-tracking error as input. A novel solution is established by separatively designing the orbit-tracking control law and the formation control protocol ignoring the perturbation at first and then applying input-to-state stability theory to analyse the asymptotic stability of the cascade system. It is shown that the closed-loop system is asymptotic stability if the directed communication topology contains a directed spanning tree. The effectiveness of the analytical results is verified by numerical simulations.

  11. Demonstration of bi-directional LED visible light communication using TDD traffic with mitigation of reflection interference.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y F; Yeh, C H; Chow, C W; Liu, Y; Liu, Y L; Tsang, H K

    2012-10-08

    In this work, we experimentally demonstrate a bi-directional transmission link using light emitting diode (LED) visible light communication (VLC) for both downlink and uplink paths. Time-division-duplex (TDD) is proposed and demonstrated to significantly eliminate the reflection interference in VLC. A free space bi-directional transmission of 2 m using simple on-off keying (OOK) modulation with bit error rate (BER) of < 10(-5) in both directions are achieved. Moreover, the influence of reflection interference is analyzed, showing the proposed scheme can significantly eliminate the reflection interference.

  12. Checkpoints to the Brain: Directing Myeloid Cell Migration to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Harrison-Brown, Meredith; Liu, Guo-Jun; Banati, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells are a unique subset of leukocytes with a diverse array of functions within the central nervous system during health and disease. Advances in understanding of the unique properties of these cells have inspired interest in their use as delivery vehicles for therapeutic genes, proteins, and drugs, or as “assistants” in the clean-up of aggregated proteins and other molecules when existing drainage systems are no longer adequate. The trafficking of myeloid cells from the periphery to the central nervous system is subject to complex cellular and molecular controls with several ‘checkpoints’ from the blood to their destination in the brain parenchyma. As important components of the neurovascular unit, the functional state changes associated with lineage heterogeneity of myeloid cells are increasingly recognized as important for disease progression. In this review, we discuss some of the cellular elements associated with formation and function of the neurovascular unit, and present an update on the impact of myeloid cells on central nervous system (CNS) diseases in the laboratory and the clinic. We then discuss emerging strategies for harnessing the potential of site-directed myeloid cell homing to the CNS, and identify promising avenues for future research, with particular emphasis on the importance of untangling the functional heterogeneity within existing myeloid subsets. PMID:27918464

  13. Checkpoints to the Brain: Directing Myeloid Cell Migration to the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Harrison-Brown, Meredith; Liu, Guo-Jun; Banati, Richard

    2016-12-02

    Myeloid cells are a unique subset of leukocytes with a diverse array of functions within the central nervous system during health and disease. Advances in understanding of the unique properties of these cells have inspired interest in their use as delivery vehicles for therapeutic genes, proteins, and drugs, or as "assistants" in the clean-up of aggregated proteins and other molecules when existing drainage systems are no longer adequate. The trafficking of myeloid cells from the periphery to the central nervous system is subject to complex cellular and molecular controls with several 'checkpoints' from the blood to their destination in the brain parenchyma. As important components of the neurovascular unit, the functional state changes associated with lineage heterogeneity of myeloid cells are increasingly recognized as important for disease progression. In this review, we discuss some of the cellular elements associated with formation and function of the neurovascular unit, and present an update on the impact of myeloid cells on central nervous system (CNS) diseases in the laboratory and the clinic. We then discuss emerging strategies for harnessing the potential of site-directed myeloid cell homing to the CNS, and identify promising avenues for future research, with particular emphasis on the importance of untangling the functional heterogeneity within existing myeloid subsets.

  14. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes central nervous system myelination via a direct effect upon oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Junhua; Wong, Agnes W; Willingham, Melanie M; van den Buuse, Maarten; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Murray, Simon S

    2010-01-01

    The extracellular factors that are responsible for inducing myelination in the central nervous system (CNS) remain elusive. We investigated whether brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is implicated, by first confirming that BDNF heterozygous mice exhibit delayed CNS myelination during early postnatal development. We next established that the influence of BDNF upon myelination was direct, by acting on oligodendrocytes, using co-cultures of dorsal root ganglia neurons and oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Importantly, we found that BDNF retains its capacity to enhance myelination of neurons or by oligodendrocytes derived from p75NTR knockout mice, indicating the expression of p75NTR is not necessary for BDNF-induced myelination. Conversely, we observed that phosphorylation of TrkB correlated with myelination, and that inhibiting TrkB signalling also inhibited the promyelinating effect of BDNF, suggesting that BDNF enhances CNS myelination via activating oligodendroglial TrkB-FL receptors. Together, our data reveal a previously unknown role for BDNF in potentiating the normal development of CNS myelination, via signalling within oligodendrocytes.

  15. Moving Forward by Stimulating the Brain: Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Post-Stroke Hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Peters, Heather T; Edwards, Dylan J; Wortman-Jutt, Susan; Page, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Stroke remains a leading cause of disability worldwide, with a majority of survivors experiencing long term decrements in motor function that severely undermine quality of life. While many treatment approaches and adjunctive strategies exist to remediate motor impairment, many are only efficacious or feasible for survivors with active hand and wrist function, a population who constitute only a minority of stroke survivors. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a type of non-invasive brain stimulation, has been increasingly utilized to increase motor function following stroke as it is able to be used with stroke survivors of varying impairment levels, is portable, is relatively inexpensive and has few side effects and contraindications. Accordingly, in recent years the number of studies investigating its efficacy when utilized as an adjunct to motor rehabilitation regimens has drastically increased. While many of these trials have reported positive and promising efficacy, methodologies vary greatly between studies, including differences in stimulation parameters, outcome measures and the nature of physical practice. As such, an urgent need remains, centering on the need to investigate these methodological differences and synthesize the most current evidence surrounding the application of tDCS for post-stroke motor rehabilitation. Accordingly, the purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed overview of the most recent tDCS literature (published 2014-2015), while highlighting these variations in methodological approach, as well to elucidate the mechanisms associated with tDCS and post-stroke motor re-learning and neuroplasticity.

  16. The Acquisition of Communication Skills by People with Brain Injury: Some Comparisons with Children with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Roger J.; Bellon, Michelle L.

    2002-01-01

    This research identifies the extent to which different contexts modified the language of four people with brain injuries. The four contexts included: their own home, a residential camp, a post-camp period with support, followed by a return home with limited support. Measures demonstrate the success of the enriched camp facility. (Contains…

  17. Imaging of brain tumors after administration of L-(/sup 13/N)glutamate: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Reiman, R.E.; Benua, R.S.; Gelbard, A.S.; Allen, J.C.; Vomero, J.J.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1982-08-01

    Cyclotron-produced L-(/sup 13/N)glutamate was used to visualize malignant intracranial tumors in 12 pediatric patients who had evidence of recurrent disease as documented by computed transaxial tomography (TCT). Imaging was performed using a rectilinear scanner, gamma camera, or a positron-emission tomograph (PET). The results indicate that /sup 13/N is rapidly taken up by a majority of brain tumors following the administration of L-(/sup 13/N)glutamate, and that /sup 13/N uptake is correlated with breakdown of the blood-brain barrier as demonstrated by contrast TCT or pertechnetate /sup 99m/Tc studies. The feasibility of using this agent in conjunction with PET is established.

  18. The Berlin Brain-Computer Interface: Progress Beyond Communication and Control

    PubMed Central

    Blankertz, Benjamin; Acqualagna, Laura; Dähne, Sven; Haufe, Stefan; Schultze-Kraft, Matthias; Sturm, Irene; Ušćumlic, Marija; Wenzel, Markus A.; Curio, Gabriel; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2016-01-01

    The combined effect of fundamental results about neurocognitive processes and advancements in decoding mental states from ongoing brain signals has brought forth a whole range of potential neurotechnological applications. In this article, we review our developments in this area and put them into perspective. These examples cover a wide range of maturity levels with respect to their applicability. While we assume we are still a long way away from integrating Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) technology in general interaction with computers, or from implementing neurotechnological measures in safety-critical workplaces, results have already now been obtained involving a BCI as research tool. In this article, we discuss the reasons why, in some of the prospective application domains, considerable effort is still required to make the systems ready to deal with the full complexity of the real world. PMID:27917107

  19. LETTERS AND COMMENTS: Self-initiation of EEG-based brain computer communication using the heart rate response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, R.; Müller-Putz, G. R.; Pfurtscheller, G.

    2007-12-01

    Self-initiation, that is the ability of a brain-computer interface (BCI) user to autonomously switch on and off the system, is a very important issue. In this work we analyze whether the respiratory heart rate response, induced by brisk inspiration, can be used as an additional communication channel. After only 20 min of feedback training, ten healthy subjects were able to self-initiate and operate a 4-class steady-state visual evoked potential-based (SSVEP) BCI by using one bipolar ECG and one bipolar EEG channel only. Threshold detection was used to measure a beat-to-beat heart rate increase. Despite this simple method, during a 30 min evaluation period on average only 2.9 non-intentional switches (heart rate changes) were detected.

  20. Study of dual-directional high rate secure communication systems using chaotic multiple-quantum-well lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Sen-Lin

    2007-11-01

    A scheme of synchronized injection multi-quantum-well (MQW) laser system using optical coupling-feedback is presented for performing chaotic dual-directional secure communication. The performance characterization of chaos masking is investigated theoretically, the equation of synchronization demodulation is deduced and its root is also given. Chaos masking encoding with a rate of 5Gbit/s and a modulation frequency of 1GHz, chaos modulation with a rate of 0.2Gbit/s and a modulation frequency of 0.2 GHz and chaos shifting key with a rate of 0.2Gbit/s are numerically simulated, separately. The ratio of the signal to the absolute synchronous error and the time for achieving synchronous demodulation are analysed in detail. The results illustrate that the system has stronger privacy and good performances so that it can be applied in chaotic dual-directional high rate secure communications.

  1. Perceptual elements in brain mechanisms of acoustic communication in humans and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Reser, David H; Rosa, Marcello

    2014-12-01

    Ackermann et al. outline a model for elaboration of subcortical motor outputs as a driving force for the development of the apparently unique behaviour of language in humans. They emphasize circuits in the striatum and midbrain, and acknowledge, but do not explore, the importance of the auditory perceptual pathway for evolution of verbal communication. We suggest that understanding the evolution of language will also require understanding of vocalization perception, especially in the auditory cortex.

  2. Myths on Bi-direction Communication of Web 2.0 Based Social Networks: Is Social Network Truly Interactive?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-10

    MAR 2012 2 . REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 01-03-2010 to 01-03-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Myths on bi-direction communication of Web 2.0...publication • Search Engines, Portals, News • Business / Service App. interfaces • eBay, Amazone … • Social networks with many devices • Mobile phones...response Impact Analyser Figure 1 Social Interaction Monitoring 2 Status of Efforts 1) System Development We have studied web -monitoring

  3. Extracellular vesicles as modulators of cell-to-cell communication in the healthy and diseased brain

    PubMed Central

    Pegtel, D. M.; Peferoen, L.; Amor, S.

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis relies heavily on effective cell-to-cell communication. In the central nervous system (CNS), probably more so than in other organs, such communication is crucial to support and protect neurons especially during ageing, as well as to control inflammation, remove debris and infectious agents. Emerging evidence indicates that extracellular vesicles (EVs) including endosome-derived exosomes and fragments of the cellular plasma membrane play a key role in intercellular communication by transporting messenger RNA, microRNA (miRNA) and proteins. In neurodegenerative diseases, secreted vesicles not only remove misfolded proteins, but also transfer aggregated proteins and prions and are thus thought to perpetuate diseases by ‘infecting’ neighbouring cells with these pathogenic proteins. Conversely, in other CNS disorders signals from stressed cells may help control inflammation and inhibit degeneration. EVs may also reflect the status of the CNS and are present in the cerebrospinal fluid indicating that exosomes may act as biomarkers of disease. That extracellular RNA and in particular miRNA, can be transferred by EV also indicates that these vesicles could be used as carriers to specifically target the CNS to deliver immune modulatory drugs, neuroprotective agents and anti-cancer drugs. Here, we discuss the recent evidence indicating the potential role of exosomes in neurological disorders and how knowledge of their biology may enable a Trojan-horse approach to deliver drugs into the CNS and treat neurodegenerative and other disorders of the CNS. PMID:25135977

  4. Brain responses to success and failure: Direct recordings from human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Jung, Julien; Jerbi, Karim; Ossandon, Tomas; Ryvlin, Philippe; Isnard, Jean; Bertrand, Olivier; Guénot, Marc; Mauguière, François; Lachaux, Jean-Philippe

    2010-08-01

    Evaluating the outcome of our own actions is a fundamental process by which we adapt our behavior in our interaction with the external world. fMRI and electrophysiological studies in monkeys have found feedback-specific responses in several brain regions, unveiling facets of a large-scale network predominantly distributed in the frontal lobes. However, a consensus has yet to be reached regarding the exact contribution of each region. The present study benefited from intracerebral EEG recordings in epileptic patients to record directly the neural activity in each of those frontal structures in response to positive and negative feedback. Both types of feedback induced a sequence of high-frequency responses (>40 Hz) in a widespread network involving medial frontal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and insular cortex. The pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), DLPFC, and lateral OFC showed higher activation in response to negative feedback, while medial OFC and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) were more responsive to positive feedback. Responses in the medial prefrontal cortex (pre-SMA and dACC) were sustained (lasting more than 1,000 ms), while responses in the DLPFC, insula, and the OFC were short lasting (less than 800 ms). Taken together, our findings show that evaluating the outcome of our actions triggers gamma-range activity modulations in several frontal and insular regions. Moreover, we found that the timing and amplitude of those gamma-band responses reveal fine-scale dissociations between the neural dynamics of positive versus negative feedback processing.

  5. Improved spatial targeting with directionally segmented deep brain stimulation leads for treating essential tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Maureen; Deyo, Steve; Abosch, Aviva; Bajwa, Jawad A.; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2012-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the ventral intermediate nucleus of thalamus (Vim) is known to exert a therapeutic effect on postural and kinetic tremor in patients with essential tremor (ET). For DBS leads implanted near the caudal border of Vim, however, there is an increased likelihood that one will also induce paresthesia side-effects by stimulating neurons within the sensory pathway of the ventral caudal (Vc) nucleus of thalamus. The aim of this computational study was to (1) investigate the neuronal pathways modulated by therapeutic, sub-therapeutic and paresthesia-inducing DBS settings in three patients with ET and (2) determine how much better an outcome could have been achieved had these patients been implanted with a DBS lead containing directionally segmented electrodes (dDBS). Multi-compartment neuron models of the thalamocortical, cerebellothalamic and medial lemniscal pathways were first simulated in the context of patient-specific anatomies, lead placements and programming parameters from three ET patients who had been implanted with Medtronic 3389 DBS leads. The models showed that in these patients, complete suppression of tremor was associated most closely with activating an average of 62% of the cerebellothalamic afferent input into Vim (n = 10), while persistent paresthesias were associated with activating 35% of the medial lemniscal tract input into Vc thalamus (n = 12). The dDBS lead design demonstrated superior targeting of the cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathway, especially in cases of misaligned DBS leads. Given the close proximity of Vim to Vc thalamus, the models suggest that dDBS will enable clinicians to more effectively sculpt current through and around thalamus in order to achieve a more consistent therapeutic effect without inducing side-effects.

  6. [Non-invasive brain stimulation in neurology : Transcranial direct current stimulation to enhance cognitive functioning].

    PubMed

    Antonenko, D; Flöel, A

    2016-08-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been successfully used in neuroscientific research to modulate cognitive functions. Recent studies suggested that improvement of behavioral performance is associated with tDCS-induced modulation of neuronal activity and connectivity. Thus, tDCS may also represent a promising tool for reconstitution of cognitive functions in the context of memory decline related to Alzheimer's disease or aphasia following stroke; however, evidence from randomized sham-controlled clinical trials is still scarce. Initial results of tDCS-induced behavioral improvement in patients with Alzheimer's dementia and its precursors indicated that an intense memory training combined with tDCS may be effective. Early interventions in the stage of mild cognitive impairment could be crucial but further evidence is needed to substantiate this. In patients with aphasia following stroke tDCS was applied to the left and right hemispheres, with varying results depending on the severity of the symptoms and polarity of the stimulation. Patients with mild aphasia can benefit from tDCS of the language dominant hemisphere while in patients with severe aphasia tDCS of right hemispheric homologous brain language areas may be particularly relevant. Moreover, recent studies suggested that an intervention in the subacute phase of aphasia could be most promising. In summary, tDCS could provide the exciting possibility to reconstitute cognitive functions in patients with neurological disorders. Future studies have to elucidate whether tDCS can be used in the clinical routine to prevent further cognitive decline in neurodegenerative diseases and whether beneficial effects from experimental studies translate into long-term improvement in activities of daily life.

  7. Future directions in research on consumer-provider communication and adherence to cancer prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    DiMatteo, M Robin

    2003-05-01

    The goal of this paper is to examine emerging issues in consumer-provider communication and patient adherence to cancer prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, and coping with survivorship. Many factors that have been shown to affect adherence can be supported or hindered by provider-patient communication, including the provider-patient relationship, patients' beliefs, social and cultural norms, family and social support, mood, and behavioral management. Six research questions are posed, and substantive and methodological recommendations are offered for empirical research on the measurement and achievement of patient adherence.

  8. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonelle, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    Communications in any system is one of the last technologies to be considered, and sometimes it is considered too late to impact the system. This was somewhat the impression on reviewing the NASA budget for two mission scenarios for the space station. However, that budget fortunately was well spent, and the money was spent to get the most benefit per dollar. Another thing that is very often forgotten is that technology is not produced in a vacuum. In fact, in conducting independent research and development (IR&D), the first phase is to define the requirements which must be time phased, becuase very often the conditions will change during the life of the system. From the requirements, a set of architectures that are at least representative of that era are produced. If the exact requirements were not established, at least boundaries are set on the requirements for that architecture. When this is completed, then the technology that is really needed is defined. The major criticism of the work that was presented to the panel is the lack of a firm set of requirements.

  9. Changing Direction: Assessing Student Thoughts and Feelings about a New Program in Strategic Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisby, Cynthia M.; Reber, Bryan H.; Cameron, Glen T.

    A number of recent studies have examined integration of advertising and public relations, but none reports what students think. Over three semesters, students in an introduction to strategic communication course were asked to assess an integrated public relations and advertising curriculum. Students supported integration and viewed a focus on new…

  10. New directions in family planning communication: 12 predictions for the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Piotrow, P T; Rimon, J G

    1988-12-01

    Good communication about family planning is needed for many reasons: 1) what many people think they know about family planning is wrong, 2) about 25% of the Asian population (600 million people) are between the ages of 10 and 19 and they need to be informed, 3) individuals must want to use family planning so they will use it regularly and effectively, and 4) people hear competing messages from those opposed to family planning. The authors make the following predictions for the field of family planning IEC in the 1990s: 1) family planning communication will have many different audiences, so messages and media will have to be developed for very specific groups; 2) more time will be spent on research, learning about specific audiences, the media, and background before developing messages, and messages and products will be carefully tested before being widely distributed; 3) peer groups will be used more to reach peer groups; 4) entertainment will reach and teach wider audiences about family planning, AIDS, and sexual responsibility (promoting "enter-education," a combination of entertainment and education); 5) audiences will participate more actively in different kinds of family planning communication, including community mobilization and individual involvement; 6) family planning messages will be much more personal, using human interest stories to capture and persuade the audience; 7) multiple media will be used more and more to get the message across; 8) the best quality family planning entertainment materials will be able to compete with commercial products and produce revenue; 9) campaigns and other communications will be oriented towards large regional markets; 10) more creative and more sympathetic communication in clinics and by health care providers will increase acceptance and continuation rates for many methods; 11) communication among family planning professionals will increasingly depend on effective national population information centers that can use

  11. A Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) system to use arbitrary Windows applications by directly controlling mouse and keyboard.

    PubMed

    Spuler, Martin

    2015-08-01

    A Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) allows to control a computer by brain activity only, without the need for muscle control. In this paper, we present an EEG-based BCI system based on code-modulated visual evoked potentials (c-VEPs) that enables the user to work with arbitrary Windows applications. Other BCI systems, like the P300 speller or BCI-based browsers, allow control of one dedicated application designed for use with a BCI. In contrast, the system presented in this paper does not consist of one dedicated application, but enables the user to control mouse cursor and keyboard input on the level of the operating system, thereby making it possible to use arbitrary applications. As the c-VEP BCI method was shown to enable very fast communication speeds (writing more than 20 error-free characters per minute), the presented system is the next step in replacing the traditional mouse and keyboard and enabling complete brain-based control of a computer.

  12. Disruption of tumour-host communication by downregulation of LFA-1 reduces COX-2 and e-NOS expression and inhibits brain metastasis growth

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; O'Brien, Emma R.; Andreou, Kleopatra; Scrace, Simon F.; Zakaria, Rasheed; Jenkinson, Michael D.; O'Neill, Eric; Sibson, Nicola R.

    2016-01-01

    Over 20% of cancer patients will suffer metastatic spread to the brain, and prognosis remains poor. Communication between tumour cells and host tissue is essential during metastasis, yet little is known of the processes underlying such interactions in the brain. Here we test the hypothesis that cross-talk between tumour cells and host brain cells, through tumour cell leukocyte function associated protein-1 (LFA-1), is critical in metastasis development. Temporal expression of LFA-1 and its major ligand intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was determined in two different mouse models of brain metastasis. Marked upregulation of both proteins was found, co-localising with astrocytes, microglia and tumour cells themselves. Silencing of LFA-1 expression in MDA231Br-GFP cells prior to intracerebral injection resulted in > 70% reduction in tumour burden compared to control MDA231Br-GFP cells (p < 0.005, n = 5). Subsequent qRT-PCR analysis of brain tissue revealed significant reductions in COX-2, VEGF and eNOS from host brain tissue, but not tumour cells, in mice injected with LFA-1 knockdown cells (p < 0.0001, n = 5). Finally, expression of both LFA-1 and ICAM-1 was demonstrated in human brain metastasis samples. The results of this study suggest LFA-1 as a new target in brain metastasis therapy and highlight the potential synergy with current anti-COX-2 and anti-NOS therapies. PMID:27447568

  13. Is Social Phobia a "Mis-Communication" Disorder? Brain Functional Connectivity during Face Perception Differs between Patients with Social Phobia and Healthy Control Subjects.

    PubMed

    Danti, Sabrina; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Gentili, Claudio; Gobbini, Maria Ida; Pietrini, Pietro; Guazzelli, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Recently, a differential recruitment of brain areas throughout the distributed neural system for face perception has been found in social phobic patients as compared to healthy control subjects. These functional abnormalities in social phobic patients extend beyond emotion-related brain areas, such as the amygdala, to include cortical networks that modulate attention and process other facial features, and they are also associated with an alteration of the task-related activation/deactivation trade-off. Functional connectivity is becoming a powerful tool to examine how components of large-scale distributed neural systems are coupled together while performing a specific function. This study was designed to determine whether functional connectivity networks among brain regions within the distributed system for face perception also would differ between social phobic patients and healthy controls. Data were obtained from eight social phobic patients and seven healthy controls by using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Our findings indicated that social phobic patients and healthy controls have different patterns of functional connectivity across brain regions within both the core and the extended systems for face perception and the default mode network. To our knowledge, this is the first study that shows that functional connectivity during brain response to socially relevant stimuli differs between social phobic patients and healthy controls. These results expand our previous findings and indicate that brain functional changes in social phobic patients are not restricted to a single specific brain structure, but rather involve a mis-communication among different sensory and emotional processing brain areas.

  14. Directivity of a Sparse Array in the Presence of Atmospheric-Induced Phase Fluctuations for Deep Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James A.; Acosta, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Widely distributed (sparse) ground-based arrays have been utilized for decades in the radio science community for imaging celestial objects, but have only recently become an option for deep space communications applications with the advent of the proposed Next Generation Deep Space Network (DSN) array. But whereas in astronomical imaging, observations (receive-mode only) are made on the order of minutes to hours and atmospheric-induced aberrations can be mostly corrected for in post-processing, communications applications require transmit capabilities and real-time corrections over time scales as short as fractions of a second. This presents an unavoidable problem with the use of sparse arrays for deep space communications at Ka-band which has yet to be successfully resolved, particularly for uplink arraying. In this paper, an analysis of the performance of a sparse antenna array, in terms of its directivity, is performed to derive a closed form solution to the expected array loss in the presence of atmospheric-induced phase fluctuations. The theoretical derivation for array directivity degradation is validated with interferometric measurements for a two-element array taken at Goldstone, California. With the validity of the model established, an arbitrary 27-element array geometry is defined at Goldstone, California, to ascertain its performance in the presence of phase fluctuations. It is concluded that a combination of compact array geometry and atmospheric compensation is necessary to ensure high levels of availability.

  15. Direct, quantitative, and noninvasive imaging of the transport of active agents through intact brain with Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sirianni, Rachael W.; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Saltzman, W. Mark; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Our goal was to use Positron Emission Tomography (PET) to analyze the movement of radiolabeled agents in tissue to enable direct measurement of drug delivery to the brain. Procedures A variety of 11C- and 18F-labeled compounds were delivered directly to an agarose phantom or rat striatum. Concentration profiles were extracted for analysis and fitted to diffusion models. Results Diffusion coefficients ranged from 0.075±0.0026 mm2/min ([18F]Fluoride, 18 Da) to 0.0016±0.0018 mm2/min ([18F]NPB4-avidin, 68 kDa) and matched well with predictions based on molecular weight (R2=0.965). The tortuosity of the brain extracellular space was estimated to be 1.56, with the tissue clearance halftime of each tracer in the brain varying from 19 to 41 minutes. Conclusions PET is an effective modality to directly quantify the movement of locally delivered drugs or drug-carriers. This continuous, non-invasive assessment of delivery will aid the design of better drug delivery methods. PMID:23624949

  16. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry for direct measurement of clozapine in rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yunsheng; Casale, Roger; Fukuda, Elaine; Chen, Jiwen; Knemeyer, Ian; Wingate, Julia; Morrison, Richard; Korfmacher, Walter

    2006-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization hyphenated with quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to directly determine the distribution of pharmaceuticals in rat brain tissue slices which might unravel their disposition for new drug development. Clozapine, an antipsychotic drug, and norclozapine were used as model compounds to investigate fundamental parameters such as matrix and solvent effects and irradiance dependence on MALDI intensity but also to address the issues with direct tissue imaging MS technique such as (1) uniform coating by the matrix, (2) linearity of MALDI signals, and (3) redistribution of surface analytes. The tissue sections were coated with various matrices on MALDI plates by airspray deposition prior to MS detection. MALDI signals of analytes were detected by monitoring the dissociation of the individual protonated molecules to their predominant MS/MS product ions. The matrices were chosen for tissue applications based on their ability to form a homogeneous coating of dense crystals and to yield greater sensitivity. Images revealing the spatial localization in tissue sections using MALDI-QTOF following a direct infusion of (3)H-clozapine into rat brain were found to be in good correlation with those using a radioautographic approach. The density of clozapine and its major metabolites from whole brain homogenates was further confirmed using fast high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) procedures.

  17. A hybrid brain computer interface to control the direction and speed of a simulated or real wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Long, Jinyi; Li, Yuanqing; Wang, Hongtao; Yu, Tianyou; Pan, Jiahui; Li, Feng

    2012-09-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are used to translate brain activity signals into control signals for external devices. Currently, it is difficult for BCI systems to provide the multiple independent control signals necessary for the multi-degree continuous control of a wheelchair. In this paper, we address this challenge by introducing a hybrid BCI that uses the motor imagery-based mu rhythm and the P300 potential to control a brain-actuated simulated or real wheelchair. The objective of the hybrid BCI is to provide a greater number of commands with increased accuracy to the BCI user. Our paradigm allows the user to control the direction (left or right turn) of the simulated or real wheelchair using left- or right-hand imagery. Furthermore, a hybrid manner can be used to control speed. To decelerate, the user imagines foot movement while ignoring the flashing buttons on the graphical user interface (GUI). If the user wishes to accelerate, then he/she pays attention to a specific flashing button without performing any motor imagery. Two experiments were conducted to assess the BCI control; both a simulated wheelchair in a virtual environment and a real wheelchair were tested. Subjects steered both the simulated and real wheelchairs effectively by controlling the direction and speed with our hybrid BCI system. Data analysis validated the use of our hybrid BCI system to control the direction and speed of a wheelchair.

  18. A cholinergic-sympathetic pathway primes immunity in hypertension and mediates brain-to-spleen communication

    PubMed Central

    Carnevale, Daniela; Perrotta, Marialuisa; Pallante, Fabio; Fardella, Valentina; Iacobucci, Roberta; Fardella, Stefania; Carnevale, Lorenzo; Carnevale, Raimondo; De Lucia, Massimiliano; Cifelli, Giuseppe; Lembo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The crucial role of the immune system in hypertension is now widely recognized. We previously reported that hypertensive challenges couple the nervous drive with immune system activation, but the physiological and molecular mechanisms of this connection are unknown. Here, we show that hypertensive challenges activate splenic sympathetic nerve discharge to prime immune response. More specifically, a vagus-splenic nerve drive, mediated by nicotinic cholinergic receptors, links the brain and spleen. The sympathetic discharge induced by hypertensive stimuli was absent in both coeliac vagotomized mice and in mice lacking α7nAChR, a receptor typically expressed by peripheral ganglionic neurons. This cholinergic-sympathetic pathway is necessary for T cell activation and egression on hypertensive challenges. In addition, we show that selectively thermoablating the splenic nerve prevents T cell egression and protects against hypertension. This novel experimental procedure for selective splenic denervation suggests new clinical strategies for resistant hypertension. PMID:27676657

  19. Controlled quantum secure direct communication by entanglement distillation or generalized measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xiaoqian

    2016-05-01

    We propose two controlled quantum secure communication schemes by entanglement distillation or generalized measurement. The sender Alice, the receiver Bob and the controllers David and Cliff take part in the whole schemes. The supervisors David and Cliff can control the information transmitted from Alice to Bob by adjusting the local measurement angles θ _4 and θ _3. Bob can verify his secret information by classical one-way function after communication. The average amount of information is analyzed and compared for these two methods by MATLAB. The generalized measurement is a better scheme. Our schemes are secure against some well-known attacks because classical encryption and decoy states are used to ensure the security of the classical channel and the quantum channel.

  20. Phase error statistics of a phase-locked loop synchronized direct detection optical PPM communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natarajan, Suresh; Gardner, C. S.

    1987-01-01

    Receiver timing synchronization of an optical Pulse-Position Modulation (PPM) communication system can be achieved using a phased-locked loop (PLL), provided the photodetector output is suitably processed. The magnitude of the PLL phase error is a good indicator of the timing error at the receiver decoder. The statistics of the phase error are investigated while varying several key system parameters such as PPM order, signal and background strengths, and PPL bandwidth. A practical optical communication system utilizing a laser diode transmitter and an avalanche photodiode in the receiver is described, and the sampled phase error data are presented. A linear regression analysis is applied to the data to obtain estimates of the relational constants involving the phase error variance and incident signal power.

  1. Learned integration of visual, vestibular, and motor cues in multiple brain regions computes head direction during visually guided navigation.

    PubMed

    Fortenberry, Bret; Gorchetchnikov, Anatoli; Grossberg, Stephen

    2012-12-01

    Effective navigation depends upon reliable estimates of head direction (HD). Visual, vestibular, and outflow motor signals combine for this purpose in a brain system that includes dorsal tegmental nucleus, lateral mammillary nuclei, anterior dorsal thalamic nucleus, and the postsubiculum. Learning is needed to combine such different cues to provide reliable estimates of HD. A neural model is developed to explain how these three types of signals combine adaptively within the above brain regions to generate a consistent and reliable HD estimate, in both light and darkness, which explains the following experimental facts. Each HD cell is tuned to a preferred head direction. The cell's firing rate is maximal at the preferred direction and decreases as the head turns from the preferred direction. The HD estimate is controlled by the vestibular system when visual cues are not available. A well-established visual cue anchors the cell's preferred direction when the cue is in the animal's field of view. Distal visual cues are more effective than proximal cues for anchoring the preferred direction. The introduction of novel cues in either a novel or familiar environment can gain control over a cell's preferred direction within minutes. Turning out the lights or removing all familiar cues does not change the cell's firing activity, but it may accumulate a drift in the cell's preferred direction. The anticipated time interval (ATI) of the HD estimate is greater in early processing stages of the HD system than at later stages. The model contributes to an emerging unified neural model of how multiple processing stages in spatial navigation, including postsubiculum head direction cells, entorhinal grid cells, and hippocampal place cells, are calibrated through learning in response to multiple types of signals as an animal navigates in the world.

  2. Gesture-Directed Sensor-Information Fusion (GDSIF) for Protection and Communication in Hazardous Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-20

    G. Rogers, R. Luna, and J. Ellen, “Wireless Communication Glove Apparatus for Motion Tracking, Gesture Recognition , Data Transmission, and Reception...and easier to deploy in a variety of ways. (See, for example, [1] and [3].) The current eGloves have magnetic and motion sensors for gesture ... recognition [5], [6]. An important future step to enhance the effectiveness of the war fighter is to integrate CBRN and other sensors into the eGloves

  3. Beverage Antennas for HF Communications, Direction Finding and Over-the- Horizon Radars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    calculated and tabulated in a readily accessible format for the communications engineer. Beverage antennas are shown to be effective elements or "building...of the antenna to radio signals, is toward the terminated end. The dimensions of HF Beverage antennas are as follows; their lengths vary from 50 to 150...m and their heights atove ground vary from 0.3 to 3 m. Typically though, their length and height are respectively about 110 m and 1.5 m. The behaviou

  4. The Directed Megaphone: A Theater Commander’s Means to Communicate His Vision and Intent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    Excellence. observed, ’The intensity of communications is unmistakable in the excellent companies.൰ From management theorists’ discussions of corporate ...are the leader’s actions and visible commitment to the vision. Communicatine the vision continually and with variety The leaders Bennis and Nanus...studied for their book all seemed to be "masters at selecting, synthesizing, and articulating an appropriate vision of the future.""’I The corporate

  5. Evaluation of a 2-Channel NIRS-Based Optical Brain Switch for Motor Disabilities' Communication Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagara, Kazuhiko; Kido, Kunihiko

    We have developed a portable NIRS-based optical BCI system that features a non-invasive, facile probe attachment and does not require muscle movement to control the target devices. The system consists of a 2-channel probe, a signal-processing unit, and an infrared-emission device, which measures the blood volume change in the participant's prefrontal cortex in a real time. We use the threshold logic as a switching technology, which transmits a control signal to a target device when the electrical waveforms exceed the pre-defined threshold. Eight healthy volunteers participated in the experiments and they could change the television channel or control the movement of a toy robot with average switching times of 11.5±5.3s and the hit rate was 83.3%. These trials suggest that this system provides a novel communication aid for people with motor disabilities.

  6. Communication Strategies in Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Advertising (DTCA): Application of the Six Segment Message Strategy Wheel.

    PubMed

    Ju, Ilwoo; Park, Jin Seong

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses a void in the literature on direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising (DTCA) with a theory-based content analysis. The findings indicate that Taylor's communication strategy wheel provides insight into what and how pharmaceutical marketers communicate with consumers by means of DTCA. Major findings are summarized as follows: (a) In most DTC ads, informational and transformational message themes and creative approaches were simultaneously used, indicating a combination strategy; (b) DTCA message themes were associated with creative strategies in alignment with Taylor's framework; and (c) message themes and creative strategies varied across therapeutic categories and DTCA categories with different levels of ad spending. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  7. Individualized model predicts brain current flow during transcranial direct-current stimulation treatment in responsive stroke patient.

    PubMed

    Datta, Abhishek; Baker, Julie M; Bikson, Marom; Fridriksson, Julius

    2011-07-01

    Although numerous published reports have demonstrated the beneficial effects of transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) on task performance, fundamental questions remain regarding the optimal electrode configuration on the scalp. Moreover, it is expected that lesioned brain tissue will influence current flow and should therefore be considered (and perhaps leveraged) in the design of individualized tDCS therapies for stroke. The current report demonstrates how different electrode configurations influence the flow of electrical current through brain tissue in a patient who responded positively to a tDCS treatment targeting aphasia. The patient, a 60-year-old man, sustained a left hemisphere ischemic stroke (lesion size = 87.42 mL) 64 months before his participation. In this study, we present results from the first high-resolution (1 mm(3)) model of tDCS in a brain with considerable stroke-related damage; the model was individualized for the patient who received anodal tDCS to his left frontal cortex with the reference cathode electrode placed on his right shoulder. We modeled the resulting brain current flow and also considered three additional reference electrode positions: right mastoid, right orbitofrontal cortex, and a "mirror" configuration with the anode over the undamaged right cortex. Our results demonstrate the profound effect of lesioned tissue on resulting current flow and the ability to modulate current pattern through the brain, including perilesional regions, through electrode montage design. The complexity of brain current flow modulation by detailed normal and pathologic anatomy suggest: (1) That computational models are critical for the rational interpretation and design of individualized tDCS stroke-therapy; and (2) These models must accurately reproduce head anatomy as shown here.

  8. Barriers to Real-Time Medical Direction via Cellular Communication for Prehospital Emergency Care Providers in Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Strehlow, Matthew C; Rao, G.V. Ramana; Newberry, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many low- and middle-income countries depend on emergency medical technicians (EMTs), nurses, midwives, and layperson community health workers with limited training to provide a majority of emergency medical, trauma, and obstetric care in the prehospital setting. To improve timely patient care and expand provider scope of practice, nations leverage cellular phones and call centers for real-time online medical direction. However, there exist several barriers to adequate communication that impact the provision of emergency care. We sought to identify obstacles in the cellular communication process among GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute (GVK EMRI) EMTs in Gujarat, India. Methods: A convenience sample of practicing EMTs in Gujarat, India were surveyed regarding the barriers to call initiation and completion. Results: 108 EMTs completed the survey. Overall, ninety-seven (89.8%) EMTs responded that the most common reason they did not initiate a call with the call center physician was insufficient time. Forty-six (42%) EMTs reported that they were unable to call the physician one or more times during a typical workweek (approximately 5-6 twelve-hour shifts/week) due to their hands being occupied performing direct patient care. Fifty-eight (54%) EMTs reported that they were unable to reach the call center physician, despite attempts, at least once a week. Conclusion: This study identified multiple barriers to communication, including insufficient time to call for advice and inability to reach call center physicians. Identification of simple interventions and best practices may improve communication and ensure timely and appropriate prehospital care.  PMID:27551654

  9. Cognitive rehabilitation after severe acquired brain injury: current evidence and future directions.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Rosaria; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Bramanti, Placido

    2016-07-25

    Severe acquired brain injury (SABI) is damage to the brain, occurring after birth from traumatic or non-traumatic causes, and often resulting in deterioration of physical, cognitive, and emotional functions. Cognitive rehabilitation (CR) is aimed to help brain-injured or otherwise cognitively impaired individuals to restore normal functioning, or to compensate for cognitive deficits. Over the last years, the development of new technologies in the field of CR has led to a growing use of computer-based cognitive tools in patients with SABI. This review aims to investigate the efficacy of CR in individuals suffering from SABI, and evaluates the role of virtual reality and other innovative technologies in improving behavioural and functional outcomes. The current evidence for CR in the treatment of SABI-related deficits does not allow conclusive results to be achieved and further research is needed to identity the patient and treatment factors that contribute to successful outcomes.

  10. Social Brain Development in Williams Syndrome: The Current Status and Directions for Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Brian W.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2012-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental condition that occurs as a result of a contiguous deletion of ∼26–28 genes on chromosome 7q11.23. WS is often associated with a distinctive social phenotype characterized by an increased affinity toward processing faces, reduced sensitivity to fear related social stimuli and a reduced ability to form concrete social relationships. Understanding the biological mechanisms that underlie the social phenotype in WS may elucidate genetic and neural factors influencing the typical development of the social brain. In this article, we review available studies investigating the social phenotype of WS throughout development and neuroimaging studies investigating brain structure and function as related to social and emotional functioning in this condition. This review makes an important contribution by highlighting several neuro-behavioral mechanisms that may be a cause or a consequence of atypical social development in WS. In particular, we discuss how distinctive social behaviors in WS may be associated with alterations or delays in the cortical representation of faces, connectivity within the ventral stream, structure and function of the amygdala and how long- and short-range connections develop within the brain. We integrate research on typical brain development and from existing behavioral and neuroimaging research on WS. We conclude with a discussion of how genetic and environmental factors might interact to influence social brain development in WS and how future neuroimaging and behavioral research can further elucidate social brain development in WS. Lastly, we describe how ongoing studies may translate to improved social developmental outcomes for individuals with WS. PMID:22701108

  11. Workload measurement in a communication application operated through a P300-based brain-computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, A.; Leotta, F.; Bianchi, L.; Aloise, F.; Zickler, C.; Hoogerwerf, E.-J.; Kübler, A.; Mattia, D.; Cincotti, F.

    2011-04-01

    Advancing the brain-computer interface (BCI) towards practical applications in technology-based assistive solutions for people with disabilities requires coping with problems of accessibility and usability to increase user acceptance and satisfaction. The main objective of this study was to introduce a usability-oriented approach in the assessment of BCI technology development by focusing on evaluation of the user's subjective workload and satisfaction. The secondary aim was to compare two applications for a P300-based BCI. Eight healthy subjects were asked to use an assistive technology solution which integrates the P300-based BCI with commercially available software under two conditions—visual stimuli needed to evoke the P300 response were either overlaid onto the application's graphical user interface or presented on a separate screen. The two conditions were compared for effectiveness (level of performance), efficiency (subjective workload measured by means of NASA-TXL) and satisfaction of the user. Although no significant difference in usability could be detected between the two conditions, the methodology proved to be an effective tool to highlight weaknesses in the technical solution.

  12. A cell-phone-based brain-computer interface for communication in daily life.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Te; Wang, Yijun; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2011-04-01

    Moving a brain-computer interface (BCI) system from a laboratory demonstration to real-life applications still poses severe challenges to the BCI community. This study aims to integrate a mobile and wireless electroencephalogram (EEG) system and a signal-processing platform based on a cell phone into a truly wearable and wireless online BCI. Its practicality and implications in a routine BCI are demonstrated through the realization and testing of a steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based BCI. This study implemented and tested online signal processing methods in both time and frequency domains for detecting SSVEPs. The results of this study showed that the performance of the proposed cell-phone-based platform was comparable, in terms of the information transfer rate, with other BCI systems using bulky commercial EEG systems and personal computers. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate a truly portable, cost-effective and miniature cell-phone-based platform for online BCIs.

  13. Distributed Consensus Optimization in Multiagent Networks With Time-Varying Directed Topologies and Quantized Communication.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaqing; Huang, Chicheng; Chen, Guo; Liao, Xiaofeng; Huang, Tingwen

    2017-03-31

    This paper considers solving a class of optimization problems which are modeled as the sum of all agents' convex cost functions and each agent is only accessible to its individual function. Communication between agents in multiagent networks is assumed to be limited: each agent can only interact information with its neighbors by using time-varying communication channels with limited capacities. A technique which overcomes the limitation is to implement a quantization process to the interacted information. The quantized information is first encoded as a binary sequence at the side of each agent before sending. After the binary sequence is received by the neighboring agent, corresponding decoding scheme is utilized to resume the original information with a certain degree of error which is caused by the quantization process. With the availability of each agent's encoding states (associated with its out-channels) and decoding states (associated with its in-channels), we devise a set of distributed optimization algorithms that generate two iterative sequences, one of which converges to the optimal solution and the other of which reaches to the optimal value. We prove that if the parameters satisfy some mild conditions, the quantization errors are bounded and the consensus optimization can be achieved. How to minimize the number of quantization level of each connected communication channel in fixed networks is also explored thoroughly. It is found that, by properly choosing system parameters, one bit information exchange suffices to ensure consensus optimization. Finally, we present two numerical simulation experiments to illustrate the efficacy of the algorithms as well as to validate the theoretical findings.

  14. Phase locked loop synchronization for direct detection optical PPM communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. C.; Gardner, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Receiver timing synchronization of an optical pulse position modulation (PPM) communication system can be achieved using a phase locked loop (PLL) if the photodetector output is properly processed. The synchronization performance is shown to improve with increasing signal power and decreasing loop bandwidth. Bit error rate (BER) of the PLL synchronized PPM system is analyzed and compared to that for the perfectly synchronized system. It is shown that the increase in signal power needed to compensate for the imperfect synchronization is small (less than 0.1 dB) for loop bandwidths less than 0.1% of the slot frequency.

  15. The effect on emotions and brain activity by the direct/indirect lighting in the residential environment.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yu-Bin; Woo, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Jinseong; Kim, Jae-Jin; Park, Jin Young

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to explore how direct/indirect lighting affects emotions and brain oscillations compared to the direct lighting when brightness and color temperature are controlled. Twenty-eight subjects (12 females; mean age 22.5) participated. The experimental conditions consisted of two lighting environments: direct/indirect lighting (400 lx downlight, 300 lx uplight) and direct lighting (700 lx downlight). On each trial, a luminance environment was presented for 4 min, followed by participants rated their emotional feelings of the lighting environment. EEG data were recorded during the experiment. Spectral analysis was performed for the range of delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma ranges. The participants felt cooler and more pleasant and theta oscillations on the F4, F8, T4, and TP7 electrodes were more enhanced in the direct/indirect lighting environment compared to the direct lighting environment. There was significant correlation between the "cool" rating and the theta power of the F8 electrode. The participants felt more pleasant in the direct/indirect lighting environment, indicating that space with direct/indirect lighting modulated subjective perception. Additionally, our results suggest that theta oscillatory activity can be used as a biological marker that reflects emotional status in different lighting environments.

  16. High-Performance Consensus Control in Networked Systems With Limited Bandwidth Communication and Time-Varying Directed Topologies.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaqing; Chen, Guo; Huang, Tingwen; Dong, Zhaoyang

    2016-02-08

    Communication data rates and energy constraints are two important factors that have to be considered in the coordination control of multiagent networks. Although some encoder-decoder-based consensus protocols are available, there still exists a fundamental theoretical problem: how can we further reduce the update rate of control input for each agent without the changing consensus performance? In this paper, we consider the problem of average consensus over directed and time-varying digital networks of discrete-time first-order multiagent systems with limited communication data transmission rates. Each agent has a real-valued state but can only exchange binary symbolic sequence with its neighbors due to bandwidth constraints. A class of novel event-triggered dynamic encoding and decoding algorithms is proposed, based on which a kind of consensus protocol is presented. Moreover, we develop a scheme to select the numbers of time-varying quantization levels for each connected communication channel in the time-varying directed topologies at each time step. The analytical relation among system and network parameters is characterized explicitly. It is shown that the asymptotic convergence rate is related to the scale of the network, the number of quantization levels, the system parameter, and the network structure. It is also found that under the designed event-triggered protocol, for a directed and time-varying digital network, which uniformly contains a spanning tree over a time interval, the average consensus can be achieved with an exponential convergence rate based on merely 1-b information exchange between each pair of adjacent agents at each time step.

  17. Direct-to-Earth Communications and Signal Processing for Mars Exploration Rover Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satorius, E.; Estabrook, P.; Wilson, J.; Fort, D.

    2003-01-01

    For planetary lander missions, the most challenging phase of the spacecraft-to-ground communications is during the entry, descent, and landing (EDL). As each 2003 Mars Exploration Rover (MER) enters the Martian atmosphere, it slows dramatically. The extreme acceleration and jerk cause extreme Doppler dynamics on the 8.4-GHz (X-band) signal received on Earth. When the vehicle slows sufficiently, the parachute is deployed, causing almost a step in deceleration. After parachute deployment, the lander is lowered beneath the parachute on a bridle. The swinging motion of the lander imparts high Doppler dynamics on the signal and causes the received signal strength to vary widely due to changing antenna pointing angles. All this time, the vehicle transmits important health and status information that is especially critical if the landing is not successful. Even using the largest Deep Space Network antennas, the weak signal and high dynamics render it impossible to conduct reliable phase-coherent communications. Therefore, a specialized form of frequency-shift keying will be used. This article describes the EDL scenario, the signal conditions, the methods used to detect and frequency track the carrier and to detect the data modulation, and the resulting performance estimates.

  18. Information Leakage Problem in Efficient Bidirectional Quantum Secure Direct Communication with Single Photons in Both Polarization and Spatial-Mode Degrees of Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Han-Wu; Liu, Wen-Jie

    2016-11-01

    The information leakage problem in the efficient bidirectional quantum secure direct communication protocol with single photons in both polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom is pointed out. Next, a way to revise this protocol to a truly secure one is given. We hope people pay more attention to the information leakage problem in order to design truly secure quantum communication protocols.

  19. Digital Game Playing and Direct and Indirect Aggression in Early Adolescence: The Roles of Age, Social Intelligence, and Parent-Child Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallenius, Marjut; Punamaki, Raija-Leena; Rimpela, Arja

    2007-01-01

    The roles of age, social intelligence and parent-child communication in moderating the association between digital game playing and direct and indirect aggression were examined in 478 Finnish 10- and 13-year-old schoolchildren based on self-reports. The results confirmed that digital game violence was directly associated with direct aggression,…

  20. The Risk Factors of Symptomatic Communicating Hydrocephalus After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Unilateral Vestibular Schwannoma: The Implication of Brain Atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Paek, Sun Ha; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Chae-Yong; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Park, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Yong Hwy; Song, Sang Woo; Kim, In Kyung; Jung, Hee-Won

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To identify the effect of brain atrophy on the development of symptomatic communicating hydrocephalus (SCHCP) after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for sporadic unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS). Methods and Materials: A total of 444 patients with VS were treated with SRS as a primary treatment. One hundred eighty-one patients (40.8%) were male, and the mean age of the patients was 53 {+-} 13 years (range, 11-81 years). The mean follow-up duration was 56.8 {+-} 35.8 months (range, 12-160 months). The mean tumor volume was 2.78 {+-} 3.33 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.03-23.30 cm{sup 3}). The cross-sectional area of the lateral ventricles (CALV), defined as the combined area of the lateral ventricles at the level of the mammillary body, was measured on coronal T1-weighted magnetic resonance images as an indicator of brain atrophy. Results: At distant follow-up, a total of 25 (5.6%) patients had SCHCP. The median time to symptom development was 7 months (range, 1-48 months). The mean CALV was 334.0 {+-} 194.0 mm{sup 2} (range, 44.70-1170 mm{sup 2}). The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.988 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.976-0.994; p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the CALV had a significant relationship with the development of SCHCP (p < 0.001; odds ration [OR] = 1.005; 95% CI, 1.002-1.007). Tumor volume and female sex also had a significant association (p < 0.001; OR = 1.246; 95% CI, 1.103-1.409; p < 0.009; OR = 7.256; 95% CI, 1.656-31.797, respectively). However, age failed to show any relationship with the development of SCHCP (p = 0.364). Conclusion: Brain atrophy may be related to de novo SCHCP after SRS, especially in female patients with a large VS. Follow-up surveillance should be individualized, considering the risk factors involved for each patient, for prompt diagnosis of SCHCP.

  1. Communication patterns in a psychotherapy following traumatic brain injury: A quantitative case study based on symbolic dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The role of psychotherapy in the treatment of traumatic brain injury is receiving increased attention. The evaluation of psychotherapy with these patients has been conducted largely in the absence of quantitative data concerning the therapy itself. Quantitative methods for characterizing the sequence-sensitive structure of patient-therapist communication are now being developed with the objective of improving the effectiveness of psychotherapy following traumatic brain injury. Methods The content of three therapy session transcripts (sessions were separated by four months) obtained from a patient with a history of several motor vehicle accidents who was receiving dialectical behavior therapy was scored and analyzed using methods derived from the mathematical theory of symbolic dynamics. Results The analysis of symbol frequencies was largely uninformative. When repeated triples were examined a marked pattern of change in content was observed over the three sessions. The context free grammar complexity and the Lempel-Ziv complexity were calculated for each therapy session. For both measures, the rate of complexity generation, expressed as bits per minute, increased longitudinally during the course of therapy. The between-session increases in complexity generation rates are consistent with calculations of mutual information. Taken together these results indicate that there was a quantifiable increase in the variability of patient-therapist verbal behavior during the course of therapy. Comparison of complexity values against values obtained from equiprobable random surrogates established the presence of a nonrandom structure in patient-therapist dialog (P = .002). Conclusions While recognizing that only limited conclusions can be based on a case history, it can be noted that these quantitative observations are consistent with qualitative clinical observations of increases in the flexibility of discourse during therapy. These procedures can be of particular

  2. Mapping directionality specific volume changes using tensor based morphometry: An application to the study of gyrogenesis and lateralization of the human fetal brain

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia; Habas, Piotr A.; Kim, Kio; Rousseau, Francois; Glenn, Orit A.; Barkovich, A. James; Studholme, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Tensor based morphometry (TBM) is a powerful approach to analyze local structural changes in brain anatomy. However, conventional scalar TBM methods do not completely capture all direction specific volume changes required to model complex changes such as those during brain growth. In this paper, we describe novel TBM descriptors for studying direction-specific changes in a subject population which can be used in conjunction with scalar TBM to analyze local patterns in directionality of volume change during brain development. We also extend the methodology to provide a new approach to mapping directional asymmetry in deformation tensors associated with the emergence of structural asymmetry in the developing brain. We illustrate the use of these methods by studying developmental patterns in the human fetal brain, in vivo. Results show that fetal brain development exhibits a distinct spatial pattern of anisotropic growth. The most significant changes in the directionality of growth occurs in the cortical plate at major sulci. Our analysis also detected directional growth asymmetry in the peri-sylvian region and the medial frontal lobe of the fetal brain. PMID:22503938

  3. Mapping directionality specific volume changes using tensor based morphometry: an application to the study of gyrogenesis and lateralization of the human fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia; Habas, Piotr A; Kim, Kio; Rousseau, Francois; Glenn, Orit A; Barkovich, A James; Studholme, Colin

    2012-11-01

    Tensor based morphometry (TBM) is a powerful approach to analyze local structural changes in brain anatomy. However, conventional scalar TBM methods do not completely capture all direction specific volume changes required to model complex changes such as those during brain growth. In this paper, we describe novel TBM descriptors for studying direction-specific changes in a subject population which can be used in conjunction with scalar TBM to analyze local patterns in directionality of volume change during brain development. We also extend the methodology to provide a new approach to mapping directional asymmetry in deformation tensors associated with the emergence of structural asymmetry in the developing brain. We illustrate the use of these methods by studying developmental patterns in the human fetal brain, in vivo. Results show that fetal brain development exhibits a distinct spatial pattern of anisotropic growth. The most significant changes in the directionality of growth occur in the cortical plate at major sulci. Our analysis also detected directional growth asymmetry in the peri-Sylvian region and the medial frontal lobe of the fetal brain.

  4. Gender on the brain: a case study of science communication in the new media environment.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Cliodhna; Joffe, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscience research on sex difference is currently a controversial field, frequently accused of purveying a 'neurosexism' that functions to naturalise gender inequalities. However, there has been little empirical investigation of how information about neurobiological sex difference is interpreted within wider society. This paper presents a case study that tracks the journey of one high-profile study of neurobiological sex differences from its scientific publication through various layers of the public domain. A content analysis was performed to ascertain how the study was represented in five domains of communication: the original scientific article, a press release, the traditional news media, online reader comments and blog entries. Analysis suggested that scientific research on sex difference offers an opportunity to rehearse abiding cultural understandings of gender. In both scientific and popular contexts, traditional gender stereotypes were projected onto the novel scientific information, which was harnessed to demonstrate the factual truth and normative legitimacy of these beliefs. Though strains of misogyny were evident within the readers' comments, most discussion of the study took pains to portray the sexes' unique abilities as equal and 'complementary'. However, this content often resembled a form of benevolent sexism, in which praise of women's social-emotional skills compensated for their relegation from more esteemed trait-domains, such as rationality and productivity. The paper suggests that embedding these stereotype patterns in neuroscience may intensify their rhetorical potency by lending them the epistemic authority of science. It argues that the neuroscience of sex difference does not merely reflect, but can actively shape the gender norms of contemporary society.

  5. Gender on the Brain: A Case Study of Science Communication in the New Media Environment

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Cliodhna; Joffe, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscience research on sex difference is currently a controversial field, frequently accused of purveying a ‘neurosexism’ that functions to naturalise gender inequalities. However, there has been little empirical investigation of how information about neurobiological sex difference is interpreted within wider society. This paper presents a case study that tracks the journey of one high-profile study of neurobiological sex differences from its scientific publication through various layers of the public domain. A content analysis was performed to ascertain how the study was represented in five domains of communication: the original scientific article, a press release, the traditional news media, online reader comments and blog entries. Analysis suggested that scientific research on sex difference offers an opportunity to rehearse abiding cultural understandings of gender. In both scientific and popular contexts, traditional gender stereotypes were projected onto the novel scientific information, which was harnessed to demonstrate the factual truth and normative legitimacy of these beliefs. Though strains of misogyny were evident within the readers’ comments, most discussion of the study took pains to portray the sexes’ unique abilities as equal and ‘complementary’. However, this content often resembled a form of benevolent sexism, in which praise of women’s social-emotional skills compensated for their relegation from more esteemed trait-domains, such as rationality and productivity. The paper suggests that embedding these stereotype patterns in neuroscience may intensify their rhetorical potency by lending them the epistemic authority of science. It argues that the neuroscience of sex difference does not merely reflect, but can actively shape the gender norms of contemporary society. PMID:25354280

  6. Introducing the tactile speller: an ERP-based brain-computer interface for communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Waal, Marjolein; Severens, Marianne; Geuze, Jeroen; Desain, Peter

    2012-08-01

    In this study, a tactile speller was developed and compared with existing visual speller paradigms in terms of classification performance and elicited event-related potentials (ERPs). The fingertips of healthy participants were stimulated with short mechanical taps while electroencephalographic activity was measured. The letters of the alphabet were allocated to different fingers and subjects could select one of the fingers by silently counting the number of taps on that finger. The offline and online performance of the tactile speller was compared to the overt and covert attention visual matrix speller and the covert attention Hex-o-Spell speller. For the tactile speller, binary target versus non-target classification accuracy was 67% on average. Classification and decoding accuracies of the tactile speller were lower than the overt matrix speller, but higher than the covert matrix speller, and similar to Hex-o-Spell. The average maximum information transfer rate of the tactile speller was 7.8 bits min-1 (1.51 char min-1), with the best subject reaching a bit-rate of 27 bits min-1 (5.22 char min-1). An increased amplitude of the P300 ERP component was found in response to attended stimuli versus unattended stimuli in all speller types. In addition, the tactile and overt matrix spellers also used the N2 component for discriminating between targets and non-targets. Overall, this study shows that it is possible to use a tactile speller for communication. The tactile speller provides a useful alternative to the visual speller, especially for people whose eye gaze is impaired.

  7. Development of a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.; Seki, C.; Kashikura, K.

    1996-12-31

    We have developed and tested a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface of animals. The beta camera consists of a thin CaF{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator, a tapered fiber optics plate (taper fiber) and a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The taper fiber is the key component of the camera. We have developed two types of beta cameras. One is 20mm diameter field of view camera for imaging brain surface of cats. The other is 10mm diameter camera for that of rats. Spatial resolutions of beta camera for cats and rats were 0.8mm FWHM and 0.5mm FWHM, respectively. We confirmed that developed beta cameras may overcome the limitation of the spatial resolution of the positron emission tomography (PET).

  8. NIRS-Based Hyperscanning Reveals Inter-brain Neural Synchronization during Cooperative Jenga Game with Face-to-Face Communication

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ning; Mok, Charis; Witt, Emily E.; Pradhan, Anjali H.; Chen, Jingyuan E.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2016-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an increasingly popular technology for studying social cognition. In particular, fNIRS permits simultaneous measurement of hemodynamic activity in two or more individuals interacting in a naturalistic setting. Here, we used fNIRS hyperscanning to study social cognition and communication in human dyads engaged in cooperative and obstructive interaction while they played the game of Jenga™. Novel methods were developed to identify synchronized channels for each dyad and a structural node-based spatial registration approach was utilized for inter-dyad analyses. Strong inter-brain neural synchrony (INS) was observed in the posterior region of the right middle and superior frontal gyrus, in particular Brodmann area 8 (BA8), during cooperative and obstructive interaction. This synchrony was not observed during the parallel game play condition and the dialog section, suggesting that BA8 was involved in goal-oriented social interaction such as complex interactive movements and social decision-making. INS was also observed in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), in particular Brodmann 9, during cooperative interaction only. These additional findings suggest that BA9 may be particularly engaged when theory-of-mind (ToM) is required for cooperative social interaction. The new methods described here have the potential to significantly extend fNIRS applications to social cognitive research. PMID:27014019

  9. NIRS-Based Hyperscanning Reveals Inter-brain Neural Synchronization during Cooperative Jenga Game with Face-to-Face Communication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Mok, Charis; Witt, Emily E; Pradhan, Anjali H; Chen, Jingyuan E; Reiss, Allan L

    2016-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an increasingly popular technology for studying social cognition. In particular, fNIRS permits simultaneous measurement of hemodynamic activity in two or more individuals interacting in a naturalistic setting. Here, we used fNIRS hyperscanning to study social cognition and communication in human dyads engaged in cooperative and obstructive interaction while they played the game of Jenga™. Novel methods were developed to identify synchronized channels for each dyad and a structural node-based spatial registration approach was utilized for inter-dyad analyses. Strong inter-brain neural synchrony (INS) was observed in the posterior region of the right middle and superior frontal gyrus, in particular Brodmann area 8 (BA8), during cooperative and obstructive interaction. This synchrony was not observed during the parallel game play condition and the dialog section, suggesting that BA8 was involved in goal-oriented social interaction such as complex interactive movements and social decision-making. INS was also observed in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), in particular Brodmann 9, during cooperative interaction only. These additional findings suggest that BA9 may be particularly engaged when theory-of-mind (ToM) is required for cooperative social interaction. The new methods described here have the potential to significantly extend fNIRS applications to social cognitive research.

  10. Nursing and information and communication technology (ICT): a discussion of trends and future directions.

    PubMed

    While, Alison; Dewsbury, Guy

    2011-10-01

    This paper traces the development of information and communication (ICT) within health care and the emergence of telehealth as a key component of modern health care delivery as health care moves from the 'face to face age' to the 'information age'. The paper examines the interface of ICT and nursing practice and highlights the limited evidence relating to the nursing contribution within telehealth particularly beyond data input and output analysis for other health care personnel. Additionally, the absence of research relating to the impact of ICT upon nurses and their working lives is identified. The paper concludes that nurses need to engage more fully with ICT so that they contribute to shaping the care system and emerge as leaders of the new care systems delivering future clinical activity.

  11. A Study of an Optical Lunar Surface Communications Network with High Bandwidth Direct to Earth Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K.; Biswas, A.; Schoolcraft, J.

    2011-01-01

    A lunar surface systems study explores the application of optical communications to support a high bandwidth data link from a lunar relay satellite and from fixed lunar assets. The results show that existing 1-m ground stations could provide more than 99% coverage of the lunar terminal at 100Mb/s data rates from a lunar relay satellite and in excess of 200Mb/s from a fixed terminal on the lunar surface. We have looked at the effects of the lunar regolith and its removal on optical samples. Our results indicate that under repeated dust removal episodes sapphire rather than fused silica would be a more durable material for optical surfaces. Disruption tolerant network protocols can minimize the data loss due to link dropouts. We report on the preliminary results of the DTN protocol implemented over the optical carrier.

  12. A highly directional transducer for multipath mitigation in high-frequency underwater acoustic communications.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Simon E; Emokpae, Lloyd; Nicholas, Michael; Edelmann, Geoffrey F

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a transducer design of the hollow cylinder type designed to minimize transmission multipath and the need for channel equalization over short acoustic communication distances in shallow water. Operating at 750 kHz, the half-maximum envelope of the main lobe is approximately 3°. The transducer was incorporated into a low-complexity modem system in which it acted as both transmitter and receiver. At-sea testing indicated that the system is capable of operating over horizontal distances of 5 m without evidence of multipath distortion. The system was also found to be effective as an omnidirectional transmitter/receiver in the 10-60 kHz band.

  13. Beyond advance directives: importance of communication skills at the end of life.

    PubMed

    Tulsky, James A

    2005-07-20

    Patients and their families struggle with myriad choices concerning medical treatments that frequently precede death. Advance directives have been proposed as a tool to facilitate end-of-life decision making, yet frequently fail to achieve this goal. In the context of the case of a man with metastatic cancer for whom an advance directive was unable to prevent a traumatic death, I review the challenges in creating and implementing advance directives, discuss factors that can affect clear decision making; including trust, uncertainty, emotion, hope, and the presence of multiple medical providers; and offer practical suggestions for physicians. Advance care planning remains a useful tool for approaching conversations with patients about the end of life. However, such planning should occur within a framework that emphasizes responding to patient and family emotions and focuses more on goals for care and less on specific treatments.

  14. Optimizing the P300-based brain-computer interface: current status, limitations and future directions.

    PubMed

    Mak, J N; Arbel, Y; Minett, J W; McCane, L M; Yuksel, B; Ryan, D; Thompson, D; Bianchi, L; Erdogmus, D

    2011-04-01

    This paper summarizes the presentations and discussions at a workshop held during the Fourth International BCI Meeting charged with reviewing and evaluating the current state, limitations and future development of P300-based brain-computer interface (P300-BCI) systems. We reviewed such issues as potential users, recording methods, stimulus presentation paradigms, feature extraction and classification algorithms, and applications. A summary of the discussions and the panel's recommendations for each of these aspects are presented.

  15. Diffusion MRI: Pitfalls, literature review and future directions of research in mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Delouche, Aurélie; Attyé, Arnaud; Heck, Olivier; Grand, Sylvie; Kastler, Adrian; Lamalle, Laurent; Renard, Felix; Krainik, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a leading cause of disability in adults, many of whom report a distressing combination of physical, emotional and cognitive symptoms, collectively known as post-concussion syndrome, that persist after the injury. Significant developments in magnetic resonance diffusion imaging, involving voxel-based quantitative analysis through the measurement of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity, have enhanced our knowledge on the different stages of mTBI pathophysiology. Other diffusion imaging-derived techniques, including diffusion kurtosis imaging with multi-shell diffusion and high-order tractography models, have recently demonstrated their usefulness in mTBI. Our review starts by briefly outlining the physical basis of diffusion tensor imaging including the pitfalls for use in brain trauma, before discussing findings from diagnostic trials testing its usefulness in assessing brain structural changes in patients with mTBI. Use of different post-processing techniques for the diffusion imaging data, identified the corpus callosum as the most frequently injured structure in mTBI, particularly at sub-acute and chronic stages, and a crucial location for evaluating functional outcome. However, structural changes appear too subtle for identification using traditional diffusion biomarkers, thus disallowing expansion of these techniques into clinical practice. In this regard, more advanced diffusion techniques are promising in the assessment of this complex disease.

  16. Research on alcohol and adolescent brain development: opportunities and future directions.

    PubMed

    Witt, Ellen D

    2010-02-01

    In the past 15 years, both human and animal studies have advanced our understanding of the effects of adolescent alcohol exposure on behavioral and neural development, particularly in the areas of the ontogeny of initial sensitivity and tolerance to alcohol, the consequences of adolescent alcohol exposure on subsequent drinking patterns, as well as cognitive and neural function. Despite these advances, there are still substantial gaps in our understanding of whether heavy adolescent drinking interferes with normal brain development at the cellular and molecular level, and if so, how these changes may translate into patterns of brain connectivity that result in the emergence of alcohol use disorders. This article discusses our current knowledge of the cellular and molecular brain changes that stem from heavy alcohol exposure, including binge patterns, during adolescence. Progress has been made in linking the behavioral effects of adolescent drinking to underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. However, it is suggested that future research on the etiology and consequences of adolescent drinking use an integrative approach to this problem by combining multiple levels, including genetic, cellular and molecular, systems (neuroimaging), and behavioral, with an emphasis on integrating the different levels of analysis.

  17. Appropriate Relational Messages in Direct Selling Interaction: Should Salespeople Adapt to Buyers' Communicator Style?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comstock, Jamie; Higgins, Gary

    1997-01-01

    Prescribes rules for appropriate behavior for the direct sales relationship. Suggests that sellers may not completely understand these rules. Determines that buyers prefer sellers who are trustworthy, composed, and task-oriented. Shows that sellers are well aware of buyers' preferences for task-related interaction but may overestimate the value of…

  18. 32 CFR 705.4 - Communication directly with private organizations and individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... from groups or individuals for pamphlets, photos, biographies, historical matter, etc., must be... photos, as explained in the subparagraph below, the requester may be directed to it. Under some... required by part 701 of this chapter. (d) Copies of released U.S. Navy photos may be purchased by...

  19. 32 CFR 705.4 - Communication directly with private organizations and individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... from groups or individuals for pamphlets, photos, biographies, historical matter, etc., must be... photos, as explained in the subparagraph below, the requester may be directed to it. Under some... required by part 701 of this chapter. (d) Copies of released U.S. Navy photos may be purchased by...

  20. 32 CFR 705.4 - Communication directly with private organizations and individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... from groups or individuals for pamphlets, photos, biographies, historical matter, etc., must be... photos, as explained in the subparagraph below, the requester may be directed to it. Under some... required by part 701 of this chapter. (d) Copies of released U.S. Navy photos may be purchased by...

  1. 32 CFR 705.4 - Communication directly with private organizations and individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... from groups or individuals for pamphlets, photos, biographies, historical matter, etc., must be... photos, as explained in the subparagraph below, the requester may be directed to it. Under some... required by part 701 of this chapter. (d) Copies of released U.S. Navy photos may be purchased by...

  2. 32 CFR 705.4 - Communication directly with private organizations and individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... from groups or individuals for pamphlets, photos, biographies, historical matter, etc., must be... photos, as explained in the subparagraph below, the requester may be directed to it. Under some... required by part 701 of this chapter. (d) Copies of released U.S. Navy photos may be purchased by...

  3. Mammary odor cues and pheromones: mammalian infant-directed communication about maternal state, mammae, and milk.

    PubMed

    Schaal, Benoist

    2010-01-01

    Neonatal mammals are exposed to an outstandingly powerful selective pressure at birth, and any mean to alleviate their localization effort and accelerate acceptance to orally grasp a nipple and ingest milk should have had advantageous consequences over evolutionary time. Thus, it is essential for females to display a biological interface structure that is sensorily conspicuous and executively easy for their newborns. Females' strategy to increase the conspicuousness of nipples could only exploit the newborns' most advanced and conserved sensory systems, touch and olfaction, and selection has accordingly shaped tactilely and olfactorily conspicuous mammary structures. This evolutionary modification has worked either by affecting structural features of mammaries or indirectly by affecting maternal behavioral propensities to create olfactory traces on them. These predictions are considered here in mammalian cases that have received empirical attention among marsupials, rodents, lagomorphs, ungulates, carnivores, and primates. It appears that broadcasting chemical cues and/or signals from the mammae is a pan-mammalian reproductive strategy to pilot neonatal arousal, motivation and attraction to the mother, provide assistance in localizing and orally grasping the mammae, and boost up learning. But the ways by which these chemical cues are produced and assembled on the mammae are both diverse between species and complex within species, offering an outstanding opportunity for comparative analyses in chemical communication.

  4. Definition of genetic events directing the development of distinct types of brain tumors from postnatal neural stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hertwig, Falk; Meyer, Katharina; Braun, Sebastian; Ek, Sara; Spang, Rainer; Pfenninger, Cosima V; Artner, Isabella; Prost, Gaëlle; Chen, Xinbin; Biegel, Jaclyn A; Judkins, Alexander R; Englund, Elisabet; Nuber, Ulrike A

    2012-07-01

    Although brain tumors are classified and treated based upon their histology, the molecular factors involved in the development of various tumor types remain unknown. In this study, we show that the type and order of genetic events directs the development of gliomas, central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid-like tumors from postnatal mouse neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC/NPC). We found that the overexpression of specific genes led to the development of these three different brain tumors from NSC/NPCs, and manipulation of the order of genetic events was able to convert one established tumor type into another. In addition, loss of the nuclear chromatin-remodeling factor SMARCB1 in rhabdoid tumors led to increased phosphorylation of eIF2α, a central cytoplasmic unfolded protein response (UPR) component, suggesting a role for the UPR in these tumors. Consistent with this, application of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib led to an increase in apoptosis of human cells with reduced SMARCB1 levels. Taken together, our findings indicate that the order of genetic events determines the phenotypes of brain tumors derived from a common precursor cell pool, and suggest that the UPR may represent a therapeutic target in atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors.

  5. Lack of a primary physicochemical determinant in the direct transport of drugs to the brain after nasal administration in rats: potential involvement of transporters in the pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Ryoon; Maeng, Han-Joo; Chae, Jung-Byung; Chong, Saeho; Kim, Dae-Duk; Shim, Chang-Koo; Chung, Suk-Jae

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the relative contribution of the direct pathway in overall brain transport for 17 model drugs with different physicochemical properties after nasal administrations and to identify factors that govern the fraction of the dose transported to the brain via the direct pathway (F(a, direct)). When the model drugs were nasally administered to rats, 5 of the 17 model drugs were delivered to a significant extent to the brain via the direct pathway. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that the correlation between various physicochemical properties and F(a, direct) was not statistically significant, indicative of a lack of primary physicochemical determinants in the direct transport pathway. Transporters such as rOAT3 and rOCT2 were expressed at significant levels in rat olfactory epithelia, and uptakes of standard substrates were significantly decreased in HEK293 cells expressing rOAT3 and rOCT2 in the presence of the five model drugs that were delivered to appreciable extents to the brain via the direct pathway. Therefore, these observations indicate that carrier-mediated transport may play a role in the brain delivery of drugs from the nose via the direct transport pathway.

  6. Neuronal and glial alterations due to focal cortical hypoxia induced by direct cobalt chloride (CoCl2) brain injection.

    PubMed

    Caltana, Laura; Merelli, Amalia; Lazarowski, Alberto; Brusco, Alicia

    2009-05-01

    Ischemic brain injury is a dynamic process that involves oxidative stress, inflammation, and cell death, as well as activation of endogenous adaptive and regenerative mechanisms depending on activation of transcription factors such as hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1alpha). Because CoCl2 activates HIF-1alpha, we described a new focal-hypoxia model by direct intracerebral CoCl2 injection. Adult male Wistar rats were intracerebrally injected with CoCl2 (2 microl-50 mM), in frontoparietal cortex of right hemisphere, and saline (2 microl) in the contralateral hemisphere. In slides of fixed brains at 1, 6, 9, 24 h or 5 day after treatment, TTC, histochemistry (toluidine blue, Hoescht-33342, TUNEL), immunostaining (HIF-1alpha, GFAP), Lycopersicon esculentum lectin staining, and electron microscopy (EM) were performed. Immediately after 1 h post CoCl2 injection, HIF-1alpha stabilization and neuronal nuclear shrinkage and cromathin condensation were observed by immunostaining and EM, respectively. Neuronal apoptotic nuclear morphology and GFAP immunoreactivity and lectin maximal reactivity were detected during 6-9 h. Ultrastructural alterations of morphology included edematous perinuclear cytoplasm, organelles and endoplasmic reticulum (RE) enlargement, mitochondrial swelling with increased matrix density, and deposits of electron-dense material. Neurons showed particular nuclear indentations. Astrocytes and oligodendrocytes presented alterations in both nuclei and RE with dilated lumen and altered mitochondrias, and all these ultrastructural changes became detectable at day 5. CoCl2 cortical injection mimics focal brain ischemia, inducing neuronal death and glial activation. This model brings the opportunity to develop focal ischemia in selected brain areas to study their functional consequences and potential pharmacological therapies for in vivo models of stroke.

  7. EXTENDING THE ASSESSMENT OF TECHNOLOGY-AIDED PROGRAMS TO SUPPORT LEISURE AND COMMUNICATION IN PEOPLE WITH ACQUIRED BRAIN INJURY AND EXTENSIVE MULTIPLE DISABILITIES.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Buonocunto, Francesca; D'amico, Fiora; Quaranta, Sara; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; Colonna, Fabio

    2015-10-01

    Intervention programs for people with acquired brain injury and extensive motor and communication impairment need to be diversified according to their characteristics and environment. These two studies assessed two technology-aided programs for supporting leisure (i.e., access to songs and videos) and communication (i.e., expressing needs and feelings and making requests) in six of those people. The three people participating in Study 1 did not possess speech but were able to understand spoken and written sentences. Their program presented leisure and communication options through written phrases appearing on the computer screen. The three people participating in Study 2 did not possess any speech and were unable to understand spoken or written language. Their program presented leisure and communication options through pictorial images. All participants relied on a simple microswitch response to enter the options and activate songs, videos, and communication messages. The data showed that the participants of both studies learned to use the program available to them and to engage in leisure and communication independently. The importance of using programs adapted to the participants and their environment was discussed.

  8. Social communication mediates the relationship between emotion perception and externalizing behaviors in young adult survivors of pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    PubMed

    Ryan, Nicholas P; Anderson, Vicki; Godfrey, Celia; Eren, Senem; Rosema, Stefanie; Taylor, Kaitlyn; Catroppa, Cathy

    2013-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of childhood disability, and is associated with elevated risk for long-term social impairment. Though social (pragmatic) communication deficits may be among the most debilitating consequences of childhood TBI, few studies have examined very long-term communication outcomes as children with TBI make the transition to young adulthood. In addition, the extent to which reduced social function contributes to externalizing behaviors in survivors of childhood TBI remains poorly understood. The present study aimed to evaluate the extent of social communication difficulty among young adult survivors of childhood TBI (n=34, injury age: 1.0-7.0 years; M time since injury: 16.55 years) and examine relations among aspects of social function including emotion perception, social communication and externalizing behaviors rated by close-other proxies. Compared to controls the TBI group had significantly greater social communication difficulty, which was associated with more frequent externalizing behaviors and poorer emotion perception. Analyses demonstrated that reduced social communication mediated the association between poorer emotion perception and more frequent externalizing behaviors. Our findings indicate that socio-cognitive impairments may indirectly increase the risk for externalizing behaviors among young adult survivors of childhood TBI, and underscore the need for targeted social skills interventions delivered soon after injury, and into the very long-term.

  9. [Extinction of brain activation responses to direct electrical stimulation of its structures in normal awake cats].

    PubMed

    Kratin, Iu G; Andreeva, V N; Iragashev, M S

    1975-03-01

    In unrestrained cats, repeated electric stimulation of the mesencephalic reticular formation (MRF), center median (CM) of the thalamus, and different cortical areas: both the low--and the high--threshold points (in regard to the brain activation), with the threshold strength current evoked similar EEG reactions of activation which diminished and disappeared after 3--5 repetitions of the stimuli. The moderate strength current evoked, apart from the EEG activation, pseudoviolent movements (turning of the head, etc.) and changes in the breathing rate. All these reactions could be extinguidhed by sufficient number of repetitions of stimuli, the effector reactions disappearing first, the EEG changes--last. The essential difference of the stimulation effects emerged when the strong current stimulation was used. In this case, when stimulating the high-threshold cortical points, the EEG and effector reactions could be abolished during long enough repetition of the stimuli, but it was impossible when stimulating the low-threshold cortical points, the MRF or CM: all the reactions stayed intense and stable, the animals became highly irritated. The data obtained are discussed from the point of view of the authors' concept of the interaction between the activating and integrative analysing mechanisms of the brain.

  10. Polarization insensitive silicon photonic ROADM with selectable communication direction for radio access networks.

    PubMed

    Sorianello, Vito; Angelis, Gabriele De; Cassese, Tommaso; Preite, Massimo Valerio; Velha, Philippe; Bianchi, Alberto; Romagnoli, Marco; Testa, Francesco

    2016-12-15

    We report on an experimental prototype of a low-cost silicon photonic reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexer (ROADM). The device is able to operate with up to 12 wavelength division multiplexing channels. In order to control the polarization of the multi-wavelength signal at the input of the device, an integrated polarization controller is investigated as an alternative to the polarization diversity device architecture. The integrated ROADM is equipped with optical switches for the selection of the path direction and variable optical attenuators for optical power control. We demonstrate the polarization insensitive routing of 10 Gb/s channels between two ROADM nodes with error-free transmission.

  11. Brain-Computer Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Schalk, Gerwin

    2009-01-01

    The theoretical groundwork of the 1930’s and 1940’s and the technical advance of computers in the following decades provided the basis for dramatic increases in human efficiency. While computers continue to evolve, and we can still expect increasing benefits from their use, the interface between humans and computers has begun to present a serious impediment to full realization of the potential payoff. This article is about the theoretical and practical possibility that direct communication between the brain and the computer can be used to overcome this impediment by improving or augmenting conventional forms of human communication. It is about the opportunity that the limitations of our body’s input and output capacities can be overcome using direct interaction with the brain, and it discusses the assumptions, possible limitations, and implications of a technology that I anticipate will be a major source of pervasive changes in the coming decades. PMID:18310804

  12. Topology-graph directed separating boundary surfaces approximation of nonmanifold neuroanatomical structures: application to mouse brain olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Koh, Wonryull; McCormick, Bruce H

    2009-04-01

    Boundary surface approximation of 3-D neuroanatomical regions from sparse 2-D images (e.g., mouse brain olfactory bulb structures from a 2-D brain atlas) has proven to be difficult due to the presence of abutting, shared boundary surfaces that are not handled by traditional boundary-representation data structures and surfaces-from-contours algorithms. We describe a data structure and an algorithm to reconstruct separating surfaces among multiple regions from sparse cross-sectional contours. We define a topology graph for each region, that describes the topological skeleton of the region's boundary surface and that shows between which contours the surface patches should be generated. We provide a graph-directed triangulation algorithm to reconstruct surface patches between contours. We combine our graph-directed triangulation algorithm together with a piecewise parametric curve fitting technique to ensure that abutting or shared surface patches are precisely coincident. We show that our method overcomes limitations in 1) traditional contours-from-surfaces algorithms that assume binary, not multiple, regionalization of space, and in 2) few existing separating surfaces algorithms that assume conversion of input into a regular volumetric grid, which is not possible with sparse interplanar resolution.

  13. Evidence for rostro-caudal functional organization in multiple brain areas related to goal-directed behavior.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Matthew L; Fox, Kieran C R; Christoff, Kalina

    2014-07-14

    The functional organization of brain areas supporting goal-directed behavior is debated. Some accounts suggest a rostro-caudal organization, while others suggest a broad recruitment as part of a multiple demand network. We used fMRI and an anatomical region of interest (ROI) approach to test which account better characterizes the organization of key brain areas related to goal-directed behavior: the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), cingulate cortex, and insula. Subjects performed a cognitive control task with distinct trial events corresponding to rule representation, rule maintenance, action execution, and monitoring progress towards an overarching motivational goal. The use of ROIs allowed us to look for evidence of rostro-caudal gradients during each event separately. Our results provide strong evidence for rostro-caudal gradients in all regions. During the action execution period, activation was robust in caudal ROIs and decreased linearly moving to rostral ROIs in the LPFC, cingulate cortex, and MPFC. Conversely, during the goal monitoring period, activation was weak in caudal ROIs and increased linearly moving to the rostral ROIs in the aforementioned regions. The insula exhibited the reverse pattern. These findings provide evidence for rostro-caudal organization in multiple regions within the same study. More importantly, they demonstrate that rostro-caudal gradients can be observed during individual trial events, ruling out confounding factors such as task difficulty.

  14. Therapeutic effects of non-invasive brain stimulation with direct currents (tDCS) in neuropsychiatric diseases.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Min-Fang; Paulus, Walter; Nitsche, Michael A

    2014-01-15

    Neuroplasticity, which is the dynamic structural and functional reorganization of central nervous system connectivity due to environmental and internal demands, is recognized as a major physiological basis for adaption of cognition, and behavior, and thus of utmost importance for normal brain function. Pathological alterations of plasticity are increasingly explored as pathophysiological foundation of diverse neurological and psychiatric diseases. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques (NIBS), such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), are able to induce and modulate neuroplasticity in humans. Therefore, they have potential to alter pathological plasticity on the one hand, and foster physiological plasticity on the other, in neuropsychiatric diseases to reduce symptoms, and enhance rehabilitation. tDCS is an emerging NIBS tool, which induces glutamatergic plasticity via application of relatively weak currents through the scalp in humans. In the last years its efficacy to treat neuropsychiatric diseases has been explored increasingly. In this review, we will give an overview of pathological alterations of plasticity in neuropsychiatric diseases, gather clinical studies involving tDCS to ameliorate symptoms, and discuss future directions of application, with an emphasis on optimizing stimulation effects.

  15. A practical, intuitive brain-computer interface for communicating ‘yes’ or ‘no’ by listening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, N. Jeremy; Ricci, Erin; Haider, Sameah; McCane, Lynn M.; Heckman, Susan; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.; Vaughan, Theresa M.

    2014-06-01

    Objective. Previous work has shown that it is possible to build an EEG-based binary brain-computer interface system (BCI) driven purely by shifts of attention to auditory stimuli. However, previous studies used abrupt, abstract stimuli that are often perceived as harsh and unpleasant, and whose lack of inherent meaning may make the interface unintuitive and difficult for beginners. We aimed to establish whether we could transition to a system based on more natural, intuitive stimuli (spoken words ‘yes’ and ‘no’) without loss of performance, and whether the system could be used by people in the locked-in state. Approach. We performed a counterbalanced, interleaved within-subject comparison between an auditory streaming BCI that used beep stimuli, and one that used word stimuli. Fourteen healthy volunteers performed two sessions each, on separate days. We also collected preliminary data from two subjects with advanced amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), who used the word-based system to answer a set of simple yes-no questions. Main results. The N1, N2 and P3 event-related potentials elicited by words varied more between subjects than those elicited by beeps. However, the difference between responses to attended and unattended stimuli was more consistent with words than beeps. Healthy subjects’ performance with word stimuli (mean 77% ± 3.3 s.e.) was slightly but not significantly better than their performance with beep stimuli (mean 73% ± 2.8 s.e.). The two subjects with ALS used the word-based BCI to answer questions with a level of accuracy similar to that of the healthy subjects. Significance. Since performance using word stimuli was at least as good as performance using beeps, we recommend that auditory streaming BCI systems be built with word stimuli to make the system more pleasant and intuitive. Our preliminary data show that word-based streaming BCI is a promising tool for communication by people who are locked in.

  16. Direct Spectrum Division Transmission for Highly Efficient Frequency Utilization in Satellite Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Jun-Ichi; Yamashita, Fumihiro; Nakahira, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi

    This paper proposes Direct Spectrum Division Transmission with spectrum editing technique. The transmitter divides the single carrier modulated signal into multiple “sub-spectra” in the frequency domain and arranges each sub-spectrum so as to more fully utilize the unused frequency resources. In the receiver, the divided sub-spectra are combined in the frequency domain and demodulated. By editing the divided spectrum in the frequency domain, the total bandwidth occupied by the multiple “sub-spectra” is less than that of the modulated signal. The proposed technique allows the unused frequency resources scattered across the bands to be better utilized. Simulations show that the proposed technique makes the bit error rate negligible.

  17. A Comparison of Students' Outcomes in Two Classes: Business Administration Students vs Communication Arts Students Based on Self-Directed Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orawiwatnakul, Wiwat; Wichadee, Saovapa

    2011-01-01

    With research showing the benefits of self-directed learning, more activities are needed to provide learners opportunities for self-directed practice (Khomson, 1997; Lee, 1998; Phongnapharuk, 2007). A 12-week experimental study was performed with 80 EFL learners; one group contained 40 Communication Arts students and the other one consisted of 40…

  18. Acoustic communication in the Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) an examination into vocal sacs, sound propagation, and signal directionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantzker, Marc Steven

    The thesis is an inquiry into the acoustic communication of a very unusual avian species, the Greater Sage-Grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus. One of the most outstanding features of this animal's dynamic mating display is its use of paired air sacs that emerge explosively from an esophageal pouch. My first line of inquiry into this system is a review of the form and function of similar vocal apparatuses, collectively called vocal sacs, in birds. Next, with a combination of mathematical models and field measurements, My collaborator and I investigate the acoustic environment where the Greater Sage-Grouse display. The complexities of this acoustic environment are relevant both to the birds and to the subsequent examinations of the display's properties. Finally, my collaborators and I examine a cryptic component of the acoustic display --- directionality --- which we measured simultaneously from multiple locations around free moving grouse on their mating grounds.

  19. Short communication: Genetic relationships between functional longevity and direct health traits in Austrian Fleckvieh cattle.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, C; Fuerst, C; Ducrocq, V; Fuerst-Waltl, B

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a multitrait 2-step approach applied to yield deviations and deregressed breeding values to get genetic parameters of functional longevity, clinical mastitis, early fertility disorders, cystic ovaries, and milk fever of Austrian Fleckvieh cattle. An approximate multitrait approach allows the combination of information from pseudo-phenotypes derived from different statistical models in routine genetic evaluation, which cannot be estimated easily in a full multitrait model. A total of 66,890 Fleckvieh cows were included in this study. For estimating genetic parameters, a simple linear animal model with year of birth as a fixed effect and animal as a random genetic effect was fitted. The joint analysis of yield deviations and deregressed breeding values was feasible. As expected, heritabilities were low, ranging from 0.03 (early fertility disorders) to 0.15 (functional longevity). Genetic correlations between functional longevity and clinical mastitis, early fertility disorders, cystic ovaries, and milk fever were 0.63, 0.29, 0.20, and 0.20, respectively. Within direct health traits genetic correlations were between 0.14 and 0.45. Results suggest that selecting for more robust disease-resistant cows would imply an improvement of functional longevity.

  20. Direct Telephonic Communication in a Heart Failure Transitional Care Program: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Ken S.; Beutler, David S.; Sheikh, Hassam; Weiss, Jessica L.; Parkinson, Dallin; Nguyen, Peter; Gerkin, Richard D.; Loli, Akil I.

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the trend of phone calls in the Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center (BGSMC) Heart Failure Transitional Care Program (HFTCP). The primary goal of the HFTCP is to reduce 30-Day readmissions for heart failure patients by using a multi-pronged approach. Methods This study included 104 patients in the HFTCP discharged over a 51-week period who had around-the-clock telephone access to the Transitionalist. Cellular phone records were reviewed. This study evaluated the length and timing of calls. Results A total of 4398 telephone calls were recorded of which 39% were inbound and 61% were outbound. This averaged to 86 calls per week. During the “Weekday Daytime” period, Eighty-five percent of the totals calls were made. There were 229 calls during the “Weekday Nights” period with 1.5 inbound calls per week. The “Total Weekend” calls were 10.2% of the total calls which equated to a weekly average of 8.8. Conclusions Our experience is that direct, physician-patient telephone contact is feasible with a panel of around 100 HF patients for one provider. If the proper financial reimbursements are provided, physicians may be apt to participate in similar transitional care programs. Likewise, third party payers will benefit from the reduction in unnecessary emergency room visits and hospitalizations. PMID:28352437

  1. A new rapid acquisition technique for direct sequence spread-spectrum communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidovici, S.; Milstein, L. B.; Schilling, D. L.

    1984-11-01

    This paper describes a rapid acquisition technique which can be used in direct sequence spread-spectrum systems. It is sequential in nature and is based on a double threshold which defines when a decision can be made. The values of the thresholds change at every examination instant. The procedure makes use of a bound to the partial cross-correlation function of PN sequences which ensures that only the sequence length needs to be given as far as the PN sequence particulars are concerned. A decision is made only if the probability of error associated with a decision at that point is equal to or better than a prespecified value. Finally, it is shown that most of the computational difficulties associated with the bound as given by a recursive algorithm can be eliminated when using a low-order polynomial approximation to the bound. However, either by using the bound or its polynomial approximation, a significant improvement in the acquisition time is obtained.

  2. “Optical communication with brain cells by means of an implanted duplex micro-device with optogenetics and Ca2+ fluoroimaging”

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Takuma; Haruta, Makito; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Matsumata, Miho; Eizumi, Kawori; Kitsumoto, Chikara; Motoyama, Mayumi; Maezawa, Yasuyo; Ohta, Yasumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Tokuda, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Ohta, Jun

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the brain function based on neural activity, a minimally invasive analysis technology in a freely moving animal is necessary. Such technology would provide new knowledge in neuroscience and contribute to regenerative medical techniques and prosthetics care. An application that combines optogenetics for voluntarily stimulating nerves, imaging to visualize neural activity, and a wearable micro-instrument for implantation into the brain could meet the abovementioned demand. To this end, a micro-device that can be applied to the brain less invasively and a system for controlling the device has been newly developed in this study. Since the novel implantable device has dual LEDs and a CMOS image sensor, photostimulation and fluorescence imaging can be performed simultaneously. The device enables bidirectional communication with the brain by means of light. In the present study, the device was evaluated in an in vitro experiment using a new on-chip 3D neuroculture with an extracellular matrix gel and an in vivo experiment involving regenerative medical transplantation and gene delivery to the brain by using both photosensitive channel and fluorescent Ca2+ indicator. The device succeeded in activating cells locally by selective photostimulation, and the physiological Ca2+ dynamics of neural cells were visualized simultaneously by fluorescence imaging. PMID:26878910

  3. “Optical communication with brain cells by means of an implanted duplex micro-device with optogenetics and Ca2+ fluoroimaging”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takuma; Haruta, Makito; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Matsumata, Miho; Eizumi, Kawori; Kitsumoto, Chikara; Motoyama, Mayumi; Maezawa, Yasuyo; Ohta, Yasumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Tokuda, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Ohta, Jun

    2016-02-01

    To better understand the brain function based on neural activity, a minimally invasive analysis technology in a freely moving animal is necessary. Such technology would provide new knowledge in neuroscience and contribute to regenerative medical techniques and prosthetics care. An application that combines optogenetics for voluntarily stimulating nerves, imaging to visualize neural activity, and a wearable micro-instrument for implantation into the brain could meet the abovementioned demand. To this end, a micro-device that can be applied to the brain less invasively and a system for controlling the device has been newly developed in this study. Since the novel implantable device has dual LEDs and a CMOS image sensor, photostimulation and fluorescence imaging can be performed simultaneously. The device enables bidirectional communication with the brain by means of light. In the present study, the device was evaluated in an in vitro experiment using a new on-chip 3D neuroculture with an extracellular matrix gel and an in vivo experiment involving regenerative medical transplantation and gene delivery to the brain by using both photosensitive channel and fluorescent Ca2+ indicator. The device succeeded in activating cells locally by selective photostimulation, and the physiological Ca2+ dynamics of neural cells were visualized simultaneously by fluorescence imaging.

  4. Monocyte trafficking to the brain with stress and inflammation: a novel axis of immune-to-brain communication that influences mood and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Wohleb, Eric S.; McKim, Daniel B.; Sheridan, John F.; Godbout, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Psychological stress activates neuroendocrine pathways that alter immune responses.Stress-induced alterations in microglia phenotype and monocyte priming leads to aberrant peripheral and central inflammation.Elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine levels caused by microglia activation and recruitment of monocytes to the brain contribute to development and persistent anxiety-like behavior.Mechanisms that mediate interactions between microglia, endothelial cells, and macrophages and how these contribute to changes in behavior are discussed.Sensitization of microglia and re-distribution of primed monocytes are implicated in re-establishment of anxiety-like behavior. Psychological stress causes physiological, immunological, and behavioral alterations in humans and rodents that can be maladaptive and negatively affect quality of life. Several lines of evidence indicate that psychological stress disrupts key functional interactions between the immune system and brain that ultimately affects mood and behavior. For example, activation of microglia, the resident innate immune cells of the brain, has been implicated as a key regulator of mood and behavior in the context of prolonged exposure to psychological stress. Emerging evidence implicates a novel neuroimmune circuit involving microglia activation and sympathetic outflow to the peripheral immune system that further reinforces stress-related behaviors by facilitating the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to the brain. Evidence from various rodent models, including repeated social defeat (RSD), revealed that trafficking of monocytes to the brain promoted the establishment of anxiety-like behaviors following prolonged stress exposure. In addition, new evidence implicates monocyte trafficking from the spleen to the brain as key regulator of recurring anxiety following exposure to prolonged stress. The purpose of this review is to discuss mechanisms that cause stress-induced monocyte re-distribution in the brain

  5. Monocyte trafficking to the brain with stress and inflammation: a novel axis of immune-to-brain communication that influences mood and behavior.

    PubMed

    Wohleb, Eric S; McKim, Daniel B; Sheridan, John F; Godbout, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTSPsychological stress activates neuroendocrine pathways that alter immune responses.Stress-induced alterations in microglia phenotype and monocyte priming leads to aberrant peripheral and central inflammation.Elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine levels caused by microglia activation and recruitment of monocytes to the brain contribute to development and persistent anxiety-like behavior.Mechanisms that mediate interactions between microglia, endothelial cells, and macrophages and how these contribute to changes in behavior are discussed.Sensitization of microglia and re-distribution of primed monocytes are implicated in re-establishment of anxiety-like behavior. Psychological stress causes physiological, immunological, and behavioral alterations in humans and rodents that can be maladaptive and negatively affect quality of life. Several lines of evidence indicate that psychological stress disrupts key functional interactions between the immune system and brain that ultimately affects mood and behavior. For example, activation of microglia, the resident innate immune cells of the brain, has been implicated as a key regulator of mood and behavior in the context of prolonged exposure to psychological stress. Emerging evidence implicates a novel neuroimmune circuit involving microglia activation and sympathetic outflow to the peripheral immune system that further reinforces stress-related behaviors by facilitating the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to the brain. Evidence from various rodent models, including repeated social defeat (RSD), revealed that trafficking of monocytes to the brain promoted the establishment of anxiety-like behaviors following prolonged stress exposure. In addition, new evidence implicates monocyte trafficking from the spleen to the brain as key regulator of recurring anxiety following exposure to prolonged stress. The purpose of this review is to discuss mechanisms that cause stress-induced monocyte re-distribution in the brain and

  6. Non-invasive Brain Stimulation and Auditory Verbal Hallucinations: New Techniques and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Peter; Alderson-Day, Ben; Ellison, Amanda; Jardri, Renaud; Fernyhough, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) are the experience of hearing a voice in the absence of any speaker. Results from recent attempts to treat AVHs with neurostimulation (rTMS or tDCS) to the left temporoparietal junction have not been conclusive, but suggest that it may be a promising treatment option for some individuals. Some evidence suggests that the therapeutic effect of neurostimulation on AVHs may result from modulation of cortical areas involved in the ability to monitor the source of self-generated information. Here, we provide a brief overview of cognitive models and neurostimulation paradigms associated with treatment of AVHs, and discuss techniques that could be explored in the future to improve the efficacy of treatment, including alternating current and random noise stimulation. Technical issues surrounding the use of neurostimulation as a treatment option are discussed (including methods to localize the targeted cortical area, and the state-dependent effects of brain stimulation), as are issues surrounding the acceptability of neurostimulation for adolescent populations and individuals who experience qualitatively different types of AVH. PMID:26834541

  7. Research on outcomes of pediatric traumatic brain injury: current advances and future directions.

    PubMed

    Taylor, H Gerry

    2004-01-01

    The articles in this series demonstrate the diversity of research approaches needed to enhance understanding of the sequelae of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children. Methods ranged from assessment of information processing deficits to evaluation of the construct validity of cognitive tests, tracking of changes in academic achievement after injury, and measurement of behavior and social outcomes. Several articles considered multiple influences on sequelae, including TBI severity, age at injury, time since injury, and preinjury child characteristics. The findings provide new information on injury consequences and the cognitive correlates of postinjury problems in behavior, achievement, and discourse processing. Continued progress requires additional study of relations between specific forms of neuropathology and outcomes, more comprehensive assessments of environmental influences, and greater efforts to monitor postinjury developmental changes. Other needs include more probing assessments of the effects of TBI on daily functioning and social-emotional outcomes, investigation of the specificity of sequelae and of sources of variability in outcome, and application of models that examine mechanisms of effect. This research will benefit clinical practice, clarify processes underlying children's behavior and learning problems, and advance knowledge of normal development.

  8. Using Visual Scene Displays as Communication Support Options for People with Chronic, Severe Aphasia: A Summary of AAC Research and Future Research Directions.

    PubMed

    Beukelman, David R; Hux, Karen; Dietz, Aimee; McKelvey, Miechelle; Weissling, Kristy

    2015-01-01

    Research about the effectiveness of communicative supports and advances in photographic technology has prompted changes in the way speech-language pathologists design and implement interventions for people with aphasia. The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of photographic images as a basis for developing communication supports for people with chronic aphasia secondary to sudden-onset events due to cerebrovascular accidents (strokes). Topics include the evolution of AAC-based supports as they relate to people with aphasia, the development and key features of visual scene displays (VSDs), and future directions concerning the incorporation of photographs into communication supports for people with chronic and severe aphasia.

  9. Local entrainment of oscillatory activity induced by direct brain stimulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Amengual, Julià L.; Vernet, Marine; Adam, Claude; Valero-Cabré, Antoni

    2017-01-01

    In a quest for direct evidence of oscillation entrainment, we analyzed intracerebral electroencephalographic recordings obtained during intracranial electrical stimulation in a cohort of three medication-resistant epilepsy patients tested pre-surgically. Spectral analyses of non-epileptogenic cerebral sites stimulated directly with high frequency electrical bursts yielded episodic local enhancements of frequency-specific rhythmic activity, phase-locked to each individual pulse. These outcomes reveal an entrainment of physiological oscillatory activity within a frequency band dictated by the rhythm of the stimulation source. Our results support future uses of rhythmic stimulation to elucidate the causal contributions of synchrony to specific aspects of human cognition and to further develop the therapeutic manipulation of dysfunctional rhythmic activity subtending the symptoms of some neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:28256510

  10. Language Mapping Using fMRI and Direct Cortical Stimulation for Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Nicole Petrovich; Peck, Kyung K.; Holodny, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Language functional magnetic resonance imaging for neurosurgical planning is a useful but nuanced technique. Consideration of primary and secondary language anatomy, task selection, and data analysis choices all impact interpretation. In the following chapter, we consider practical considerations and nuances alike for language functional magnetic resonance imaging in the support of and comparison with the neurosurgical gold standard, direct cortical stimulation. Pitfalls and limitations are discussed. PMID:26848555

  11. Direct Visualization of Neurotransmitters in Rat Brain Slices by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI - MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Anna Maria A. P.; Vendramini, Pedro H.; Galaverna, Renan; Schwab, Nicolas V.; Alberici, Luciane C.; Augusti, Rodinei; Castilho, Roger F.; Eberlin, Marcos N.

    2016-12-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of neurotransmitters has so far been mainly performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) where derivatization reagents, deuterated matrix and/or high resolution, or tandem MS have been applied to circumvent problems with interfering ion peaks from matrix and from isobaric species. We herein describe the application of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI)-MSI in rat brain coronal and sagittal slices for direct spatial monitoring of neurotransmitters and choline with no need of derivatization reagents and/or deuterated materials. The amino acids γ-aminobutyric (GABA), glutamate, aspartate, serine, as well as acetylcholine, dopamine, and choline were successfully imaged using a commercial DESI source coupled to a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The spatial distribution of the analyzed compounds in different brain regions was determined. We conclude that the ambient matrix-free DESI-MSI is suitable for neurotransmitter imaging and could be applied in studies that involve evaluation of imbalances in neurotransmitters levels.

  12. Direct Visualization of Neurotransmitters in Rat Brain Slices by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI - MS).

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Anna Maria A P; Vendramini, Pedro H; Galaverna, Renan; Schwab, Nicolas V; Alberici, Luciane C; Augusti, Rodinei; Castilho, Roger F; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2016-12-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of neurotransmitters has so far been mainly performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) where derivatization reagents, deuterated matrix and/or high resolution, or tandem MS have been applied to circumvent problems with interfering ion peaks from matrix and from isobaric species. We herein describe the application of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI)-MSI in rat brain coronal and sagittal slices for direct spatial monitoring of neurotransmitters and choline with no need of derivatization reagents and/or deuterated materials. The amino acids γ-aminobutyric (GABA), glutamate, aspartate, serine, as well as acetylcholine, dopamine, and choline were successfully imaged using a commercial DESI source coupled to a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The spatial distribution of the analyzed compounds in different brain regions was determined. We conclude that the ambient matrix-free DESI-MSI is suitable for neurotransmitter imaging and could be applied in studies that involve evaluation of imbalances in neurotransmitters levels. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  13. Training of goal-directed attention regulation enhances control over neural processing for individuals with brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Anthony J-W; Novakovic-Agopian, Tatjana; Nycum, Terrence J; Song, Shawn; Turner, Gary R; Hills, Nancy K; Rome, Scott; Abrams, Gary M; D'Esposito, Mark

    2011-05-01

    Deficits in attention and executive control are some of the most common, debilitating and persistent consequences of brain injuries. Understanding neural mechanisms that support clinically significant improvements, when they do occur, may help advance treatment development. Intervening via rehabilitation provides an opportunity to probe such mechanisms. Our objective was to identify neural mechanisms that underlie improvements in attention and executive control with rehabilitation training. We tested the hypothesis that intensive training enhances modulatory control of neural processing of perceptual information in patients with acquired brain injuries. Patients (n=12) participated either in standardized training designed to target goal-directed attention regulation, or a comparison condition (brief education). Training resulted in significant improvements on behavioural measures of attention and executive control. Functional magnetic resonance imaging methods adapted for testing the effects of intervention for patients with varied injury pathology were used to index modulatory control of neural processing. Pattern classification was utilized to decode individual functional magnetic resonance imaging data acquired during a visual selective attention task. Results showed that modulation of neural processing in extrastriate cortex was significantly enhanced by attention regulation training. Neural changes in prefrontal cortex, a candidate mediator for attention regulation, appeared to depend on individual baseline state. These behavioural and neural effects did not occur with the comparison condition. These results suggest that enhanced modulatory control over visual processing and a rebalancing of prefrontal functioning may underlie improvements in attention and executive control.

  14. Heuristics for connectivity-based brain parcellation of SMA/pre-SMA through force-directed graph layout.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Alessandro; Cerliani, Leonardo; Nanetti, Luca; Roerdink, Jos B T M

    2011-02-01

    We propose the use of force-directed graph layout as an explorative tool for connectivity-based brain parcellation studies. The method can be used as a heuristic to find the number of clusters intrinsically present in the data (if any) and to investigate their organisation. It provides an intuitive representation of the structure of the data and facilitates interactive exploration of properties of single seed voxels as well as relations among (groups of) voxels. We validate the method on synthetic data sets and we investigate the changes in connectivity in the supplementary motor cortex, a brain region whose parcellation has been previously investigated via connectivity studies. This region is supposed to present two easily distinguishable connectivity patterns, putatively denoted by SMA (supplementary motor area) and pre-SMA. Our method provides insights with respect to the connectivity patterns of the premotor cortex. These present a substantial variation among subjects, and their subdivision into two well-separated clusters is not always straightforward.

  15. Modulation effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on phase synchronization in motor imagery brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Wei, Pengfei; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been demonstrated that it can enhance the cortex excitability and modulate the event-related desynchronization (ERD) in motor imagery (MI). Phase synchronization is an important signature in the brain that reflects the neural interaction and integration, which has been adopted as an important EEG pattern for Brian-Computer Interface (BCI) control. In this study, we designed an experiment paradigm and investigated whether the tDCS can modulate the phase synchronization between the primary motor cortex (M1) and the supplementary motor area (SMA) in MI. Ten healthy subjects were selected and separated into two groups randomly. They performed the left and right hand MI task in two successive sessions. According to the different groups, anodal or sham stimulation were administrated to the right side of the M1. The phase locking value (PLV), which is a reliable measurement of phase synchronization in MI, was calculated. The pre and post-stimulation normalized PLV in the left hand MI task were compared. The result manifests that the normalized PLV of the entire subjects in anodal stimulation group increases after the stimulation, which shows a statistically significant difference (paired t-test p = 0.0371, n = 5). Our study reveals that the tDCS can impact the neural coupling between different brain regions and modulate phase synchronization in MI. Moreover, intervention of phase synchronization by tDCS might contribute to the rehabilitation of people with motor disorder and neurological disorders.

  16. Modulating functional connectivity patterns and topological functional organization of the human brain with transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Polanía, Rafael; Nitsche, Michael A; Paulus, Walter

    2011-08-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique that alters cortical excitability and activity in a polarity-dependent way. Stimulation for few minutes has been shown to induce plastic alterations of cortical excitability and to improve cognitive performance. These effects might be caused by stimulation-induced alterations of functional cortical network connectivity. We aimed to investigate the impact of tDCS on cortical network function through functional connectivity and graph theoretical analysis. Single recordings in healthy volunteers with 62 electroencephalography channels were acquired before and after 10 min of facilitatory anodal tDCS over the primary motor cortex (M1), combined with inhibitory cathodal tDCS of the contralateral frontopolar cortex, in resting state and during voluntary hand movements. Correlation matrices containing all 62 pairwise electrode combinations were calculated with the synchronization likelihood (SL) method and thresholded to construct undirected graphs for the θ, α, β, low-γ and high-γ frequency bands. SL matrices and undirected graphs were compared before and after tDCS. Functional connectivity patterns significantly increased within premotor, motor, and sensorimotor areas of the stimulated hemisphere during motor activity in the 60-90 Hz frequency range. Additionally, tDCS-induced significant intrahemispheric and interhemispheric connectivity changes in all the studied frequency bands. In summary, we show for the first time evidence for tDCS-induced changes in brain synchronization and topological functional organization.

  17. Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease: Recent Trends and Future Direction

    PubMed Central

    FUKAYA, Chikashi; YAMAMOTO, Takamitsu

    2015-01-01

    To date, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has already been performed on more than 120,000 patients worldwide and in more than 7,000 patients in Japan. However, fundamental understanding of DBS effects on the pathological neural circuitry remains insufficient. Recent studies have specifically shown the importance of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) loops, which were identified as functionally and anatomically discrete units. Three main circuits exist in the CSTC loops, namely, the motor, associative, and limbic circuits. From these theoretical backgrounds, it is determined that DBS sometimes influences not only motor functions but also the cognitive and affective functions of Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients. The main targets of DBS for PD are subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus interna (GPi). Ventralis intermedius (Vim)-DBS was found to be effective in improving tremor. However, Vim-DBS cannot sufficiently improve akinesia and rigidity. Therefore, Vim-DBS is seldom carried out for the treatment of PD. In this article, we review the present state of DBS, mainly STN-DBS and GPi-DBS, for PD. In the first part of the article, appropriate indications and practical effects established in previous studies are discussed. The findings of previous investigations on the complications caused by the surgical procedure and on the adverse events induced by DBS itself are reviewed. In the second part, we discuss target selection (GPi vs. STN) and the effect of DBS on nonmotor symptoms. In the final part, as issues that should be resolved, the suitable timing of surgery, symptoms unresponsive to DBS such as on-period axial symptoms, and the related postoperative programing of stimulation parameters, are discussed. PMID:25925761

  18. Theoretical Optimization of Stimulation Strategies for a Directionally Segmented Deep Brain Stimulation Electrode Array

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, YiZi; Peña, Edgar; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Goal Programming deep brain stimulation (DBS) systems currently involves a clinician manually sweeping through a range of stimulus parameter settings to identify the setting that delivers the most robust therapy for a patient. With the advent of DBS arrays with a higher number and density of electrodes, this trial and error process becomes unmanageable in a clinical setting. This study developed a computationally efficient, model-based algorithm to estimate an electrode configuration that will most strongly activate tissue within a volume of interest. Methods The cerebellar-receiving area of motor thalamus, the target for treating essential tremor with DBS, was rendered from imaging data and discretized into grid points aligned in approximate afferent and efferent axonal pathway orientations. A finite-element model (FEM) was constructed to simulate the volumetric tissue voltage during DBS. We leveraged the principle of voltage superposition to formulate a convex optimization-based approach to maximize activating function (AF) values at each grid point (via three different criteria), hence increasing the overall probability of action potential initiation and neuronal entrainment within the target volume. Results For both efferent and afferent pathways, this approach achieved global optima within several seconds. The optimal electrode configuration and resulting AF values differed across each optimization criteria and between axonal orientations. Conclusion This approach only required a set of FEM simulations equal to the number of DBS array electrodes, and could readily accommodate anisotropic-inhomogeneous tissue conductances or other axonal orientations. Significance The algorithm provides an efficient, flexible determination of optimal electrode configurations for programming DBS arrays. PMID:26208259

  19. Assessment of the best flow model to characterize diffuse correlation spectroscopy data acquired directly on the brain

    PubMed Central

    Verdecchia, Kyle; Diop, Mamadou; Morrison, Laura B.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) is a non-invasive optical technique capable of monitoring tissue perfusion. The normalized temporal intensity autocorrelation function generated by DCS is typically characterized by assuming that the movement of erythrocytes can be modeled as a Brownian diffusion-like process instead of by the expected random flow model. Recently, a hybrid model, referred to as the hydrodynamic diffusion model, was proposed, which combines the random and Brownian flow models. The purpose of this study was to investigate the best model to describe autocorrelation functions acquired directly on the brain in order to avoid confounding effects of extracerebral tissues. Data were acquired from 11 pigs during normocapnia and hypocapnia, and flow changes were verified by computed tomography perfusion (CTP). The hydrodynamic diffusion model was found to provide the best fit to the autocorrelation functions; however, no significant difference for relative flow changes measured by the Brownian and hydrodynamic diffusion models was observed. PMID:26600995

  20. Extensive Direct Subcortical Cerebellum-Basal Ganglia Connections in Human Brain as Revealed by Constrained Spherical Deconvolution Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Milardi, Demetrio; Arrigo, Alessandro; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Cacciola, Alberto; Marino, Silvia; Mormina, Enricomaria; Calamuneri, Alessandro; Bruschetta, Daniele; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Trimarchi, Fabio; Quartarone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    The connections between the cerebellum and basal ganglia were assumed to occur at the level of neocortex. However evidences from animal data have challenged this old perspective showing extensive subcortical pathways linking the cerebellum with the basal ganglia. Here we tested the hypothesis if these connections also exist between the cerebellum and basal ganglia in the human brain by using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and tractography. Fifteen healthy subjects were analyzed by using constrained spherical deconvolution technique obtained with a 3T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We found extensive connections running between the subthalamic nucleus and cerebellar cortex and, as novel result, we demonstrated a direct route linking the dentate nucleus to the internal globus pallidus as well as to the substantia nigra. These findings may open a new scenario on the interpretation of basal ganglia disorders. PMID:27047348

  1. Frontal Brain Electrical Activity (EEG) and Heart Rate in Response to Affective Infant-Directed (ID) Speech in 9-Month-Old Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santesso, Diane L.; Schmidt, Louis A.; Trainor, Laurel J.

    2007-01-01

    Many studies have shown that infants prefer infant-directed (ID) speech to adult-directed (AD) speech. ID speech functions to aid language learning, obtain and/or maintain an infant's attention, and create emotional communication between the infant and caregiver. We examined psychophysiological responses to ID speech that varied in affective…

  2. The communication of forensic science in the criminal justice system: A review of theory and proposed directions for research.

    PubMed

    Howes, Loene M

    2015-03-01

    Clear communication about forensic science is essential to the effectiveness and perceived trustworthiness of the criminal justice system. Communication can be seen as a meaning-making process that involves different components such as the sender of a message, the message itself, the channel in which a message is sent, and the receiver of the message. Research conducted to date on the communication between forensic scientists and non-scientists in the criminal justice system has focused on different components of the communication process as objects of study. The purpose of this paper is to bring together communication theory and past research on the communication of forensic science to contribute to a deeper understanding of it, and to provide a coherent view of it overall. The paper first outlines the broader context of communication theory and science communication as a backdrop to forensic science communication. Then it presents a conceptual framework as a way to organise past research and, using the framework, reviews recent examples of empirical research and commentary on the communication of forensic science. Finally the paper identifies aspects of the communication of forensic science that may be addressed by future research to enhance the effectiveness of communication between scientists and non-scientists in this multidisciplinary arena.

  3. Brain network dynamics characterization in epileptic seizures. Joint directed graph and pairwise synchronization measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, A. C.; Machado, B. S.; Florence, G.; Hamad, A. P.; Sakamoto, A. C.; Fujita, A.; Baccalá, L. A.; Amaro, E.; Sameshima, K.

    2014-12-01

    Here we propose and evaluate a new approach to analyse multichannel mesial temporal lobe epilepsy EEG data from eight patients through complex network and synchronization theories. The method employs a Granger causality test to infer the directed connectivity graphs and a wavelet transform based phase synchronization measure whose characteristics allow studying dynamical transitions during epileptic seizures. We present a new combined graph measure that quantifies the level of network hub formation, called network hub out-degree, which closely reflects the level of synchronization observed during the ictus.

  4. Direct or Directed: Orchestrating a More Harmonious Approach to Teaching Technology within an Art & Design Higher Education Curriculum with Special Reference to Visual Communications Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Lindsey; Meachem, Lester

    2007-01-01

    In this scoping study we have investigated the integration of subject-specific software into the structure of visual communications courses. There is a view that the response within visual communications courses to the rapid developments in technology has been linked to necessity rather than by design. Through perceptions of staff with day-to-day…

  5. Whole-brain mapping of direct inputs to midbrain dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Watabe-Uchida, Mitsuko; Zhu, Lisa; Ogawa, Sachie K; Vamanrao, Archana; Uchida, Naoshige

    2012-06-07

    Recent studies indicate that dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) convey distinct signals. To explore this difference, we comprehensively identified each area's monosynaptic inputs using the rabies virus. We show that dopamine neurons in both areas integrate inputs from a more diverse collection of areas than previously thought, including autonomic, motor, and somatosensory areas. SNc and VTA dopamine neurons receive contrasting excitatory inputs: the former from the somatosensory/motor cortex and subthalamic nucleus, which may explain their short-latency responses to salient events; and the latter from the lateral hypothalamus, which may explain their involvement in value coding. We demonstrate that neurons in the striatum that project directly to dopamine neurons form patches in both the dorsal and ventral striatum, whereas those projecting to GABAergic neurons are distributed in the matrix compartment. Neuron-type-specific connectivity lays a foundation for studying how dopamine neurons compute outputs.

  6. Cocaine and mitochondria-related signaling in the brain: A mechanistic view and future directions.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto; Jardim, Fernanda Rafaela

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine is extensively used as a psychostimulant among subjects at different ages worldwide. Cocaine causes neuronal dysfunction and, consequently, negatively affects human behavior and decreases life quality severely. Cocaine acts through diverse mechanisms, including mitochondrial impairment and activation of cell signaling pathways associated to stress response. There is some controversy regarding the effect of cocaine in inducing cell death through apoptosis in different experimental models. The aim of the present work is to discuss data associated to the mitochondrial consequences of cocaine exposure of mammalian cells in several experimental models from in vitro to in vivo, including postmortem human tissue analyses. Furthermore, future directions are proposed in order to serve as a suggestive guide in relation to the next steps towards the complete elucidation of the mechanisms of toxicity elicited by cocaine upon mitochondria of neuronal cells.

  7. Energy-dense diet triggers changes in gut microbiota, reorganization of gut-brain vagal communication and increases body fat accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Alexandra C.; Cooper, Erin M.; DiLorenzo, Patricia M.; O’Loughlin, Levi J.; Konkel, Michael E.; Peters, James H.; Hajnal, Andras; Sen, Tanusree; Lee, Sun Hye; de La Serre, Claire B.; Czaja, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is associated with consumption of energy-dense diets and development of systemic inflammation. Gut microbiota play a role in energy harvest and inflammation and can influence the change from lean to obese phenotypes. The nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) is a brain target for gastrointestinal signals modulating satiety and alterations in gut-brain vagal pathway may promote overeating and obesity. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that high-fat diet-induced changes in gut microbiota alter vagal gut-brain communication associated with increased body fat accumulation. Sprague-Dawley rats consumed a low energy-dense rodent diet (LFD; 3.1 kcal/g) or high energy-dense diet (HFD, 5.24 kcal/g). Minocycline was used to manipulate gut microbiota composition. 16S Sequencing was used to determine microbiota composition. Immunofluorescence against IB4 and Iba1 was used to determine NTS reorganization and microglia activation. Nodose ganglia from LFD rats were isolated and co-cultured with different bacteria strains to determine neurotoxicity. HFD altered gut microbiota with increases in Firmicutes/Bacteriodetes ratio and in pro-inflammatory Proteobacteria proliferation. HFD triggered reorganization of vagal afferents and microglia activation in the NTS, associated with weight gain. Minocycline-treated HFD rats exhibited microbiota profile comparable to LFD animals. Minocycline suppressed HFD-induced reorganization of vagal afferents and microglia activation in the NTS, and reduced body fat accumulation. Proteobacteria isolated from cecum of HFD rats were toxic to vagal afferent neurons in culture. Our findings show that diet-induced shift in gut microbiome may disrupt vagal gut-brain communication resulting in microglia activation and increased body fat accumulation. PMID:28379213

  8. Safety and Efficacy of Cerebrolysin in Infants with Communication Defects due to Severe Perinatal Brain Insult: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Deifalla, Shaymaa M.; El-Houssinie, Moustafa; Mokbel, Somaia A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The neuroregenerative drug Cerebrolysin has demonstrated efficacy in improving cognition in adults with stroke and Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of Cerebrolysin in the treatment of communication defects in infants with severe perinatal brain insult. Methods A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in which 158 infants (age 6-21 months) with communication defects due to severe perinatal brain insult were enrolled; 120 infants completed the study. The Cerebrolysin group (n=60) received twice-weekly Cerebrolysin injections of 0.1 mL/kg body weight for 5 weeks (total of ten injections). The placebo group (n=60) received the same amount and number of normal saline injections. Results The baseline Communication and Symbolic-Behavior-Scale-Developmental Profile scores were comparable between the two groups. After 3 months, the placebo group exhibited improvements in the social (p<0.01) and speech composite (p=0.02) scores, with 10% and 1.5% increases from baseline, respectively. The scores of the Cerebrolysin group changed from concern to no concern, with increases of 65.44%, 45.54%, 358.06%, and 96.00% from baseline in the social (p<0.001), speech (p<0.001), symbolic (p<0.001), and total (p<0.001) scores. Conclusions Cerebrolysin dramatically improved infants' communication especially symbolic behavior which positively affected social interaction. These findings suggest that cerebrolysin may be an effective and feasible way equivalent to stem cell therapy. PMID:26365023

  9. Evaluation of the electric field in the brain during transcranial direct current stimulation: A sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Laura; Martinho, Miguel; Salvador, Ricardo; Wenger, Cornelia; Fernandes, Sofia R; Ripolles, Oscar; Ruffini, Giulio; Miranda, Pedro C; Santos, Laura; Martinho, Miguel; Salvador, Ricardo; Wenger, Cornelia; Fernandes, Sofia R; Ripolles, Oscar; Ruffini, Giulio; Miranda, Pedro C; Santos, Laura; Martinho, Miguel; Wenger, Cornelia; Salvador, Ricardo; Ripolles, Oscar; Ruffini, Giulio; Fernandes, Sofia R; Miranda, Pedro C

    2016-08-01

    The use of computational modeling studies accounts currently for the best approach to predict the electric field (E-field) distribution in transcranial direct current stimulation. As with any model, the values attributed to the physical properties, namely the electrical conductivity of the tissues, affect the predicted E-field distribution. A wide range of values for the conductivity of most tissues is reported in the literature. In this work, we used the finite element method to compute the E-field induced in a realistic human head model for two electrode montages targeting the left dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). A systematic analysis of the effect of different isotropic conductivity profiles on the E-field distribution was performed for the standard bipolar 7×5 cm(2) electrodes configuration and also for an optimized multielectrode montage. Average values of the E-field's magnitude, normal and tangential components were calculated in the target region in the left DLPFC. Results show that the field decreases with increasing scalp, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and grey matter (GM) conductivities, while the opposite is observed for the skull and white matter conductivities. The tissues whose conductivity most affects the E-field in the cortex are the scalp and the CSF, followed by the GM and the skull. Uncertainties in the conductivity of individual tissues may affect electric field values by up to about 80%.

  10. In vivo induction of massive proliferation, directed migration, and differentiation of neural cells in the adult mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, James; Reid, Steve; Kinyamu, Richard; Opole, Isaac; Opole, Rebecca; Baratta, Janie; Korc, Murray; Endo, Tiffany L.; Duong, Alexander; Nguyen, Gemi; Karkehabadhi, Masoud; Twardzik, Daniel; Loughlin, Sandra

    2000-01-01

    The development of an in vivo procedure for the induction of massive proliferation, directed migration, and neurodifferentiation (PMD) in the damaged adult central nervous system would hold promise for the treatment of human neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. We investigated the in vivo induction of PMD in the forebrain of the adult rat by using a combination of 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons and infusions of transforming growth factor α (TGFα) into forebrain structures. Only in animals with both lesion and infusion of TGFα was there a rapid proliferation of forebrain stem cells followed by a timed migration of a ridge of neuronal and glial progenitors directed toward the region of the TGFα infusion site. Subsequently, increasing numbers of differentiated neurons were observed in the striatum. In behavioral experiments, there was a significant reduction of apomorphine-induced rotations in animals receiving the TGFα infusions. These results show that the brain contains stem cells capable of PMD in response to an exogenously administered growth factor. This finding has significant implications with respect to the development of treatments for both acute neural trauma and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:11121069

  11. [Interhemisphere neurochemical differences in the brain of silver foxes selected for behavior and the problem of directed asymmetry].

    PubMed

    Trut, L N; Pliusnina, I Z; Kolesnikova, L A; Kozlova, O N

    2000-07-01

    The study deals with the mechanisms that bring about a directional asymmetry in the expression of some morphological traits observed in some animals subjected to experimental domestication. The key role in the integration of development is attributed to the genetic systems controlling the activity of brain neurotransmitter systems. Therefore, the investigation of directional asymmetry of morphological traits began with the analysis of interhemispheral differences in neurotransmitter activity in animal lines selected for domestic and aggressive behavior. Experiments on silver foxes reveal interhemispheral differences in the dopaminergic system emerging in the striatum. An increased dopamine level is observed in the right half of the striatum of aggressive foxes and in both right and left halves of the striata of domestic foxes. On the basis of the literature data, it is suggested that the considerable increase in the dopamine level in the right halves of the striata of both aggressive and domestic animals is related to a genetic increase in the manifestation of emotional response in both lines, whereas its increase in the left half of the striatum of domesticated foxes may be related to a correlated deterioration of the function of the pituitary-adrenal system.

  12. Evaluation of Physician and Nurse Dyad Training Procedures to Deliver a Palliative and End-of-Life Communication Intervention to Parents of Children with a Brain Tumor.

    PubMed

    Hendricks-Ferguson, Verna L; Kane, Javier R; Pradhan, Kamnesh R; Shih, Chie-Schin; Gauvain, Karen M; Baker, Justin N; Haase, Joan E

    2015-01-01

    When a child's prognosis is poor, physicians and nurses (MDs/RNs) often struggle with initiating discussions about palliative and end-of-life care (PC/EOL) early in the course of illness trajectory. We describe evaluation of training procedures used to prepare MD/RN dyads to deliver an intervention entitled: Communication Plan: Early Through End of Life (COMPLETE) intervention. Our training was delivered to 5 pediatric neuro-oncologists and 8 pediatric nurses by a team of expert consultants (i.e., in medical ethics, communication, and PC/EOL) and parent advisors. Although half of the group received training in a 1-day program and half in a 2-day program, content for all participants included 4 modules: family assessment, goal-directed treatment planning, anticipatory guidance, and staff communication and follow-up. Evaluations included dichotomous ratings and qualitative comments on content, reflection, and skills practice for each module. Positive aspects of our training included parent advisers' insights, emphasis on hope and non-abandonment messages, written materials to facilitate PC/EOL communication, and an MD/RN dyad approach. Lessons learned and challenges related to our training procedures will be described. Overall, the MDs and RNs reported that our PC/EOL communication-training procedures were helpful and useful. Future investigators should carefully plan training procedures for PC/EOL communication interventions.

  13. Robust quantum secure direct communication and authentication protocol against decoherence noise based on six-qubit DF state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yan; Zhang, Shi-Bin; Yan, Li-Li; Han, Gui-Hua

    2015-05-01

    By using six-qubit decoherence-free (DF) states as quantum carriers and decoy states, a robust quantum secure direct communication and authentication (QSDCA) protocol against decoherence noise is proposed. Four six-qubit DF states are used in the process of secret transmission, however only the |0‧⟩ state is prepared. The other three six-qubit DF states can be obtained by permuting the outputs of the setup for |0‧⟩. By using the |0‧⟩ state as the decoy state, the detection rate and the qubit error rate reach 81.3%, and they will not change with the noise level. The stability and security are much higher than those of the ping-pong protocol both in an ideal scenario and a decoherence noise scenario. Even if the eavesdropper measures several qubits, exploiting the coherent relationship between these qubits, she can gain one bit of secret information with probability 0.042. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61402058), the Science and Technology Support Project of Sichuan Province of China (Grant No. 2013GZX0137), the Fund for Young Persons Project of Sichuan Province of China (Grant No. 12ZB017), and the Foundation of Cyberspace Security Key Laboratory of Sichuan Higher Education Institutions, China (Grant No. szjj2014-074).

  14. Word timing recovery in direct detection optical PPM communication systems with avalanche photodiodes using a phase lock loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Davidson, Frederic M.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for word timing recovery in a direct-detection optical PPM communication system is described. It tracks on back-to-back pulse pairs in the received random PPM data sequences with the use of a phase locked loop. The experimental system consisted of an 833-nm AlGaAs laser diode transmitter and a silicon avalanche photodiode photodetector, and it used Q = 4 PPM signaling at source data rate 25 Mb/s. The mathematical model developed to describe system performance is shown to be in good agreement with the experimental measurements. Use of this recovered PPM word clock with a slot clock recovery system caused no measurable penalty in receiver sensitivity. The completely self-synchronized receiver was capable of acquiring and maintaining both slot and word synchronizations for input optical signal levels as low as 20 average detected photons per information bit. The receiver achieved a bit error probability of 10 to the -6th at less than 60 average detected photons per information bit.

  15. In quantum direct communication an undetectable eavesdropper can always tell Ψ from Φ Bell states in the message mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavičić, Mladen

    2013-04-01

    We show that in any quantum direct communication protocol that is based on Ψ and Φ Bell states, an eavesdropper can always tell Ψ from Φ states without altering the transmission in any way in the message mode. This renders all protocols that make use of only one Ψ state and one Φ state completely insecure in the message mode. All four-Bell-state protocols require a revision and this might be of importance for new implementations of entanglement-based cryptographic protocols. The detection rate of an eavesdropper is 25% per control transmission, i.e., a half of the rate in the two-state (ping-pong) protocol. An eavesdropper can detect control probes with certainty in the standard control transmission without a photon in the Alice-to-Bob's travel mode and with near certainty in a transmission with a fake photon in the travel mode. Resending of measured control photons via the travel mode would make an eavesdropper completely invisible.

  16. Enhancement of couples' communication and dyadic coping by a self-directed approach: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bodenmann, Guy; Hilpert, Peter; Nussbeck, Fridtjof W; Bradbury, Thomas N

    2014-08-01

    Although prevention of relationship distress and dissolution has potential to strengthen the well-being of partners and any children they are raising, dissemination of prevention programs can be limited because couples face many barriers to in-person participation. An alternative strategy, providing couples with an instructional DVD, is tested in the present study, in which 330 Caucasian couples (N = 660 participants; mean age: men 41.4 years, women 40.0 years) were randomly assigned to a DVD group without any further support, a DVD group with technical telephone coaching, or a wait-list control group. Couples completed questionnaires at pretest, posttest, and 3 and 6 months after completion of the intervention. Self-report measures of dyadic coping, communication quality, ineffective arguing, and relationship satisfaction were used to test whether the intervention groups improved in comparison with the control group. Women in both intervention groups increased in dyadic coping, reduced conflict behavior, and were more satisfied with their relationship 6 months after the intervention. Effects for men were mixed. Participants with poorer skills reported stronger improvement. Intimate relationships can, within limits, be positively influenced by a self-directed approach. Effective dissemination of principles underlying successful relationships can be facilitated through the use of emerging low-cost tools and technologies.

  17. INFORMAS (International Network for Food and Obesity/non-communicable diseases Research, Monitoring and Action Support): summary and future directions.

    PubMed

    Kumanyika, S

    2013-10-01

    This supplement presents the foundational elements for INFORMAS (International Network for Food and Obesity/non-communicable diseases Research, Monitoring and Action Support). As explained in the overview article by Swinburn and colleagues, INFORMAS has a compelling rationale and has set forth clear objectives, outcomes, principles and frameworks for monitoring and benchmarking key aspects of food environments and the policies and actions that influence the healthiness of food environments. This summary highlights the proposed monitoring approaches for the 10 interrelated INFORMAS modules: public and private sector policies and actions; key aspects of food environments (food composition, labelling, promotion, provision, retail, prices, and trade and investment) and population outcomes (diet quality). This ambitious effort should be feasible when approached in a step-wise manner, taking into account existing monitoring efforts, data sources, country contexts and capacity, and when adequately resourced. After protocol development and pilot testing of the modules, INFORMAS aims to be a sustainable, low-cost monitoring framework. Future directions relate to institutionalization, implementation and, ultimately, to leveraging INFORMAS data in ways that will bring key drivers of food environments into alignment with public health goals.

  18. Comparison between direct-sequence and multicarrier spread-spectrum acoustic communications in time-varying channels.

    PubMed

    van Walree, P A

    2010-12-01

    Underwater communication experiments have been conducted in the Norwegian Oslofjord. Two modulation schemes are compared in a 7-kHz frequency band on a 14-kHz center frequency. The first scheme is direct-sequence spread spectrum (DSSS), using a 7-chip spreading code to achieve a raw data rate of 1000 bps on a single carrier. The second scheme is multicarrier spread spectrum (MCSS) and accomplishes spreading by using seven subbands. The DSSS receiver equalizes on the chips prior to explicit symbol despreading, whereas MCSS features joint multiband equalization and despreading. Four channels are examined, from nearly static to overspread. In slowly varying channels, MCSS offers the best performance. DSSS has the best tracking potential for rapidly varying channels, where the challenge is to obtain reliable chip decisions before symbol despreading. The tracking potential can be realized to some extent by hypothesis-feedback equalization. It is further shown that adaptive equalizers are capable of code conversion, i.e., the DSSS receiver can demodulate the MCSS waveform, and vice versa. Neither receiver requires knowledge of the spreading code in order to despread the data.

  19. Digital Game Playing and Direct and Indirect Aggression in Early Adolescence: The Roles of Age, Social Intelligence, and Parent-Child Communication.

    PubMed

    Wallenius, Marjut; Punamäki, Raija-Leena; Rimpelä, Arja

    2007-04-01

    The roles of age, social intelligence and parent-child communication in moderating the association between digital game playing and direct and indirect aggression were examined in 478 Finnish 10- and 13-year-old schoolchildren based on self-reports. The results confirmed that digital game violence was directly associated with direct aggression, especially at age 10, but only among boys. The moderating role of social intelligence was substantiated among older boys: game violence was associated with indirect aggression among those with high level of social intelligence. Further, as hypothesized, digital game playing was associated with direct aggression especially when parent-child communication was poor, but only among boys. Our findings emphasize the importance of individual and situational factors as moderators of the link between game violence and aggression.

  20. Methotrexate administration directly into the fourth ventricle in children with malignant fourth ventricular brain tumors: a pilot clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, David I; Rytting, Michael; Zaky, Wafik; Kerr, Marcia; Ketonen, Leena; Kundu, Uma; Moore, Bartlett D; Yang, Grace; Hou, Ping; Sitton, Clark; Cooper, Laurence J; Gopalakrishnan, Vidya; Lee, Dean A; Thall, Peter F; Khatua, Soumen

    2015-10-01

    We hypothesize that chemotherapy can be safely administered directly into the fourth ventricle to treat recurrent malignant brain tumors in children. For the first time in humans, methotrexate was infused into the fourth ventricle in children with recurrent, malignant brain tumors. A catheter was surgically placed into the fourth ventricle and attached to a ventricular access device. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow was confirmed by CINE MRI postoperatively. Each cycle consisted of 4 consecutive daily methotrexate infusions (2 milligrams). Disease response was monitored with serial MRI scans and CSF cytologic analysis. Trough CSF methotrexate levels were sampled. Five patients (3 with medulloblastoma and 2 with ependymoma) received 18, 18, 12, 9, and 3 cycles, respectively. There were no serious adverse events or new neurological deficits attributed to methotrexate. Two additional enrolled patients were withdrawn prior to planned infusions due to rapid disease progression. Median serum methotrexate level 4 h after infusion was 0.04 µmol/L. Range was 0.02-0.13 µmol/L. Median trough CSF methotrexate level 24 h after infusion was 3.18 µmol/L (range 0.53-212.36 µmol/L). All three patients with medulloblastoma had partial response or stable disease until one patient had progressive disease after cycle 18. Both patients with ependymoma had progressive disease after 9 and 3 cycles, respectively. Low-dose methotrexate can be infused into the fourth ventricle without causing neurological toxicity. Some patients with recurrent medulloblastoma experience a beneficial anti-tumor effect both within the fourth ventricle and at distant sites.

  1. Digital Game Violence and Direct Aggression in Adolescence: A Longitudinal Study of the Roles of Sex, Age, and Parent-Child Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallenius, Marjut; Punamaki, Raija-Leena

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the roles of sex, age, and parent-child communication in moderating the association between digital game violence and direct aggression in a two-year longitudinal study. Finnish 12- and 15-year-old adolescents (N = 316) participated in the follow-up survey. As hypothesized, digital game violence was linked to direct…

  2. Upward-Directed Persuasive Communication and Attribution of Success and Failure toward an Understanding of the Role of Gender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Patricia Hayes

    A study was conducted to examine the impact of gender on upward communication (subordinates to superiors) in organizations. It was hypothesized that women would (1) report less self-confidence when approaching a communicative performance situation, (2) rate themselves less successfully following persuasive presentations, and (3) be more likely to…

  3. End-of-life communication in Korean older adults: With focus on advance care planning and advance directives.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Ji Eun; Cho, BeLong; Yoo, Sang Ho; Kim, SangYun; Yoo, Jun-Hyun

    2016-04-01

    The present article aimed to provide a comprehensive review of current status of end-of-life (EOL) care and sociocultural considerations in Korea, with focus on the EOL communication and use of advance directives (AD) in elderly Koreans. Through literature review, we discuss the current status of EOL care and sociocultural considerations in Korea, and provide a look-ahead. In Korea, patients often receive life-sustaining treatment until the very end of life. Advance care planning is rare, and most do-not-resuscitate decisions are made between the family and physician at the very end of patient's life. Koreans, influenced mainly by Confucian tradition, prefer a natural death and discontinuation of life-sustaining treatment. Although Koreans generally believe that death is natural and unavoidable, they tend not to think about or discuss death, and regard preparation for death as unnecessary. As a result, AD are completed by just 4.7% of the general adult population. This situation can be explained by several sociocultural characteristics including opting for natural death, wish not to burden others, preference for family involvement and trust in doctor, avoidance of talking about death, and filial piety. Patients often receive life-sustaining treatment until the very EOL, advance care planning and the use of AD is not common in Korea. This was related to unique sociocultural characteristics of Korea. A more active role of physicians, development of a more deliberate EOL discussion process, development of culturally appropriate AD and promotion of advance care planning might be required to provide good EOL care in Korea.

  4. Reward Contingencies Improve Goal-Directed Behavior by Enhancing Posterior Brain Attentional Regions and Increasing Corticostriatal Connectivity in Cocaine Addicts.

    PubMed

    Rosell-Negre, Patricia; Bustamante, Juan-Carlos; Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Costumero, Víctor; Llopis-Llacer, Juan-José; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The dopaminergic system provides the basis for the interaction between motivation and cognition. It is triggered by the possibility of obtaining rewards to initiate the neurobehavioral adaptations necessary to achieve them by directing the information from motivational circuits to cognitive and action circuits. In drug addiction, the altered dopamine (DA) modulation of the meso-cortico-limbic reward circuitry, such as the prefrontal cortex (PFC), underlies the disproportionate motivational value of drug use at the expense of other non-drug reinforcers and the user's loss of control over his/her drug intake. We examine how the magnitude of the reward affects goal-directed processes in healthy control (HC) subjects and abstinent cocaine dependent (ACD) patients by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a counting Stroop task with blocked levels of monetary incentives of different magnitudes (€0, €0.01, €0.5, €1 or €1.5). Our results showed that increasing reward magnitude enhances (1) performance facilitation in both groups; (2) left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activity in HC and left superior occipital cortex activity in ACD; and (3) left DLPFC and left putamen connectivity in ACD compared to HC. Moreover, we observed that (4) dorsal striatal and pallidum activity was associated with craving and addiction severity during the parametric increases in the monetary reward. In conclusion, the brain response to gradients in monetary value was different in HC and ACD, but both groups showed improved task performance due to the possibility of obtaining greater monetary rewards.

  5. Reward Contingencies Improve Goal-Directed Behavior by Enhancing Posterior Brain Attentional Regions and Increasing Corticostriatal Connectivity in Cocaine Addicts

    PubMed Central

    Rosell-Negre, Patricia; Bustamante, Juan-Carlos; Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Costumero, Víctor; Llopis-Llacer, Juan-José; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The dopaminergic system provides the basis for the interaction between motivation and cognition. It is triggered by the possibility of obtaining rewards to initiate the neurobehavioral adaptations necessary to achieve them by directing the information from motivational circuits to cognitive and action circuits. In drug addiction, the altered dopamine (DA) modulation of the meso-cortico-limbic reward circuitry, such as the prefrontal cortex (PFC), underlies the disproportionate motivational value of drug use at the expense of other non-drug reinforcers and the user’s loss of control over his/her drug intake. We examine how the magnitude of the reward affects goal-directed processes in healthy control (HC) subjects and abstinent cocaine dependent (ACD) patients by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a counting Stroop task with blocked levels of monetary incentives of different magnitudes (€0, €0.01, €0.5, €1 or €1.5). Our results showed that increasing reward magnitude enhances (1) performance facilitation in both groups; (2) left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activity in HC and left superior occipital cortex activity in ACD; and (3) left DLPFC and left putamen connectivity in ACD compared to HC. Moreover, we observed that (4) dorsal striatal and pallidum activity was associated with craving and addiction severity during the parametric increases in the monetary reward. In conclusion, the brain response to gradients in monetary value was different in HC and ACD, but both groups showed improved task performance due to the possibility of obtaining greater monetary rewards. PMID:27907134

  6. Ultra-low-cost 3D gaze estimation: an intuitive high information throughput compliment to direct brain-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, W. W.; Faisal, A. A.

    2012-08-01

    Eye movements are highly correlated with motor intentions and are often retained by patients with serious motor deficiencies. Despite this, eye tracking is not widely used as control interface for movement in impaired patients due to poor signal interpretation and lack of control flexibility. We propose that tracking the gaze position in 3D rather than 2D provides a considerably richer signal for human machine interfaces by allowing direct interaction with the environment rather than via computer displays. We demonstrate here that by using mass-produced video-game hardware, it is possible to produce an ultra-low-cost binocular eye-tracker with comparable performance to commercial systems, yet 800 times cheaper. Our head-mounted system has 30 USD material costs and operates at over 120 Hz sampling rate with a 0.5-1 degree of visual angle resolution. We perform 2D and 3D gaze estimation, controlling a real-time volumetric cursor essential for driving complex user interfaces. Our approach yields an information throughput of 43 bits s-1, more than ten times that of invasive and semi-invasive brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that are vastly more expensive. Unlike many BMIs our system yields effective real-time closed loop control of devices (10 ms latency), after just ten minutes of training, which we demonstrate through a novel BMI benchmark—the control of the video arcade game ‘Pong’.

  7. Resveratrol Directly Binds to Mitochondrial Complex I and Increases Oxidative Stress in Brain Mitochondria of Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chupin, Stéphanie; Baron, Stéphanie; Nivet-Antoine, Valérie; Vessières, Emilie; Ayer, Audrey; Henrion, Daniel; Lenaers, Guy; Reynier, Pascal; Procaccio, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is often described as a promising therapeutic molecule for numerous diseases, especially in metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders. While the mechanism of action is still debated, an increasing literature reports that resveratrol regulates the mitochondrial respiratory chain function. In a recent study we have identified mitochondrial complex I as a direct target of this molecule. Nevertheless, the mechanisms and consequences of such an interaction still require further investigation. In this study, we identified in silico by docking study a binding site for resveratrol at the nucleotide pocket of complex I. In vitro, using solubilized complex I, we demonstrated a competition between NAD+ and resveratrol. At low doses (<5μM), resveratrol stimulated complex I activity, whereas at high dose (50 μM) it rather decreased it. In vivo, in brain mitochondria from resveratrol treated young mice, we showed that complex I activity was increased, whereas the respiration rate was not improved. Moreover, in old mice with low antioxidant defenses, we demonstrated that complex I activation by resveratrol led to oxidative stress. These results bring new insights into the mechanism of action of resveratrol on mitochondria and highlight the importance of the balance between pro- and antioxidant effects of resveratrol depending on its dose and age. These parameters should be taken into account when clinical trials using resveratrol or analogues have to be designed. PMID:26684010

  8. Ultra-low-cost 3D gaze estimation: an intuitive high information throughput compliment to direct brain-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Abbott, W W; Faisal, A A

    2012-08-01

    Eye movements are highly correlated with motor intentions and are often retained by patients with serious motor deficiencies. Despite this, eye tracking is not widely used as control interface for movement in impaired patients due to poor signal interpretation and lack of control flexibility. We propose that tracking the gaze position in 3D rather than 2D provides a considerably richer signal for human machine interfaces by allowing direct interaction with the environment rather than via computer displays. We demonstrate here that by using mass-produced video-game hardware, it is possible to produce an ultra-low-cost binocular eye-tracker with comparable performance to commercial systems, yet 800 times cheaper. Our head-mounted system has 30 USD material costs and operates at over 120 Hz sampling rate with a 0.5-1 degree of visual angle resolution. We perform 2D and 3D gaze estimation, controlling a real-time volumetric cursor essential for driving complex user interfaces. Our approach yields an information throughput of 43 bits s(-1), more than ten times that of invasive and semi-invasive brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that are vastly more expensive. Unlike many BMIs our system yields effective real-time closed loop control of devices (10 ms latency), after just ten minutes of training, which we demonstrate through a novel BMI benchmark--the control of the video arcade game 'Pong'.

  9. Does transcranial direct current stimulation enhance cognitive and motor functions in the ageing brain? A systematic review and meta- analysis.

    PubMed

    Summers, Jeffery J; Kang, Nyeonju; Cauraugh, James H

    2016-01-01

    The use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to enhance cognitive and motor functions has enjoyed a massive increase in popularity. Modifying neuroplasticity via non-invasive cortical stimulation has enormous potential to slow or even reverse declines in functions associated with ageing. The current meta-analysis evaluated the effects of tDCS on cognitive and motor performance in healthy older adults. Of the 81 studies identified, 25 qualified for inclusion. A random effects model meta-analysis revealed a significant overall standardized mean difference equal to 0.53 (SE=0.09; medium heterogeneity: I(2)=57.08%; and high fail-safe: N=448). Five analyses on moderator variables indicated significant tDCS beneficial effects: (a) on both cognitive and motor task performances, (b) across a wide-range of cognitive tasks, (c) on specific brain areas, (d) stimulation offline (before) or online (during) the cognitive and motor tasks. Although the meta-analysis revealed robust support for enhancing both cognitive and motor performance, we outline a number of caveats on the use of tDCS.

  10. Proteomic-based prognosis of brain tumor patients using direct-tissue matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Sarah A; Weil, Robert J; Thompson, Reid C; Shyr, Yu; Moore, Jason H; Toms, Steven A; Johnson, Mahlon D; Caprioli, Richard M

    2005-09-01

    Clinical diagnosis and treatment decisions for a subset of primary human brain tumors, gliomas, are based almost exclusively on tissue histology. Approaches for glioma diagnosis can be highly subjective due to the heterogeneity and infiltrative nature of these tumors and depend on the skill of the neuropathologist. There is therefore a critical need to develop more precise, non-subjective, and systematic methods to classify human gliomas. To this end, mass spectrometric analysis has been applied to these tumors to determine glioma-specific protein patterns. Protein profiles have been obtained from human gliomas of various grades through direct analysis of tissue samples using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MS). Statistical algorithms applied to the MS profiles from tissue sections identified protein patterns that correlated with tumor histology and patient survival. Using a data set of 108 glioma patients, two patient populations, a short-term and a long-term survival group, were identified based on the tissue protein profiles. In addition, a subset of 57 patients diagnosed with high-grade, grade IV, malignant gliomas were analyzed and a novel classification scheme that segregated short-term and long-term survival patients based on the proteomic profiles was developed. The protein patterns described served as an independent indicator of patient survival. These results show that this new molecular approach to monitoring gliomas can provide clinically relevant information on tumor malignancy and is suitable for high-throughput clinical screening.

  11. Brain Performance Enhancement for Military Operators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    deployment), or help to recovery after stressful experiences. Neurofeedback can be considered as direct communication between brain and system...improve well-being. Neurofeedback is already considered a valuable tool in treating for instance depression, sleep disorders, and post traumatic...stress disorder. • Cognitive performance. Neurofeedback and other neuroscientific techniques can also be employed to increase cognitive performance

  12. Disorganization of Equilibrium Directional Interactions in the Brain Motor Network of Parkinson's disease: New Insight of Resting State Analysis Using Granger Causality and Graphical Approach.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Mahdieh; Mahloojifar, Ali

    2013-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological disorder characterized by tremor, rigidity, and slowness of movements. Particular changes related to various pathological attacks in PD could result in causal interactions of the brain network from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data. In this paper, we aimed to disclose the network structure of the directed influences over the brain using multivariate Granger causality analysis and graph theory in patients with PD as compared with control group. rs-fMRI at rest from 10 PD patients and 10 controls were analyzed. Topological properties of the networks showed that information flow in PD is smaller than that in healthy individuals. We found that there is a balanced local network in healthy control group, including positive pair-wise cross connections between caudate and cerebellum and reciprocal connections between motor cortex and caudate in the left and right hemispheres. The results showed that this local network is disrupted in PD due to disturbance of the interactions in the motor networks. These findings suggested alteration of the functional organization of the brain in the resting state that affects the information transmission from and to other brain regions related to both primary dysfunctions and higher-level cognition impairments in PD. Furthermore, we showed that regions with high degree values could be detected as betweenness centrality nodes. Our results demonstrate that properties of small-world connectivity could also recognize and quantify the characteristics of directed influence brain networks in PD.

  13. Disorganization of Equilibrium Directional Interactions in the Brain Motor Network of Parkinson's disease: New Insight of Resting State Analysis Using Granger Causality and Graphical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Mahdieh; Mahloojifar, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological disorder characterized by tremor, rigidity, and slowness of movements. Particular changes related to various pathological attacks in PD could result in causal interactions of the brain network from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data. In this paper, we aimed to disclose the network structure of the directed influences over the brain using multivariate Granger causality analysis and graph theory in patients with PD as compared with control group. rs-fMRI at rest from 10 PD patients and 10 controls were analyzed. Topological properties of the networks showed that information flow in PD is smaller than that in healthy individuals. We found that there is a balanced local network in healthy control group, including positive pair-wise cross connections between caudate and cerebellum and reciprocal connections between motor cortex and caudate in the left and right hemispheres. The results showed that this local network is disrupted in PD due to disturbance of the interactions in the motor networks. These findings suggested alteration of the functional organization of the brain in the resting state that affects the information transmission from and to other brain regions related to both primary dysfunctions and higher-level cognition impairments in PD. Furthermore, we showed that regions with high degree values could be detected as betweenness centrality nodes. Our results demonstrate that properties of small-world connectivity could also recognize and quantify the characteristics of directed influence brain networks in PD. PMID:24098860

  14. Multivariate autoregressive models with exogenous inputs for intracerebral responses to direct electrical stimulation of the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jui-Yang; Pigorini, Andrea; Massimini, Marcello; Tononi, Giulio; Nobili, Lino; Van Veen, Barry D.

    2012-01-01

    A multivariate autoregressive (MVAR) model with exogenous inputs (MVARX) is developed for describing the cortical interactions excited by direct electrical current stimulation of the cortex. Current stimulation is challenging to model because it excites neurons in multiple locations both near and distant to the stimulation site. The approach presented here models these effects using an exogenous input that is passed through a bank of filters, one for each channel. The filtered input and a random input excite a MVAR system describing the interactions between cortical activity at the recording sites. The exogenous input filter coefficients, the autoregressive coefficients, and random input characteristics are estimated from the measured activity due to current stimulation. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated using intracranial recordings from three surgical epilepsy patients. We evaluate models for wakefulness and NREM sleep in these patients with two stimulation levels in one patient and two stimulation sites in another resulting in a total of 10 datasets. Excellent agreement between measured and model-predicted evoked responses is obtained across all datasets. Furthermore, one-step prediction is used to show that the model also describes dynamics in pre-stimulus and evoked recordings. We also compare integrated information—a measure of intracortical communication thought to reflect the capacity for consciousness—associated with the network model in wakefulness and sleep. As predicted, higher information integration is found in wakefulness than in sleep for all five cases. PMID:23226122

  15. Towards real-time communication between in vivo neurophysiological data sources and simulator-based brain biomimetic models

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Giljae; Matsunaga, Andréa; Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Zhang, Wenjie; Lytton, William W; Francis, Joseph T; Fortes, José AB

    2015-01-01

    Development of more sophisticated implantable brain-machine interface (BMI) will require both interpretation of the neurophysiological data being measured and subsequent determination of signals to be delivered back to the brain. Computational models are the heart of the machine of BMI and therefore an essential tool in both of these processes. One approach is to utilize brain biomimetic models (BMMs) to develop and instantiate these algorithms. These then must be connected as hybrid systems in order to interface the BMM with in vivo data acquisition devices and prosthetic devices. The combined system then provides a test bed for neuroprosthetic rehabilitative solutions and medical devices for the repair and enhancement of damaged brain. We propose here a computer network-based design for this purpose, detailing its internal modules and data flows. We describe a prototype implementation of the design, enabling interaction between the Plexon Multichannel Acquisition Processor (MAP) server, a commercial tool to collect signals from microelectrodes implanted in a live subject and a BMM, a NEURON-based model of sensorimotor cortex capable of controlling a virtual arm. The prototype implementation supports an online mode for real-time simulations, as well as an offline mode for data analysis and simulations without real-time constraints, and provides binning operations to discretize continuous input to the BMM and filtering operations for dealing with noise. Evaluation demonstrated that the implementation successfully delivered monkey spiking activity to the BMM through LAN environments, respecting real-time constraints. PMID:26702394

  16. Teachers' Awareness of the Learner-Teacher Interaction: Preliminary Communication of a Study Investigating the Teaching Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Vanessa; Solis, S. Lynneth

    2013-01-01

    A new phase of research on teaching is under way that seeks to understand the teaching brain. In this vein, this study investigated the cognitive processes employed by master teachers. Using an interview protocol influenced by microgenetic techniques, 23 master teachers used the Self-in-Relation-to-Teaching (SiR2T) tool to answer "What are…

  17. Increasing Left and Right Brain Communication to Improve Learning for Tenth Grade Students in a Public School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Jennifer J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory correlation research study was to determine if students who engaged in exercises designed to increase left and right brain hemisphere connections would score higher on identical tests than those who did not perform the exercises. Because the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act requires students to reach benchmarks of…

  18. COMMUNICATION TRAINING IN CHILDHOOD BRAIN DAMAGE, A MONOGRAPH IN THE BANNERSTONE DIVISION OF AMERICAN LECTURES IN SPEECH AND HEARING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MECHAM, MERLIN J.; AND OTHERS

    INTENDED AS A TEXT SOURCE BOOK, OR PRACTICAL REFERENCE, THE BOOK DISCUSSES SPEECH AND HEARING PROBLEMS, PSYCHOLOGICAL AND LINGUISTIC IMPLICATIONS, AND SPECIAL EDUCATION FOR CEREBRAL PALSIED AND BRAIN DAMAGED CHILDREN. NUMBER AND COMPLEXITY OF SPEECH AND HEARING PROBLEMS ARE EMPHASIZED, I.E., NEUROMUSCULAR INVOLVEMENT, ARTICULATION, RHYTHM, VOICE…

  19. Promoting Adaptive Behavior in Persons with Acquired Brain Injury, Extensive Motor and Communication Disabilities, and Consciousness Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; De Tommaso, Marina; Megna, Marisa; Badagliacca, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    These two studies extended the evidence on the use of technology-based intervention packages to promote adaptive behavior in persons with acquired brain injury and multiple disabilities. Study I involved five participants in a minimally conscious state who were provided with intervention packages based on specific arrangements of optic, tilt, or…

  20. Direct communication between the left circumflex and the right coronary arteries: a very rare coronary anomaly circulation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marcos Danillo Peixoto; Cavalcanti, Rafael R. César; Kajita, Alexandre H.; Miranda, Thais; Kajita, Luiz J.; Horta, Pedro E.; Ribeiro, Expedito E.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery anomalies (CAA) are congenital changes in their origin, course, and/or structure. Intercoronary communication (ICC) is a very rare subset with uni- or bidirectional blood flow between two or more coronary arteries. We present the case of a 58-year-old man with an acute coronary syndrome whose coronary angiography incidentally showed a surprising and very rare communication between the right coronary and left circumflex arteries. PMID:26885496

  1. Chip Waveform Selection in Offset-Quaternary Direct-Sequence Spread-Spectrum Multiple-Access Communications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    with offset quadriphase-shift-keyed ( OQPSK ) modulation was analyzed in [4]. The knowledge of the effects of other types of modulation in an SSMA system...DS/SSMA com- munication system when a type of modulation is chosen from a class which includes OQPSK and MSK modulations. We carry out a general...in the same expected 99 percent power bandwidth as an "" K/SSMA communication system and an OQPSK /SSMA communication system, respectively. Examining

  2. Direct nose-to-brain transfer of a growth hormone releasing neuropeptide, hexarelin after intranasal administration to rabbits.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Kim, Kwonho

    2009-08-13

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the olfactory transfer of a growth hormone releasing neuropeptide, hexarelin to the brain tissues by comparing brain uptake levels after intranasal administration with those after intravenous administration. The hexarelin nasal formulation was prepared using an aqueous cosolvent vehicle consisting of ethanol, propylene glycol, and n-tridecyl-beta-D-maltoside as a permeation enhancer. Hexarelin was administered intravenously or intranasally to male rabbits at a dose of 1 mg/kg. Drug concentrations in the plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and six different regions of the brain, i.e., olfactory bulb (OB), olfactory tract (OT), anterior (CB1), middle (CB2), posterior (CB3) cerebrum, and cerebellum (CL) were analyzed by LC/MS method after solid phase extraction. The brain and cerebrospinal fluid levels achieved following intranasal administration were approximately 1.6 times greater than those attained after intravenous administration despite the intranasal plasma levels being significantly lower than the intravenous plasma levels. Intranasal administration resulted in significantly different spatial distribution patterns in various regions of brain with the rank order of C(OB)>C(OT)>C(CB1, CB2, CB3)>C(CL) at 10, 20, and 40 min post-dosing, whereas intravenous administration yielded nearly similar distribution patterns in the brain. The intranasal administration into one nostril (left or right) exhibited markedly greater hexarelin concentrations in olfactory bulb and olfactory tract on the treated-side of brain tissues than those on the non-treated-side of the brain hemisphere. It was demonstrated that the hydrophilic neuropeptide hexarelin was transferred via olfactory pathway to the brain hemispheres and the drug transfer via this route significantly contributed to high brain concentrations after nasal administration to rabbits.

  3. A unified approach to diffusion direction sensitive slice registration and 3-D DTI reconstruction from moving fetal brain anatomy.

    PubMed

    Fogtmann, Mads; Seshamani, Sharmishtaa; Kroenke, Christopher; Xi Cheng; Chapman, Teresa; Wilm, Jakob; Rousseau, Francois; Studholme, Colin

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents an approach to 3-D diffusion tensor image (DTI) reconstruction from multi-slice diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions of the moving fetal brain. Motion scatters the slice measurements in the spatial and spherical diffusion domain with respect to the underlying anatomy. Previous image registration techniques have been described to estimate the between slice fetal head motion, allowing the reconstruction of 3D a diffusion estimate on a regular grid using interpolation. We propose Approach to Unified Diffusion Sensitive Slice Alignment and Reconstruction (AUDiSSAR) that explicitly formulates a process for diffusion direction sensitive DW-slice-to-DTI-volume alignment. This also incorporates image resolution modeling to iteratively deconvolve the effects of the imaging point spread function using the multiple views provided by thick slices acquired in different anatomical planes. The algorithm is implemented using a multi-resolution iterative scheme and multiple real and synthetic data are used to evaluate the performance of the technique. An accuracy experiment using synthetically created motion data of an adult head and an experiment using synthetic motion added to sedated fetal monkey dataset show a significant improvement in motion-trajectory estimation compared to current state-of-the-art approaches. The performance of the method is then evaluated on challenging but clinically typical in utero fetal scans of four different human cases, showing improved rendition of cortical anatomy and extraction of white matter tracts. While the experimental work focuses on DTI reconstruction (second-order tensor model), the proposed reconstruction framework can employ any 5-D diffusion volume model that can be represented by the spatial parameterizations of an orientation distribution function.

  4. A Unified Approach to Diffusion Direction Sensitive Slice Registration and 3-D DTI Reconstruction From Moving Fetal Brain Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Fogtmann, Mads; Seshamani, Sharmishtaa; Kroenke, Christopher; Cheng, Xi; Chapman, Teresa; Wilm, Jakob; Rousseau, François

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to 3-D diffusion tensor image (DTI) reconstruction from multi-slice diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions of the moving fetal brain. Motion scatters the slice measurements in the spatial and spherical diffusion domain with respect to the underlying anatomy. Previous image registration techniques have been described to estimate the between slice fetal head motion, allowing the reconstruction of 3-D a diffusion estimate on a regular grid using interpolation. We propose Approach to Unified Diffusion Sensitive Slice Alignment and Reconstruction (AUDiSSAR) that explicitly formulates a process for diffusion direction sensitive DW-slice-to-DTI-volume alignment. This also incorporates image resolution modeling to iteratively deconvolve the effects of the imaging point spread function using the multiple views provided by thick slices acquired in different anatomical planes. The algorithm is implemented using a multi-resolution iterative scheme and multiple real and synthetic data are used to evaluate the performance of the technique. An accuracy experiment using synthetically created motion data of an adult head and a experiment using synthetic motion added to sedated fetal monkey dataset show a significant improvement in motion-trajectory estimation compared to a state-of-the-art approaches. The performance of the method is then evaluated on challenging but clinically typical in utero fetal scans of four different human cases, showing improved rendition of cortical anatomy and extraction of white matter tracts. While the experimental work focuses on DTI reconstruction (second-order tensor model), the proposed reconstruction framework can employ any 5-D diffusion volume model that can be represented by the spatial parameterizations of an orientation distribution function. PMID:24108711

  5. Using cholinergic M1 receptor positive allosteric modulators to improve memory via enhancement of brain cholinergic communication.

    PubMed

    Chambon, Caroline; Jatzke, Claudia; Wegener, Nico; Gravius, Andreas; Danysz, Wojciech

    2012-12-15

    Benzylquinolone carboxylic acid (BQCA) is a recently described cholinergic muscarinic M(1) receptor positive allosteric modulator having potential as cognitive enhancer in dementia. The present study focused on the characterisation of BQCA's mode of action in relation to positive effects on memory and side-effects in an animal model. To get insight into this mode of action, in vitro receptor potency/left shift experiments in cells stably expressing the rat's M(1) receptor were performed. They revealed an inflection point value of BQCA corresponding to 306nM, and potentiation of the agonist response up to 47-fold in presence of 10μM of BQCA. In vivo, brain microdialysis showed a maximal brain level of 270nM, 40min after i.p. administration at 10mg/kg. Based on in vitro data obtained with this dose, it can be concluded that BQCA reaches brain levels which should potentiate the agonist response about 4-fold. Behavioural data confirmed that BQCA used at 10mg/kg attenuated scopolamine-induced memory deficit in a spontaneous alternation task. Moreover, BQCA showed no side effect at 10mg/kg and above in spontaneous locomotion and salivation tests. The profile of BQCA observed in the present study displays a clear advantage over the M(1)-M(3) agonist cevimeline. The present data show the therapeutic potential of the M(1) receptor positive allosteric modulator BQCA for the treatment of memory deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Two possible driving forces supporting the evolution of animal communication. Comment on "Towards a Computational Comparative Neuroprimatology: Framing the language-ready brain" by Michael A. Arbib

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulin-Frier, Clément; Verschure, Paul F. M. J.

    2016-03-01

    In the target paper [1], M.A. Arbib proposes a quite exhaustive review of the (often computational) models developed during the last decades that support his detailed scenario on language evolution (the Mirror System Hypothesis, MSH). The approach considers that language evolved from a mirror system for grasping already present in LCA-m (the last common ancestor of macaques and humans), to a simple imitation system for grasping present in LCA-c (the last common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans), to a complex imitation system for grasping that developed in the hominid line since that ancestor. MSH considers that this complex imitation system is a key evolutionary step for a language-ready brain, providing all the required elements for an open-ended gestural communication system. The transition from the gestural (bracchio-manual and visual) to the vocal (articulatory and auditory) domain is supposed to be a less important evolutionary step.

  7. Gut Microbiota-brain Axis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Xing; Wang, Yu-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the updated information about the gut microbiota-brain axis. Data Sources: All articles about gut microbiota-brain axis published up to July 18, 2016, were identified through a literature search on PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science, with the keywords of “gut microbiota”, “gut-brain axis”, and “neuroscience”. Study Selection: All relevant articles on gut microbiota and gut-brain axis were included and carefully reviewed, with no limitation of study design. Results: It is well-recognized that gut microbiota affects the brain's physiological, behavioral, and cognitive functions although its precise mechanism has not yet been fully understood. Gut microbiota-brain axis may include gut microbiota and their metabolic products, enteric nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic branches within the autonomic nervous system, neural-immune system, neuroendocrine system, and central nervous system. Moreover, there may be five communication routes between gut microbiota and brain, including the gut-brain's neural network, neuroendocrine-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, gut immune system, some neurotransmitters and neural regulators synthesized by gut bacteria, and barrier paths including intestinal mucosal barrier and blood-brain barrier. The microbiome is used to define the composition and functional characteristics of gut microbiota, and metagenomics is an appropriate technique to characterize gut microbiota. Conclusions: Gut microbiota-brain axis refers to a bidirectional information network between the gut microbiota and the brain, which may provide a new way to protect the brain in the near future. PMID:27647198

  8. Characterizing the associative content of brain structures involved in habitual and goal-directed actions in humans: a multivariate FMRI study.

    PubMed

    McNamee, Daniel; Liljeholm, Mimi; Zika, Ondrej; O'Doherty, John P

    2015-03-04

    While there is accumulating evidence for the existence of distinct neural systems supporting goal-directed and habitual action selection in the mammalian brain, much less is known about the nature of the information being processed in these different brain regions. Associative learning theory predicts that brain systems involved in habitual control, such as the dorsolateral striatum, should contain stimulus and response information only, but not outcome information, while regions involved in goal-directed action, such as ventromedial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and dorsomedial striatum, should be involved in processing information about outcomes as well as stimuli and responses. To test this prediction, human participants underwent fMRI while engaging in a binary choice task designed to enable the separate identification of these different representations with a multivariate classification analysis approach. Consistent with our predictions, the dorsolateral striatum contained information about responses but not outcomes at the time of an initial stimulus, while the regions implicated in goal-directed action selection contained information about both responses and outcomes. These findings suggest that differential contributions of these regions to habitual and goal-directed behavioral control may depend in part on basic differences in the type of information that these regions have access to at the time of decision making.

  9. Shape-directed compartmentalized delivery of a nanoparticle-conjugated small-molecule activator of an epigenetic enzyme in the brain.

    PubMed

    Chaturbedy, Piyush; Kumar, Manoj; Salikolimi, Krishnachary; Das, Sadhan; Sinha, Sarmistha Halder; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Suma, B S; Kundu, Tapas K; Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy

    2015-11-10

    Targeted drug delivery to specific subcellular compartments of brain cells is challenging despite their importance in the treatment of several brain-related diseases. Herein, we report on shape-directed intracellular compartmentalization of nanoparticles in brain cells and their ability to deliver therapeutic molecules to specific organelles. Iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with different morphologies (spheres, spindles, biconcaves, and nanotubes) were synthesized and coated with a fluorescent carbon layer derived from glucose (Fe3O4@C). In vivo studies showed that the Fe3O4@C nanoparticles with biconcave geometry localized predominantly in the nuclei of the brain cells, whereas those with nanotube geometry were contained mostly in the cytoplasm. Remarkably, a small-molecule activator of histone acetyltransferases delivered into the nuclei of the brain cells using nanoparticles with biconcave geometry showed enhancement in enzymatic activity by a factor of three and resulted in specific gene expression (transcription) compared with that of the molecule delivered to the cytoplasm using nanotube geometry.

  10. A multimenu system based on the P300 component as a time saving procedure for communication with a brain-computer interface

    PubMed Central

    Jarmolowska, Joanna; Turconi, Marcello M.; Busan, Pierpaolo; Mei, Jie; Battaglini, Piero P.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) spelling procedure based on the P300 evoked potential. It uses a small matrix of words arranged in a tree-shaped organization (“multimenu”), and allows the user to build phrases one word at a time, instead of letter by letter. Experiments were performed in two sessions on a group of seven healthy volunteers. In the former, the “multimenu” was tested with a total of 60 choices: 30 “externally-imposed” selections and 30 “free-choice” selections. In the latter, 3 × 3 matrices were compared with 6 × 6 matrices. Each matrix was composed of letters or words, for a total of four matrices. Differences in classifier accuracy, bit rate and amplitude of the evoked P300 were evaluated. Average accuracy in all subjects was 87% with no differences between the selection methods. The 3 × 3 “multimenu” obtained the same level of classifier accuracy as the 6 × 6 matrices, even with a significantly lower amplitude of the P300. Bit rate was increased when using the 3 × 3 matrices compared to the 6 × 6 ones. The “multimenu” system was equally effective, but faster than conventional, letter-based matrices. By improving the speed of communication, this method can be of help to patients with severe difficulties in communication. PMID:23531548

  11. Review: Human Intracortical recording and neural decoding for brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Brandman, David M; Cash, Sydney S; Hochberg, Leigh R

    2017-03-02

    Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) use neural information recorded from the brain for voluntary control of external devices. The development of BCI systems has largely focused on improving functional independence for individuals with severe motor impairments, including providing tools for communication and mobility. In this review, we describe recent advances in intracortical BCI technology and provide potential directions for further research.

  12. Teaching a Child with Autism and Severe Language Delays to Reject: Direct and Indirect Effects of Functional Communication Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Christian A.; Drasgow, Erik; Halle, James W.; Brucker, Jennifer M.

    2005-01-01

    We used functional communication training to teach Bob, a 10-year-old student with autism and severe language delays, to reject items by touching an icon. Our initial assessment revealed that Bob's behaviours serving a rejecting function consisted of pushing away, yelling, bear hugging-grabbing, and leaving. We used prompting, differential…

  13. 4 Gbps direct modulation of 450 nm GaN laser for high-speed visible light communication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changmin; Zhang, Chong; Cantore, Michael; Farrell, Robert M; Oh, Sang Ho; Margalith, Tal; Speck, James S; Nakamura, Shuji; Bowers, John E; DenBaars, Steven P

    2015-06-15

    We demonstrate high-speed data transmission with a commercial high power GaN laser diode at 450 nm. 2.6 GHz bandwidth was achieved at an injection current of 500 mA using a high-speed visible light communication setup. Record high 4 Gbps free-space data transmission rate was achieved at room temperature.

  14. Brain controlled robots.

    PubMed

    Kawato, Mitsuo

    2008-06-01

    In January 2008, Duke University and the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) publicized their successful control of a brain-machine interface for a humanoid robot by a monkey brain across the Pacific Ocean. The activities of a few hundred neurons were recorded from a monkey's motor cortex in Miguel Nicolelis's lab at Duke University, and the kinematic features of monkey locomotion on a treadmill were decoded from neural firing rates in real time. The decoded information was sent to a humanoid robot, CB-i, in ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories located in Kyoto, Japan. This robot was developed by the JST International Collaborative Research Project (ICORP) as the "Computational Brain Project." CB-i's locomotion-like movement was video-recorded and projected on a screen in front of the monkey. Although the bidirectional communication used a conventional Internet connection, its delay was suppressed below one over several seconds, partly due to a video-streaming technique, and this encouraged the monkey's voluntary locomotion and influenced its brain activity. This commentary introduces the background and future directions of the brain-controlled robot.

  15. Then and Now: Examining How Consumer Communication and Attitudes of Direct-to-Consumer Pharmaceutical Advertising Have Changed in the Last Decade.

    PubMed

    Wood, Kelly S; Cronley, Maria L

    2014-09-01

    This study examines changes over a 10-year period in consumer reports of communication with health care providers about direct-to-consumer advertised (DTCA) medications. Two rounds of survey data were collected in 2003 and 2012 using repeated cross-sectional procedures to examine consumer willingness to discuss DTCA medications, content and tone of those conversations, and attitudes about the advertisements. In total, 472 surveys were analyzed. Generally, we found physician-patient conversations, attitudes, and behaviors regarding DTCA have changed. Consumers in 2012 reported talking significantly less about the names of the advertised drug, comparing the advertised drug with their current medication, and sharing general information than consumers in 2003. Attitudes toward the advertisements were significantly more negative in 2012 compared to 2003. Of those who specifically asked for a prescription, the proportion of patients who received the prescription was significantly lower in 2012, despite research suggesting increased rates of prescriptions. These results are interpreted in light of previous research about the lack of research examining the actual communication between physicians and patients on this topic. Limitations of the study are provided along with directions for future research about DTCA and physician-patient communication.

  16. COMMUNICATION: Toward closed-loop optimization of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease: concepts and lessons from a computational model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiao-jiang; Greenwald, Brian; Rabitz, Herschel; Shea-Brown, Eric; Kosut, Robert

    2007-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus with periodic, high-frequency pulse trains is an increasingly standard therapy for advanced Parkinson's disease. Here, we propose that a closed-loop global optimization algorithm may identify novel DBS waveforms that could be more effective than their high-frequency counterparts. We use results from a computational model of the Parkinsonian basal ganglia to illustrate general issues relevant to eventual clinical or experimental tests of such an algorithm. Specifically, while the relationship between DBS characteristics and performance is highly complex, global search methods appear able to identify novel and effective waveforms with convergence rates that are acceptably fast to merit further investigation in laboratory or clinical settings.

  17. Simultaneous posterior communicating artery aneurysm clipping and selective amygdalohippocampectomy via direct lateral access through the mesial temporal lobe to the basal cisterns.

    PubMed

    Abla, Adib A; Smith, Kris A; Nakaji, Peter

    2011-05-01

    We report a 23-year-old man with intractable epilepsy and an incidental posterior communicating artery aneurysm who was treated simultaneously for both pathologies. He was counseled regarding the potential to treat both pathologies with one procedure. He elected to undergo a simultaneous approach. The patient was doing well at his 5-month follow-up examination with no residual seizures or neurologic deficits. We conclude that access to aneurysms within the basal cisterns is viable with transchoroidal approaches through the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle. Anterior extension through portions of the amygdala further increases access. In our patient, selective amygdalohippocampectomy and posterior communicating artery aneurysm clipping were performed during the same surgical setting/approach. This directly lateral corridor allowed our young patient with an incidental aneurysm to undergo a less invasive combined operation rather than two separate procedures.

  18. Increased Pain Communication following Multiple Group Memberships Salience Leads to a Relative Reduction in Pain-Related Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jetten, Jolanda; Molenberghs, Pascal; Bastian, Brock; Karnadewi, Fika

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a fundamental human experience that triggers a range of social and psychological responses. In this study, we present behavioral and fMRI data to examine the effect of multiple group memberships salience on reported and neural indices of pain. We found that participants expressed higher levels of pain when more social group memberships were salient. This is consistent with the notion that pain itself motivates people to communicate their pain, and more so when multiple psychological resources are salient. In addition, fMRI results reveal an interesting twist: when participants increased their pain reporting as group memberships increased (from one group to four), there was a corresponding relative reduction in dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and anterior insula activation. These results provide evidence for an adaptive response to pain: the more people make use of the social resources at their disposal when experiencing pain, the less pain areas are activated. PMID:27657917

  19. Fabrication of an ionic-sensitive in situ gel loaded with resveratrol nanosuspensions intended for direct nose-to-brain delivery.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jifu; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Shupeng; Tong, Tiantian; Zhuang, Qiannan; Jin, Kai; Chen, Wei; Tang, Hua

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to fabricate a composite in situ gelling formulation combining nanoparticulates and an ionic-triggered deacetylated gellan gum (DGG) matrix for challenging intranasal drug delivery. The prepared resveratrol nanosuspensions (Res-NSs) were distributed in DGG solutions. Parameters such as the in situ gelation capability, particle size, rheological properties, and texture profiles were used to describe the properties of the in situ gel. Pharmacokinetic and brain-targeting efficiency studies were performed after intranasal and intravenous administration, respectively. Biodistribution and localization using in vivo imaging systems and fluorescence microscopy are also described. The formulation containing 0.6% w/v DGG displayed a favorable gelling ability and the desired viscosity. The rheology results established that the DGG in situ gel possesses the characteristics of shear thinning, thixotropy and yield stress. The results of the textural profile revealed an increase in adhesiveness and viscosity for the in situ gel compared to the DGG solution. In vitro penetration studies followed a Higuchi mathematic model. Pharmacokinetics revealed a 2.88-times increase of bioavailability in the brain by intranasal Res-NSs in situ gel formulation. The drug targeting efficiency (458.2%) and direct transport percentages (78.18%) demonstrated direct delivery via the nose-brain pathway. The distribution and localization further illustrated the existence of direct nose-to-brain transport, bypassing the BBB. In sum, this hybrid in situ gel system is a promising approach for intranasal application in terms of the enhancement of nasal mucosal permeability and increased nasal cavity residence time by a nanotechnology delivery system and in situ gelling technology.

  20. Different Mode of Afferents Determines the Frequency Range of High Frequency Activities in the Human Brain: Direct Electrocorticographic Comparison between Peripheral Nerve and Direct Cortical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Riki; Matsuhashi, Masao; Usami, Kiyohide; Shimotake, Akihiro; Kunieda, Takeharu; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Physiological high frequency activities (HFA) are related to various brain functions. Factors, however, regulating its frequency have not been well elucidated in humans. To validate the hypothesis that different propagation modes (thalamo-cortical vs. cortico-coritcal projections), or different terminal layers (layer IV vs. layer II/III) affect its frequency, we, in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), compared HFAs induced by median nerve stimulation with those induced by electrical stimulation of the cortex connecting to SI. We employed 6 patients who underwent chronic subdural electrode implantation for presurgical evaluation. We evaluated the HFA power values in reference to the baseline overriding N20 (earliest cortical response) and N80 (late response) of somatosensory evoked potentials (HFASEP(N20) and HFASEP(N80)) and compared those overriding N1 and N2 (first and second responses) of cortico-cortical evoked potentials (HFACCEP(N1) and HFACCEP(N2)). HFASEP(N20) showed the power peak in the frequency above 200 Hz, while HFACCEP(N1) had its power peak in the frequency below 200 Hz. Different propagation modes and/or different terminal layers seemed to determine HFA frequency. Since HFACCEP(N1) and HFA induced during various brain functions share a similar broadband profile of the power spectrum, cortico-coritcal horizontal propagation seems to represent common mode of neural transmission for processing these functions. PMID:26087042