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Sample records for direct factor xa

  1. Edoxaban: a new oral direct factor xa inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Camm, A John; Bounameaux, Henri

    2011-08-20

    Edoxaban is an oral direct factor Xa inhibitor that is currently undergoing investigation in phase III clinical trials for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolic events (VTE). Factor Xa is an attractive target for anticoagulant treatment, as it is the primary and rate-limiting source of amplification in the coagulation cascade. Edoxaban is a competitive inhibitor of factor Xa and has >10 000-fold greater selectivity for factor Xa relative to thrombin. In phase I clinical trials, the anticoagulant effects of edoxaban included dose-dependent increases in activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time following single edoxaban doses of 10-150 mg and after multiple ascending doses (60 mg twice daily, 90 mg daily and 120 mg daily). The anticoagulant effects of edoxaban were rapid in onset (time to peak plasma concentration 1-2 hours) and sustained for up to 24 hours. Prolongation of bleeding time in 8% of subjects was >9.5 minutes (none of which appeared to be clinically significant) 2 hours after initial dosing, and was independent of edoxaban dose, formulation or dietary state. In general, plasma edoxaban concentrations were linearly correlated with coagulation parameters. Phase II clinical trials in patients with AF and VTE suggest that the edoxaban 30 mg once-daily and 60 mg once-daily regimens had a similar or better safety profile compared with dose-adjusted warfarin (international normalized ratio 2.0-3.0) in terms of bleeding events, and that edoxaban was not associated with hepatotoxicity. In addition, edoxaban was associated with statistically significant dose-dependent reductions in VTE after orthopaedic surgery compared with placebo or dalteparin sodium. Further clinical investigation of the efficacy and safety of once-daily edoxaban is being conducted in phase III clinical trials in comparison with warfarin in patients with AF in the phase III

  2. A specific antidote for reversal of anticoagulation by direct and indirect inhibitors of coagulation factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Lu, Genmin; DeGuzman, Francis R; Hollenbach, Stanley J; Karbarz, Mark J; Abe, Keith; Lee, Gail; Luan, Peng; Hutchaleelaha, Athiwat; Inagaki, Mayuko; Conley, Pamela B; Phillips, David R; Sinha, Uma

    2013-04-01

    Inhibitors of coagulation factor Xa (fXa) have emerged as a new class of antithrombotics but lack effective antidotes for patients experiencing serious bleeding. We designed and expressed a modified form of fXa as an antidote for fXa inhibitors. This recombinant protein (r-Antidote, PRT064445) is catalytically inactive and lacks the membrane-binding γ-carboxyglutamic acid domain of native fXa but retains the ability of native fXa to bind direct fXa inhibitors as well as low molecular weight heparin-activated antithrombin III (ATIII). r-Antidote dose-dependently reversed the inhibition of fXa by direct fXa inhibitors and corrected the prolongation of ex vivo clotting times by such inhibitors. In rabbits treated with the direct fXa inhibitor rivaroxaban, r-Antidote restored hemostasis in a liver laceration model. The effect of r-Antidote was mediated by reducing plasma anti-fXa activity and the non-protein bound fraction of the fXa inhibitor in plasma. In rats, r-Antidote administration dose-dependently and completely corrected increases in blood loss resulting from ATIII-dependent anticoagulation by enoxaparin or fondaparinux. r-Antidote has the potential to be used as a universal antidote for a broad range of fXa inhibitors.

  3. Chromogenic laboratory assays to measure the factor Xa-inhibiting properties of apixaban--an oral, direct and selective factor Xa inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Becker, Richard C; Yang, Hongqiu; Barrett, Yuchen; Mohan, Puneet; Wang, Jessie; Wallentin, Lars; Alexander, John H

    2011-08-01

    An ability to readily determine an anticoagulant effect with an emerging class of direct, active site, oral factor Xa inhibitors is viewed by the medical community as attractive and by some as an absolute requirement for their use in clinical practice. We performed a pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic substudy in APPRAISE-1-a study of apixaban in patients with acute coronary syndrome(ACS). A total of 1691 patients had blood sampled for apixaban plasma concentrations using mass spectrometry/high performance liquid chromatography and anti-Xa activity using a chromogenic assay employing either low molecular weight heparin or apixaban as reference standards. Anti-Xa activity, determined by either anti-Xa-LMWH (r = 0.9671; P < 0.0001) or anti-Xa-apixaban (r = 0.9669; P < 0.0001) correlated strongly and in a linear fashion with apixaban plasma concentrations. The correlations for each method were equally strong at low (<100 ng/ml) (r = 0.86, P < 0.0001; r = 0.85, P < 0.0001), intermediate(100-200 ng/ml) (r = 0.73, P < 0.0001; r = 0.69, P < 0.0001) and high (>200 ng/ml) (r = 0.91, P < 0.0001; r = 0.91, P < 0.0001) plasma concentrations of apixaban, respectively. Our pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic substudy suggests that an apixaban-mediated anticoagulant effect can be detected even at very low plasma concentrations using a standard laboratory chromogenic anti-Xa assay with either LMWH or apixaban calibrators. While establishing parameters for safety and efficacy will require further investigation, an ability to discern the presence of a drug effect may provide clinically useful information.

  4. Future therapeutic directions for factor Xa inhibition in the prophylaxis and treatment of thrombotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Turpie, Alexander G G

    2003-11-15

    The targeted mechanism of factor Xa inhibition has been studied extensively, initially as prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in the orthopedic surgical setting. Future therapeutic directions for selective factor Xa inhibition in the management of other thrombotic diseases are discussed. Thromboembolic diseases can occur in the venous or arterial sides of the circulatory system. Factor Xa inhibition is a targeted approach to anticoagulation that resulted from significant advances in our understanding of the coagulation cascade. The factor Xa inhibitor fondaparinux has been studied extensively in the orthopedic surgical setting for the prophylaxis of VTE. Current investigations that are under way or completed evaluate the efficacy and safety of fondaparinux for the management of various thrombotic diseases. The future development of fondaparinux resides primarily in three therapeutic areas: prevention of VTE, treatment of VTE, and treatment of acute coronary syndromes. For the prevention of VTE, fondaparinux has been studied as extended prophylaxis following hip fracture surgery (PENTHIFRA Plus), for use in high-risk abdominal surgical patients (PEGASUS and APOLLO), and for use in medical patients (ARTEMIS). Studies evaluating fondaparinux for the treatment of VTE are part of the large MATISSE clinical program (MATISSE DVT and MATISSE PE). Fondaparinux was investigated in phase 2 studies for the treatment of acute coronary syndromes, including acute ST-segment myocardial infarction (PENTALYSE) and unstable angina (PENTUA). Encouraging data from these trials are the basis for phase 3 programs in this area (MICHELANGELO). The orthopedic prophylactic and nonorthopedic clinical programs for fondaparinux in the management of thrombosis support the concept that targeted inhibition of coagulation is an effective advance in antithrombotic therapy.

  5. Anticoagulation beyond direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors: indications for targeting the intrinsic pathway?

    PubMed

    van Montfoort, Maurits L; Meijers, Joost C M

    2013-08-01

    Antithrombotic drugs like vitamin K antagonists and heparin have been the gold standard for the treatment and prevention of thromboembolic disease for many years. Unfortunately, there are several disadvantages of these antithrombotic drugs: they are accompanied by serious bleeding problems, it is necessary to monitor the therapeutic window, and there are various interactions with food and other drugs. This has led to the development of new oral anticoagulants, specifically inhibiting either thrombin or factor Xa. In terms of effectiveness, these drugs are comparable to the currently available anticoagulants; however, they are still associated with issues such as bleeding, reversal of the drug and complicated laboratory monitoring. Vitamin K antagonists, heparin, direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors have in common that they target key proteins of the haemostatic system. In an attempt to overcome these difficulties we investigated whether the intrinsic coagulation factors (VIII, IX, XI, XII, prekallikrein and high-molecular-weight kininogen) are superior targets for anticoagulation. We analysed epidemiological data concerning thrombosis and bleeding in patients deficient in one of the intrinsic pathway proteins. Furthermore, we discuss several thrombotic models in intrinsic coagulation factor-deficient animals. The combined results suggest that intrinsic coagulation factors could be suitable targets for anticoagulant drugs.

  6. Potent Direct Inhibitors of Factor Xa Based on the Tetrahydroisoquinoline Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Al-Horani, Rami A.; Mehta, Akul Y.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2012-01-01

    Direct inhibition of coagulation factor Xa (FXa) carries significant promise for developing effective and safe anticoagulants. Although a large number of FXa inhibitors have been studied, each can be classified as either possessing a highly flexible or a rigid core scaffold. We reasoned that an intermediate level of flexibility will provide high selectivity for FXa considering that its active site is less constrained in comparison to thrombin and more constrained as compared to trypsin. We studied several core scaffolds including 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid for direct FXa inhibition. Using a genetic algorithm-based docking and scoring approach, a promising candidate 23 was identified, synthesized, and found to inhibit FXa with a Ki of 28 μM. Optimization of derivative 23 resulted in the design of a potent dicarboxamide 47, which displayed a Ki of 135 nM. Dicarboxamide 47 displayed at least 1852-fold selectivity for FXa inhibition over other coagulation enzymes and doubled PT and aPTT of human plasma at 17.1 μM and 20.2 μM, respectively, which are comparable to those of clinically relevant agents. Dicarboxamide 47 is expected to serve as an excellent lead for further anticoagulant discovery. PMID:22770607

  7. Effect of famotidine on the pharmacokinetics of apixaban, an oral direct factor Xa inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Upreti, Vijay V; Song, Yan; Wang, Jessie; Byon, Wonkyung; Boyd, Rebecca A; Pursley, Janice M; LaCreta, Frank; Frost, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    Background Apixaban is an oral, selective, direct factor Xa inhibitor approved for thromboprophylaxis after orthopedic surgery and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation, and under development for treatment of venous thromboembolism. This study investigated the effect of a gastric acid suppressant, famotidine (a histamine H2-receptor antagonist), on the pharmacokinetics of apixaban in healthy subjects. Methods This two-period, two-treatment crossover study randomized 18 healthy subjects to receive a single oral dose of apixaban 10 mg with and without a single oral dose of famotidine 40 mg administered 3 hours before dosing with apixaban. Plasma apixaban concentrations were measured up to 60 hours post-dose and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. Results Famotidine did not affect maximum apixaban plasma concentration (Cmax) or area under the plasma concentration-time curve from zero to infinite time (AUC∞). Point estimates for ratios of geometric means with and without famotidine were close to unity for Cmax (0.978) and AUC∞ (1.007), and 90% confidence intervals were entirely contained within the 80%–125% no-effect interval. Administration of apixaban alone and with famotidine was well tolerated. Conclusion Famotidine does not affect the pharmacokinetics of apixaban, consistent with the physicochemical properties of apixaban (lack of an ionizable group and pH-independent solubility). Apixaban pharmacokinetics would not be affected by an increase in gastrointestinal pH due to underlying conditions (eg, achlorhydria), or by gastrointestinal pH-mediated effects of other histamine H2-receptor antagonists, antacids, or proton pump inhibitors. Given that famotidine is also an inhibitor of the human organic cation transporter (hOCT), these results indicate that apixaban pharmacokinetics are not influenced by hOCT uptake transporter inhibitors. Overall, these results support that apixaban can be administered without regard to coadministration

  8. Population Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Modeling Analysis of GCC‐4401C, a Novel Direct Factor Xa Inhibitor, in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Choi, HY; Choi, S; Kim, YH

    2016-01-01

    GCC‐4401C, an orally active direct factor Xa inhibitor that is similar to rivaroxaban, is currently under development for venous thromboembolic disease (VTE). The purpose of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PKs) and pharmacodynamics (PDs) of GCC‐4401C by population modeling analysis and to predict proper dosage regimens compared to rivaroxaban using data from two phase I clinical studies. Plasma GCC‐4401C concentrations over time were best described by a two‐compartment linear model and body weight was associated with central volume of distribution. Relevant PD markers generally changed in a dose‐dependent manner and were described well with sigmoid, simple maximum effect, or linear models. GCC‐4401C was absorbed more rapidly than rivaroxaban. Comparisons based on simulations of PD marker changes over time suggest that 20 mg and 40 mg of GCC‐4401C administered under fasted status are comparable to 10 mg and 20 mg of rivaroxaban under fed status. PMID:27511836

  9. The effects of direct factor Xa inhibitor (Rivaroxaban) on the human osteoblastic cell line SaOS2.

    PubMed

    Gigi, Roy; Salai, Moshe; Dolkart, Oleg; Chechik, Ofir; Katzburg, Sarah; Stern, Naftali; Somjen, Dalia

    2012-01-01

    Thromboprophylaxis reduces the risk of surgery-related deep vein thrombosis, but anticoagulants were associated with systemic osteoporosis, a known risk factor for poor fracture healing. Rivaroxaban (XARELTO(®)) is a novel anticoagulant with specific ability to inhibit factor Xa, a serine endopeptidase, which plays a key role in coagulation. This study investigated the direct effects of rivaroxaban on bone biology using an in vitro cell culture model from the human female osteoblastic cell line SaOS2. Cells at subconfluence were treated for 24 hr with different concentrations of rivaroxaban and analyzed for DNA synthesis and creatine kinase- and alkaline phosphatase-specific activities, and were treated 21 days for analyzing mineralization. Rivaroxaban (0.01-50 μg/ml) dose-dependently inhibited up to 60% DNA synthesis of the cells. Creatine kinase-specific activity was also inhibited dose-dependently to a similar extent by the same concentrations. Alkaline phosphatase-specific activity was dose-dependently inhibited but only up to 30%. Cell mineralization was unaffected by 10 μg/ml rivaroxaban. This model demonstrated a significant rivaroxaban-induced reduction in osteoblastic cell growth and energy metabolism, and slight inhibition of the osteoblastic marker, alkaline phosphatase, while osteoblastic mineralization was unaffected. These findings might indicate that rivaroxaban inhibits the first stage of bone formation but does not affect later stages (i.e., bone mineralization).

  10. Phenyltriazolinones as potent factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Quan, Mimi L; Pinto, Donald J P; Rossi, Karen A; Sheriff, Steven; Alexander, Richard S; Amparo, Eugene; Kish, Kevin; Knabb, Robert M; Luettgen, Joseph M; Morin, Paul; Smallwood, Angela; Woerner, Francis J; Wexler, Ruth R

    2010-02-15

    We have discovered that phenyltriazolinone is a novel and potent P1 moiety for coagulation factor Xa. X-ray structures of the inhibitors with a phenyltriazolinone in the P1 position revealed that the side chain of Asp189 has reoriented resulting in a novel S1 binding pocket which is larger in size to accommodate the phenyltriazolinone P1 substrate.

  11. The effect of the direct factor Xa inhibitors apixaban and rivaroxaban on haemostasis tests: a comprehensive assessment using in vitro and ex vivo samples.

    PubMed

    Bonar, Roslyn; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Mohammed, Soma; Ahuja, Monica; Pasalic, Leonardo; Sioufi, John; Marsden, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), now including dabigatran, apixaban and rivaroxaban, have given clinicians alternative options to low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) and vitamin K antagonist therapy, including warfarin, for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolic (VTE) disease. DOACs have been successfully marketed as not requiring monitoring; however, there will be situations where clinicians will request laboratory testing, including emergency department admissions for haemorrhage or thrombosis, or emergency surgical interventions. We report the results of several Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia Quality Assurance Programs (RCPAQAP) surveys using apixaban and rivaroxaban spiked samples to either assess the suitability of certain potential screening or drug-quantifying assays, for assessment of drug presence or absence or measurement of levels, as well as assessing potential interference in a wide variety of haemostasis assays. We also include additional evaluations using ex vivo samples from patients given apixaban and rivaroxaban for various therapeutic reasons. The prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) show better sensitivity with rivaroxaban than apixaban. Anti-Xa assays show good concordance and reproducibility with expected drug levels; however, availability of these assays may be limited to larger institutions. Interference of apixaban and rivaroxaban on haemostasis testing extends beyond routine coagulation assays to encompass a plethora of specialised assays, including factor assays, lupus inhibitor, and FVIII inhibitor estimation. In conclusion, this report highlights the influence of these drugs on most tests performed in haemostasis laboratories, and the potential for some tests to predict the presence, absence or level of these drugs in plasma.

  12. Comparative evaluation of direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors with antiplatelet agents under flow and static conditions: an in vitro flow chamber model.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Kazuya; Ohnishi, Tomoko; Sameshima, Hisayo; Miura, Naoki; Koide, Takehiko; Maruyama, Ikuro; Tanaka, Kenichi A

    2014-01-01

    Dabigatran and rivaroxaban are novel oral anticoagulants that specifically inhibit thrombin and factor Xa, respectively. The aim of this study is to elucidate antithrombotic properties of these anticoagulant agents under arterial and venous shear conditions. Whole blood samples treated with dabigatran or rivaroxaban at 250, 500, and 1000 nM, with/without aspirin and AR-C66096, a P2Y12 antagonist, were perfused over a microchip coated with collagen and tissue thromboplastin at shear rates of 240 and 600 s(-1). Fibrin-rich platelet thrombus formation was quantified by monitoring flow pressure changes. Dabigatran at higher concentrations (500 and 1000 nM) potently inhibited thrombus formation at both shear rates, whereas 1000 nM of rivaroxaban delayed, but did not completely inhibit, thrombus formation. Dual antiplatelet agents weakly suppressed thrombus formation at both shear rates, but intensified the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran and rivaroxaban. The anticoagulant effects of dabigatran and rivaroxaban were also evaluated under static conditions using thrombin generation (TG) assay. In platelet-poor plasma, dabigatran at 250 and 500 nM efficiently prolonged the lag time (LT) and moderately reduce peak height (PH) of TG, whereas rivaroxaban at 250 nM efficiently prolonged LT and reduced PH of TG. In platelet-rich plasma, however, both anticoagulants efficiently delayed LT and reduced PH of TG. Our results suggest that dabigatran and rivaroxaban may exert distinct antithrombotic effects under flow conditions, particularly in combination with dual antiplatelet therapy.

  13. Rivaroxaban, a direct inhibitor of the coagulation factor Xa interferes with hormonal-induced physiological modulations in human female osteoblastic cell line SaSO2.

    PubMed

    Somjen, Dalia; Katzburg, Sara; Gigi, Roi; Dolkart, Oleg; Sharon, Orli; Salai, Moshe; Stern, Naftali

    2013-05-01

    The use of anticoagulants has been associated with systemic osteoporosis and increased risk for poor fracture healing but is inevitable following major orthopedic surgery of lower limbs. Rivaroxaban A (R) is an anticoagulant recently introduced in the clinical setting, which is a specific factor Xa inhibitor. We reported previously that R significantly inhibited cell growth, energy metabolism and alkaline phosphatase activity in human osteoblastic cell line SaOS2, with no effect on mineralization, indicating transient inhibition of bone formation. We now investigated the effects of R on SaOS2 response to osteoblast-modulating hormones. At sub-confluence cells were treated with: estradiol-17β (E2), the phytoestrogens daidzein (D) and biochainin A (BA), the carboxy-pytoestrogenic derivative carboxy-D (cD), the estrogen receptor α (ERα) agonist PPT, the estrogen receptor β (ERβ) agonist DPN, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and several vitamin D metabolites and analogs with/without R for 24h. All hormones tested stimulated significantly DNA synthesis (DNA), creatine kinase (CK) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) specific activities, but all these stimulations were totally inhibited when given together with R. R had no effect on mRNA expression of ERα, ERβ and 25 Hydroxy-vitamin D3-1α hydroxylase (1OHase), but inhibited hormonal modulations of mRNA expressions. In conclusion R inhibited significantly hormonal stimulation of different parameters indicating inhibition of not only the early stages of bone formation, but also the stimulatory effects of bone modulating hormones with a yet unclear mechanism. The relevance of these findings to human bone physiology is yet to be investigated.

  14. Kinetic characterization of factor Xa binding using a quenched fluorescent substrate based on the reactive site of factor Xa inhibitor from Bauhinia ungulata seeds.

    PubMed

    Oliva, M L V; Andrade, S A; Juliano, M A; Sallai, R C; Torquato, R J; Sampaio, M U; Pott, V J; Sampaio, C A M

    2003-07-01

    The specific Kunitz Bauhinia ungulata factor Xa inhibitor (BuXI) and the Bauhinia variegata trypsin inhibitor (BvTI) blocked the activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, plasmin, plasma kallikrein and factor XIIa, and factor Xa inhibition was achieved only by BuXI (K(i) 14 nM). BuXI and BvTI are highly homologous (70%). The major differences are the methionine residues at BuXI reactive site, which are involved in the inhibition, since the oxidized protein no longer inhibits factor Xa but maintains the trypsin inhibition. Quenched fluorescent substrates based on the reactive site sequence of the inhibitors were synthesized and the kinetic parameters of the hydrolysis were determined using factor Xa and trypsin. The catalytic efficiency k(cat)/K(m) 4.3 x 10(7) M(-1)sec(>-1) for Abz-VMIAALPRTMFIQ-EDDnp (lead peptide) hydrolysis by factor Xa was 10(4)-fold higher than that of Boc-Ile-Glu-Gly-Arg-AMC, widely used as factor Xa substrate. Lengthening of the substrate changed its susceptibility to factor Xa hydrolysis. Both methionine residues in the substrate influence the binding to factor Xa. Serine replacement of threonine (P(1)') decreases the catalytic efficiency by four orders of magnitude. Factor Xa did not hydrolyze the substrate containing the reactive site sequence of BvTI, that inhibits trypsin inhibitor but not factor Xa. Abz-VMIAALPRTMFIQ-EDDnp prolonged both the prothrombin time and the activated partial thromboplastin time, and the other modified substrates used in this experiment altered blood-clotting assays.

  15. Factor Xa stimulates fibroblast procollagen production, proliferation, and calcium signaling via PAR{sub 1} activation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc-Brude, Olivier P. . E-mail: olivier.blanc-brude@larib.inserm.fr; Archer, Fabienne; Leoni, Patricia; Derian, Claudia; Bolsover, Steven; Laurent, Geoffrey J.; Chambers, Rachel C.

    2005-03-10

    Fibroblast proliferation and procollagen production are central features of tissue repair and fibrosis. In addition to its role in blood clotting, the coagulation cascade proteinase thrombin can contribute to tissue repair by stimulating fibroblasts via proteolytic activation of proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR{sub 1}). During hemostasis, the coagulation cascade proteinase factor X is converted into factor Xa. We have previously shown that factor Xa upregulates fibroblast proliferation via production of autocrine PDGF. In this study, we further examined the effects of factor Xa on fibroblast function and aimed to identify its signaling receptor. We showed that factor Xa stimulates procollagen promoter activity and protein production by human and mouse fibroblasts. This effect was independent of PDGF and thrombin production, but dependent on factor Xa proteolytic activity. We also showed that PAR{sub 1}-deficient mouse fibroblasts did not upregulate procollagen production, mobilize cytosolic calcium, or proliferate in response to factor Xa. Desensitization techniques and PAR{sub 1}-specific agonists and inhibitors were used to demonstrate that PAR{sub 1} mediates factor Xa signaling in human fibroblasts. This is the first report that factor Xa stimulates extracellular matrix production. In contrast with endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts appear to be the only cell type in which the effects of factor Xa are mediated mainly via PAR{sub 1} and not PAR{sub 2}. These findings are critical for our understanding of tissue repair and fibrotic mechanisms, and for the design of novel approaches to inhibit the profibrotic effects of the coagulation cascade without compromising blood hemostasis.

  16. New advances in the discovery of thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vacca, J P

    2000-08-01

    The search for the ideal anticoagulant has spanned decades and has resulted in several strategies including the clinical use of heparin, low molecular weight heparins, and the vitamin K antagonist warfarin. Over the past five years, many groups have reported preclinical results with direct-acting thrombin inhibitors and several of these are now moving into clinical trials. In addition, many groups have disclosed the discovery of potent, orally bioavailable factor Xa inhibitors. Several of these compounds are now in early clinical trials and the results are forthcoming.

  17. [Management of major bleeding complications and emergency surgery in patients on long-term treatment with direct oral anticoagulants, thrombin or factor-Xa inhibitors. Proposals of the Working Group on Perioperative Haemostasis (GIHP) - March 2013].

    PubMed

    Pernod, G; Albaladejo, P; Godier, A; Samama, C M; Susen, S; Gruel, Y; Blais, N; Fontana, P; Cohen, A; Llau, J V; Rosencher, N; Schved, J F; de Maistre, E; Samama, M M; Mismetti, P; Sié, P

    2013-10-01

    New direct oral anticoagulants (NOAC), inhibitors of factor IIa or Xa, are expected to be widely used for the treatment of venous thromboembolic disease, or in case of atrial fibrillation. Such anticoagulant treatments are known to be associated with haemorrhagic complications. Moreover, it is likely that such patients on long-term treatment with NOAC will be exposed to emergency surgery or invasive procedures. Due to the present lack of experience in such conditions, we cannot make recommendations, but only propose management for optimal safety as regards the risk of bleeding in such emergency conditions. In this article, only dabigatran and rivaroxaban were discussed. For emergency surgery at risk of bleeding, we propose to dose the plasmatic concentration of drug. Levels inferior or equal to 30ng/mL for both dabigatran and rivaroxaban, should enable the realization of a high bleeding risk surgery. For higher concentration, it was proposed to postpone surgery by monitoring the evolution of the drug concentration. Action is then defined by the kind of NOAC and its concentration. If the dosage of the drug is not immediately available, proposals only based on the usual tests, PT and aPTT, also are presented. However, these tests do not really assess drug concentration or bleeding risk. In case of severe haemorrhage in a critical organ, it is proposed to reduce the effect of anticoagulant therapy using a nonspecific procoagulant drug (activated prothrombin concentrate, FEIBA, 30-50U/kg, or non-activated 4-factors prothrombin concentrates 50U/kg). For any other type of severe haemorrhage, the administration of such a procoagulant drug, potentially thrombogenic in these patients, will be discussed regarding concentration of NACO and possibilities for mechanical haemostasis.

  18. Management of major bleeding complications and emergency surgery in patients on long-term treatment with direct oral anticoagulants, thrombin or factor-Xa inhibitors: proposals of the working group on perioperative haemostasis (GIHP) - March 2013.

    PubMed

    Pernod, Gilles; Albaladejo, Pierre; Godier, Anne; Samama, Charles M; Susen, Sophie; Gruel, Yves; Blais, Normand; Fontana, Pierre; Cohen, Ariel; Llau, Juan V; Rosencher, Nadia; Schved, Jean-François; de Maistre, Emmanuel; Samama, Meyer M; Mismetti, Patrick; Sié, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Direct new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) - inhibitors of thrombin or factor Xa - are intended to be used largely in the treatment of venous thromboembolic disease or the prevention of systematic embolism in atrial fibrillation, instead of vitamin K antagonists. Like any anticoagulant treatment, they are associated with spontaneous or provoked haemorrhagic risk. Furthermore, a significant proportion of treated patients are likely to be exposed to emergency surgery or invasive procedures. Given the absence of a specific antidote, the action to be taken in these situations must be defined. The lack of data means that it is only possible to issue proposals rather than recommendations, which will evolve according to accumulated experience. The proposals presented here apply to dabigatran (Pradaxa(®)) and rivaroxaban (Xarelto(®)); data for apixaban and edoxaban are still scarce. For urgent surgery with haemorrhagic risk, the drug plasma concentration should be less or equal to 30ng/mL for dabigatran and rivaroxaban should enable surgery associated with a high bleeding risk. Beyond that, if possible, the intervention should be postponed by monitoring the drug concentration. The course to follow is then defined according to the NOAC and its concentration. If the anticoagulant dosage is not immediately available, worse propositions, based on the usual tests (prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time), are presented. However, these tests do not really assess drug concentration or the risk of bleeding that depends on it. In case of serious bleeding in a critical organ, the effect of anticoagulant therapy should be reduced using a non-specific procoagulant drug as a first-line approach: activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC) (FEIBA(®) 30-50U/kg) or non-activated PCC (50U/kg). In addition, for any other type of severe haemorrhage, the administration of a procoagulant drug, which is potentially thrombogenic in these patients, is discussed according

  19. Kinetic characterization of the protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor reaction with blood coagulation factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Swanson, Richard; Broze, George J; Olson, Steven T

    2008-10-31

    Protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) is a recently identified member of the serpin superfamily that functions as a cofactor-dependent regulator of blood coagulation factors Xa (FXa) and XIa. Here we show that ZPI and its cofactor, protein Z (PZ), inhibit procoagulant membrane-bound factor Xa by the branched pathway acyl-intermediate trapping mechanism used by other serpins, but with significant variations of this mechanism that are unique to ZPI. Rapid kinetic analyses showed that the reaction proceeded by the initial assembly of a membrane-associated PZ-ZPI-FXa Michaelis complex (K(M) 53+/-5 nM) followed by conversion to a stable ZPI-FXa complex (k(lim) 1.2+/-0.1 s(-1)). Cofactor premixing experiments together with independent kinetic analyses of ZPI-PZ and factor Xa-PZ-membrane complex formation suggested that assembly of the Michaelis complex through either ZPI-PZ-lipid or factor Xa-PZ-lipid intermediates was rate-limiting. Reaction stoichiometry analyses and native PAGE showed that for every factor Xa molecule inhibited by ZPI, two serpin molecules were cleaved. Native PAGE and immunoblotting showed that PZ dissociated from ZPI once ZPI forms a stable complex with FXa, and kinetic analyses confirmed that PZ acted catalytically to accelerate the membrane-dependent ZPI-factor Xa reaction. The ZPI-FXa complex was only transiently stable and dissociated with a rate constant that showed a bell-shaped pH dependence indicative of participation of factor Xa active-site residues. The complex was detectable by SDS-PAGE when denatured at low pH, consistent with it being a kinetically trapped covalent acyl-intermediate. Together our findings show that ZPI functions like other serpins to regulate the activity of FXa but in a manner uniquely dependent on protein Z, procoagulant membranes, and pH.

  20. Role of Factor Xa Inhibitors in Cancer-Associated Thrombosis: Any New Data?

    PubMed Central

    Zalpour, Ali; Kroll, Michael H.; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid; Yusuf, Syed Wamique; Escalante, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    The association between cancer and venous thromboembolism (VTE) has been well documented in the literature. Prevention and treatment of VTE in cancer patients is imperative. Typically, the mainstay regimen for VTE prevention and treatment has been anticoagulation therapy, unless contraindicated. This therapy consists of unfractionated heparin (UFH), low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), factor Xa inhibitor, or vitamin K antagonist (VKA). Current guidelines recommend LMWH over VKA for the treatment of VTE in cancer patients. Factor-specific anticoagulants have been proven safe and effective, and recently factor Xa inhibitors have emerged as a treatment alternative to heparins and VKA. Currently, three factor Xa inhibitors have been identified: fondaparinux (the only one approved so far by the US Food and Drug Administration), idraparinux (in clinical trials), and idrabiotaparinux (in clinical trials). This paper will examine the role of these agents, focusing on fondaparinux, for the prevention and treatment of VTE in cancer patients. PMID:22013445

  1. Anti-xa directed protocol for anticoagulation management in children supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, L Carlisle; Alten, Jeffrey A; Goldberg, Kellen G; Timpa, Joseph G; Phillips, Jay; Laney, Debbie; Borasino, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The optimum heparin monitoring method during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is unknown. We report a protocol utilizing only anti-factor Xa (anti-Xa) to manage anticoagulation in 22 consecutive ECMO patients. Anti-Xa was monitored with heparin titration every hour until goal 0.4-0.8 IU/ml. Once therapeutic, monitoring was progressively spaced up to every 6 hours. Patients received frequent antithrombin III (ATIII). Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation indications were as follows: 13 cardiorespiratory failures, eight extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitations (ECPRs), and one pulmonary hypertension. Median weight was 4 kg, age 12.5 days, and ECMO duration 88 hours. Survival was 50%. Mean heparin dose was 38 ± 11 unit/kg/hr. Eight patients received no heparin for median 9 hours because of postoperative bleeding. Compared with prior activated clotting time (ACT) protocol, there were 20 fewer blood draws per day to manage anticoagulation, p < 0.001. Only 9% of the anti-Xa levels were outside therapeutic range versus 22% using ACT, p < 0.01. Six patients had bleeding complications, and seven had oxygenator change-out. Change-out was associated with blood product administration and bleeding but not with heparin-free period (p = 0.39). Survival to discharge was higher among those who did not require circuit/oxygenator change-outs, 4/7 versus 7/7 (p < 0.01). Anti-factor Xa-based ECMO heparin management protocol is feasible, decreases blood sampling and heparin infusion adjustments, and does not appear to increase complications.

  2. The relative molecular mass dependence of the anti-factor Xa properties of heparin.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, V; Scully, M F; Kakkar, V V

    1986-01-01

    The effect of heparin fractions of various Mr, with high affinity for antithrombin III, on the kinetics of the reaction between factor Xa and antithrombin III have been studied using purified human proteins. Each of the heparin fractions, which varied between pentasaccharide and Mr 32,000, accelerated the inhibition of factor Xa although an increasing rate of inhibition was observed with increasing Mr. The chemically synthesized pentasaccharide preparation (Mr 1714) gave a maximum inhibition rate constant of 1.2 X 10(7) M-1 X min-1, compared with 6.3 X 10(4) M-1 X min-1 in the absence of heparin, and this rose progressively to 4.2 X 10(8) M-1 X min-1 with the two fractions of highest Mr (22,500 and 32,000). The 35-fold difference in inhibition rates observed with the high-affinity fractions was virtually abolished by the presence of 0.3 M-NaCl. The disparity in these rates of inhibition was shown to be due to a change in the Km for factor Xa when a two-substrate model of heparin catalysis was used. The Km for factor Xa rose from 28 nM for the fraction of Mr 32,000 to 770 nM for the pentasaccharide, whilst 0.3 M-NaCl also caused an increase in Km with the high-Mr fraction. These data suggest that the increased rates of inhibition observed with heparins of higher Mr may be due to an involvement of heparin binding to factor Xa as well as to antithrombin III. PMID:3800942

  3. Stabilizing of a globular protein by a highly complex water network: a molecular dynamics simulation study on factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Wallnoefer, Hannes G; Handschuh, Sandra; Liedl, Klaus R; Fox, Thomas

    2010-06-03

    The role of water molecules is increasingly attracting attention in structural biology, and many studies have demonstrated their crucial contribution to the stability and function of proteins. Here, we present molecular dynamics studies on factor Xa (fXa) to investigate the effect of water molecules in this serine protease. fXa is a key enzyme in the blood coagulation cascade, and thus, an important target for antithrombotic drugs. A reasonable representation of the structure is crucial for an investigation at the molecular level and, thus, a prerequisite for structure-based drug design. Simulations of well-resolved fXa X-ray structures with different sets of water molecules show the importance of a well-determined water set for the simulation. We discuss implications of different water sets on the structure and dynamics of fXa.

  4. Pharmacophore identification, in silico screening, and virtual library design for inhibitors of the human factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Krovat, Eva M; Frühwirth, Karin H; Langer, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    Factor Xa inhibitors are innovative anticoagulant agents that provide a better safety/efficacy profile compared to other anticoagulative drugs. A chemical feature-based modeling approach was applied to identify crucial pharmacophore patterns from 3D crystal structures of inhibitors bound to human factor Xa (Pdb entries 1fjs, 1kns, 1eqz) using the software LIGANDSCOUT and CATALYST. The complex structures were selected regarding the criteria of high inhibitory potency (i.e. all ligands show K(i) values against factor Xa in the subnanomolar range) and good resolution (i.e. at least 2.2 A) in order to generate selective and high quality pharmacophore models. The resulting chemical-feature based hypotheses were used for virtual screening of commercial molecular databases such as the WDI database. Furthermore, a ligand-based molecular modeling approach was performed to obtain common-feature hypotheses that represent the relevant chemical interactions between 10 bioactive factor Xa inhibitors and the protein, respectively. In a next step a virtual combinatorial library was designed in order to generate new compounds with similar chemical and spatial properties as known inhibitors. The software tool ILIB DIVERSE was used for this procedure in order to provide new scaffolds of this group of anticoagulants. Finally we present the combination of these two techniques, hence virtual screening was performed with selective pharmacophore models in a focused virtual combinatorial database. De novo derived molecular scaffolds that were able to adequately satisfy the pharmacophore criteria are revealed and are promising templates for candidates for further development.

  5. Contemporary developments in the discovery of selective factor Xa inhibitors: A review.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nirav R; Patel, Dushyant V; Murumkar, Prashant R; Yadav, Mange Ram

    2016-10-04

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of death in cardiovascular diseases such as myocardial infarction (MI), unstable angina and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the industrialized world. Venous thromboembolism is observed in about 1 million people every year in United States causing significant morbidity and mortality. Conventional antithrombotic therapy has been reported to have several disadvantages and limitations like inconvenience in oral administration, bleeding risks (heparin analogs), narrow therapeutic window and undesirable interactions with food and drugs (vitamin K antagonist-warfarin). The unmet medical demand for orally active safe anticoagulants has generated widespread interest among the medicinal chemists engaged in this field. To modulate blood coagulation, various enzymes involved in the coagulation process have received great attention as potential targets by various research groups for the development of oral anticoagulants. Among these enzymes, factor Xa (FXa) has remained the centre of attention in the last decade. Intensive research efforts have been made by various research groups for the development of small, safe and orally bioavailable FXa inhibitors. This review is an attempt to compile the research work of various researchers in the direction of development of FXa inhibitors reported since 2010 onward.

  6. Phosphatidylserine-induced factor Xa dimerization and binding to factor Va are competing processes in solution.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Rinku; Koklic, Tilen; Rezaie, Alireza R; Lentz, Barry R

    2013-01-08

    A soluble, short chain phosphatidylserine, 1,2-dicaproyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (C6PS), binds to discrete sites on FXa, FVa, and prothrombin to alter their conformations, to promote FXa dimerization (K(d) ~ 14 nM), and to enhance both the catalytic activity of FXa and the cofactor activity of FVa. In the presence of calcium, C6PS binds to two sites on FXa, one in the epidermal growth factor-like (EGF) domain and one in the catalytic domain; the latter interaction is sensitive to Na(+) binding and probably represents a protein recognition site. Here we ask whether dimerization of FXa and its binding to FVa in the presence of C6PS are competitive processes. We monitored FXa activity at 5, 20, and 50 nM FXa while titrating with FVa in the presence of 400 μM C6PS and 3 or 5 mM Ca(2+) to show that the apparent K(d) of FVa-FXa interaction increased with an increase in FXa concentration at 5 mM Ca(2+), but the K(d) was only slightly affected at 3 mM Ca(2+). A mixture of 50 nM FXa and 50 nM FVa in the presence of 400 μM C6PS yielded both Xa homodimers and Xa·Va heterodimers, but no FXa dimers bound to FVa. A mutant FXa (R165A) that has reduced prothrombinase activity showed both weakened dimerization (K(d) ~ 147 nM) and weakened FVa binding (apparent K(d) values of 58, 92, and 128 nM for 5, 20, and 50 nM R165A FXa, respectively). Native gel electrophoresis showed that the GLA-EGF(NC) fragment of FXa (lacking the catalytic domain) neither dimerized nor formed a complex with FVa in the presence of 400 μM C6PS and 5 mM Ca(2+). Our results demonstrate that the dimerization site and FVa-binding site are both located in the catalytic domain of FXa and that these sites are linked thermodynamically.

  7. Structure-based drug design of pyrrolidine-1, 2-dicarboxamides as a novel series of orally bioavailable factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Van Huis, Chad A; Bigge, Christopher F; Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Cody, Wayne L; Dudley, Danette A; Filipski, Kevin J; Heemstra, Ronald J; Kohrt, Jeffrey T; Narasimhan, Lakshmi S; Schaum, Robert P; Zhang, Erli; Bryant, John W; Haarer, Staci; Janiczek, Nancy; Leadley, Robert J; McClanahan, Thomas; Thomas Peterson, J; Welch, Kathleen M; Edmunds, Jeremy J

    2007-06-01

    A novel series of pyrrolidine-1,2-dicarboxamides was discovered as factor Xa inhibitors using structure-based drug design. This series consisted of a neutral 4-chlorophenylurea P1, a biphenylsulfonamide P4 and a D-proline scaffold (1, IC(50) = 18 nM). Optimization of the initial hit resulted in an orally bioavailable, subnanomolar inhibitor of factor Xa (13, IC(50) = 0.38 nM), which was shown to be efficacious in a canine electrolytic model of thrombosis with minimal bleeding.

  8. Acylcarnitines are anticoagulants that inhibit factor Xa and are reduced in venous thrombosis, based on metabolomics data

    PubMed Central

    Deguchi, Hiroshi; Banerjee, Yajnavalka; Trauger, Sunia; Siuzdak, Gary; Kalisiak, Ewa; Fernández, José A.; Hoang, Linh; Tran, Minerva; Yegneswaran, Subramanian; Elias, Darlene J.

    2015-01-01

    In many patients with deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (venous thromboembolism, VTE), biomarkers or genetic risk factors have not been identified. To discover novel plasma metabolites associated with VTE risk, we employed liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based untargeted metabolomics, which do not target any specific metabolites. Using the Scripps Venous Thrombosis Registry population for a case-control study, we discovered that 10:1 and 16:1 acylcarnitines were low in plasmas of the VTE patient group compared with matched controls, respectively. Data from targeted metabolomics studies showed that several long-chain acylcarnitines (10:1, 12:0, 12:2, 18:1, and 18:2) were lower in the VTE group. Clotting assays were used to evaluate a causal relationship for low acylcarnitines in patients with VTE. Various acylcarnitines inhibited factor Xa-initiated clotting. Inhibition of factor Xa by acylcarnitines was greater for longer acyl chains. Mechanistic studies showed that 16:0 acylcarnitine had anticoagulant activity in the absence of factor Va or phospholipids. Surface plasmon resonance investigations revealed that 16:0 acylcarnitine was bound to factor Xa and that binding did not require the γ-carboxy glutamic acid domain. In summary, our study identified low plasma levels of acylcarnitines in patients with VTE and showed that acylcarnitines have anticoagulant activity related to an ability to bind and inhibit factor Xa. PMID:26175037

  9. A NMR and MD study of the active site of factor Xa by selective inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, B. T.; Fraternali, F.; Do, Q. T.; Atkinson, R. A.; Palmas, P.; Sklenar, V.; Wildgoose, P.; Strop, P.; Saudek, V.

    1998-02-01

    The structure of two selective inhibitors obtained by the screening of a vast combinatorial library, Ac-Tyr-Ile-Arg-Ile-NH2 and Ac-(4-amino-Phe)-(Cyc.-Gly)-NH2, in the active site of the blood clotting enzyme factor Xa was determined using transferred NOE NMR and simulated annealing (SA) under NMR constraints. The refined structures of the inhibitors were docked in the active site and SA was performed inside the enzyme which has been kept as a rigid charged template. The final structures were optimised by molecular dynamics simulation of the complexes in water. The inhibitors assume a compact, very well defined conformation embedded in the binding site without blocking the catalysis. The model allows to explain the mode of action, affinity and specificity. L'étude structurale d'inhibiteurs du facteur Xa, une enzyme de coagulation, obtenus par chimie combinatoire : Ac-Tyr-Ile-Arg-Ile-NH2, Ac-(4-amino-Phe)-(Cyc.-Gly)-NH2, a été réalisée par RMN NOE de transfert et modélisation moléculaire. Les structures ont été calculées sous contraintes RMN : géométrie de distance, recuit simulé et minimisation, affinées par une recherche conformationnelle et recuit de l'inhibiteur placé dans le site actif et optimisées par simulation de dynamique moléculaire du complexe dans l'eau. L'inhibiteur présente une structure compacte positionnée dans le site d'interaction hors d'accès du site catalytique. Ce modèle permet d'expliquer le mode d'action, l'affinité et la spécificité des peptides.

  10. Group D prothrombin activators from snake venom are structural homologues of mammalian blood coagulation factor Xa.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Veena S; Joseph, Jeremiah S; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2003-01-01

    Procoagulant venoms of several Australian elapids contain proteinases that specifically activate prothrombin; among these, Group D activators are functionally similar to coagulation factor Xa (FXa). Structural information on this class of prothrombin activators will contribute significantly towards understanding the mechanism of FXa-mediated prothrombin activation. Here we present the purification of Group D prothrombin activators from three Australian snake venoms (Hoplocephalus stephensi, Notechis scutatus scutatus and Notechis ater niger) using a single-step method, and their N-terminal sequences. The N-terminal sequence of the heavy chain of hopsarin D (H. stephensi) revealed that a fully conserved Cys-7 was substituted with a Ser residue. We therefore determined the complete amino acid sequence of hopsarin D. Hopsarin D shows approximately 70% similarity with FXa and approximately 98% similarity with trocarin D, a Group D prothrombin activator from Tropidechis carinatus. It possesses the characteristic Gla domain, two epidermal growth factor-like domains and a serine proteinase domain. All residues important for catalysis are conserved, as are most regions involved in interactions with factor Va and prothrombin. However, there are some structural differences. Unlike FXa, hopsarin D is glycosylated in both its chains: in light-chain residue 52 and heavy-chain residue 45. The glycosylation on the heavy chain is a large carbohydrate moiety adjacent to the active-site pocket. Overall, hopsarin D is structurally and functionally similar to mammalian coagulation FXa. PMID:12403650

  11. A novel microfluidic anti-factor Xa assay device for monitoring anticoagulant therapy at the point-of-care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Leanne F.; Rainey, Paul; Castro-López, Vanessa; O'Donnell, James S.; Killard, Anthony J.

    2013-05-01

    Millions of patients worldwide are receiving anticoagulant therapy to treat hypercoagulable diseases. While standard testing is still performed in the central laboratory, point-of-care (POC) diagnostics are being developed due to the increasing number of patients requiring long-term anticoagulation and with a need for more personalized and targeted therapy. Many POC devices on the market focus on clot measurement, a technique which is limited in terms of variability, highlighting the need for more reliable assays of anticoagulant status. The anti-Xa assay, a factor specific optical assay, was developed to measure the extent to which exogenous factor Xa (FXa) is inhibited by heparinantithrombin complexes. We have developed a novel microfluidic device and assay for monitoring the effect of heparin anticoagulant therapy at the point-of-care. The assay which was also developed in our institute is based on the anti-Xa assay principle but uses fluorescence as the method of detection. Our device is a disposable laminate microfluidic strip, fabricated from the cyclic polyolefin (COP), Zeonor®, which is extremely suitable for application to fluorescent device platforms. We present data on the execution of the anti-Xa assay in this microfluidic format, demonstrating that the assay can be used to measure heparin in human plasma samples from 0 to 0.8 U/ml, with average assay reproducibility of 8% and a rapid result obtained within 60 seconds. Results indicate that with further development, the fluorogenic anti-Xa assay and device could become a successful method for monitoring anticoagulant therapy.

  12. Hysteresis-like binding of coagulation factors X/Xa to procoagulant activated platelets and phospholipids results from multistep association and membrane-dependent multimerization.

    PubMed

    Podoplelova, Nadezhda A; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N; Kurasawa, James H; Sarafanov, Andrey G; Chambost, Herve; Vasil'ev, Sergey A; Demina, Irina A; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2016-06-01

    Binding of coagulation factors X (fX) and Xa (fXa) to activated platelets is required for the formation of membrane-dependent enzymatic complexes of intrinsic tenase and prothrombinase. We carried out an in-depth characterization of fX/fXa binding to phospholipids and gel-filtered, thrombin-activated platelets. Flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance, and computational modeling were used to investigate interactions of fX/fXa with the membranes. Confocal microscopy was employed to study fXa binding to platelet thrombi formed in flowing whole blood under arterial conditions. Binding of fX/fXa to either vesicles or procoagulant platelets did not follow a traditional one-step reversible binding model. Their dissociation was a two-step process resulting in a plateau that was up to 10-fold greater than the saturation value observed in the association experiments. Computational modeling and experimental evidence suggested that this was caused by a combination of two-step association (mainly for fX) and multimerization on the membrane (mainly for fXa). Importantly, fX formed multimers with fXa, thereby improving its retention. The same binding/dissociation hysteresis was observed for annexin V known to form trimers on the membranes. Experiments with platelets from gray syndrome patients showed that alpha-granular factor Va provided an additional high-affinity binding site for fXa that did not affect the hysteresis. Confocal microscopy observation of fXa binding to platelet thrombi in a flow chamber and its wash-out confirmed that this phenomenon persisted under physiologically relevant conditions. This suggests its possible role of "locking" coagulation factors on the membrane and preventing their inhibition in plasma and removal from thrombi by flow.

  13. The effect of Ca2+, phospholipid and factor V on the anti-(factor Xa) activity of heparin and its high-affinity oligosaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Barrowcliffe, T W; Havercroft, S J; Kemball-Cook, G; Lindahl, U

    1987-01-01

    The influence of Ca2+, phospholipid and Factor V was determined on the rate of inactivation of Factor Xa by antithrombin III, in the absence and in the presence of unfractionated heparin and of three high-affinity heparin oligosaccharides in the Mr range 1500-6000. In the absence of heparin the addition of Ca2+, phospholipid and Factor V caused a 4-fold decrease in rate of inactivation of Factor Xa. As concentrations of unfractionated heparin were increased the protective effect of Ca2+/phospholipid/Factor V was gradually abolished, and at a concentration of 2.4 nM there were no differences in rates of neutralization of Factor Xa in the presence or absence of Ca2+, phospholipid and Factor V. In contrast, heparin decasaccharide (Mr 3000) and pentasaccharide (Mr 1500) fragments were unable to overcome the protective effect of Ca2+/phospholipid/Factor V; in the presence of these components their catalytic efficiencies were 16-fold and 40-fold less respectively than that of unfractionated heparin. A heparin 20-22-saccharide fragment (Mr approx. 6000) gave similar inactivation rates in the presence and in the absence of Ca2+/phospholipid/Factor V. Human and bovine Factor Xa gave similar results. These results indicate that in the presence of Ca2+/phospholipid/Factor V optimum inhibition of Factor Xa requires a saccharide sequence of heparin additional to that involved in binding to antithrombin III. The use of free enzyme for the assessment of anti-(Factor Xa) activity of low-Mr heparin fractions could give misleading results. PMID:3606581

  14. Parenteral administration of factor Xa/IIa inhibitors limits experimental aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Corey S.; Seto, Sai-Wang; Krishna, Smriti M.; Sharma, Surabhi; Jose, Roby J.; Biros, Erik; Wang, Yutang; Morton, Susan K.; Golledge, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Intraluminal thrombus is a consistent feature of human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Coagulation factor Xa (FXa) catalyses FII to thrombin (FIIa). We examined the effect of FXa/FIIa inhibition on experimental aortic aneurysm in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE−/−) mice infused with angiotensin II (AngII). The concentration of FXa within the supra-renal aorta (SRA) correlated positively with SRA diameter. Parenteral administration of enoxaparin (FXa/IIa inhibitor) and fondaparinux (FXa inhibitor) over 14 days reduced to severity of aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis in AngII-infused ApoE−/− mice. Enteral administration of the FIIa inhibitor dabigatran had no significant effect. Aortic protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 expression increased in response to AngII infusion. Fondaparinux reduced SRA levels of FXa, FIIa, PAR-2, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2, Smad2/3 phosphorylation, and MOMA-2 positive cells in the mouse model. FXa stimulated Smad2/3 phosphorylation and MMP2 expression in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in vitro. Expression of MMP2 in FXa-stimulated VSMC was downregulated in the presence of a PAR-2 but not a PAR-1 inhibitor. These findings suggest that FXa/FIIa inhibition limits aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis severity due to down-regulation of vascular PAR-2-mediated Smad2/3 signalling and MMP2 expression. Inhibition of FXa/FIIa may be a potential therapy for limiting aortic aneurysm. PMID:28220880

  15. The Tick-Derived Anticoagulant Madanin Is Processed by Thrombin and Factor Xa

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Ana C.; de Sanctis, Daniele; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    The cysteine-less peptidic anticoagulants madanin-1 and madanin-2 from the bush tick Haemaphysalis longicornis are the founding members of the MEROPS inhibitor family I53. It has been previously suggested that madanins exert their functional activity by competing with physiological substrates for binding to the positively charged exosite I (fibrinogen-binding exosite) of α-thrombin. We hereby demonstrate that competitive inhibition of α-thrombin by madanin-1 or madanin-2 involves binding to the enzyme's active site. Moreover, the blood coagulation factors IIa and Xa are shown to hydrolyze both inhibitors at different, although partially overlapping cleavage sites. Finally, the three-dimensional structure of the complex formed between human α-thrombin and a proteolytic fragment of madanin-1, determined by X-ray crystallography, elucidates the molecular details of madanin-1 recognition and processing by the proteinase. Taken together, the current findings establish the mechanism of action of madanins, natural anticoagulants that behave as cleavable competitive inhibitors of thrombin. PMID:23951260

  16. Parenteral administration of factor Xa/IIa inhibitors limits experimental aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Moran, Corey S; Seto, Sai-Wang; Krishna, Smriti M; Sharma, Surabhi; Jose, Roby J; Biros, Erik; Wang, Yutang; Morton, Susan K; Golledge, Jonathan

    2017-02-21

    Intraluminal thrombus is a consistent feature of human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Coagulation factor Xa (FXa) catalyses FII to thrombin (FIIa). We examined the effect of FXa/FIIa inhibition on experimental aortic aneurysm in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice infused with angiotensin II (AngII). The concentration of FXa within the supra-renal aorta (SRA) correlated positively with SRA diameter. Parenteral administration of enoxaparin (FXa/IIa inhibitor) and fondaparinux (FXa inhibitor) over 14 days reduced to severity of aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis in AngII-infused ApoE(-/-) mice. Enteral administration of the FIIa inhibitor dabigatran had no significant effect. Aortic protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 expression increased in response to AngII infusion. Fondaparinux reduced SRA levels of FXa, FIIa, PAR-2, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2, Smad2/3 phosphorylation, and MOMA-2 positive cells in the mouse model. FXa stimulated Smad2/3 phosphorylation and MMP2 expression in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in vitro. Expression of MMP2 in FXa-stimulated VSMC was downregulated in the presence of a PAR-2 but not a PAR-1 inhibitor. These findings suggest that FXa/FIIa inhibition limits aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis severity due to down-regulation of vascular PAR-2-mediated Smad2/3 signalling and MMP2 expression. Inhibition of FXa/FIIa may be a potential therapy for limiting aortic aneurysm.

  17. Cleavage of spike protein of SARS coronavirus by protease factor Xa is associated with viral infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Lanying; Kao, Richard Y.; Zhou, Yusen; He, Yuxian; Zhao, Guangyu; Wong, Charlotte; Jiang, Shibo; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Jin, Dong-Yan; Zheng, Bo-Jian . E-mail: bzheng@hkucc.hku.hk

    2007-07-20

    The spike (S) protein of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has been known to recognize and bind to host receptors, whose conformational changes then facilitate fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membrane, leading to viral entry into target cells. However, other functions of SARS-CoV S protein such as proteolytic cleavage and its implications to viral infection are incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the infection of SARS-CoV and a pseudovirus bearing the S protein of SARS-CoV was inhibited by a protease inhibitor Ben-HCl. Also, the protease Factor Xa, a target of Ben-HCl abundantly expressed in infected cells, was able to cleave the recombinant and pseudoviral S protein into S1 and S2 subunits, and the cleavage was inhibited by Ben-HCl. Furthermore, this cleavage correlated with the infectivity of the pseudovirus. Taken together, our study suggests a plausible mechanism by which SARS-CoV cleaves its S protein to facilitate viral infection.

  18. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-07-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency.

  19. Basis for the specificity and activation of the serpin protein Z-dependent proteinase inhibitor (ZPI) as an inhibitor of membrane-associated factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Dementiev, Alexey; Olson, Steven T; Gettins, Peter G W

    2010-06-25

    The serpin ZPI is a protein Z (PZ)-dependent specific inhibitor of membrane-associated factor Xa (fXa) despite having an unfavorable P1 Tyr. PZ accelerates the inhibition reaction approximately 2000-fold in the presence of phospholipid and Ca(2+). To elucidate the role of PZ, we determined the x-ray structure of Gla-domainless PZ (PZ(DeltaGD)) complexed with protein Z-dependent proteinase inhibitor (ZPI). The PZ pseudocatalytic domain bound ZPI at a novel site through ionic and polar interactions. Mutation of four ZPI contact residues eliminated PZ binding and membrane-dependent PZ acceleration of fXa inhibition. Modeling of the ternary Michaelis complex implicated ZPI residues Glu-313 and Glu-383 in fXa binding. Mutagenesis established that only Glu-313 is important, contributing approximately 5-10-fold to rate acceleration of fXa and fXIa inhibition. Limited conformational change in ZPI resulted from PZ binding, which contributed only approximately 2-fold to rate enhancement. Instead, template bridging from membrane association, together with previously demonstrated interaction of the fXa and ZPI Gla domains, resulted in an additional approximately 1000-fold rate enhancement. To understand why ZPI has P1 tyrosine, we examined a P1 Arg variant. This reacted at a diffusion-limited rate with fXa, even without PZ, and predominantly as substrate, reflecting both rapid acylation and deacylation. P1 tyrosine thus ensures that reaction with fXa or most other arginine-specific proteinases is insignificant unless PZ binds and localizes ZPI and fXa on the membrane, where the combined effects of Gla-Gla interaction, template bridging, and interaction of fXa with Glu-313 overcome the unfavorability of P1 Tyr and ensure a high rate of reaction as an inhibitor.

  20. Basis for the Specificity and Activation of the Serpin Protein Z-dependent Proteinase Inhibitor (ZPI) as an Inhibitor of Membrane-associated Factor Xa

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Dementiev, Alexey; Olson, Steven T.; Gettins, Peter G.W.

    2012-12-13

    The serpin ZPI is a protein Z (PZ)-dependent specific inhibitor of membrane-associated factor Xa (fXa) despite having an unfavorable P1 Tyr. PZ accelerates the inhibition reaction {approx}2000-fold in the presence of phospholipid and Ca{sup 2+}. To elucidate the role of PZ, we determined the x-ray structure of Gla-domainless PZ (PZ{sub {Delta}GD}) complexed with protein Z-dependent proteinase inhibitor (ZPI). The PZ pseudocatalytic domain bound ZPI at a novel site through ionic and polar interactions. Mutation of four ZPI contact residues eliminated PZ binding and membrane-dependent PZ acceleration of fXa inhibition. Modeling of the ternary Michaelis complex implicated ZPI residues Glu-313 and Glu-383 in fXa binding. Mutagenesis established that only Glu-313 is important, contributing {approx}5-10-fold to rate acceleration of fXa and fXIa inhibition. Limited conformational change in ZPI resulted from PZ binding, which contributed only {approx}2-fold to rate enhancement. Instead, template bridging from membrane association, together with previously demonstrated interaction of the fXa and ZPI Gla domains, resulted in an additional {approx}1000-fold rate enhancement. To understand why ZPI has P1 tyrosine, we examined a P1 Arg variant. This reacted at a diffusion-limited rate with fXa, even without PZ, and predominantly as substrate, reflecting both rapid acylation and deacylation. P1 tyrosine thus ensures that reaction with fXa or most other arginine-specific proteinases is insignificant unless PZ binds and localizes ZPI and fXa on the membrane, where the combined effects of Gla-Gla interaction, template bridging, and interaction of fXa with Glu-313 overcome the unfavorability of P1 Tyr and ensure a high rate of reaction as an inhibitor.

  1. Structure-based design of novel guanidine/benzamidine mimics: potent and orally bioavailable factor Xa inhibitors as novel anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Lam, Patrick Y S; Clark, Charles G; Li, Renhua; Pinto, Donald J P; Orwat, Michael J; Galemmo, Robert A; Fevig, John M; Teleha, Christopher A; Alexander, Richard S; Smallwood, Angela M; Rossi, Karen A; Wright, Matthew R; Bai, Stephen A; He, Kan; Luettgen, Joseph M; Wong, Pancras C; Knabb, Robert M; Wexler, Ruth R

    2003-10-09

    As part of an ongoing effort to prepare orally active factor Xa inhibitors using structure-based drug design techniques and molecular recognition principles, a systematic study has been performed on the pharmacokinetic profile resulting from replacing the benzamidine in the P1 position with less basic benzamidine mimics or neutral residues. It is demonstrated that lowering the pK(a) of the P1 ligand resulted in compounds (3-benzylamine, 15a; 1-aminoisoquinoline, 24a; 3-aminobenzisoxazole, 23a; 3-phenylcarboxamide, 22b; and 4-methoxyphenyl, 22a) with improved pharmacokinetic features mainly as a result of decreased clearance, increased volume of distribution, and enhanced oral absorption. This work resulted in a series of potent and orally bioavailable factor Xa inhibitors that ultimately led to the discovery of SQ311, 24a. SQ311, which utilizes a 1-aminoisoquinoline as the P1 ligand, inhibits factor Xa with a K(i) of 0.33 nM and demonstrates both good in vivo antithrombotic efficacy and oral bioavailability.

  2. Coagulation factor Xa drives tumor cells into apoptosis through BH3-only protein Bim up-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Borensztajn, Keren S. . E-mail: K.S.Borensztajn@amc.uva.nl; Bijlsma, Maarten F.; Groot, Angelique P.; Brueggemann, Lois W.; Versteeg, Henri H.; Reitsma, Pieter H.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Spek, C. Arnold

    2007-07-15

    Coagulation Factor (F)Xa is a serine protease that plays a crucial role during blood coagulation by converting prothrombin into active thrombin. Recently, however, it emerged that besides this role in coagulation, FXa induces intracellular signaling leading to different cellular effects. Here, we show that coagulation factor (F)Xa drives tumor cells of epithelial origin, but not endothelial cells or monocytes, into apoptosis, whereas it even enhances fibroblast survival. FXa signals through the protease activated receptor (PAR)-1 to activate extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and p38. This activation is associated with phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB, and in tumor cells with up-regulation of the BH3-only pro-apoptotic protein Bim, leading to caspase-3 cleavage, the main hallmark of apoptosis. Transfection of tumor cells with dominant negative forms of CREB or siRNA for either PAR-1, Bim, ERK1 and/or p38 inhibited the pro-apoptotic effect of FXa. In fibroblasts, FXa-induced PAR-1 activation leads to down-regulation of Bim and pre-treatment with PAR-1 or Bim siRNA abolishes proliferation. We thus provide evidence that beyond its role in blood coagulation, FXa plays a key role in cellular processes in which Bim is the central player in determining cell survival.

  3. Staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 10 (SSL10) inhibits blood coagulation by binding to prothrombin and factor Xa via their γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Saotomo; Yokoyama, Ryosuke; Kamoshida, Go; Fujiwara, Toshinobu; Okada, Hiromi; Takii, Takemasa; Tsuji, Tsutomu; Fujii, Satoshi; Hashizume, Hideki; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2013-07-26

    The staphylococcal superantigen-like protein (SSL) family is composed of 14 exoproteins sharing structural similarity with superantigens but no superantigenic activity. Target proteins of four SSLs have been identified to be involved in host immune responses. However, the counterparts of other SSLs have been functionally uncharacterized. In this study, we have identified porcine plasma prothrombin as SSL10-binding protein by affinity purification using SSL10-conjugated Sepharose. The resin recovered the prodomain of prothrombin (fragment 1 + 2) as well as factor Xa in pull-down analysis. The equilibrium dissociation constant between SSL10 and prothrombin was 1.36 × 10(-7) M in surface plasmon resonance analysis. On the other hand, the resin failed to recover γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain-less coagulation factors and prothrombin from warfarin-treated mice, suggesting that the Gla domain of the coagulation factors is essential for the interaction. SSL10 prolonged plasma clotting induced by the addition of Ca(2+) and factor Xa. SSL10 did not affect the protease activity of thrombin but inhibited the generation of thrombin activity in recalcified plasma. S. aureus produces coagulase that non-enzymatically activates prothrombin. SSL10 attenuated clotting induced by coagulase, but the inhibitory effect was weaker than that on physiological clotting, and SSL10 did not inhibit protease activity of staphylothrombin, the complex of prothrombin with coagulase. These results indicate that SSL10 inhibits blood coagulation by interfering with activation of coagulation cascade via binding to the Gla domain of coagulation factor but not by directly inhibiting thrombin activity. This is the first finding that the bacterial protein inhibits blood coagulation via targeting the Gla domain of coagulation factors.

  4. Daboxin P, a Major Phospholipase A2 Enzyme from the Indian Daboia russelii russelii Venom Targets Factor X and Factor Xa for Its Anticoagulant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Janaki Krishnamurthy; Shih, Norrapat; Majumder, Munmi; Mattaparthi, Venkata Satish Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Rupak; Doley, Robin

    2016-01-01

    In the present study a major protein has been purified from the venom of Indian Daboia russelii russelii using gel filtration, ion exchange and Rp-HPLC techniques. The purified protein, named daboxin P accounts for ~24% of the total protein of the crude venom and has a molecular mass of 13.597 kDa. It exhibits strong anticoagulant and phospholipase A2 activity but is devoid of any cytotoxic effect on the tested normal or cancerous cell lines. Its primary structure was deduced by N-terminal sequencing and chemical cleavage using Edman degradation and tandem mass spectrometry. It is composed of 121 amino acids with 14 cysteine residues and catalytically active His48 -Asp49 pair. The secondary structure of daboxin P constitutes 42.73% of α-helix and 12.36% of β-sheet. It is found to be stable at acidic (pH 3.0) and neutral pH (pH 7.0) and has a Tm value of 71.59 ± 0.46°C. Daboxin P exhibits anticoagulant effect under in-vitro and in-vivo conditions. It does not inhibit the catalytic activity of the serine proteases but inhibits the activation of factor X to factor Xa by the tenase complexes both in the presence and absence of phospholipids. It also inhibits the tenase complexes when active site residue (His48) was alkylated suggesting its non-enzymatic mode of anticoagulant activity. Moreover, it also inhibits prothrombinase complex when pre-incubated with factor Xa prior to factor Va addition. Fluorescence emission spectroscopy and affinity chromatography suggest the probable interaction of daboxin P with factor X and factor Xa. Molecular docking analysis reveals the interaction of the Ca+2 binding loop; helix C; anticoagulant region and C-terminal region of daboxin P with the heavy chain of factor Xa. This is the first report of a phospholipase A2 enzyme from Indian viper venom which targets both factor X and factor Xa for its anticoagulant activity. PMID:27089306

  5. Assessment of anti-factor Xa activity of heparin in binary parenteral nutrition admixtures for premature neonates.

    PubMed

    Foinard, A; Perez, M; Barthélémy, C; Lannoy, D; Flamein, F; Storme, L; Tournoys, A; Décaudin, B; Odou, P

    2015-07-01

    An in vitro study was carried out to determine the anti-Xa activity of heparin in binary parenteral nutrition (BPN) admixtures for premature neonates in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) after a 24-hour infusion, as well as to assess drug interaction with a 50% glucose solution. Two types of bags were prepared: (1) BPN admixtures (composition defined in the NICU) including sodium heparin at 77 UI/mL and (2) bags containing only G50% with sodium heparin at 193 UI/mL. The anti-Xa activity of heparin was measured in bags at T0, after the 24-hour infusion and in eluates at the outlet of the infusion line after 24hours, using a validated chromogenic anti-Xa method. Comparisons of the mean concentration observed with the theoretical value for anti-Xa activity were performed with the Student t-test. Mean values of anti-Xa activity do not differ significantly from the values expected for all conditions. We found a slight variation in anti-Xa activity when infused over 24hours for both types of bags, with and without in-line filtration, showing that heparin remains stable during this infusion period in both BPN admixtures and G50%.

  6. CrataBL, a lectin and Factor Xa inhibitor, plays a role in blood coagulation and impairs thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Salu, Bruno R; Ferreira, Rodrigo S; Brito, Marlon V; Ottaiano, Tatiana F; Cruz, José Walber M C; Silva, Mariana Cristina C; Correia, Maria Tereza S; Paiva, Patrícia M G; Maffei, Francisco Humberto A; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela

    2014-09-01

    Arterial thrombosis is an important complication of diabetes and cancer, being an important target for therapeutic intervention. Crataeva tapia bark lectin (CrataBL) has been previously shown to have hypoglycemiant effect and also to induce cancer cell apoptosis. It also showed inhibitory activity against Factor Xa (Kiapp=8.6 μm). In the present study, we evaluated the anti-thrombotic properties of CrataBL in arterial thrombosis model. CrataBL prolongs the activated partial thromboplastin time on human and mouse plasma, and it impairs the heparin-induced potentiation of antithrombin III and heparin-induced platelet activation in the presence of low-dose ADP. It is likely that the dense track of positive charge on CrataBL surface competes with the heparin ability to bind to antithrombin III and to stimulate platelets. In the photochemically induced thrombosis model in mice, in the groups treated with 1.25, 5.0, or 10 mg/kg CrataBL, prior to the thrombus induction, the time of total artery occlusion was prolonged by 33.38%, 65%, and 66.11%, respectively, relative to the time of the control group. In contrast to heparin, the bleeding time in CrataBL-treated mice was no longer than in the control. In conclusion, CrataBL was effective in blocking coagulation and arterial thrombus formation, without increasing bleeding time.

  7. Microfluidic Chip-Based Online Screening Coupled to Mass Spectrometry: Identification of Inhibitors of Thrombin and Factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Janaki Krishnamoorthy; Otvos, Reka A; Kool, Jeroen; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2016-02-01

    Thrombin and factor Xa (FXa) are critical enzymes of the blood coagulation cascade and are excellent targets of anticoagulant agents. Natural sources present an array of anticoagulants that can be developed as antithrombotic drugs. High-resolution, online screening techniques have been developed for the identification of drug leads from complex mixtures. In this study, we have developed and optimized a microfluidic online screening technique coupled to nano-liquid chromatography (LC) and in parallel with a mass spectrometer for the identification of thrombin and FXa inhibitors in mixtures. Inhibitors eluting from the nano-LC were split postcolumn in a 1:1 ratio; half was fed into a mass spectrometer (where its mass is detected), and the other half was fed into a microfluidic chip (which acts as a microreactor for the online assays). With our platform, thrombin and FXa inhibitors were detected in the assay in parallel with their mass identification. These methods are suitable for the identification of inhibitors from sample amounts as low as sub-microliter volumes.

  8. Discovery of imidazo[1,5-c]imidazol-3-ones: weakly basic, orally active factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Imaeda, Yasuhiro; Kuroita, Takanobu; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Kawamoto, Tetsuji; Tobisu, Mamoru; Konishi, Noriko; Hiroe, Katsuhiko; Kawamura, Masaki; Tanaka, Toshimasa; Kubo, Keiji

    2008-06-26

    The coagulation enzyme factor Xa (FXa) has been recognized as a promising target for the development of new antithrombotic agents. We previously found compound 1 to be an orally bioavailable FXa inhibitor in fasted monkeys; however, 1 showed poor bioavailability in rats and fed monkeys. To work out the pharmacokinetic problems, we focused our synthetic efforts on the chemical conversion of the 4-(imidazo[1,2- a]pyridin-5-yl)piperazine moiety of 1 to imidazolylpiperidine derivatives (fused and nonfused), which resulted in the discovery of the weakly basic imidazo[1,5- c]imidazol-3-one 3q as a potent and selective FXa inhibitor. Compound 3q showed favorable oral bioavailability in rats and monkeys under both fasted and fed conditions and antithrombotic efficacy in a rat model of venous thrombosis after oral administration, without a significant increase in bleeding time (unlike warfarin). On the basis of these promising properties, compound 3q was selected for further evaluation.

  9. Human plasma kallikrein and tissue kallikrein binding to a substrate based on the reactive site of a factor Xa inhibitor isolated from Bauhinia ungulata seeds.

    PubMed

    Oliva, M L; Andrade, S A; Batista, I F; Sampaio, M U; Juliano, M; Fritz, H; Auerswald, E A; Sampaio, C A

    1999-12-01

    Kunitz type Bauhinia ungulata factor Xa inhibitor (BuXI) was purified from B. ungulata seeds. BuXI inactivates factor Xa and human plasma kallikrein (HuPK) with Ki values of 18.4 and 6.9 nM, respectively. However, Bauhinia variegata trypsin inhibitor (BvTI) which is 70% homologous to BuXI does not inhibit factor Xa and is less efficient on HuPK (Ki = 80 nM). The comparison between BuXI and BvTI reactive site structure indicates differences at Met59, Thr66 and Met67 residues. The hydrolysis rate of quenched fluorescence peptide substrates based on BuXI reactive site sequence, Abz-VMIAALPRTMFIQ-EDDnp (leading peptide), by HuPK and porcine pancreatic kallikrein (PoPK) is low, but hydrolysis is enhanced with Abz-VMIAALPRTMQ-EDDnp, derived from the leading peptide shortened by removing the dipeptide Phe-Ileu from the C-terminal portion, for HuPK (Km = 0.68 microM, k(cat)/Km = 1.3 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)), and the shorter substrate Abz-LPRTMQ-EDDnp is better for PoPK (Km = 0.66 microM, k(cat)/Km = 2.2 x 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)). The contribution of substrate methionine residues to HuPK and PoPK hydrolysis differs from that observed with factor Xa. The determined Km and k(cat) values suggest that the substrates interact with kallikreins the same as an enzyme and inhibitor interacts to form complexes.

  10. Effects of factor Xa on the expression of proteins in femoral arteries from type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    López-Farré, Antonio J; Rodriguez-Sierra, Pablo; Modrego, Javier; Segura, Antonio; Martín-Palacios, Naiara; Saiz, Ana M; Zamorano-León, José J; Duarte, Juan; Serrano, Javier; Moñux, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Aim Further to its pivotal role in haemostasis, factor Xa (FXa) promotes effects on the vascular wall. The purpose of the study was to evaluate if FXa modifies the expression level of energy metabolism and oxidative stress-related proteins in femoral arteries obtained from type 2 diabetic patients with end-stage vasculopathy. Methods Femoral arteries were obtained from 12 type 2 diabetic patients who underwent leg amputation. Segments from the femoral arteries were incubated in vitro alone and in the presence of 25 nmol l−1 FXa and 25 nmol l−1 FXa + 50 nmol l−1 rivaroxaban. Results In the femoral arteries, FXa increased triosephosphate isomerase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase isotype 1 expression but decreased pyruvate dehydrogenase expression. These facts were accompanied by an increased content of acetyl-CoA. Aconitase activity was reduced in FXa-incubated femoral arteries as compared with control. Moreover, FXa increased the protein expression level of oxidative stress-related proteins which was accompanied by an increased malonyldialdehyde arterial content. The FXa inhibitor, rivaroxaban, failed to prevent the reduced expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase induced by FXa but reduced acetyl-CoA content and reverted the decreased aconitase activity observed with FXa alone. Rivaroxaban + FXa but not FXa alone increased the expression level of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I and II, two mitochondrial long chain fatty acid transporters. Rivaroxaban also prevented the increased expression of oxidative stress-related proteins induced by FXa alone. Conclusions In femoral isolated arteries from type 2 diabetic patients with end-stage vasculopathy, FXa promoted disruption of the aerobic mitochondrial metabolism. Rivaroxaban prevented such effects and even seemed to favour long chain fatty acid transport into mitochondria. PMID:25041869

  11. Characterization of a human coagulation factor Xa-binding site on Viperidae snake venom phospholipases A2 by affinity binding studies and molecular bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Grazyna; Gowda, Veerabasappa T; Maroun, Rachid C

    2007-01-01

    Background The snake venom group IIA secreted phospholipases A2 (SVPLA2), present in the Viperidae snake family exhibit a wide range of toxic and pharmacological effects. They exert their different functions by catalyzing the hydrolysis of phospholipids (PL) at the membrane/water interface and by highly specific direct binding to: (i) presynaptic membrane-bound or intracellular receptors; (ii) natural PLA2-inhibitors from snake serum; and (iii) coagulation factors present in human blood. Results Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) protein-protein interaction measurements and an in vitro biological test of inhibition of prothrombinase activity, we identify a number of Viperidae venom SVPLA2s that inhibit blood coagulation through direct binding to human blood coagulation factor Xa (FXa) via a non-catalytic, PL-independent mechanism. We classify the SVPLA2s in four groups, depending on the strength of their binding. Molecular electrostatic potentials calculated at the surface of 3D homology-modeling models show a correlation with inhibition of prothrombinase activity. In addition, molecular docking simulations between SVPLA2 and FXa guided by the experimental data identify the potential FXa binding site on the SVPLA2s. This site is composed of the following regions: helices A and B, the Ca2+ loop, the helix C-β-wing loop, and the C-terminal fragment. Some of the SVPLA2 binding site residues belong also to the interfacial binding site (IBS). The interface in FXa involves both, the light and heavy chains. Conclusion We have experimentally identified several strong FXa-binding SVPLA2s that disrupt the function of the coagulation cascade by interacting with FXa by the non-catalytic PL-independent mechanism. By theoretical methods we mapped the interaction sites on both, the SVPLA2s and FXa. Our findings may lead to the design of novel, non-competitive FXa inhibitors. PMID:18062812

  12. At-line nanofractionation with parallel mass spectrometry and bioactivity assessment for the rapid screening of thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors in snake venoms.

    PubMed

    Mladic, Marija; Zietek, Barbara M; Iyer, Janaki Krishnamoorthy; Hermarij, Philip; Niessen, Wilfried M A; Somsen, Govert W; Kini, R Manjunatha; Kool, Jeroen

    2016-02-01

    Snake venoms comprise complex mixtures of peptides and proteins causing modulation of diverse physiological functions upon envenomation of the prey organism. The components of snake venoms are studied as research tools and as potential drug candidates. However, the bioactivity determination with subsequent identification and purification of the bioactive compounds is a demanding and often laborious effort involving different analytical and pharmacological techniques. This study describes the development and optimization of an integrated analytical approach for activity profiling and identification of venom constituents targeting the cardiovascular system, thrombin and factor Xa enzymes in particular. The approach developed encompasses reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) analysis of a crude snake venom with parallel mass spectrometry (MS) and bioactivity analysis. The analytical and pharmacological part in this approach are linked using at-line nanofractionation. This implies that the bioactivity is assessed after high-resolution nanofractionation (6 s/well) onto high-density 384-well microtiter plates and subsequent freeze drying of the plates. The nanofractionation and bioassay conditions were optimized for maintaining LC resolution and achieving good bioassay sensitivity. The developed integrated analytical approach was successfully applied for the fast screening of snake venoms for compounds affecting thrombin and factor Xa activity. Parallel accurate MS measurements provided correlation of observed bioactivity to peptide/protein masses. This resulted in identification of a few interesting peptides with activity towards the drug target factor Xa from a screening campaign involving venoms of 39 snake species. Besides this, many positive protease activity peaks were observed in most venoms analysed. These protease fingerprint chromatograms were found to be similar for evolutionary closely related species and as such might serve as generic snake protease

  13. RoXaN, a Novel Cellular Protein Containing TPR, LD, and Zinc Finger Motifs, Forms a Ternary Complex with Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 4G and Rotavirus NSP3

    PubMed Central

    Vitour, Damien; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Vende, Patrice; Becker, Michelle M.; Poncet, Didier

    2004-01-01

    Rotavirus mRNAs are capped but not polyadenylated, and viral proteins are translated by the cellular translation machinery. This is accomplished through the action of the viral nonstructural protein NSP3, which specifically binds the 3′ consensus sequence of viral mRNAs and interacts with the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4G I. To further our understanding of the role of NSP3 in rotavirus replication, we looked for other cellular proteins capable of interacting with this viral protein. Using the yeast two-hybrid assay, we identified a novel cellular protein-binding partner for rotavirus NSP3. This 110-kDa cellular protein, named RoXaN (rotavirus X protein associated with NSP3), contains a minimum of three regions predicted to be involved in protein-protein or nucleic acid-protein interactions. A tetratricopeptide repeat region, a protein-protein interaction domain most often found in multiprotein complexes, is present in the amino-terminal region. In the carboxy terminus, at least five zinc finger motifs are observed, further suggesting the capacity of RoXaN to bind other proteins or nucleic acids. Between these two regions exists a paxillin leucine-aspartate repeat (LD) motif which is involved in protein-protein interactions. RoXaN is capable of interacting with NSP3 in vivo and during rotavirus infection. Domains of interaction were mapped and correspond to the dimerization domain of NSP3 (amino acids 163 to 237) and the LD domain of RoXaN (amino acids 244 to 341). The interaction between NSP3 and RoXaN does not impair the interaction between NSP3 and eIF4G I, and a ternary complex made of NSP3, RoXaN, and eIF4G I can be detected in rotavirus-infected cells, implicating RoXaN in translation regulation. PMID:15047801

  14. Conserved Amblyomma americanum tick Serpin19, an inhibitor of blood clotting factors Xa and XIa, trypsin and plasmin, has anti-haemostatic functions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Kwon; Tirloni, Lucas; Radulovic, Zeljko; Lewis, Lauren; Bakshi, Mariam; Hill, Creston; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Logullo, Carlos; Termignoni, Carlos; Mulenga, Albert

    2015-08-01

    Tick saliva serine protease inhibitors (serpins) facilitate tick blood meal feeding through inhibition of protease mediators of host defense pathways. We previously identified a highly conserved Amblyomma americanum serpin 19 that is characterised by its reactive center loop being 100% conserved in ixodid ticks. In this study, biochemical characterisation reveals that the ubiquitously transcribed A. americanum serpin 19 is an anti-coagulant protein, inhibiting the activity of five of the eight serine protease blood clotting factors. Pichia pastoris-expressed recombinant (r) A. americanum serpin 19 inhibits the enzyme activity of trypsin, plasmin and blood clotting factors (f) Xa and XIa, with stoichiometry of inhibition estimated at 5.1, 9.4, 23.8 and 28, respectively. Similar to typical inhibitory serpins, recombinant A. americanum serpin 19 forms irreversible complexes with trypsin, fXa and fXIa. At a higher molar excess of recombinant A. americanum serpin 19, fXIIa is inhibited by 82.5%, and thrombin (fIIa), fIXa, chymotrypsin and tryptase are inhibited moderately by 14-29%. In anti-hemostatic functional assays, recombinant A. americanum serpin 19 inhibits thrombin but not ADP and cathepsin G activated platelet aggregation, delays clotting in recalcification and thrombin time assays by up to 250s, and up to 40s in the activated partial thromboplastin time assay. Given A. americanum serpin 19 high cross-tick species conservation, and specific reactivity of recombinant A. americanum serpin 19 with antibodies to A. americanum tick saliva proteins, we conclude that recombinant A. americanum serpin 19 is a potential candidate for development of a universal tick vaccine.

  15. Factor Xa induces tissue factor expression in endothelial cells by P44/42 MAPK and NF-κB-dependent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rong; Wang, Ning-Ping; Tanaka, Kenichi A.; Levy, Jerrold H.; Guyton, Robert A.; Zhao, Zhi-Qing; Vinten-Johansen, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Tissue factor (TF) is an initiator of coagulation. The serine protease factor Xa (FXa) is the convergence point of the extrinsic and intrinsic components of the coagulation cascade. In addition to its hemostatic function, FXa elicits inflammatory responses in endothelial cells that may be important in surgical procedures in which inflammation is triggered. This study tested the hypothesis that FXa can upregulate TF on vascular endothelial cells by a MAPK- and NF-κB- dependent pathway. Methods and results Incubation of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with FXa increased TF protein expression and activity in a dose–dependent manner. Pre-incubation of HUVECs with the serine protease inhibitor antithrombin, which targets not only thrombin but also FXa and FIXa, inhibited FXa-induced TF expression, but the selective thrombin inhibitor hirudin did not inhibit FXa-induced TF expression, ruling out a thrombin-mediated pathway. After 10 min incubation with HUVECs, FXa rapidly induced P44/42 MAPK activation (immunoblotting of phosphorylated P44/42 MAPK) with a peak at 30 minutes. The MEK 1/2 inhibitor PD98059 partially reduced FXa-induced TF expression and activity (3.82±0.11 vs 6.54±0.08 fmol/min/cm2, P<0.05). NF-κB was activated by FXa, confirmed by cytoplasmic IkB α degradation and increased NF-κB P65 nuclear translocation. Interruption of the NF-κB pathway by the IkB α phosphorylation inhibitor Bay 11-7802 abrogated FXa-induced TF protein expression and activity (1.93± 0.02 vs 6.54±0.08 fmol/min/cm2, P<0.05). However, inhibition of PI3 kinase by LY 294002 did not attenuate FXa-induced TF protein expression and activity. Conclusions 1) FXa upregulates TF protein expression and activity in HUVECs 2) FXa-induced upregulation of TF is independent of the thrombin-PAR1 pathway, and 3) the MAPK and NF-kB pathways, but not PI3 kinase pathway, are involved in FXa-induced TF expression on human umbilical endothelial cells. FXa

  16. The discovery of (2R,4R)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N- (2-fluoro-4-(2-oxopyridin-1(2H)-yl)phenyl)-4-methoxypyrrolidine-1,2-dicarboxamide (PD 0348292), an orally efficacious factor Xa inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kohrt, Jeffrey T; Bigge, Christopher F; Bryant, John W; Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Chi, Liguo; Cody, Wayne L; Dahring, Tawny; Dudley, Danette A; Filipski, Kevin J; Haarer, Staci; Heemstra, Ron; Janiczek, Nancy; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; McClanahan, Thomas; Peterson, J Thomas; Sahasrabudhe, Vaisheli; Schaum, Robert; Van Huis, Chad A; Welch, Kathleen M; Zhang, Erli; Leadley, Robert J; Edmunds, Jeremy J

    2007-08-01

    Herein, we report the discovery of novel, proline-based factor Xa inhibitors containing a neutral P1 chlorophenyl pharmacophore. Through the additional incorporation of 1-(4-amino-3-fluoro-phenyl)-1H-pyridin-2-one 22, as a P4 pharmacophore, we discovered compound 7 (PD 0348292). This compound is a selective, orally bioavailable, efficacious FXa inhibitor that is currently in phase II clinical trials for the treatment and prevention of thrombotic disorders.

  17. Factor Xa releases matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) from human vascular smooth muscle cells and stimulates the conversion of pro-MMP-2 to MMP-2: role of MMP-2 in factor Xa-induced DNA synthesis and matrix invasion.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Bernhard H; Bretschneider, Ellen; Braun, Marina; Schrör, Karsten

    2002-05-31

    Pro-matrix metalloproteinase-2 (pro-MMP-2) is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). We report that activated coagulation factor X (FXa) induces the release of MMP-2 (65 kDa) from human SMCs. In addition, FXa cleaves pro-MMP-2 (72 kDa) into MMP-2. Pro-MMP-2 and MMP-2 were determined by gelatin zymography. MMP-2 was generated in conditioned medium containing pro-MMP-2 in a concentration-dependent fashion by FXa (3 to 100 nmol/L). FX at concentrations up to 300 nmol/L was ineffective. The conversion of pro-MMP-2 to MMP-2 was inhibited by a selective FXa inhibitor (DX-9065a) at 3 to 10 micromol/L. There was a concentration-dependent induction of an intermediate MMP-2 form (68 kDa) in lysates of FXa-treated cells. This indicates that cellular mechanisms are involved in FXa-induced conversion of pro-MMP-2. As a possible biological consequence of MMP-2 activation by FXa, DNA synthesis and matrix invasion of SMCs were determined. Both were stimulated by FXa and inhibited by the selective FXa inhibitor DX-9065a and the MMP inhibitor GM 6001 but not by hirudin or aprotinin. It is concluded that stimulation of SMCs by FXa increases the levels of MMP-2 in the extracellular space and that two different mechanisms are involved: release of active MMP-2 and cleavage of secreted pro-MMP-2. Both might contribute to the mitogenic potency of FXa and FXa-stimulated matrix invasion of SMCs.

  18. Home treatment of patients with low-risk pulmonary embolism with the oral factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban. Rationale and design of the HoT-PE Trial.

    PubMed

    Barco, Stefano; Lankeit, Mareike; Binder, Harald; Schellong, Sebastian; Christ, Michael; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Duerschmied, Daniel; Bauersachs, Rupert; Empen, Klaus; Held, Matthias; Schwaiblmair, Martin; Fonseca, Cândida; Jiménez, David; Becattini, Cecilia; Quitzau, Kurt; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2016-07-04

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a potentially life-threatening acute cardiovascular syndrome. However, more than 95 % of patients are haemodynamically stable at presentation, and among them are patients at truly low risk who may qualify for immediate or early discharge. The Home Treatment of Pulmonary Embolism (HoT-PE) study is a prospective international multicentre single-arm phase 4 management (cohort) trial aiming to determine whether home treatment of acute low-risk PE with the oral factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban is feasible, effective, and safe. Patients with confirmed PE, who have no right ventricular dysfunction or free floating thrombi in the right atrium or ventricle, are eligible if they meet none of the exclusion criteria indicating haemodynamic instability, serious comorbidity or any condition mandating hospitalisation, or a familial/social environment unable to support home treatment. The first dose of rivaroxaban is given in hospital, and patients are discharged within 48 hours of presentation. Rivaroxaban is taken for at least three months. The primary outcome is symptomatic recurrent venous thromboembolism or PE-related death within three months of enrolment. Secondary outcomes include quality of life and patient satisfaction, and health care resource utilisation compared to existing data on standard-duration hospital treatment. HoT-PE is planned to analyse 1,050 enrolled patients, providing 80 % power to reject the null hypothesis that the recurrence rate of venous thromboembolism is >3 % with α≤0.05. If the hypothesis of HoT-PE is confirmed, early discharge and out-of-hospital treatment may become an attractive, potentially cost-saving option for a significant proportion of patients with acute PE.

  19. A computational modeling and molecular dynamics study of the Michaelis complex of human protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) and factor Xa (FXa)

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Vasudevan; Lee, Chang Jun; Lin, Ping; Duke, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) and antithrombin III (AT3) are members of the serpin superfamily of protease inhibitors that inhibit factor Xa (FXa) and other proteases in the coagulation pathway. While experimental structural information is available for the interaction of AT3 with FXa, at present there is no structural data regarding the interaction of ZPI with FXa, and the precise role of this interaction in the blood coagulation pathway is poorly understood. In an effort to gain a structural understanding of this system, we have built a solvent equilibrated three-dimensional structural model of the Michaelis complex of human ZPI/FXa using homology modeling, protein–protein docking and molecular dynamics simulation methods. Preliminary analysis of interactions at the complex interface from our simulations suggests that the interactions of the reactive center loop (RCL) and the exosite surface of ZPI with FXa are similar to those observed from X-ray crystal structure-based simulations of AT3/FXa. However, detailed comparison of our modeled structure of ZPI/FXa with that of AT3/FXa points to differences in interaction specificity at the reactive center and in the stability of the inhibitory complex, due to the presence of a tyrosine residue at the P1 position in ZPI, instead of the P1 arginine residue in AT3. The modeled structure also shows specific structural differences between AT3 and ZPI in the heparin-binding and flexible N-terminal tail regions. Our structural model of ZPI/FXa is also compatible with available experimental information regarding the importance for the inhibitory action of certain basic residues in FXa. PMID:19172319

  20. Lufaxin, a Novel Factor Xa Inhibitor from the Salivary Gland of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis, Blocks PAR2 Activation and Inhibits Inflammation and Thrombosis in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Nicolas; Assumpção, Teresa C. F.; Mizurini, Daniella M.; Gilmore, Dana; Dutra-Oliveira, Angélica; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Sá-Nunes, Anderson; Teixeira, Clarissa; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Monteiro, Robson Q.; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Blood-sucking arthropods salivary glands (SGs) contain a remarkable diversity of antihemostatics. The aim of this study was to identify the unique salivary anticoagulant of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis, which remained elusive for decades. Methods and Results Several L. longipalpis salivary proteins were expressed in HEK293 cells and screened for inhibition of blood coagulation. A novel 32.4-kDa molecule, named Lufaxin, was identified as a slow, tight, non-competitive, and reversible inhibitor of Factor Xa (FXa). Notably, Lufaxin primary sequence does not share similarity to any physiological or salivary inhibitors of coagulation reported to date. Lufaxin is specific for FXa and does not interact with FX, DEGR- FXa, or 15 other enzymes. In addition, Lufaxin blocks prothrombinase and increases both PT and aPTT. Surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that FXa binds Lufaxin with a KD ~3 nM, and isothermal titration calorimetry determined a stoichiometry of 1:1. Lufaxin also prevents PAR2 activation by FXa in the MDA-MB-231 cell line and abrogates edema formation triggered by injection of FXa in the paw of mice. Moreover, Lufaxin prevents FeCl3-induced carotid artery thrombus formation and prolongs aPTT ex vivo, implying that it works as an anticoagulant in vivo. Finally, SG of sandflies was found to inhibit FXa and to interact with the enzyme. Conclusion Lufaxin belongs to a novel family of slow-tight FXa inhibitors, which display antithrombotic and antiinflamatory activities. It is a useful tool to understand FXa structural features and its role in pro-hemostatic and pro-inflammatory events. PMID:22796577

  1. Monitoring Low Molecular Weight Heparins at Therapeutic Levels: Dose-Responses of, and Correlations and Differences between aPTT, Anti-Factor Xa and Thrombin Generation Assays

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Owain; Lybeck, Emanuel; Strandberg, Karin; Tynngård, Nahreen; Schött, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Background Low molecular weight heparins (LMWH’s) are used to prevent and treat thrombosis. Tests for monitoring LMWH’s include anti-factor Xa (anti-FXa), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and thrombin generation. Anti-FXa is the current gold standard despite LMWH’s varying affinities for FXa and thrombin. Aim To examine the effects of two different LMWH’s on the results of 4 different aPTT-tests, anti-FXa activity and thrombin generation and to assess the tests’ concordance. Method Enoxaparin and tinzaparin were added ex-vivo in concentrations of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 anti-FXa international units (IU)/mL, to blood from 10 volunteers. aPTT was measured using two whole blood methods (Free oscillation rheometry (FOR) and Hemochron Jr (HCJ)) and an optical plasma method using two different reagents (ActinFSL and PTT-Automat). Anti-FXa activity was quantified using a chromogenic assay. Thrombin generation (Endogenous Thrombin Potential, ETP) was measured on a Ceveron Alpha instrument using the TGA RB and more tissue-factor rich TGA RC reagents. Results Methods’ mean aPTT at 1.0 IU/mL LMWH varied between 54s (SD 11) and 69s (SD 14) for enoxaparin and between 101s (SD 21) and 140s (SD 28) for tinzaparin. ActinFSL gave significantly shorter aPTT results. aPTT and anti-FXa generally correlated well. ETP as measured with the TGA RC reagent but not the TGA RB reagent showed an inverse exponential relationship to the concentration of LMWH. The HCJ-aPTT results had the weakest correlation to anti-FXa and thrombin generation (Rs0.62–0.87), whereas the other aPTT methods had similar correlation coefficients (Rs0.80–0.92). Conclusions aPTT displays a linear dose-respone to LMWH. There is variation between aPTT assays. Tinzaparin increases aPTT and decreases thrombin generation more than enoxaparin at any given level of anti-FXa activity, casting doubt on anti-FXa’s present gold standard status. Thrombin generation with tissue factor-rich activator is

  2. Discovery of 1-[3-(aminomethyl)phenyl]-N-3-fluoro-2'-(methylsulfonyl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-yl]-3-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide (DPC423), a highly potent, selective, and orally bioavailable inhibitor of blood coagulation factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Pinto, D J; Orwat, M J; Wang, S; Fevig, J M; Quan, M L; Amparo, E; Cacciola, J; Rossi, K A; Alexander, R S; Smallwood, A M; Luettgen, J M; Liang, L; Aungst, B J; Wright, M R; Knabb, R M; Wong, P C; Wexler, R R; Lam, P Y

    2001-02-15

    Factor Xa (fXa) plays a critical role in the coagulation cascade, serving as the point of convergence of the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Together with nonenzymatic cofactor Va and Ca2+ on the phospholipid surface of platelets or endothelial cells, factor Xa forms the prothrombinase complex, which is responsible for the proteolysis of prothrombin to catalytically active thrombin. Thrombin, in turn, catalyzes the cleavage of fibrinogen to fibrin, thus initiating a process that ultimately leads to clot formation. Recently, we reported on a series of isoxazoline and isoxazole monobasic noncovalent inhibitors of factor Xa which show good potency in animal models of thrombosis. In this paper, we wish to report on the optimization of the heterocyclic core, which ultimately led to the discovery of a novel pyrazole SN429 (2b; fXa K(i) = 13 pM). We also report on our efforts to improve the oral bioavailability and pharmacokinetic profile of this series while maintaining subnanomolar potency and in vitro selectivity. This was achieved by replacing the highly basic benzamidine P1 with a less basic benzylamine moiety. Further optimization of the pyrazole core substitution and the biphenyl P4 culminated in the discovery of DPC423 (17h), a highly potent, selective, and orally active factor Xa inhibitor which was chosen for clinical development.

  3. Activated partial thromboplastin time and anti-xa measurements in heparin monitoring: biochemical basis for discordance.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Clifford M; Streiff, Michael B; Shermock, Kenneth M; Kraus, Peggy S; Chen, Junnan; Jani, Jayesh; Kickler, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    We examined the concordance of heparin levels measured by a chromogenic anti-Xa assay and the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) during unfractionated heparin therapy (UFH) and the biochemical basis for differences between these measures. We also investigated the endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) as a possible measure of anticoagulation. Paired measures of anti-Xa and APTT were performed on 569 samples from 149 patients on UFH. The anti-Xa values and the APTT were concordant in only 54% of measurements. One hundred twelve samples from 59 patients on UFH were assayed for APTT, anti-Xa, factor II, factor VIII, and ETP. Supratherapeutic APTT values but therapeutic anti-Xa results had decreased factor II activity. Subtherapeutic APTT but therapeutic anti-Xa values had high factor VIII activity. ETP correlated with anticoagulation status and UFH dose. In conclusion, factor II and VIII activity contributes to discordance between APTT and anti-Xa results. ETP measurements may provide an additional assessment of anticoagulation status.

  4. A Novel Direct Factor Xa Inhibitory Peptide with Anti-Platelet Aggregation Activity from Agkistrodon acutus Venom Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meimei; Ye, Xiaohui; Ming, Xin; Chen, Yahui; Wang, Ying; Su, Xingli; Su, Wen; Kong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Snake venom is a natural substance that contains numerous bioactive proteins and peptides, nearly all of which have been identified over the last several decades. In this study, we subjected snake venom to enzymatic hydrolysis to identify previously unreported bioactive peptides. The novel peptide ACH-11 with the sequence LTFPRIVFVLG was identified with both FXa inhibition and anti-platelet aggregation activities. ACH-11 inhibited the catalytic function of FXa towards its substrate S-2222 via a mixed model with a Ki value of 9.02 μM and inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP and U46619 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, ACH-11 exhibited potent antithrombotic activity in vivo. It reduced paralysis and death in an acute pulmonary thrombosis model by 90% and attenuated thrombosis weight in an arterio-venous shunt thrombosis model by 57.91%, both at a dose of 3 mg/kg. Additionally, a tail cutting bleeding time assay revealed that ACH-11 did not prolong bleeding time in mice at a dose of 3 mg/kg. Together, our results reveal that ACH-11 is a novel antithrombotic peptide exhibiting both FXa inhibition and anti-platelet aggregation activities, with a low bleeding risk. We believe that it could be a candidate or lead compound for new antithrombotic drug development. PMID:26035670

  5. 1-[3-Aminobenzisoxazol-5'-yl]-3-trifluoromethyl-6-[2'-(3-(R)-hydroxy-N-pyrrolidinyl)methyl-[1,1']-biphen-4-yl]-1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrazolo-[3,4-c]-pyridin-7-one (BMS-740808) a highly potent, selective, efficacious, and orally bioavailable inhibitor of blood coagulation factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Donald J P; Orwat, Michael J; Quan, Mimi L; Han, Qi; Galemmo, Robert A; Amparo, Eugene; Wells, Brian; Ellis, Christopher; He, Ming Y; Alexander, Richard S; Rossi, Karen A; Smallwood, Angela; Wong, Pancras C; Luettgen, Joseph M; Rendina, Alan R; Knabb, Robert M; Mersinger, Lawrence; Kettner, Charles; Bai, Steven; He, Kan; Wexler, Ruth R; Lam, Patrick Y S

    2006-08-01

    Attempts to further optimize the pyrazole factor Xa inhibitors centered on masking the aryl aniline P4 moiety. Scaffold optimization resulted in the identification of a novel bicyclic pyrazolo-pyridinone scaffold which retained fXa potency. The novel bicyclic scaffold preserved all binding interactions observed with the monocyclic counterpart and importantly the carboxamido moiety was integrated within the scaffold making it less susceptible to hydrolysis. These efforts led to the identification of 1-[3-aminobenzisoxazol-5'-yl]-3-trifluoromethyl-6-[2'-(3-(R)-hydroxy-N-pyrrolidinyl)methyl-[1,1']-biphen-4-yl]-1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrazolo-[3,4-c]-pyridin-7-one 6f (BMS-740808), a highly potent (fXa Ki=30 pM) with a rapid onset of inhibition (2.7x10(7) M-1 s-1) in vitro, selective (>1000-fold over other proteases), efficacious in the AVShunt thrombosis model, and orally bioavailable inhibitor of blood coagulation factor Xa.

  6. CD-XA Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This is the McDornell Douglas CD-XA Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) concept. The Delta Clipper-Experimental (DC-X) was originally developed by McDonnell Douglas for the DOD. The DC-XA is a single-stage-to-orbit, vertical takeoff/vertical landing, launch vehicle concept, whose development is geared to significantly reduce launch cost and provided a test bed for NASA Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) technology as the Delta Clipper-Experimental Advanced (DC-XA). The program was discontinued in 2003.

  7. Molecular phylogeny, homology modeling, and molecular dynamics simulation of race-specific bacterial blight disease resistance protein (xa5) of rice: a comparative agriproteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Dehury, Budheswar; Sahu, Mousumi; Sarma, Kishore; Sahu, Jagajjit; Sen, Priyabrata; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Sharma, Gauri Dutta; Choudhury, Manabendra Dutta; Barooah, Madhumita

    2013-08-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.), a model plant belonging to the family Poaceae, is a staple food for a majority of the people worldwide. Grown in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world, this important cereal crop is under constant and serious threat from both biotic and abiotic stresses. Among the biotic threats, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, causing the damaging bacterial blight disease in rice, is a prominent pathogen. The xa5 gene in the host plant rice confers race-specific resistance to this pathogen. This recessive gene belongs to the Xa gene family of rice and encodes a gamma subunit of transcription factor IIA (TFIIAγ). In view of the importance of this gene in conferring resistance to the devastating disease, we reconstructed the phylogenetic relationship of this gene, developed a three-dimensional protein model, followed by long-term molecular dynamics simulation studies to gain a better understanding of the evolution, structure, and function of xa5. The modeled structure was found to fit well with the small subunit of TFIIA from human, suggesting that it may also act as a small subunit of TFIIA in rice. The model had a stable conformation in response to the atomic flexibility and interaction, when subjected to MD simulation at 20 nano second in aqueous solution. Further structural analysis of xa5 indicated that the protein retained its basic transcription factor function, suggesting that it might govern a novel pathway responsible for bacterial blight resistance. Future molecular docking studies of xa5 underway with its corresponding avirulence gene is expected to shed more direct light into plant-pathogen interactions at the molecular level and thus pave the way for richer agriproteomic insights.

  8. Clinical decision-making for vitamin K-1 and K-2 deficiency and coronary artery calcification with warfarin therapy: are diet, factor Xa inhibitors or both the answer?

    PubMed

    Wahlqvist, Mark L; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Tzeng, Bing-Hsiean

    2013-01-01

    Coronary artery calcification is a recognised risk factor for ischaemic heart disease and mortality. Evidence is now strong that Mönckeberg's arteriosclerosis, a form of vascular calcification, can be attributable to vitamin K deficiency, but that vitamin K-2, especially the MK-4 form from foods like cheese can be protective. Warfarin blocks the recycling of hepatic and peripheral vitamin K leading to secondary vitamin K deficiency with adverse effects on vasculature, bone, kidneys, brain and other tissues and systems (inflammatory, immune function and neoplasia at least). There is individual susceptibility to vitamin K deficiency and warfarin sensitivity, partly explicable in terms of genetic polymorphisms, epigenetics, diet and pharmacotherapy. The emergence of extensive coronary calcification in a man with atrial fibrillation treated for a decade with warfarin is described by way of illustration and to raise the present clinical management conundrums. Finally, a putative set of recommendations is provided.

  9. Discovery of 1-(4-Methoxyphenyl)-7-oxo-6-(4-(2-oxopiperidin-1-yl)phenyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro- 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-c]pyridine-3-carboxamide (Apixaban, BMS-562247), a Highly Potent, Selective, Efficacious, and Orally Bioavailable Inhibitor of Blood Coagulation Factor Xa

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Donald J.P.; Orwat, Michael J.; Koch, Stephanie; Rossi, Karen A.; Alexander, Richard S.; Smallwood, Angela; Wong, Pancras C.; Rendina, Alan R.; Luettgen, Joseph M.; Knabb, Robert M.; He, Kan; Xin, Baomin; Wexler, Ruth R.; Lam, Patrick Y.S.

    2010-03-08

    Efforts to identify a suitable follow-on compound to razaxaban (compound 4) focused on modification of the carboxamido linker to eliminate potential in vivo hydrolysis to a primary aniline. Cyclization of the carboxamido linker to the novel bicyclic tetrahydropyrazolopyridinone scaffold retained the potent fXa binding activity. Exceptional potency of the series prompted an investigation of the neutral P{sub 1} moieties that resulted in the identification of the p-methoxyphenyl P{sub 1}, which retained factor Xa binding affinity and good oral bioavailability. Further optimization of the C-3 pyrazole position and replacement of the terminal P{sub 4} ring with a neutral heterocycle culminated in the discovery of 1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-7-oxo-6-(4-(2-oxopiperidin-1-yl)phenyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-c]pyridine-3-carboxamide (apixaban, compound 40). Compound 40 exhibits a high degree of fXa potency, selectivity, and efficacy and has an improved pharmacokinetic profile relative to 4.

  10. High-resolution genetic mapping of rice bacterial blight resistance gene Xa23.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunlian; Fan, Yinglun; Zheng, Chongke; Qin, Tengfei; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhao, Kaijun

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial blight (BB) caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is the most devastating bacterial disease of rice (Oryza sativa L.), a staple food crop that feeds half of the world's population. In management of this disease, the most economical and effective approach is cultivating resistant varieties. Due to rapid change of pathogenicity in the pathogen, it is necessary to identify and characterize more host resistance genes for breeding new resistant varieties. We have previously identified the BB resistance (R) gene Xa23 that confers the broadest resistance to Xoo strains isolated from different rice-growing regions and preliminarily mapped the gene within a 1.7 cm region on the long arm of rice chromosome 11. Here, we report fine genetic mapping and in silico analysis of putative candidate genes of Xa23. Based on F2 mapping populations derived from crosses between Xa23-containing rice line CBB23 and susceptible varieties JG30 or IR24, six new STS markers Lj36, Lj46, Lj138, Lj74, A83B4, and Lj13 were developed. Linkage analysis revealed that the new markers were co-segregated with or closely linked to the Xa23 locus. Consequently, the Xa23 gene was mapped within a 0.4 cm region between markers Lj138 and A83B4, in which the co-segregating marker Lj74 was identified. The corresponding physical distance between Lj138 and A83B4 on Nipponbare genome is 49.8 kb. Six Xa23 candidate genes have been annotated, including four candidate genes encoding hypothetical proteins and the other two encoding a putative ADP-ribosylation factor protein and a putative PPR protein. These results will facilitate marker-assisted selection of Xa23 in rice breeding and molecular cloning of this valuable R gene.

  11. Mox: a novel modifier of the tomato Xa locus.

    PubMed

    Peterson, P W; Yoder, J I

    1995-01-01

    We have isolated a novel mutation that caused variegated leaf color in a tomato plant which had multiple maize Ac transposable elements and the tomato Xa allele. Xa is a previously characterized semi-dominant mutation that causes tomato leaves to be bright yellow when heterozygous (Xa/xa+). The mutation responsible for the new phenotype was named Mox (Modifier of Xa). The Mox mutation modified the Xa/xa+ yellow leaf phenotype in two ways: it compensated for the Xa allele resulting in a plant with a wildtype green color, and it caused somatic variegation which appeared as white and yellow sectors on the green background. Somatic variegation was visible only if the plant contained both the Mox and Xa loci. Genetic studies indicated that the Mox locus was linked in repulsion to Xa and that the Mox locus was genetically transmitted at a reduced frequency through the male gamete. Molecular characterization of the Ac elements in lines segregating for Mox identified an Ac insertion that appeared to cosegregate with Mox variegation. We propose a model in which the Mox mutation consists of a duplication of the xa+ allele and subsequent Ac-induced breakage of the duplicated region causes variegation.

  12. Antifactor Xa levels versus activated partial thromboplastin time for monitoring unfractionated heparin.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Jeremy W; Vondracek, Thomas G

    2012-06-01

    Intravenous unfractionated heparin (UFH) remains an important therapeutic agent, particularly in the inpatient setting, for anticoagulation. Historically, the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) has been the primary laboratory test used to monitor and adjust UFH. The aPTT test has evolved since the 1950s, and the historical goal range of 1.5-2.5 times the control aPTT, which first gained favor in the 1970s, has fallen out of favor due to a high degree of variability in aPTT readings from one laboratory to another, and even from one reagent to another. As a result, it is now recommended that the aPTT goal range be based on a corresponding heparin concentration of 0.2-0.4 unit/ml by protamine titration or 0.3-0.7 unit/ml by antifactor Xa assay. Given that several biologic factors can influence the aPTT independent of the effects of UFH, many institutions have transitioned to monitoring heparin with antifactor Xa levels, rather than the aPTT. Clinical data from the last 10-20 years have begun to show that a conversion from aPTT to antifactor Xa monitoring may offer a smoother dose-response curve, such that levels remain more stable, requiring fewer blood samples and dosage adjustments. Given the minimal increased acquisition cost of the antifactor Xa reagents, it can be argued that the antifactor Xa is a cost-effective method for monitoring UFH. In this review, we discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of the aPTT, antifactor Xa, and protamine titration tests, and provide a clinical framework to guide practitioners who are seeking to optimize UFH monitoring within their own institutions.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae subsp. cloacae Strain 08XA1, a Fecal Bacterium of Giant Pandas

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yue; Zhao, Chuan-Wu; Zhang, Yi-Zheng; Zhang, Zhi-He; Pan, Guang-Lin; Liu, Wen-Wang; Ma, Qing-Yi; Hou, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Enterobacter cloacae, a common pathogenic bacterium, is a Gram-negative bacillus. We analyzed the draft genome of Enterobacter cloacae subsp. cloacae strain 08XA1 from the feces of a giant panda in China. Genes encoding a β-lactamase and efflux pumps, as well as other factors, have been found in the genome. PMID:23209197

  14. Determination of rivaroxaban in patient’s plasma samples by anti-Xa chromogenic test associated to High Performance Liquid Chromatography tandem Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS)

    PubMed Central

    Derogis, Priscilla Bento Matos; Sanches, Livia Rentas; de Aranda, Valdir Fernandes; Colombini, Marjorie Paris; Mangueira, Cristóvão Luis Pitangueira; Katz, Marcelo; Faulhaber, Adriana Caschera Leme; Mendes, Claudio Ernesto Albers; Ferreira, Carlos Eduardo dos Santos; França, Carolina Nunes; Guerra, João Carlos de Campos

    2017-01-01

    Rivaroxaban is an oral direct factor Xa inhibitor, therapeutically indicated in the treatment of thromboembolic diseases. As other new oral anticoagulants, routine monitoring of rivaroxaban is not necessary, but important in some clinical circumstances. In our study a high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method was validated to measure rivaroxaban plasmatic concentration. Our method used a simple sample preparation, protein precipitation, and a fast chromatographic run. It was developed a precise and accurate method, with a linear range from 2 to 500 ng/mL, and a lower limit of quantification of 4 pg on column. The new method was compared to a reference method (anti-factor Xa activity) and both presented a good correlation (r = 0.98, p < 0.001). In addition, we validated hemolytic, icteric or lipemic plasma samples for rivaroxaban measurement by HPLC-MS/MS without interferences. The chromogenic and HPLC-MS/MS methods were highly correlated and should be used as clinical tools for drug monitoring. The method was applied successfully in a group of 49 real-life patients, which allowed an accurate determination of rivaroxaban in peak and trough levels. PMID:28170419

  15. The broadly effective recessive resistance gene xa5 of rice is a virulence effector-dependent quantitative trait for bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng; Antony, Ginny; Li, Ting; Liu, Bo; Obasa, Ken; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in disease susceptibility (S) genes, here referred to as recessive resistance genes, have promise for providing broad durable resistance in crop species. However, few recessive disease resistance genes have been characterized. Here, we show that the broadly effective resistance gene xa5,for resistance to bacterial blight of rice (Oryza sativa), is dependent on the effector genes present in the pathogen. Specifically, the effectiveness of xa5 in preventing disease by strains of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is dependent on major transcription activation-like (TAL) effector genes, and correlates with reduced expression of the cognate S genes. xa5 is ineffective in preventing disease by strains containing the TAL effector gene pthXo1, which directs robust expression of the S gene OsSWEET11, a member of sucrose transporter gene family. Incompatibility is associated with major TAL effectors that target the known alternative S genes OsSWEET14 and OsSWEET13. Incompatibility is defeated by transfer of pthXo1 to otherwise xa5-incompatible strains or by engineering a synthetic designer TAL effector to boost SWEET gene expression. In either case, compatible or incompatible, target gene expression and lesion formation are reduced in the presence of xa5. The results indicate that xa5 functions as a quantitative trait locus, dampening effector function, and, regardless of compatibility, target gene expression. Resistance is hypothesized to occur when S gene expression, and, by inference, sucrose leakage, falls below a threshold level.

  16. Marker-aided Incorporation of Xa38, a Novel Bacterial Blight Resistance Gene, in PB1121 and Comparison of its Resistance Spectrum with xa13 + Xa21.

    PubMed

    Ellur, Ranjith K; Khanna, Apurva; S, Gopala Krishnan; Bhowmick, Prolay K; Vinod, K K; Nagarajan, M; Mondal, Kalyan K; Singh, Nagendra K; Singh, Kuldeep; Prabhu, Kumble Vinod; Singh, Ashok K

    2016-07-11

    Basmati rice is preferred internationally because of its appealing taste, mouth feel and aroma. Pusa Basmati 1121 (PB1121) is a widely grown variety known for its excellent grain and cooking quality in the international and domestic market. It contributes approximately USD 3 billion to India's forex earning annually by being the most traded variety. However, PB1121 is highly susceptible to bacterial blight (BB) disease. A novel BB resistance gene Xa38 was incorporated in PB1121 from donor parent PR114-Xa38 using a modified marker-assisted backcross breeding (MABB) scheme. Phenotypic selection prior to background selection was instrumental in identifying the novel recombinants with maximum recovery of recurrent parent phenome. The strategy was effective in delimiting the linkage drag to <0.5 mb upstream and <1.9 mb downstream of Xa38 with recurrent parent genome recovery upto 96.9% in the developed NILs. The NILs of PB1121 carrying Xa38 were compared with PB1121 NILs carrying xa13 + Xa21 (developed earlier in our lab) for their resistance to BB. Both NILs showed resistance against the Xoo races 1, 2, 3 and 6. Additionally, Xa38 also resisted Xoo race 5 to which xa13 + Xa21 was susceptible. The PB1121 NILs carrying Xa38 gene will provide effective control of BB in the Basmati growing region.

  17. Marker-aided Incorporation of Xa38, a Novel Bacterial Blight Resistance Gene, in PB1121 and Comparison of its Resistance Spectrum with xa13 + Xa21

    PubMed Central

    Ellur, Ranjith K.; Khanna, Apurva; S, Gopala Krishnan.; Bhowmick, Prolay K.; Vinod, K. K.; Nagarajan, M.; Mondal, Kalyan K.; Singh, Nagendra K.; Singh, Kuldeep; Prabhu, Kumble Vinod; Singh, Ashok K.

    2016-01-01

    Basmati rice is preferred internationally because of its appealing taste, mouth feel and aroma. Pusa Basmati 1121 (PB1121) is a widely grown variety known for its excellent grain and cooking quality in the international and domestic market. It contributes approximately USD 3 billion to India’s forex earning annually by being the most traded variety. However, PB1121 is highly susceptible to bacterial blight (BB) disease. A novel BB resistance gene Xa38 was incorporated in PB1121 from donor parent PR114-Xa38 using a modified marker-assisted backcross breeding (MABB) scheme. Phenotypic selection prior to background selection was instrumental in identifying the novel recombinants with maximum recovery of recurrent parent phenome. The strategy was effective in delimiting the linkage drag to <0.5 mb upstream and <1.9 mb downstream of Xa38 with recurrent parent genome recovery upto 96.9% in the developed NILs. The NILs of PB1121 carrying Xa38 were compared with PB1121 NILs carrying xa13 + Xa21 (developed earlier in our lab) for their resistance to BB. Both NILs showed resistance against the Xoo races 1, 2, 3 and 6. Additionally, Xa38 also resisted Xoo race 5 to which xa13 + Xa21 was susceptible. The PB1121 NILs carrying Xa38 gene will provide effective control of BB in the Basmati growing region. PMID:27403778

  18. Hemofiltration during cardiopulmonary bypass: the effect on anti-Xa and anti-IIa heparin activity.

    PubMed

    Despotis, G J; Levine, V; Filos, K S; Joiner-Maier, D; Joist, J H

    1997-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that heparin concentrations during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may vary considerably, which may be related to variability in redistribution, cellular and plasma protein binding, and clearance of heparin. The purpose of this study was to determine whether hemofiltration removes lower molecular weight fractions of heparin from plasma and thus contributes to variability of blood levels of heparin. Twenty patients undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB were enrolled in this study after informed consent was obtained. The study was subdivided into two phases. The first 10 patients were enrolled in Phase I, which was designed to determine whether hemofiltration removes lower molecular weight fractions of heparin from blood. Blood specimens obtained from the inflow line and outflow lines of the hemofiltration unit were used to measure complete blood counts (CBC) and plasma heparin activity by anti-Xa and anti-IIa assays. Phase II was designed to evaluate the effect of hemofiltration on circulating plasma heparin activity. In Phase II, blood specimens were obtained from 10 patients via the arterial cannula of the extracorporeal circuit prior to and after hemofiltration for measurements of CBCs, anti-Xa plasma heparin, as well as whole blood heparin concentration using an automated protamine titration assay (Hepcon instrument, Medtronic Inc., Parker, CO). Ultrafiltrate and reservoir volumes were measured in both phases of the study. Hemofiltration did not remove lower (anti-Xa measurable) molecular weight heparin, but it resulted in a considerable increase in heparin activity in the outflow line, as measured by both anti-Xa and anti-IIa assays. The plasma anti-Xa heparin activity obtained after hemofiltration (5 +/- 1.8 U/mL) was substantially (P = 0.003) greater than heparin activity obtained prior to hemofiltration (3.9 +/- 1.7 U/mL). The increase in heparin activity with hemofiltration was directly related to ultrafiltrate volume (r = 0

  19. A comparison of red blood cell transfusion utilization between anti-activated factor X and activated partial thromboplastin monitoring in patients receiving unfractionated heparin.

    PubMed

    Belk, K W; Laposata, M; Craver, C

    2016-11-01

    Essentials Anti-activated factor X (Anti-Xa) monitoring is more precise than activated partial thromboplastin (aPTT). 20 804 hospitalized cardiovascular patients monitored with Anti-Xa or aPTT were analyzed. Adjusted transfusion rates were significantly lower for patients monitored with Anti-Xa. Adoption of Anti-Xa protocols could reduce transfusions among cardiovascular patients in the US.

  20. Human Factors Directions for Civil Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    2002-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in understanding human capabilities and limitations, incorporating human factors into aircraft design, operation, and certification, and the emergence of new technologies designed to reduce workload and enhance human performance in the system, most aviation accidents still involve human errors. Such errors occur as a direct or indirect result of untimely, inappropriate, or erroneous actions (or inactions) by apparently well-trained and experienced pilots, controllers, and maintainers. The field of human factors has solved many of the more tractable problems related to simple ergonomics, cockpit layout, symbology, and so on. We have learned much about the relationships between people and machines, but know less about how to form successful partnerships between humans and the information technologies that are beginning to play a central role in aviation. Significant changes envisioned in the structure of the airspace, pilots and controllers' roles and responsibilities, and air/ground technologies will require a similarly significant investment in human factors during the next few decades to ensure the effective integration of pilots, controllers, dispatchers, and maintainers into the new system. Many of the topics that will be addressed are not new because progress in crucial areas, such as eliminating human error, has been slow. A multidisciplinary approach that capitalizes upon human studies and new classes of information, computational models, intelligent analytical tools, and close collaborations with organizations that build, operate, and regulate aviation technology will ensure that the field of human factors meets the challenge.

  1. [Antidotes to novel direct oral anticoagulants].

    PubMed

    Khorev, N G; Momot, A P; Kon'kova, V O

    During the last 10 years, several novel direct oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have entered the clinical arena and were registered in the Russian Federation for use in patients presenting with atrial fibrillation, venous thrombosis, and pulmonary artery thromboembolism. NOACs are classified into two groups: direct thrombin inhibitor (notably dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (including rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban). Their disadvantage is lack of specific antidotes in case of an emergency situation (injury, infarction, stroke requiring thrombolysis, urgent operation). The review contains the data on the existing therapeutic regimens of treating haemorrhage on the background of taking these coagulants. This is followed by analysing the present-day results of clinical trials aimed at working out pharmaceutical agents (andexanet alpha, idarucizumab, aripazine) being antidotes to direct thrombin inhibitor and the factor Xa inhibitors. Administration of these agents makes it possible to reverse coagulation and minimize the aftermaths of haemorrhage in patients taking these drugs, in emergency situations.

  2. Induction of Xa10-like genes in rice cultivar Nipponbare confers disease resistance to rice bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Tian, Dongsheng; Gu, Keyu; Yang, Xiaobei; Wang, Lanlan; Zeng, Xuan; Yin, Zhongchao

    2017-03-17

    Bacterial blight of rice, caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, is one of the most destructive bacterial diseases throughout the major rice growing regions in the world. The rice disease resistance (R) genes Xa10 confers race-specific disease resistance to X. oryzae pv. oryzae strains that deliver the corresponding transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors AvrXa10. Upon bacterial infection, AvrXa10 binds specifically to the effector binding element (EBE) in the promoter of the R gene and activates its expression. Xa10 encodes an executor R protein that triggers hypersensitive response and activates disease resistance. Rice cultivar Nipponbare carries two Xa10-like genes in its genome, of which one is the susceptible allele of the Xa23 gene, a Xa10-like TAL effector-dependent executor R gene isolated recently from rice cultivar CBB23. However, the function of the two Xa10-like genes in disease resistance to X. oryzae pv. oryzae strains has not been investigated. Here we designated the two Xa10-like genes as Xa10-Ni and Xa23-Ni and characterized their function for disease resistance to rice bacterial blight. Both Xa10-Ni and Xa23-Ni provided disease resistance to X. oryzae pv. oryzae strains that deliver the matching artificially designed TAL effectors (dTALEs). Transgenic rice plants containing Xa10-Ni and Xa23-Ni under the Xa10 promoter provided specific disease resistance to X. oryzae pv. oryzae strains that deliver AvrXa10. Xa10-Ni and Xa23-Ni knock-out mutants abolished dTALE-dependent disease resistance to X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Heterologous expression of Xa10-Ni and Xa23-Ni in Nicotiana benthamiana triggered cell death. The 19-amino acid residues at the N-terminal regions of XA10 or XA10-Ni are dispensable for their function in inducing cell death in N. benthamiana and the C-terminal regions of XA10, XA10-Ni and XA23-Ni are interchangeable among each other without affecting their function. Like XA10, both XA10-Ni and XA23-Ni locate to the endoplasmic

  3. Directional intercept factor of truncated CPCs

    SciTech Connect

    Minano, J.C.

    1983-09-01

    The fraction of power reaching the collector of a truncated cylindrical compound parabolic concentrator, out of the total power arriving at its entry aperture in a given direction, is calculated without ray tracing for all directions.

  4. XA21-specific induction of stress-related genes following Xanthomonas infection of detached rice leaves

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Furong; Chen, Huamin; Wei, Tong; Nguyen, Yen P.; Shaker, Isaac W.F.

    2016-01-01

    The rice XA21 receptor kinase confers robust resistance to the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzaepv. oryzae (Xoo). We developed a detached leaf infection assay to quickly and reliably measure activation of the XA21-mediated immune response using genetic markers. We used RNA sequencing of elf18 treated EFR:XA21:GFP plants to identify candidate genes that could serve as markers for XA21 activation. From this analysis, we identified eight genes that are up-regulated in both in elf18 treated EFR:XA21:GFP rice leaves and Xoo infected XA21 rice leaves. These results provide a rapid and reliable method to assess bacterial-rice interactions. PMID:27703843

  5. A ΩXaV motif in the Rift Valley fever virus NSs protein is essential for degrading p62, forming nuclear filaments and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Cyr, Normand; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Lecoq, Lauriane; Guendel, Irene; Chabot, Philippe R.; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Omichinski, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a single-stranded RNA virus capable of inducing fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans. A key component of RVFV virulence is its ability to form nuclear filaments through interactions between the viral nonstructural protein NSs and the host general transcription factor TFIIH. Here, we identify an interaction between a ΩXaV motif in NSs and the p62 subunit of TFIIH. This motif in NSs is similar to ΩXaV motifs found in nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors and transcription factors known to interact with p62. Structural and biophysical studies demonstrate that NSs binds to p62 in a similar manner as these other factors. Functional studies in RVFV-infected cells show that the ΩXaV motif is required for both nuclear filament formation and degradation of p62. Consistent with the fact that the RVFV can be distinguished from other Bunyaviridae-family viruses due to its ability to form nuclear filaments in infected cells, the motif is absent in the NSs proteins of other Bunyaviridae-family viruses. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that p62 binding to NSs through the ΩXaV motif is essential for degrading p62, forming nuclear filaments and enhancing RVFV virulence. In addition, these results show how the RVFV incorporates a simple motif into the NSs protein that enables it to functionally mimic host cell proteins that bind the p62 subunit of TFIIH. PMID:25918396

  6. Rice Xa21 primed genes and pathways that are critical for combating bacterial blight infection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hai; Chen, Zheng; Fang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Junfei; Xia, Zhihui; Gao, Lifen; Chen, Lihong; Li, Lili; Li, Tiantian; Zhai, Wenxue; Zhang, Weixiong

    2015-07-17

    Rice bacterial blight (BB) is a devastating rice disease. The Xa21 gene confers a broad and persistent resistance against BB. We introduced Xa21 into Oryza sativa L ssp indica (rice 9311), through multi-generation backcrossing, and generated a nearly isogenic, blight-resistant 9311/Xa21 rice. Using next-generation sequencing, we profiled the transcriptomes of both varieties before and within four days after infection of bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. The identified differentially expressed (DE) genes and signaling pathways revealed insights into the functions of Xa21. Surprisingly, before infection 1,889 genes on 135 of the 316 signaling pathways were DE between the 9311/Xa21 and 9311 plants. These Xa21-mediated basal pathways included mainly those related to the basic material and energy metabolisms and many related to phytohormones such as cytokinin, suggesting that Xa21 triggered redistribution of energy, phytohormones and resources among essential cellular activities before invasion. Counter-intuitively, after infection, the DE genes between the two plants were only one third of that before the infection; other than a few stress-related pathways, the affected pathways after infection constituted a small subset of the Xa21-mediated basal pathways. These results suggested that Xa21 primed critically important genes and signaling pathways, enhancing its resistance against bacterial infection.

  7. RNA Splicing Factors and RNA-Directed DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao-Feng; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2014-03-26

    RNA-directed histone and/or DNA modification is a conserved mechanism for the establishment of epigenetic marks from yeasts and plants to mammals. The heterochromation formation in yeast is mediated by RNAi-directed silencing mechanism, while the establishment of DNA methylation in plants is through the RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway. Recently, splicing factors are reported to be involved in both RNAi-directed heterochromatin formation in yeast and the RdDM pathway in plants. In yeast, splicing factors may provide a platform for facilitating the siRNA generation through an interaction with RDRC and thereby affect the heterochromatin formation, whereas in plants, various splicing factors seem to act at different steps in the RdDM pathway.

  8. The role of intrinsic factors in control of arm movement direction: implications from directional preferences.

    PubMed

    Dounskaia, Natalia; Goble, Jacob A; Wang, Wanyue

    2011-03-01

    The role of extrinsic and intrinsic factors in control of arm movement direction remains under debate. We addressed this question by investigating preferences in selection of movement direction and whether factors causing these preferences have extrinsic or intrinsic nature. An unconstrained free-stroke drawing task was used during which participants produced straight strokes on a horizontal table, choosing the direction and the beginning and end of each stroke arbitrarily. The variation of the initial arm postures across strokes provided a possibility to distinguish between the extrinsic and intrinsic origins of directional biases. Although participants were encouraged to produce strokes equally in all directions, each participant demonstrated preferences for some directions over the others. However, the preferred directions were not consistent across participants, suggesting no directional preferences in extrinsic space. Consistent biases toward certain directions were revealed in intrinsic space representing initial arm postures. Factors contributing to the revealed preferences were analyzed within the optimal control framework. The major bias was explained by a tendency predicted by the leading joint hypothesis (LJH) to minimize active interference with interaction torque generated by shoulder motion at the elbow. Some minor biases may represent movements of minimal inertial resistance or maximal kinematic manipulability. These results support a crucial role of intrinsic factors in control of the movement direction of the arm. Based on the LJH interpretation of the major bias, we hypothesize that the dominant tendency was to minimize neural effort for control of arm intersegmental dynamics. Possible organization of neural processes underlying optimal selection of movement direction is discussed.

  9. Inhibitory properties of separate recombinant Kunitz-type-protease-inhibitor domains from tissue-factor-pathway inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Petersen, L C; Bjørn, S E; Olsen, O H; Nordfang, O; Norris, F; Norris, K

    1996-01-15

    Tissue-factor-pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is a multivalent inhibitor with three tandemly arranged Kunitz- type-protease-inhibitor (KPI) domains. Previous studies [Girard, Y. J., Warren, L. A., Novotny , W. F., Likert, K. M., Brown, S. G., Miletich, J. R & Broze, G. J. (1989) Nature 338, 518-520] by means of site-directed mutagenesis indicated that KPI domain 1 interacts with factor VIIa, that KPI domain 2 interacts with factor Xa, and that KPI domain 3 is apparently without inhibitory function. To elucidate the reaction mechanism of this complex inhibitor, we followed a different approach and studied the inhibitory properties of fragments of TFPI obtained by expression in yeast. Results obtained with TFPI-(1-161)-peptide and separate recombinant TFPI-KPI domains 1, 2 and 3 showed that KPI domain 1 inhibited factor VIIa/tissue factor (Ki = 250 nM), KPI domain 2 inhibited factor Xa (Ki = 90 nM), and that KPI domain 3 was without detectable inhibitory function. Studies with separate KPI domains also showed that KPI domain 2 was mainly responsible for inhibition of trypsin (Ki = 0.1 nM) and chymotrypsin (Ki = 0.75 nM), whereas KPI domain 1 inhibited plasmin (Ki = 26 nM) and cathepsin G (Ki = 200 nM). The structural basis for the interaction between serine proteases and KPI domains is discussed in terms of putative three-dimensional models of the proteins derived by comparative molecular-modelling methods. Studies of factor Xa inhibition by intact TFPI (Ki approximately 0.02 nM) suggested that regions other than the contact area of the KPI domain, interacted strongly with factor Xa. Secondary-site interactions were crucial for TFPI inhibition of factor Xa but was of little or no importance for its inhibition of trypsin.

  10. Directional reflectance factor distributions of a cotton row crop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Newcomb, W. W.; Schutt, J. B.; Pinter, P. J., Jr.; Jackson, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The directional reflectance factor distribution spanning the entire exitance hemisphere was measured for a cotton row crop (Gossypium barbadense L.) with 39 percent ground cover. Spectral directional radiances were taken in NOAA satellite 7 AVHRR bands 1 and 2 using a three-band radiometer with restricted 12 deg full angle field of view at half peak power points. Polar co-ordinate system plots of directional reflectance factor distributions and three-dimensional computer graphic plots of scattered flux were used to study the dynamics of the directional reflectance factor distribution as a function of spectral band, geometric structure of the scene, solar zenith and azimuth angles, and optical properties of the leaves and soil. The factor distribution of the incomplete row crops was highly polymodal relative to that for complete vegetation canopies. Besides the enhanced reflectance for the antisolar point, a reflectance minimum was observed towards the forwardscatter direction in the principle plane of the sun. Knowledge of the mechanics of the observed dynamics of the data may be used to provide rigorous validation for two- or three-dimensional radiative transfer models, and is important in interpreting aircraft and satellite data where the solar angle varies widely.

  11. Fast rotation of a subkilometer-sized near-Earth object 2011 XA{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Urakawa, Seitaro; Ohtsuka, Katsuhito; Abe, Shinsuke; Ito, Takashi; Nakamura, Tomoki

    2014-05-01

    We present light curve observations and their multiband photometry for near-Earth object (NEO) 2011 XA{sub 3}. The light curve has shown a periodicity of 0.0304 ± 0.0003 days (= 43.8 ± 0.4 minutes). The fast rotation shows that 2011 XA{sub 3} is in a state of tension (i.e., a monolithic asteroid) and cannot be held together by self-gravitation. Moreover, the multiband photometric analysis indicates that the taxonomic class of 2011 XA{sub 3} is S-complex, or V-type. Its estimated effective diameter is 225 ± 97 m (S-complex) and 166 ± 63 m (V-type), respectively. Therefore, 2011 XA{sub 3} is a candidate for the second-largest, fast-rotating, monolithic asteroid. Moreover, the orbital parameters of 2011 XA{sub 3} are apparently similar to those of NEO (3200) Phaethon, but F/B-type. We computed the orbital evolutions of 2011 XA{sub 3} and Phaethon. However, the results of the computation and distinct taxonomy indicate that neither of the asteroids is of common origin.

  12. Direct Extrapolation of Biota-sediment Accumulation Factors (BSAFs)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) for fish and shellfish were extrapolated directly from one location and species to other species, to other locations within a site, to other sites, and their combinations. The median errors in the extrapolations across species at a loc...

  13. AvrXa27 binding influences unwinding of the double-stranded DNA in the UPT box.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Junpeng; Liu, Nanv; Wei, Qi; Xi, Xuguang; Fu, Jing

    2017-03-04

    Transcription-Activator Like (TAL) effectors, delivered by Xanthomonas pathogens bind specifically to UP-regulated by TAL effectors (UPT) box of the host gene promoter to arouse disease or trigger defense response. This type of protein-DNA interaction model has been applied in site-directed genome editing. However, the off-target effects of TAL have severely hindered the development of this promising technology. To better exploit the specific interaction and to deeper understand the TAL-induced host transcription rewiring, the binding between the central repeat region (CRR) of the TAL effector AvrXa27 and its UPT box variants was studied by kinetics analysis and TAL-blocked helicase unwinding assay. The results revealed that while AvrXa27 exhibited the highest affinity to the wild type UPT box, it could also bind to mutated UPT box variants, implying the possibility of non-specific interactions. Furthermore, some of these non-specific combinations restricted the helicase-elicited double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) separation to a greater extent. Our findings provide insight into the mechanism of TAL transcriptional activation and are beneficial to TAL-mediated genome modification.

  14. Direct inhibition of the NOTCH transcription factor complex.

    PubMed

    Moellering, Raymond E; Cornejo, Melanie; Davis, Tina N; Del Bianco, Cristina; Aster, Jon C; Blacklow, Stephen C; Kung, Andrew L; Gilliland, D Gary; Verdine, Gregory L; Bradner, James E

    2009-11-12

    Direct inhibition of transcription factor complexes remains a central challenge in the discipline of ligand discovery. In general, these proteins lack surface involutions suitable for high-affinity binding by small molecules. Here we report the design of synthetic, cell-permeable, stabilized alpha-helical peptides that target a critical protein-protein interface in the NOTCH transactivation complex. We demonstrate that direct, high-affinity binding of the hydrocarbon-stapled peptide SAHM1 prevents assembly of the active transcriptional complex. Inappropriate NOTCH activation is directly implicated in the pathogenesis of several disease states, including T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL). The treatment of leukaemic cells with SAHM1 results in genome-wide suppression of NOTCH-activated genes. Direct antagonism of the NOTCH transcriptional program causes potent, NOTCH-specific anti-proliferative effects in cultured cells and in a mouse model of NOTCH1-driven T-ALL.

  15. Direct inhibition of the NOTCH transcription factor complex

    PubMed Central

    Moellering, Raymond E.; Cornejo, Melanie; Davis, Tina N.; Del Bianco, Cristina; Aster, Jon C.; Blacklow, Stephen C.; Kung, Andrew L.; Gilliland, D. Gary; Verdine, Gregory L.; Bradner, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Direct inhibition of transcription factor complexes remains a central challenge in the discipline of ligand discovery. In general, these proteins lack surface involutions suitable for high-affinity binding by small molecules. Here we report the design of synthetic, cell-permeable, stabilized α-helical peptides that target a critical protein–protein interface in the NOTCH transactivation complex. We demonstrate that direct, high-affinity binding of the hydrocarbon-stapled peptide SAHM1 prevents assembly of the active transcriptional complex. Inappropriate NOTCH activation is directly implicated in the pathogenesis of several disease states, including T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL). The treatment of leukaemic cells with SAHM1 results in genome-wide suppression of NOTCH-activated genes. Direct antagonism of the NOTCH transcriptional program causes potent, NOTCH-specific anti-proliferative effects in cultured cells and in a mouse model of NOTCH1-driven T-ALL. PMID:19907488

  16. Effect of food, an antacid, and the H2 antagonist ranitidine on the absorption of BAY 59-7939 (rivaroxaban), an oral, direct factor Xa inhibitor, in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kubitza, Dagmar; Becka, Michael; Zuehlsdorf, Michael; Mueck, Wolfgang

    2006-05-01

    To investigate the influence of food and administration of an antacid (aluminum-magnesium hydroxide) or ranitidine on the absorption of BAY 59-7939 (rivaroxaban), 4 randomized studies were performed in healthy male subjects. In 2 food interaction studies, subjects received BAY 59-7939, either as two 5-mg tablets (fasted and fed), four 5-mg tablets (fasted), or one 20-mg tablet (fasted and fed). In 2 drug interaction studies, BAY 59-7939 (six 5-mg tablets) was given alone or with ranitidine (150 mg twice daily, preceded by a 3-day pretreatment phase) or antacid (10 mL). Plasma samples were obtained to assess pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of BAY 59-7939. In the presence of food, time to maximum concentration (t(max)) was delayed by 1.25 hours; maximum concentration (C(max)) and area under the curve (AUC) were increased, with reduced interindividual variability at higher doses of BAY 59-7939. Compared with baseline, BAY 59-7939 resulted in a relative increase in maximum prothrombin time (PT) prolongation of 44% (10 mg) and 53% (20 mg) in the fasted state, compared with 53% and 83% after food. Time to maximum PT prolongation was delayed by 0.5 to 1.5 hours after food, with no relevant influence of food type. No significant difference in C(max) and AUC was observed with coadministration of BAY 59-7939 and ranitidine or antacid.

  17. Effect of nadroparin on anti-Xa activity during nocturnal hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Buitenwerf, Edward; Risselada, Arne J.; van Roon, Eric N.; Veeger, Nic J.G.M.; Hemmelder, Marc H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nadroparin is used during hemodialysis to prevent clotting of the extra corporeal system. During nocturnal hemodialysis patients receive an increased dosage of nadroparin compared to conventional hemodialysis. We tested whether the prescribed dosage regimen of nadroparin, according to Dutch guidelines, causes accumulation of nadroparin. Methods Anti-Xa levels were used as an indicator of nadroparin accumulation. Anti-Xa was measured photometrically in 13 patients undergoing nocturnal hemodialysis for 4 nights a week. Nadroparin was administered according to Dutch dosage guidelines. We assessed anti-Xa levels at 4 time points during 1 dialysis week: before the start of the first dialysis session of the week (baseline), prior to (T1) and after the last dialysis session of the week (T2) and before the first dialysis of the following week (T3). Results Patients received 71–95 IU/kg at the start of dialysis and another 50% of the initial dosage after 4 h with a total cumulative dosage of 128 ± 24 IU/kg. Anti-Xa levels increased from 0.017 at baseline to 0.019 at T1 (p = 0.03). Anti-Xa levels were 0.419 ± 0.252 IU/ml at T2 (p < 0.001 vs baseline and T1), whereas anti-Xa levels were not changed at T3 compared to baseline. Conclusion Dosing of nadroparin according to Dutch guidelines in patients on nocturnal hemodialysis does not lead to accumulation of nadroparin. We therefore consider the Dutch dosage guidelines for nadroparin an effective and safe strategy. General significance This article is the first to present data on anti-Xa activity during nocturnal hemodialysis which is a widely used and potentially dangerous therapy. PMID:26672512

  18. 3D/3D registration of coronary CTA and biplane XA reconstructions for improved image guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Dibildox, Gerardo Baka, Nora; Walsum, Theo van; Punt, Mark; Aben, Jean-Paul; Schultz, Carl; Niessen, Wiro

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The authors aim to improve image guidance during percutaneous coronary interventions of chronic total occlusions (CTO) by providing information obtained from computed tomography angiography (CTA) to the cardiac interventionist. To this end, the authors investigate a method to register a 3D CTA model to biplane reconstructions. Methods: The authors developed a method for registering preoperative coronary CTA with intraoperative biplane x-ray angiography (XA) images via 3D models of the coronary arteries. The models are extracted from the CTA and biplane XA images, and are temporally aligned based on CTA reconstruction phase and XA ECG signals. Rigid spatial alignment is achieved with a robust probabilistic point set registration approach using Gaussian mixture models (GMMs). This approach is extended by including orientation in the Gaussian mixtures and by weighting bifurcation points. The method is evaluated on retrospectively acquired coronary CTA datasets of 23 CTO patients for which biplane XA images are available. Results: The Gaussian mixture model approach achieved a median registration accuracy of 1.7 mm. The extended GMM approach including orientation was not significantly different (P > 0.1) but did improve robustness with regards to the initialization of the 3D models. Conclusions: The authors demonstrated that the GMM approach can effectively be applied to register CTA to biplane XA images for the purpose of improving image guidance in percutaneous coronary interventions.

  19. Dynamics of directional reflectance factor distributions for vegetation canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Directional reflectance factors that span the entire exitance hemisphere are collected on the ground for a variety of homogeneous vegetation canopies and bare soils. NOAA 6/7 AVHRR bands 1 (0.58-0.68 micron) and 2 (0.73-1.1 microns) are used. When possible, geometric measurements of leaf orientation distributions are taken simultaneously with each spectral measurement. Other supporting structural and optical measurements are made. These data sets are taken at various times of the day for each cover type. These unique sets, together with pertinent data in the literature, are used to investigate the dynamics of the directional reflectance factor distribution as a function of the geometric structure of the scene, solar zenith angle, and optical properties of the scene components (leaves and soil). For complete homogeneous vegetation canopies, the principal trend observed at all sun angles and spectral bands is a minimum reflectance near nadir and increasing reflectance with increasing off-nadir view angle for all azimuth directions.

  20. Interaction of blood coagulation factor Va with phospholipid vesicles examined by using lipophilic photoreagents

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, U.C.; Isaacs, B.S.; Yemul, S.S.; Esmon, C.T.; Bayley, H.; Johnson, A.E.

    1987-01-13

    Two different lipophilic photoreagents, (/sup 3/H)adamantane diazirine and 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-(/sup 125/I)iodophenyl)diazirine (TID), have been utilized to examine the interactions of blood coagulation factor Va with calcium, prothrombin, factor Xa, and, in particular, phospholipid vesicles. With each of these structurally dissimilar reagents, the extent of photolabeling of factor Va was greater when the protein was bound to a membrane surface than when it was free in solution. Specifically, the covalent photoreaction with Vl, the smaller subunit of factor Va, was 2-fold higher in the presence of phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine (PC/PS, 3:1) vesicles, to which factor Va binds, than in the presence of 100% PC vesicles, to which the protein does not bind. However, the magnitude of the PC/PS-dependent photolabeling was much less than has been observed previously with integral membrane proteins. It therefore appears that the binding of factor Va to the membrane surface exposes Vl to the lipid core of the bilayer, but that only a small portion of the Vl polypeptide is exposed to, or embedded in, the bilayer core. Addition of either prothrombin or active-site-blocked factor Xa to PC/PS-bound factor Va had little effect on the photolabeling of Vl with TID, but reduced substantially the covalent labeling of Vh, the larger subunit of factor Va. This indicates that prothrombin and factor Xa each cover nonpolar surfaces on Vh when the macromolecules associate on the PC/PS surface. It therefore seems likely that the formation of the prothrombinase complex involves a direct interaction between Vh and factor Xa and between Vh and prothrombin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Genetic engineering of the Xa10 promoter for broad-spectrum and durable resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xuan; Tian, Dongsheng; Gu, Keyu; Zhou, Zhiyun; Yang, Xiaobei; Luo, Yanchang; White, Frank F; Yin, Zhongchao

    2015-09-01

    Many pathovars of plant pathogenic bacteria Xanthomonas species inject transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors into plant host cells to promote disease susceptibility or trigger disease resistance. The rice TAL effector-dependent disease resistance gene Xa10 confers narrow-spectrum race-specific resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the causal agent of bacterial blight disease in rice. To generate broad-spectrum and durable resistance to Xoo, we developed a modified Xa10 gene, designated as Xa10(E5) . Xa10(E5) has an EBE-amended promoter containing 5 tandemly arranged EBEs each responding specifically to a corresponding virulent or avirulent TAL effector and a stable transgenic rice line containing Xa10(E5) was generated in the cultivar Nipponbare. The Xa10(E5) gene was specifically induced by Xoo strains that harbour the corresponding TAL effectors and conferred TAL effector-dependent resistance to the pathogens at all developmental stages of rice. Further disease evaluation demonstrated that the Xa10(E5) gene in either Nipponbare or 9311 genetic backgrounds provided broad-spectrum disease resistance to 27 of the 28 Xoo strains collected from 11 countries. The development of Xa10(E5) and transgenic rice lines provides new genetic materials for molecular breeding of rice for broad-spectrum and durable disease resistance to bacterial blight.

  2. Characterization and expression analysis of two cDNAs encoding Xa1 and oxysterol binding proteins in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and subsequent microarray analysis, expression profiles of sorghum genes responsive to greenbug phloem-feeding were obtained and identified. Among the profiles, two cDNAs designated to MM73 and MM95 were identified to encode Xa1 (Xa1) and oxysterol ...

  3. High-resolution genetic mapping of Xa27(t), a new bacterial blight resistance gene in rice, Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed

    Gu, K; Tian, D; Yang, F; Wu, L; Sreekala, C; Wang, D; Wang, G-L; Yin, Z

    2004-03-01

    Bacterial blight of rice, caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae ( Xoo) (Ishyama) Dye, is one of the serious diseases prevalent throughout Asia. In a previous study, a resistance ( R) locus was transferred from the tetraploid wild rice Oryza minuta to the cultivated rice species, Oryza sativa L. Here, we report the fine genetic mapping of the R locus, tentatively designated as Xa27(t). We performed disease evaluation with an Xa27(t) near-isogenic line, IRBB27, testing 35 Xoo strains collected from 11 countries. The Xa27(t) locus conferred a high level of resistance to 27 strains and moderate resistance to three strains. Resistance of the Xa27(t) gene was developmentally regulated in IRBB27 and showed semi-dominant or a dosage effect in the cv. CO39 genetic background. As a prelude to cloning Xa27(t), a molecular mapping strategy was employed with a large mapping population consisting of 3,875 gametes. Three molecular markers, M336, M1081, and M1059, closely linked to Xa27(t), were identified to facilitate the mapping of Xa27(t) to the long arm of chromosome 6. The Xa27(t) locus was confirmed by chromosome landing of M1081 and M1095 markers on the rice genome. Markers derived from the genomic sequence of O. sativa cv. Nipponbare were used to further saturate the Xa27(t) genomic region. Xa27(t) was finally located within a genetic interval of 0.052 cM, flanked by markers M964 and M1197, and co-segregated with markers M631, M1230, and M449.

  4. Developing an Anti-Xa-Based Anticoagulation Protocol for Patients with Percutaneous Ventricular Assist Devices.

    PubMed

    Sieg, Adam; Mardis, B Andrew; Mardis, Caitlin R; Huber, Michelle R; New, James P; Meadows, Holly B; Cook, Jennifer L; Toole, J Matthew; Uber, Walter E

    2015-01-01

    Because of the complexities associated with anticoagulation in temporary percutaneous ventricular assist device (pVAD) recipients, a lack of standardization exists in their management. This retrospective analysis evaluates current anticoagulation practices at a single center with the aim of identifying an optimal anticoagulation strategy and protocol. Patients were divided into two cohorts based on pVAD implanted (CentriMag (Thoratec; Pleasanton, CA) / TandemHeart (CardiacAssist; Pittsburgh, PA) or Impella (Abiomed, Danvers, MA)), with each group individually analyzed for bleeding and thrombotic complications. Patients in the CentriMag/TandemHeart cohort were subdivided based on the anticoagulation monitoring strategy (activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) or antifactor Xa unfractionated heparin (anti-Xa) values). In the CentriMag/TandemHeart cohort, there were five patients with anticoagulation titrated based on anti-Xa values; one patient developed a device thrombosis and a major bleed, whereas another patient experienced major bleeding. Eight patients received an Impella pVAD. Seven total major bleeds in three patients and no thrombotic events were detected. Based on distinct differences between the devices, anti-Xa values, and outcomes, two protocols were created to guide anticoagulation adjustments. However, anticoagulation in patients who require pVAD support is complex with constantly evolving anticoagulation goals. The ideal level of anticoagulation should be individually determined using several coagulation laboratory parameters in concert with hemodynamic changes in the patient's clinical status, the device, and the device cannulation.

  5. OsWRKY62 is a negative regulator of basal and Xa21-mediated defense against Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rice Xa21 gene, which confers resistance to the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), encodes a receptor-like kinase. Few components involved in transducing the Xa21-mediated defense response have yet been identified. It is reported that XA21 binds to a WRKY transcription fac...

  6. Inhibition of coagulation proteases Xa and IIa decreases ischemia-reperfusion injuries in a preclinical renal transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Tillet, Solenne; Giraud, Sébastien; Kerforne, Thomas; Saint-Yves, Thibaut; Joffrion, Sandrine; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Cau, Jerôme; Mauco, Gérard; Petitou, Maurice; Hauet, Thierry

    2016-12-01

    Coagulation is an important pathway in the pathophysiology of ischemia-reperfusion injuries. In particular, deceased after circulatory death (DCD) donors undergo a no-flow period, a strong activator of coagulation. Hence, therapies influencing the coagulation cascade must be developed. We evaluated the effect of a new highly specific and effective anti-Xa/IIa molecule, with an integrated innovative antidote site (EP217609), in a porcine preclinical model mimicking injuries observed in DCD donor kidney transplantation. Kidneys were clamped for 60 minutes (warm ischemia), then flushed and preserved for 24 hours at 4°C in University of Wisconsin (UW) solution (supplemented or not). EP217609-supplemented UW solution (UW-EP), compared with unfractionated heparin-supplemented UW solution (UW-UFH) or UW alone (UW). A mechanistic investigation was conducted in vitro: addition of EP217609 to endothelial cells during hypoxia at 4°C in the UW solution inhibited thrombin generation during reoxygenation at 37°C in human plasma and reduced tumor necrosis factor alpha, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 messenger RNA cell expressions. In vivo, function recovery was markedly improved in the UW-EP group. Interestingly, levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes (reflecting thrombin generation) were reduced 60 minutes after reperfusion in the UW-EP group. In addition, 3 months after transplantation, lower fibrosis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, inflammation, and leukocyte infiltration were observed. Using this new dual anticoagulant, anti-Xa/IIa activity during kidney flush and preservation is protected by reducing thrombin generation at revascularization, improving early function recovery, and decreasing chronic lesions. Such an easy-to-deploy clinical strategy could improve marginal graft outcome.

  7. Local shear conditions and platelet aggregates regulate the incorporation and activity of circulating tissue factor in ex-vivo thrombi.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Viji; Vele, Oana; Nemerson, Yale

    2002-11-01

    The presence of thrombogenic blood-borne or circulating tissue factor (cTF) has recently been demonstrated. These observations have implicated cTF to be a key determinant of thrombus propagation by depositing on platelets in nascent thrombi. Previously, we detected cTF by detergent solubilization and addition of phospholipids. We now report the direct demonstration of TF activity in ex-vivo thrombi. Collagen-coated substrates were exposed to native blood at shear rates of 0, 650, and 2,000 s(-1) for 10 min in a modified rotating Teflon cone and plate viscometer. Substrates were then gently rinsed to remove 'loose' (unadherent) components of blood. cTF activity was measured by adding a solution containing 10 nM FVIIa, 100 nM FX, and 5 mM CaCl(2) to the substrates exposed to blood. Samples of this mixture were obtained at intervals for 30 min and the amount of Xa generated was quantified by adding a chromogenic substrate, Spectrozyme Xa, and measuring the increase in OD at 405 nm. Our studies show that a minimal amount of generated Xa (approximately 1nM) can be measured from ex-vivo thrombi. Static and shear samples generated the same amount of Xa, with the exception of blood subjected to 650 s(-1) shear. At 650 s(-1) shear rate, the amount of Xa generated reached a maximum of 4 nM at 5 min and then decreased to approximately 1 nM. Immunohistological stains and fluorescent images demonstrate the presence of cTF antigen at 650 s(-1) wall shear rate.

  8. 76 FR 80829 - Special Conditions: XtremeAir GmbH, XA42; Acrobatic Category Aerodynamic Stability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... airplane. The XA42 airplane has a novel or unusual design feature associated with its static stability... acrobatic capability: Neutral longitudinal and lateral static stability characteristics. Discussion The Code of Federal Regulations states static stability criteria for longitudinal, lateral, and...

  9. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of the DC-XA Composite Liquid Hydrogen Tank During Structural Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, C.

    1996-01-01

    The results of acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of the DC-XA composite liquid hydrogen tank are presented in this report. The tank was subjected to pressurization, tensile, and compressive loads at ambient temperatures and also while full of liquid nitrogen. The tank was also pressurized with liquid hydrogen. AE was used to monitor the tank for signs of structural defects developing during the test.

  10. The First Test Flight of the Delta Clipper-Experimental Advanced (DC-XA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The Delta Clipper-Experimental Advanced (DC-XA) is a single-stage-to-orbit, vertical takeoff / vertical landing launch vehicle concept, whose development was geared to significantly reduce launch cost and provided a test bed for NASA Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) technology. This photograph shows the descending vehicle landing during the first successful test flight at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. The program was discontinued in 2003.

  11. Direct binding of hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor to CD44v6.

    PubMed

    Volz, Yvonne; Koschut, David; Matzke-Ogi, Alexandra; Dietz, Marina S; Karathanasis, Christos; Richert, Ludovic; Wagner, Moritz G; Mély, Yves; Heilemann, Mike; Niemann, Hartmut H; Orian-Rousseau, Véronique

    2015-06-29

    CD44v6, a member of the CD44 family of transmembrane glycoproteins is a co-receptor for two receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), Met and VEGFR-2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2). CD44v6 is not only required for the activation of these RTKs but also for signalling. In order to understand the role of CD44v6 in Met and VEGFR-2 activation and signalling we tested whether CD44v6 binds to their ligands, HGF (hepatocyte growth factor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), respectively. FACS analysis and cellular ELISA showed binding of HGF and VEGF only to cells expressing CD44v6. Direct binding of CD44v6 to HGF and VEGF was demonstrated in pull-down assays and the binding affinities were determined using MicroScale Thermophoresis, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy. The binding affinity of CD44v6 to HGF is in the micromolar range in contrast with the high-affinity binding measured in the case of VEGF and CD44v6, which is in the nanomolar range. These data reveal a heparan sulfate-independent direct binding of CD44v6 to the ligands of Met and VEGFR-2 and suggest different roles of CD44v6 for these RTKs.

  12. Comparative nutritional compositions and proteomics analysis of transgenic Xa21 rice seeds compared to conventional rice.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Dipak; Paul, Soumitra; Sarkar, Sailendra Nath; Datta, Swapan K; Datta, Karabi

    2016-07-15

    Transgenic rice expressing the Xa21 gene have enhanced resistant to most devastating bacterial blight diseases caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). However, identification of unintended modifications, owing to the genetic modification, is an important aspect of transgenic crop safety assessment. In this study, the nutritional compositions of seeds from transgenic rice plants expressing the Xa21 gene were compared against non-transgenic rice seeds. In addition, to detect any changes in protein translation levels as a result of Xa21 gene expression, rice seed proteome analyses were also performed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. No significant differences were found in the nutritional compositions (proximate components, amino acids, minerals, vitamins and anti-nutrients) of the transgenic and non-transgenic rice seeds. Although gel electrophoresis identified 11 proteins that were differentially expressed between the transgenic and non-transgenic seed, only one of these (with a 20-fold up-regulation in the transgenic seed) shows nutrient reservoir activity. No new toxins or allergens were detected in the transgenic seeds.

  13. Materials Testing on the DC-X and DC-XA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dane; Carroll, Carol; Marschall, Jochen; Pallix, Joan

    1997-01-01

    Flight testing of thermal protection materials has been carried out over a two year period on the base heat shield of the Delta Clipper (DC-X and DC-XA), as well on a body flap. The purpose was to use the vehicle as a test bed for materials and more efficient repair or maintenance processes which would be potentially useful for application on new entry vehicles (i.e., X-33, RLV, planetary probes), as well as on the existing space shuttle orbiters. Panels containing Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) and/or structural materials were constructed either at NASA Ames Research Center or at McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) and attached between two of the four thrusters in the base heat shield of the DC-X or DC-XA. Three different panels were flown on DC-X flights 6, 7, and 8. A total of 7 panels were flown on DC-XA flights 1, 2, and 3. The panels constructed at Ames contained a variety of ceramic TPS including flexible blankets, tiles with high emissivity coatings, lightweight ceramic ablators and other ceramic composites. The MDS test panels consisted primarily of a variety of metallic composites. This report focuses on the ceramic TPS test results.

  14. Item Factor Analysis: Current Approaches and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, R. J.; Edwards, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    The rationale underlying factor analysis applies to continuous and categorical variables alike; however, the models and estimation methods for continuous (i.e., interval or ratio scale) data are not appropriate for item-level data that are categorical in nature. The authors provide a targeted review and synthesis of the item factor analysis (IFA)…

  15. Future directions in Alzheimer's disease from risk factors to prevention.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Bushra; Tolppanen, Anna-Maija; Kivipelto, Miia; Soininen, Hilkka

    2014-04-15

    The increase in life expectancy has resulted in a high occurrence of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Research on AD has undergone a paradigm shift from viewing it as a disease of old age to taking a life course perspective. Several vascular, lifestyle, psychological and genetic risk factors influencing this latent period have been recognized and they may act both independently and by potentiating each other. These risk factors have consequently been used to derive risk scores for predicting the likelihood of dementia. Despite population differences, age, low education and vascular risk factors were identified as key factors in all scoring systems. Risk scores can help to identify high-risk individuals who might benefit from different interventions. The European Dementia Prevention Initiative (EDPI), an international collaboration, encourages data sharing between different randomized controlled trials. At the moment, it includes three large ongoing European trials: Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER), Prevention of Dementia by Intensive Vascular Care (preDIVA), and Multidomain Alzheimer Prevention study (MAPT). Recently EDPI has developed a "Healthy Aging through Internet Counseling in Elderly" (HATICE) program, which intends to manage modifiable risk factors in an aged population through an easily accessible Internet platform. Thus, the focus of dementia research has shifted from identification of potential risk factors to using this information for developing interventions to prevent or delay the onset of dementia as well as identifying special high-risk populations who could be targeted in intervention trials.

  16. [Pyramiding of senescence-inhibition IPT gene and Xa23 for resistance to bacterial blight in rice (Oryza sativa L.)].

    PubMed

    He, Guang-Ming; Sun, Chuan-Qing; Fu, Yong-Cai; Fu, Qiang; Zhao, Kai-Jun; Wang, Chun-Lian; Zhang, Qi; Ling, Zhong-Zhuan; Wang, Xiang-Kun

    2004-08-01

    Transgenic lines (GC-1) carrying a senescence-inhibition cheimeric gene, IPT (isopentenyl transferase) gene, CBB23, a isogenic lines carrying Xa23 gene for resistance to bacterial blight, and Hexi15, a commercial cultivar showing high resistance to blast disease, were used as donors to pyramid IPT gene and Xa23 by marker-assisted selection (MAS). Seventeen BC1F1 plants pyramiding Xa23 gene and IPT genes were obtained from three multi-cross combinations. Then, the plants carrying Xa23 and IPT genes were crossed with parental lines of two-line hybrid rice, such as 9311, E32, Pei' ai 64S and W9834S. The progenies were backcrossed the acceptor parents. A total of 17 plants carrying Xa23 and IPT genes were detected by PCR, disease resistance identification and analysis of CTK contents of in the four combinations of "(9311///Hexi15/CBB23// GC-1) x 9311", "(E32///Hexi15/CBB23//GC-1) x E32", "(Pei'ai 64S///Hexi15/CBB23//GC-1) x Pei' ai 64S" and "(GC-1/CBB23//W9834S/Hexi15) x W9834S". These plants showed resistance to blast disease by inoculating test using 21 the lines of Pyricularia grisea from Northern China. Six plants of BC2F1 pyramiding Xa23 and IPT genes were further obtained in the combinations of "[(9311///Hexi15/CBB23//GC-1) x 9311] x 9311", "[(E32///Hexi15/CBB23//GC-1) x E32] x E32". After backcrossed and self-crossed 1 approximately 2nd, the plants pyramiding Xa23 and IPT genes can be used in the program of hybrid rice breeding.

  17. Direct estimates of friction factors for a mobile rippled bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Abudo, S.; Foster, D. L.

    2017-01-01

    New friction factor estimates are computed from the total momentum transfer applied to a rippled sediment bed. The total time-dependent momentum flux is achieved by implementing the double-averaged horizontal momentum equation on the nearbed flow field collected with PIV. Time-independent friction factors are obtained by regressing the total momentum flux to the common quadratic stress law given by 12ρu∞|u∞|. The resulting friction factors compare favorably with available analysis techniques including energy dissipation, vertical turbulence intensity, and maximum shear stress, but can be 2-6 times smaller than estimates determined with the model by Madsen (1994) and the formula of Swart (1974) using the ripple roughness.

  18. The transcriptional factor Osterix directly interacts with RNA helicase A.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Bruna Rabelo; Okamura, Hirohiko; Yoshida, Kaya; Qiu, Lihong; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2007-04-06

    Osterix is an osteoblast-specific transcriptional factor, required for bone formation and osteoblast differentiation. Here, we identified new Osterix interacting factors by using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Among the candidates, RNA helicase A was identified to interact with Osterix. To determine the interaction of Osterix with RNA helicase A, immunoprecipitation assay was performed. Western analysis confirmed the association between Osterix and RNA helicase A. Immunocytochemical analysis also showed that Osterix and RNA helicase A were co-localized in HEK 293 cells. Our data suggest that RNA helicase A might be a component of Osterix regulation.

  19. A confirmatory factor analysis of the Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brett; Brown, Ted

    2013-12-01

    The Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale measures readiness for self-directed learning among undergraduate healthcare students. While several exploratory factor analyses and one confirmatory factor analysis have examined the psychometric properties of the Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale, questions have been raised regarding the underlying latent constructs being measured. The objective of this study was to determine the best-fitting Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale factorial structure among three models published in the literature. Data from the three-factor 40-item Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale completed by 233 undergraduate paramedic students from four Australian universities (response rate of 26%) were analyzed using maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analysis. Comparison of model fit from the 40-item version was undertaken with the previously documented four-factor 36-item and three-factor 29-item Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scales. The model fit indices of the three one-factor congeneric models with maximum likelihood analysis demonstrate that the 40-item Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale does not fit the data well. The best fitting model was the four-factor 36-item Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale followed by the three-factor 29-item models. The confirmatory factor analysis results did not support the overall construct validity of the original 40-item Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale.

  20. Direct Application of Biota-sediment Accumulation Factors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biota-sediment bioaccumulation factors (BSAFs) relate chemical residues in fish to chemical concentrations in contaminated sediments. BSAFs used by EPAs Office of Water in developing water quality criteria and by EPAs Superfund program in performing risk assessments for sites wi...

  1. Explicit polynomial formulas for solutions of the matrix equation AX-XA=C

    SciTech Connect

    Demenchuk, Alexandr K.; Makarov, Evgenii K.

    2009-08-15

    We provide some mathematical tool to analyze the possible theoretical structure of Hamiltonian reconstructed from von Neumann or Heisenberg's equation for a finite-dimensional quantum system. To this end, we give an explicit polynomial representation for the general solution of the matrix equation AX-XA=C together with some (also polynomial) solvability conditions when A and C are some complex square matrices of the same size and the matrix A is semisimple. When the matrix A is normal, we derive a polynomial existence condition for Hermitian solutions and a similar formula for all solutions of this type.

  2. The rice immune receptor XA21 recognizes a tyrosine-sulfated protein from a Gram-negative bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Rory N.; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Joe, Anna; Thomas, Nicholas; Liu, Furong; Albert, Markus; Robinson, Michelle R.; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Luu, Dee Dee; Chen, Huamin; Bahar, Ofir; Daudi, Arsalan; De Vleesschauwer, David; Caddell, Daniel; Zhang, Weiguo; Zhao, Xiuxiang; Li, Xiang; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Ruan, Deling; Majumder, Dipali; Chern, Mawsheng; Kalbacher, Hubert; Midha, Samriti; Patil, Prabhu B.; Sonti, Ramesh V.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Liu, Chang C.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance of the extracellular environment by immune receptors is of central importance to eukaryotic survival. The rice receptor kinase XA21, which confers robust resistance to most strains of the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is representative of a large class of cell surface immune receptors in plants and animals. We report the identification of a previously undescribed Xoo protein, called RaxX, which is required for activation of XA21-mediated immunity. Xoo strains that lack RaxX, or carry mutations in the single RaxX tyrosine residue (Y41), are able to evade XA21-mediated immunity. Y41 of RaxX is sulfated by the prokaryotic tyrosine sulfotransferase RaxST. Sulfated, but not nonsulfated, RaxX triggers hallmarks of the plant immune response in an XA21-dependent manner. A sulfated, 21–amino acid synthetic RaxX peptide (RaxX21-sY) is sufficient for this activity. Xoo field isolates that overcome XA21-mediated immunity encode an alternate raxX allele, suggesting that coevolutionary interactions between host and pathogen contribute to RaxX diversification. RaxX is highly conserved in many plant pathogenic Xanthomonas species. The new insights gained from the discovery and characterization of the sulfated protein, RaxX, can be applied to the development of resistant crop varieties and therapeutic reagents that have the potential to block microbial infection of both plants and animals. PMID:26601222

  3. Gene silencing using the recessive rice bacterial blight resistance gene xa13 as a new paradigm in plant breeding.

    PubMed

    Li, Changyan; Wei, Jing; Lin, Yongjun; Chen, Hao

    2012-05-01

    Resistant germplasm resources are valuable for developing resistant varieties in agricultural production. However, recessive resistance genes are usually overlooked in hybrid breeding. Compared with dominant traits, however, they may confer resistance to different pathogenic races or pest biotypes with different mechanisms of action. The recessive rice bacterial blight resistance gene xa13, also involved in pollen development, has been cloned and its resistance mechanism has been recently characterized. This report describes the conversion of bacterial blight resistance mediated by the recessive xa13 gene into a dominant trait to facilitate its use in a breeding program. This was achieved by knockdown of the corresponding dominant allele Xa13 in transgenic rice using recently developed artificial microRNA technology. Tissue-specific promoters were used to exclude most of the expression of artificial microRNA in the anther to ensure that Xa13 functioned normally during pollen development. A battery of highly bacterial blight resistant transgenic plants with normal seed setting rates were acquired, indicating that highly specific gene silencing had been achieved. Our success with xa13 provides a paradigm that can be adapted to other recessive resistance genes.

  4. The Use of a Dexamethasone-inducible System to Synchronize Xa21 Expression to Study Rice Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Caddell, Daniel F.; Wei, Tong; Park, Chang-Jin; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2016-01-01

    Inducible gene expression systems offer researchers the opportunity to synchronize target gene expression at particular developmental stages and in particular tissues. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a vertebrate steroid receptor, has been well adopted for this purpose in plants. To generate steroid-inducible plants, a construct of GAL4-binding domain-VP16 activation domain-GR fusion (GVG) with the target gene under the control of upstream activation sequence (UAS) has been developed and extensively used in plant research. Immune receptors perceive conserved molecular patterns secreted by pathogens and initiate robust immune responses. The rice immune receptor, XA21, recognizes a molecular pattern highly conserved in all sequenced genomes of Xanthomonas, and confers robust resistance to X. oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). However, identifying genes downstream of XA21 has been hindered because of the restrained lesion and thus limited defense response region in the plants expressing Xa21. Inducible expression allows for a synchronized immune response across a large amount of rice tissue, well suited for studying XA21-mediated immunity by genome-wide approaches such as transcriptomics and proteomics. In this protocol, we describe the use of this GVG system to synchronize Xa21 expression. PMID:27525297

  5. Direct foreign investment: a migration push-factor?

    PubMed

    Sassen-koob, S

    1984-01-01

    Policymakers and analysts now recognize that US military activities abroad contribute to the creation of refugee flows into the US. Previously, immigration into the US was viewed as a result of inept and failed domestic policies in the countries of origin. Results show that recent immigrants to the US come from countries with neither the poorest nor the largest population growth rate in the less developed world. However, the sending countries received US direct foreign investment (DFI) in the 1970s, particularly labor intensive investment in export manufacturing. Significant levels and concentrations of DFI promote emigration through: 1) the incorporation of new segments of the population into wage labor and the associated disruption of traditional work structures, 2) the feminization of the new industrial work force and its impact on the work opportunities of men, and 3) the consolidation of objective and ideological links with the highly industrialized countries where most foreign capital originates. The data suggest an examination of the causes of emigration on a much more specific level than that of underdevelopment, poverty, and population growth. These facts carry immediate policy implications for US immigration organizations: 1) if US firms in export processing zones recruited workers from the pool of unemployed--mostly prime-age males--rather than expanding the labor supply by recruiting young women, thereby disrupting unwaged work structures, and 2) if these firms would desist from having high turnover rates among workers, then the migration impact of this type of development would be minimized.

  6. [New anticoagulants - direct thrombin inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Brand, B; Graf, L

    2012-11-01

    Direct thrombin-inhibitors inactivate not only free but also fibrin-bound thrombin. The group of parenteral direct thrombin-inhibitors includes the recombinant hirudins lepirudin and desirudin, the synthetic hirudin bivalirudin, and the small molecule argatroban. All these compounds do not interact with PF4/heparin-antibodies. Therefore, argatroban as well as bivalirudin are currently used to treat heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). The oral direct thrombin-inhibitor dabigatran etexilate is already licensed in many countries for the treatment of non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Dabigatran etexilate reveals a stable and predictable effect that allows a medication without dose adjustment or monitoring. The substance shows only few interactions with other drugs but strong inhibitors of p-glycoprotein can increase plasma levels of dabigatran substantially. After oral intake, the prodrug dabigatran etexilate is cleaved by esterase-mediated hydrolyses to the active compound dabigatran. Elimination of dabigatran is predominantly renal. Safety and efficacy of dabigatran etexilate were tested in an extensive clinical study program. Non-inferiority compared to current standard treatments was shown for prophylaxis of venous thromboembolic events after total knee and hip replacement, for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation, and for treatment of acute venous thromboembolism. In daily practice, Dabigatran etexilate competes against the new direct factor Xa-inhibitors. In the absence of direct comparative clinical trials, it is not yet clear if one class of substances has distinct advantages over the other.

  7. Independent anti-angiogenic capacities of coagulation factors X and Xa.

    PubMed

    Lange, Soledad; Gonzalez, Ibeth; Pinto, Mauricio P; Arce, Maximiliano; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Aranda, Evelyn; Elliot, Matias; Alvarez, Marjorie; Henriquez, Soledad; Velasquez, Ethel V; Orge, Felipe; Oliva, Barbara; Gonzalez, Pamela; Villalon, Manuel; Cautivo, Kelly M; Kalergis, Alexis M; Pereira, Karla; Mendoza, Camila; Saez, Claudia; Kato, Sumie; Cuello, Mauricio A; Parborell, Fernanda; Irusta, Griselda; Palma, Veronica; Allende, Miguel L; Owen, Gareth I

    2014-11-01

    Knockout models have shown that the coagulation system has a role in vascular development and angiogenesis. Herein, we report for the first time that zymogen FX and its active form (FXa) possess anti-angiogenic properties. Both the recombinant FX and FXa inhibit angiogenesis in vitro using endothelial EA.hy926 and human umbilical cord vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). This effect is dependent on the Gla domain of FX. We demonstrate that FX and FXa use different mechanisms: the use of Rivaroxaban (RX) a specific inhibitor of FXa attenuated its anti-angiogenic properties but did not modify the anti-angiogenic effect of FX. Furthermore, only the anti-angiogenic activity of FXa is PAR-1dependent. Using in vivo models, we show that FX and FXa are anti-angiogenic in the zebrafish intersegmental vasculature (ISV) formation and in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. Our results provide further evidence for the non-hemostatic functions of FX and FXa and demonstrate for the first time a biological role for the zymogen FX.

  8. XaNSoNS: GPU-accelerated simulator of diffraction patterns of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neverov, V. S.

    XaNSoNS is an open source software with GPU support, which simulates X-ray and neutron 1D (or 2D) diffraction patterns and pair-distribution functions (PDF) for amorphous or crystalline nanoparticles (up to ∼107 atoms) of heterogeneous structural content. Among the multiple parameters of the structure the user may specify atomic displacements, site occupancies, molecular displacements and molecular rotations. The software uses general equations nonspecific to crystalline structures to calculate the scattering intensity. It supports four major standards of parallel computing: MPI, OpenMP, Nvidia CUDA and OpenCL, enabling it to run on various architectures, from CPU-based HPCs to consumer-level GPUs.

  9. Establishing the heparin therapeutic range using aPTT and anti-Xa measurements for monitoring unfractionated heparin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Jung-Hyun; Jang, In-Seok; Kim, Jong Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background Unfractionated heparin (UFH) has unstable pharmacokinetics and requires close monitoring. The activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) test has been used to monitor UFH therapy for decades in Korea, but its results can be affected by numerous variables. We established an aPTT heparin therapeutic range (HTR) corresponding to therapeutic anti-Xa levels for continuous intravenous UFH administration, and used appropriate monitoring to determine if an adequate dose of UFH was applied. Methods A total of 134 ex vivo samples were obtained from 71 patients with a variety of thromboembolisms. All patients received intravenous UFH therapy and were enrolled from June to September 2015 at Gyeongsang National University Hospital. All laboratory protocols were in accordance with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines and the College of American Pathologist requirements for aPTT HTR. Results An aPTT range of 87.1 sec to 128.7 sec corresponded to anti-Xa levels of 0.3 IU/mL to 0.7 IU/mL for HTR under our laboratory conditions. Based on their anti-Xa levels, blood specimen distribution were as follows: less than 0.3 IU/mL, 65.7%; 0.3–0.7 IU/mL (therapeutic range), 33.6%; and more than 0.7 IU/mL, 0.7%. No evidence of recurring thromboembolism was observed. Conclusion Using the conventional aPTT target range may lead to inappropriate dosing of UFH. Transitioning from the aPTT test to the anti-Xa assay is required to avoid the laborious validation of the aPTT HTR test, even though the anti-Xa assay is more expensive. PMID:27722127

  10. Analysis of Korean Students' International Mobility by 2-D Model: Driving Force Factor and Directional Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Elisa L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the dynamics of Korean students' international mobility to study abroad by using the 2-D Model. The first D, "the driving force factor," explains how and what components of the dissatisfaction with domestic higher education perceived by Korean students drives students' outward mobility to seek…

  11. Synthesis, purification, and characterization of an Arg sub 152 yields Glu site-directed mutant of recombinant human blood clotting factor VII

    SciTech Connect

    Wildgoose, P.; Kisiel, W. ); Berkner, K.L. )

    1990-04-03

    Coagulation factor VII circulates in blood as a single-chain zymogen of a serine protease and is converted to its activated two-chain form, factor VIIa, by cleavage of an internal peptide bond located at Arg{sub 152}-Ile{sub 153}. Previous studies using serine protease active-site inhibitors suggest that zymogen factor VII may possess sufficient proteolytic activity to initiate the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. In order to assess the putative intrinsic proteolytic activity of single-chain factor VII, the authors have constructed a site-specific mutant of recombinant human factor VII in which arginine-152 has been replaced with a glutamic acid residue. Mutant factor VII was purified in a single step from culture supernatants of baby hamster kidney cells transfected with a plasmid containing the sequence for Arg{sub 152} {yields} Glu factor VII using a calcium-dependent, murine anti-factor VII monoclonal antibody column. The clotting activity of mutant factor VII was completely inhibited following incubation with dansyl-Glu-Gly-Arg chloromethyl ketone, suggesting that the apparent clotting activity of mutant factor VII was due to a contaminating serine protease. Immunoblots of mutant factor VII with human factor IXa revealed no cleavage, whereas incubation of mutant factor VII with human factor Xa resulted in cleavage of mutant factor VII and the formation of a lower molecular weight degradation product migrating at M{sup r}{approx}40 000. The results are consistent with the proposal that zymogen factor VII possesses no intrinsic proteolytic activity toward factor X or factor IX.

  12. Discovery of non-directional and directional pioneer transcription factors by modeling DNase profile magnitude and shape

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Sophia; Barkal, Amira A; van Hoff, John Peter; Karun, Vivek; Jaakkola, Tommi; Gifford, David K

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe Protein Interaction Quantitation (PIQ), a computational method that models the magnitude and shape of genome-wide DNase profiles to facilitate the identification of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. Through the use of machine learning techniques, PIQ identified binding sites for >700 TFs from one DNase-seq experiment with accuracy comparable to ChIP-seq for motif-associated TFs (median AUC=0.93 across 303 TFs). We applied PIQ to analyze DNase-seq data from mouse embryonic stem cells differentiating into pre-pancreatic and intestinal endoderm. We identified (n=120) and experimentally validated eight ‘pioneer’ TF families that dynamically open chromatin, enabling other TFs to bind to adjacent DNA. Four pioneer TF families only open chromatin in one direction from their motifs. Furthermore, we identified a class of ‘settler’ TFs whose genomic binding is principally governed by proximity to open chromatin. Our results support a model of hierarchical TF binding in which directional and non-directional pioneer activity shapes the chromatin landscape for population by settler TFs. PMID:24441470

  13. The Measure of Human Error: Direct and Indirect Performance Shaping Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; Candice D. Griffith; Jeffrey C. Joe

    2007-08-01

    The goal of performance shaping factors (PSFs) is to provide measures to account for human performance. PSFs fall into two categories—direct and indirect measures of human performance. While some PSFs such as “time to complete a task” are directly measurable, other PSFs, such as “fitness for duty,” can only be measured indirectly through other measures and PSFs, such as through fatigue measures. This paper explores the role of direct and indirect measures in human reliability analysis (HRA) and the implications that measurement theory has on analyses and applications using PSFs. The paper concludes with suggestions for maximizing the reliability and validity of PSFs.

  14. A complex task? Direct modulation of transcription factors with small molecules

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Angela N.

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factors with aberrant activity in disease are promising yet untested targets for therapeutic development, particularly in oncology. Directly inhibiting or activating the function of a transcription factor requires specific disruption or recruitment of protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. The discovery or design of small molecules that specifically modulate these interactions has thus far proven to be a significant challenge and the protein class is often perceived to be ‘undruggable.’ This review will summarize recent progress in the development of small-molecule probes of transcription factors and provide evidence to challenge the notion that this important protein class is chemically intractable. PMID:20395165

  15. Pathways to Adult Sexual Revictimization: Direct and Indirect Behavioral Risk Factors across the Lifespan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fargo, Jamison D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate direct and indirect social and behavioral risk factors for adult sexual revictimization. Participants include 147 adult, predominantly African American (88%) women, 59% of whom had a documented history of child sexual abuse. Participants are interviewed in adulthood about adolescent and adult sexual…

  16. Lifestyle factors, direct and indirect costs for a Brazilian airline company.

    PubMed

    Rabacow, Fabiana Maluf; Luiz, Olinda do Carmo; Malik, Ana Maria; Burdorf, Alex

    2014-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze lifestyle risk factors related to direct healthcare costs and the indirect costs due to sick leave among workers of an airline company in Brazil. METHODS In this longitudinal 12-month study of 2,201 employees of a Brazilian airline company, the costs of sick leave and healthcare were the primary outcomes of interest. Information on the independent variables, such as gender, age, educational level, type of work, stress, and lifestyle-related factors (body mass index, physical activity, and smoking), was collected using a questionnaire on enrolment in the study. Data on sick leave days were available from the company register, and data on healthcare costs were obtained from insurance records. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to investigate the association between direct and indirect healthcare costs with sociodemographic, work, and lifestyle-related factors. RESULTS Over the 12-month study period, the average direct healthcare expenditure per worker was US$505.00 and the average indirect cost because of sick leave was US$249.00 per worker. Direct costs were more than twice the indirect costs and both were higher in women. Body mass index was a determinant of direct costs and smoking was a determinant of indirect costs. CONCLUSIONS Obesity and smoking among workers in a Brazilian airline company were associated with increased health costs. Therefore, promoting a healthy diet, physical activity, and anti-tobacco campaigns are important targets for health promotion in this study population.

  17. Lifestyle factors, direct and indirect costs for a Brazilian airline company

    PubMed Central

    Rabacow, Fabiana Maluf; Luiz, Olinda do Carmo; Malik, Ana Maria; Burdorf, Alex

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze lifestyle risk factors related to direct healthcare costs and the indirect costs due to sick leave among workers of an airline company in Brazil. METHODS In this longitudinal 12-month study of 2,201 employees of a Brazilian airline company, the costs of sick leave and healthcare were the primary outcomes of interest. Information on the independent variables, such as gender, age, educational level, type of work, stress, and lifestyle-related factors (body mass index, physical activity, and smoking), was collected using a questionnaire on enrolment in the study. Data on sick leave days were available from the company register, and data on healthcare costs were obtained from insurance records. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to investigate the association between direct and indirect healthcare costs with sociodemographic, work, and lifestyle-related factors. RESULTS Over the 12-month study period, the average direct healthcare expenditure per worker was US$505.00 and the average indirect cost because of sick leave was US$249.00 per worker. Direct costs were more than twice the indirect costs and both were higher in women. Body mass index was a determinant of direct costs and smoking was a determinant of indirect costs. CONCLUSIONS Obesity and smoking among workers in a Brazilian airline company were associated with increased health costs. Therefore, promoting a healthy diet, physical activity, and anti-tobacco campaigns are important targets for health promotion in this study population. PMID:26039398

  18. Tissue factor-driven thrombin generation and inflammation in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    ten Cate, Hugo

    2012-05-01

    The transmembrane receptor tissue factor is a prominent protein expressed at macrophages and smooth muscle cells within human atherosclerotic lesions. While many coagulation proteins are detectable in atherosclerosis, a locally active thrombin and fibrin generating molecular machinery may be instrumental in manipulating cellular functions involved in atherogenesis. These include inflammation, angiogenesis and cell proliferation. Indeed, many experimental studies in mice show a correlation between hypercoagulability and increased atherosclerosis. In mice, the amount of atherosclerosis and/or the plaque phenotype, appear to be modifiable by specific anticoagulant interventions. While attempts to vary tissue factor level in the vasculature does not directly reduce plaque burden, the overexpression of tissue factor pathway inhibitor attenuates thrombogenicity and neo intima formation in mice. Moreover, inhibition of factor Xa or thrombin with novel selective agents, including rivaroxaban and dabigatran, inhibits inflammation associated with atherosclerosis in apoE(-/-) mice. The potential to modify a complex chronic disease like atherosclerosis with novel selective anticoagulants merits further clinical study.

  19. How useful is the monitoring of (low molecular weight) heparin therapy by anti-Xa assay? A laboratory perspective.

    PubMed

    Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Bonar, Roslyn; Aboud, Margaret; Low, Joyce; Sioufi, John; Wheeler, Michael; Lloyd, John; Street, Alison; Marsden, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    We have conducted a series of laboratory-based surveys to assess variability in assay results utilized to monitor heparin anticoagulant therapy. These surveys involved laboratories participating in the Haematology component of the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia Quality Assurance Program (RCPA QAP). Thirty five of 646 laboratories that were sent a preliminary questionnaire indicated that they performed anti-Xa assays and these laboratories were sent a panel of four plasma samples. These plasma samples contained respectively: (i) no added heparin, (ii) low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), enoxaparin, added to a level of approximately .5 U/mL, (iii) unfractionated heparin added to a level of approximately .5 U/mL, and (iv) LMWH added to a level of approximately 1.0 U/mL. Tests to be performed were the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), the thrombin time (TT), fibrinogen, and anti-Xa. As expected, returned results for APTT and TT showed some elevation in heparinized samples while fibrinogen assays were not affected. Anti-Xa assays yielded the following results (median [range]): (i) .01 [0-.11], (ii) .43 [.33-.80], (iii) .23 [.10-.49], and (iv) .90 [.60-1.30]. Thus, although median values were close to those anticipated, there was a wide variation in returned results. In a repeat exercise a few months later laboratories were also asked about their therapeutic ranges (TRs) and provided with an additional vial of LMWH-spiked (1.0 U/mL) plasma labeled as 'heparin-standard' to be used as an assay calibrant. TRs varied substantially between laboratories, from low ranges of .2-.4 to high ranges of .8-1.2. Anti-Xa assay results were similar to those of the first survey: (median [range]): (a) repeat testing: (i) .02 [0-.28], (ii) .47 [.34-.80], (iii) .25 [.14-.58], (iv) .95 [.65-1.31]; (b) repeat testing using survey provided 'heparin-standard': (i) .02 [0-.24], (ii) .55 [.4-.83], (iii) .28 [.10-.63], (iv) 1.00 [.9-1.16]. Thus using the provided

  20. Direct and Indirect Links between Peer Factors and Adolescent Adjustment Difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Houltberg, Benjamin J.; Cui, Lixian; Bosler, Cara D.; Morris, Amanda Sheffield; Silk, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to examine the role of emotion regulation in the link between peer factors and adolescent adjustment difficulties. The sample consisted of 206 adolescents (ages 10–18 years) and parents. Peer factors (i.e., peer antisocial behavior, peer co-rumination, peer emotion regulation) and youth depressive symptoms were based on youth reports. Youth emotion regulation and antisocial behavior were assessed using parent and youth ratings. Results showed that peer antisocial behavior was directly (but not indirectly) related to youth antisocial behavior and depressive symptoms, whereas peer emotion regulation was indirectly (but not directly) related to both adolescent outcomes. In addition, peer co-rumination was indirectly related to youth antisocial behavior and directly and indirectly related to youth depressive symptoms. In general, the results indicated little evidence of moderation by adolescent age, sex, or ethnic differences. Implications for peer relationships as socialization contexts are discussed. PMID:26893530

  1. Activation of factor X by rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, A.K.; Matschiner, J.T.

    1986-05-01

    Synthesis and secretion of blood coagulation factor X was studied in hepatocytes prepared by perfusion of rat livers with collagenase. Hepatocytes were incubated in the presence of vitamin K and /sup 3/H-leucine for up to 4h at 37/sup 0/C. Factor X was isolated from the incubation medium by immunochemical techniques and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The recovered /sup 3/H-labeled proteins migrated, after reduction of disulfides, as two polypeptide chains with apparent molecular weights (M/sub r/) of approximately 42,000 and 22,000 representing the heavy and light chains of factor X respectively. The apparent M/sub r/ of the heavy chain was about 10,000 daltons lighter than seen with the heavy chain of factor X isolated from rat plasma and was more characteristic of the heavy chain of factor Xa. When the levels of factor X secreted by hepatocytes were determined by clotting assays, activity was present as factor Xa. Also, when purified plasma factor X was added to incubations of hepatocytes (>95% parenchymal cells) the added factor X was rapidly converted to factor Xa. Plasma membranes prepared from isolated hepatocytes or from liver homogenates contained an enzyme that converted factor X to factor Xa in a calcium dependent reaction. The physiological significance of a factor X activating enzyme on hepatocyte plasma membranes is not clear.

  2. Form factor effects in the direct detection of isospin-violating dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Hao; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Lie-Wen E-mail: malkuth@sjtu.edu.cn

    2014-08-01

    Isospin-violating dark matter (IVDM) provides a possible mechanism to ameliorate the tension among recent direct detection experiments. For IVDM, we demonstrate that the results of direct detection experiments based on neutron-rich target nuclei may depend strongly on the density dependence of the symmetry energy which is presently largely unknown and controls the neutron skin thickness that reflects the relative difference of neutron and proton form factors in the neutron-rich nuclei. In particular, using the neutron and proton form factors obtained from Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculations by varying the symmetry energy within the uncertainty region set by the latest model-independent measurement of the neutron skin thickness of {sup 208}Pb from PREX experiment at JLab, we find that, for IVDM with neutron-to-proton coupling ratio fixed to f{sub n}/f{sub p}=-0.7, the form factor effect may enhance the sensitivity of Xe-based detectors (e.g., XENON100 and LUX) to the DM-proton cross section by a factor of 3 in the DM mass region constrained by CMDS-II(Si) and even by more than an order of magnitude for heavy DM with mass larger than 80 GeV, compared with the results using the empirical Helm form factor. Our results further indicate that the form factor effect can significantly modify the recoil spectrum of Xe-based detectors for heavy IVDM with f{sub n}/f{sub p}=-0.7.

  3. Form factor effects in the direct detection of isospin-violating dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hao; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2014-08-01

    Isospin-violating dark matter (IVDM) provides a possible mechanism to ameliorate the tension among recent direct detection experiments. For IVDM, we demonstrate that the results of direct detection experiments based on neutron-rich target nuclei may depend strongly on the density dependence of the symmetry energy which is presently largely unknown and controls the neutron skin thickness that reflects the relative difference of neutron and proton form factors in the neutron-rich nuclei. In particular, using the neutron and proton form factors obtained from Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculations by varying the symmetry energy within the uncertainty region set by the latest model-independent measurement of the neutron skin thickness of 208Pb from PREX experiment at JLab, we find that, for IVDM with neutron-to-proton coupling ratio fixed to fn/fp=-0.7, the form factor effect may enhance the sensitivity of Xe-based detectors (e.g., XENON100 and LUX) to the DM-proton cross section by a factor of 3 in the DM mass region constrained by CMDS-II(Si) and even by more than an order of magnitude for heavy DM with mass larger than 80 GeV, compared with the results using the empirical Helm form factor. Our results further indicate that the form factor effect can significantly modify the recoil spectrum of Xe-based detectors for heavy IVDM with fn/fp=-0.7.

  4. Spitzer IRS Observations of the XA Region in the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Raymond, John C.; Bautista, Manuel; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Long, Knox S.

    2014-05-01

    We report on spectra of two positions in the XA region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant obtained with the InfraRed Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra span the 10-35 μm wavelength range, which contains a number of collisionally excited forbidden lines. These data are supplemented by optical spectra obtained at the Whipple Observatory and an archival UV spectrum from the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Coverage from the UV through the IR provides tests of shock wave models and tight constraints on model parameters. Only lines from high ionization species are detected in the spectrum of a filament on the edge of the remnant. The filament traces a 180 km s-1 shock that has just begun to cool, and the oxygen to neon abundance ratio lies in the normal range found for Galactic H II regions. Lines from both high and low ionization species are detected in the spectrum of the cusp of a shock-cloud interaction, which lies within the remnant boundary. The spectrum of the cusp region is matched by a shock of about 150 km s-1 that has cooled and begun to recombine. The post-shock region has a swept-up column density of about 1.3 × 1018 cm-2, and the gas has reached a temperature of 7000-8000 K. The spectrum of the Cusp indicates that roughly half of the refractory silicon and iron atoms have been liberated from the grains. Dust emission is not detected at either position. Based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope.

  5. Spitzer IRS observations of the XA region in the cygnus loop supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Sankrit, Ravi; Bautista, Manuel; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Long, Knox S.

    2014-05-20

    We report on spectra of two positions in the XA region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant obtained with the InfraRed Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra span the 10-35 μm wavelength range, which contains a number of collisionally excited forbidden lines. These data are supplemented by optical spectra obtained at the Whipple Observatory and an archival UV spectrum from the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Coverage from the UV through the IR provides tests of shock wave models and tight constraints on model parameters. Only lines from high ionization species are detected in the spectrum of a filament on the edge of the remnant. The filament traces a 180 km s{sup –1} shock that has just begun to cool, and the oxygen to neon abundance ratio lies in the normal range found for Galactic H II regions. Lines from both high and low ionization species are detected in the spectrum of the cusp of a shock-cloud interaction, which lies within the remnant boundary. The spectrum of the cusp region is matched by a shock of about 150 km s{sup –1} that has cooled and begun to recombine. The post-shock region has a swept-up column density of about 1.3 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup –2}, and the gas has reached a temperature of 7000-8000 K. The spectrum of the Cusp indicates that roughly half of the refractory silicon and iron atoms have been liberated from the grains. Dust emission is not detected at either position.

  6. Direct conversion of human fibroblasts into functional osteoblasts by defined factors.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kenta; Kishida, Tsunao; Sato, Yoshiki; Nishioka, Keisuke; Ejima, Akika; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Kanamura, Narisato; Mazda, Osam

    2015-05-12

    Osteoblasts produce calcified bone matrix and contribute to bone formation and remodeling. In this study, we established a procedure to directly convert human fibroblasts into osteoblasts by transducing some defined factors and culturing in osteogenic medium. Osteoblast-specific transcription factors, Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), and Osterix, in combination with Octamer-binding transcription factor 3/4 (Oct4) and L-Myc (RXOL) transduction, converted ∼ 80% of the fibroblasts into osteocalcin-producing cells. The directly converted osteoblasts (dOBs) induced by RXOL displayed a similar gene expression profile as normal human osteoblasts and contributed to bone repair after transplantation into immunodeficient mice at artificial bone defect lesions. The dOBs expressed endogenous Runx2 and Osterix, and did not require continuous expression of the exogenous genes to maintain their phenotype. Another combination, Oct4 plus L-Myc (OL), also induced fibroblasts to produce bone matrix, but the OL-transduced cells did not express Osterix and exhibited a more distant gene expression profile to osteoblasts compared with RXOL-transduced cells. These findings strongly suggest successful direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into functional osteoblasts by RXOL, a technology that may provide bone regeneration therapy against bone disorders.

  7. Factor structure of overall autobiographical memory usage: the directive, self and social functions revisited.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Anne S; Habermas, Tilmann

    2011-08-01

    According to theory, autobiographical memory serves three broad functions of overall usage: directive, self, and social. However, there is evidence to suggest that the tripartite model may be better conceptualised in terms of a four-factor model with two social functions. In the present study we examined the two models in Danish and German samples, using the Thinking About Life Experiences Questionnaire (TALE; Bluck, Alea, Habermas, & Rubin, 2005), which measures the overall usage of the three functions generalised across concrete memories. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the four-factor model and rejected the theoretical three-factor model in both samples. The results are discussed in relation to cultural differences in overall autobiographical memory usage as well as sharing versus non-sharing aspects of social remembering.

  8. Determination of stress intensity factor with direct stress approach using finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, X.; Zhu, F.; He, P. F.

    2017-03-01

    In this article, a direct stress approach based on finite element analysis to determine the stress intensity factor is improved. Firstly, by comparing the rigorous solution against the asymptotic solution for a problem of an infinite plate embedded a central crack, we found that the stresses in a restrictive interval near the crack tip given by the rigorous solution can be used to determine the stress intensity factor, which is nearly equal to the stress intensity factor given by the asymptotic solution. Secondly, the crack problem is solved numerically by the finite element method. Depending on the modeling capability of the software, we designed an adaptive mesh model to simulate the stress singularity. Thus, the stress result in an appropriate interval near the crack tip is fairly approximated to the rigorous solution of the corresponding crack problem. Therefore, the stress intensity factor may be calculated from the stress distribution in the appropriate interval, with a high accuracy.

  9. Variation of directional reflectance factors with structural changes of a developing alfalfa canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchner, J. A.; Kimes, D. S.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1982-01-01

    Directional reflectance factors of an alfalfa canopy were determined and related to canopy structure, agronomic variables, and irradiance conditions at four periods during a cutting cycle. Nadir and off-nadir reflectance factors decreased with increasing biomass in Thematic Mapper band 3(0.63-0.69 micrometer) and increased with increasing biomass in band 4(0.76-0.90 micrometer). The sensor view angle had less impact on perceived reflectance as the alfalfa progressed from an erectophile canopy of stems after harvest to a near planophile canopy of leaves at maturity. Studies of directional reflectance are needed for testing and upgrading vegetation canopy models and to aid in the complex interpretation problems presented by aircraft scanners and pointable satellites where illumination and viewing geometries may vary widely. Distinct changes in the patterns of radiance observed by a sensor as structural and biomass changes occur are keys to monitoring the growth and condition of crops.

  10. Risk Factors for and Behavioral Consequences of Direct Versus Indirect Exposure to Violence.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Gregory M; Posick, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that direct exposure (personal victimization) and indirect exposure (witnessing or hearing about the victimization of a family member, friend, or neighbor) to violence are correlated. However, questions remain about the co-occurrence of these phenomena within individuals. We used data on 1915 youths (with an average age of 12 years at baseline) from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods to examine this issue. Results indicated that youths who tended to be personally victimized were also likely to witness violence; conversely, youths who disproportionately witnessed violence were relatively unlikely to experience personal victimization. In addition, direct and indirect exposures to violence were associated with subsequent adverse outcomes in similar ways. The key distinguishing factor was, rather, the cumulative level of violence (both direct and indirect) to which youths were exposed.

  11. Cerebral Venous Thromboembolism in Antiphospholipid Syndrome Successfully Treated with the Combined Use of an Anti-Xa Inhibitor and Corticosteroid.

    PubMed

    Sugie, Masayuki; Iizuka, Natsuko; Shimizu, Yuki; Ichikawa, Hiroo

    2015-01-01

    We herein report a case presenting with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) associated with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). The patient developed recurrent CVST followed by a hemorrhagic ischemic stroke despite the use of warfarin during the appropriate therapeutic window. Thus, we substituted warfarin to rivaroxaban with prednisolone and obtained a good clinical course. In addition to the effect of prednisolone of inhibiting elevated lupus anticoagulants and the recurrence of arterial thrombosis, rivaroxaban may prevent CVST and inhibit hypercoagulability induced by corticosteroids. The combination of an anti-Xa inhibitor and corticosteroid may be an alternative treatment for CVST and arterial thrombus with warfarin-resistant APS.

  12. Transcription factors that directly regulate the expression of CSLA9 encoding mannan synthase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Chan; Reca, Ida-Barbara; Kim, Yongsig; Park, Sunchung; Thomashow, Michael F; Keegstra, Kenneth; Han, Kyung-Hwan

    2014-03-01

    Mannans are hemicellulosic polysaccharides that have a structural role and serve as storage reserves during plant growth and development. Previous studies led to the conclusion that mannan synthase enzymes in several plant species are encoded by members of the cellulose synthase-like A (CSLA) gene family. Arabidopsis has nine members of the CSLA gene family. Earlier work has shown that CSLA9 is responsible for the majority of glucomannan synthesis in both primary and secondary cell walls of Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. Little is known about how expression of the CLSA9 gene is regulated. Sequence analysis of the CSLA9 promoter region revealed the presence of multiple copies of a cis-regulatory motif (M46RE) recognized by transcription factor MYB46, leading to the hypothesis that MYB46 (At5g12870) is a direct regulator of the mannan synthase CLSA9. We obtained several lines of experimental evidence in support of this hypothesis. First, the expression of CSLA9 was substantially upregulated by MYB46 overexpression. Second, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) was used to demonstrate the direct binding of MYB46 to the promoter of CSLA9 in vitro. This interaction was further confirmed in vivo by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Finally, over-expression of MYB46 resulted in a significant increase in mannan content. Considering the multifaceted nature of MYB46-mediated transcriptional regulation of secondary wall biosynthesis, we reasoned that additional transcription factors are involved in the CSLA9 regulation. This hypothesis was tested by carrying out yeast-one hybrid screening, which identified ANAC041 and bZIP1 as direct regulators of CSLA9. Transcriptional activation assays and EMSA were used to confirm the yeast-one hybrid results. Taken together, we report that transcription factors ANAC041, bZIP1 and MYB46 directly regulate the expression of CSLA9.

  13. Hemophilia as a defect of the tissue factor pathway of blood coagulation: Effect of factors VIII and IX on factor X activation in a continuous-flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Repke, D.; Gemmell, C.H.; Guha, A.; Turitto, V.T.; Nemerson, Y. ); Broze, G.J. Jr. )

    1990-10-01

    The effect of factors VIII and IX on the ability of the tissue factor-factor VIIa complex to activate factor X was studied in a continuous-flow tubular enzyme reactor. Tissue factor immobilized in a phospholipid bilayer on the inner surface of the tube was exposed to a perfusate containing factors VIIa, VIII, IX, and X flowing at a wall shear rate of 57, 300, or 1130 sec{sup {minus}1}. The addition of factors VIII and IX at their respective plasma concentrations resulted in a further 2{endash}-to 3{endash}fold increase. The direct activation of factor X by tissue factor-factor VIIa could be virtually eliminated by the lipoprotein-associated coagulation inhibitor. These results suggest that the tissue factor pathway, mediated through factors VIII and IX, produces significant levels of factor Xa even in the presence of an inhibitor of the tissue factor-factor VIIa complex; moreover, the activation is dependent on local shear conditions. These findings are consistent both with a model of blood coagulation in which initiation of the system results from tissue factor and with the bleeding observed in hemophilia.

  14. [Factors affecting the DAPI fluorescence direct count in the tidal river sediment].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Huang, Shan; Wu, Qun-he; Li, Rui-yi; Zhang, Ren-duo

    2010-08-01

    The factors affecting the DAPI (4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylidole) fluorescence direct count in the tidal river sediment were examined. Sediment samples were collected from the Guangzhou section of the Pearl River. Besides sediment texture and organic matter, an improved staining procedure and the involved parameters were analyzed. Results showed that the procedure with the sediment with 2000 fold dilution and ultrasonic water bath for 10 min, and with a final DAPI concentration of 10 microg x mL(-1) and staining time for more than 30 min produced the optimum results of DAPI direct count in the sediment. The total bacterial number was correlated to the proportion of the non-nucleoid-containing cells to the total bacterial number (r = 0.587, p = 0.004). The organic matter content also correlated to the ration. The clay content had a strong correlation with the organic matter, through which the clay content also affected the ratio. A multiple regression analysis between the ration versus the organic matter, the total bacterial number, and the clay content showed that the regression equation fit the measure values satisfactorily (r = 0.694). These results indicated that the above factors needed to be considered in the applications of the DAPI fluorescence direct counting method to the tidal river sediment.

  15. Environmental Determinants of Cardiovascular Diseases Risk Factors: A Qualitative Directed Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sabzmakan, Leila; Mohammadi, Eesa; Morowatisharifabad, Mohammad Ali; Afaghi, Ahmad; Naseri, Mohammad Hassan; Mirzaei, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the number one cause of death in the world. In most analyses of health problems, environment plays a significant and modifiable role in causing the problem either directly or indirectly through behavior. Objectives: This study aims to understand the patients and healthcare providers’ experiences about the environmental determinants of CVD risk factors based on the Precede Model. Patients and Methods: This qualitative study conducted over six months in 2012 at Diabetes Units of Health Centers associated with Alborz University of Medical Sciences and Health Services which is located in Karaj, Iran. The data were collected based on individual semi-structured interviews with 50 patients and 12 healthcare providers. Data analysis was performed simultaneous with data collection using the content analysis directed method. Results: Lack of behaviors like stress control, healthy eating and physical activity were the roots of the risk factors for CVD. The environmental factor is one of the barriers for conducting these behaviors. The environmental barriers included of structural environment including “availability and accessibility of health resources”, “new skills”, and “law and policies” which are located in enabling category and social environment including “social support”, “motivation to comply” and “consequences of behavior” which are located in reinforcing category. The most barriers to performing health behaviors were often structural. Conclusions: The environmental factors were barriers for doing healthy behaviors. These factors need to be considered to design health promotion interventions. Policymakers should not only focus on patients’ education but also should provide specific facilities to enhance economic, social and cultural status. PMID:25031848

  16. RNA-directed DNA methylation and plant development require an IWR1-type transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Tatsuo; Bucher, Etienne; Daxinger, Lucia; Huettel, Bruno; Kreil, David P; Breinig, Frank; Lind, Marc; Schmitt, Manfred J; Simon, Stacey A; Gurazada, Sai Guna Ranjan; Meyers, Blake C; Lorkovic, Zdravko J; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2010-01-01

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) in plants requires two RNA polymerase (Pol) II-related RNA polymerases, namely Pol IV and Pol V. A genetic screen designed to reveal factors that are important for RdDM in a developmental context in Arabidopsis identified DEFECTIVE IN MERISTEM SILENCING 4 (DMS4). Unlike other mutants defective in RdDM, dms4 mutants have a pleiotropic developmental phenotype. The DMS4 protein is similar to yeast IWR1 (interacts with RNA polymerase II), a conserved putative transcription factor that interacts with Pol II subunits. The DMS4 complementary DNA partly complements the K1 killer toxin hypersensitivity of a yeast iwr1 mutant, suggesting some functional conservation. In the transgenic system studied, mutations in DMS4 directly or indirectly affect Pol IV-dependent secondary short interfering RNAs, Pol V-mediated RdDM, Pol V-dependent synthesis of intergenic non-coding RNA and expression of many Pol II-driven genes. These data suggest that DMS4 might be a regulatory factor for several RNA polymerases, thus explaining its diverse roles in the plant.

  17. Direct evidence of an elongation factor-Tu/Ts·GTP·Aminoacyl-tRNA quaternary complex.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Benjamin J; Altman, Roger B; Ferguson, Angelica; Wasserman, Michael R; Zhou, Zhou; Blanchard, Scott C

    2014-08-22

    During protein synthesis, elongation factor-Tu (EF-Tu) bound to GTP chaperones the entry of aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) into actively translating ribosomes. In so doing, EF-Tu increases the rate and fidelity of the translation mechanism. Recent evidence suggests that EF-Ts, the guanosine nucleotide exchange factor for EF-Tu, directly accelerates both the formation and dissociation of the EF-Tu-GTP-Phe-tRNA(Phe) ternary complex (Burnett, B. J., Altman, R. B., Ferrao, R., Alejo, J. L., Kaur, N., Kanji, J., and Blanchard, S. C. (2013) J. Biol. Chem. 288, 13917-13928). A central feature of this model is the existence of a quaternary complex of EF-Tu/Ts·GTP·aa-tRNA(aa). Here, through comparative investigations of phenylalanyl, methionyl, and arginyl ternary complexes, and the development of a strategy to monitor their formation and decay using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we reveal the generality of this newly described EF-Ts function and the first direct evidence of the transient quaternary complex species. These findings suggest that EF-Ts may regulate ternary complex abundance in the cell through mechanisms that are distinct from its guanosine nucleotide exchange factor functions.

  18. Effect of 3.2 vs. 3.8% sodium citrate concentration on anti-Xa levels for patients on therapeutic low molecular weight heparin.

    PubMed

    Payne, S; MacKinnon, K; Keeney, M; Morrow, B; Kovacs, M J

    2003-10-01

    In this study, we compared the effect of sodium citrate, a sample collection variable, on the anti-Xa levels of patients (n = 28) on dalteparin, a low molecular weight heparin. The median anti-Xa level for 3.2% sodium citrate was 0.235 U/ml while the median level for 3.8% sodium citrate was 0.230 U/ml. We conclude that different sodium citrate concentrations give statistically equivalent anti-Xa levels for the same samples. This conclusion is in contrast to the findings of the effect of sodium citrate concentration on International Normalized Ratio (INR) and activated partial-thromboplastin time (aPTT). In accordance with previous recommendations, we advocate the exclusive use of 3.2% sodium citrate in an effort to standardize coagulation testing.

  19. Discovery of directional and nondirectional pioneer transcription factors by modeling DNase profile magnitude and shape.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Richard I; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; O'Donnell, Charles W; Lewis, Sophia; Barkal, Amira A; van Hoff, John Peter; Karun, Vivek; Jaakkola, Tommi; Gifford, David K

    2014-02-01

    We describe protein interaction quantitation (PIQ), a computational method for modeling the magnitude and shape of genome-wide DNase I hypersensitivity profiles to identify transcription factor (TF) binding sites. Through the use of machine-learning techniques, PIQ identified binding sites for >700 TFs from one DNase I hypersensitivity analysis followed by sequencing (DNase-seq) experiment with accuracy comparable to that of chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq). We applied PIQ to analyze DNase-seq data from mouse embryonic stem cells differentiating into prepancreatic and intestinal endoderm. We identified 120 and experimentally validated eight 'pioneer' TF families that dynamically open chromatin. Four pioneer TF families only opened chromatin in one direction from their motifs. Furthermore, we identified 'settler' TFs whose genomic binding is principally governed by proximity to open chromatin. Our results support a model of hierarchical TF binding in which directional and nondirectional pioneer activity shapes the chromatin landscape for population by settler TFs.

  20. Pathways to adult sexual revictimization: direct and indirect behavioral risk factors across the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Fargo, Jamison D

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate direct and indirect social and behavioral risk factors for adult sexual revictimization. Participants include 147 adult, predominantly African American (88%) women, 59% of whom had a documented history of child sexual abuse. Participants are interviewed in adulthood about adolescent and adult sexual victimization as well as other background and lifestyle characteristics. Structural equation modeling indicates that the relationship between child and adolescent sexual victimization is indirect, mediated by adolescent risk-taking behavior. The relationship between adolescent and adult sexual victimization is also indirect, mediated by risky sexual behavior. The residual effects of early childhood family environment and childhood physical abuse also indirectly predict sexual revictimization. Results provide empirical support for the general supposition that the relationship between child and adult sexual victimization is complex and that many intermediary factors differentially affect risk for a heightened vulnerability to sexual revictimization.

  1. Rice xa13 recessive resistance to bacterial blight is defeated by induction of the disease susceptibility gene Os-11N3.

    PubMed

    Antony, Ginny; Zhou, Junhui; Huang, Sheng; Li, Ting; Liu, Bo; White, Frank; Yang, Bing

    2010-11-01

    The rice (Oryza sativa) gene xa13 is a recessive resistance allele of Os-8N3, a member of the NODULIN3 (N3) gene family, located on rice chromosome 8. Os-8N3 is a susceptibility (S) gene for Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae, the causal agent of bacterial blight, and the recessive allele is defeated by strains of the pathogen producing any one of the type III effectors AvrXa7, PthXo2, or PthXo3, which are all members of the transcription activator-like (TAL) effector family. Both AvrXa7 and PthXo3 induce the expression of a second member of the N3 gene family, here named Os-11N3. Insertional mutagenesis or RNA-mediated silencing of Os-11N3 resulted in plants with loss of susceptibility specifically to strains of X. oryzae pv oryzae dependent on AvrXa7 or PthXo3 for virulence. We further show that AvrXa7 drives expression of Os-11N3 and that AvrXa7 interacts and binds specifically to an effector binding element within the Os-11N3 promoter, lending support to the predictive models for TAL effector binding specificity. The result indicates that variations in the TAL effector repetitive domains are driven by selection to overcome both dominant and recessive forms of resistance to bacterial blight in rice. The finding that Os-8N3 and Os-11N3 encode closely related proteins also provides evidence that N3 proteins have a specific function in facilitating bacterial blight disease.

  2. Ethanol and corticotropin releasing factor receptor modulation of central amygdala neurocircuitry: An update and future directions.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Winder, Danny G

    2015-05-01

    The central amygdala is a critical brain region for many aspects of alcohol dependence. Much of the work examining the mechanisms by which the central amygdala mediates the development of alcohol dependence has focused on the interaction of acute and chronic ethanol with central amygdala corticotropin releasing factor signaling. This work has led to a great deal of success in furthering the general understanding of central amygdala neurocircuitry and its role in alcohol dependence. Much of this work has primarily focused on the hypothesis that ethanol utilizes endogenous corticotropin releasing factor signaling to upregulate inhibitory GABAergic transmission in the central amygdala. Work that is more recent suggests that corticotropin releasing factor also plays an important role in mediating anxiety-like behaviors via the enhancement of central amygdala glutamatergic transmission, implying that ethanol/corticotropin releasing factor interactions may modulate excitatory neurotransmission in this brain region. In addition, a number of studies utilizing optogenetic strategies or transgenic mouse lines have begun to examine specific central amygdala neurocircuit dynamics and neuronal subpopulations to better understand overall central amygdala neurocircuitry and the role of neuronal subtypes in mediating anxiety-like behaviors. This review will provide a brief update on this literature and describe some potential future directions that may be important for the development of better treatments for alcohol addiction.

  3. MicroRNA-218 inhibits melanogenesis by directly suppressing microphthalmia-associated transcription factor expression

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Zhang, Jin-Fang; Wang, Wei-Mao; Cheung, Florence Wing-ki; Lu, Ying-fei; Ng, Chi-fai; Kung, Hsiang-fu; Liu, Wing-keung

    2014-01-01

    The microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a pivotal regulator of melanogenic enzymes for melanogenesis, and its expression is modulated by many transcriptional factors at the transcriptional level or post-transcriptional level through microRNAs (miRNAs). Although several miRNAs modulate melanogenic activities, there is no evidence of their direct action on MITF expression. Out of eight miRNAs targeting the 3′-UTR of Mitf predicted by bioinformatic programs, our results show miR-218 to be a novel candidate for direct action on MITF expression. Ectopic miR-218 dramatically reduced MITF expression, suppressed tyrosinase activity, and induced depigmentation in murine immortalized melan-a melanocytes. MiR-218 also suppressed melanogenesis in human pigmented skin organotypic culture (OTC) through the repression of MITF. An inverse correlation between MITF and miR-218 expression was found in human primary skin melanocytes and melanoma cell lines. Taken together, our findings demonstrate a novel mechanism involving miR-218 in the regulation of the MITF pigmentary process and its potential application for skin whitening therapy. PMID:24824743

  4. Biomechanical factors associated with time to complete a change of direction cutting maneuver.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Brendan M; Franklyn-Miller, Andrew D; King, Enda A; Moran, Kieran A; Strike, Siobhán C; Falvey, Éanna C

    2014-10-01

    Cutting ability is an important aspect of many team sports, however, the biomechanical determinants of cutting performance are not well understood. This study aimed to address this issue by identifying the kinetic and kinematic factors correlated with the time to complete a cutting maneuver. In addition, an analysis of the test-retest reliability of all biomechanical measures was performed. Fifteen (n = 15) elite multidirectional sports players (Gaelic hurling) were recruited, and a 3-dimensional motion capture analysis of a 75° cut was undertaken. The factors associated with cutting time were determined using bivariate Pearson's correlations. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to examine the test-retest reliability of biomechanical measures. Five biomechanical factors were associated with cutting time (2.28 ± 0.11 seconds): peak ankle power (r = 0.77), peak ankle plantar flexor moment (r = 0.65), range of pelvis lateral tilt (r = -0.54), maximum thorax lateral rotation angle (r = 0.51), and total ground contact time (r = -0.48). Intraclass correlation coefficient scores for these 5 factors, and indeed for the majority of the other biomechanical measures, ranged from good to excellent (ICC >0.60). Explosive force production about the ankle, pelvic control during single-limb support, and torso rotation toward the desired direction of travel were all key factors associated with cutting time. These findings should assist in the development of more effective training programs aimed at improving similar cutting performances. In addition, test-retest reliability scores were generally strong, therefore, motion capture techniques seem well placed to further investigate the determinants of cutting ability.

  5. Directed evolution of brain-derived neurotrophic factor for improved folding and expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Burns, Michael L; Malott, Thomas M; Metcalf, Kevin J; Hackel, Benjamin J; Chan, Jonah R; Shusta, Eric V

    2014-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in nervous system function and has therapeutic potential. Microbial production of BDNF has resulted in a low-fidelity protein product, often in the form of large, insoluble aggregates incapable of binding to cognate TrkB or p75 receptors. In this study, employing Saccharomyces cerevisiae display and secretion systems, it was found that BDNF was poorly expressed and partially inactive on the yeast surface and that BDNF was secreted at low levels in the form of disulfide-bonded aggregates. Thus, for the purpose of increasing the compatibility of yeast as an expression host for BDNF, directed-evolution approaches were employed to improve BDNF folding and expression levels. Yeast surface display was combined with two rounds of directed evolution employing random mutagenesis and shuffling to identify BDNF mutants that had 5-fold improvements in expression, 4-fold increases in specific TrkB binding activity, and restored p75 binding activity, both as displayed proteins and as secreted proteins. Secreted BDNF mutants were found largely in the form of soluble homodimers that could stimulate TrkB phosphorylation in transfected PC12 cells. Site-directed mutagenesis studies indicated that a particularly important mutational class involved the introduction of cysteines proximal to the native cysteines that participate in the BDNF cysteine knot architecture. Taken together, these findings show that yeast is now a viable alternative for both the production and the engineering of BDNF.

  6. Direct CP Violation, Branching Ratios and Form Factors B --> pi, B --> K in B decays

    SciTech Connect

    O. Leitner; X.-H. Guo; A.W. Thomas

    2004-11-01

    The B {yields} {pi} and B {yields} K transitions involved in hadronic B decays are investigated in a phenomenological way through the framework of QCD factorization. By comparing our results with experimental branching ratios from the BELLE, BABAR and CLEO collaborations for all the B decays including either a pion or a kaon, we propose boundaries for the transition form factors B {yields} {pi} and B {yields} K depending on the CKM matrix element parameters {rho} and {eta}. From this analysis, the form factors required to reproduce the experimental data for branching ratios are F{sup B {yields} {pi}} = 0.31 {+-} 0.12 and F{sup B {yields} K} = 0.37 {+-} 0.13. We calculate the direct CP violating asymmetry parameter, a{sub CP}, for B {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi} and B {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} K decays, in the case where {rho} - {omega} mixing effects are taken into account. Based on these results, we find that the direct CP asymmetry for B{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}, {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, B{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}K{sup -}, and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {bar K}{sup 0}, reaches its maximum when the invariant mass {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is in the vicinity of the {omega} meson mass. The inclusion of {rho} - {omega} mixing provides an opportunity to erase, without ambiguity, the phase uncertainty mod{pi} in the determination of th CKM angles {alpha} in case of b {yields} u and {gamma} in case of b {yields} s.

  7. Direct measurement of electron beam quality conversion factors using water calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Renaud, James Seuntjens, Jan; Sarfehnia, Arman; Marchant, Kristin; McEwen, Malcolm; Ross, Carl

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors describe an electron sealed water calorimeter (ESWcal) designed to directly measure absorbed dose to water in clinical electron beams and its use to derive electron beam quality conversion factors for two ionization chamber types. Methods: A functioning calorimeter prototype was constructed in-house and used to obtain reproducible measurements in clinical accelerator-based 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV electron beams. Corrections for the radiation field perturbation due to the presence of the glass calorimeter vessel were calculated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The conductive heat transfer due to dose gradients and nonwater materials was also accounted for using a commercial finite element method software package. Results: The relative combined standard uncertainty on the ESWcal dose was estimated to be 0.50% for the 9–20 MeV beams and 1.00% for the 6 MeV beam, demonstrating that the development of a water calorimeter-based standard for electron beams over such a wide range of clinically relevant energies is feasible. The largest contributor to the uncertainty was the positioning (Type A, 0.10%–0.40%) and its influence on the perturbation correction (Type B, 0.10%–0.60%). As a preliminary validation, measurements performed with the ESWcal in a 6 MV photon beam were directly compared to results derived from the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) photon beam standard water calorimeter. These two independent devices were shown to agree well within the 0.43% combined relative uncertainty of the ESWcal for this beam type and quality. Absorbed dose electron beam quality conversion factors were measured using the ESWcal for the Exradin A12 and PTW Roos ionization chambers. The photon-electron conversion factor, k{sub ecal}, for the A12 was also experimentally determined. Nonstatistically significant differences of up to 0.7% were found when compared to the calculation-based factors listed in the AAPM’s TG-51 protocol

  8. Direct interaction of avermectin with epidermal growth factor receptor mediates the penetration resistance in Drosophila larvae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Ping; Wang, Pan; Sun, Ying-Jian; Wu, Yi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    With the widespread use of avermectins (AVMs) for managing parasitic and agricultural pests, the resistance of worms and insects to AVMs has emerged as a serious threat to human health and agriculture worldwide. The reduced penetration of AVMs is one of the main reasons for the development of the resistance to the chemicals. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we use the larvae of Drosophila melanogaster as the model organism to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of penetration resistance to AVMs. We clearly show that the chitin layer is thickened and the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is overexpressed in the AVM-resistant larvae epidermis. We reveal that the activation of the transcription factor Relish by the over-activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/AKT/ERK pathway induces the overexpression of the chitin synthases DmeCHS1/2 and P-gp in the resistant larvae. Interestingly, we discover for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that AVM directly interacts with EGFR and leads to the activation of the EGFR/AKT/ERK pathway, which activates the transcription factor Relish and induces the overexpression of DmeCHS1/2 and P-gp. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of penetration resistance to drugs. PMID:27249340

  9. Determining the direction of causality between psychological factors and aircraft noise annoyance.

    PubMed

    Kroesen, Maarten; Molin, Eric J E; van Wee, Bert

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, an attempt is made to establish the direction of causality between a range of psychological factors and aircraft noise annoyance. For this purpose, a panel model was estimated within a structural equation modeling approach. Data were gathered from two surveys conducted in April 2006 and April 2008, respectively, among the same residents living within the 45 Level day-evening-night contour of Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, the largest airport in the Netherlands (n=250). A surprising result is that none of the paths from the psychological factors to aircraft noise annoyance were found to be significant. Yet 2 effects were significant the other way around: (1) from 'aircraft noise annoyance' to 'concern about the negative health effects of noise' and (2) from 'aircraft noise annoyance' to 'belief that noise can be prevented.' Hence aircraft noise annoyance measured at time 1 contained information that can effectively explain changes in these 2 variables at time 2, while controlling for their previous values. Secondary results show that (1) aircraft noise annoyance is very stable through time and (2) that changes in aircraft noise annoyance and the identified psychological factors are correlated.

  10. Proportion of beneficiaries and factors affecting Janani Suraksha Yojana direct cash transfer scheme in Puducherry, India

    PubMed Central

    Rajarajan, K.; Kumar, S. Ganesh; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) direct benefit transfer scheme was launched in the year 2013 in India and there is a paucity of information affecting it. The study aimed to assess the proportion of eligible beneficiaries utilizing JSY direct cash benefit transfer in Puducherry and to identify its barriers and facilitating factors. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted from January to March 2015 among 152 eligible JSY beneficiaries residing in rural and urban field practice areas of a tertiary care institution in Puducherry, India. Data were collected using a pretested semi structured questionnaire and presented as proportion or percentages. Results: About 144 beneficiaries participated in the study with a response rate of 94.7%. About 46% (66) of them availed cash transfer benefit. The mean time of receiving the benefit is 95.8 days (interquartile range 60–120 days). Among those who have not received (78), about 49 (62.8%) had not applied and 29 (37.18%) filled applications were rejected due to various reasons. About 77.1% (111) of beneficiaries were informed about JSY scheme through health workers. About 52.1% (75/144) still preferred direct bank transfer through the bank. The reasons for not availing benefits includes not having a bank account (24.3%), followed by not having Aadhaar number (9.7%), 11.8% had no ration card, and 13.8% stayed in their mother house. Conclusion: Majority of the beneficiaries did not receive direct cash transfer benefits in urban area than rural area and there is a need to simplify the procedures to improve the uptake of services to this group. PMID:28348997

  11. Transgenic expression of the rice Xa21 pattern-recognition receptor in banana (Musa sp.) confers resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Jaindra N; Lorenzen, Jim; Bahar, Ofir; Ronald, Pamela; Tripathi, Leena

    2014-08-01

    Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW), caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum (Xcm), is the most devastating disease of banana in east and central Africa. The spread of BXW threatens the livelihood of millions of African farmers who depend on banana for food security and income. There are no commercial chemicals, biocontrol agents or resistant cultivars available to control BXW. Here, we take advantage of the robust resistance conferred by the rice pattern-recognition receptor (PRR), XA21, to the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). We identified a set of genes required for activation of Xa21-mediated immunity (rax) that were conserved in both Xoo and Xcm. Based on the conservation, we hypothesized that intergeneric transfer of Xa21 would confer resistance to Xcm. We evaluated 25 transgenic lines of the banana cultivar 'Gonja manjaya' (AAB) using a rapid bioassay and 12 transgenic lines in the glasshouse for resistance against Xcm. About 50% of the transgenic lines showed complete resistance to Xcm in both assays. In contrast, all of the nontransgenic control plants showed severe symptoms that progressed to complete wilting. These results indicate that the constitutive expression of the rice Xa21 gene in banana results in enhanced resistance against Xcm. Furthermore, this work demonstrates the feasibility of PRR gene transfer between monocotyledonous species and provides a valuable new tool for controlling the BXW pandemic of banana, a staple food for 100 million people in east Africa.

  12. Analysis of nucleotide diversity among alleles of the major bacterial blight resistance gene Xa27 in cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa) and its wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Bimolata, Waikhom; Kumar, Anirudh; Sundaram, Raman Meenakshi; Laha, Gouri Shankar; Qureshi, Insaf Ahmed; Reddy, Gajjala Ashok; Ghazi, Irfan Ahmad

    2013-08-01

    Xa27 is one of the important R-genes, effective against bacterial blight disease of rice caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). Using natural population of Oryza, we analyzed the sequence variation in the functionally important domains of Xa27 across the Oryza species. DNA sequences of Xa27 alleles from 27 rice accessions revealed higher nucleotide diversity among the reported R-genes of rice. Sequence polymorphism analysis revealed synonymous and non-synonymous mutations in addition to a number of InDels in non-coding regions of the gene. High sequence variation was observed in the promoter region including the 5'UTR with 'π' value 0.00916 and 'θ w ' = 0.01785. Comparative analysis of the identified Xa27 alleles with that of IRBB27 and IR24 indicated the operation of both positive selection (Ka/Ks > 1) and neutral selection (Ka/Ks ≈ 0). The genetic distances of alleles of the gene from Oryza nivara were nearer to IRBB27 as compared to IR24. We also found the presence of conserved and null UPT (upregulated by transcriptional activator) box in the isolated alleles. Considerable amino acid polymorphism was localized in the trans-membrane domain for which the functional significance is yet to be elucidated. However, the absence of functional UPT box in all the alleles except IRBB27 suggests the maintenance of single resistant allele throughout the natural population.

  13. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L; Rosen, Barry P; Tamás, Markus J

    2015-12-28

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)] in vitro and in vivo and that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation.

  14. Hemispherical directional reflectance factor using UAV and a hyperspectral camera, validation and crop field test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakala, T.; Honkavaara, E.; Markelin, L.

    2014-10-01

    Small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and a prototype hyperspectral imaging camera (HSI) was used to measure the hemispherical directional reflectance factor (HDRF) of a test field with known light scattering properties. The HSI acquires a burst of 24 images within two seconds and all of these images are acquired with different spectral content. By using the autopilot of the UAV, the flight can be preplanned so that the target area is optimally covered with overlapping images from multiple view angles. Structure from motion (SFM) algorithm is used to accurately determine the view angles for each image. The HDRF is calculated for each ground pixel by determining view directions from all of the images for that particular pixel. The pixel intensity values are then processed to reflectance by using a reference panel, which has been measured in laboratory with Finnish Geodetic Institute Field Goniospectrometer (FIGIFIGO). The UAV flight was performed over a test field with different gravel targets. The targets have known HDRF and this allows us to validate the UAV results. Another test was performed over a crop field to display the potential of this method for crop monitoring.

  15. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K.; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)] in vitro and in vivo and that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation. PMID:26711267

  16. Impact damage resistance of carbon/epoxy composite tubes for the DC-XA liquid hydrogen feedline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    1995-01-01

    Low-velocity impacts were inflicted upon two elbow sections of carbon/epoxy feedline that are to be a part of the Delta Clipper-XA flight vehicle. A soap-based liquid leak detector solution was used to inspect the impact sites for leaks of pressurized gas that was pumped into the tube. Visual surface damage was noted and recorded for each impact site. After impact testing of each of the two sections of tubes was completed, the damage zones were disected from the tube and cross sectioned through the impact site. These specimens were polished after potting them in epoxy and were examined for microcracking using a fluorescent dye penetrant technique. The results showed that nonvisible damage could cause microcracking, thereby resulting in leaks through the tube wall.

  17. Assessing dynamic spectral causality by lagged adaptive directed transfer function and instantaneous effect factor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haojie; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhu, Shanan; He, Bin

    2014-07-01

    It is of significance to assess the dynamic spectral causality among physiological signals. Several practical estimators adapted from spectral Granger causality have been exploited to track dynamic causality based on the framework of time-varying multivariate autoregressive (tvMVAR) models. The nonzero covariance of the model's residuals has been used to describe the instantaneous effect phenomenon in some causality estimators. However, for the situations with Gaussian residuals in some autoregressive models, it is challenging to distinguish the directed instantaneous causality if the sufficient prior information about the "causal ordering" is missing. Here, we propose a new algorithm to assess the time-varying causal ordering of tvMVAR model under the assumption that the signals follow the same acyclic causal ordering for all time lags and to estimate the instantaneous effect factor (IEF) value in order to track the dynamic directed instantaneous connectivity. The time-lagged adaptive directed transfer function (ADTF) is also estimated to assess the lagged causality after removing the instantaneous effect. In this study, we first investigated the performance of the causal-ordering estimation algorithm and the accuracy of IEF value. Then, we presented the results of IEF and time-lagged ADTF method by comparing with the conventional ADTF method through simulations of various propagation models. Statistical analysis results suggest that the new algorithm could accurately estimate the causal ordering and give a good estimation of the IEF values in the Gaussian residual conditions. Meanwhile, the time-lagged ADTF approach is also more accurate in estimating the time-lagged dynamic interactions in a complex nervous system after extracting the instantaneous effect. In addition to the simulation studies, we applied the proposed method to estimate the dynamic spectral causality on real visual evoked potential (VEP) data in a human subject. Its usefulness in time

  18. Assessing Dynamic Spectral Causality by Lagged Adaptive Directed Transfer Function and Instantaneous Effect Factor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haojie; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhu, Shanan

    2014-01-01

    It is of significance to assess the dynamic spectral causality among physiological signals. Several practical estimators adapted from spectral Granger causality have been exploited to track dynamic causality based on the framework of time-varying multivariate autoregressive (tvMVAR) models. The non-zero covariance of the model’s residuals has been used to describe the instantaneous effect phenomenon in some causality estimators. However, for the situations with Gaussian residuals in some autoregressive models, it is challenging to distinguish the directed instantaneous causality if the sufficient prior information about the “causal ordering” is missing. Here, we propose a new algorithm to assess the time-varying causal ordering of tvMVAR model under the assumption that the signals follow the same acyclic causal ordering for all time lags and to estimate the instantaneous effect factor (IEF) value in order to track the dynamic directed instantaneous connectivity. The time-lagged adaptive directed transfer function (ADTF) is also estimated to assess the lagged causality after removing the instantaneous effect. In the present study, we firstly investigated the performance of the causal-ordering estimation algorithm and the accuracy of IEF value. Then, we presented the results of IEF and time-lagged ADTF method by comparing with the conventional ADTF method through simulations of various propagation models. Statistical analysis results suggest that the new algorithm could accurately estimate the causal ordering and give a good estimation of the IEF values in the Gaussian residual conditions. Meanwhile, the time-lagged ADTF approach is also more accurate in estimating the time-lagged dynamic interactions in a complex nervous system after extracting the instantaneous effect. In addition to the simulation studies, we applied the proposed method to estimate the dynamic spectral causality on real visual evoked potential (VEP) data in a human subject. Its usefulness in

  19. Secreted Factors from Colorectal and Prostate Cancer Cells Skew the Immune Response in Opposite Directions

    PubMed Central

    Lundholm, Marie; Hägglöf, Christina; Wikberg, Maria L.; Stattin, Pär; Egevad, Lars; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Palmqvist, Richard; Edin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration has been associated with an improved prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), but a poor prognosis in prostate cancer (PC) patients. In this study, the distribution and prognostic value of proinflammatory M1 macrophages (NOS2+) and immunosuppressive M2 macrophages (CD163+) was evaluated in a cohort of 234 PC patients. We found that macrophages infiltrating PC were mainly of an M2 type and correlated with a more aggressive tumor and poor patient prognosis. Furthermore, the M1/M2 ratio was significantly decreased in PC compared to CRC. Using in vitro cell culture experiments, we could show that factors secreted from CRC and PC cells induced macrophages of a proinflammatory or immunosuppressive phenotype, respectively. These macrophages differentially affected autologous T lymphocyte proliferation and activation. Consistent with this, CRC specimens were found to have higher degrees of infiltrating T-helper 1 cells and active cytotoxic T lymphocytes, while PC specimens displayed functionally inactive T cells. In conclusion, our results imply that tumour-secreted factors from cancers of different origin can drive macrophage differentiation in opposite directions and thereby regulate the organization of the anti-tumour immune response. Our findings suggest that reprogramming of macrophages could be an important tool in the development of new immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26503803

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes central nervous system myelination via a direct effect upon oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Junhua; Wong, Agnes W; Willingham, Melanie M; van den Buuse, Maarten; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Murray, Simon S

    2010-01-01

    The extracellular factors that are responsible for inducing myelination in the central nervous system (CNS) remain elusive. We investigated whether brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is implicated, by first confirming that BDNF heterozygous mice exhibit delayed CNS myelination during early postnatal development. We next established that the influence of BDNF upon myelination was direct, by acting on oligodendrocytes, using co-cultures of dorsal root ganglia neurons and oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Importantly, we found that BDNF retains its capacity to enhance myelination of neurons or by oligodendrocytes derived from p75NTR knockout mice, indicating the expression of p75NTR is not necessary for BDNF-induced myelination. Conversely, we observed that phosphorylation of TrkB correlated with myelination, and that inhibiting TrkB signalling also inhibited the promyelinating effect of BDNF, suggesting that BDNF enhances CNS myelination via activating oligodendroglial TrkB-FL receptors. Together, our data reveal a previously unknown role for BDNF in potentiating the normal development of CNS myelination, via signalling within oligodendrocytes.

  1. Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase PIN1 Directly Binds to and Stabilizes Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyeong-jun; Kwon, Nayoung; Choi, Min-A; Jung, Kyung Oh; Piao, Juan-Yu; Ngo, Hoang Kieu Chi; Kim, Su-Jung; Kim, Do-Hee; Chung, June-Key; Cha, Young-Nam; Youn, Hyewon; Choi, Bu Young; Min, Sang-Hyun; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PIN1) regulates the functional activity of a subset of phosphoproteins through binding to phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs and subsequently isomerization of the phosphorylated bonds. Interestingly, PIN1 is overexpressed in many types of malignancies including breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers. However, its oncogenic functions have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report that PIN1 directly interacts with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in human colon cancer (HCT116) cells. PIN1 binding to HIF-1α occurred in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We also found that PIN1 interacted with HIF-1α at both exogenous and endogenous levels. Notably, PIN1 binding stabilized the HIF-1α protein, given that their levels were significantly increased under hypoxic conditions. The stabilization of HIF-1α resulted in increased transcriptional activity, consequently upregulating expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, a major contributor to angiogenesis. Silencing of PIN1 or pharmacologic inhibition of its activity abrogated the angiogenesis. By utilizing a bioluminescence imaging technique, we were able to demonstrate that PIN1 inhibition dramatically reduced the tumor volume in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model and angiogenesis as well as hypoxia-induced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α. These results suggest that PIN1 interacting with HIF-1α is a potential cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic target. PMID:26784107

  2. Direct measurement of 11B(p ,γ )12C astrophysical S factors at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. J.; Jia, B. L.; Xu, S. W.; Chen, S. Z.; Ma, S. B.; Hou, S. Q.; Hu, J.; Zhang, L. Y.; Yu, X. Q.

    2016-05-01

    We directly measure the absolute cross section of 11B(p ,γ )12C in the energy region of Ec .m .=130 -257 keV by using a thin target for the first time. This work is performed on a 320-kV platform at the Institute of Modern Physics in Lanzhou. The astrophysical S factors of this reaction are obtained for capture to the ground and first excited states of 12C. The properties of the known resonance at ˜150 keV are derived and agree with the previous results. However, in the energy region of 170-240 keV, our S factors are about 15%-50% larger than the adopted values in NACRE II and are also larger than the upper limits of NACRE II by up to ˜20 % . This indicates that our new reaction rate is enhanced by about 15%-50% compared to the NACRE II adopted rate in the temperature region 0.32-0.62 GK.

  3. The splicing factor PRP2, a putative RNA helicase, interacts directly with pre-mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Teigelkamp, S; McGarvey, M; Plumpton, M; Beggs, J D

    1994-01-01

    The RNA helicase-like splicing factor PRP2 interacts only transiently with spliceosomes. To facilitate analysis of interactions of PRP2 with spliceosomal components, PRP2 protein was stalled in splicing complexes by two different methods. A dominant negative mutant form of PRP2 protein, which associates stably with spliceosomes, was found to interact directly with pre-mRNAs, as demonstrated by UV-crosslinking experiments. The use of various mutant and truncated pre-mRNAs revealed that this interaction requires a spliceable pre-mRNA and an assembled spliceosome; a 3' splice site is not required. To extend these observations to the wild-type PRP2 protein, spliceosomes were depleted of ATP; PRP2 protein interacts with pre-mRNA in these spliceosomes in an ATP-independent fashion. Comparison of RNA binding by PRP2 protein in the presence of ATP or gamma S-ATP showed that ATP hydrolysis rather than mere ATP binding is required to release PRP2 protein from pre-mRNA. As PRP2 is an RNA-stimulated ATPase, these experiments strongly suggest that the pre-mRNA is the native co-factor stimulating ATP hydrolysis by PRP2 protein in spliceosomes. Since PRP2 is a putative RNA helicase, we propose that the pre-mRNA is the target of RNA displacement activity of PRP2 protein, promoting the first step of splicing. Images PMID:8112302

  4. Acoustical inverse problems regularization: Direct definition of filter factors using Signal-to-Noise Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, P.-A.; Gérard, A.; Camier, C.; Berry, A.

    2014-02-01

    Acoustic imaging aims at localization and characterization of sound sources using microphone arrays. In this paper a new regularization method for acoustic imaging by inverse approach is proposed. The method first relies on the singular value decomposition of the plant matrix and on the projection of the measured data on the corresponding singular vectors. In place of regularization using classical methods such as truncated singular value decomposition and Tikhonov regularization, the proposed method involves the direct definition of the filter factors on the basis of a thresholding operation, defined from the estimated measurement noise. The thresholding operation is achieved using modified filter functions. The originality of the approach is to propose the definition of a filter factor which provides more damping to the singular components dominated by noise than that given by the Tikhonov filter. This has the advantage of potentially simplifying the selection of the best regularization amount in inverse problems. Theoretical results show that this method is comparatively more accurate than Tikhonov regularization and truncated singular value decomposition.

  5. Direct phylogenetic evidence for lateral transfer of elongation factor-like gene.

    PubMed

    Kamikawa, Ryoma; Inagaki, Yuji; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2008-05-13

    Genes encoding elongation factor-like (EFL) proteins, which show high similarity to elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha), have been found in phylogenetically distantly related eukaryotes. The sporadic distribution of "EFL-containing" lineages within "EF-1alpha-containing" lineages indirectly, but strongly, suggests lateral gene transfer as the principal driving force in EFL evolution. However, one of the most critical aspects in the above hypothesis, the donor lineages in any putative cases of lateral EFL gene transfer, remained unclear. In this study, we provide direct evidence for lateral transfer of an EFL gene through the analyses of 10 diatom EFL genes. All diatom EFL homologues tightly clustered in phylogenetic analyses, suggesting acquisition of the exogenous EFL gene early in diatom evolution. Our survey additionally identified Thalassiosira pseudonana as a eukaryote bearing EF-1alpha and EFL genes and secondary EFL gene loss in Phaeodactylum tricornutum, the complete genome of which encodes only the EF-1alpha gene. Most importantly, the EFL phylogeny recovered a robust grouping of homologues from diatoms, the cercozoan Bigelowiella natans, and the foraminifer Planoglabratella opecularis, with the diatoms nested within the Bigelowiella plus Planoglabratella (Rhizaria) grouping. The particular relationships recovered are further consistent with two characteristic sequence motifs. The best explanation of our data analyses is an EFL gene transfer from a foraminifer to a diatom, the first case in which the donor-recipient relationship was clarified. Finally, based on a reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR assay and the genome information of Thalassiosira and Phaeodactylum, we propose the loss of elongation factor function in Thalassiosira EF-1alpha.

  6. Distinguishing direct from indirect roles for bicoid mRNA localization factors

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Timothy T.; Xanthakis, Despina; Parton, Richard; Dobbie, Ian; Rabouille, Catherine; Gavis, Elizabeth R.; Davis, Ilan

    2010-01-01

    Localization of bicoid mRNA to the anterior of the Drosophila oocyte is essential for patterning the anteroposterior body axis in the early embryo. bicoid mRNA localizes in a complex multistep process involving transacting factors, molecular motors and cytoskeletal components that remodel extensively during the lifetime of the mRNA. Genetic requirements for several localization factors, including Swallow and Staufen, are well established, but the precise roles of these factors and their relationship to bicoid mRNA transport particles remains unresolved. Here we use live cell imaging, super-resolution microscopy in fixed cells and immunoelectron microscopy on ultrathin frozen sections to study the distribution of Swallow, Staufen, actin and dynein relative to bicoid mRNA during late oogenesis. We show that Swallow and bicoid mRNA are transported independently and are not colocalized at their final destination. Furthermore, Swallow is not required for bicoid transport. Instead, Swallow localizes to the oocyte plasma membrane, in close proximity to actin filaments, and we present evidence that Swallow functions during the late phase of bicoid localization by regulating the actin cytoskeleton. In contrast, Staufen, dynein and bicoid mRNA form nonmembranous, electron dense particles at the oocyte anterior. Our results exclude a role for Swallow in linking bicoid mRNA to the dynein motor. Instead we propose a model for bicoid mRNA localization in which Swallow is transported independently by dynein and contributes indirectly to bicoid mRNA localization by organizing the cytoskeleton, whereas Staufen plays a direct role in dynein-dependent bicoid mRNA transport. PMID:20023172

  7. Direct phylogenetic evidence for lateral transfer of elongation factor-like gene

    PubMed Central

    Kamikawa, Ryoma; Inagaki, Yuji; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2008-01-01

    Genes encoding elongation factor-like (EFL) proteins, which show high similarity to elongation factor-1α (EF-1α), have been found in phylogenetically distantly related eukaryotes. The sporadic distribution of “EFL-containing” lineages within “EF-1α-containing” lineages indirectly, but strongly, suggests lateral gene transfer as the principal driving force in EFL evolution. However, one of the most critical aspects in the above hypothesis, the donor lineages in any putative cases of lateral EFL gene transfer, remained unclear. In this study, we provide direct evidence for lateral transfer of an EFL gene through the analyses of 10 diatom EFL genes. All diatom EFL homologues tightly clustered in phylogenetic analyses, suggesting acquisition of the exogenous EFL gene early in diatom evolution. Our survey additionally identified Thalassiosira pseudonana as a eukaryote bearing EF-1α and EFL genes and secondary EFL gene loss in Phaeodactylum tricornutum, the complete genome of which encodes only the EF-1α gene. Most importantly, the EFL phylogeny recovered a robust grouping of homologues from diatoms, the cercozoan Bigelowiella natans, and the foraminifer Planoglabratella opecularis, with the diatoms nested within the Bigelowiella plus Planoglabratella (Rhizaria) grouping. The particular relationships recovered are further consistent with two characteristic sequence motifs. The best explanation of our data analyses is an EFL gene transfer from a foraminifer to a diatom, the first case in which the donor–recipient relationship was clarified. Finally, based on a reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR assay and the genome information of Thalassiosira and Phaeodactylum, we propose the loss of elongation factor function in Thalassiosira EF-1α. PMID:18458344

  8. Pestivirus Npro Directly Interacts with Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Monomer and Dimer

    PubMed Central

    Holthauzen, Luis Marcelo F.; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) is a transcription factor involved in the activation of type I alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) in response to viral infection. Upon viral infection, the IRF3 monomer is activated into a phosphorylated dimer, which induces the transcription of interferon genes in the nucleus. Viruses have evolved several ways to target IRF3 in order to subvert the innate immune response. Pestiviruses, such as classical swine fever virus (CSFV), target IRF3 for ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. This is mediated by the viral protein Npro that interacts with IRF3, but the molecular details for this interaction are largely unknown. We used recombinant Npro and IRF3 proteins and show that Npro interacts with IRF3 directly without additional proteins and forms a soluble 1:1 complex. The full-length IRF3 but not merely either of the individual domains is required for this interaction. The interaction between Npro and IRF3 is not dependent on the activation state of IRF3, since Npro binds to a constitutively active form of IRF3 in the presence of its transcriptional coactivator, CREB-binding protein (CBP). The results indicate that the Npro-binding site on IRF3 encompasses a region that is unperturbed by the phosphorylation and subsequent activation of IRF3 and thus excludes the dimer interface and CBP-binding site. IMPORTANCE The pestivirus N-terminal protease, Npro, is essential for evading the host's immune system by facilitating the degradation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). However, the nature of the Npro interaction with IRF3, including the IRF3 species (inactive monomer versus activated dimer) that Npro targets for degradation, is largely unknown. We show that classical swine fever virus Npro and porcine IRF3 directly interact in solution and that full-length IRF3 is required for interaction with Npro. Additionally, Npro interacts with a constitutively active form of IRF3 bound to its transcriptional

  9. Novel chemo-enzymatic oligomers of cinnamic acids as direct and indirect inhibitors of coagulation proteinases.

    PubMed

    Monien, Bernhard H; Henry, Brian L; Raghuraman, Arjun; Hindle, Michael; Desai, Umesh R

    2006-12-01

    Thrombin and factor Xa, two important procoagulant enzymes, have been prime targets for regulation of clotting through the direct and indirect mechanism of inhibition. Our efforts on exploiting the indirect mechanism led us to study a carboxylic acid-based scaffold, which displayed major acceleration in the inhibition of these enzymes [J. Med. Chem.2005, 48, 1269, 5360]. This work advances the study to chemo-enzymatically prepared oligomers of 4-hydroxycinnamic acids, DHPs, which display interesting anticoagulant properties. Oligomers, ranging in size from tetramers to pentadecamers, were prepared through peroxidase-catalyzed oxidative coupling of caffeic, ferulic, and sinapic acids, and sulfated using triethylamine-sulfur trioxide complex. Chromatographic, spectroscopic, and elemental studies suggest that the DHPs are heterogeneous, polydisperse preparations composed of inter-monomer linkages similar to those found in natural lignins. Measurement of activated thromboplastin and prothrombin time indicates that both the sulfated and unsulfated derivatives of the DHPs display anticoagulant activity, which is dramatically higher than that of the reference polyacrylic acids. More interestingly, this activity approaches that of low-molecular-weight heparin with the sulfated derivative showing approximately 2- to 3-fold greater potency than the unsulfated parent. Studies on the inhibition of factor Xa and thrombin indicate that the oligomers exert their anticoagulant effect through both direct and indirect inhibition mechanisms. This dual inhibition property of 4-hydroxycinnamic acid-based DHP oligomers is the first example in inhibitors of coagulation. This work puts forward a novel, non-heparin structure, which may be exploited for the design of potent, dual action inhibitors of coagulation through combinatorial virtual screening on a library of DHP oligomers.

  10. Direct oral anticoagulants: Current indications and unmet needs in the treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Bertoletti, Laurent; Ollier, Edouard; Duvillard, Cécile; Delavenne, Xavier; Beyens, Marie-Noëlle; De Magalhaes, Elodie; Bellet, Florelle; Basset, Thierry; Mismetti, Patrick; Laporte, Silvy

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) is being completely modified with the development of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs). Rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban directly inhibit factor Xa, whereas dabigatran inhibits factor IIa. All these drugs are proposed orally, and share pharmacological similarities: fixed doses without any therapeutic drug monitoring, key role of the transporter proteins P-glycoprotein for all of them and metabolism mediated by CYP3A4 for the anti-Xa, short half-life with variable rate of renal elimination. More than 25 000 patients with acute VTE were included in phase-III studies. Rivaroxaban and apixaban challenged all the conventional therapy (parenteral heparins followed by anti-vitamin K antagonists) whereas edoxaban and dabigatran challenged only anti-vitamin K antagonists. All the DOACs met the non-inferiority efficacy endpoint (recurrent VTE during treatment), whereas the large non-inferiority margin was debated for dabigatran. However, they were associated with better safety and a decreased risk of major bleeding. According to indirect comparisons, there were no statistically significant differences between DOACs in terms of efficacy but some differences are not excluded in term of safety. Although DOACs allow for simplification of treatment in the majority of patients with acute VTE, their risk/benefit ratio is questioned in elderly patients, patients with mild-to-severe renal impairment, and in some clinical subgroups such as cancer or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Validated reversal strategies (potentially based on laboratory monitoring) are expected for patients with major bleeding, overdose or with a need for surgery.

  11. NELL-1, an osteoinductive factor, is a direct transcriptional target of Osterix.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Zhang, Xinli; Sun, Shan; Zara, Janette N; Zou, Xuan; Chiu, Robert; Culiat, Cymbelin T; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2011-01-01

    NELL-1 is a novel secreted protein associated with premature fusion of cranial sutures in craniosynostosis that has been found to promote osteoblast cell differentiation and mineralization. Our previous study showed that Runx2, the key transcription factor in osteoblast differentiation, transactivates the NELL-1 promoter. In this study, we evaluated the regulatory involvement and mechanisms of Osterix, an essential transcription factor of osteoblasts, in NELL-1 gene expression and function. Promoter analysis showed a cluster of potential Sp1 sites (Sp1/Osterix binding sites) within approximately 70 bp (from -71 to -142) of the 5' flanking region of the human NELL-1 transcriptional start site. Luciferase activity in our NELL-1 promoter reporter systems was significantly decreased in Saos-2 cells when Osterix was overexpressed. Mutagenesis study demonstrated that this suppression is mediated by the Sp1 sites. The binding specificity of Osterix to these Sp1 sites was confirmed in Saos-2 cells and primary human osteoblasts by EMSA in vitro and ChIP assay in vivo. ChIP assay also showed that Osterix downregulated NELL-1 by affecting binding of RNA polymerase II to the NELL-1 promoter, but not by competing with Runx2 binding to the OSE2 sites. Moreover, NELL-1 mRNA levels were significantly decreased when Osterix was overexpressed in Saos-2, U2OS, Hela and Glioma cells. Correspondingly, knockdown of Osterix increased NELL-1 transcription and osteoblastic differentiation in both Saos-2 cells and primary human osteoblasts. These results suggest that Osterix is a direct transcriptional regulator with repressive effect on NELL-1 gene expression, contributing to a delicate balance of regulatory effects on NELL-1 transcription with Runx2, and may play a crucial role in osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. These findings also extend our understanding of the molecular mechanism of Runx2, Osterix, and NELL-1 and demonstrate their crosstalk during osteogenesis.

  12. Pathogenicity Island Cross Talk Mediated by Recombination Directionality Factors Facilitates Excision from the Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Megan R.; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pathogenicity islands (PAIs) are mobile integrated genetic elements (MIGEs) that contain a diverse range of virulence factors and are essential in the evolution of pathogenic bacteria. PAIs are widespread among bacteria and integrate into the host genome, commonly at a tRNA locus, via integrase-mediated site-specific recombination. The excision of PAIs is the first step in the horizontal transfer of these elements and is not well understood. In this study, we examined the role of recombination directionality factors (RDFs) and their relationship with integrases in the excision of two PAIs essential for Vibrio cholerae host colonization: Vibrio pathogenicity island 1 (VPI-1) and VPI-2. VPI-1 does not contain an RDF, which allowed us to answer the question of whether RDFs are an absolute requirement for excision. We found that an RDF was required for efficient excision of VPI-2 but not VPI-1 and that RDFs can induce excision of both islands. Expression data revealed that the RDFs act as transcriptional repressors to both VPI-1- and VPI-2-encoded integrases. We demonstrated that the RDFs Vibrio excision factor A (VefA) and VefB bind at the attachment sites (overlapping the int promoter region) of VPI-1 and VPI-2, thus supporting this mode of integrase repression. In addition, V. cholerae RDFs are promiscuous due to their dual functions of promoting excision of both VPI-1 and VPI-2 and acting as negative transcriptional regulators of the integrases. This is the first demonstration of cross talk between PAIs mediated via RDFs which reveals the complex interactions that occur between separately acquired MIGEs. IMPORTANCE Deciphering the mechanisms of pathogenicity island excision is necessary for understanding the evolution and spread of these elements to their nonpathogenic counterparts. Such mechanistic insight would assist in predicting the mobility of uncharacterized genetic elements. This study identified extensive RDF-mediated cross talk between two

  13. Transcription Factor Rational Design Improves Directed Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Into Skeletal Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Manuel AFV; Janssen, Josephine M; Nguyen, Quynh G; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Hauschka, Stephen D; Dickson, George; de Vries, Antoine AF

    2011-01-01

    There is great interest in transdifferentiating cells from one lineage into those of another and in dedifferentiating mature cells back into a stem/progenitor cell state by deploying naturally occurring transcription factors (TFs). Often, however, steering cellular differentiation pathways in a predictable and efficient manner remains challenging. Here, we investigated the principle of combining domains from different lineage-specific TFs to improve directed cellular differentiation. As proof-of-concept, we engineered the whole-human TF MyoDCD, which has the NH2-terminal transcription activation domain (TAD) and adjacent DNA-binding motif of MyoD COOH-terminally fused to the TAD of myocardin (MyoCD). We found via reporter gene and marker protein assays as well as by a cell fusion readout system that, targeting the TAD of MyoCD to genes normally responsive to the skeletal muscle-specific TF MyoD enforces more robust myogenic reprogramming of nonmuscle cells than that achieved by the parental, prototypic master TF, MyoD. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) transduced with a codon-optimized microdystrophin gene linked to a synthetic striated muscle-specific promoter and/or with MyoD or MyoDCD were evaluated for complementing the genetic defect in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) myocytes through heterotypic cell fusion. Cotransduction of hMSCs with MyoDCD and microdystrophin led to chimeric myotubes containing the highest dystrophin levels. PMID:21266958

  14. Nurse-Administered, Gut-Directed Hypnotherapy in IBS: Efficacy and Factors Predicting a Positive Response.

    PubMed

    Lövdahl, Jenny; Ringström, Gisela; Agerforz, Pia; Törnblom, Hans; Simrén, Magnus

    2015-07-01

    Hypnotherapy is an effective treatment in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is often delivered by a psychotherapist and is costly and time consuming. Nurse-administered hypnotherapy could increase availability and reduce costs. In this study the authors evaluate the effectiveness of nurse-administered, gut-directed hypnotherapy and identify factors predicting treatment outcome. Eighty-five patients were included in the study. Participants received hypnotherapy by a nurse once/week for 12 weeks. Patients reported marked improvement in gastrointestinal (GI) and extra-colonic symptoms after treatment, as well as a reduction in GI-specific anxiety, general anxiety, and depression. Fifty-eight percent were responders after the 12 weeks treatment period, and of these 82% had a favorable clinical response already at week 6. Women were more likely than men to respond favorably to the treatment. Nurse-administered hypnotherapy is an effective treatment for IBS. Being female and reporting a favorable response to treatment by week 6 predicted a positive treatment response at the end of the 12 weeks treatment period.

  15. NRC-interacting factor directs neurite outgrowth in an activity-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X-S; Fu, W-Y; Hung, K-W; Chien, W W Y; Li, Z; Fu, A K; Ip, N Y

    2015-03-19

    Nuclear hormone receptor coregulator-interacting factor 1 (NIF-1) is a zinc finger nuclear protein that was initially identified to enhance nuclear hormone receptor transcription via its interaction with nuclear hormone receptor coregulator (NRC). NIF-1 may regulate gene transcription either by modulating general transcriptional machinery or remodeling chromatin structure through interactions with specific protein partners. We previously reported that the cytoplasmic/nuclear localization of NIF-1 is regulated by the neuronal Cdk5 activator p35, suggesting potential neuronal functions for NIF-1. The present study reveals that NIF-1 plays critical roles in regulating neuronal morphogenesis at early stages. NIF-1 was prominently expressed in the nuclei of developing rat cortical neurons. Knockdown of NIF-1 expression attenuated both neurite outgrowth in cultured cortical neurons and retinoic acid (RA)-treated Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells. Furthermore, activity-induced Ca(2+) influx, which is critical for neuronal morphogenesis, stimulated the nuclear localization of NIF-1 in cortical neurons. Suppression of NIF-1 expression reduced the up-regulation of neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription. These findings collectively suggest that NIF-1 directs neuronal morphogenesis during early developmental stages through modulating activity-dependent gene transcription.

  16. The contribution of interindividual factors to variability of response in transcranial direct current stimulation studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lucia M.; Uehara, Kazumasa; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    There has been an explosion of research using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for investigating and modulating human cognitive and motor function in healthy populations. It has also been used in many studies seeking to improve deficits in disease populations. With the slew of studies reporting “promising results” for everything from motor recovery after stroke to boosting memory function, one could be easily seduced by the idea of tDCS being the next panacea for all neurological ills. However, huge variability exists in the reported effects of tDCS, with great variability in the effect sizes and even contradictory results reported. In this review, we consider the interindividual factors that may contribute to this variability. In particular, we discuss the importance of baseline neuronal state and features, anatomy, age and the inherent variability in the injured brain. We additionally consider how interindividual variability affects the results of motor-evoked potential (MEP) testing with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which, in turn, can lead to apparent variability in response to tDCS in motor studies. PMID:26029052

  17. Identification of factors involved in target RNA-directed microRNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Gabrielle; Cetin, Semih; Messmer, Mélanie; Chane-Woon-Ming, Béatrice; Terenzi, Olivier; Chicher, Johana; Kuhn, Lauriane; Hammann, Philippe; Pfeffer, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism by which micro (mi)RNAs control their target gene expression is now well understood. It is however less clear how the level of miRNAs themselves is regulated. Under specific conditions, abundant and highly complementary target RNA can trigger miRNA degradation by a mechanism involving nucleotide addition and exonucleolytic degradation. One such mechanism has been previously observed to occur naturally during viral infection. To date, the molecular details of this phenomenon are not known. We report here that both the degree of complementarity and the ratio of miRNA/target abundance are crucial for the efficient decay of the small RNA. Using a proteomic approach based on the transfection of biotinylated antimiRNA oligonucleotides, we set to identify the factors involved in target-mediated miRNA degradation. Among the retrieved proteins, we identified members of the RNA-induced silencing complex, but also RNA modifying and degradation enzymes. We further validate and characterize the importance of one of these, the Perlman Syndrome 3′-5′ exonuclease DIS3L2. We show that this protein interacts with Argonaute 2 and functionally validate its role in target-directed miRNA degradation both by artificial targets and in the context of mouse cytomegalovirus infection. PMID:26809675

  18. Exchange factors directly activated by cAMP mediate melanocortin 4 receptor-induced gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Glas, Evi; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gs protein-coupled receptors regulate many vital body functions by activation of cAMP response elements (CRE) via cAMP-dependent kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the CRE binding protein (CREB). Melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4R) are prototypical Gs-coupled receptors that orchestrate the hypothalamic control of food-intake and metabolism. Remarkably, the significance of PKA for MC4R-induced CRE-dependent transcription in hypothalamic cells has not been rigorously interrogated yet. In two hypothalamic cell lines, we observed that blocking PKA activity had only weak or no effects on reporter gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of exchange factors directly activated by cAMP-1/2 (EPAC-1/2) mitigated MC4R-induced CRE reporter activation and mRNA induction of the CREB-dependent genes c-fos and thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that extracellular-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK-1/2) activated by EPACs and not PKA are the elusive CREB kinases responsible for MC4R-induced CREB/CRE activation in hypothalamic cells. Overall, these data emphasize the pivotal role of EPACs rather than PKA in hypothalamic gene expression elicited by a prototypical Gs-coupled receptor. PMID:27612207

  19. Antigenicity of recombinant maltose binding protein-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis fusion proteins with and without factor Xa cleaving

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne’s disease (JD) in ruminants. Proteomic studies have shown that MAP expresses certain proteins when exposed to in vitro physiological stress conditions similar to the conditions experienced within a host during natural infection. Such prot...

  20. Improvement of low bioavailability of a novel factor Xa inhibitor through formulation of cationic additives in its oral dosage form.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yoshimine; Kanamaru, Taro; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Shinji; Akashi, Mitsuru; Sakuma, Shinji

    2011-12-15

    A clinical trial of (2S)-2-[4-[[(3S)-1-acetimidoyl-3-pyrrolidinyl]oxy]phenyl]-3-(7-amidino-2-naphtyl) propanoic acid (DX-9065) revealed that its oral bioavailability was only 3% when it was administered as a conventional capsule formulation. The low bioavailability of DX-9065 was likely caused by both its poor membrane permeability and its electrostatic interaction with anionic bile acids. We hypothesized that DX-9065 absorption would be enhanced when the cationic drug was free from the complex through its replacement with other cationic substances. Polystyrene nanospheres coated with cationic poly(vinylamine) and cholestyramine, which is clinically used as a cholesterol-lowering agent, dramatically prevented DX-9065 from interacting with chenodeoxycholic acid in vitro. Successive animal experiments showed that bioavailability of DX-9065 administered with these cationic substances was 2-3 times that of DX-9065 administered solely. A dry syrup formulation with one-half of a minimal cholesterol-lowering equivalent dose of cholestyramine was designed, and the clinical trial was resumed. A 1.3-fold increase in bioavailability of DX-9065 was observed when the dry syrup was administered. We successfully demonstrated that DX-9065 absorption was enhanced when the drug was administered with cationic additives; however, it appeared that the absorption-enhancing function of cholestyramine largely depended on its dose. The dose escalation is probably prerequisite for the significant improvement of DX-9065 absorption in humans.

  1. Mutating factor VIII: lessons from structure to function.

    PubMed

    Fay, Philip J; Jenkins, P Vincent

    2005-01-01

    Factor VIII, a metal ion-dependent heterodimer, circulates in complex with von Willebrand factor. At sites of vessel wall damage, this procofactor is activated to factor VIIIa by limited proteolysis and assembles onto an anionic phospholipid surface in complex with factor IXa to form the intrinsic factor Xase; an enzyme complex that efficiently converts factor X to factor Xa during the propagation phase of coagulation. Factor Xase activity is down-regulated by mechanisms that include self-dampening by dissociation of a critical factor VIIIa subunit and proteolytic inactivation by the activated protein C pathway. Recent studies identify putative metal ion coordination sites as well as ligands involved in the catabolism of the activated and procofactor forms of the protein. Our knowledge of these multiple intra- and inter-molecular interactions has been facilitated by the application of naturally occurring and site-directed mutations to study factor VIII structure and function. In this review, we document important and novel contributions following this line of investigation.

  2. The transcription factor paired box-5 promotes osteoblastogenesis through direct induction of Osterix and Osteocalcin.

    PubMed

    Hinoi, Eiichi; Nakatani, Eri; Yamamoto, Tomomi; Iezaki, Takashi; Takahata, Yoshifumi; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Ishiura, Ryo; Takamori, Misa; Yoneda, Yukio

    2012-12-01

    Although skeletal abnormalities are seen in mice deficient of particular paired box (Pax) family proteins, little attention has been paid to their role in osteoblastogenesis so far. Here, we investigated the possible involvement of several Pax family members in mechanisms underlying the regulation of differentiation and maturation of osteoblasts. Among different Pax family members tested, Pax5 was not markedly expressed in murine calvarial osteoblasts before culture, but progressively expressed by osteoblasts under differentiation toward maturation. Immunoreactive Pax5 was highly detectable in primary cultured mature osteoblasts on immunoblotting and in osteoblastic cells attached to cancellous bone in mouse tibial sections on immunohistochemistry, respectively. Knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) of endogenous Pax5 led to significant inhibition of the expression of Osteocalcin, and Osterix through deterioration of gene transactivation, in addition to a1(I)Collagen expression and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining, without affecting runt-related transcription factor-2 (Runx2) expression and cell viability in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. The introduction of Pax5 enhanced promoter activities of Osteocalcin and Osterix in a manner dependent on the paired domain in MC3T3-E1 cells. Putative Pax5 binding sites were identified in the 5'-flanking regions of mouse Osteocalcin and Osterix, whereas chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed the direct binding of Pax5 to particular regions of Osteocalcin and Osterix promoters in MC3T3-E1 cells. Overexpression of Pax5 significantly increased Osteocalcin, Osterix, and a1(I)Collagen expression, ALP activity, and Ca(2+) accumulation, without affecting Runx2 expression, in MC3T3-E1 cells. In vertebrae of transgenic mice predominantly expressing Pax5 in osteoblasts, a significant increase was seen in the ratio of bone volume over tissue volume and the bone formation rate. These findings suggest that Pax5 could positively

  3. Hantaviruses direct endothelial cell permeability by sensitizing cells to the vascular permeability factor VEGF, while angiopoietin 1 and sphingosine 1-phosphate inhibit hantavirus-directed permeability.

    PubMed

    Gavrilovskaya, Irina N; Gorbunova, Elena E; Mackow, Natalie A; Mackow, Erich R

    2008-06-01

    Hantaviruses infect human endothelial cells and cause two vascular permeability-based diseases: hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. Hantavirus infection alone does not permeabilize endothelial cell monolayers. However, pathogenic hantaviruses inhibit the function of alphav beta3 integrins on endothelial cells, and hemorrhagic disease and vascular permeability deficits are consequences of dysfunctional beta3 integrins that normally regulate permeabilizing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) responses. Here we show that pathogenic Hantaan, Andes, and New York-1 hantaviruses dramatically enhance the permeability of endothelial cells in response to VEGF, while the nonpathogenic hantaviruses Prospect Hill and Tula have no effect on endothelial cell permeability. Pathogenic hantaviruses directed endothelial cell permeability 2 to 3 days postinfection, coincident with pathogenic hantavirus inhibition of alphav beta3 integrin functions, and hantavirus-directed permeability was inhibited by antibodies to VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2). These studies demonstrate that pathogenic hantaviruses, similar to alphav beta3 integrin-deficient cells, specifically enhance VEGF-directed permeabilizing responses. Using the hantavirus permeability assay we further demonstrate that the endothelial-cell-specific growth factor angiopoietin 1 (Ang-1) and the platelet-derived lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) inhibit hantavirus directed endothelial cell permeability at physiologic concentrations. These results demonstrate the utility of a hantavirus permeability assay and rationalize the testing of Ang-1, S1P, and antibodies to VEGFR2 as potential hantavirus therapeutics. The central importance of beta3 integrins and VEGF responses in vascular leak and hemorrhagic disease further suggest that altering beta3 or VEGF responses may be a common feature of additional viral hemorrhagic diseases. As a result, our findings provide a potential mechanism

  4. 42 CFR 413.80 - Direct GME payments: Determination of weighting factors for foreign medical graduates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., the National Board of Medical Examiners Examination, Parts I and II, may be substituted for FMGEMS for... factors for foreign medical graduates. 413.80 Section 413.80 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... weighting factors for foreign medical graduates. (a) The weighting factor for a foreign medical graduate...

  5. 42 CFR 413.80 - Direct GME payments: Determination of weighting factors for foreign medical graduates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., the National Board of Medical Examiners Examination, Parts I and II, may be substituted for FMGEMS for... factors for foreign medical graduates. 413.80 Section 413.80 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... weighting factors for foreign medical graduates. (a) The weighting factor for a foreign medical graduate...

  6. Protein-Templated Formation of an Inhibitor of the Blood Coagulation Factor Xa through a Background-Free Amidation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Jaegle, Mike; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Rademann, Jörg

    2017-03-20

    Protein-templated reactions enable the target-guided formation of protein ligands from reactive fragments, ideally with no background reaction. Herein, we investigate the templated formation of amides. A nucleophilic fragment that binds to the coagulation factor Xa was incubated with the protein and thirteen differentially activated dipeptides. The protein induced a non-catalytic templated reaction for the phenyl and trifluoroethyl esters; the latter was shown to be a completely background-free reaction. Starting from two fragments with millimolar affinity, a 29 nm superadditive inhibitor of factor Xa was obtained. The fragment ligation reaction was detected with high sensitivity by an enzyme activity assay and by mass spectrometry. The reaction progress and autoinhibition of the templated reaction by the formed ligation product were determined, and the structure of the protein-inhibitor complex was elucidated.

  7. Protein‐Templated Formation of an Inhibitor of the Blood Coagulation Factor Xa through a Background‐Free Amidation Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Jaegle, Mike; Steinmetzer, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Protein‐templated reactions enable the target‐guided formation of protein ligands from reactive fragments, ideally with no background reaction. Herein, we investigate the templated formation of amides. A nucleophilic fragment that binds to the coagulation factor Xa was incubated with the protein and thirteen differentially activated dipeptides. The protein induced a non‐catalytic templated reaction for the phenyl and trifluoroethyl esters; the latter was shown to be a completely background‐free reaction. Starting from two fragments with millimolar affinity, a 29 nm superadditive inhibitor of factor Xa was obtained. The fragment ligation reaction was detected with high sensitivity by an enzyme activity assay and by mass spectrometry. The reaction progress and autoinhibition of the templated reaction by the formed ligation product were determined, and the structure of the protein–inhibitor complex was elucidated. PMID:28199769

  8. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Direct thrombin inhibitors versus vitamin K antagonists for preventing cerebral or systemic embolism in people with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014,3:CD009893].

    PubMed

    Vaz Carneiro, António; Costa, João

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the most important complications of lone (non-valvular) atrial fibrillation. Its prevention is usually accomplished through oral anticoagulation. Until a few years ago warfarin was the most used agent, but recently two new pharmacologic classes have been introduced for stroke prevention in these patients: oral direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran and ximelagatran) and oral factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban). In this systematic review, oral direct thrombin inhibitors were compared with warfarin for efficacy and safety. The results indicate that there is no difference in terms of efficacy (except dabigatran 150 mg BID). Oral direct thrombin inhibitors presented less hemorrhages but increased treatment withdrawal due to adverse side-effects (the authors performed post-hoc analyses excluding ximelagatran because this drug was withdrawn from the market owing to safety concerns). There was no difference in terms of mortality between the agents.

  9. Preparation and characterization of members of the system La 2- xA1+ xCu 2O 6± y where A = Ca,Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doverspike, K.; Liu, J.-H.; Dwight, K.; Wold, A.

    1989-09-01

    Members of the system La 2- xA1+ xCu 2O 6± y, where A = Ca,Sr, were prepared by decomposition of the nitrates. The tolerance of these compounds for oxygen uptake, as well as the ease of substitution for the A-site ions, is shown to be closely related to the distribution of the alkaline-earth ions on the 8- and 9-coordinated A-sites.

  10. Enhancing the Thermostability of Serratia plymuthica Sucrose Isomerase Using B-Factor-Directed Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xuguo; Cheng, Sheng; Ai, Yixin; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The sucrose isomerase of Serratia plymuthica AS9 (AS9 PalI) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and characterized. The half-life of AS9 PalI was 20 min at 45°C, indicating that it was unstable. In order to improve its thermostability, six amino acid residues with higher B-factors were selected as targets for site-directed mutagenesis, and six mutants (E175N, K576D, K174D, G176D, S575D and N577K) were designed using the RosettaDesign server. The E175N and K576D mutants exhibited improved thermostability in preliminary experiments, so the double mutant E175N/K576D was constructed. These three mutants (E175N, K576D, E175N/K576D) were characterized in detail. The results indicate that the three mutants exhibit a slightly increased optimal temperature (35°C), compared with that of the wild-type enzyme (30°C). The mutants also share an identical pH optimum of 6.0, which is similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. The half-lives of the E175N, K576D and E175N/K576D mutants were 2.30, 1.78 and 7.65 times greater than that of the wild-type enzyme at 45°C, respectively. Kinetic studies showed that the Km values for the E175N, K576D and E175N/K576D mutants decreased by 6.6%, 2.0% and 11.0%, respectively, and their kcat/Km values increased by 38.2%, 4.2% and 19.4%, respectively, compared with those of the wild-type enzyme. After optimizing the conditions for isomaltulose production at 45°C, we found that the E175N, K576D and E175N/K576D mutants displayed slightly improved isomaltulose yields, compared with the wild-type enzyme. Therefore, the mutants produced in this study would be more suitable for industrial biosynthesis of isomaltulose.

  11. Enhancing the Thermostability of Serratia plymuthica Sucrose Isomerase Using B-Factor-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Yixin; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The sucrose isomerase of Serratia plymuthica AS9 (AS9 PalI) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and characterized. The half-life of AS9 PalI was 20 min at 45°C, indicating that it was unstable. In order to improve its thermostability, six amino acid residues with higher B-factors were selected as targets for site-directed mutagenesis, and six mutants (E175N, K576D, K174D, G176D, S575D and N577K) were designed using the RosettaDesign server. The E175N and K576D mutants exhibited improved thermostability in preliminary experiments, so the double mutant E175N/K576D was constructed. These three mutants (E175N, K576D, E175N/K576D) were characterized in detail. The results indicate that the three mutants exhibit a slightly increased optimal temperature (35°C), compared with that of the wild-type enzyme (30°C). The mutants also share an identical pH optimum of 6.0, which is similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. The half-lives of the E175N, K576D and E175N/K576D mutants were 2.30, 1.78 and 7.65 times greater than that of the wild-type enzyme at 45°C, respectively. Kinetic studies showed that the Km values for the E175N, K576D and E175N/K576D mutants decreased by 6.6%, 2.0% and 11.0%, respectively, and their kcat/Km values increased by 38.2%, 4.2% and 19.4%, respectively, compared with those of the wild-type enzyme. After optimizing the conditions for isomaltulose production at 45°C, we found that the E175N, K576D and E175N/K576D mutants displayed slightly improved isomaltulose yields, compared with the wild-type enzyme. Therefore, the mutants produced in this study would be more suitable for industrial biosynthesis of isomaltulose. PMID:26886729

  12. Evaluation of the Williamsburg County Direct Instruction Program: Factors Leading to Success in Rural Elementary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darch, Craig; And Others

    Several evaluation formats were used to examine the impact that the Direct Instruction Model had on 600 selected students in Williamsburg County, South Carolina, over a 7-year period. The performance of students in the Direct Instruction Model was contrasted with the performance of similar students (on the basis of family income, ethnicity,…

  13. Expression of DDX3 Is Directly Modulated by Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 Alpha in Breast Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Botlagunta, Mahendran; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Vesuna, Farhad; Winnard, Paul T.; Bol, Guus M.; Patel, Arvind H.; Raman, Venu

    2011-01-01

    DEAD box protein, DDX3, is aberrantly expressed in breast cancer cells ranging from weakly invasive to aggressive phenotypes and functions as an important regulator of cancer cell growth and survival. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxia inducible factor-1α is a transcriptional activator of DDX3 in breast cancer cells. Within the promoter region of the human DDX3 gene, we identified three putative hypoxia inducible factor-1 responsive elements. By luciferase reporter assays in combination with mutated hypoxia inducible factor-1 responsive elements, we determined that the hypoxia inducible factor-1 responsive element at position -153 relative to the translation start site is essential for transcriptional activation of DDX3 under hypoxic conditions. We also demonstrated that hypoxia inducible factor-1 binds to the DDX3 promoter and that the binding is specific, as revealed by siRNA against hypoxia inducible factor-1 and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Thus, the activation of DDX3 expression during hypoxia is due to the direct binding of hypoxia inducible factor-1 to hypoxia responsive elements in the DDX3 promoter. In addition, we observed a significant overlap in the protein expression pattern of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and DDX3 in MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumors. Taken together, our results demonstrate, for the first time, the role of DDX3 as a hypoxia-inducible gene that exhibits enhanced expression through the interaction of hypoxia inducible factor-1 with hypoxia inducible factor-1 responsive elements in its promoter region. PMID:21448281

  14. Factors Influencing Direct-Care Paraprofessionals' Decisions to Initiate Mental Health Referrals for Adults with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Matthew N. I.; Miller, Trisha T.; Skillman, Gemma D.

    2005-01-01

    Direct-care paraprofessionals' recognition of psychopathology of varying severity in persons with mental retardation was evaluated. Factors that may influence paraprofessionals' decisions to initiate referrals for mental health services on behalf of individuals with mental retardation were also evaluated. Results suggest that staff members…

  15. Degree and Direction of Multiple Career Factors: Sex Differences and Construct Validity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Michal; And Others

    Personality, environment, and the interaction between them have been suggested as the major factors accounting for career development. Students (N=283) were asked to respond to 28 items on a recently revised self-report instrument, the Career Factor Checklist (CFC), in order to establish the construct validity of the revised CFC and to investigate…

  16. Pharmacokinetics of danaparoid sodium, dalteparin sodium and heparin determined by inhibitory effect on the activated coagulation factor X activity after single intravenous administration in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ishida, M; Nakada, Y; Horiuchi, M; Sakamoto, F

    1998-08-01

    The inhibitory effect on the activated coagulation factor X activity (anti-Xa activity) in plasma and urine of danaparoid sodium (DAS, CAS 9005-49-6) was compared with that of dalteparin sodium (DLS, CAS 9041-08-1) and heparin (CAS 9005-49-6) after single intravenous administration at a dose of 640 anti-Xa U/kg to male rabbits. The elimination of half-life of DAS was 9.90 h and was 6.0 times longer than that of DLS and 16.5 times longer than that of heparin. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of DAS was 47.13 +/- 14.55 anti-Xa U.h/ml and was 2.4 times larger than that of DLS and 2.9 times larger than that of heparin. The urinary cumulative excretion of anti-Xa activity of DAS and DLS was 42.6 +/- 6.4% and 16.4 +/- 0.8% of dose, respectively, in 24 h after dosing, respectively. But the anti-Xa activity in urine was not detected at any sampling points after administration of heparin. DAS has a longer elimination half-life and a higher renal excretion of anti-Xa activity than that of DLS and heparin. Therefore, in comparison to DLS and heparin, it seems that the anticoagulant activity of DAS has a long duration.

  17. Factors that augment the role of direct retainers in mandibular distal-extension removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Donahue, T J

    1988-12-01

    Several features of RPD design that augment direct retainer design were identified. They are as follows: 1. The duplication of direct retainer function by other prosthesis components 2. Physiologic adjustment of the framework to assure contacts with abutment teeth that are consistent with the design and intended functions of the components and that transfer stress in a manner those teeth are designed to accept 3. Intimate adaptation of denture bases to the residual mucosa, with recall visits to monitor this adaptation 4. Specific loading of the denture bases through selective placement of artificial teeth 5. Splinting of abutment teeth

  18. AquaPathogen X--A template database for tracking field isolates of aquatic pathogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, Evi; Kurath, Gael

    2012-01-01

    AquaPathogen X is a template database for recording information on individual isolates of aquatic pathogens and is available for download from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Fisheries Research Center (WFRC) website (http://wfrc.usgs.gov). This template database can accommodate the nucleotide sequence data generated in molecular epidemiological studies along with the myriad of abiotic and biotic traits associated with isolates of various pathogens (for example, viruses, parasites, or bacteria) from multiple aquatic animal host species (for example, fish, shellfish, or shrimp). The simultaneous cataloging of isolates from different aquatic pathogens is a unique feature to the AquaPathogen X database, which can be used in surveillance of emerging aquatic animal diseases and clarification of main risk factors associated with pathogen incursions into new water systems. As a template database, the data fields are empty upon download and can be modified to user specifications. For example, an application of the template database that stores the epidemiological profiles of fish virus isolates, called Fish ViroTrak (fig. 1), was also developed (Emmenegger and others, 2011).

  19. e-Portfolios Enhancing Students' Self-Directed Learning: A Systematic Review of Influencing Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckers, Jorrick; Dolmans, Diana; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    e-Portfolios have become increasingly popular among educators as learning tools. Some research even shows that e-portfolios can be utilised to facilitate the development of skills for self-directed learning. Such skills include self-assessment of performance, formulation of learning goals, and selection of future tasks. However, it is not yet…

  20. Evaluation of the Williamsburg County Direct Instruction Program: Factors Leading to Success in Rural Elementary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darch, Craig; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Presents evaluation studies examining use of Direct Instruction (DI) Model on rural South Carolina students. Compares results of DI and conventional methods in reading, mathematics, language, and spelling. Results show DI students outperformed local comparison students on virtually every measure. (TES)

  1. High fill-factor multilevel Fresnel zone plate arrays by femtosecond laser direct writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Li-Gang; Wang, Dian; Jiang, Tong; Wu, Si-Zhu; Li, Ai-Wu; Song, Jun-Feng

    2011-02-01

    Fresnel zone plate arrays (FZPAs), as a kind of an important integrated micro-optical device, have attracted great attention. However, the fill factor of present FZPAs by femtosecond technology is a little low, which leads to serious light loss and low signal-to-noise. Here we reported high fill-factor square and hexagonal FZPAs by femtosecond laser two-photon polymerization of the resin SU-8. Their optical focusing and imaging properties showed the high uniformity and high fidelity of these FZPAs. Moreover, 100% fill-factor FZPAs were demonstrated by optimal theoretical design and experimental parameters. With this high quality FZPAs, clear imaging "F" was obtained. At last, high-level phase type FZPAs were prepared to further enhance the diffractive efficiency to as much as 75%.

  2. Isl1 is a direct transcriptional target of Forkhead transcription factors in second heart field-derived mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jione; Nathan, Elisha; Xu, Shan-Mei; Tzahor, Eldad; Black, Brian L.

    2009-01-01

    The cells of the second heart field (SHF) contribute to the outflow tract and right ventricle, as well as to parts of the left ventricle and atria. Isl1, a member of the LIM-homeodomain transcription factor family, is expressed early in this cardiac progenitor population and functions near the top of a transcriptional pathway essential for heart development. Isl1 is required for the survival and migration of SHF-derived cells into the early developing heart at the inflow and outflow poles. Despite this important role for Isl1 in early heart formation, the transcriptional regulation of Isl1 has remained largely undefined. Therefore, to identify transcription factors that regulate Isl1 expression in vivo, we screened the conserved noncoding sequences from the mouse Isl1 locus for enhancer activity in transgenic mouse embryos. Here, we report the identification of an enhancer from the mouse Isl1 gene that is sufficient to direct expression to the SHF and its derivatives. The Isl1 SHF enhancer contains three consensus Forkhead transcription factor binding sites that are efficiently and specifically bound by Forkhead transcription factors. Importantly, the activity of the enhancer is dependent on these three Forkhead binding sites in transgenic mouse embryos. Thus, these studies demonstrate that Isl1 is a direct transcriptional target of Forkhead transcription factors in the SHF and establish a transcriptional pathway upstream of Isl1 in the SHF. PMID:19580802

  3. Synergistic Effects of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor on Bone Morphogenetic Proteins Induced Bone Formation In Vivo: Influencing Factors and Future Research Directions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Wang, Hai; Qiu, Guixing; Su, Xinlin

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), as key mediators in angiogenesis and osteogenesis, are used in a combined delivery manner as a novel strategy in bone tissue engineering. VEGF has the potential to enhance BMPs induced bone formation. Both gene delivery and material-based delivery systems were incorporated in previous studies to investigate the synergistic effects of VEGF and BMPs. However, their results were controversial due to variation of methods incorporated in different studies. Factors influencing the synergistic effects of VEGF on BMPs induced bone formation were identified and analyzed in this review to reduce confusion on this issue. The potential mechanisms and directions of future studies were also proposed here. Further investigating mechanisms of the synergistic effects and optimizing these influencing factors will help to generate more effective bone regeneration. PMID:28070506

  4. Directional Variance Adjustment: Bias Reduction in Covariance Matrices Based on Factor Analysis with an Application to Portfolio Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, Daniel; Hatrick, Kerr; Hesse, Christian W.; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lemm, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Robust and reliable covariance estimates play a decisive role in financial and many other applications. An important class of estimators is based on factor models. Here, we show by extensive Monte Carlo simulations that covariance matrices derived from the statistical Factor Analysis model exhibit a systematic error, which is similar to the well-known systematic error of the spectrum of the sample covariance matrix. Moreover, we introduce the Directional Variance Adjustment (DVA) algorithm, which diminishes the systematic error. In a thorough empirical study for the US, European, and Hong Kong stock market we show that our proposed method leads to improved portfolio allocation. PMID:23844016

  5. PTT Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... monitor warfarin therapy. Other anticoagulants—anticoagulation therapy with direct thrombin inhibitor (e.g., argatroban, dabigatran) or direct factor Xa inhibitor (e.g., rivaroxaban) Prolonged PTT ...

  6. Receptor Signaling Directs Global Recruitment of Pre-existing Transcription Factors to Inducible Elements

    PubMed Central

    Cockerill, Peter N.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression programs are largely regulated by the tissue-specific expression of lineage-defining transcription factors or by the inducible expression of transcription factors in response to specific stimuli. Here I will review our own work over the last 20 years to show how specific activation signals also lead to the wide-spread re-distribution of pre-existing constitutive transcription factors to sites undergoing chromatin reorganization. I will summarize studies showing that activation of kinase signaling pathways creates open chromatin regions that recruit pre-existing factors which were previously unable to bind to closed chromatin. As models I will draw upon genes activated or primed by receptor signaling in memory T cells, and genes activated by cytokine receptor mutations in acute myeloid leukemia. I also summarize a hit-and-run model of stable epigenetic reprograming in memory T cells, mediated by transient Activator Protein 1 (AP-1) binding, which enables the accelerated activation of inducible enhancers. PMID:28018147

  7. The Direct and Indirect Effects of Environmental Factors on Nurturing Intellectual Giftedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Shabatat, Ahmad Mohammad; Abbas, Merza; Ismail, Hairul Nizam

    2011-01-01

    Many people believe that environmental factors promote giftedness and invest in many programs to adopt gifted students providing them with challenging activities. Intellectual giftedness is founded on fluid intelligence and extends to more specific abilities through the growth and inputs from the environment. Acknowledging the roles played by the…

  8. Imaging analysis of nuclear antiviral factors through direct detection of incoming adenovirus genome complexes.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Tetsuro; Will, Hans; Nagata, Kyosuke; Wodrich, Harald

    2016-04-22

    Recent studies involving several viral systems have highlighted the importance of cellular intrinsic defense mechanisms through nuclear antiviral proteins that restrict viral propagation. These factors include among others components of PML nuclear bodies, the nuclear DNA sensor IFI16, and a potential restriction factor PHF13/SPOC1. For several nuclear replicating DNA viruses, it was shown that these factors sense and target viral genomes immediately upon nuclear import. In contrast to the anticipated view, we recently found that incoming adenoviral genomes are not targeted by PML nuclear bodies. Here we further explored cellular responses against adenoviral infection by focusing on specific conditions as well as additional nuclear antiviral factors. In line with our previous findings, we show that neither interferon treatment nor the use of specific isoforms of PML nuclear body components results in co-localization between incoming adenoviral genomes and the subnuclear domains. Furthermore, our imaging analyses indicated that neither IFI16 nor PHF13/SPOC1 are likely to target incoming adenoviral genomes. Thus our findings suggest that incoming adenoviral genomes may be able to escape from a large repertoire of nuclear antiviral mechanisms, providing a rationale for the efficient initiation of lytic replication cycle.

  9. Peer Relationship Problems of Children with AD/HD: Risk Factors and New Directions in Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozdemir, Selda

    2009-01-01

    This review integrates and evaluates research conducted on possible contributing factors to peer relationship problems of children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD). Substantial evidence suggests that children with AD/HD have serious problems in multiple aspects of their relationships with peers. Difficulties resulting from…

  10. The Direct and Indirect Effects of Environmental Factors on Nurturing Intellectual Giftedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Shabatat, Ahmad Mohammad; Abbas, Merza; Ismail, Hairul Nizam

    2009-01-01

    Many people believe that environmental factors promote giftedness and invest in many programs to adopt gifted students providing them with challenging activities. Intellectual giftedness is founded on fluid intelligence and extends to more specific abilities through the growth and inputs from the environment. Acknowledging the roles played by the…

  11. Influence of Parenting Factors on Childhood Social Anxiety: Direct Observation of Parental Warmth and Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rork, Kristine E.; Morris, Tracy L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine the association of parenting behaviors and social anxiety in children. Three parental factors--including parental socialization, control, and warmth--were investigated in a sample of 31 two-parent families. Rather than solely relying upon retrospective questionnaires, this study incorporated direct…

  12. Factors affecting the placement or replacement of direct restorations in a dental school

    PubMed Central

    Silvani, Samara; Trivelato, Roberta Ferreira; Nogueira, Ruchele Dias; Gonçalves, Luciano de Souza; Geraldo-Martins, Vinícius Rangel

    2014-01-01

    Context: The knowledge of the reasons for the placement of direct restorations makes possible to trace an epidemiological profile of a specific population and to direct the teaching of dentistry to techniques that are commonly used today and will be continued performed in the future. Purpose: The aim of this study was to verify the reasons for placement and replacement of direct restorations in patients treated in the Dental Clinic of the Uberaba University – Brazil. Materials and Methods: This study evaluated 306 restorative procedures carried out on 60 patients. During the treatment planning, a form that contained information about the patient's gender, tooth number, the classification of restorations, the reasons for placement and replacement of amalgam and tooth-colored restorations, the material that had to be removed and the new material used to fill the cavities was filled for each patient. Statistical analysis was carried out using Chi-square test (α = 0.05). Results: The data showed that most of the patients were female (66.7%). Of all the restorations placed, 60.45% were 1st-time placements, while 39.55% were replacements. For 1st-time restorations, the main reason for placement was primary caries (76.76%), followed by non-carious cervical lesions (15.14%). The amalgam restorations were replaced more frequently (67.77%). The primary reason for replacements was the presence of secondary caries (for both previous amalgam (42.68%) and composite (66.67%) restorations (P < 0.05). The resin composite was the most indicated material for the new restorations (98.04%) (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The main reason for placement of direct restorations was primary caries, while secondary caries was the main reason for replacements. In almost all cases, the material used to fill the cavities was the resin composite. PMID:24808696

  13. Sensitivity of scattering and absorbing aerosol direct radiative forcing to physical climate factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocko, Ilissa B.; Ramaswamy, V.; Ginoux, Paul; Ming, Yi; Horowitz, Larry W.

    2012-10-01

    The direct radiative forcing of the climate system includes effects due to scattering and absorbing aerosols. This study explores how important physical climate characteristics contribute to the magnitudes of the direct radiative forcings (DRF) from anthropogenic sulfate, black carbon, and organic carbon. For this purpose, we employ the GFDL CM2.1 global climate model, which has reasonable aerosol concentrations and reconstruction of twentieth-century climate change. Sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols constitute the most important anthropogenic aerosol perturbations to the climate system and provide striking contrasts between primarily scattering (sulfate and organic carbon) and primarily absorbing (black carbon) species. The quantitative roles of cloud coverage, surface albedo, and relative humidity in governing the sign and magnitude of all-sky top-of-atmosphere (TOA) forcings are examined. Clouds reduce the global mean sulfate TOA DRF by almost 50%, reduce the global mean organic carbon TOA DRF by more than 30%, and increase the global mean black carbon TOA DRF by almost 80%. Sulfate forcing is increased by over 50% as a result of hygroscopic growth, while high-albedo surfaces are found to have only a minor (less than 10%) impact on all global mean forcings. Although the radiative forcing magnitudes are subject to uncertainties in the state of mixing of the aerosol species, it is clear that fundamental physical climate characteristics play a large role in governing aerosol direct radiative forcing magnitudes.

  14. Vaccine-Mediated Immunotherapy Directed Against a Transcription Factor Driving the Metastatic Process

    PubMed Central

    Ardiani, Andressa; Gameiro, Sofia R.; Palena, Claudia; Hamilton, Duane; Kwilas, Anna; King, Thomas H.; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous reports have now demonstrated that the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process is involved in solid tumor progression, metastasis, and drug resistance. Several transcription factors have been implicated as drivers of EMT and metastatic progression, including Twist. Overexpression of Twist has been shown to be associated with poor prognosis and drug resistance for many carcinomas and other tumor types. The role of Twist in experimental cancer metastases has been principally studied in the 4T1 mammary tumor model, where silencing of Twist in vitro has been shown to greatly reduce in-vivo metastatic spread. Transcription factors such as Twist are generally believed to be “undruggable” due to their nuclear location and lack of a specific groove for tight binding of a small molecule inhibitor. An alternative approach to drug therapy targeting transcription factors driving the metastatic process is T-cell–mediated immunotherapy. A therapeutic vaccine platform that has been previously characterized consists of heat-killed recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) capable of expressing tumor-associated antigen protein. We report here the construction and characterization of a recombinant yeast expressing the entire Twist protein, which is capable of inducing both CD8+ and CD4+ Twist-specific T-cell responses in vivo. Vaccination of mice reduced the size of primary transplanted 4T1 tumors and had an even greater anti-tumor effect on lung metastases of the same mice, which was dependent on Twist-specific CD8+ T cells. These studies provide the rationale for vaccine-induced T-cell–mediated therapy of transcription factors involved in driving the metastatic process. PMID:24520078

  15. Direct calibration in megavoltage photon beams using Monte Carlo conversion factor: validation and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Wright, Tracy; Lye, Jessica E; Ramanathan, Ganesan; Harty, Peter D; Oliver, Chris; Webb, David V; Butler, Duncan J

    2015-01-21

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) has established a method for ionisation chamber calibrations using megavoltage photon reference beams. The new method will reduce the calibration uncertainty compared to a (60)Co calibration combined with the TRS-398 energy correction factor. The calibration method employs a graphite calorimeter and a Monte Carlo (MC) conversion factor to convert the absolute dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water. EGSnrc is used to model the linac head and doses in the calorimeter and water phantom. The linac model is validated by comparing measured and modelled PDDs and profiles. The relative standard uncertainties in the calibration factors at the ARPANSA beam qualities were found to be 0.47% at 6 MV, 0.51% at 10 MV and 0.46% for the 18 MV beam. A comparison with the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) as part of the key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K6 gave results of 0.9965(55), 0.9924(60) and 0.9932(59) for the 6, 10 and 18 MV beams, respectively, with all beams within 1σ of the participant average. The measured kQ values for an NE2571 Farmer chamber were found to be lower than those in TRS-398 but are consistent with published measured and modelled values. Users can expect a shift in the calibration factor at user energies of an NE2571 chamber between 0.4-1.1% across the range of calibration energies compared to the current calibration method.

  16. Site-directed mutagenesis and saturation mutagenesis for the functional study of transcription factors involved in plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Werkman, Joshua R; Kong, Que; Yuan, Ling

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is largely coordinated by a complex network of interactions between transcription factors (TFs), co-factors, and their cognate cis-regulatory elements in the genome. TFs are multidomain proteins that arise evolutionarily through protein domain shuffling. The modular nature of TFs has led to the idea that specific modules of TFs can be re-designed to regulate desired gene(s) through protein engineering. Utilization of designer TFs for the control of metabolic pathways has emerged as an effective approach for metabolic engineering. We are interested in engineering the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH, Myc-type) transcription factors. Using site-directed and saturation mutagenesis, in combination with efficient and high-throughput screening systems, we have identified and characterized several amino acid residues critical for higher transactivation activity of a Myc-like bHLH transcription factor involved in anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in plants. Site-directed and saturation mutagenesis should be generally applicable to engineering of all TFs.

  17. The Function of the MEF2 Family of Transcription Factors in Cardiac Development, Cardiogenomics, and Direct Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Cody A.; Naya, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Proper formation of the mammalian heart requires precise spatiotemporal transcriptional regulation of gene programs in cardiomyocytes. Sophisticated regulatory networks have evolved to not only integrate the activities of distinct transcription factors to control tissue-specific gene programs but also, in many instances, to incorporate multiple members within these transcription factor families to ensure accuracy and specificity in the system. Unsurprisingly, perturbations in this elaborate transcriptional circuitry can lead to severe cardiac abnormalities. Myocyte enhancer factor–2 (MEF2) transcription factor belongs to the evolutionarily conserved cardiac gene regulatory network. Given its central role in muscle gene regulation and its evolutionary conservation, MEF2 is considered one of only a few core cardiac transcription factors. In addition to its firmly established role as a differentiation factor, MEF2 regulates wide variety of, sometimes antagonistic, cellular processes such as cell survival and death. Vertebrate genomes encode multiple MEF2 family members thereby expanding the transcriptional potential of this core transcription factor in the heart. This review highlights the requirement of the MEF2 family and their orthologs in cardiac development in diverse animal model systems. Furthermore, we describe the recently characterized role of MEF2 in direct reprogramming and genome-wide cardiomyocyte gene regulation. A thorough understanding of the regulatory functions of the MEF2 family in cardiac development and cardiogenomics is required in order to develop effective therapeutic strategies to repair the diseased heart. PMID:27630998

  18. Factor analysis as a tool for spectral line component separation 21cm emission in the direction of L1780

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, L. V.; Mattila, K.; Haikala, L.; Balazs, L. G.

    1992-01-01

    The spectra of the 21cm HI radiation from the direction of L1780, a small high-galactic latitude dark/molecular cloud, were analyzed by multivariate methods. Factor analysis was performed on HI (21cm) spectra in order to separate the different components responsible for the spectral features. The rotated, orthogonal factors explain the spectra as a sum of radiation from the background (an extended HI emission layer), and from the L1780 dark cloud. The coefficients of the cloud-indicator factors were used to locate the HI 'halo' of the molecular cloud. Our statistically derived 'background' and 'cloud' spectral profiles, as well as the spatial distribution of the HI halo emission distribution were compared to the results of a previous study which used conventional methods analyzing nearly the same data set.

  19. Self-evaluation as a moderating factor of strategy change in directed forgetting benefits.

    PubMed

    Sahakyan, Lili; Delaney, Peter F; Kelley, Colleen M

    2004-02-01

    In list method directed forgetting, instructing people to forget a studied word list usually results in better recall for a newly studied list. Sahakyan and Delaney (2003) have suggested that these benefits are due to a change in encoding strategy that occurs between the study of the first list and the study of the second list. To investigate what might mediate such strategy change decisions, in two experiments we induced both forget and remember participants to evaluate their memory performance on the two lists. In Experiment 1, they were asked to explicitly recall the items from the first list before studying the second list. In Experiment 2, after the study of the first list, the participants provided a rapid aggregate judgment of learning. Evaluation eliminated the differences between the forget and remember groups for the second list in both experiments, because the remember group achieved recall levels comparable to those for the forget group. The role of performance evaluation in mediating directed forgetting benefits is discussed.

  20. Human factors in environmental management: New directions from the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.A.; Savage, S.F.

    1992-10-01

    Environmental management is the general term given to modern attempts to seek technological solutions to certain constrained environmental problems. it involves developing and applying new technologies that respond to changes in environmental policy. It does not eliminate the need for environmental ethics'' in society. Nor does it substitute for the fundamental changes in political and social structures that are needed for dealing with large-scale environmental issues. The scope of these issues can be illustrated by looking at the Hanford Site. Since 1943, the 560-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state has been the production source of much of the nuclear weapons-grade radioactive materials for the United States. The legacy of 50 years of producing fissile materials has been an environmental cleanup problem of impressive proportions. In 1989, with the Cold War winding down, Secretary of Energy James Watkins established a new vision for Hanford as the flagship for waste management research.'' As plans and preparations for cleanup work proceed at the Hanford Site and around the world, the need for well-orchestrated environmental management methodologies has become increasingly apparent. In 1990, a Human Factors Engineering Group was established in the Technology Planning and Analysis Center at PNL to provide appropriate support for the Laboratory's research efforts. At an ever-increasing rate, these research efforts require integrating human performance into complex environmental technology systems. The endeavor of responding to the Laboratory's research needs has provided innovative opportunities for the application of the concept of Human Factors. Discussed are some of the major applications of Human Factors to environmental management.

  1. Adipose Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α: Direct Role in Obesity-Linked Insulin Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotamisligil, Gokhan S.; Shargill, Narinder S.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    1993-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has been shown to have certain catabolic effects on fat cells and whole animals. An induction of TNF-α messenger RNA expression was observed in adipose tissue from four different rodent models of obesity and diabetes. TNF-α protein was also elevated locally and systemically. Neutralization of TNF-α in obese fa/fa rats caused a significant increase in the peripheral uptake of glucose in response to insulin. These results indicate a role for TNF-α in obesity and particularly in the insulin resistance and diabetes that often accompany obesity.

  2. Sequences promoting the transcription of the human XA gene overlapping P450c21A correctly predict the presence of a novel, adrenal-specific, truncated form of tenascin-X

    SciTech Connect

    Tee, Meng Kian; Thomson, A.A.; Bristow, J.; Miller, W.L.

    1995-07-20

    A compact region in the human class III major histocompatibility locus contains the human genes for the fourth component of human complement (C4) and steroid 21-hydroxylase (P450c21) in one transcriptional orientation, while the gene for the extracellular matrix protein tenascin-X (TN-X) overlaps the last exon of P450c21 on the opposite strand of DNA in the opposite transcriptional orientation. This complex locus is duplicated into A and B loci, so that the organization is 5{prime}-C4A-21A-XA-C4B-21B-XB-3{prime}. Although this duplication event truncated the 65-kb X(B) gene to a 4.5-kb XA gene, the XA gene is transcriptionally active in the adrenal cortex. To examine the basis of the tissue-specific expression of XA and C4B, we cloned the 1763-bp region that lies between the cap sites for XA and C4B and analyzed its promoter activity in both the XA and the C4 orientations. Powerful, liver-specific sequences lie within the first 75 to 138 bp from the C4B cap site, and weaker elements lie within 128 bp of the XA cap site that function in both liver and adrenal cells. Because these 128 bp upstream from the XA cap site are perfectly preserved in the XB gene encoding TN-X, we sought to determine whether a transcript similar to XA arises within the SB gene. RNase protection assays, cDNA cloning, and RT/PCR show that adrenal cells contain a novel transcript, termed short XB (XB-S), which has the same open reading frame as TN-X. Cell-free translation and immunoblotting show that this transcript encodes a novel 74-kDa XB-S protein that is identical to the carboxy-terminal 673 residues of TN-X. Because this protein consists solely of fibronectin type III repeats and a fibrinogen-like domain, it appears to correspond to an evolutionary precursor of the tenascin family of extracellular matrix proteins. 40 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Factors Affecting Patients' Perception On, and Adherence To, Anticoagulant Therapy: Anticipating the Role of Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Ekta Y; Bajorek, Beata

    2017-04-01

    The role of the direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in practice has been given extensive consideration recently, albeit largely from the clinician's perspective. However, the effectiveness and safety of using anticoagulants is highly dependent on the patient's ability to manage and take these complex, high-risk medicines. This structured narrative review explores the published literature to identify the factors underpinning patients' non-adherence to anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation (AF), and subsequently contemplates to what extent the DOACs might overcome the known challenges with traditional warfarin therapy. This review comprised a two-tier search of various databases and search platforms (CINAHL, Cochrane, Current Contents Connect, EMBASE, MEDLINE Ovid, EBSCO, PubMed, Google, Google Scholar) to yield 47 articles reporting patients perspectives on, and patients adherence to, anticoagulant therapy. The findings from the literature were synthesised under five interacting dimensions of adherence: therapy-related factors, patient-related factors, condition-related factors, social-economic factors and health system factors. Factors negatively affecting patients' day-to-day lives (especially regular therapeutic drug monitoring, dose adjustments, dietary considerations) predominantly underpin a patient's reluctance to take warfarin therapy, leading to non-adherence. Other patient-related factors underpinning non-adherence include patients' perceptions and knowledge about the purpose of anticoagulation; understanding of the risks and benefits of therapy; socioeconomic status; and expectations of care from health professionals. In considering these findings, it is apparent that the DOACs may overcome some of the barriers to traditional warfarin therapy at least to an extent, particularly the need for regular monitoring, frequent dose adjustment and dietary considerations. However, their high cost, twice-daily dosing and gastrointestinal adverse effects may present

  4. Some ionospheric factors affecting the coverage of an HF/VHF direct broadcasting satellite service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rush, C. M.; Stewart, F. G.; Pokempner, M.; Reasoner, R.

    1986-04-01

    A study has been undertaken to assess the effects of the ionosphere on the performance of a direct broadcasting satellite service operating in the high frequency (HF) band. Results relating to two issues of performance are presented: (1) determining under what conditions a frequency allocated to the broadcasting service can be expected to reach the surface of the earth from a satellite and (2) the loss of signal strength due to passage through the ionosphere. It was found that if high frequency broadcast services are to be provided on a worldwide basis using satellite platforms, the satellites need to be optimally configured for the intended service area. Also, a 3 dB loss of signal strength is expected due to ionospheric absorption.

  5. Factors that affect micro-tooling features created by direct printing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbhani, Mayur N.

    Current market required faster pace production of smaller, better, and improved products in shorter amount of time. Traditional high-rate manufacturing process such as hot embossing, injection molding, compression molding, etc. use tooling to replicate feature on a products. Miniaturization of many product in the field of biomedical, electronics, optical, and microfluidic is occurring on a daily bases. There is a constant need to produce cheaper, and faster tooling, which can be utilize by existing manufacturing processes. Traditionally, in order to manufacture micron size tooling features processes such as micro-machining, Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM), etc. are utilized. Due to a higher difficulty to produce smaller size features, and longer production cycle time, various additive manufacturing approaches are proposed, e.g. selective laser sintering (SLS), inkjet printing (3DP), fused deposition modeling (FDM), etc. were proposed. Most of these approaches can produce net shaped products from different materials such as metal, ceramic, or polymers. Several attempts were made to produce tooling features using additive manufacturing approaches. Most of these produced tooling were not cost effective, and the life cycle of these tooling was reported short. In this research, a method to produce tooling features using direct printing approach, where highly filled feedstock was dispensed on a substrate. This research evaluated different natural binders, such as guar gum, xanthan gum, and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (NaCMC) and their combinations were evaluated. The best binder combination was then use to evaluate effect of different metal (316L stainless steel (3 mum), 316 stainless steel (45 mum), and 304 stainless steel (45 mum)) particle size on feature quality. Finally, the effect of direct printing process variables such as dispensing tip internal diameter (500 mum, and 333 mum) at different printing speeds were evaluated.

  6. Risk and protective factors for sexual aggression and dating violence: common themes and future directions.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Martie P

    2014-10-01

    The primary aims of this article are to expand on three themes from the conference articles on risk and protective factors for dating and sexual violence and to offer suggestions that can guide future research. The first theme is the co-occurrence of sexual and dating violence with other forms of violence and other campus health issues. A second topic is the value of prospective studies in revealing temporal patterns of victimization and perpetration. A third theme is the role of peer norms in violence among college students. Suggestions for translating these ideas into research and action are discussed and include the need for comprehensive prevention approaches, more longitudinal research spanning the years before, during, and after college, and the application of social media technology in our interventions strategies.

  7. Autocrine epidermal growth factor signaling stimulates directionally persistent mammary epithelial cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Maheshwari, Gargi; Wiley, H Steven ); Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2001-12-24

    Autocrine receptor/ligand signaling loops were first identified in tumor cells, where it was found that transformation of cells resulted in overexpression of certain growth factors leading to unregulated proliferation of the tumor cells (Sporn and Todaro, 1980). However, in the ensuing decades autocrine signaling has been found to operate in numerous physiological situations (Sporn and Roberts, 1992), including wound healing (Tokumaru et al., 2000), angiogenesis (Seghezzi et al., 1998), and tissue organization during development (Wasserman and Freeman, 1998) and reproductive cycles (Xie et al., 1997). Although it is becoming evident that autocrine loops play crucial roles in regulation of cell function within tissue contexts, it is unclear whether their effects on cell responses are different from the effects of the same ligand presented in exogenous or paracrine manner.

  8. Chrysanthemum transcription factor CmLBD1 direct lateral root formation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lu; Zheng, Chen; Liu, Ruixia; Song, Aiping; Zhang, Zhaohe; Xin, Jingjing; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Zhang, Fei; Fang, Weimin; Chen, Fadi

    2016-01-01

    The plant-specific LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) genes are important regulators of growth and development. Here, a chrysanthemum class I LBD transcription factor gene, designated CmLBD1, was isolated and its function verified. CmLBD1 was transcribed in both the root and stem, but not in the leaf. The gene responded to auxin and was shown to participate in the process of adventitious root primordium formation. Its heterologous expression in Arabidopsis thaliana increased the number of lateral roots formed. When provided with exogenous auxin, lateral root emergence was promoted. CmLBD1 expression also favored callus formation from A. thaliana root explants in the absence of exogenously supplied phytohormones. In planta, CmLBD1 probably acts as a positive regulator of the response to auxin fluctuations and connects auxin signaling with lateral root formation. PMID:26819087

  9. Direct and Indirect Effects of Five Factor Personality and Gender on Depressive Symptoms Mediated by Perceived Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song E.; Cho, Juhee; Kwon, Min-Jung; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Shin, Hocheol

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate associations among five factor personality traits, perceived stress, and depressive symptoms and to examine the roles of personality and perceived stress in the relationship between gender and depressive symptoms. The participants (N = 3,950) were part of a cohort study for health screening and examination at the Kangbuk Samsung Hospital. Personality was measured with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Perceived stress level was evaluated with a self-reported stress questionnaire developed for the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A higher degree of neuroticism and lower degrees of extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness were significantly associated with greater perceived stress and depressive symptoms. Neuroticism and extraversion had significant direct and indirect effects (via stress as a mediator) on depressive symptoms in both genders. Agreeableness and conscientiousness had indirect effects on depression symptoms in both genders. Multiple mediation models were used to examine the mediational roles of each personality factor and perceived stress in the link between gender and depressive symptoms. Four of the personality factors (except openness) were significant mediators, along with stress, on the relationship between gender and depressive symptoms. Our findings suggest that the links between personality factors and depressive symptoms are mediated by perceived stress. As such, personality is an important factor to consider when examining the link between gender and depression. PMID:27120051

  10. Direct and Indirect Effects of Five Factor Personality and Gender on Depressive Symptoms Mediated by Perceived Stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song E; Kim, Han-Na; Cho, Juhee; Kwon, Min-Jung; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Shin, Hocheol; Kim, Hyung-Lae

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate associations among five factor personality traits, perceived stress, and depressive symptoms and to examine the roles of personality and perceived stress in the relationship between gender and depressive symptoms. The participants (N = 3,950) were part of a cohort study for health screening and examination at the Kangbuk Samsung Hospital. Personality was measured with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Perceived stress level was evaluated with a self-reported stress questionnaire developed for the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A higher degree of neuroticism and lower degrees of extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness were significantly associated with greater perceived stress and depressive symptoms. Neuroticism and extraversion had significant direct and indirect effects (via stress as a mediator) on depressive symptoms in both genders. Agreeableness and conscientiousness had indirect effects on depression symptoms in both genders. Multiple mediation models were used to examine the mediational roles of each personality factor and perceived stress in the link between gender and depressive symptoms. Four of the personality factors (except openness) were significant mediators, along with stress, on the relationship between gender and depressive symptoms. Our findings suggest that the links between personality factors and depressive symptoms are mediated by perceived stress. As such, personality is an important factor to consider when examining the link between gender and depression.

  11. Directed random walks and constraint programming reveal active pathways in hepatocyte growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Kittas, Aristotelis; Delobelle, Aurélien; Schmitt, Sabrina; Breuhahn, Kai; Guziolowski, Carito; Grabe, Niels

    2016-01-01

    An effective means to analyze mRNA expression data is to take advantage of established knowledge from pathway databases, using methods such as pathway-enrichment analyses. However, pathway databases are not case-specific and expression data could be used to infer gene-regulation patterns in the context of specific pathways. In addition, canonical pathways may not always describe the signaling mechanisms properly, because interactions can frequently occur between genes in different pathways. Relatively few methods have been proposed to date for generating and analyzing such networks, preserving the causality between gene interactions and reasoning over the qualitative logic of regulatory effects. We present an algorithm (MCWalk) integrated with a logic programming approach, to discover subgraphs in large-scale signaling networks by random walks in a fully automated pipeline. As an exemplary application, we uncover the signal transduction mechanisms in a gene interaction network describing hepatocyte growth factor-stimulated cell migration and proliferation from gene-expression measured with microarray and RT-qPCR using in-house perturbation experiments in a keratinocyte-fibroblast co-culture. The resulting subgraphs illustrate possible associations of hepatocyte growth factor receptor c-Met nodes, differentially expressed genes and cellular states. Using perturbation experiments and Answer Set programming, we are able to select those which are more consistent with the experimental data. We discover key regulator nodes by measuring the frequency with which they are traversed when connecting signaling between receptors and significantly regulated genes and predict their expression-shift consistently with the measured data. The Java implementation of MCWalk is publicly available under the MIT license at: https://bitbucket.org/akittas/biosubg.

  12. External and internal factors influencing self-directed online learning of physiotherapy undergraduate students in Sweden: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hammarlund, Catharina Sjödahl; Nilsson, Maria H.; Gummesson, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Online courses have become common in health sciences education. This learning environment can be designed using different approaches to support student learning. To further develop online environment, it is important to understand how students perceive working and learning online. The aim of this study is to identify aspects influencing students’ learning processes and their adaptation to self-directed learning online. Methods: Thirty-four physiotherapy students with a mean age of 25 years (range, 21 to 34 years) participated. Qualitative content analysis and triangulation was used when investigating the students’ self-reflections, written during a five week self-directed, problem-oriented online course. Results: Two categories emerged: ‘the influence of the structured framework’ and ‘communication and interaction with teachers and peers.’ The learning processes were influenced by external factors, e.g., a clear structure including a transparent alignment of assignments and assessment. Important challenges to over-come were primarily internal factors, e.g., low self-efficacy, difficulties to plan the work effectively and adapting to a new environment. Conclusion: The analyses reflected important perspectives targeting areas which enable further course development. The influences of external and internal factors on learning strategies and self-efficacy are important aspects to consider when designing online courses. Factors such as pedagogical design, clarity of purpose, goals, and guidelines were important as well as continuous opportunities for communication and collaboration. Further studies are needed to understand and scaffold the motivational factors among students with low self-efficacy. PMID:26101401

  13. Direct Measurement of the g-factor in crystalline bismuth at high B/T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bompadre, Silvia; Biagini, Cristiano; Maslov, Dmitrii; Hebard, Arthur

    2000-03-01

    Magneto transport data have been obtained for high purity bismuth crystals with various orientations in fields B as high as 20T and temperatures as low as 25mK. For fields on the order of 15T in the trigonal direction we find, in agreement with theoretical expectations, that all holes are in the lowest Landau level. More than twenty-five Shubnikov de Haas oscillations due to holes are observed. Electron oscillations are strongly attenuated. Close inspection of the data reveals a non-linear correction to the reciprocal field spacings together with the appearance of doublets at each field oscillation with spacings that scale as B^2. The absence of a doublet in the n=1 Landau level allows us to conclude that the Zeeman splitting is sufficiently strong to fully polarize the holes in the n=0,1,2 Landau levels. This information together with the quadratic dependence of the doublets allows us to infer g = 34 for holes.

  14. Human Factors and Health Information Technology: Current Challenges and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Kannampallil, T. G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives Recent federal mandates and incentives have spurred the rapid growth, development and adoption of health information technology (HIT). While providing significant benefits for better data integration, organization, and availability, recent reports have raised questions regarding their potential to cause medication errors, decreased clinician performance, and lowered efficiency. The goal of this survey article is to (a) examine the theoretical and foundational models of human factors and ergonomics (HFE) that are being advocated for achieving patient safety and quality, and their use in the evaluation of healthcare systems; (b) and the potential for macroergonomic HFE approaches within the context of current research in biomedical informatics. Methods We reviewed literature (2007-2013) on the use of HFE approaches in healthcare settings, from databases such as Pubmed, CINAHL, and Cochran. Results Based on the review, we discuss the systems-oriented models, their use in the evaluation of HIT, and examples of their use in the evaluation of EHR systems, clinical workflow processes, and medication errors. We also discuss the opportunities for better integrating HFE methods within biomedical informatics research and its potential advantages. Conclusions The use of HFE methods is still in its infancy - better integration of HFE within the design lifecycle, and quality improvement efforts can further the ability of informatics researchers to address the key concerns regarding the complexity in clinical settings and develop HIT solutions that are designed within the social fabric of the considered setting. PMID:25123724

  15. Evidence for direct transfer of tissue factor from monocytes to platelets in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Sovershaev, Mikhail A; Egorina, Elena M; Osterud, Bjarne; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2012-06-01

    Varying specificity of anti-tissue factor (anti-TF) antibodies gives rise to erroneous conclusions on TF positivity of platelets. Although monocytes are a well established source of TF in whole blood, there is no consensus whether platelets express or acquire TF from external sources. To test whether platelets can acquire TF expressed in monocytes, we studied a transfer of TF-yellow fluorescent protein (TF-YFP) from monocytes nucleofected with TF-YFP to platelets in a whole blood model. Platelets isolated from whole blood were found positive for TF when immunostained with anti-TF antibody from one supplier, whereas no platelet TF antigen was found in whole blood immunostained with anti-TF antibody from another supplier. Both antibodies recognized TF in monocytes. Platelets isolated from whole blood reconstituted with monocytes expressing TF-YFP fusion protein were found positive for TF-YFP only after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Taken together, TF protein could be transferred from monocytes upon stimulation with LPS.

  16. Transcription Factors and Plants Response to Drought Stress: Current Understanding and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Rohit; Wani, Shabir H.; Singh, Balwant; Bohra, Abhishek; Dar, Zahoor A.; Lone, Ajaz A.; Pareek, Ashwani; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing vulnerability of plants to a variety of stresses such as drought, salt and extreme temperatures poses a global threat to sustained growth and productivity of major crops. Of these stresses, drought represents a considerable threat to plant growth and development. In view of this, developing staple food cultivars with improved drought tolerance emerges as the most sustainable solution toward improving crop productivity in a scenario of climate change. In parallel, unraveling the genetic architecture and the targeted identification of molecular networks using modern “OMICS” analyses, that can underpin drought tolerance mechanisms, is urgently required. Importantly, integrated studies intending to elucidate complex mechanisms can bridge the gap existing in our current knowledge about drought stress tolerance in plants. It is now well established that drought tolerance is regulated by several genes, including transcription factors (TFs) that enable plants to withstand unfavorable conditions, and these remain potential genomic candidates for their wide application in crop breeding. These TFs represent the key molecular switches orchestrating the regulation of plant developmental processes in response to a variety of stresses. The current review aims to offer a deeper understanding of TFs engaged in regulating plant’s response under drought stress and to devise potential strategies to improve plant tolerance against drought. PMID:27471513

  17. Genetic profiling and epidermal growth factor receptor-directed therapy in nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cadranel, J; Zalcman, G; Sequist, L

    2011-01-01

    The principle of preferentially selecting patients most likely to benefit from therapy according to their genetic profile has led to substantial clinical benefit in some tumour types, and has potential to considerably refine treatment in advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Effective, reliable use of molecular biomarkers to inform clinical practice requires the standardisation of testing methods and careful assessment of biomarkers' predictive and prognostic value. Although a number of studies have shown that patients with activating mutations in exons 18-21 of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene respond particularly well to gefitinib and erlotinib, a prospective, randomised study was needed to differentiate between the prognostic and predictive value of EGFR mutations. From one such study, it appeared that mutational testing should become standard at diagnosis, at least for adenocarcinoma patients with a never or low smoking history, as clinical predictors are insufficient to optimise treatment. However, outstanding questions remain: what are the treatment options for patients with tumours resistant to erlotinib/gefitinib? What conclusions about treatment can we draw from EGFR copy number or KRAS mutation status? What role should anti-EGFR antibodies play in NSCLC treatment, and in which patients? This review considers current evidence linking biomarker profile to efficacy of EGFR-targeted therapy in NSCLC, and clinical implications of recent findings.

  18. Direct visualization of the phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor during its internalization in A-431 cells

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) rapidly stimulates receptor autophosphorylation in A-431 cells. After 1 min the phosphorylated receptor can be identified at the plasma membrane using an anti- phosphotyrosine antibody. With further incubation at 37 degrees C, approximately 50% of the phosphorylated EGF receptor was internalized (t1/2 = 5 min) and associated with the tubulovesicular system and later with multivesicular bodies, but not the nucleus. During this period, there was no change in the extent or sites of phosphorylation. At all times the phosphotyrosine remained on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane, opposite to the EGF ligand identified by anti-EGF antibody. These data indicate that (a) the tyrosine-phosphorylated EGF receptor is internalized in its activated form providing a mechanism for translocation of the receptor kinase to substrates in the cell interior; (b) the internalized receptor remains intact for at least 60 min, does not associate with the nucleus, and does not generate any tyrosine-phosphorylated fragments; and (c) tyrosine phosphorylation alone is not the signal for receptor internalization. PMID:2447100

  19. Direct transcriptional activation of BT genes by NLP transcription factors is a key component of the nitrate response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takeo; Maekawa, Shugo; Konishi, Mineko; Yoshioka, Nozomi; Sasaki, Yuki; Maeda, Haruna; Ishida, Tetsuya; Kato, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Junji; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2017-01-29

    Nitrate modulates growth and development, functioning as a nutrient signal in plants. Although many changes in physiological processes in response to nitrate have been well characterized as nitrate responses, the molecular mechanisms underlying the nitrate response are not yet fully understood. Here, we show that NLP transcription factors, which are key regulators of the nitrate response, directly activate the nitrate-inducible expression of BT1 and BT2 encoding putative scaffold proteins with a plant-specific domain structure in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, the 35S promoter-driven expression of BT2 partially rescued growth inhibition caused by reductions in NLP activity in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, simultaneous disruption of BT1 and BT2 affected nitrate-dependent lateral root development. These results suggest that direct activation of BT1 and BT2 by NLP transcriptional activators is a key component of the molecular mechanism underlying the nitrate response in Arabidopsis.

  20. Fossomatic cell-counting on ewe milk: comparison with direct microscopy and study of variation factors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, C; Martínez, J R; Carrledo, J A; San Primitivo, F

    2003-01-01

    Using the Fossomatic method (FSCC) a total of 23,003 analytical SCC observations were carried out on 6400 aliquots taken from 80 individual ewe milk samples with the objective of studying the influence of 4 preservation procedures (without preservation, potassium dichromate, azidiol, and bronopol), 2 storage temperatures (ambient and refrigeration), 10 milk ages (3,6,12, and 24h, and 2,3,4,5,7, and 9d postcollection), and two analytical temperatures (40 and 60 degrees C). In addition, each sample was analyzed with direct microscopic method (DMSCC), using 3 different stainings for each sample: methylene blue (MB), May-Grünwald-Giemsa (MGG) and Pyronin Y-methyl green (PGM). This allowed DMSCC and FSCC (at 24 h of age) to be compared. The reference DMSCC from MB staining was a reliable method in ewe milk, though more specific stainings such as MGG and PMG slightly improve the residual standard deviation for repeated SCC. Between DMSCC and FSCC, the highest coefficients of correlation (0.972 to 0.996) corresponded to preserved and refrigerated milk, and the lowest (0.708 to 0.919) to unpreserved and ambient stored aliquots. Except for the unpreserved and ambient stored aliquots, SCC values were similar in all aliquots. Under FSCC, preservation, storage and analytical temperature, milk age, and most of the interactions showed a significant effect on SCC variation. In preserved samples, logSCC values ranged between 5.67 (bronopol) and 5.62 (azidiol). The higest values (5.72) were for unpreserved milk, which showed false overestimation of SCC due to bacterial proliferation. LogSCC was higher at 60 degrees C (5.68) than at 40 degrees C (5.65). The interaction between age, preservation and storage temperature showed no cell degeneration in properly handled samples over the 9 d of study.

  1. Factors influencing direct-care paraprofessionals' decisions to initiate mental health referrals for adults with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Matthew N I; Miller, Trisha T; Skillman, Gemma D

    2005-04-01

    Direct-care paraprofessionals' recognition of psychopathology of varying severity in persons with mental retardation was evaluated. Factors that may influence paraprofessionals' decisions to initiate referrals for mental health services on behalf of individuals with mental retardation were also evaluated. Results suggest that staff members recognized and differentiated psychopathology of varying levels of clinical severity. Results also suggest that paraprofessionals are more likely to initiate making a referral when professionals are perceived as being competent in treating individuals with mental retardation, and when providers' interventions are consistent with the referring agency's philosophy.

  2. EMT transcription factors snail and slug directly contribute to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a molecular process through which an epithelial cell undergoes transdifferentiation into a mesenchymal phenotype. The role of EMT in embryogenesis is well-characterized and increasing evidence suggests that elements of the transition may be important in other processes, including metastasis and drug resistance in various different cancers. Methods Agilent 4 × 44 K whole human genome arrays and selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry were used to investigate mRNA and protein expression in A2780 cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines. Invasion and migration were assessed using Boyden chamber assays. Gene knockdown of snail and slug was done using targeted siRNA. Clinical relevance of the EMT pathway was assessed in a cohort of primary ovarian tumours using data from Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133 plus 2.0 arrays. Results Morphological and phenotypic hallmarks of EMT were identified in the chemoresistant cells. Subsequent gene expression profiling revealed upregulation of EMT-related transcription factors including snail, slug, twist2 and zeb2. Proteomic analysis demonstrated up regulation of Snail and Slug as well as the mesenchymal marker Vimentin, and down regulation of E-cadherin, an epithelial marker. By reducing expression of snail and slug, the mesenchymal phenotype was largely reversed and cells were resensitized to cisplatin. Finally, gene expression data from primary tumours mirrored the finding that an EMT-like pathway is activated in resistant tumours relative to sensitive tumours, suggesting that the involvement of this transition may not be limited to in vitro drug effects. Conclusions This work strongly suggests that genes associated with EMT may play a significant role in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer, therefore potentially leading to the development of predictive biomarkers of drug response or novel therapeutic strategies for overcoming drug resistance. PMID

  3. Vascular endothelial growth factor directly stimulates tumour cell proliferation in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Devery, Aoife M; Wadekar, Rekha; Bokobza, Sivan M; Weber, Anika M; Jiang, Yanyan; Ryan, Anderson J

    2015-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key stimulator of physiological and pathological angiogenesis. VEGF signals primarily through VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), a receptor tyrosine kinase whose expression is found predominantly on endothelial cells. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of VEGFR2 expression in NSCLC cells. NSCLC cells and tissue sections were stained for VEGFR2 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Immunoblotting and ELISA were used to determine the activation and inhibition of VEGFR2 and its downstream signalling pathways. Five-day proliferation assays were carried out in the presence or absence of VEGF. IHC analysis of NSCLC demonstrated tumour cell VEGFR2 expression in 20% of samples. Immunoblot analysis showed expression of VEGFR2 protein in 3/8 NSCLC cell lines that correlated with VEGFR2 mRNA expression levels. VEGF-dependent VEGFR2 activation was apparent in NSCLC cells, and was associated with increased tumor cell proliferation. Cediranib treatment or siRNA against VEGFR2 inhibited VEGF-dependent increases in cell proliferation. Inhibition of VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase activity using cediranib was more effective than inhibition of AKT (MK2206) or MEK (AZD6244) for overcoming VEGFR2-driven cell proliferation. VEGF treatment did not affect cell survival following treatment with radiation, cisplatin, docetaxel or gemcitabine. Our data suggest that a subset of NSCLC tumour cells express functional VEGFR2 which can act to promote VEGF-dependent tumour cell growth. In this tumour subset, therapies targeting VEGFR2 signalling, such as cediranib, have the potential to inhibit both tumour cell proliferation and angiogenesis.

  4. First direct measurements of {bold {ital g}} factors of the three superdeformed bands of {sup 194}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, R.H.; Kumbartzki, G.; Benczer-Koller, N.; Cizewski, J.A.; Holden, J.; McNabb, D.P.; Satteson, M.; Weissman, L.; Broude, C.; Hass, M.; Janssens, R.V.; Lauritsen, T.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.

    1998-11-01

    The average {ital g} factors of the high-energy states of the three superdeformed bands in {sup 194}Hg were determined {ital directly} in a transient field experiment. The reaction {sup 150}Nd({sup 48}Ca,4n){sup 194}Hg at a beam energy of 203 MeV was used to provide recoiling reaction product nuclei with sufficient velocity to traverse a gadolinium ferromagnetic layer. The resulting {ital g} factors g(SD1)=0.36(10), g(SD2)=0.41(20), and g(SD3)=0.71(26) are in agreement with cranked Hartree-Fock calculations as well as with the picture of a rigid rotation for which g=Z/A. thinsp {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Direct detection of transcription factors in cotyledons during seedling development using sensitive silicon-substrate photonic crystal protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sarah I; Tan, Yafang; Shamimuzzaman, Md; George, Sherine; Cunningham, Brian T; Vodkin, Lila

    2015-03-01

    Transcription factors control important gene networks, altering the expression of a wide variety of genes, including those of agronomic importance, despite often being expressed at low levels. Detecting transcription factor proteins is difficult, because current high-throughput methods may not be sensitive enough. One-dimensional, silicon-substrate photonic crystal (PC) arrays provide an alternative substrate for printing multiplexed protein microarrays that have greater sensitivity through an increased signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescent signal compared with performing the same assay upon a traditional aminosilanized glass surface. As a model system to test proof of concept of the silicon-substrate PC arrays to directly detect rare proteins in crude plant extracts, we selected representatives of four different transcription factor families (zinc finger GATA, basic helix-loop-helix, BTF3/NAC [for basic transcription factor of the NAC family], and YABBY) that have increasing transcript levels during the stages of seedling cotyledon development. Antibodies to synthetic peptides representing the transcription factors were printed on both glass slides and silicon-substrate PC slides along with antibodies to abundant cotyledon proteins, seed lectin, and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. The silicon-substrate PC arrays proved more sensitive than those performed on glass slides, detecting rare proteins that were below background on the glass slides. The zinc finger transcription factor was detected on the PC arrays in crude extracts of all stages of the seedling cotyledons, whereas YABBY seemed to be at the lower limit of their sensitivity. Interestingly, the basic helix-loop-helix and NAC proteins showed developmental profiles consistent with their transcript patterns, indicating proof of concept for detecting these low-abundance proteins in crude extracts.

  6. Generation of embryos directly from embryonic stem cells by tetraploid embryo complementation reveals a role for GATA factors in organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duncan, S A

    2005-12-01

    Gene targeting in ES (embryonic stem) cells has been used extensively to study the role of proteins during embryonic development. In the traditional procedure, this requires the generation of chimaeric mice by introducing ES cells into blastocysts and allowing them to develop to term. Once chimaeric mice are produced, they are bred into a recipient mouse strain to establish germline transmission of the allele of interest. Although this approach has been used very successfully, the breeding cycles involved are time consuming. In addition, genes that are essential for organogenesis often have roles in the formation of extra-embryonic tissues that are essential for early stages of post-implantation development. For example, mice lacking the GATA transcription factors, GATA4 or GATA6, arrest during gastrulation due to an essential role for these factors in differentiation of extra-embryonic endoderm. This lethality has frustrated the study of these factors during the development of organs such as the liver and heart. Extraembryonic defects can, however, be circumvented by generating clonal mouse embryos directly from ES cells by tetraploid complementation. Here, we describe the usefulness and efficacy of this approach using GATA factors as an example.

  7. An experiment for the direct determination of the g-factor of a single proton in a Penning trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodegheri, C. C.; Blaum, K.; Kracke, H.; Kreim, S.; Mooser, A.; Quint, W.; Ulmer, S.; Walz, J.

    2012-06-01

    A new apparatus has been designed that aims at a direct precision measurement of the g-factor of a single isolated proton or antiproton in a Penning trap. We present a thorough discussion on the trap design and a method for the experimental trap optimization using a single stored proton. A first attempt at the g-factor determination has been made in a section of the trap with a magnetic bottle. The Larmor frequency of the proton has been measured with a relative uncertainty of 1.8 × 10-6 and the magnetic moment has been determined with a relative uncertainty of 8.9 × 10-6. A g-factor of 5.585 696(50) has been obtained, which is in excellent agreement with previous measurements and predictions. Future experiments shall drive the spin-flip transition in a section of the trap with a homogeneous magnetic field. This has the potential to improve the precision of the measured g-factor of the proton and the antiproton by several orders of magnitude.

  8. Close linkage of a blast resistance gene, Pias(t), with a bacterial leaf blight resistance gene, Xa1-as(t), in a rice cultivar 'Asominori'.

    PubMed

    Endo, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masayuki; Kaji, Ryota; Nakagomi, Koji; Kataoka, Tomomori; Yokogami, Narifumi; Nakamura, Toshiki; Ishikawa, Goro; Yonemaru, Jun-Ichi; Nishio, Takeshi

    2012-12-01

    It has long been known that a bacterial leaf blight-resistant line in rice obtained from a crossing using 'Asominori' as a resistant parent also has resistance to blast, but a blast resistance gene in 'Asominori' has not been investigated in detail. In the present study, a blast resistance gene in 'Asominori', tentatively named Pias(t), was revealed to be located within 162-kb region between DNA markers YX4-3 and NX4-1 on chromosome 4 and to be linked with an 'Asominori' allele of the bacterial leaf blight resistance gene Xa1, tentatively named Xa1-as(t). An 'Asominori' allele of Pias(t) was found to be dominant and difference of disease severity between lines having the 'Asominori' allele of Pias(t) and those without it was 1.2 in disease index from 0 to 10. Pias(t) was also closely linked with the Ph gene controlling phenol reaction, suggesting the possibility of successful selection of blast resistance using the phenol reaction. Since blast-resistant commercial cultivars have been developed using 'Asominori' as a parent, Pias(t) is considered to be a useful gene in rice breeding for blast resistance.

  9. GLABRA2 Directly Suppresses Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor Genes with Diverse Functions in Root Hair Development

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Yohei; Kato, Mariko; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Aoyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana GLABRA2 (GL2) gene encodes a transcription factor involved in the cell differentiation of various epidermal tissues. During root hair pattern formation, GL2 suppresses root hair development in non-hair cells, acting as a node between the gene regulatory networks for cell fate determination and cell differentiation. Despite the importance of GL2 function, its molecular basis remains obscure because the GL2 target genes leading to the network for cell differentiation are unknown. We identified five basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor genes (ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE6 [RHD6], RHD6-LIKE1 [RSL1], RSL2, Lj-RHL1-LIKE1 [LRL1], and LRL2) as GL2 direct targets using transcriptional and posttranslational induction systems. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed GL2 binding to upstream regions of these genes in planta. Reporter gene analyses showed that these genes are expressed in various stages of root hair development and are suppressed by GL2 in non-hair cells. GL2 promoter-driven GFP fusions of LRL1 and LRL2, but not those of the other bHLH proteins, conferred root hair development on non-hair cells. These results indicate that GL2 directly suppresses bHLH genes with diverse functions in root hair development. PMID:26486447

  10. The MYB46 Transcription Factor Is a Direct Target of SND1 and Regulates Secondary Wall Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Richardson, Elizabeth A.; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate that the Arabidopsis thaliana MYB46 transcription factor is a direct target of SECONDARY WALL-ASSOCIATED NAC DOMAIN PROTEIN1 (SND1), which is a key transcriptional activator regulating the developmental program of secondary wall biosynthesis. The MYB46 gene is expressed predominantly in fibers and vessels in stems, and its encoded protein is targeted to the nucleus and can activate transcription. MYB46 gene expression was shown to be regulated by SND1, and transactivation analysis demonstrated that SND1 as well as its close homologs were able to activate the MYB46 promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that SND1 binds to the MYB46 promoter. Dominant repression of MYB46 caused a drastic reduction in the secondary wall thickening of fibers and vessels. Overexpression of MYB46 resulted in an activation of the biosynthetic pathways of cellulose, xylan, and lignin and concomitantly led to ectopic deposition of secondary walls in cells that are normally nonsclerenchymatous. In addition, the expression of two secondary wall–associated transcription factors, MYB85 and KNAT7, was highly upregulated by MYB46 overexpression. These results demonstrate that MYB46 is a direct target of SND1 and is another key player in the transcriptional network involved in the regulation of secondary wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:17890373

  11. Multi-directional Abundance Shifts Among North American Birds and the Relative Influence of Multi-Faceted Climate Factors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiongyu; Sauer, John R; Dubayah, Ralph O

    2017-03-12

    Shifts in species distributions are major fingerprint of climate change. Examining changes in species abundance structures at a continental scale enables robust evaluation of climate change influences, but few studies have conducted these evaluations due to limited data and methodological constraints. In this study, we estimate temporal changes in abundance from North American Breeding Bird Survey data at the scale of physiographic strata to examine the relative influence of different components of climatic factors and evaluate the hypothesis that shifting species distributions are multi-directional in resident bird species in North America. We quantify the direction and velocity of the abundance shifts of 57 permanent resident birds over 44 years using a centroid analysis. For species with significant abundance shifts in the centroid analysis, we conduct a more intensive correlative analysis to identify climate components most strongly associated with composite change of abundance within strata. Our hypotheses focus on two contrasts: the relative importance of climate extremes versus averages, and of temperature versus precipitation in strength of association with abundance change. Our study shows that 36 species had significant abundance shifts over the study period. The average velocity of the centroid is 5.89 km·yr(-1) .The shifted distance on average covers 259 km, 9% of range extent. Our results strongly suggest that the climate change fingerprint in studied avian distributions is multidirectional. Among 6 directions with significant abundance shifts, the northwestward shift was observed in the largest number of species (n=13). The temperature/average climate model consistently has greater predictive ability than the precipitation/extreme climate model in explaining strata-level abundance change. Our study shows heterogeneous avian responses to recent environmental changes. It highlights needs for more species-specific approaches to examine contributing

  12. The impact of neighborhood social and built environment factors across the cancer continuum: Current research, methodological considerations, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Shariff-Marco, Salma; DeRouen, Mindy; Keegan, Theresa H M; Yen, Irene H; Mujahid, Mahasin; Satariano, William A; Glaser, Sally L

    2015-07-15

    Neighborhood social and built environments have been recognized as important contexts in which health is shaped. The authors reviewed the extent to which these neighborhood factors have been addressed in population-level cancer research by scanning the literature for research focused on specific social and/or built environment characteristics and their association with outcomes across the cancer continuum, including incidence, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, and survival. The commonalities and differences in methodologies across studies, the current challenges in research methodology, and future directions in this research also were addressed. The assessment of social and built environment factors in relation to cancer is a relatively new field, with 82% of the 34 reviewed articles published since 2010. Across the wide range of social and built environment exposures and cancer outcomes considered by the studies, numerous associations were reported. However, the directions and magnitudes of associations varied, in large part because of the variation in cancer sites and outcomes studied, but also likely because of differences in study populations, geographic regions, and, importantly, choice of neighborhood measures and geographic scales. The authors recommend that future studies consider the life-course implications of cancer incidence and survival, integrate secondary and self-report data, consider work neighborhood environments, and further develop analytical and statistical approaches appropriate to the geospatial and multilevel nature of the data. Incorporating social and built environment factors into research on cancer etiology and outcomes can provide insights into disease processes, identify vulnerable populations, and generate results with translational impact of relevance for interventionists and policy makers.

  13. The Impact of Neighborhood Social and Built Environment Factors across the Cancer Continuum: Current Research, Methodologic Considerations, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Shariff-Marco, Salma; De Rouen, Mindy; Keegan, Theresa H. M.; Yen, Irene H.; Mujahid, Mahasin; Satariano, William A.; Glaser, Sally L.

    2015-01-01

    Neighborhood social and built environments have been recognized as important contexts in which health is shaped. We review the extent to which these neighborhood factors have been addressed in population-level cancer research, with a scan of the literature for research that focuses on specific social and/or built environment characteristics and association with outcomes across the cancer continuum, including incidence, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, and survival. We discuss commonalities and differences in methodologies across studies, current challenges in research methodology, and future directions in this research area. The assessment of social and built environment factors in relation to cancer is a relatively new field, with 82% of 34 reviewed papers published since 2010. Across the wide range of social and built environment exposures and cancer outcomes considered by the studies, numerous associations were reported. However, the directions and magnitudes of association varied, due in large part to the variation in cancer sites and outcomes being studied, but also likely due to differences in study populations, geographical region, and, importantly, choice of neighborhood measure and geographic scale. We recommend that future studies consider the life course implications of cancer incidence and survival, integrate secondary and self-report data, consider work neighborhood environments, and further develop analytical and statistical approaches appropriate to the geospatial and multilevel nature of the data. Incorporating social and built environment factors into research on cancer etiology and outcomes can provide insights into disease processes, identify vulnerable populations, and generate results with translational impact of relevance for interventionists and policy makers. PMID:25847484

  14. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling directs cardiomyocyte movement toward the midline during heart tube assembly.

    PubMed

    Bloomekatz, Joshua; Singh, Reena; Prall, Owen Wj; Dunn, Ariel C; Vaughan, Megan; Loo, Chin-San; Harvey, Richard P; Yelon, Deborah

    2017-01-18

    Communication between neighboring tissues plays a central role in guiding organ morphogenesis. During heart tube assembly, interactions with the adjacent endoderm control the medial movement of cardiomyocytes, a process referred to as cardiac fusion. However, the molecular underpinnings of this endodermal-myocardial relationship remain unclear. Here, we show an essential role for platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (Pdgfra) in directing cardiac fusion. Mutation of pdgfra disrupts heart tube assembly in both zebrafish and mouse. Timelapse analysis of individual cardiomyocyte trajectories reveals misdirected cells in zebrafish pdgfra mutants, suggesting that PDGF signaling steers cardiomyocytes toward the midline during cardiac fusion. Intriguingly, the ligand pdgfaa is expressed in the endoderm medial to the pdgfra-expressing myocardial precursors. Ectopic expression of pdgfaa interferes with cardiac fusion, consistent with an instructive role for PDGF signaling. Together, these data uncover a novel mechanism through which endodermal-myocardial communication can guide the cell movements that initiate cardiac morphogenesis.

  15. [Competence factors of retinal pigment epithelium cells for reprogramming in the neuronal direction during retinal regeneration in newts].

    PubMed

    Grigorian, E N

    2015-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells that have the unique ability to reprogram retinal cells @in vivo@ were analyzed in the adult newt. Our own data and that available in the literature on the peculiarities of the biology of these cells (from morphology to molecular profile, which can be associated with the capability of phenotype change) were summarized: It was established that the molecular traits of specialized and poorly differentiated cells are combined in RPE of the adult newt. It was registered that persistent (at a low level) proliferation and rapid change of specific cytoskeleton proteins can contribute to the success of RPE cell reprogramming in the neuronal direction. Each of the considered factors of competence for reprogramming can be found for animal RPE, whose cells are not able @in vivo@ to change the phenotype to a neuronal one; however, their totality (supported by the epigenetic state permissive for conversion) is probably an internal property of only newt RPE.

  16. EIN3 interferes with the sulfur deficiency signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana through direct interaction with the SLIM1 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2016-12-01

    Sulfur deficiency in plants leads to metabolic reprogramming through changes of gene expression. SLIM1 is so far the only characterized transcription factor associated strictly with sulfur deficiency stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. It belongs to the same protein family as EIN3, a major positive switch of ethylene signaling pathway. It binds to the specific cis sequence called UPE-box. Here we show that SLIM1 interacts with UPE-box as a homodimer. Interestingly, the same region of the protein is used for heterodimerization with EIN3; however, the heterodimer is not able to recognize UPE-box. Expression of several SLIM1-dependent genes is enhanced in sulfur deficiency grown Arabidopsis ein3-1 seedlings (with mutated EIN3 protein). This implies a possible regulatory mechanism of ethylene in sulfur metabolism through direct EIN3-SLIM1 interaction.

  17. Identification of direct serum-response factor gene targets during Me2SO-induced P19 cardiac cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu Xing; Garcia-Gras, Eduardo; Wycuff, Diane R; Marriot, Suzanne J; Kadeer, Nijiati; Yu, Wei; Olson, Eric N; Garry, Daniel J; Parmacek, Michael S; Schwartz, Robert J

    2005-05-13

    Serum-response factor (SRF) is an obligatory transcription factor, required for the formation of vertebrate mesoderm leading to the origin of the cardiovascular system. Protein A-TEV-tagged chromatin immunoprecipitation technology was used to collect direct SRF-bound gene targets from pluripotent P19 cells, induced by Me2SO treatment into an enriched cardiac cell population. From 242 sequenced DNA fragments, we identified 188 genomic DNA fragments as potential direct SRF targets that contain CArG boxes and CArG-like boxes. Of the 92 contiguous genes that were identified, a subgroup of 43 SRF targets was then further validated by co-transfection assays with SRF. Expression patterns of representative candidate genes were compared with the LacZ reporter expression activity of the endogenous SRF gene. According to the Unigene data base, 84% of the SRF target candidates were expressed, at least, in the heart. In SRF null embryonic stem cells, 81% of these SRF target candidates were greatly affected by the absence of SRF. Among these SRF-regulated genes, Raf1, Map4k4, and Bicc1 have essential roles in mesoderm formation. The 12 regulated SRF target genes, Mapk10 (JNK3), Txnl2, Azi2, Tera, Sema3a, Lrp4, Actc1, Myl3, Hspg2, Pgm2, Hif3a, and Asb5, have been implicated in cardiovascular formation, and the Ski and Hes6 genes have roles in muscle differentiation. SRF target genes related to cell mitosis and cycle, E2f5, Npm1, Cenpb, Rbbp6, and Scyl1, expressed in the heart tissue were differentially regulated in SRF null ES cells.

  18. Characterization of the Transcriptome of Nascent Hair Cells and Identification of Direct Targets of the Atoh1 Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Tiantian; Jen, Hsin-I; Kang, Hyojin; Klisch, Tiemo J.; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells are sensory receptors for the auditory and vestibular system in vertebrates. The transcription factor Atoh1 is both necessary and sufficient for the differentiation of hair cells, and is strongly upregulated during hair-cell regeneration in nonmammalian vertebrates. To identify genes involved in hair cell development and function, we performed RNA-seq profiling of purified Atoh1-expressing hair cells from the neonatal mouse cochlea. We identified >600 enriched transcripts in cochlear hair cells, of which 90% have not been previously shown to be expressed in hair cells. We identified 233 of these hair cell genes as candidates to be directly regulated by Atoh1 based on the presence of Atoh1 binding sites in their regulatory regions and by analyzing Atoh1 ChIP-seq datasets from the cerebellum and small intestine. We confirmed 10 of these genes as being direct Atoh1 targets in the cochlea by ChIP-PCR. The identification of candidate Atoh1 target genes is a first step in identifying gene regulatory networks for hair-cell development and may inform future studies on the potential role of Atoh1 in mammalian hair cell regeneration. PMID:25855195

  19. Barley MLA Immune Receptors Directly Interfere with Antagonistically Acting Transcription Factors to Initiate Disease Resistance Signaling[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng; Yu, Deshui; Jiao, Jian; Jing, Shaojuan; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Shen, Qian-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The nucleotide binding domain and Leucine-rich repeat (NLR)–containing proteins in plants and animals mediate pathogen sensing inside host cells and mount innate immune responses against microbial pathogens. The barley (Hordeum vulgare) mildew A (MLA) locus encodes coiled-coil (CC)–type NLRs mediating disease resistance against the powdery mildew pathogen Blumeria graminis. Here, we report direct interactions between MLA and two antagonistically acting transcription factors, MYB6 and WRKY1. The N-terminal CC signaling domain of MLA interacts with MYB6 to stimulate its DNA binding activity. MYB6 functions as a positive regulator of basal and MLA-mediated immunity responses to B. graminis. MYB6 DNA binding is antagonized by direct association with WRKY1 repressor, which in turn also interacts with the MLA CC domain. The activated form of full-length MLA10 receptor is needed to release MYB6 activator from WRKY1 repression and to stimulate MYB6-dependent gene expression. This implies that, while sequestered by the WRKY1 repressor in the presence of the resting immune receptor, MYB6 acts as an immediate and positive postactivation signaling component of the active state of MLA during transcriptional reprogramming for innate immune responses. PMID:23532068

  20. A Dual Target-directed Agent against Interleukin-6 Receptor and Tumor Necrosis Factor α ameliorates experimental arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngkyun; Yi, Hyoju; Jung, Hyerin; Rim, Yeri Alice; Park, Narae; Kim, Juryun; Jung, Seung Min; Park, Sung-Hwan; Park, Young Woo; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    A considerable proportion of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) do not respond to monospecific agents. The purpose of our study was to generate a hybrid form of biologics, targeting tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R), and determine its anti-arthritic properties in vitro and in vivo. A novel dual target-directed agent (DTA(A7/sTNFR2)) was generated by conjugating soluble TNF receptor 2 (sTNFR2) to the Fc region of A7, a new anti-IL-6R antibody obtained by screening the phage display human antibody library. DTA(A7/sTNFR2) inhibited the proliferation and migration of fibroblast-like synoviocytes from patients with RA (RA-FLS) more efficiently than single target-directed agents. DTA(A7/sTNFR2) also blocked osteoclastogenesis from bone marrow cells. The arthritis severity scores of the experimental arthritis mice with DTA(A7/sTNFR2) tended to be lower than those of mice with IgG, A7, or sTNFR2. Histological data suggested that DTA(A7/sTNFR2) is more efficient than single-target drugs in preventing joint destruction and bone loss. These results were confirmed in vivo using the minicircle system. Taken together, the results show that DTA(A7/sTNFR2) may be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA. PMID:26841833

  1. Direct cellular effects of some mediators, hormones and growth factor-like agents on denervated (isolated) rat gastric mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Bódis, B; Karádi, O; Nagy, L; Dohoczky, C; Kolega, M; Mózsik, G

    1997-01-01

    The brain-gut axis has an important role in the mechanism of gastric cytoprotection in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effect of protective agents without any central and peripheral innervation. A mixed population of rat gastric mucosal cells was isolated by the method of Nagy et al (Gastroenterology (1994) 77, 433-443). Cells were incubated for 60 min with cytoprotective drugs such as prostacyclin, histamine, pentagastrin and PL-10 substances (synthesized parts of BPC). At the end of this incubation cells were treated by 15% ethanol for 5 min. Cell viability was tested by trypan blue exclusion test and succinic dehydrogenase activity. The following results were obtained: 1) prostacyclin, histamine and pentagastrin had no direct cytoprotective effect on isolated cells; and 2) PL-10 substances significantly protected the cells against ethanol-induced cellular damage. This led to the following conclusions: 1) in the phenomenon of gastric cytoprotection only the growth factor-like agents have a direct cellular effect; and 2) the intact peripheral innervation is basically necessary for the development of mediators and hormone-induced gastric cytoprotection.

  2. Low-dimensional transport and large thermoelectric power factors in bulk semiconductors by band engineering of highly directional electronic states.

    PubMed

    Bilc, Daniel I; Hautier, Geoffroy; Waroquiers, David; Rignanese, Gian-Marco; Ghosez, Philippe

    2015-04-03

    Thermoelectrics are promising for addressing energy issues but their exploitation is still hampered by low efficiencies. So far, much improvement has been achieved by reducing the thermal conductivity but less by maximizing the power factor. The latter imposes apparently conflicting requirements on the band structure: a narrow energy distribution and a low effective mass. Quantum confinement in nanostructures and the introduction of resonant states were suggested as possible solutions to this paradox, but with limited success. Here, we propose an original approach to fulfill both requirements in bulk semiconductors. It exploits the highly directional character of some orbitals to engineer the band structure and produce a type of low-dimensional transport similar to that targeted in nanostructures, while retaining isotropic properties. Using first-principle calculations, the theoretical concept is demonstrated in Fe2YZ Heusler compounds, yielding power factors 4 to 5 times larger than in classical thermoelectrics at room temperature. Our findings are totally generic and rationalize the search of alternative compounds with similar behavior. Beyond thermoelectricity, these might be relevant also in the context of electronic, superconducting, or photovoltaic applications.

  3. In vivo studies of the role of factor VII in hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Giles, A R; Tinlin, S; Brosseau, L; Hoogendoorn, H

    1985-05-01

    The effect of both congenital and acquired factor VII deficiency on the cuticle bleeding time (CBT) was evaluated in dogs. The CBT has been previously documented to be a sensitive indicator of factor VIII:C deficiency in hemophilic dogs. Serial CBT determinations were made on normal dogs treated with high-dose warfarin. At 48 hours post-treatment, the CBT was normal, although the factor VII level was less than 1%, whereas the levels of factors II, IX, and X were 44%, 25%, and 17%, respectively. At 120 hours the CBT became abnormal when all vitamin K-dependent clotting factors had dropped to less than 18%. Administration of a plasma concentrate of factors II, IX, and X corrected the CBT, despite the factor VII level remaining at less than 1%. Similar studies in a congenitally factor VII-deficient dog (factor VII less than 2%) confirmed that this deficiency state was not associated with an abnormality of the CBT. Administration of heparin to both normal and factor VII-deficient animals was associated with prolongation of the CBT, but the heparin dose required in the normal animals was substantially higher than in the factor VII-deficient animals. These data do not suggest that factor VII/VIIa has an exclusive role in generating factor Xa, either directly or indirectly, by way of factor IXa generation, in vivo. However, the increase in heparin sensitivity of the factor VII-deficient animals does suggest that factor VII/VIIa may, in some circumstances, present a significant alternative pathway of factor X activation, although the activation pathway involved cannot be determined from the studies performed.

  4. Fourier transform microwave/millimeter-wave spectroscopy of the ScC2 (XA1) radical: A model system for endohedral metallofullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, J.; Halfen, D. T.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2014-08-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of the ScC2 radical (XA1) has been measured using Fourier transform microwave/millimeter-wave techniques in the frequency range 15-63 GHz - the first high-resolution spectroscopic study of a 3d dicarbide species. ScC2 was created in a supersonic expansion from laser-ablated scandium and CH4 in the presence of a DC discharge. Four transitions, NKa,Kc = 101 → 000 through 404 → 303, were recorded, each consisting of multiple fine/hyperfine components; rotational, fine structure, and Sc(I = 7/2) hyperfine constants were determined. These measurements confirm the T-shaped geometry for ScC2, and suggest the molecule has significant covalent character.

  5. Direct identification of residues of the epidermal growth factor receptor in close proximity to the amino terminus of bound epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Woltjer, R L; Lukas, T J; Staros, J V

    1992-01-01

    We have recently developed a kinetically controlled, step-wise affinity cross-linking technique for specific, high-yield, covalent linkage of murine epidermal growth factor (mEGF) via its N terminus to the EGF receptor. EGF receptor from A431 cells was cross-linked to radiolabeled mEGF (125I-mEGF) by this technique and the 125I-mEGF-receptor complex was purified and denatured. Tryptic digestion of this preparation gave rise to a unique radiolabeled peptide that did not comigrate with trypsin-treated 125I-mEGF in SDS/Tricine gels but that could be immunoprecipitated with antibodies to mEGF. The immunoprecipitated peptide was isolated by electrophoresis in SDS/Tricine gels, eluted, and sequenced. The sequence was found to correspond to that of a tryptic peptide of the EGF receptor beginning with Gly-85, which is in domain I, a region N terminal to the first cysteine-rich region of the receptor. Selective loss of signal in the 17th sequencing cycle suggests that the point of attachment of N-terminally modified 125I-mEGF to the receptor is Tyr-101. The data presented here provide identification by direct protein microsequencing of a site of interaction of EGF and the EGF receptor. Images PMID:1380167

  6. Direct Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Tropical And Sub-Tropical Agricultural Systems - A Review And Modelling Of Emission Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanito, Fabrizio; Lebender, Ulrike; Cornulier, Thomas; Sapkota, Tek B.; Brentrup, Frank; Stirling, Clare; Hillier, Jon

    2017-03-01

    There has been much debate about the uncertainties associated with the estimation of direct and indirect agricultural nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions in developing countries and in particular from tropical regions. In this study, we report an up-to-date review of the information published in peer-review journals on direct N2O emissions from agricultural systems in tropical and sub-tropical regions. We statistically analyze net-N2O-N emissions to estimate tropic-specific annual N2O emission factors (N2O-EFs) using a Generalized Additive Mixed Model (GAMM) which allowed the effects of multiple covariates to be modelled as linear or smooth non-linear continuous functions. Overall the mean N2O-EF was 1.2% for the tropics and sub-tropics, thus within the uncertainty range of IPCC-EF. On a regional basis, mean N2O-EFs were 1.4% for Africa, 1.1%, for Asia, 0.9% for Australia and 1.3% for Central & South America. Our annual N2O-EFs, estimated for a range of fertiliser rates using the available data, do not support recent studies hypothesising non-linear increase N2O-EFs as a function of applied N. Our findings highlight that in reporting annual N2O emissions and estimating N2O-EFs, particular attention should be paid in modelling the effect of study length on response of N2O.

  7. Direct Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Tropical And Sub-Tropical Agricultural Systems - A Review And Modelling Of Emission Factors

    PubMed Central

    Albanito, Fabrizio; Lebender, Ulrike; Cornulier, Thomas; Sapkota, Tek B.; Brentrup, Frank; Stirling, Clare; Hillier, Jon

    2017-01-01

    There has been much debate about the uncertainties associated with the estimation of direct and indirect agricultural nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions in developing countries and in particular from tropical regions. In this study, we report an up-to-date review of the information published in peer-review journals on direct N2O emissions from agricultural systems in tropical and sub-tropical regions. We statistically analyze net-N2O-N emissions to estimate tropic-specific annual N2O emission factors (N2O-EFs) using a Generalized Additive Mixed Model (GAMM) which allowed the effects of multiple covariates to be modelled as linear or smooth non-linear continuous functions. Overall the mean N2O-EF was 1.2% for the tropics and sub-tropics, thus within the uncertainty range of IPCC-EF. On a regional basis, mean N2O-EFs were 1.4% for Africa, 1.1%, for Asia, 0.9% for Australia and 1.3% for Central & South America. Our annual N2O-EFs, estimated for a range of fertiliser rates using the available data, do not support recent studies hypothesising non-linear increase N2O-EFs as a function of applied N. Our findings highlight that in reporting annual N2O emissions and estimating N2O-EFs, particular attention should be paid in modelling the effect of study length on response of N2O. PMID:28281637

  8. Genital chlamydial infection among women in Nicaragua: validity of direct fluorescent antibody testing, prevalence, risk factors and clinical manifestations.

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, B; Espinoza, F; Villegas, R R; Smith, G D; Ramos, A; Egger, M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate the performance of a direct fluorescence antibody (DFA) test and to determine the prevalence, risk factors and clinical manifestations of cervical chlamydia infection in different groups of women in Nicaragua. STUDY POPULATION: 926 women, 863 routine clinic attenders (mean age 27 years) and 63 sex workers (mean age 25 years) attending health centres in León, Corinto, Matagalpa and Bluefields. METHODS: Cervical specimens were examined using the Syva MicroTrak test system with a cut-off of 10 or more elementary bodies (EBs). The DFA results were validated by a one-step polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Discordant results were further examined in nested PCR assays directed at two different target genes. An interviewer-administered questionnaire and a standard gynaecological examination were completed. RESULTS: Sensitivity of DFA was 80.1%, specificity 98.3%, and positive and negative predictive values 62.5% and 99.3%, respectively. Values were lower in locations where samples thawed because of electricity breaks and higher among sex workers. The majority of discordant results was confirmed as positive in nested PCR assays. Prevalence of cervical chlamydia infection based on positivity in DFA and/or PCR ranged from 2% among routine clinic attenders aged 35 years or older, to 8% among adolescent clinic attenders, and to 14% among sex workers. Among routine clinic attenders, young age (odds ratio [OR] 3.6, 95% confidence intervals [95% CI] 1.4-8.9 for women aged 15-19 years as compared with 1 in women 25 years of age or older) and use of oral contraceptives (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.7-9.6) were the only statistically significant risk factors identified in multivariate logistic regression analysis. Presence of mucopurulent cervical discharge (OR 5.9, 95% CI 3.0-11.5) and presence of ectropion (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.1-6.5) were the clinical signs independently associated with infection. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that the DFA test was sensitive and

  9. Degree and Direction of Change of Body Weight in Cardiac Rehabilitation and Impact on Exercise Capacity and Cardiac Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Gomadam, Pallavi S; Douglas, Christopher J; Sacrinty, Matthew T; Brady, Molly M; Paladenech, Connie C; Robinson, Killian C

    2016-02-15

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves functional capacity and reduces mortality in patients with cardiovascular disease. It also improves cardiovascular risk factors and aids in weight reduction. Because of the increase in morbidly obese patients with cardiovascular disease, the prevalence of obesity and patterns of weight change in those undergoing CR merit fresh study. We studied 1,320 participants in a 12-week CR program at our academic medical center. We compared 5 categories: 69 class III obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥40) patients, 128 class II obese patients (BMI 35.0 to 39.9), 318 class I obese patients (BMI 30.0 to 34.9), 487 overweight patients (BMI 25.0 to 29.9), and 318 normal weight patients (BMI 18.5 to 24.9). Exercise capacity in METs, weight, blood pressure, and fasting lipid profile were measured before and after CR. Overall, 131 patients gained weight, 827 had no significant weight change, and 363 lost weight (176 lost 3% to 5% of their baseline weight, 161 lost 5% to 10%, and 26 lost >10%). Exercise capacity, blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol improved in all patients. Class III obese patients had the smallest improvement in peak METs (p <0.001), but the greatest weight loss. Patients who lost >10% of their baseline weight had the greatest improvements in exercise capacity, low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides. In conclusion, after CR, a minority of patients lost weight. Most patients had no significant weight change and some even gained weight. The greatest loss was seen in class III obese patients. All patient groups showed improvements in exercise capacity and risk factors, regardless of the direction or degree of weight change.

  10. Direct measurement of the boron isotope fractionation factor: Reducing the uncertainty in reconstructing ocean paleo-pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nir, Oded; Vengosh, Avner; Harkness, Jennifer S.; Dwyer, Gary S.; Lahav, Ori

    2015-03-01

    The boron isotopic composition of calcium carbonate skeletons is a promising proxy method for reconstructing paleo-ocean pH and atmospheric CO2 from the geological record. Although the boron isotope methodology has been used extensively over the past two decades to determine ancient ocean-pH, the actual value of the boron isotope fractionation factor (εB) between the two main dissolved boron species, 11B(OH)3 and 10B(OH)-4, has remained uncertain. Initially, εB values were theoretically computed from vibrational frequencies of boron species, resulting in a value of ∼ 19 ‰. Later, spectrophotometric pH measurements on artificial seawater suggested a higher value of ∼ 27 ‰. A few independent theoretical models also pointed to a higher εB value. Here we provide, for the first time, an independent empirical fractionation factor (εB = 26.0 ± 1.0 ‰ ; 25 °C), determined by direct measurements of B(OH)3 in seawater and other solutions. Boric acid was isolated by preferential passage through a reverse osmosis membrane under controlled pH conditions. We further demonstrate that applying the Pitzer ion-interaction approach, combined with ion-pairing calculations, results in a more accurate determination of species distribution in aquatic solutions of different chemical composition, relative to the traditional two-species boron-system approach. We show that using the revised approach reduces both the error in simulating ancient atmospheric CO2 (by up to 21%) and the overall uncertainty of applying boron isotopes for paleo-pH reconstruction. Combined, this revised methodology lays the foundation for a more accurate determination of ocean paleo-pH through time.

  11. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling directs cardiomyocyte movement toward the midline during heart tube assembly

    PubMed Central

    Bloomekatz, Joshua; Singh, Reena; Prall, Owen WJ; Dunn, Ariel C; Vaughan, Megan; Loo, Chin-San; Harvey, Richard P; Yelon, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    Communication between neighboring tissues plays a central role in guiding organ morphogenesis. During heart tube assembly, interactions with the adjacent endoderm control the medial movement of cardiomyocytes, a process referred to as cardiac fusion. However, the molecular underpinnings of this endodermal-myocardial relationship remain unclear. Here, we show an essential role for platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (Pdgfra) in directing cardiac fusion. Mutation of pdgfra disrupts heart tube assembly in both zebrafish and mouse. Timelapse analysis of individual cardiomyocyte trajectories reveals misdirected cells in zebrafish pdgfra mutants, suggesting that PDGF signaling steers cardiomyocytes toward the midline during cardiac fusion. Intriguingly, the ligand pdgfaa is expressed in the endoderm medial to the pdgfra-expressing myocardial precursors. Ectopic expression of pdgfaa interferes with cardiac fusion, consistent with an instructive role for PDGF signaling. Together, these data uncover a novel mechanism through which endodermal-myocardial communication can guide the cell movements that initiate cardiac morphogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21172.001 PMID:28098558

  12. The BCL11A transcription factor directly activates RAG gene expression and V(D)J recombination.

    PubMed

    Lee, Baeck-seung; Dekker, Joseph D; Lee, Bum-kyu; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Sleckman, Barry P; Shaffer, Arthur L; Ippolito, Gregory C; Tucker, Philip W

    2013-05-01

    Recombination-activating gene 1 protein (RAG1) and RAG2 are critical enzymes for initiating variable-diversity-joining (VDJ) segment recombination, an essential process for antigen receptor expression and lymphocyte development. The transcription factor BCL11A is required for B cell development, but its molecular function(s) in B cell fate specification and commitment is unknown. We show here that the major B cell isoform, BCL11A-XL, binds the RAG1 promoter and Erag enhancer to activate RAG1 and RAG2 transcription in pre-B cells. We employed BCL11A overexpression with recombination substrates in a cultured pre-B cell line as well as Cre recombinase-mediated Bcl11a(lox/lox) deletion in explanted murine pre-B cells to demonstrate direct consequences of BCL11A/RAG modulation on V(D)J recombination. We conclude that BCL11A is a critical component of a transcriptional network that regulates B cell fate by controlling V(D)J recombination.

  13. Factors which influence directional coarsening of gamma-prime during creep in nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Ebert, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Changes in the morphology of the gamma prime precipitate were examined as a function of the time during creep at 982 C in 001 oriented single crystals of a Ni-Al-Mo-Ta superalloy. In this alloy, which has a large negative misfit of -0.80 pct., the gamma prime particles link together during creep to form platelets, or rafts, which are aligned with their broad faces perpendicular to the applied tensile axis. The effects of initial microstructure and alloy composition of raft development and creep properties were investigated. Directional coarsening of gamma prime begins during primary creep and continues well after the onset of second state creep. The thickness of the rafts remains constant up through the onset of tertiary creep, a clear indication of the stability of the finely-spaced gamma/gamma prime lamellar structure. The thickness of the rafts which formed was equal to the initial gamma prime size which was present prior to testing. The single crystals with the finest gamma prime size exhibited the longest creep lives, because the resultant rafted structure had a larger number of gamma/gamma prime interfaces per unit volume of material. Reducing the Mo content by only 0.73 wt. pct. increased the creep life by a factor of three, because the precipitation of a third phase was eliminated.

  14. Factors which influence directional coarsening of Gamma prime during creep in nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Ebert, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Changes in the morphology of the gamma prime precipitate were examined as a function of time during creep at 982 C in 001 oriented single crystals of a Ni-Al-Mo-Ta superalloy. In this alloy, which has a large negative misfit of -0.80 pct., the gamma prime particles link together during creep to form platelets, or rafts, which are aligned with their broad faces perpendicular to the applied tensile axis. The effects of initial microstructure and alloy composition of raft development and creep properties were investigated. Directional coarsening of gamma prime begins during primary creep and continues well after the onset of second state creep. The thickness of the rafts remains constant up through the onset of tertiary creep a clear indication of the stability of the finely-spaced gamma/gamma prime lamellar structure. The thickness of the rafts which formed was equal to the initial gamma prime size which was present prior to testing. The single crystals with the finest gamma prime size exhibited the longest creep lives, because the resultant rafted structure had a larger number of gamma/gamma prime interfaces per unit volume of material. Reducing the Mo content by only 0.73 wt. pct. increased the creep life by a factor of three, because the precipitation of a third phase was eliminated.

  15. Epigenetic regulation of the transcription factor Foxa2 directs differential elafin expression in melanocytes and melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Kyung Sook; Jo, Ji Yoon; Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Yangsoon; Bae, Jong Hwan; Chung, Young-Hwa; Koh, Sang Seok

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} Elafin expression is epigenetically silenced in human melanoma cells. {yields} Foxa2 expression in melanoma cells is silenced by promoter hypermethylation. {yields} Foxa2 directs activation of the elafin promoter in vivo. {yields} Foxa2 expression induces apoptosis of melanoma cells via elafin re-expression. -- Abstract: Elafin, a serine protease inhibitor, induces the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in human melanoma cells, where its expression is transcriptionally silenced. However, it remains unknown how the elafin gene is repressed in melanoma cells. We here demonstrate that elafin expression is modulated via epigenetically regulated expression of the transcription factor Foxa2. Treatment of melanoma cells with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor induced elafin expression, which was specifically responsible for reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis. Suppression of Foxa2 transcription, mediated by DNA hypermethylation in its promoter region, was released in melanoma cells upon treatment with the demethylating agent. Luciferase reporter assays indicated that the Foxa2 binding site in the elafin promoter was critical for the activation of the promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further showed that Foxa2 bound to the elafin promoter in vivo. Analyses of melanoma cells with varied levels of Foxa2 revealed a correlated expression between Foxa2 and elafin and the ability of Foxa2 to induce apoptosis. Our results collectively suggest that, in melanoma cells, Foxa2 expression is silenced and therefore elafin is maintained unexpressed to facilitate cell proliferation in the disease melanoma.

  16. Transcription factor TFIID is a direct functional target of the adenovirus E1A transcription-repression domain.

    PubMed Central

    Song, C Z; Loewenstein, P M; Toth, K; Green, M

    1995-01-01

    The 243-amino acid adenovirus E1A oncoprotein both positively and negatively modulates the expression of cellular genes involved in the regulation of cell growth. The E1A transcription repression function appears to be linked with its ability to induce cellular DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and cell transformation, as well as to inhibit cell differentiation. The mechanism by which E1A represses the transcription of various promoters has proven enigmatic. Here we provide several lines of evidence that the "TATA-box" binding protein (TBP) component of transcription factor TFIID is a cellular target of the E1A repression function encoded within the E1A N-terminal 80 amino acids. (i) The E1A N-terminal 80 amino acids [E1A-(1-80)protein] efficiently represses basal transcription from TATA-containing core promoters in vitro. (ii) TBP reverses completely E1A repression in vitro. (iii) TBP restores transcriptional activity to E1A-(1-80) protein affinity-depleted nuclear extracts. (iv) The N-terminal repression domain of E1A interacts directly and specifically with TBP in vitro. These results may help explain how E1A represses a set of genes that lack common upstream promoter elements. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7479778

  17. Factors influencing consumers' attitudinal and behavioral responses to direct-to-consumer and over-the-counter drug advertising.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mina; Whitehill King, Karen; Reid, Leonard N

    2015-04-01

    Using a model developed from the research literature, the authors compared consumers' attitudinal and behavioral responses to direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising (DCTA) and over-the-counter nonprescription drug advertising (OTCA) of drugs. Adults 18 years of age and older who had taken any prescription drugs in the past 6 months completed online survey questionnaires. Variables measured included demographics (age, gender, race, education, and income), health-related characteristics (health status, prescription and over-the-counter drug use, health consciousness, and involvement with prescription or over-the-counter drugs), perceived amount of attention and exposure to DTCA and OTCA, attitudinal outcomes (skepticism toward DTCA/OTCA and attitude toward DTCA/OTCA), and behavioral outcomes triggered by DTCA and OTCA. The findings indicate that exposure to drug advertising is one of the most significant predictors of attitudinal and behavioral outcomes. Some audience factors such as health status, involvement with drugs, health consciousness, drug use, income, and age also were differentially associated with consumer responses to drug advertising.

  18. The direct interaction of phospholipase C-gamma 1 with phospholipase D2 is important for epidermal growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Jang, Il Ho; Lee, Sukmook; Park, Jong Bae; Kim, Jong Hyun; Lee, Chang Sup; Hur, Eun-Mi; Kim, Il Shin; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Yagisawa, Hitoshi; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2003-05-16

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor has an important role in cellular proliferation, and the enzymatic activity of phospholipase C (PLC)-gamma1 is regarded to be critical for EGF-induced mitogenesis. In this study, we report for the first time a phospholipase complex composed of PLC-gamma1 and phospholipase D2 (PLD2). PLC-gamma1 is co-immunoprecipitated with PLD2 in COS-7 cells. The results of in vitro binding analysis and co-immunoprecipitation analysis in COS-7 cells show that the Src homology (SH) 3 domain of PLC-gamma1 binds to the proline-rich motif within the Phox homology (PX) domain of PLD2. The interaction between PLC-gamma1 and PLD2 is EGF stimulation-dependent and potentiates EGF-induced inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) formation and Ca(2+) increase. Mutating Pro-145 and Pro-148 within the PX domain of PLD2 to leucines disrupts the interaction between PLC-gamma1 and PLD2 and fails to potentiate EGF-induced IP(3) formation and Ca(2+) increase. However, neither PLD2 wild type nor PLD2 mutant affects the EGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-gamma1. These findings suggest that, upon EGF stimulation, PLC-gamma1 directly interacts with PLD2 and this interaction is important for PLC-gamma1 activity.

  19. Factors associated with the persuasiveness of direct-to-consumer advertising on HPV vaccination among young women.

    PubMed

    Manika, Danae; Ball, Jennifer G; Stout, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative study explored young women's response to direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertising (DTCA) for a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. In particular, the study examined (a) the association of factors stemming from consumer research with actual and intended behavioral responses to DTCA for HPV and (b) key elements drawn from commonly used health-related theories to determine the strongest associations with behavioral intentions regarding the HPV vaccine. Survey findings showed that vaccinated women indicated that DTCA played a role in their decision to get vaccinated against HPV more so than those who were not vaccinated. Trust in DTCA for an HPV vaccine brand was significantly related to intentions to seek more information about the vaccine. Also, perceived barriers had the only significant association with behavioral intentions when taking into account perceived threat and response efficacy. These results provide practical implications for key industry decision makers and health communication professionals on the design of effective theory-based health communication message content for an HPV vaccine brand with consequent social implications.

  20. Epstein–Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B.; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G.; Sinclair, Alison J.

    2015-01-01

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  1. Excision dynamics of Vibrio pathogenicity island-2 from Vibrio cholerae: role of a recombination directionality factor VefA

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Vibrio Pathogenicity Island-2 (VPI-2) is a 57 kb region present in choleragenic V. cholerae isolates that is required for growth on sialic acid as a sole carbon source. V. cholerae non-O1/O139 pathogenic strains also contain VPI-2, which in addition to sialic acid catabolism genes also encodes a type 3 secretion system in these strains. VPI-2 integrates into chromosome 1 at a tRNA-serine site and encodes an integrase intV2 (VC1758) that belongs to the tyrosine recombinase family. IntV2 is required for VPI-2 excision from chromosome 1, which occurs at very low levels, and formation of a non-replicative circular intermediate. Results We determined the conditions and the factors that affect excision of VPI-2 in V. cholerae N16961. We demonstrate that excision from chromosome 1 is induced at low temperature and after sublethal UV-light irradiation treatment. In addition, after UV-light irradiation compared to untreated cells, cells showed increased expression of three genes, intV2 (VC1758), and two putative recombination directionality factors (RDFs), vefA (VC1785) and vefB (VC1809) encoded within VPI-2. We demonstrate that along with IntV2, the RDF VefA is essential for excision. We constructed a knockout mutant of vefA in V. cholerae N16961, and found that no excision of VPI-2 occurred, indicating that a functional vefA gene is required for excision. Deletion of the second RDF encoded by vefB did not result in a loss of excision. Among Vibrio species in the genome database, we identified 27 putative RDFs within regions that also encoded IntV2 homologues. Within each species the RDFs and their cognate IntV2 proteins were associated with different island regions suggesting that this pairing is widespread. Conclusions We demonstrate that excision of VPI-2 is induced under some environmental stress conditions and we show for the first time that an RDF encoded within a pathogenicity island in V. cholerae is required for excision of the region. PMID:21118541

  2. Modulation of enhancer looping and differential gene targeting by Epstein-Barr virus transcription factors directs cellular reprogramming.

    PubMed

    McClellan, Michael J; Wood, C David; Ojeniyi, Opeoluwa; Cooper, Tim J; Kanhere, Aditi; Arvey, Aaron; Webb, Helen M; Palermo, Richard D; Harth-Hertle, Marie L; Kempkes, Bettina; Jenner, Richard G; West, Michelle J

    2013-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) epigenetically reprogrammes B-lymphocytes to drive immortalization and facilitate viral persistence. Host-cell transcription is perturbed principally through the actions of EBV EBNA 2, 3A, 3B and 3C, with cellular genes deregulated by specific combinations of these EBNAs through unknown mechanisms. Comparing human genome binding by these viral transcription factors, we discovered that 25% of binding sites were shared by EBNA 2 and the EBNA 3s and were located predominantly in enhancers. Moreover, 80% of potential EBNA 3A, 3B or 3C target genes were also targeted by EBNA 2, implicating extensive interplay between EBNA 2 and 3 proteins in cellular reprogramming. Investigating shared enhancer sites neighbouring two new targets (WEE1 and CTBP2) we discovered that EBNA 3 proteins repress transcription by modulating enhancer-promoter loop formation to establish repressive chromatin hubs or prevent assembly of active hubs. Re-ChIP analysis revealed that EBNA 2 and 3 proteins do not bind simultaneously at shared sites but compete for binding thereby modulating enhancer-promoter interactions. At an EBNA 3-only intergenic enhancer site between ADAM28 and ADAMDEC1 EBNA 3C was also able to independently direct epigenetic repression of both genes through enhancer-promoter looping. Significantly, studying shared or unique EBNA 3 binding sites at WEE1, CTBP2, ITGAL (LFA-1 alpha chain), BCL2L11 (Bim) and the ADAMs, we also discovered that different sets of EBNA 3 proteins bind regulatory elements in a gene and cell-type specific manner. Binding profiles correlated with the effects of individual EBNA 3 proteins on the expression of these genes, providing a molecular basis for the targeting of different sets of cellular genes by the EBNA 3s. Our results therefore highlight the influence of the genomic and cellular context in determining the specificity of gene deregulation by EBV and provide a paradigm for host-cell reprogramming through modulation of

  3. Directed evolution induces tributyrin hydrolysis in a virulence factor of Xylella fastidiosa using a duplicated gene as a template

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Basuthkar J.; Asgeirsson, Bjarni; Dandekar, Abhaya

    2014-01-01

    Duplication of genes is one of the preferred ways for natural selection to add advantageous functionality to the genome without having to reinvent the wheel with respect to catalytic efficiency and protein stability. The duplicated secretory virulence factors of Xylella fastidiosa (LesA, LesB and LesC), implicated in Pierce's disease of grape and citrus variegated chlorosis of citrus species, epitomizes the positive selection pressures exerted on advantageous genes in such pathogens. A deeper insight into the evolution of these lipases/esterases is essential to develop resistance mechanisms in transgenic plants. Directed evolution, an attempt to accelerate the evolutionary steps in the laboratory, is inherently simple when targeted for loss of function. A bigger challenge is to specify mutations that endow a new function, such as a lost functionality in a duplicated gene. Previously, we have proposed a method for enumerating candidates for mutations intended to transfer the functionality of one protein into another related protein based on the spatial and electrostatic properties of the active site residues (DECAAF). In the current work, we present in vivo validation of DECAAF by inducing tributyrin hydrolysis in LesB based on the active site similarity to LesA. The structures of these proteins have been modeled using RaptorX based on the closely related LipA protein from Xanthomonas oryzae. These mutations replicate the spatial and electrostatic conformation of LesA in the modeled structure of the mutant LesB as well, providing in silico validation before proceeding to the laborious in vivo work. Such focused mutations allows one to dissect the relevance of the duplicated genes in finer detail as compared to gene knockouts, since they do not interfere with other moonlighting functions, protein expression levels or protein-protein interaction. PMID:25717364

  4. Gene array analysis of neural crest cells identifies transcription factors necessary for direct conversion of embryonic fibroblasts into neural crest cells

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Natsuki; Nishioka, Masahiro; Nakatake, Yuhki; Yulan, Piao; Mochizuki, Hiromi; Kawamura, Yoshifumi; Ko, Minoru S. H.; Goshima, Naoki; Kunisada, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neural crest cells (NC cells) are multipotent cells that emerge from the edge of the neural folds and migrate throughout the developing embryo. Although the gene regulatory network for generation of NC cells has been elucidated in detail, it has not been revealed which of the factors in the network are pivotal to directing NC identity. In this study we analyzed the gene expression profile of a pure NC subpopulation isolated from Sox10-IRES-Venus mice and investigated whether these genes played a key role in the direct conversion of Sox10-IRES-Venus mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) into NC cells. The comparative molecular profiles of NC cells and neural tube cells in 9.5-day embryos revealed genes including transcription factors selectively expressed in developing trunk NC cells. Among 25 NC cell-specific transcription factor genes tested, SOX10 and SOX9 were capable of converting MEFs into SOX10-positive (SOX10+) cells. The SOX10+ cells were then shown to differentiate into neurons, glial cells, smooth muscle cells, adipocytes and osteoblasts. These SOX10+ cells also showed limited self-renewal ability, suggesting that SOX10 and SOX9 directly converted MEFs into NC cells. Conversely, the remaining transcription factors, including well-known NC cell specifiers, were unable to convert MEFs into SOX10+ NC cells. These results suggest that SOX10 and SOX9 are the key factors necessary for the direct conversion of MEFs into NC cells. PMID:26873953

  5. Updated THM Astrophysical Factor of the 19F(p, α)16O Reaction and Influence of New Direct Data at Astrophysical Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cognata, M.; Palmerini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Indelicato, I.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Lombardo, I.; Trippella, O.

    2015-06-01

    Fluorine nucleosynthesis represents one of the most intriguing open questions in nuclear astrophysics. It has triggered new measurements which may modify the presently accepted paradigm of fluorine production and establish fluorine as an accurate probe of the inner layers of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Both direct and indirect measurements have attempted to improve the recommended extrapolation to astrophysical energies, showing no resonances. In this work, we will demonstrate that the interplay between direct and indirect techniques represents the most suitable approach to attain the required accuracy for the astrophysical factor at low energies, {{E}c.m.}≲ 300 keV, which is of interest for fluorine nucleosynthesis in AGB stars. We will use the recently measured direct 19F{{(p,α )}16}O astrophysical factor in the 600 keV≲ {{E}c.m.}≲ 800 keV energy interval to renormalize the existing Trojan Horse Method (THM) data spanning the astrophysical energies, accounting for all identified sources of uncertainty. This has a twofold impact on nuclear astrophysics. It shows the robustness of the THM approach even in the case of direct data of questionable quality, as normalization is extended over a broad range, minimizing systematic effects. Moreover, it allows us to obtain more accurate resonance data at astrophysical energies, thanks to the improved 19F{{(p,α )}16}O direct data. Finally, the present work strongly calls for more accurate direct data at low energies, so that we can obtain a better fitting of the direct reaction mechanism contributing to the 19F{{(p,α )}16}O astrophysical factor. Indeed, this work points out that the major source of uncertainty affecting the low-energy S(E) factor is the estimate of the non-resonant contribution, as the dominant role of the 113 keV resonance is now well established.

  6. Understanding the 'four directions of travel': qualitative research into the factors affecting recruitment and retention of doctors in rural Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Motivation and retention of health workers, particularly in rural areas, is a question of considerable interest to policy-makers internationally. Many countries, including Vietnam, are debating the right mix of interventions to motivate doctors in particular to work in remote areas. The objective of this study was to understand the dynamics of the health labour market in Vietnam, and what might encourage doctors to accept posts and remain in-post in rural areas. Methods This study forms part of a labour market survey which was conducted in Vietnam in November 2009 to February 2010. The study had three stages. This article describes the findings of the first stage - the qualitative research and literature review, which fed into the design of a structured survey (second stage) and contingent valuation (third stage). For the qualitative research, three tools were used - key informant interviews at national and provincial level (6 respondents); in-depth interviews of doctors at district and commune levels (11 respondents); and focus group discussions with medical students (15 participants). Results The study reports on the perception of the problem by national level stakeholders; the motivation for joining the profession by doctors; their views on the different factors affecting their willingness to work in rural areas (including different income streams, working conditions, workload, equipment, support and supervision, relationships with colleagues, career development, training, and living conditions). It presents findings on their overall satisfaction, their ranking of different attributes, and willingness to accept different kinds of work. Finally, it discusses recent and possible policy interventions to address the distribution problem. Conclusions Four typical 'directions of travel' are identified for Vietnamese doctors - from lower to higher levels of the system, from rural to urban areas, from preventive to curative health and from public to private

  7. Sur quelques oxydes de cuivre La 1-xA xCuO 3-δ (A = Sr, Y) lacunaires en oxygène et dérivés de la perovskite LaCuO 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darracq, S.; Demazeau, G.; Largeteau, A.

    1995-05-01

    LaCuO 3 was the first Cu(III) oxide with the perovskite structure. In 1990, J.F. Bringley et al. described the structures of new non-stoichiometric oxides LaCuO 3-δ. This paper deals with new materials La 1-xA xCuO 3-δ (A = Sr, Y) isostructural with the previous oxides. Their preparation conditions, their stability domain and their physical properties are correlated to the nature of the A cation.

  8. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: Certificate Number 880318W1. 09042, International Business Machines Corporation, IBM Development System for the Ada Language, Version 2.1.0, IBM 4381 under MVS/XA, Host and Target

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-28

    International Business Machines Corporation IBM Development System for the Ada Language, Version 2.1.0 IBM 4381 under MVS/XA, host and target Completion...Joint Program Office, AJPO 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side if necessary and identify by block number) International Business Machines Corporation...in the compiler listed in this declaration. I declare that International Business Machines Corporation is the owner of record of the object code of

  9. Cytoplasmic Actin Is an Extracellular Insect Immune Factor which Is Secreted upon Immune Challenge and Mediates Phagocytosis and Direct Killing of Bacteria, and Is a Plasmodium Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Sandiford, Simone L.; Dong, Yuemei; Pike, Andrew; Blumberg, Benjamin J.; Bahia, Ana C.; Dimopoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Actin is a highly versatile, abundant, and conserved protein, with functions in a variety of intracellular processes. Here, we describe a novel role for insect cytoplasmic actin as an extracellular pathogen recognition factor that mediates antibacterial defense. Insect actins are secreted from cells upon immune challenge through an exosome-independent pathway. Anopheles gambiae actin interacts with the extracellular MD2-like immune factor AgMDL1, and binds to the surfaces of bacteria, mediating their phagocytosis and direct killing. Globular and filamentous actins display distinct functions as extracellular immune factors, and mosquito actin is a Plasmodium infection antagonist. PMID:25658622

  10. Preliminary report on social psychological factors in long duration space flights: Review and directions for future research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, A. A.

    1978-01-01

    Group dynamics, sociological and psychological factors are examined. Crew composition and compatibility are studied. Group dynamics analysis includes: leadership; cohesiveness; conformity; and conflict.

  11. Impact of nonsynonymous mutations of factor X on the functions of factor X and anticoagulant activity of edoxaban.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Kengo; Morishima, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Shinichi; Ishihara, Hiroaki; Shibano, Toshiro; Murata, Mitsuru

    2015-03-01

    Edoxaban is an oral direct factor Xa (FXa) inhibitor and its efficacy as an oral anticoagulant is less subject to drug-food and drug-drug interaction than existing vitamin K antagonists. Although this profile of edoxaban suggests it is well suited for clinical use, it is not clear whether genetic variations of factor X influence the activity of edoxaban. Our aim was to investigate a possible impact of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the factor X gene on the functions of factor X and the activity of edoxaban. Two nonsynonymous SNPs within mature factor X, Ala152Thr and Gly192Arg, were selected as possible candidates that might affect the functions of FXa and the activity of edoxaban. We measured catalytic activities of wild type and mutant FXas in a chromogenic assay using S-2222 and coagulation times including prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thrombin time (aPTT) of plasma-containing recombinant FXs in the presence and absence of edoxaban. Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters of FXas, Km and Vmax values, PT and aPTT were not influenced by either mutation indicating these mutations do not affect the FXa catalytic and coagulation activities. The Ki values of edoxaban for the FXas and the concentrations of edoxaban required to double PT and aPTT were not different between wild type and mutated FXas indicating that both mutations have little impact on the activity of edoxaban. In conclusion, these data suggest that edoxaban has little interpatient variability stemming from SNPs in the factor X gene.

  12. Steroidogenic factor 1 directs programs regulating diet-induced thermogenesis and leptin action in the ventral medial hypothalamic nucleus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transcription factor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is exclusively expressed in the brain in the ventral medial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) and is required for the development of this nucleus. However, the physiological importance of transcriptional programs regulated by SF-1 in the VMH is not wel...

  13. Thromboelastography to Direct the Administration of Recombinant Activated Factor VII in a Child with Traumatic Injury Requiring Massive Transfusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    in a child with hemophilia and high titer inhibitors to factor VIII: A case report and brief review. J Extra Cor- por Technol 2006; 38:254–259 16...J Trauma 1969; 9:939–965 20. Sorensen B, Ingerslev J: Thromboelastogra- phy and recombinant factor VIIa- hemophilia and beyond. Semin Hematol 2004; 41

  14. Brief Report: Direct and Indirect Relations of Risk Factors with Eating Behavior Problems in Late Adolescent Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Birgit; Muris, Peter; Meesters, Cor; Zimmermann-van Beuningen, Ritine

    2009-01-01

    This study explored correlations between risk factors and eating behavior problems in late adolescent, non-clinical females (N = 301). Participants completed questionnaires for assessing eating problems, the closely associated factors of Body Mass Index (BMI) and body dissatisfaction, and a number of other risk variables that are thought to be…

  15. Dynamic imaging reveals that brain-derived neurotrophic factor can independently regulate motility and direction of neuroblasts within the rostral migratory stream.

    PubMed

    Bagley, J A; Belluscio, L

    2010-09-01

    Neuronal precursors generated in the subventricular zone (SVZ) migrate through the rostral migratory stream (RMS) to the olfactory bulb (OB). Although, the mechanisms regulating this migration remain largely unknown. Studies have shown that molecular factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) emanating from the OB, may function as chemoattractants drawing neuroblasts toward their target. To better understand the role of BDNF in RMS migration, we used an acute slice preparation from early postnatal mice to track the tangential migration of GAD65-GFP labeled RMS neuroblasts with confocal time-lapse imaging. By quantifying the cell dynamics using specific directional and motility criteria, our results showed that removal of the OB did not alter the overall directional trajectory of neuroblasts, but did reduce their motility. This suggested that additional guidance factors present locally within the RMS region also contribute to this migration. Here we report that BDNF and its high affinity receptor, tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (TrkB), are indeed heterogeneously expressed within the RMS at postnatal day 7. By altering BDNF levels within the entire pathway, we showed that reduced BDNF signaling changes both neuroblast motility and direction, while increased BDNF levels changes only motility. Together these data reveal that during this early postnatal period BDNF plays a complex role in regulating both the motility and direction of RMS flow, and that BDNF comes from sources within the RMS itself, as well as from the olfactory bulb.

  16. A direct method for calculating thermodynamic factors for liquid mixtures using the Permuted Widom test particle insertion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasaad Balaji, Sayee; Schnell, Sondre K.; McGarrity, Erin S.; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding mass transport in liquids by mutual diffusion is an important topic for many applications in chemical engineering. The reason for this is that diffusion is often the rate limiting step in chemical reactors and separators. In multicomponent liquid mixtures, transport diffusion can be described by both generalized Fick's law and the Maxwell-Stefan theory. The Maxwell-Stefan and Fick approaches in an n-component system are related by the so-called thermodynamic factor [R. Taylor and H.A. Kooijman, Chem. Eng. Commun, 102, 87 (1991)]. As Fick diffusivities can be measured in experiments and Maxwell-Stefan diffusivities can be obtained from molecular simulations/theory, the thermodynamic factors bridge the gap between experiments and molecular simulations/theory. It is therefore desirable to be able to compute thermodynamic factors from molecular simulations. Unfortunately, presently used simulation techniques for computing thermodynamic factors are inefficient and often require numerical differentiation of simulation results. In this work, we propose a modified version of the Widom test-particle method to compute thermodynamic factors from a single simulation. This method is found to be more efficient than the conventional Widom test particle insertion method combined with numerical differentiation of simulation results. The approach is tested for binary systems consisting of Lennard-Jones particles. The thermodynamic factors computed from the simulation and from numerically differentiating the activity coefficients obtained from the conventional Widom test particle insertion method are in excellent agreement.

  17. Human pathogenic Borrelia spielmanii sp. nov. resists complement-mediated killing by direct binding of immune regulators factor H and factor H-like protein 1.

    PubMed

    Herzberger, Pia; Siegel, Corinna; Skerka, Christine; Fingerle, Volker; Schulte-Spechtel, Ulrike; van Dam, Alje; Wilske, Bettina; Brade, Volker; Zipfel, Peter F; Wallich, Reinhard; Kraiczy, Peter

    2007-10-01

    Borrelia spielmanii sp. nov. has recently been shown to be a novel human pathogenic genospecies that causes Lyme disease in Europe. In order to elucidate the immune evasion mechanisms of B. spielmanii, we compared the abilities of isolates obtained from Lyme disease patients and tick isolate PC-Eq17 to escape from complement-mediated bacteriolysis. Using a growth inhibition assay, we show that four B. spielmanii isolates, including PC-Eq17, are serum resistant, whereas a single isolate, PMew, was more sensitive to complement-mediated lysis. All isolates activated complement in vitro, as demonstrated by covalent attachment of C3 fragments; however, deposition of the later activation products C6 and C5b-9 was restricted to the moderately serum-resistant isolate PMew and the serum-sensitive B. garinii isolate G1. Furthermore, serum adsorption experiments revealed that all B. spielmanii isolates acquired the host alternative pathway regulators factor H and factor H-like protein (FHL-1) from human serum. Both complement regulators retained their factor I-mediated C3b inactivation activities when bound to spirochetes. In addition, two distinct factor H and FHL-1 binding proteins, BsCRASP-1 and BsCRASP-2, were identified, which we estimated to be approximately 23 to 25 kDa in mass. A further factor H binding protein, BsCRASP-3, was found exclusively in the tick isolate, PC-Eq17. This is the first report describing an immune evasion mechanism utilized by B. spielmanii sp. nov., and it demonstrates the capture of human immune regulators to resist complement-mediated killing.

  18. Understanding Factors Associated with Teacher-Directed Student Use of Technology in Elementary Classrooms: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Helena P.; Russell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Analyses presented here are secondary data analyses of the "Use, Support and Effect of Instructional Technology" study aimed at identifying predictors of teacher-directed student use of technology (TDS) in elementary classrooms. Using data from a convenience sample of 1040 teachers nested within 81 schools in 21 Massachusetts' school…

  19. Adolescent Sibling Relationship Quality and Adjustment: Sibling Trustworthiness and Modeling, as Factors Directly and Indirectly Influencing These Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Wendy C.; Yu, Jeong Jin; Kuehn, Emily D.

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to examine the direct and moderating effects of trustworthiness and modeling on adolescent siblings' adjustment. Data were collected from 438 families including a mother, a younger sibling in fifth, sixth, or seventh grade (M = 11.6 years), and an older sibling (M = 14.3 years). Respondents completed Web-based…

  20. Factors influencing the return rate in a direct mail campaign to inform minority women about prevention of cervical cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Dignan, M B; Michielutte, R; Jones-Lighty, D D; Bahnson, J

    1994-01-01

    The Forsyth County Cervical Cancer Prevention Project was a 5-year community-based health education program funded by the National Cancer Institute. The program was developed to reduce cervical cancer mortality among black women in Forsyth County, and it was targeted to those ages 18 and older. The program tried to educate the target population through a combination of mass media and direct education. This paper reports on an experiment conducted to investigate sources of influence on the effectiveness of direct mail, a technique used to augment mass media health education. Direct mail has shown promise as a method for reaching target populations that are difficult to reach with other mass media approaches. Using commercially prepared mailing lists sorted by zip code and other characteristics of the resident, health-related materials can be targeted to persons at their homes. A randomized experiment involving 1,000 households was carried out to estimate the influence of type of postage and address (name versus "resident or occupant") on the response rate to direct mail. Results indicated that there was no significant advantage from use of first class over bulk rate postage, but the return was significantly greater when the envelope bore a name rather than "resident or occupant." PMID:8041850

  1. Linking Contextual Factors with Rhetorical Pattern Shift: Direct and Indirect Strategies Recommended in English Business Communication Textbooks in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Junhua; Zhu, Pinfan

    2011-01-01

    Scholars have consistently claimed that rhetorical patterns are culturally bound, and indirectness is a defining characteristic of Chinese writing. Through examining how the rhetorical mechanism of directness and indirectness is presented in 29 English business communication textbooks published in China, we explore how English business…

  2. Side chain dependence of intensity and wavenumber position of amide I' in IR and visible Raman spectra of XA and AX dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Measey, Thomas; Hagarman, Andrew; Eker, Fatma; Griebenow, Kai; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard

    2005-04-28

    A series of AX and XA dipeptides in D2O have been investigated by FTIR, isotropic, and anisotropic Raman spectroscopy at acidic, neutral, and alkaline pD, to probe the influence of amino acid side chains on the amide I' band. We obtained a set of spectral parameters for each peptide, including intensities, wavenumbers, half-widths, and dipole moments, and found that these amide I' parameters are indeed dependent on the side chain. Side chains with similar characteristic properties were found to have similar effects on the amide I'. For example, dipeptides with aliphatic side chains were found to exhibit a downshift of the amide I' wavenumber, while those containing polar side chains experienced an increase in wavenumber. The N-terminal charge causes a substantial upshift of amide I', whereas the C-terminal charge causes a moderate decrease of the transition dipole moment. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on the investigated dipeptides in vacuo yielded different correlations between theoretically and experimentally obtained wavenumbers for aliphatic/aromatic and polar/charged side chains, respectively. This might be indicative of a role of the hydration shell in transferring side chain-backbone interactions. For Raman bands, we found a correlation between amide I' depolarization ratio and wavenumber which reflects that some side chains (valine, histidine) have a significant influence on the Raman tensor. Altogether, the obtained data are of utmost importance for utilizing amide I as a tool for secondary structure analysis of polypeptides and proteins and providing an experimental basis for theoretical modeling of this important backbone mode. This is demonstrated by a rather accurate modeling for the amide I' band profiles of the IR, isotropic Raman, and anisotropic Raman spectra of the beta-amyloid fragment Abeta(1-82).

  3. Direct binding of translation initiation factor eIF2gamma-G domain to its GTPase-activating and GDP-GTP exchange factors eIF5 and eIF2B epsilon.

    PubMed

    Alone, Pankaj V; Dever, Thomas E

    2006-05-05

    The GTP-binding eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2 delivers initiator methionyl-tRNA to the 40 S ribosomal subunit. The factor eIF5 stimulates hydrolysis of GTP by eIF2 upon AUG codon recognition, whereas the factor eIF2B promotes guanine nucleotide exchange on eIF2 to recycle the factor for additional rounds of translation initiation. The GTP-binding (G) domain resides in the gamma subunit of the heterotrimeric eIF2; however, only eIF2beta, and not eIF2gamma, has been reported to directly bind to eIF5 or eIF2B. Using proteins expressed in yeast or recombinant systems we show that full-length yeast eIF2gamma, as well as its isolated G domain, binds directly to eIF5 and the epsilon subunit of eIF2B, and we map the interaction sites to the catalytically important regions of these factors. Consistently, an internal deletion of residues 50-100 of yeast eIF5 impairs the interaction with recombinant eIF2gamma-G domain and abolishes the ability of eIF5 to stimulate eIF2 GTPase activity in translation initiation complexes in vitro. Thus, rather than allosterically regulating eIF2gamma-G domain function via eIF2beta, our data support a model in which the GTPase-activating factor eIF5 and the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor eIF2B modulate eIF2 function through direct interactions with the eIF2gamma-G domain.

  4. New alternating direction procedures in finite element analysis based upon EBE approximate factorizations. [element-by-element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, T. J. R.; Winget, J.; Levit, I.; Tezduyar, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    Element-by-element approximate factorization procedures are proposed for solving the large finite element equation systems which arise in computational mechanics. A variety of techniques are compared on problems of structural mechanics, heat conduction and fluid mechanics. The results obtained suggest considerable potential for the methods described.

  5. A Study of Program Leadership Among Extension Specialists Directed Toward Learning What Factors Augment and Deter Leadership Expression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaelsen, Leon Claude

    This study sought to identify factors which facilitate or deter leadership expression in rural extension specialists. Questionnaires were sent to specialists in ten states who devoted 50% or more of their time to extension work in production, management, and resource use, and to those working in marketing. Evaluations were secured from…

  6. Antiplatelet agents affecting the interaction of Tissue Factor-Factor VIIa complex with Factor X in a continuous-flow reactor.

    PubMed

    Gir, S; Reavis, R; Turitto, V T; Gollamudi, R

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of antithrombotic agents in the activation of Factor X in the presence of the Tissue Factor-Factor VIIa (TF-VIIa) complex in a continuous-flow reactor. Tissue Factor immobilized in a phospholipid bilayer on the inner surface of a capillary tube (internal diameter = 0.27 mm) was exposed to a perfusate containing Factors VIIa and X flowing at a flow rate of 12.7 microliters/min, corresponding to a wall shear rate of 100 s-1. Factor Xa (the activated form of Factor X) in the effluent was determined by a chromogenic assay. The effectiveness of two platelet aggregation inhibitors, alpha,alpha'-bis-[3-(N,N-diethylcarbamoyl)piperidino-p-xylene dihydrobromide (A-1) and alpha,alpha'-bis-[3-N-benzyl-N-methylcarbamoyl)piperidino]-p-xylen e dihydrobromide (A-4) in inhibiting Factor X activation is reported here. The results suggest that the Tissue Factor pathway, mediated through TF-VIIa complex, produces significantly lower levels of Factor Xa in the presence of compounds A-1 and A-4. On the basis of these findings, it appears that the anticoagulation action of these compounds reinforces their platelet aggregation-inhibitory properties. These carbamoylpiperidines (nipecotamides) therefore appear to be useful antithrombotic agents.

  7. Knockdown of kinesin KIF11 abrogates directed migration in response to epidermal growth factor-mediated chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Lin, Stanley Li

    2014-09-26

    Establishment of microtubule polarity is critical for directional cell migration involved in morphogenesis, differentiation, cell division, and metastasis. Current models, involving iterative microtubule capture and inactivation of microtubule depolymerizing mechanisms at the leading edge, cannot account for the biased migration exhibited by cells in culture in the absence of directional cues, suggesting central mechanisms governing microtubule polarity remain unknown. We engineered two human MDA-MB-231/IMP1 breast carcinoma cell lines, denoted kdKIF11-1 and kdKIF11-2, in which the kinesin KIF11 (also known as Eg5) was stably knocked down by two different shRNAs. Western blot analysis showed knockdown by each shRNA decreased KIF11 expression by 58% and 79% for kdKIF11-1 and kdKIF11-2, respectively, whereas Rac1 expression was unaffected. All cell lines retained a well-defined microtubule structure. Compared to cells infected with the control viral vector, both KIF11 knockdown cell lines displayed a 14-45% increase in cell motility in a scratch wound healing assay. In contrast, KIF11 knockdown decreased invasion by 70%, compared to the control, as measured by invasion through Matrigel-coated transwells. To determine whether the reduction in invasion was due to reduced chemotaxis, we substituted collagen for Matrigel in the transwell assay and similarly observed a 44-54% reduction in migration, using EGF as the chemoattractant. However, when including EGF in both the upper and lower chambers of the transwell to stimulate migration but eliminate chemotaxis, transwell migration decreased for the control cell line only, indicating that KIF11 knockdown did not impair migration, but severely impaired chemotaxis. We conclude KIF11 is a key downstream molecule that responds to directional cues in chemotaxis to govern the direction of migration.

  8. Understanding the Relative Contributions of Direct Environmental Effects and Passive Genotype-Environment Correlations in the Association between Familial Risk Factors and Child Disruptive Behavior Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bornovalova, Marina A.; Cummings, Jenna R.; Hunt, Elizabeth; Blazei, Ryan; Malone, Steve; Iacono, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous work reports an association between familial risk factors stemming from parental characteristics and offspring disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs). This association may reflect a) the direct effects of familial environment, and b) a passive gene-environment correlation, wherein the parents provide both the genes and the environment. The current study examined the contributions of direct environmental influences and passive gene-environment correlations by comparing the effects of familial risk factors on child DBDs in genetically related (biological) and non-related (adoptive) families. Method: Participants were 402 adoptive and 204 biological families. Familial environment was defined as maternal and paternal maladaptive parenting and antisociality, marital conflict, and divorce; offspring DBDs included attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, and oppositional defiant disorder. Mixed-level regressions estimated the main effects of familial environment, adoption status, and the familial environment by adoption status interaction term, which tested for a presence of passive gene-environment correlations. Results: There was a main effect of maternal and paternal maladaptive parenting and marital discord on child DBDs, indicating a direct environmental effect. There was no direct environmental effect of maternal or paternal antisociality, but maternal and paternal antisociality had stronger associations with child DBDs in biological families than adoptive families, indicating the presence of a passive gene-environment correlation. Conclusions: Many familial risk factors affected children equally across genetically-related and non-related families, providing evidence for direct environmental effects. The relationship of parental antisociality and offspring DBDs was best explained by a passive gene-environment correlation, where a general vulnerability toward externalizing psychopathology is passed down by the parents to the

  9. Direct visualization of the elt-2 gut-specific GATA factor binding to a target promoter inside the living Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    PubMed

    Fukushige, T; Hendzel, M J; Bazett-Jones, D P; McGhee, J D

    1999-10-12

    In analyzing the transcriptional networks that regulate development, one ideally would like to determine whether a particular transcription factor binds directly to a candidate target promoter inside the living embryo. Properties of the Caenorhabditis elegans elt-2 gene, which encodes a gut-specific GATA factor, have allowed us to develop such a method. We previously have shown, by means of ectopic expression studies, that elt-2 regulates its own promoter. To test whether this autoregulation is direct, we fused green fluorescent protein (GFP) close to the C terminus of elt-2 in a construct that contains the full elt-2 promoter and the full elt-2 zinc finger DNA binding domain; the construct is expressed correctly (i.e., only in the gut lineage) and is able to rescue the lethality of an elt-2 null mutant. Multicopy transgenic arrays of this rescuing elt-2::GFP construct were integrated into the genome and transgenic embryos were examined when the developing gut has 4-8 cells; the majority of these embryonic gut nuclei show two discrete intense foci of fluorescence. We interpret these fluorescent foci as the result of ELT-2::GFP binding directly to its own promoter within nuclei of the developing gut lineage. Numerous control experiments, both genetic and biochemical, all support this conclusion and support the specificity of the binding. The approach should be applicable to studying other transcription factors binding target promoters, all within the living C. elegans embryo.

  10. Future Directions in Research on Racism-Related Stress and Racial-Ethnic Protective Factors for Black Youth.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shawn C T; Neblett, Enrique W

    2016-05-04

    Research on racism-related stress and racial-ethnic protective factors represents an important enterprise for optimizing the mental health of African American and other racial and ethnic minority youth. However, there has been a relative dearth of work on these factors in the clinical psychology research literature, and more work is needed in outlets such as these. To this end, the current article adopts a developmental psychopathology framework and uses recent empirical findings to outline our current understanding of racism-related stress and racial-ethnic protective factors (i.e., racial identity, racial socialization, Africentric worldview) for African American youth. We then provide nine recommendations-across basic, applied, and broader/cross-cutting research lines-that we prioritize as essential to advancing the future scientific investigation of this crucial research agenda. Within and across these recommendations, we issue a charge to researchers and clinicians alike, with the ultimate goal of alleviating the negative mental health impact that racism-related stress can have on the well-being and mental health of African American and other racial and ethnic minority youth.

  11. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single ‘complex peak’ in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event. PMID:26678946

  12. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single ‘complex peak’ in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event.

  13. Vandetanib (ZD6474), a dual inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Alessandro; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; Falasconi, Fabiano; De Feo, Gianfranco; Del Giudice, Antonia; Bryce, Jane; Di Maio, Massimo; De Maio, Ermelinda; Normanno, Nicola; Perrone, Francesco

    2009-04-01

    Vandetanib is a novel, orally available inhibitor of different intracellular signaling pathways involved in tumor growth, progression, and angiogenesis: vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, epidermal growth factor receptor, and REarranged during Transfection tyrosine kinase activity. Phase I clinical trials have shown that vandetanib is well tolerated as a single agent at daily doses < or =300 mg. In the phase II setting, negative results were observed with vandetanib in small cell lung cancer, metastatic breast cancer, and multiple myeloma. In contrast, three randomized phase II studies showed that vandetanib prolonged the progression-free survival (PFS) time of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as a single agent when compared with gefitinib or when added to chemotherapy. Rash, diarrhea, hypertension, fatigue, and asymptomatic QTc prolongation were the most common adverse events. Antitumor activity was also observed in medullary thyroid cancer. Four randomized phase III clinical trials in NSCLC are exploring the efficacy of vandetanib in combination with docetaxel, the Zactima in cOmbination with Docetaxel In non-small cell lung Cancer (ZODIAC) trial, or with pemetrexed, the Zactima Efficacy with Alimta in Lung cancer (ZEAL) trial, or as a single agent, the Zactima Efficacy when Studied versus Tarceva (ZEST) and the Zactima Efficacy trial for NSCLC Patients with History of EGFR-TKI chemo-Resistance (ZEPHYR) trials. Based on a press release by the sponsor of these trials, the PFS time was longer with vandetanib in the ZODIAC and ZEAL trials; the ZEST trial was negative for its primary superiority analysis, but was successful according to a preplanned noninferiority analysis of PFS. Ongoing phase II and III clinical trials will better define the appropriate schedule, the optimal setting of evaluation, and the safety of long-term use of vandetanib.

  14. A factor analytic investigation of the BASC-2 Behavioral and Emotional Screening System Parent Form: psychometric properties, practical implications, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Dowdy, Erin; Chin, Jenna K; Twyford, Jennifer M; Dever, Bridget V

    2011-06-01

    The Behavior Assessment System for Children, Second Edition (BASC-2) Behavioral and Emotional Screening System Parent Form (BESS Parent; Kamphaus & Reynolds, 2007) is a recently developed instrument designed to identify behavioral and emotional risk in students. To describe the underlying factor structure for this instrument, exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) were conducted utilizing two subsets of a large, nationally-representative sample. The results of the EFA suggested that the BESS Parent contained a four-factor latent structure (i.e., Externalizing, Internalizing, Adaptive Skills, and Inattention), which was supported by CFA. Results support further investigation into utilizing four subscales in addition to an overall risk score; distributional and reliability information for the BESS Parent subscales is provided. Practical implications for school psychologists interested in early identification and directions for future research are discussed.

  15. Extracellular and intracellular factors regulating the migration direction of a chemotactic cell in traveling-wave chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiwata, R.; Iwasa, M.

    2015-04-01

    This report presents a simple model that describes the motion of a single Dictyostelium discoideum cell exposed to a traveling wave of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The model incorporates two types of responses to stimulation by cAMP: the changes in the polarity and motility of the cell. The periodic change in motility is assumed to be induced by periodic cAMP stimulation on the basis of previous experimental studies. Consequently, the net migration of the cell occurs in a particular direction with respect to wave propagation, which explains the migration of D. discoideum cells in aggregation. The wave period and the difference between the two response times are important parameters that determine the direction of migration. The theoretical prediction compared with experiments presented in another study. The transition from the single-cell state of the population of D. discoideum cells to the aggregation state is understood to be a specific example of spontaneous breakage of symmetry in biology.

  16. Home Food Environment Factors Associated with the Presence of Fruit and Vegetables at Dinner: A Direct Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Trofholz, Amanda C.; Tate, Allan D.; Draxten, Michelle L.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Berge, Jerica M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little research exists about the factors influencing the foods available at family meals. This study examines the home food environment factors contributing to the presence of fruit and vegetables at family meals. Methods Home food inventory (HFI) and survey data were collected from low-income, minority families (n=120) with children 6-12 years old. Observations from video-recorded family dinner meals, totaling 800 videos, were used to measure the frequency at which fruit and vegetables were served. Multiple regression was used to investigate how the fruit and vegetables in the HFI and other home food environment factors were related to the number of days fruit and vegetables were served at dinner during the observation period. Results Availability and accessibility of fruit and vegetables in the home were each found to be significantly associated with the presence of fruits and vegetables at family dinners. Of the fruit and vegetable categories (i.e., fresh, canned, or frozen), having fresh fruit and vegetables available in the home was found to be most strongly associated with serving fruit and vegetables at dinner, respectively. Higher parent intake of vegetables was associated with the presence of vegetables at dinners, and parent meal planning was associated with the presence of fruit at dinners. Conclusions Increasing the availability and accessibility of fresh fruit and vegetables in the home may be an effective approach to increasing the presence of fruits and vegetables at family dinners, especially among low-income, minority households. It is also essential to understand why families are not using all fruits and vegetables (e.g., canned and frozen) available in the home for family meals. Family meals are a place to promote the increased presence of both fruit and vegetables. PMID:26527254

  17. The use of parabolic variations and the direct determination of stress intensity factors using the BIE method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendelson, A.

    1977-01-01

    Two advances in the numerical techniques of utilizing the BIE method are presented. The boundary unknowns are represented by parabolas over each interval which are integrated in closed form. These integrals are listed for easy use. For problems involving crack tip singularities, these singularities are included in the boundary integrals so that the stress intensity factor becomes just one more unknown in the set of boundary unknowns thus avoiding the uncertainties of plotting and extrapolating techniques. The method is applied to the problems of a notched beam in tension and bending, with excellent results.

  18. The use of parabolic variations and the direct determination of stress intensity factors using the BIE method. [Boundary Integral Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendelson, A.

    1977-01-01

    Two advances in the numerical techniques of utilizing the BIE method are presented. The boundary unknowns are represented by parabolas over each interval which are integrated in closed form. These integrals are listed for easy use. For problems involving crack tip singularities, these singularities are included in the boundary integrals so that the stress intensity factor becomes just one more unknown in the set of boundary unknowns thus avoiding the uncertainties of plotting and extrapolating techniques. The method is applied to the problems of a notched beam in tension and bending, with excellent results.

  19. Improved efficacy of soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) fusion protein by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Son, Young Jun; Han, Jihye; Lee, Jae Yeon; Kim, HaHyung; Chun, Taehoon

    2015-06-01

    Soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B fusion immunoglobulin (hRANK-Ig) has been considered as one of the therapeutic agents to treat osteoporosis or diseases associated with bone destruction by blocking the interaction between RANK and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). However, no scientific record showing critical amino acid residues within the structural interface between the human RANKL and RANK complex is yet available. In this study, we produced several mutants of hRANK-Ig by replacement of amino acid residue(s) and tested whether the mutants had increased binding affinity to human RANKL. Based on the results from flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance analyses, the replacement of E(125) with D(125), or E(125) and C(127) with D(125) and F(127) within loop 3 of cysteine-rich domain 3 of hRANK-Ig increases binding affinity to human RANKL over the wild-type hRANK-Ig. This result may provide the first example of improvement in the efficacy of hRANK-Ig by protein engineering and may give additional information to understand a more defined structural interface between hRANK and RANKL.

  20. The transcription factor, the Cdk, its cyclin and their regulator: directing the transcriptional response to a nutritional signal.

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, K; Fisher, F; McAndrew, P C; Goding, C R

    1994-01-01

    The Pho80-Pho85 cyclin-cdk complex prevents transcription of PHO5 by inhibiting the ability of the basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor Pho4 to activate transcription in response to high phosphate conditions. In low phosphate the Pho80-Pho85 complex is inactivated and Pho4 is then able to activate the acid phosphatase gene PHO5. We show here that Pho4 and the homeobox protein Pho2 interact in vivo and act cooperatively to activate the PHO5 UAS, with interaction being regulated by the phosphate switch. In addition, we also demonstrate that an additional factor, Pho81, interacts in high phosphate with both the Pho80 cyclin and with Pho4. In low phosphate, Pho80 and Pho81 dissociate from Pho4, but retain the ability to interact with each other. The evidence presented here supports the idea that Pho81 acts as a phosphate-sensitive trigger that regulates the ability of the Pho80-Pho85 cyclin-cdk complex to bind Pho4, while DNA binding by Pho4 is dependent on the phosphate-sensitive interaction with Pho2. Images PMID:7957107

  1. New Insights into the Pros and Cons of the Clinical Use of Vitamin K Antagonists (VKAs) Versus Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs)

    PubMed Central

    van Gorp, Rick H.; Schurgers, Leon J.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin K-antagonists (VKA) are the most widely used anticoagulant drugs to treat patients at risk of arterial and venous thrombosis for the past 50 years. Due to unfavorable pharmacokinetics VKA have a small therapeutic window, require frequent monitoring, and are susceptible to drug and nutritional interactions. Additionally, the effect of VKA is not limited to coagulation, but affects all vitamin K-dependent proteins. As a consequence, VKA have detrimental side effects by enhancing medial and intimal calcification. These limitations stimulated the development of alternative anticoagulant drugs, resulting in direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) drugs, which specifically target coagulation factor Xa and thrombin. DOACs also display non-hemostatic vascular effects via protease-activated receptors (PARs). As atherosclerosis is characterized by a hypercoagulable state indicating the involvement of activated coagulation factors in the genesis of atherosclerosis, anticoagulation could have beneficial effects on atherosclerosis. Additionally, accumulating evidence demonstrates vascular benefit from high vitamin K intake. This review gives an update on oral anticoagulant treatment on the vasculature with a special focus on calcification and vitamin K interaction. PMID:26593943

  2. Human transforming growth factor type. cap alpha. coding sequence is not a directed-acting oncogene when overexpressed in NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Finzi, E.; Fleming, T.; Segatto, O.; Pennington, C.Y.; Bringman, T.S.; Derynck, R.; Aaronson, S.A.

    1987-06-01

    A peptide secreted by some tumor cells in vitro imparts anchorage-independent growth to normal rat kidney (NRK) cells and has been termed transforming growth factor type ..cap alpha.. (TGF-..cap alpha..). To directly investigate the transforming properties of this factor, the human sequence coding for TGF-..cap alpha.. was placed under the control of either a metallothionein promoter or a retroviral long terminal repeat. These constructs failed to induce morphological transformation upon transfection of NIH 3T3 cells, whereas viral oncogenes encoding a truncated form of its cognate receptor, the EGF receptor, or another growth factor, sis/platelet-derived growth factor 2, efficiently induced transformed foci. Binding assays were done using (/sup 125/I)-EGF. When NIH 3T3 clonal sublines were selected by transfection of TGF-..cap alpha.. expression vectors in the presence of a dominant selectable market, they were shown to secrete large amounts of TGF-..cap alpha.. into the medium, to have downregulated EGF receptors, and to be inhibited in growth by TGF-..cap alpha.. monoclonal antibody. These results indicated that secreted TGF-..cap alpha.. interacts with its receptor at a cell surface location. Single cell-derived TGF-..cap alpha..-expressing sublines grew to high saturation density in culture. These and other results imply that TGF-..cap alpha.. exerts a growth-promoting effect on the entire NIH 3T3 cell population after secretion into the medium but little, if any, effect on the individual cell synthesizing this factor. It is concluded that the normal coding sequence for TGF-..cap alpha.. is not a direct-acting oncogene when overexpressed in NIH 3T3 cells.

  3. The human transforming growth factor type alpha coding sequence is not a direct-acting oncogene when overexpressed in NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Finzi, E; Fleming, T; Segatto, O; Pennington, C Y; Bringman, T S; Derynck, R; Aaronson, S A

    1987-01-01

    A peptide secreted by some tumor cells in vitro imparts anchorage-independent growth to normal rat kidney (NRK) cells and has been termed transforming growth factor type alpha (TGF-alpha). To directly investigate the transforming properties of this factor, the human sequence coding for TGF-alpha was placed under the control of either a metallothionein promoter or a retroviral long terminal repeat. These constructs failed to induce morphological transformation upon transfection of NIH 3T3 cells, whereas viral oncogenes encoding a truncated form of its cognate receptor, the EGF receptor, or another growth factor, sis/platelet-derived growth factor 2, efficiently induced transformed foci. When NIH 3T3 clonal sublines were selected by transfection of TGF-alpha expression vectors in the presence of a dominant selectable marker, they were shown to secrete large amounts of TGF-alpha into the medium, to have downregulated EGF receptors, and to be inhibited in growth by TGF-alpha monoclonal antibody. These results indicated that secreted TGF-alpha interacts with its receptor at a cell surface location. Single cell-derived TGF-alpha-expressing sublines grew to high saturation density in culture. However, when plated as single cells on contact-inhibited monolayers of NIH 3T3 cells, they failed to form colonies, whereas v-sis- and v-erbB-transfected cells formed transformed colonies under the same conditions. Moreover, TGF-alpha-expressing sublines were not tumorigenic in nude mice. These and other results imply that TGF-alpha exerts a growth-promoting effect on the entire NIH 3T3 cell population after secretion into the medium but little, if any, effect on the individual cell synthesizing this factor. It is concluded that the normal coding sequence for TGF-alpha is not a direct-acting oncogene when overexpressed in NIH 3T3 cells. Images PMID:3035551

  4. Four temporary Neptune co-orbitals: (148975) 2001 XA255, (310071) 2010 KR59, (316179) 2010 EN65, and 2012 GX17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2012-11-01

    Context. Numerical simulations suggest that Neptune primordial co-orbitals may significantly outnumber the equivalent population hosted by Jupiter, yet the objects remain elusive. Since the first discovery in 2001 just ten minor planets, including nine Trojans and one quasi-satellite, have been positively identified as Neptune co-orbitals. In contrast, Minor Planet Center (MPC) data indicate that more than 5000 objects are confirmed Jupiter co-orbitals. On the other hand, some simulations predict that a negligible fraction of passing bodies are captured into the 1:1 commensurability with Neptune today. Aims: Hundreds of objects have been discovered in the outer solar system during the various wide-field surveys carried out during the past decade, and many of them have been classified using cuts in the pericentre and other orbital elements. This leads to possible misclassifications of resonant objects. Here, we explore this possibility to uncover neglected Neptune co-orbitals. Methods: Using numerical analysis techniques, we singled out eleven candidates and used N-body calculations to either confirm or reject their co-orbital nature. Results: We confirm that four objects previously classified as Centaurs by the MPC currently are temporary Neptune co-orbitals. (148975) 2001 XA255 is the most dynamically unstable of the four. It appears to be a relatively recent (50 kyr) visitor from the scattered disk on its way to the inner solar system. (310071) 2010 KR59 is following a complex horseshoe orbit, (316179) 2010 EN65 is in the process of switching from L4 to L5 Trojan, and 2012 GX17 is a promising L5 Trojan candidate in urgent need of follow-up. The four objects move in highly inclined orbits and have high eccentricities. These dynamically hot objects are not primordial 1:1 librators, but are captured and likely originated from beyond Neptune, having entered the region of the giant planets relatively recently. Conclusions: Casting doubt over claims by other authors

  5. Risk factors for falls in older adults with lower extremity arthritis: a conceptual framework of current knowledge and future directions.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Cathy M; Gyurcsik, Nancy C

    2012-01-01

    Objectif : Le nombre de Canadiens de 65 ans et plus augmentera au cours des 20 prochaines années et la prévalence des maladies chroniques, dont l'arthrite, sera en hausse, tout comme le nombre de chutes. Bien que des facteurs de risques de chute connus soient associés à l'arthrose du genou ou de la hanche, une somme minimale de recherches a évalué les risques ou les taux de chutes et de fractures chez ce segment de la population. En conséquence, l'objectif de cette étude était de dresser un résumé des recherches réalisées sur les risques de chute ou de fracture chez les adultes plus âgés aux prises avec de l'arthrose au genou ou à la hanche, et d'élaborer un cadre conceptuel pour le dépistage et l'évaluation des risques de chute. Méthode : La Classification internationale du fonctionnement, du handicap et de la santé (CIF), qui forme les directives cliniques pour le dépistage des risques de chute, et une revue documentaire sélective ont été utilisées. Résultats : Il existe des lacunes dans nos connaissances relatives aux risques de chute et de fracture au sein de ce segment de la population. La dégradation de la performance musculaire, de l'équilibre et de la mobilité a été établie, mais on sait peu de choses en ce qui a trait aux répercussions possibles de facteurs contextuels personnels ou environnementaux sur les risques de chute ou de fracture. L'activité physique peut aider à prévenir les chutes, mais la non-adhésion des patients à un programme d'activité physique pose problème. Conclusion : Une évaluation des risques de chute chez les adultes plus âgés souffrant d'arthrose du genou ou de la hanche est nécessaire. La promotion de l'activité physique régulière, en se concentrant sur les facteurs contextuels personnels propres à la maladie ou à l'activité, pourrait aider directement la planification du traitement.

  6. Structural factors and mechanisms underlying the improved photodynamic cell killing with silicon phthalocyanine photosensitizers directed to lysosomes versus mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Myriam E; Zhang, Ping; Azizuddin, Kashif; Delos Santos, Grace B; Chiu, Song-mao; Xue, Liang-yan; Berlin, Jeffery C; Peng, Xinzhan; Wu, Hongqiao; Lam, Minh; Nieminen, Anna-Liisa; Kenney, Malcolm E; Oleinick, Nancy L

    2009-01-01

    The phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4 has been shown to bind preferentially to mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Upon photoirradiation of Pc 4-loaded cells, membrane components, especially Bcl-2, are photodamaged and apoptosis, as indicated by activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, is triggered. A series of analogs of Pc 4 were synthesized, and the results demonstrate that Pcs with the aminopropylsiloxy ligand of Pc 4 or a similar one on one side of the Pc ring and a second large axial ligand on the other side of the ring have unexpected properties, including enhanced cell uptake, greater monomerization resulting in greater intracellular fluorescence and three-fold higher affinity constants for liposomes. The hydroxyl-bearing axial ligands tend to reduce aggregation of the Pc and direct it to lysosomes, resulting in four to six times more killing of cells, as defined by loss of clonogenicity, than with Pc 4. Whereas Pc 4-PDT photodamages Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, Pc 181-PDT causes much less photodamage to Bcl-2 over the same dose-response range relative to cell killing, with earlier cleavage of Bid and slower caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Therefore, within this series of photosensitizers, these hydroxyl-bearing axial ligands are less aggregated than is Pc 4, tend to localize to lysosomes and are more effective in overall cell killing than is Pc 4, but induce apoptosis more slowly and by a modified pathway.

  7. Inhibition of B-NHEJ in Plateau-Phase Cells Is Not a Direct Consequence of Suppressed Growth Factor Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Satyendra K.; Bednar, Theresa; Zhang Lihua; Wu, Wenqi; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: It has long been known that the proliferation status of a cell is a determinant of radiation response, and the available evidence implicates repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the underlying mechanism. Recent results have shown that a novel, highly error-prone pathway of nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) operating as backup (B-NHEJ) processes DSBs in irradiated cells when the canonical, DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase)-dependent pathway of NHEJ (D-NHEJ) is compromised. Notably, B-NHEJ shows marked reduction in efficiency when D-NHEJ-deficient cells cease to grow and enter a plateau phase. This phenomenon is widespread and observed in cells of different species with defects in core components of D-NHEJ, with the notable exception of DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit). Using new, standardized serum-deprivation protocols, we re-examine the growth requirements of B-NHEJ and test the role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in its regulation. Methods and Materials: DSB repair was measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in cells maintained under different conditions of growth. Results: Serum deprivation in D-NHEJ-deficient cells causes a rapid reduction in B-NHEJ similar to that measured in normally growing cells that enter the plateau phase of growth. Upon serum deprivation, reduction in B-NHEJ activity is evident at 4 h and reaches a plateau reflecting maximum inhibition at 12-16 h. The inhibition is reversible, and B-NHEJ quickly recovers to the levels of actively growing cells upon supply of serum to serum-deprived cells. Chemical inhibition of EGFR in proliferating cells inhibits only marginally B-NHEJ and addition of EGFR in serum-deprived cells increases only a marginally B-NHEJ. Conclusions: The results document a rapid and fully reversible adaptation of B-NHEJ to growth activity and point to factors beyond EGFR in its regulation. They show notable differences in the regulation of error

  8. Direct evidence of estrogen modulation of pituitary sensitivity to luteinizing hormone-releasing factor during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C F; Yen, S S

    1975-01-01

    To delineate the role of estradiol in the augmented pituitary gonadotropin responsiveness to synthetic luteinizing hormone releasing factor (LRF) seen during high-estrogen phases of the ovulatory cycles (late follicular and midluteal phases), the anti-estrogenic effect of clomiphene citrate (Clomid) on pituitary response to LRF was evaluated during different phases of the ovulatory cycle. Clomid administration (100 mg/day times 5 days) completely negates the augmented gonadotropin responses to LRF (150 mug) during late follicular and midluteal phases observed during the control studies. Thus, a quantitatively and qualitatively similar pituitary sensitivity to LRF during three distinct phases of the menstrual cycle was induced by Clomid treatment that resembles the LRF responsiveness of themale pituitary. The present study demonstrates the pituitary component of the estrogen-induced changes in the sensitivity to LRF. From this and previous data, we conclude that the increases of estradiol secretion associated with the follicular maturation and corpus luteum formation represent a major component of the feedback signal in the modulation of cyclic gonadotropin release occasioned in a large measure by the augmented pituitary sensitivity to LRF. PMID:1088908

  9. Protein kinase A modulates transforming growth factor-β signaling through a direct interaction with Smad4 protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huibin; Li, Gangyong; Wu, Jing-Jiang; Wang, Lidong; Uhler, Michael; Simeone, Diane M

    2013-03-22

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling normally functions to regulate embryonic development and cellular homeostasis. It is increasingly recognized that TGFβ signaling is regulated by cross-talk with other signaling pathways. We previously reported that TGFβ activates protein kinase A (PKA) independent of cAMP through an interaction of an activated Smad3-Smad4 complex and the regulatory subunit of the PKA holoenzyme (PKA-R). Here we define the interaction domains of Smad4 and PKA-R and the functional consequences of this interaction. Using a series of Smad4 and PKA-R truncation mutants, we identified amino acids 290-300 of the Smad4 linker region as critical for the specific interaction of Smad4 and PKA-R. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that the B cAMP binding domain of PKA-R was sufficient for interaction with Smad4. Targeting of B domain regions conserved among all PKA-R isoforms and exposed on the molecular surface demonstrated that amino acids 281-285 and 320-329 were required for complex formation with Smad4. Interactions of these specific regions of Smad4 and PKA-R were necessary for TGFβ-mediated increases in PKA activity, CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) phosphorylation, induction of p21, and growth inhibition. Moreover, this Smad4-PKA interaction was required for TGFβ-induced epithelial mesenchymal transition, invasion of pancreatic tumor cells, and regulation of tumor growth in vivo.

  10. Myosin II directly binds and inhibits Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors: a possible link to Rho family GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chan-Soo; Choi, Chang-Ki; Schwartz, Martin Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration requires the coordinated spatiotemporal regulation of actomyosin contraction and cell protrusion/adhesion. Nonmuscle myosin II (MII) controls Rac1 and Cdc42 activation, and cell protrusion and focal complex formation in migrating cells. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that MII interacts specifically with multiple Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Binding is mediated by the conserved tandem Dbl homology–pleckstrin homology module, the catalytic site of these GEFs, with dissociation constants of ∼0.3 µM. Binding to the GEFs required assembly of the MII into filaments and actin-stimulated ATPase activity. Binding of MII suppressed GEF activity. Accordingly, inhibition of MII ATPase activity caused release of GEFs and activation of Rho GTPases. Depletion of βPIX GEF in migrating NIH3T3 fibroblasts suppressed lamellipodial protrusions and focal complex formation induced by MII inhibition. The results elucidate a functional link between MII and Rac1/Cdc42 GTPases, which may regulate protrusion/adhesion dynamics in migrating cells. PMID:20713598

  11. Anti-platelet factor 4/heparin antibodies from patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia provoke direct activation of microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Tavor, Sigal; Praprotnik, Sonja; Boffa, Marie Claire; Weksler, Babette; Walenga, M Jeanine; Amiral, Jean; Eldor, Amiram

    2002-02-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a serious complication that occurs in approximately 1-5% of patients treated with heparin and may be associated with severe thrombotic events. HIT is mediated by antibodies directed mostly to epitope(s) formed by complexes between heparin or other anionic mucopolysaccharides and platelet factor 4 (PF4). Anti-PF4/heparin IgG antibodies from six patients with HIT were affinity purified and assessed for interaction with human microvascular and macrovascular endothelial cells (EC). The antibodies directly activated primary cultures of human bone marrow microvascular EC (HBMEC) and SV40 immortalized HBMEC (TrHBMEC) only in the presence of PF4, but did not activate macrovascular human umbilical vein EC (HUVEC) under the same conditions. These antibodies were found to bind to TrHBMEC through the F(ab)(2) portion of the anti-PF4/heparin IgG. TrHBMEC activation was characterized by an augmented release of IL-6, von Willebrand factor, soluble thrombomodulin, and by an elevated expression of the adhesion molecules P-selectin, E-selectin and vascular cellular endothelial molecule-I to different degrees. Enhanced monocyte adhesion to PF4/heparin antibody-treated TrHBMEC (33-72% adhesion) was also observed. None of these effects occurred with unstimulated HUVEC. However, pre-treatment of HUVEC with tumor necrosis factor-alpha resulted in the same changes observed with microvascular EC exposed to the HIT antibodies. Our findings indicate that anti-PF4/heparin antibodies directly activate microvascular EC while interaction with macrovascular EC requires pre-activation. These results may explain some of the specific clinical manifestations in HIT.

  12. Brown carbon aerosols from burning of boreal peatlands: microphysical properties, emission factors, and implications for direct radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Gyawali, Madhu; Yatavelli, Reddy L. N.; Pandey, Apoorva; Watts, Adam C.; Knue, Joseph; Chen, Lung-Wen A.; Pattison, Robert R.; Tsibart, Anna; Samburova, Vera; Moosmüller, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The surface air warming over the Arctic has been almost twice as much as the global average in recent decades. In this region, unprecedented amounts of smoldering peat fires have been identified as a major emission source of climate-warming agents. While much is known about greenhouse gas emissions from these fires, there is a knowledge gap on the nature of particulate emissions and their potential role in atmospheric warming. Here, we show that aerosols emitted from burning of Alaskan and Siberian peatlands are predominantly brown carbon (BrC) - a class of visible light-absorbing organic carbon (OC) - with a negligible amount of black carbon content. The mean fuel-based emission factors for OC aerosols ranged from 3.8 to 16.6 g kg-1. Their mass absorption efficiencies were in the range of 0.2-0.8 m2 g-1 at 405 nm (violet) and dropped sharply to 0.03-0.07 m2 g-1 at 532 nm (green), characterized by a mean Ångström exponent of ≈ 9. Electron microscopy images of the particles revealed their morphologies to be either single sphere or agglomerated "tar balls". The shortwave top-of-atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing per unit optical depth under clear-sky conditions was estimated as a function of surface albedo. Only over bright surfaces with albedo greater than 0.6, such as snow cover and low-level clouds, the emitted aerosols could result in a net warming (positive forcing) of the atmosphere.

  13. Physical therapy and imaging outcome measures in a haemophilia population treated with factor prophylaxis: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Manco-Johnson, M J; Pettersson, H; Petrini, P; Babyn, P S; Bergstrom, B-M; Bradley, C-S; Doria, A S; Feldman, B M; Funk, S; Hilliard, P; Kilcoyne, R; Lundin, B; Nuss, R; Rivard, G; Schoenmakers, M A G C; Van den Berg, M; Wiedel, J; Zourikian, N; Blanchette, V S

    2004-10-01

    Routine infusions of factor VIII to prevent bleeding, known as prophylaxis, and other intensive therapies are being more broadly applied to patients with haemophilia. These therapies differ widely in replacement product usage, cost, frequency of venous access and parental effort. In order to address residual issues relating to recommendations, implementation, and evaluations of prophylaxis therapy in persons with haemophila, a multinational working group was formed and called the International Prophylaxis Study Group (IPSG). The group was comprised of haemophilia treaters actively involved in studies of prophylaxis from North America and Europe. Two expert committees, the Physical Therapy (PT) Working Group and the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Working Group were organized to critically assess existing tools for assessment of joint outcome. These two committees independently concluded that the WFH Physical Examination Scale (WFH PE Scale) and the WFH X-ray Scale (WFH XR Scale) were inadequately sensitive to detect early changes in joints. New scales were developed based on suggested modifications of the existing scales and called the Haemophilia Joint Health Score (HJHS) and the International MRI Scales. The new scales were piloted. Concordance was measured by the intra-class correlation coefficient of variation. Reliability of the HJHS was excellent with an inter-observer co-efficient of 0.83 and a test-retest value of 0.89. The MRI study was conducted using both Denver and European scoring approaches; inter-reader reliability using the two approaches was 0.88 and 0.87; test-retest reliability was 0.92 and 0.93. These new PT and MRI scales promise to improve outcome assessment in children on early preventive treatment regimens.

  14. The POU factor ventral veins lacking/Drifter directs the timing of metamorphosis through ecdysteroid and juvenile hormone signaling.

    PubMed

    Cheng, CeCe; Ko, Amy; Chaieb, Leila; Koyama, Takashi; Sarwar, Prioty; Mirth, Christen K; Smith, Wendy A; Suzuki, Yuichiro

    2014-06-01

    Although endocrine changes are known to modulate the timing of major developmental transitions, the genetic mechanisms underlying these changes remain poorly understood. In insects, two developmental hormones, juvenile hormone (JH) and ecdysteroids, are coordinated with each other to induce developmental changes associated with metamorphosis. However, the regulation underlying the coordination of JH and ecdysteroid synthesis remains elusive. Here, we examined the function of a homolog of the vertebrate POU domain protein, Ventral veins lacking (Vvl)/Drifter, in regulating both of these hormonal pathways in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Tenebrionidae). RNA interference-mediated silencing of vvl expression led to both precocious metamorphosis and inhibition of molting in the larva. Ectopic application of a JH analog on vvl knockdown larvae delayed the onset of metamorphosis and led to a prolonged larval stage, indicating that Vvl acts upstream of JH signaling. Accordingly, vvl knockdown also reduced the expression of a JH biosynthesis gene, JH acid methyltransferase 3 (jhamt3). In addition, ecdysone titer and the expression of the ecdysone response gene, hormone receptor 3 (HR3), were reduced in vvl knockdown larvae. The expression of the ecdysone biosynthesis gene phantom (phm) and spook (spo) were reduced in vvl knockdown larvae in the anterior and posterior halves, respectively, indicating that Vvl might influence ecdysone biosynthesis in both the prothoracic gland and additional endocrine sources. Injection of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) into vvl knockdown larvae could restore the expression of HR3 although molting was never restored. These findings suggest that Vvl coordinates both JH and ecdysteroid biosynthesis as well as molting behavior to influence molting and the timing of metamorphosis. Thus, in both vertebrates and insects, POU factors modulate the production of major neuroendocrine regulators during sexual maturation.

  15. Direct activation of human and mouse Oct4 genes using engineered TALE and Cas9 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiabiao; Lei, Yong; Wong, Wing-Ki; Liu, Senquan; Lee, Kai-Chuen; He, Xiangjun; You, Wenxing; Zhou, Rui; Guo, Jun-Tao; Chen, Xiongfong; Peng, Xianlu; Sun, Hao; Huang, He; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Bo

    2014-04-01

    The newly developed transcription activator-like effector protein (TALE) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 transcription factors (TF) offered a powerful and precise approach for modulating gene expression. In this article, we systematically investigated the potential of these new tools in activating the stringently silenced pluripotency gene Oct4 (Pou5f1) in mouse and human somatic cells. First, with a number of TALEs and sgRNAs targeting various regions in the mouse and human Oct4 promoters, we found that the most efficient TALE-VP64s bound around -120 to -80 bp, while highly effective sgRNAs targeted from -147 to -89-bp upstream of the transcription start sites to induce high activity of luciferase reporters. In addition, we observed significant transcriptional synergy when multiple TFs were applied simultaneously. Although individual TFs exhibited marginal activity to up-regulate endogenous gene expression, optimized combinations of TALE-VP64s could enhance endogenous Oct4 transcription up to 30-fold in mouse NIH3T3 cells and 20-fold in human HEK293T cells. More importantly, the enhancement of OCT4 transcription ultimately generated OCT4 proteins. Furthermore, examination of different epigenetic modifiers showed that histone acetyltransferase p300 could enhance both TALE-VP64 and sgRNA/dCas9-VP64 induced transcription of endogenous OCT4. Taken together, our study suggested that engineered TALE-TF and dCas9-TF are useful tools for modulating gene expression in mammalian cells.

  16. Climatic factors directly impact the volatile organic compound fingerprint in green Arabica coffee bean as well as coffee beverage quality.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, B; Boulanger, R; Dussert, S; Ribeyre, F; Berthiot, L; Descroix, F; Joët, T

    2012-12-15

    Coffee grown at high elevations fetches a better price than that grown in lowland regions. This study was aimed at determining whether climatic conditions during bean development affected sensory perception of the coffee beverage and combinations of volatile compounds in green coffee. Green coffee samples from 16 plots representative of the broad range of climatic variations in Réunion Island were compared by sensory analysis. Volatiles were extracted by solid phase micro-extraction and the volatile compounds were analysed by GC-MS. The results revealed that, among the climatic factors, the mean air temperature during seed development greatly influenced the sensory profile. Positive quality attributes such as acidity, fruity character and flavour quality were correlated and typical of coffees produced at cool climates. Two volatile compounds (ethanal and acetone) were identified as indicators of these cool temperatures. Among detected volatiles, most of the alcohols, aldehydes, hydrocarbons and ketones appeared to be positively linked to elevated temperatures and high solar radiation, while the sensory profiles displayed major defects (i.e. green, earthy flavour). Two alcohols (butan-1,3-diol and butan-2,3-diol) were closely correlated with a reduction in aromatic quality, acidity and an increase in earthy and green flavours. We assumed that high temperatures induce accumulation of these compounds in green coffee, and would be detected as off-flavours, even after roasting. Climate change, which generally involves a substantial increase in average temperatures in mountainous tropical regions, could be expected to have a negative impact on coffee quality.

  17. The POU Factor Ventral Veins Lacking/Drifter Directs the Timing of Metamorphosis through Ecdysteroid and Juvenile Hormone Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chaieb, Leila; Koyama, Takashi; Sarwar, Prioty; Mirth, Christen K.; Smith, Wendy A.; Suzuki, Yuichiro

    2014-01-01

    Although endocrine changes are known to modulate the timing of major developmental transitions, the genetic mechanisms underlying these changes remain poorly understood. In insects, two developmental hormones, juvenile hormone (JH) and ecdysteroids, are coordinated with each other to induce developmental changes associated with metamorphosis. However, the regulation underlying the coordination of JH and ecdysteroid synthesis remains elusive. Here, we examined the function of a homolog of the vertebrate POU domain protein, Ventral veins lacking (Vvl)/Drifter, in regulating both of these hormonal pathways in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Tenebrionidae). RNA interference-mediated silencing of vvl expression led to both precocious metamorphosis and inhibition of molting in the larva. Ectopic application of a JH analog on vvl knockdown larvae delayed the onset of metamorphosis and led to a prolonged larval stage, indicating that Vvl acts upstream of JH signaling. Accordingly, vvl knockdown also reduced the expression of a JH biosynthesis gene, JH acid methyltransferase 3 (jhamt3). In addition, ecdysone titer and the expression of the ecdysone response gene, hormone receptor 3 (HR3), were reduced in vvl knockdown larvae. The expression of the ecdysone biosynthesis gene phantom (phm) and spook (spo) were reduced in vvl knockdown larvae in the anterior and posterior halves, respectively, indicating that Vvl might influence ecdysone biosynthesis in both the prothoracic gland and additional endocrine sources. Injection of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) into vvl knockdown larvae could restore the expression of HR3 although molting was never restored. These findings suggest that Vvl coordinates both JH and ecdysteroid biosynthesis as well as molting behavior to influence molting and the timing of metamorphosis. Thus, in both vertebrates and insects, POU factors modulate the production of major neuroendocrine regulators during sexual maturation. PMID:24945490

  18. Gata4 expression in lateral mesoderm is downstream of BMP4 and isactivated directly by Forkhead and GATA transcription factors through adistal enhancer element

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas, Anabel; De Val, Sarah; Heidt, Analeah B.; Xu, Shan-Mei; Bristow, James; Black, Brian L.

    2005-05-20

    The GATA family of zinc-finger transcription factors plays key roles in the specification and differentiation of multiple cell types during development. GATA4 is an early regulator of gene expression during the development of endoderm and mesoderm, and genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that GATA4 is required for embryonic development.Despite the importance of GATA4 in tissue specification and differentiation, the mechanisms by which Gata4 expression is activated and the transcription factor pathways upstream of GATA4 remain largely undefined. To identify transcriptional regulators of Gata4 in the mouse,we screened conserved noncoding sequences from the mouse Gata4 gene for enhancer activity in transgenic embryos. Here, we define the regulation of a distal enhancer element from Gata4 that is sufficient to direct expression throughout the lateral mesoderm, beginning at 7.5 days of mouse embryonic development. The activity of this enhancer is initially broad but eventually becomes restricted to the mesenchyme surrounding the liver. We demonstrate that the function of this enhancer in transgenic embryos is dependent upon highly conserved Forkhead and GATA transcription factor binding sites, which are bound by FOXF1 and GATA4,respectively. Furthermore, the activity of the Gata4 lateral mesoderm enhancer is attenuated by the BMP antagonist Noggin, and the enhancer is not activated in Bmp4-null embryos. Thus, these studies establish that Gata4 is a direct transcriptional target of Forkhead and GATA transcription factors in the lateral mesoderm, and demonstrate that Gata4lateral mesoderm enhancer activation requires BMP4, supporting a model in which GATA4 serves as a downstream effector of BMP signaling in the lateral mesoderm.

  19. Direct Detection of Transcription Factors in Cotyledons during Seedling Development Using Sensitive Silicon-Substrate Photonic Crystal Protein Arrays1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sarah I.; Tan, Yafang; Shamimuzzaman, Md; George, Sherine; Cunningham, Brian T.; Vodkin, Lila

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors control important gene networks, altering the expression of a wide variety of genes, including those of agronomic importance, despite often being expressed at low levels. Detecting transcription factor proteins is difficult, because current high-throughput methods may not be sensitive enough. One-dimensional, silicon-substrate photonic crystal (PC) arrays provide an alternative substrate for printing multiplexed protein microarrays that have greater sensitivity through an increased signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescent signal compared with performing the same assay upon a traditional aminosilanized glass surface. As a model system to test proof of concept of the silicon-substrate PC arrays to directly detect rare proteins in crude plant extracts, we selected representatives of four different transcription factor families (zinc finger GATA, basic helix-loop-helix, BTF3/NAC [for basic transcription factor of the NAC family], and YABBY) that have increasing transcript levels during the stages of seedling cotyledon development. Antibodies to synthetic peptides representing the transcription factors were printed on both glass slides and silicon-substrate PC slides along with antibodies to abundant cotyledon proteins, seed lectin, and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. The silicon-substrate PC arrays proved more sensitive than those performed on glass slides, detecting rare proteins that were below background on the glass slides. The zinc finger transcription factor was detected on the PC arrays in crude extracts of all stages of the seedling cotyledons, whereas YABBY seemed to be at the lower limit of their sensitivity. Interestingly, the basic helix-loop-helix and NAC proteins showed developmental profiles consistent with their transcript patterns, indicating proof of concept for detecting these low-abundance proteins in crude extracts. PMID:25635113

  20. Epidermal growth factor activates telomerase activity by direct binding of Ets-2 to hTERT promoter in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chung-Ping; Lee, Li-Wen; Tang, Sheau-Chung; Hsin, I-Lun; Lin, Yu-Wen; Ko, Jiunn-Liang

    2015-07-01

    Growth signals are directly or indirectly involved in telomerase regulation. In this study, we investigated molecular mechanisms of the effect of EGF (epidermal growth factor) on regulating hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase) expression. To elucidate specific transcription factors involved in EGF-stimulated hTERT transcription in A549 and H1299 lung cancer cells, transcription factors drives hTERT promoter activity, such as Myc, Mad, and Ets-2, was evaluated on luciferase reporter assay. The upregulation of hTERT promoter by Ets-2 and Myc were abolished by Mad. Using DAPA (DNA affinity precipitation assay), Ets-2 binding to SNP (T) was stronger than Ets-2 binding to SNP (C) at -245 bp upstream of the transcription start site within the core promoter of hTERT. Ets-2 silence by siRNA decreased hTERT expression at mRNA and protein levels. The regulation of hTERT promoter by EGF/Ets-2 was diminished via the EGFR kinase signal pathway-specific inhibitors AG1478 and Iressa. Inhibitors of Erk and Akt inhibited Ets-2-activated hTERT promoter activity. These data suggested that Ets-2, a genuine cancer-specific transcription factor, is actively involved in EGFR kinase-induced hTERT overexpression pathway in lung cancer cells. Blockage of this pathway may contribute to targeted gene therapy in lung cancer.

  1. The tbx2a/b transcription factors direct pronephros segmentation and corpuscle of Stannius formation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Bridgette E; Li, Yue; Marra, Amanda N; Cheng, Christina N; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2017-01-01

    The simplified and genetically conserved zebrafish pronephros is an excellent model to examine the cryptic processes of cell fate decisions during the development of nephron segments as well as the origins of associated endocrine cells that comprise the corpuscles of Stannius (CS). Using whole mount in situ hybridization, we found that transcripts of the zebrafish genes t-box 2a (tbx2a) and t-box 2b (tbx2b), which belong to the T-box family of transcription factors, were expressed in the caudal intermediate mesoderm progenitors that give rise to the distal pronephros and CS. Deficiency of tbx2a, tbx2b or both tbx2a/b reduced the size of the distal late (DL) segment, which was accompanied by a proximal convoluted segment (PCT) expansion. Further, tbx2a/b deficiency led to significantly larger CS clusters. These phenotypes were also observed in embryos with the from beyond (fby)(c144) mutation, which encodes a premature stop codon in the tbx2b T-box sequence. Conversely, overexpression of tbx2a and tbx2b in wild-type embryos expanded the DL segment where cells were comingled with the adjacent DE, and also decreased CS cell number, but notably did not alter PCT development-providing independent evidence that tbx2a and tbx2b are each necessary and sufficient to promote DL fate and suppress CS genesis. Epistasis studies indicated that tbx2a acts upstream of tbx2b to regulate the DL and CS fates, and likely has other targets as well. Retinoic acid (RA) addition and inhibition studies revealed that tbx2a and tbx2b are negatively regulated by RA signaling. Interestingly, the CS cell expansion that typifies tbx2a/b deficiency also occurred when blocking Notch signaling with the chemical DAPT (N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester). Ectopic activation of Notch in Tg(hsp70::Gal4; UAS::NICD)(NICD) embryos led to a reduced CS post heat-shock induction. To further examine the link between the tbx2a/b genes and Notch during CS formation, DAPT

  2. Neutralization of (NK-cell-derived) B-cell activating factor by Belimumab restores sensitivity of chronic lymphoid leukemia cells to direct and Rituximab-induced NK lysis.

    PubMed

    Wild, J; Schmiedel, B J; Maurer, A; Raab, S; Prokop, L; Stevanović, S; Dörfel, D; Schneider, P; Salih, H R

    2015-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes that substantially contribute to the therapeutic benefit of antitumor antibodies like Rituximab, a crucial component in the treatment of B-cell malignancies. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the ability of NK cells to lyse the malignant cells and to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity upon Fc receptor stimulation is compromised, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unclear. We report here that NK-cells activation-dependently produce the tumor necrosis factor family member 'B-cell activating factor' (BAFF) in soluble form with no detectable surface expression, also in response to Fc receptor triggering by therapeutic CD20-antibodies. BAFF in turn enhanced the metabolic activity of primary CLL cells and impaired direct and Rituximab-induced lysis of CLL cells without affecting NK reactivity per se. The neutralizing BAFF antibody Belimumab, which is approved for treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, prevented the effects of BAFF on the metabolism of CLL cells and restored their susceptibility to direct and Rituximab-induced NK-cell killing in allogeneic and autologous experimental systems. Our findings unravel the involvement of BAFF in the resistance of CLL cells to NK-cell antitumor immunity and Rituximab treatment and point to a benefit of combinatory approaches employing BAFF-neutralizing drugs in B-cell malignancies.

  3. Self-Directed Violence Aboard U.S. Navy Aircraft Carriers: An Examination of General and Shipboard-Specific Risk and Protective Factors.

    PubMed

    Saitzyk, Arlene; Vorm, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Self-directed violence (SDV), which includes suicidal ideation with and without intent, suicidal preparatory behaviors and attempts with and without harm, non-suicidal self-directed violence, and completed suicide, has been a rising concern in the military. Military shipboard personnel may represent a unique subset of this population due to the distinct nature of deployment stressors and embedded supports. As such, one might expect differences in the prevalence of SDV between this group and other active duty personnel, signifying a distinct operational impact. This study analyzed the prevalence of SDV among personnel assigned or deployed to U.S. Navy aircraft carriers, and examined whether occurrences varied by descriptors commonly identified in the literature (e.g., age, gender, marital status, pay grade/rank). This study also examined characteristics specific to life aboard a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier in order to better understand the issues particular to this population. Descriptive analyses and relative risk findings suggested similarities in demographic risk factors to the general military population, but also striking differences related to occupational specialty and assigned department. This study is the first to shed light on risk and protective factors relevant to shipboard personnel.

  4. Site-directed mutagenesis of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF): analysis of O-glycosylation sites and properties.

    PubMed

    Davis-Fleische, K M; Brigstock, D R; Besner, G E

    2001-01-01

    Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a 22 kDa, O-glycosylated protein. HeLa cells infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing human HB-EGF produced a secreted, bioactive protein, with Mr 22,000 that was decreased to 14,000 by treatment with O-glycanase. Site-directed mutagenesis of HB-EGF cDNA using oligonucleotide- and PCR-directed techniques was performed to change the potential glycosylation sites, Thr75 and Thr85, to alanine residues to prevent O-glycosylation. Purification and characterization of the mutant proteins demonstrated that: (i) both O-glycosylation sites of HB-EGF are utilized, (ii) HB-EGF secretion does not require O-glycosylation, (iii) removal of O-glycans does not affect proteolytic cleavage of the HB-EGF precursor, nor does it influence HB-EGF intracellular trafficking or subcellular localization, and (iv) HB-EGF produced by HeLa cells is heavily sialylated. Comparisons between glycosylation mutants and wild-type HB-EGF revealed no significant apparent differences in receptor binding activity.

  5. The role of hyperglycaemia-induced alterations of antithrombin III and factor X activation in the thrombin hyperactivity of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Quatraro, A; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Dello Russo, P; Lefebvre, P; Giugliano, D

    1990-05-01

    Factor X concentration and factor X activation, antithrombin III anti-Xa activity and plasma concentration, and fibrinopeptide A were measured in 20 diabetic patients and 20 normal subjects. Although factor X activation (81.3 +/- 2.2 vs 97.3 +/- 2.1%, p less than 0.01; mean +/- SE) and antithrombin III activity (76.5 +/- 2.2 vs 96.3 +/- 1.8%, p less than 0.01) were reduced in the diabetic patients, fibrinopeptide A concentration was increased (3.7 +/- 0.4 vs 1.7 +/- 0.2 ng ml-1, p less than 0.01). The ratio of factor X activation to antithrombin III anti-factor Xa activity was increased in the diabetic patients (1.10 +/- 0.01 vs 1.01 +/- 0.02, p less than 0.01). Induced hyperglycaemia was able to mimic all these abnormalities, without changing factor X or antithrombin III concentration. The results suggest that in vivo hyperglycaemia produces a decrease of factor X activation, but at the same time increases fibrinopeptide A formation due to a greater decrease of antithrombin III anti-Xa activity.

  6. Cdc42 and Rac family GTPases regulate mode and speed but not direction of primary fibroblast migration during platelet-derived growth factor-dependent chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Monypenny, James; Zicha, Daniel; Higashida, Chiharu; Oceguera-Yanez, Fabian; Narumiya, Shuh; Watanabe, Naoki

    2009-05-01

    Cdc42 and Rac family GTPases are important regulators of morphology, motility, and polarity in a variety of mammalian cell types. However, comprehensive analysis of their roles in the morphological and behavioral aspects of chemotaxis within a single experimental system is still lacking. Here we demonstrate using a direct viewing chemotaxis assay that of all of the Cdc42/Rac1-related GTPases expressed in primary fibroblasts, Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoG are required for efficient migration towards platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). During migration, Cdc42-, Rac1-, and RhoG-deficient cells show aberrant morphology characterized as cell elongation and cell body rounding, loss of lamellipodia, and formation of thick membrane extensions, respectively. Analysis of individual cell trajectories reveals that cell speed is significantly reduced, as well as persistence, but to a smaller degree, while the directional response to the gradient of PDGF is not affected. Combined knockdown of Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoG results in greater inhibition of cell speed than when each protein is knocked down alone, but the cells are still capable of migrating toward PDGF. We conclude that, Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoG function cooperatively during cell migration and that, while each GTPase is implicated in the control of morphology and cell speed, these and other Cdc42/Rac-related GTPases are not essential for the directional response toward PDGF.

  7. Direct effects of growth hormone (GH)-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) and GH-releasing factor (GRF) on GH secretion from cultured porcine somatotropes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hormigo, A; Castaño, J P; Torronteras, R; Malagón, M M; Ramírez, J L; Gracia-Navarro, F

    1998-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) belongs to the expanding family of synthetic GH secretagogues (GHSs). Previous studies have shown that non-peptidyl GHRP-6 analogues stimulate GH release in vivo in pigs, and interact synergistically with GH-releasing factor (GRF), but its direct effects on porcine somatotropes have not been addressed hitherto. In the present study, we have evaluated the response of cultured porcine pituitary cells to GHRP-6, and its interaction with GRF and somatostatin (SRIF). Secretory response of somatotropes was assessed by using two distinct techniques. GH released by monolayer cell cultures was evaluated by enzyme immunoassay, whereas that secreted by individual somatotropes was measured by immunodensitometry using a cell blotting assay. Our results demonstrate that both GHRP-6 and GRF stimulated GH release from monolayer cultures at doses equal to or above 10(-9) M. Use of cell immunoblot assay demonstrated that, like GRF, the hexapeptide acts directly upon porcine somatotropes to exert its action. Moreover, regardless of the technique applied, combined administration of GHRP-6 (10(-6) or 10(-9) M) and GRF (10(-8) M) resulted in an additive, but not synergistic, stimulatory GH response. Finally, SRIF (10(-7) M) inhibited the stimulatory effect of GHRP-6 alone or in combination with GRF. These results indicate that GHRP-6 directly and effectively stimulates GH secretion from porcine somatotropes in vitro, and acts additively when coadministered with GRF. Therefore, the synergistic stimulatory effect of GHSs and GRF reported in vivo in this species might require additional factors that are lacking in the in vitro situation.

  8. Drosophila melanogaster Hox Transcription Factors Access the RNA Polymerase II Machinery through Direct Homeodomain Binding to a Conserved Motif of Mediator Subunit Med19

    PubMed Central

    Boube, Muriel; Hudry, Bruno; Immarigeon, Clément; Carrier, Yannick; Bernat-Fabre, Sandra; Merabet, Samir; Graba, Yacine; Bourbon, Henri-Marc; Cribbs, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Hox genes in species across the metazoa encode transcription factors (TFs) containing highly-conserved homeodomains that bind target DNA sequences to regulate batteries of developmental target genes. DNA-bound Hox proteins, together with other TF partners, induce an appropriate transcriptional response by RNA Polymerase II (PolII) and its associated general transcription factors. How the evolutionarily conserved Hox TFs interface with this general machinery to generate finely regulated transcriptional responses remains obscure. One major component of the PolII machinery, the Mediator (MED) transcription complex, is composed of roughly 30 protein subunits organized in modules that bridge the PolII enzyme to DNA-bound TFs. Here, we investigate the physical and functional interplay between Drosophila melanogaster Hox developmental TFs and MED complex proteins. We find that the Med19 subunit directly binds Hox homeodomains, in vitro and in vivo. Loss-of-function Med19 mutations act as dose-sensitive genetic modifiers that synergistically modulate Hox-directed developmental outcomes. Using clonal analysis, we identify a role for Med19 in Hox-dependent target gene activation. We identify a conserved, animal-specific motif that is required for Med19 homeodomain binding, and for activation of a specific Ultrabithorax target. These results provide the first direct molecular link between Hox homeodomain proteins and the general PolII machinery. They support a role for Med19 as a PolII holoenzyme-embedded “co-factor” that acts together with Hox proteins through their homeodomains in regulated developmental transcription. PMID:24786462

  9. Complement C4-derived monocyte-directed chemotaxis-inhibitory factor. A molecular mechanism to cause polymorphonuclear leukocyte-predominant infiltration in rheumatoid arthritis synovial cavities.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Tsuruta, T.; Takagi, K.; Kambara, T.

    1991-01-01

    To reveal the mechanism of the lesser infiltration of monocytes in synovial cavities with rheumatoid arthritis despite the presence of chronic inflammation, the synovial fluid from 15 rheumatoid arthritis patients was analyzed with respect to leukocyte chemotaxis. The synovial fluid possessed strong chemotactic activity to polymorphonuclear leukocytes but rather suppressed one to monocytes. The synovial fluid contained two different inhibitory activities in monocyte chemotaxis. One, which also suppressed polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis, was identified as alpha 1 protease inhibitor. The other, with molecular weight of 8 kd, possessed the specificity to monocytes and shared the antigenicity with complement C4 but not with C3 or C5. A similar inhibitor was generated in normal human plasma when the classical pathway of the complement system was initiated with aggregated human IgG, while it was not when alternative pathway was initiated with zymosan. The small size factor in the synovial fluid, apparently derived from C4, seemed to be a cyto-directed factor that might block an early part of signal transduction system of monocytes in the chemotaxis. After removal of the small-size inhibitor, the synovial fluid exhibited chemotactic ability to monocytes. Therefore the apparent C4-derived factor might play a key role in the polymorphonuclear leukocyte-predominant infiltration in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:2024711

  10. [Direct medical costs and influencing factors in severe hand, foot and mouth disease in children aged between six months and five years old].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y M; Yang, J; Liao, Q H

    2017-01-06

    Objective: To estimate the direct medical cost of severe hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in patients aged less than five years. Methods: A stratified sampling method was used to collect data on severe HFMD cases reported in the National HFMD surveillance database between Jan 1, 2012, and Dec 31, 2013. The sampling was referenced with the national aetiologic distribution of Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71), Coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) and other Enteroviruses (OEV) for severe HFMD cases and the included cases were distributed among seven geographic regions (Northeast, North China, Northwest, Central China, Southwest, East China and South China). A nationwide telephone interview using a structured questionnaire was conducted to obtain the direct medical cost and any complications that occurred in patients during the outbreak of laboratory-confirmed HFMD. After excluding the cases who could not recall their medical expenses or complications, a total of 685 cases were included in the analysis. Kruskal-Wallis H test was used to analyze the differences among patients who reported different complications. Multiple linear regression with bootstrap analysis of 500 replicates was used to explore the factors that influenced the direct medical costs. Results: Of 685 patients analyzed, 456 (66.6%) were male and 229 (33.4%) were female. The direct medical costs P50 (P25, P75) were 14 250 (10 301, 20 600) Yuan. In total, 127 (18.5%) patients were diagnosed with severe HFMD patients with respiratory disease, 38 (5.5%) patients were diagnosed with aseptic meningitis, and 378 (55.2%) with encephalitis/brainstem encephalitis/acute flaccid paralysis. Furthermore, 53 (18.5%) patients were diagnosed with myocarditis, 39 (5.7%) with pulmonary hemorrhage/pulmonary edema and 50 (7.3%) with cardiopulmonary failure. The median (interquartile range) direct medical costs were 12 360 (7 313, 16 480) Yuan for severe HFMD patients with respiratory disease, 13 803 (9 064, 19 930) Yuan for aseptic

  11. New direct method for evaluating recoilless f-factors of two iron-sites in Fe-bearing compounds using Mössbauer spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barrero, C A; García, K E

    2013-07-21

    We propose a new direct method for calculating simultaneously two recoilless f-factors of any iron-bearing compound relative to that of a reference material by collecting only a single-temperature Mössbauer spectrum. This methodology is comparatively much simpler than the usual one which requires taking Mössbauer spectra of the compound at several temperatures and subsequently fitting the temperature dependence of the subspectral area or the isomer shift data with a lattice vibrational model. We demonstrate the applicability of this new methodology in the case of three common iron-bearing compounds: magnetite, akaganeite and goethite, but of course this type of study can be extended to other materials. The two f-factors for each compound were related to iron ions located in sites of different origin: for magnetite, these were related to irons with two different oxidation states; for akaganeite to irons in two different crystallographic sites; and for goethite to irons in similar crystal sites but located in grains of different sizes. In the case of magnetite, we found that the f-factors for the Fe(3+) and Fe(2.5+) sites relative to that of metallic iron powder were of fFe (3+)∕fFe = 0.97 ± 0.05 and fFe (2.5+)∕fFe = 0.92 ± 0.05, respectively. Interestingly, the quotient of these two f-factors, i.e., fFe (2.5+)∕fFe (3+), is equal to 0.95 ± 0.05, which compares fairly well with a value reported in literature obtained using the complex methodology based on the temperature dependence of the absolute subspectral area and the Debye approximation. For akaganeite, the f-factors of the doublet 1, D1, and doublet 2, D2, sites relative to that of metallic iron powder were of fD 1∕fFe = 0.95 ± 0.08 and fD 2∕fFe = 0.98 ± 0.15, respectively. And for goethite we found that the f-factors of the sextet 1, G1, and sextet 2, G2, sites relative to that of metallic iron powder were of fG 1∕fFe = 0.80 ± 0.02 and fG 2∕fFe = 0.80 ± 0.02, respectively. The

  12. Isolation and study of an acquired inhibitor of human coagulation factor V.

    PubMed Central

    Nesheim, M E; Nichols, W L; Cole, T L; Houston, J G; Schenk, R B; Mann, K G; Bowie, E J

    1986-01-01

    A coagulation Factor V inhibitor developed in a man 75 yr of age in association with an anaplastic malignancy and drug treatment (including the aminoglycoside antibiotic, gentamicin). The patient did not bleed abnormally, despite both surgical challenge and plasma Factor V activity of less than 1%. The inhibited plasma had grossly prolonged prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times, but a normal thrombin time. Mixing studies indicated progressive coagulation inhibition with normal plasma, but not with Factor V-deficient plasma, and reversal of coagulation inhibition by the addition of bovine Factor V to the patient's plasma. 1 ml of patient plasma inhibited the Factor V activity of 90 ml of normal human plasma. The inhibitor was isolated by sequential affinity chromatography on protein A-Sepharose and Factor V-Sepharose. The IgG isolate markedly inhibits the activity of prothrombinase assembled from purified Factors Xa and Va, calcium ion, and phospholipid vesicles, and partially inhibits prothrombinase assembled from purified Factor Xa, calcium ion, and normal platelets. The Factor V of platelets, however, appears relatively inaccessible to the antibody, inasmuch as platelets isolated from whole blood supplemented for 8 h with the antibody functioned normally with respect to platelet Factor V-mediated prothrombinase function. The absence of obvious hemorrhagic difficulties in the patient, the total inhibition of plasma Factor V by the inhibitor, and the apparent inaccessibility of platelet Factor V to the inhibitor specifically implicate platelet Factor V in the maintenance of hemostasis. Images PMID:3944265

  13. DIRECTIONAL COUPLERS

    DOEpatents

    Nigg, D.J.

    1961-12-01

    A directional coupler of small size is designed. Stripline conductors of non-rectilinear configuration, and separated from each other by a thin dielectric spacer. cross each other at least at two locations at right angles, thus providing practically pure capacitive coupling which substantially eliminates undesirable inductive coupling. The conductors are sandwiched between a pair of ground planes. The coupling factor is dependent only on the thickness and dielectric constant of the dielectric spacer at the point of conductor crossover. (AEC)

  14. Inhibition of the activation of Hageman factor (factor XII) by peripheral blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ratnoff, O D; Emanuelson, M M; Ziats, N P

    1987-01-01

    Suspensions of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes, T or B lymphocytes, platelets or granulocytes, and cell-depleted supernatant fluids of these suspensions inhibited activation of Hageman factor (HF, Factor XII) by ellagic acid, a property not shared by erythrocytes. PBMC also inhibited HF activation by glass or sulfatides. Contaminating platelets may have contributed to inhibition by PBMC. Elaboration of agents inhibiting HF activation required metabolically active cells. The inhibitor(s) in PBMC supernates were not identified with known agents, but had properties of a nonenzymatic protein. PBMC supernates did not contain fibrinogen, nor alter the thrombin, prothrombin, or partial thromboplastin times of normal plasma, amidolysis by activated plasma thromboplastin antecedent (Factor XIa) or activated Stuart factor (Factor Xa) or esterolysis by C1 (C1 esterase); they inhibited plasmin minimally. These experiments suggest that peripheral blood cells may impede intravascular coagulation. Whether this property helps maintain the fluidity of blood is unclear. PMID:3498741

  15. New Infestin-4 Mutants with Increased Selectivity against Factor XIIa

    PubMed Central

    Vuimo, Tatiana A.; Surov, Stepan S.; Ovsepyan, Ruzanna A.; Korneeva, Vera A.; Vorobiev, Ivan I.; Orlova, Nadezhda A.; Minakhin, Leonid; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Severinov, Konstantin V.; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I.; Panteleev, Mikhail A.

    2015-01-01

    Factor XIIa (fXIIa) is a serine protease that triggers the coagulation contact pathway and plays a role in thrombosis. Because it interferes with coagulation testing, the need to inhibit fXIIa exists in many cases. Infestin-4 (Inf4) is a Kazal-type inhibitor of fXIIa. Its specificity for fXIIa can be enhanced by point mutations in the protease-binding loop. We attempted to adapt Inf4 for the selective repression of the contact pathway under various in vitro conditions, e.g., during blood collection and in ‘global’ assays of tissue factor (TF)-dependent coagulation. First, we designed a set of new Inf4 mutants that, in contrast to wt-Inf4, had stabilized canonical conformations during molecular dynamics simulation. Off-target activities against factor Xa (fXa), plasmin, and other coagulation proteases were either reduced or eliminated in these recombinant mutants, as demonstrated by chromogenic assays. Interactions with fXIIa and fXa were also analyzed using protein-protein docking. Next, Mutant B, one of the most potent mutants (its Ki for fXIIa is 0.7 nM) was tested in plasma. At concentrations 5–20 μM, this mutant delayed the contact-activated generation of thrombin, as well as clotting in thromboelastography and thrombodynamics assays. In these assays, Mutant B did not affect coagulation initiated by TF, thus demonstrating sufficient selectivity and its potential practical significance as a reagent for coagulation diagnostics. PMID:26670620

  16. De novo transcriptome sequence assembly from coconut leaves and seeds with a focus on factors involved in RNA-directed DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Yi; Lee, Chueh-Pai; Fu, Jason L; Chang, Bill Chia-Han; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2014-09-04

    Coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) is a symbol of the tropics and a source of numerous edible and nonedible products of economic value. Despite its nutritional and industrial significance, coconut remains under-represented in public repositories for genomic and transcriptomic data. We report de novo transcript assembly from RNA-seq data and analysis of gene expression in seed tissues (embryo and endosperm) and leaves of a dwarf coconut variety. Assembly of 10 GB sequencing data for each tissue resulted in 58,211 total unigenes in embryo, 61,152 in endosperm, and 33,446 in leaf. Within each unigene pool, 24,857 could be annotated in embryo, 29,731 could be annotated in endosperm, and 26,064 could be annotated in leaf. A KEGG analysis identified 138, 138, and 139 pathways, respectively, in transcriptomes of embryo, endosperm, and leaf tissues. Given the extraordinarily large size of coconut seeds and the importance of small RNA-mediated epigenetic regulation during seed development in model plants, we used homology searches to identify putative homologs of factors required for RNA-directed DNA methylation in coconut. The findings suggest that RNA-directed DNA methylation is important during coconut seed development, particularly in maturing endosperm. This dataset will expand the genomics resources available for coconut and provide a foundation for more detailed analyses that may assist molecular breeding strategies aimed at improving this major tropical crop.

  17. The auxin response factor MONOPTEROS controls meristem function and organogenesis in both the shoot and root through the direct regulation of PIN genes.

    PubMed

    Krogan, Naden T; Marcos, Danielle; Weiner, Aaron I; Berleth, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The regulatory effect auxin has on its own transport is critical in numerous self-organizing plant patterning processes. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking auxin signal transduction and auxin transport is still fragmentary, and important regulatory genes remain to be identified. To track a key link between auxin signaling and auxin transport in development, we established an Arabidopsis thaliana genetic background in which fundamental patterning processes in both shoot and root were essentially abolished and the expression of PIN FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux facilitators was dramatically reduced. In this background, we demonstrate that activating a steroid-inducible variant of the auxin response factor (ARF) MONOPTEROS (MP) is sufficient to restore patterning and PIN gene expression. Further, we show that MP binds to distinct promoter elements of multiple genetically defined PIN genes. Our work identifies a direct regulatory link between central, well-characterized genes involved in auxin signal transduction and auxin transport. The steroid-inducible MP system directly demonstrates the importance of this molecular link in multiple patterning events in embryos, shoots and roots, and provides novel options for interrogating the properties of self-regulated auxin-based patterning in planta.

  18. De Novo Transcriptome Sequence Assembly from Coconut Leaves and Seeds with a Focus on Factors Involved in RNA-Directed DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Yi; Lee, Chueh-Pai; Fu, Jason L.; Chang, Bill Chia-Han; Matzke, Antonius J. M.; Matzke, Marjori

    2014-01-01

    Coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) is a symbol of the tropics and a source of numerous edible and nonedible products of economic value. Despite its nutritional and industrial significance, coconut remains under-represented in public repositories for genomic and transcriptomic data. We report de novo transcript assembly from RNA-seq data and analysis of gene expression in seed tissues (embryo and endosperm) and leaves of a dwarf coconut variety. Assembly of 10 GB sequencing data for each tissue resulted in 58,211 total unigenes in embryo, 61,152 in endosperm, and 33,446 in leaf. Within each unigene pool, 24,857 could be annotated in embryo, 29,731 could be annotated in endosperm, and 26,064 could be annotated in leaf. A KEGG analysis identified 138, 138, and 139 pathways, respectively, in transcriptomes of embryo, endosperm, and leaf tissues. Given the extraordinarily large size of coconut seeds and the importance of small RNA-mediated epigenetic regulation during seed development in model plants, we used homology searches to identify putative homologs of factors required for RNA-directed DNA methylation in coconut. The findings suggest that RNA-directed DNA methylation is important during coconut seed development, particularly in maturing endosperm. This dataset will expand the genomics resources available for coconut and provide a foundation for more detailed analyses that may assist molecular breeding strategies aimed at improving this major tropical crop. PMID:25193496

  19. The Stress Response Factors Yap6, Cin5, Phd1, and Skn7 Direct Targeting of the Conserved Co-Repressor Tup1-Ssn6 in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Sean E.; Rizzo, Jason M.; Tatomer, Deirdre C.; Lieb, Jason D.; Buck, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining the proper expression of the transcriptome during development or in response to a changing environment requires a delicate balance between transcriptional regulators with activating and repressing functions. The budding yeast transcriptional co-repressor Tup1-Ssn6 is a model for studying similar repressor complexes in multicellular eukaryotes. Tup1-Ssn6 does not bind DNA directly, but is directed to individual promoters by one or more DNA-binding proteins, referred to as Tup1 recruiters. This functional architecture allows the Tup1-Ssn6 to modulate the expression of genes required for the response to a variety of cellular stresses. To understand the targeting or the Tup1-Ssn6 complex, we determined the genomic distribution of Tup1 and Ssn6 by ChIP-chip. We found that most loci bound by Tup1-Ssn6 could not be explained by co-occupancy with a known recruiting cofactor and that deletion of individual known Tup1 recruiters did not significantly alter the Tup1 binding profile. These observations suggest that new Tup1 recruiting proteins remain to be discovered and that Tup1 recruitment typically depends on multiple recruiting cofactors. To identify new recruiting proteins, we computationally screened for factors with binding patterns similar to the observed Tup1-Ssn6 genomic distribution. Four top candidates, Cin5, Skn7, Phd1, and Yap6, all known to be associated with stress response gene regulation, were experimentally confirmed to physically interact with Tup1 and/or Ssn6. Incorporating these new recruitment cofactors with previously characterized cofactors now explains the majority of Tup1 targeting across the genome, and expands our understanding of the mechanism by which Tup1-Ssn6 is directed to its targets. PMID:21552514

  20. Do Advance Directives Direct?

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Susan P

    2015-06-01

    Resolution of long-standing debates about the role and impact of advance directives - living wills and powers of attorney for health care - has been hampered by a dearth of appropriate data, in particular data that compare the process and outcomes of end-of-life decision making on behalf of patients with and without advance directives. Drawing on a large ethnographic study of patients in two intensive care units in a large urban teaching hospital, this article compares aspects of the medical decision-making process and outcomes by advance-directive status. Controlling for demographic characteristics and severity of illness, the study finds few significant differences between patients without advance directives and those who claim to have them. Surprisingly, these few differences hold only for those whose directives are in their hospital chart. There are no significant differences between those with no directive and those claiming to have a copy at home or elsewhere. The article considers the implications if directives seemingly must be in hand to show even modest effects. Do advance directives direct? The intensive care unit data provide far more support for the growing body of literature that casts doubt on their impact than studies that promote the use of them.

  1. Analysis of small latent transforming growth factor-beta complex formation and dissociation by surface plasmon resonance. Absence of direct interaction with thrombospondins.

    PubMed

    Bailly, S; Brand, C; Chambaz, E M; Feige, J J

    1997-06-27

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) is a pluripotent regulator of cell growth and differentiation. The growth factor is expressed as a latent complex that must be converted to an active form before interacting with its ubiquitous high affinity receptors. This conversion involves the release of the mature TGFbeta through disruption of the noncovalent interactions with its propeptide or latency associated protein (LAP). Complex formation or dissociation between LAP and TGFbeta plays a very important role in TGFbeta biological activity at different steps. To further characterize the kinetic parameters of this interaction, we have employed surface plasmon resonance biosensor methodology. Using this technique, we observed real time association of LAP with mature TGFbeta1. The complex formation showed an equilibrium Kd around 3-7 nM. Furthermore, we observed dissociation of the complex in the presence of extreme pH, chaotropic agents, or plasmin, confirming their effects on TGFbeta activation. The same approach was used to examine whether latent TGFbeta1 could interact with thrombospondins, previously described as activators of latent TGFbeta. Using this method, we could not detect any direct interaction of thrombospondins with either LAP alone, TGFbeta1 alone, or the small latent TGFbeta1 complex. This suggests that activation of latent TGFbeta1 complex by thrombospondins is through an indirect mechanism.

  2. The bHLH factor deadpan is a direct target of Notch signaling and regulates neuroblast self-renewal in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    San-Juán, Beatriz P; Baonza, Antonio

    2011-04-01

    A defining feature of stem cells is their capacity to renew themselves at each division while producing differentiated progeny. How these cells balance self-renewal versus differentiation is a fundamental issue in developmental and cancer biology. The Notch signaling pathway has long been known to influence cell fate decisions during development. Indeed, there is a great deal of evidence correlating its function with the regulation of neuroblast (NB) self-renewal during larval brain development in Drosophila. However, little is known about the transcription factors regulated by this pathway during this process. Here we show that deadpan (dpn), a gene encoding a bHLH transcription factor, is a direct target of the Notch signaling pathway during type II NB development. Type II NBs undergo repeated asymmetric divisions to self-renew and to produce immature intermediate neural progenitors. These cells mature into intermediate neural progenitors (INPs) that have the capacity to undergo multiple rounds of asymmetric division to self-renew and to generate GMCs and neurons. Our results indicate that the expression of dpn at least in INPs cells depends on Notch signaling. The ectopic expression of dpn in immature INP cells can transform these cells into NBs-like cells that divide uncontrollably causing tumor over-growth. We show that in addition to dpn, Notch signaling must be regulating other genes during this process that act redundantly with dpn.

  3. Excision of the high-pathogenicity island of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis requires the combined actions of its cognate integrase and Hef, a new recombination directionality factor.

    PubMed

    Lesic, Biliana; Bach, Sandrine; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Hacker, Jörg; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2004-06-01

    The Yersinia high-pathogenicity island (HPI) encodes the siderophore yersiniabactin-mediated iron uptake system. The HPI of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis I has previously been shown to be able to excise precisely from the bacterial chromosome by recombination between the attB-R and attB-L sites flanking the island. However, the nature of the Y. pseudotuberculosis HPI excision machinery remained unknown. We show here that, upon excision, the HPI forms an episomal circular molecule. The island thus has the ability to excise from the chromosome, circularize and reintegrate itself, either in the same location or in another asn tRNA copy. We also demonstrate that the HPI-encoded bacteriophage P4-like integrase (Int) plays a critical role in HPI excision and that, like phage integrases, it acts as a site-specific recombinase that catalyses both excision and integration reactions. However, Int alone cannot efficiently promote recombination between the attB-R and attB-L sites, and we demonstrate that a newly identified HPI-borne factor, designated Hef (for HPI excision factor) is also required for this activity. Hef belongs to a family of recombination directionality factors. Like the other members of this family, Hef probably plays an architectural rather than a catalytic role and promotes HPI excision from the chromosome by driving the function of Int towards an excisionase activity. The fact that the HPI, and probably several other pathogenicity islands, carry a machinery of integration/excision highly similar to those of bacteriophages argues for a phage-mediated acquisition and transfer of these elements.

  4. Alveolar epithelial cells are critical in protection of the respiratory tract by secretion of factors able to modulate the activity of pulmonary macrophages and directly control bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Chuquimia, Olga D; Petursdottir, Dagbjort H; Periolo, Natalia; Fernández, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The respiratory epithelium is a physical and functional barrier actively involved in the clearance of environmental agents. The alveolar compartment is lined with membranous pneumocytes, known as type I alveolar epithelial cells (AEC I), and granular pneumocytes, type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC II). AEC II are responsible for epithelial reparation upon injury and ion transport and are very active immunologically, contributing to lung defense by secreting antimicrobial factors. AEC II also secrete a broad variety of factors, such as cytokines and chemokines, involved in activation and differentiation of immune cells and are able to present antigen to specific T cells. Another cell type important in lung defense is the pulmonary macrophage (PuM). Considering the architecture of the alveoli, a good communication between the external and the internal compartments is crucial to mount effective responses. Our hypothesis is that being in the interface, AEC may play an important role in transmitting signals from the external to the internal compartment and in modulating the activity of PuM. For this, we collected supernatants from AEC unstimulated or stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These AEC-conditioned media were used in various setups to test for the effects on a number of macrophage functions: (i) migration, (ii) phagocytosis and intracellular control of bacterial growth, and (iii) phenotypic changes and morphology. Finally, we tested the direct effect of AEC-conditioned media on bacterial growth. We found that AEC-secreted factors had a dual effect, on one hand controlling bacterial growth and on the other hand increasing macrophage activity.

  5. Plasma Kallikrein Promotes Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation and Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle through Direct Activation of Protease-activated Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Rany T.; Keum, Joo-Seob; Lee, Mi-Hye; Wang, Bing; Gooz, Monika; Luttrell, Deirdre K.; Luttrell, Louis M.; Jaffa, Ayad A.

    2010-01-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system, along with the interlocking renin-angiotensin system, is a key regulator of vascular contractility and injury response. The principal effectors of the kallikrein-kinin system are plasma and tissue kallikreins, proteases that cleave high molecular weight kininogen to produce bradykinin. Most of the cellular actions of kallikrein (KK) are thought to be mediated by bradykinin, which acts via G protein-coupled B1 and B2 bradykinin receptors on VSMCs and endothelial cells. Here, we find that primary aortic vascular smooth muscle but not endothelial cells possess the ability to activate plasma prekallikrein. Surprisingly, exposing VSMCs to prekallikrein leads to activation of the ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade via a mechanism that requires kallikrein activity but does not involve bradykinin receptors. In transfected HEK293 cells, we find that plasma kallikrein directly activates G protein-coupled protease-activated receptors (PARs) 1 and 2, which possess consensus kallikrein cleavage sites, but not PAR4. In vascular smooth muscles, KK stimulates ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) 17 activity via a PAR1/2 receptor-dependent mechanism, leading sequentially to release of the endogenous ADAM17 substrates, amphiregulin and tumor necrosis factor-α, metalloprotease-dependent transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors, and metalloprotease and epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent ERK1/2 activation. These results suggest a novel mechanism of bradykinin-independent kallikrein action that may contribute to the regulation of vascular responses in pathophysiologic states, such as diabetes mellitus. PMID:20826789

  6. Short-term salivary acetaldehyde increase due to direct exposure to alcoholic beverages as an additional cancer risk factor beyond ethanol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An increasing body of evidence now implicates acetaldehyde as a major underlying factor for the carcinogenicity of alcoholic beverages and especially for oesophageal and oral cancer. Acetaldehyde associated with alcohol consumption is regarded as 'carcinogenic to humans' (IARC Group 1), with sufficient evidence available for the oesophagus, head and neck as sites of carcinogenicity. At present, research into the mechanistic aspects of acetaldehyde-related oral cancer has been focused on salivary acetaldehyde that is formed either from ethanol metabolism in the epithelia or from microbial oxidation of ethanol by the oral microflora. This study was conducted to evaluate the role of the acetaldehyde that is found as a component of alcoholic beverages as an additional factor in the aetiology of oral cancer. Methods Salivary acetaldehyde levels were determined in the context of sensory analysis of different alcoholic beverages (beer, cider, wine, sherry, vodka, calvados, grape marc spirit, tequila, cherry spirit), without swallowing, to exclude systemic ethanol metabolism. Results The rinsing of the mouth for 30 seconds with an alcoholic beverage is able to increase salivary acetaldehyde above levels previously judged to be carcinogenic in vitro, with levels up to 1000 μM in cases of beverages with extreme acetaldehyde content. In general, the highest salivary acetaldehyde concentration was found in all cases in the saliva 30 sec after using the beverages (average 353 μM). The average concentration then decreased at the 2-min (156 μM), 5-min (76 μM) and 10-min (40 μM) sampling points. The salivary acetaldehyde concentration depends primarily on the direct ingestion of acetaldehyde contained in the beverages at the 30-sec sampling, while the influence of the metabolic formation from ethanol becomes the major factor at the 2-min sampling point. Conclusions This study offers a plausible mechanism to explain the increased risk for oral cancer associated with

  7. Comparison of human coagulation factor VIII expression directed by cytomegalovirus and mammary gland-specific promoters in HC11 cells and transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Hao, Siguo; Ma, Liyuan; Zhang, Wenhao; Wan, Jiangbo; Deng, Xiaohui

    2015-10-01

    Hemophilia A is an inherited X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by coagulant factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency. The conventional treatment involves the administration of recombinant human FVIII (rhFVIII) preparations. In this study, the mammary gland 'bioreactor' is designed to specifically and efficiently express a foreign protein hFVIII in the mammary glands of transgenic mice. We constructed a P1A3-hFVIIIBD vector directed by the mammary gland-specific P1A3 promoter, and transiently transfected HC11 cells and mouse mammary glands with P1A3-hFVIIIBD or CMV-hFVIIIBD vectors directed by a ubiquitous cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, respectively. We also generated P1A3-hFVIIIBD and CMV-hFVIIIBD transgenic mice by microinjection, respectively. Our data indicated that both vectors effectively expressed hFVIIIBD in HC11 cells at the transcription level, and hFVIIIBD protein was efficiently expressed in mouse milk after the injection of the hFVIIIBD vectors into mouse mammary glands during lactation. In both CMV-hFVIIIBD and P1A3-hFVIIIBD transgenic mice, hFVIIIBD proteins were efficiently expressed in the mammary glands at the mRNA and protein levels. No significant difference was observed in hFVIIIBD levels between the CMV-hFVIIIBD and P1A3-hFVIIIBD transgenic mice (P > 0.05). However, the activity of hFVIII in CMV-directed transgenic mice was slightly higher than that in P1A3-directed transgenic mice (P < 0.05). While hFVIIIBD was present in multiple organs in CMV-hFVIIIBD mice, P1A3-hFVIIIBD mice showed negligible hFVIIIBD expression in organs other than the mammary glands. This study demonstrated that the mammary gland-specific P1A3-hFVIIIBD vector was more suitable for the generation of hFVIIIBD mammary gland bioreactor.

  8. The Arabidopsis transcription factor BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1-ETHYL METHANESULFONATE-SUPPRESSOR1 is a direct substrate of MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE6 and regulates immunity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sining; Yang, Fan; Li, Lin; Chen, Huamin; Chen, She; Zhang, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) are recognized by plant pattern recognition receptors to activate PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), as well as other cytoplasmic kinases, integrate upstream immune signals and, in turn, dissect PTI signaling via different substrates to regulate defense responses. However, only a few direct substrates of these signaling kinases have been identified. Here, we show that PAMP perception enhances phosphorylation of BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1-ETHYL METHANESULFONATE-SUPPRESSOR1 (BES1), a transcription factor involved in brassinosteroid (BR) signaling pathway, through pathogen-induced MAPKs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). BES1 interacts with MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE6 (MPK6) and is phosphorylated by MPK6. bes1 loss-of-function mutants display compromised resistance to bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. BES1 S286A/S137A double mutation (BES1(SSAA)) impairs PAMP-induced phosphorylation and fails to restore bacterial resistance in bes1 mutant, indicating a positive role of BES1 phosphorylation in plant immunity. BES1 is phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase3 (GSK3)-like kinase BR-insensitive2 (BIN2), a negative regulator of BR signaling. BR perception inhibits BIN2 activity, allowing dephosphorylation of BES1 to regulate plant development. However, BES1(SSAA) does not affect BR-mediated plant growth, suggesting differential residue requirements for the modulation of BES1 phosphorylation in PTI and BR signaling. Our study identifies BES1 as a unique direct substrate of MPK6 in PTI signaling. This finding reveals MAPK-mediated BES1 phosphorylation as another BES1 modulation mechanism in plant cell signaling, in addition to GSK3-like kinase-mediated BES1 phosphorylation and F box protein-mediated BES1 degradation.

  9. Acute Pre-operative Infarcts and Poor Cerebrovascular Reserve are Independent Risk Factors for Severe Ischemic Complications Following Direct Extracranial-Intracranial Bypass for Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pulling, T. Michael; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Marks, Michael P.; Steinberg, Gary K.; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Severe ischemic changes are a rare but devastating complication following direct superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (STA MCA) bypass in Moyamoya patients. This study was undertaken to determine whether pre-operative MR imaging and/or cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) assessment using reference standard stable xenon enhanced computed tomography (xeCT) could predict such complications. Materials and Methods Among all adult patients receiving direct bypass at our institution between 2005 and 2010 who received a clinically interpretable xeCT examination, we identified index cases (patients with >15 ml post-operative infarcts) and control cases (patients without post-operative infarcts and without transient or permanent ischemic symptoms). Differences between groups were evaluated using the Mann Whitney test. Univariate and multivariate generalized linear model regression were employed to test predictors of post-operative infarct. Results Six index cases were identified and compared with 25 controls. Infarct size in the index cases was 95±55 ml. Four of six index cases (67%), but no control patients, had pre-operative acute infarcts. Baseline CBF was similar, but CVR was significantly lower in the index cases compared with control cases. For example, in the anterior circulation, median CVR was 0.4% (range: −38.0% to 16.6%) in index vs. 26.3% (range: −8.2% to 60.5%) in control patients (p=0.003). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the presence of a small pre-operative infarct (regardless of location) and impaired CVR were independent, significant predictors of severe post-operative ischemic injury. Conclusion Acute infarcts and impaired CVR on pre operative imaging are independent risk factors for severe ischemic complications following STA MCA bypass in Moyamoya disease. PMID:26564435

  10. Identification of singles bar as a direct transcriptional target of Drosophila Myocyte enhancer factor-2 and a regulator of adult myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Tonya M; Fremin, Brayon J; Cripps, Richard M

    2015-05-15

    In Drosophila, myoblast fusion is a conserved process in which founder cells (FCs) and fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fuse to form a syncytial muscle fiber. Mutants for the myogenic regulator Myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) show a failure of myoblast fusion, indicating that MEF2 regulates the fusion process. Indeed, chromatin immunoprecipitation studies show that several genes involved in myoblast fusion are bound by MEF2 during embryogenesis. Of these, the MARVEL domain gene singles bar (sing), is down-regulated in MEF2 knockdown pupae, and has five consensus MEF2 binding sites within a 9000-bp region. To determine if MEF2 is an essential and direct regulator of sing during pupal muscle development, we identified a 315-bp myoblast enhancer of sing. This enhancer was active during myoblast fusion, and mutation of two MEF2 sites significantly decreased enhancer activity. We show that lack of sing expression resulted in adult lethality and muscle loss, due to a failure of fusion during the pupal stage. Additionally, we sought to determine if sing was required in either FCs or FCMs to support fusion. Interestingly, knockdown of sing in either population did not significantly affect fusion, however, knockdown in both FCs and FCMs resulted in muscles with significantly reduced nuclei numbers, provisionally indicating that sing function is required in either cell type, but not both. Finally, we found that MEF2 regulated sing expression at the embryonic stage through the same 315-bp enhancer, indicating that sing is a MEF2 target at both critical stages of myoblast fusion. Our studies define for the first time how MEF2 directly controls fusion at multiple stages of the life cycle, and provide further evidence that the mechanisms of fusion characterized in Drosophila embryos is also used in the formation of the more complex adult muscles.

  11. Stromal cell-derived factor-1-directed bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell migration in response to inflammatory and/or hypoxic stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Wu, Rui-Xin; Gao, Li-Na; Xia, Yu; Tang, Hao-Ning; Chen, Fa-Ming

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Directing cell trafficking toward a target site of interest is critical for advancing stem cell therapy in clinical theranostic applications. In this study, we investigated the effects of inflammatory and/or hypoxic stimuli on the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) during in vitro culture and after in vivo implantation. Using tablet scratch experiments and observations from a transwell system, we found that both inflammatory and hypoxic stimuli significantly enhanced cell migration. However, the combination of inflammatory and hypoxic stimuli did not result in a synergistic effect. The presence of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) significantly enhanced cell migration irrespective of the incubation conditions, and these positive effects could be blocked by treatment with AMD3100. Based on a time course experiment, we found that preconditioning cells with either inflammatory or hypoxic stimuli for 24 h or with both stimuli for 12 h led to high levels of chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) expression. In vivo studies further demonstrated that pretreatment of BMMSCs with inflammatory and/or hypoxic stimuli resulted in an increased number of systemically injected cells migrating toward skin injuries, and local SDF-1 administration significantly increased cell migration. These findings suggest that in vitro control of either inflammatory or hypoxic stimuli has significant potential to enhance SDF-1-directed BMMSC migration via the upregulation of CXCR4 expression. Although combining the stimuli did not necessarily lead to a synergistic effect, the potential to reduce the dose and time required for cell preconditioning indicates that combinations of various strategies warrant further exploration. PMID:26745021

  12. miR-506 acts as a tumor suppressor by directly targeting the hedgehog pathway transcription factor Gli3 in human cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Wen, S-Y; Lin, Y; Yu, Y-Q; Cao, S-J; Zhang, R; Yang, X-M; Li, J; Zhang, Y-L; Wang, Y-H; Ma, M-Z; Sun, W-W; Lou, X-L; Wang, J-H; Teng, Y-C; Zhang, Z-G

    2015-02-05

    Although significant advances have recently been made in the diagnosis and treatment of cervical carcinoma, the long-term survival rate for advanced cervical cancer remains low. Therefore, an urgent need exists to both uncover the molecular mechanisms and identify potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of cervical cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have important roles in cancer progression and could be used as either potential therapeutic agents or targets. miR-506 is a component of an X chromosome-linked miRNA cluster. The biological functions of miR-506 have not been well established. In this study, we found that miR-506 expression was downregulated in approximately 80% of the cervical cancer samples examined and inversely correlated with the expression of Ki-67, a marker of cell proliferation. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies in human cervical cancer, Caski and SiHa cells, demonstrated that miR-506 acts as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting cervical cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. Further studies showed that miR-506 induced cell cycle arrest at the G1/S transition, and enhanced apoptosis and chemosensitivity of cervical cancer cell. We subsequently identified Gli3, a hedgehog pathway transcription factor, as a direct target of miR-506 in cervical cancer. Furthermore, Gli3 silencing recapitulated the effects of miR-506, and reintroduction of Gli3 abrogated miR-506-induced cell growth arrest and apoptosis. Taken together, we conclude that miR-506 exerts its anti-proliferative function by directly targeting Gli3. This newly identified miR-506/Gli3 axis provides further insight into the pathogenesis of cervical cancer and indicates a potential novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of cervical cancer.

  13. Direct hippocampal injection of pseudo lentivirus-delivered nerve growth factor gene rescues the damaged cognitive function after traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong; Wan, Jie-qing; Gao, Guo-yi; Pan, Yao-hua; Ding, Sheng-hao; Fan, Yi-ling; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) treatment is a long-term process and requires repeated medicine administration, which, however, can cause high expense, infection, and hemorrhage to patients. To investigate how a long-term expression of nerve growth factor (Ngf) gene affects the injured hippocampus function post-TBI, in this study, a pseudo lentivirus carrying the β-Ngf fusion gene, with green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene, was constructed to show the gene expression and its ability of protecting cells from oxidative damage in vitro. Then, the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene was directly injected into the injured brain to evaluate its influence on the injured hippocampus function post-TBI in vivo. We found that the expression of the pseudo lentivirus-delivered β-Ngf fusion gene lasted more than four-week after the cell transduction and the encoded β-NGF fusion protein could induce the neuron-like PC12 cell differentiation. Moreover, the hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene sped the injured cognitive function recovery of the rat subjected to TBI. Together, our findings indicate that the long-term expression of the β-Ngf fusion gene, delivered by the pseudo lentivirus, can promote the neurite outgrowth of the neuron-like cells and protect the cells from the oxidative damage in vitro, and that the direct and single dose hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene is able to rescue the hippocampus function after the TBI in the rat.

  14. Angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4, fasting-induced adipose factor) is a direct glucocorticoid receptor target and participates in glucocorticoid-regulated triglyceride metabolism.

    PubMed

    Koliwad, Suneil K; Kuo, Taiyi; Shipp, Lauren E; Gray, Nora E; Backhed, Fredrik; So, Alex Yick-Lun; Farese, Robert V; Wang, Jen-Chywan

    2009-09-18

    Glucocorticoids are important regulators of lipid homeostasis, and chronically elevated glucocorticoid levels induce hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic steatosis, and visceral obesity. The occupied glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a transcription factor. However, those genes regulating lipid metabolism under GR control are not fully known. Angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4, fasting-induced adipose factor), a protein inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase, is synthesized and secreted during fasting, when circulating glucocorticoid levels are physiologically increased. We therefore tested whether the ANGPTL4 gene (Angptl4) is transcriptionally controlled by GR. We show that treatment with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone increased Angptl4 mRNA levels in primary hepatocytes and adipocytes (2-3-fold) and in the livers and white adipose tissue of mice (approximately 4-fold). We tested the mechanism of this increase in H4IIE hepatoma cells and found that dexamethasone treatment increased the transcriptional rate of Angptl4. Using bioinformatics and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we identified a GR binding site within the rat Angptl4 sequence. A reporter plasmid containing this site was markedly activated by dexamethasone, indicative of a functional glucocorticoid response element. Dexamethasone treatment also increased histone H4 acetylation and DNase I accessibility in genomic regions near this site, further supporting that it is a glucocorticoid response element. Glucocorticoids promote the flux of triglycerides from white adipose tissue to liver. We found that mice lacking ANGPTL4 (Angptl4(-/-)) had reductions in dexamethasone-induced hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis, suggesting that ANGPTL4 is required for this flux. Overall, we establish that ANGPTL4 is a direct GR target that participates in glucocorticoid-regulated triglyceride metabolism.

  15. Factors Associated with Non-Participation and Non-Adherence in Directly Observed Mass Drug Administration for Malaria in The Gambia

    PubMed Central

    Dierickx, Susan; Gryseels, Charlotte; Mwesigwa, Julia; O’Neill, Sarah; Bannister-Tyrell, Melanie; Ronse, Maya; Jaiteh, Fatou; Gerrets, René; D’Alessandro, Umberto; Grietens, Koen Peeters

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The potential benefits of Mass Drug Administration (MDA) for malaria elimination are being considered in several malaria endemic countries where a decline in malaria transmission has been reported. For this strategy to work, it is important that a large proportion of the target population participates, requiring an in-depth understanding of factors that may affect participation and adherence to MDA programs. Methodology This social science study was ancillary to a one-round directly observed MDA campaign with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, carried out in 12 villages in rural Gambia between June and August 2014. The social science study employed a mixed-methods approach combining qualitative methods (participant observation and in-depth interviewing) and quantitative methods (structured follow-up interviews among non-participating and non-adhering community members). Results Of 3942 people registered in the study villages, 67.9% adhered to the three consecutive daily doses. For the remaining villagers, 12.6% did not attend the screening, 3.5% was not eligible and 16% did not adhere to the treatment schedule. The main barriers for non-participation and adherence were long and short-term mobility of individuals and specific subgroups, perceived adverse drug reactions and rumors, inconveniences related to the logistics of MDA (e.g. waiting times) and the perceived lack of information about MDA. Conclusion While, there was no fundamental resistance from the target communities, adherence was 67.9%. This shows the necessity of understanding local perceptions and barriers to increase its effectiveness. Moreover, certain of the constraining factors were socio-spatially clustered which might prove problematic since focal areas of residual malaria transmission may remain allowing malaria to spread to adjacent areas where transmission had been temporarily interrupted. PMID:26866685

  16. Sustained dual release of placental growth factor-2 and bone morphogenic protein-2 from heparin-based nanocomplexes for direct osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun; Deng, Li-Zhi; Sun, Hai-Peng; Xu, Jia-Yun; Li, Yi-Ming; Xie, Xin; Zhang, Li-Ming; Deng, Fei-Long

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the direct osteogenic effect between placental growth factor-2 (PlGF-2) and bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2). Methods Three groups of PlGF-2/BMP-2-loaded heparin–N-(2-hydroxyl) propyl-3-trimethyl ammonium chitosan chloride (HTCC) nanocomplexes were prepared: those with 0.5 μg PlGF-2; with 1.0 μg BMP-2; and with 0.5 μg PlGF-2 combined with 1.0 μg BMP-2. The loading efficiencies and release profiles of these growth factors (GFs) in this nanocomplex system were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, their biological activities were evaluated using cell counting kit-8, cell morphology, and cell number counting assays, and their osteogenic activities were quantified using alkaline phosphatase and Alizarin Red S staining assays. Results The loading efficiencies were more than 99% for the nanocomplexes loaded with just PlGF-2 and for those loaded with both PlGF-2 and BMP-2. For the nanocomplex loaded with just BMP-2, the loading efficiency was more than 97%. About 83%–84% of PlGF-2 and 89%–91% of BMP-2 were stably retained on the nanocomplexes for at least 21 days. In in vitro biological assays, PlGF-2 exhibited osteogenic effects comparable to those of BMP-2 despite its dose in the experiments being lower than that of BMP-2. Moreover, the results implied that heparin-based nanocomplexes encapsulating two GFs have enhanced potential in the enhancement of osteoblast function. Conclusion PlGF-2-loaded heparin–HTCC nanocomplexes may constitute a promising system for bone regeneration. Moreover, the dual delivery of PlGF-2 and BMP-2 appears to have greater potential in bone tissue regeneration than the delivery of either GFs alone. PMID:27042064

  17. Factors influencing knowledge on completion of treatment among TB patients under directly observed treatment strategy, in selected health facilities in Embu County, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ndwiga, Joshua Muriuki; Kikuvi, Gideon; Omolo, Jared Odhiambo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The World Health Organization (WHO) promotes the Directly Observed Treatment (DOT) strategy as the standard to increase adherence to Tuberculosis (TB) medication. However, cases of retreatment and Multi Drug Resistant continue to be reported in many parts of Kenya. This study sought to determine the factors influencing the completion of tuberculosis medication among TB patients in Embu County, Kenya. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on a population of tuberculosis patients under DOT attending selected TB treatment clinics in Embu County, in Kenya. One hundred and forty TB patients interviewed within a period of 3 months. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 17.0 and included Bivariate and Multivariate Analysis. The level of significance was p≤ 0.05. Results The male and female participants were 61.4% and 38.6% respectively. The mean age of the respondents was 35±31.34-39.3 years. For the majority (52%) of the participants, the highest level of education was primary education. The unemployed participants formed the highest number of the respondent in the study (73%). The majorities (91.4%0) of the respondents were under the home-based DOT strategy (91.4%, 95% C.I: 85.5-95.5). Bivariate analysis using Chi-square showed that the level of education (p=0.003), patients feeling uncomfortable during supervision (p=0.01), and knowledge regarding the frequency of taking medication (p=0.004) were all significantly associated with knowledge regarding the importance of completion of medication. However, none of these factors was significant after multivariate analysis. Conclusion Most participants did not know the importance of completion of medication. TB programs should come up with better ways to educate TB patients on the importance of supervision and treatment completion during the treatment of TB. The education programs should focus on influencing the attitudes of patients and creating awareness about the importance of treatment

  18. Development of a physiology-directed population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic model for characterizing the impact of genetic and demographic factors on clopidogrel response in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xi-Ling; Samant, Snehal; Lewis, Joshua P; Horenstein, Richard B; Shuldiner, Alan R; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Peletier, Lambertus A; Lesko, Lawrence J; Schmidt, Stephan

    2016-01-20

    Clopidogrel (Plavix®), is a widely used antiplatelet agent, which shows high inter-individual variability in treatment response in patients following the standard dosing regimen. In this study, a physiology-directed population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model was developed based on clopidogrel and clopidogrel active metabolite (clop-AM) data from the PAPI and the PGXB2B studies using a step-wise approach in NONMEM (version 7.2). The developed model characterized the in vivo disposition of clopidogrel, its bioactivation into clop-AM in the liver and subsequent platelet aggregation inhibition in the systemic circulation reasonably well. It further allowed the identification of covariates that significantly impact clopidogrel's dose-concentration-response relationship. In particular, CYP2C19 intermediate and poor metabolizers converted 26.2% and 39.5% less clopidogrel to clop-AM, respectively, compared to extensive metabolizers. In addition, CES1 G143E mutation carriers have a reduced CES1 activity (82.9%) compared to wild-type subjects, which results in a significant increase in clop-AM formation. An increase in BMI was found to significantly decrease clopidogrel's bioactivation, whereas increased age was associated with increased platelet reactivity. Our PK/PD model analysis suggests that, in order to optimize clopidogrel dosing on a patient-by-patient basis, all of these factors have to be considered simultaneously, e.g. by using quantitative clinical pharmacology tools.

  19. Vitamin D Binding Protein-Macrophage Activating Factor Directly Inhibits Proliferation, Migration, and uPAR Expression of Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bielenberg, Diane R.; Dridi, Sami; Wu, Jason; Jiang, Weihua; Huang, Bin; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven; Fannon, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background Vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf) is a potent inhibitor of tumor growth. Its activity, however, has been attributed to indirect mechanisms such as boosting the immune response by activating macrophages and inhibiting the blood vessel growth necessary for the growth of tumors. Methods and Findings In this study we show for the first time that DBP-maf exhibits a direct and potent effect on prostate tumor cells in the absence of macrophages. DBP-maf demonstrated inhibitory activity in proliferation studies of both LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines as well as metastatic clones of these cells. Flow cytometry studies with annexin V and propidium iodide showed that this inhibitory activity is not due to apoptosis or cell death. DBP-maf also had the ability to inhibit migration of prostate cancer cells in vitro. Finally, DBP-maf was shown to cause a reduction in urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression in prostate tumor cells. There is evidence that activation of this receptor correlates with tumor metastasis. Conclusions These studies show strong inhibitory activity of DBP-maf on prostate tumor cells independent of its macrophage activation. PMID:20976141

  20. Factors affecting patient delay of diagnosis and completion of Direct Observation Therapy, Short-course (DOTS) among the migrant population in Shandong, China.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Ruoyan Gai; Xu, Lingzhong; Zhou, Chengchao; Yuan, Qing; Geng, Hong; Wang, Xingzhou

    2013-06-01

    In China, the epidemiological and socioeconomic status of the migrant population suggests that the vulnerable population should be prioritized for tuberculosis (TB) control. A face-to-face interview using a structured questionnaire was performed on a total of 314 smear-positive pulmonary TB patients among the migrant population of 12 randomly selected counties in Shandong Province, China. From the results, the cases of patient delay of diagnosis accounted for 40.8%, and the completion rate of Direct Observation Therapy, Short-course (DOTS) was as low as 67.2%. There were 47.1% missed cases in the first diagnosis. Factors affecting detection and treatment were present in their socioeconomic status, working style, and the accessibility to related TB care. The findings indicated that migrant TB patients suffer delayed diagnosis, a low case detection rate and a low completion DOTS rate. Improvement of migrants' working conditions and accessibility to specialized TB care is essential and is expected to lead to better case detection and treatment completion.

  1. Transcription factor ATF4 directs basal and stress-induced gene expression in the unfolded protein response and cholesterol metabolism in the liver.

    PubMed

    Fusakio, Michael E; Willy, Jeffrey A; Wang, Yongping; Mirek, Emily T; Al Baghdadi, Rana J T; Adams, Christopher M; Anthony, Tracy G; Wek, Ronald C

    2016-05-01

    Disturbances in protein folding and membrane compositions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicit the unfolded protein response (UPR). Each of three UPR sensory proteins-PERK (PEK/EIF2AK3), IRE1, and ATF6-is activated by ER stress. PERK phosphorylation of eIF2 represses global protein synthesis, lowering influx of nascent polypeptides into the stressed ER, coincident with preferential translation of ATF4 (CREB2). In cultured cells, ATF4 induces transcriptional expression of genes directed by the PERK arm of the UPR, including genes involved in amino acid metabolism, resistance to oxidative stress, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153/DDIT3). In this study, we characterize whole-body and tissue-specific ATF4-knockout mice and show in liver exposed to ER stress that ATF4 is not required for CHOP expression, but instead ATF6 is a primary inducer. RNA-Seq analysis indicates that ATF4 is responsible for a small portion of the PERK-dependent UPR genes and reveals a requirement for expression of ATF4 for expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response basally and cholesterol metabolism both basally and under stress. Consistent with this pattern of gene expression, loss of ATF4 resulted in enhanced oxidative damage, and increased free cholesterol in liver under stress accompanied by lowered cholesterol in sera.

  2. Bioengineered coagulation factor VIII enables long-term correction of murine hemophilia A following liver-directed adeno-associated viral vector delivery

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Harrison C; Wright, J Fraser; Zhou, Shangzhen; Lytle, Allison M; Shields, Jordan E; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2014-01-01

    Clinical data support the feasibility and safety of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors in gene therapy applications. Despite several clinical trials of AAV-based gene transfer for hemophilia B, a unique set of obstacles impede the development of a similar approach for hemophilia A. These include (i) the size of the factor VIII (fVIII) transgene, (ii) humoral immune responses to fVIII, (iii) inefficient biosynthesis of human fVIII, and (iv) AAV vector immunity. Through bioengineering approaches, a novel fVIII molecule, designated ET3, was developed and shown to improve biosynthetic efficiency 10- to 100-fold. In this study, the utility of ET3 was assessed in the context of liver-directed, AAV-mediated gene transfer into hemophilia A mice. Due to the large size of the expression cassette, AAV-ET3 genomes packaged into viral particles as partial genome fragments. Despite this potential limitation, a single peripheral vein administration of AAV-ET3 into immune-competent hemophilia A mice resulted in correction of the fVIII deficiency at lower vector doses than previously reported for similarly oversized AAV-fVIII vectors. Therefore, ET3 appears to improve vector potency and mitigate at least one of the critical barriers to AAV-based clinical gene therapy for hemophilia A. PMID:26015976

  3. The nuclear-encoded sigma factor SIG4 directly activates transcription of chloroplast psbA and ycf17 genes in the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Gaku; Imamura, Sousuke; Era, Atsuko; Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Hanaoka, Mitsumasa; Tanaka, Kan

    2015-05-01

    The plant organelle chloroplast originated from the endosymbiosis of a cyanobacterial-like photosynthetic bacterium, and still retains its own genome derived from this ancestor. We have been focusing on a unicellular red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, as a model photosynthetic eukaryote. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptional specificity of SIG4, which is one of four nuclear-encoded chloroplast RNA polymerase sigma factors in this alga. Accumulation of the SIG4 protein was observed in response to nitrogen depletion or high light conditions. By comparing the chloroplast transcriptomes under nitrogen depletion and SIG4-overexpressing conditions, we identified several candidate genes as SIG4 targets. Together with the results of chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, the promoters of the psbA (encoding the D1 protein of the photosystem II reaction center) and ycf17 (encoding a protein of the early light-inducible protein family) genes were shown to be direct activation targets. The phycobilisome (PBS) CpcB protein was decreased by SIG4 overexpression, which suggests the negative involvement of SIG4 in PBS accumulation.

  4. Scratch that itch: revisiting links between self-directed behaviour and parasitological, social and environmental factors in a free-ranging primate

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Valéria; MacIntosh, Andrew J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Different hypotheses explain variation in the occurrence of self-directed behaviour such as scratching and self-grooming: a parasite hypothesis linked with ectoparasite load, an environmental hypothesis linked with seasonal conditions and a social hypothesis linked with social factors. These hypotheses are not mutually exclusive but are often considered separately. Here, we revisited these hypotheses together in female Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata fuscata) of Kōjima islet, Japan. We input occurrences of scratching and self-grooming during focal observations in models combining parasitological (lice load), social (dominance rank, social grooming, aggression received and proximity), and environmental (rainfall, temperature and season) variables. Using an information-theory approach, we simultaneously compared the explanatory value of models against each other using variation in Akaike's information criterion and Akaike's weights. We found that evidence for models with lice load, with or without environmental–social parameters, was stronger than that for other models. In these models, scratching was positively associated with lice load and social grooming whereas self-grooming was negatively associated with lice load and positively associated with social grooming, dominance rank and number of female neighbours. This study indicates that the study animals scratch primarily because of an immune/stimulus itch, possibly triggered by ectoparasite bites/movements. It also confirms that self-grooming could act as a displacement activity in the case of social uncertainty. We advocate that biological hypotheses be more broadly considered even when investigating social processes, as one does not exclude the other. PMID:28018646

  5. Scratch that itch: revisiting links between self-directed behaviour and parasitological, social and environmental factors in a free-ranging primate.

    PubMed

    Duboscq, Julie; Romano, Valéria; Sueur, Cédric; MacIntosh, Andrew J J

    2016-11-01

    Different hypotheses explain variation in the occurrence of self-directed behaviour such as scratching and self-grooming: a parasite hypothesis linked with ectoparasite load, an environmental hypothesis linked with seasonal conditions and a social hypothesis linked with social factors. These hypotheses are not mutually exclusive but are often considered separately. Here, we revisited these hypotheses together in female Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata fuscata) of Kōjima islet, Japan. We input occurrences of scratching and self-grooming during focal observations in models combining parasitological (lice load), social (dominance rank, social grooming, aggression received and proximity), and environmental (rainfall, temperature and season) variables. Using an information-theory approach, we simultaneously compared the explanatory value of models against each other using variation in Akaike's information criterion and Akaike's weights. We found that evidence for models with lice load, with or without environmental-social parameters, was stronger than that for other models. In these models, scratching was positively associated with lice load and social grooming whereas self-grooming was negatively associated with lice load and positively associated with social grooming, dominance rank and number of female neighbours. This study indicates that the study animals scratch primarily because of an immune/stimulus itch, possibly triggered by ectoparasite bites/movements. It also confirms that self-grooming could act as a displacement activity in the case of social uncertainty. We advocate that biological hypotheses be more broadly considered even when investigating social processes, as one does not exclude the other.

  6. Results of Quenching Factor Measurements of CaWO at mK Temperatures for the Direct Dark Matter Search Experiment CRESST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, R.; Ciemniak, C.; Deuter, G.; Feilitzsch, F. V.; Gütlein, A.; Hagn, H.; Hellgartner, D.; Jochum, J.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Münster, A.; Potzel, W.; Roth, S.; Rottler, K.; Sailer, C.; Scholl, S.; Sivers, M. V.; Usherov, I.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Wüstrich, M.; Zöller, A.

    2014-09-01

    The CRESST experiment aims at a direct detection of WIMP dark matter (DM) using scintillating CaWO crystals operated as phonon detectors at mK temperatures. An important feature of the experiment is the active background discrimination technique exploiting the different light outputs depending on the kind of particle interaction. The reduced light yield of nuclear recoils compared to electron recoils is quantified by quenching factors (QFs). The precise measurement of the QFs and thus the identification of the individual recoiling nucleus in the multi-target material CaWO is crucial for neutron background discrimination and assuming a positive DM signal would allow to a certain extent WIMP-mass spectroscopy. At the Munich tandem accelerator a dedicated neutron scattering facility has been set up to measure the QFs of CaWO, in particular that of tungsten, at mK temperatures. Monoenergetic neutrons (11 MeV) produced by the accelerator are scattered off a CRESST-like detector module that is operated in a dilution refrigerator. In this setup, the recoiling nucleus (O, Ca and W) is identified by time-of-flight measurement in liquid-scintillator detectors placed at fixed scattering angles. The QF of W could be determined with unprecedented accuracy at mK temperatures and under realistic measurement conditions: (preliminary value).

  7. Transcription factor ATF4 directs basal and stress-induced gene expression in the unfolded protein response and cholesterol metabolism in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Fusakio, Michael E.; Willy, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yongping; Mirek, Emily T.; Al Baghdadi, Rana J. T.; Adams, Christopher M.; Anthony, Tracy G.; Wek, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in protein folding and membrane compositions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicit the unfolded protein response (UPR). Each of three UPR sensory proteins—PERK (PEK/EIF2AK3), IRE1, and ATF6—is activated by ER stress. PERK phosphorylation of eIF2 represses global protein synthesis, lowering influx of nascent polypeptides into the stressed ER, coincident with preferential translation of ATF4 (CREB2). In cultured cells, ATF4 induces transcriptional expression of genes directed by the PERK arm of the UPR, including genes involved in amino acid metabolism, resistance to oxidative stress, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153/DDIT3). In this study, we characterize whole-body and tissue-specific ATF4-knockout mice and show in liver exposed to ER stress that ATF4 is not required for CHOP expression, but instead ATF6 is a primary inducer. RNA-Seq analysis indicates that ATF4 is responsible for a small portion of the PERK-dependent UPR genes and reveals a requirement for expression of ATF4 for expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response basally and cholesterol metabolism both basally and under stress. Consistent with this pattern of gene expression, loss of ATF4 resulted in enhanced oxidative damage, and increased free cholesterol in liver under stress accompanied by lowered cholesterol in sera. PMID:26960794

  8. Regulation of factor IXa in vitro in human and mouse plasma and in vivo in the mouse. Role of the endothelium and the plasma proteinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, H.E.; Trapp, H.G.; Griffith, M.J.; Roberts, H.R.; Pizzo, S.V.

    1984-06-01

    The regulation of human Factor IXa was studied in vitro in human and mouse plasma and in vivo in the mouse. In human plasma, approximately 60% of the /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was bound to antithrombin III (ATIII) by 2 h, with no binding to alpha 2-macroglobulin or alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor, as assessed by gel electrophoresis and IgG- antiproteinase inhibitor-Sepharose beads. In the presence of heparin, virtually 100% of the /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was bound to ATIII by 1 min. The distribution of /sup 125/I-Factor IXa in mouse plasma was similar. The clearance of /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was rapid (50% clearance in 2 min) and biphasic and was inhibited by large molar excesses of ATIII-thrombin and alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor-trypsin, but not alpha 2-macro-globulin-trypsin; it was also inhibited by large molar excesses of diisopropylphosphoryl - (DIP-) Factor Xa, DIP-thrombin, and Factor IX, but not by prothrombin or Factor X. The clearance of Factor IX was also rapid (50% clearance in 2.5 min) and was inhibited by a large molar excess of Factor IX, but not by large molar excesses of Factor X, prothrombin, DIP-Factor Xa, or DIP-thrombin. Electrophoresis and IgG- antiproteinase inhibitor-Sepharose bead studies confirmed that by 2 min after injection into the murine circulation, 60% of the /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was bound to ATIII. Organ distribution studies with /sup 125/I-Factor IXa demonstrated that most of the radioactivity was in the liver. These studies suggest that Factor IXa binds to at least two classes of binding sites on endothelial cells. One site apparently recognizes both Factors IX and IXa, but not Factor X, Factor Xa, prothrombin, or thrombin. The other site recognizes thrombin, Factor Xa, and Factor IXa, but not the zymogen forms of these clotting factors. After this binding, Factor IXa is bound to ATIII and the complex is cleared from the circulation by hepatocytes.

  9. [Direct oral anticoagulants: what is the exact assessment of coagulation tests and plasma levels by laboratory tests in clinical practice?].

    PubMed

    Gendron, Nicolas; Smadja, David M

    2016-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DAO), anti-IIa or anti-Xa, are intended to be widely used for the treatment and prevention of thrombotic disorders in venous thromboembolic disease and atrial fibrillation as an alternative of vitamin K antagonists (VKA). Despite predictable pharmacological properties, spontaneous or provoked hemorrhagic risks by DAO are major limitations. Thus, after few years of inconsistence concerning biological implication and in particular coagulation tests, it is now established that we need biology to evaluate hemorrhagic risk before surgery or in hemorrhagic cases.

  10. Serotonin (5-HT) inhibits Factor XIII-A-mediated plasma fibronectin matrix assembly and crosslinking in osteoblast cultures via direct competition with transamidation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Cui; Kaartinen, Mari T

    2015-03-01

    Serotonin (5-HT)--a monoamine with a variety of physiological functions--has recently emerged as a major regulator of bone mass. 5-HT is synthesized in the brain and the gut, and gut-derived 5-HT contributes to circulating 5-HT levels and is a negative modulator of bone mass and quality. 5-HT's negative effects on the skeleton are considered to be mediated via its receptors and transporter in osteoblasts and osteoclasts; however, 5-HT can also incorporate covalently into proteins via a transglutaminase-mediated serotonylation reaction, which in turn can alter protein function. Plasma fibronectin (pFN)--a major component of the bone extracellular matrix that regulates bone matrix quality in vivo--is a major transglutaminase substrate in bone and in osteoblast cultures. We have recently demonstrated that pFN assembly into osteoblast culture matrix requires a Factor XIII-A (FXIII-A) transglutaminase-mediated crosslinking step that regulates both quantity and quality of type I collagen matrix in vitro. In this study, we show that 5-HT interferes with pFN assembly into the extracellular matrix in osteoblast cultures, which in turn has major consequences on matrix assembly and mineralization. 5-HT treatment of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cultures dramatically decreased both pFN fibrillogenesis as analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy and pFN levels in DOC-soluble and DOC-insoluble matrix fractions. This was accompanied by an increase in pFN levels in the culture media. Analysis of the media showed covalent incorporation of 5-HT into pFN. Minor co-localization of pFN with 5-HT was also seen in extracellular fibrils. 5-HT also showed co-localization with FXIII-A on the cell surface and inhibited its transamidation activity directly. 5-HT treatment of osteoblast cultures resulted in a discontinuous pFN matrix and impaired type I collagen deposition, decreased alkaline phosphatase and lysyl oxidase activity, and delayed mineralization of the cultures. Addition of excess

  11. Nrf2 Transcription Factor Can Directly Regulate mTOR: LINKING CYTOPROTECTIVE GENE EXPRESSION TO A MAJOR METABOLIC REGULATOR THAT GENERATES REDOX ACTIVITY.

    PubMed

    Bendavit, Gabriel; Aboulkassim, Tahar; Hilmi, Khalid; Shah, Sujay; Batist, Gerald

    2016-12-02

    Nrf2 is a master transcription factor that regulates a wide variety of cellular proteins by recognizing and binding to antioxidant response elements (AREs) in their gene promoter regions. In this study we show that increasing cellular Nrf2 results in transcriptional activation of the gene for mTOR, which is central to the PI3K signaling pathway. This is the case in cells with normal physiological PI3K. However, in cells with abnormally active PI3K increased cellular Nrf2 levels have no effect on mTOR. ChIP assays results show that increased Nrf2 binding is associated with decreased p65 binding and H3-K27me3 signal (marker of gene repression) as well as increased H3-K4me3 signal (marker of gene activation). However, in cells with PI3K activation, no effect of cellular Nrf2 increase on mTOR transcription was observed. In these cells, increasing Nrf2 levels increases Nrf2 promoter binding marginally, whereas p65 binding and H3-K27me3 mark were significantly increased, and H3-K4me3 signal is reduced. Together, these data show for the first time that Nrf2 directly regulates mTOR transcription when the PI3K pathway is intact, whereas this function is lost when PI3K is activated. We have identified a link between the Nrf2 system of sensing environmental stress and mTOR, which is a key cellular protein in metabolism. Studies in cells with activating mutations in the PI3K pathway suggest that Nrf2 transcriptional regulation of mTOR is related to promoter binding of p65 and of methylation of histone residues permissive of transcription.

  12. Epidermal Growth Factor-dependent Activation of the Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Pathway by DJ-1 Protein through Its Direct Binding to c-Raf Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Kato-Ose, Izumi; Murata, Hiroaki; Maita, Hiroshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2015-01-01

    DJ-1 is an oncogene and also a causative gene for familial Parkinson disease. DJ-1 has various functions, and the oxidative status of cysteine at position 106 (Cys-106) is crucial for determination of the activation level of DJ-1. Although DJ-1 requires activated Ras for its oncogenic activity and although it activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, a cell growth pathway downstream of Ras, the precise mechanism underlying activation of the ERK pathway by DJ-1 is still not known. In this study, we found that DJ-1 directly bound to the kinase domain of c-Raf but not to Ras and that Cys-106 mutant DJ-1 bound to c-Raf more weakly than did wild-type DJ-1. Co-localization of DJ-1 with c-Raf in the cytoplasm was enhanced in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-treated cells. Knockdown of DJ-1 expression attenuated the phosphorylation level of c-Raf in EGF-treated cells, resulting in reduced activation of MEK and ERK1/2. Although EGF-treated DJ-1 knock-out cells also showed attenuated c-Raf activation, reintroduction of wild-type DJ-1, but not C106S DJ-1, into DJ-1 knock-out cells restored c-Raf activation in a DJ-1 binding activity in a c-Raf-dependent manner. DJ-1 was not responsible for activation of c-Raf in phorbol myristate acetate-treated cells. Furthermore, DJ-1 stimulated self-phosphorylation activity of c-Raf in vitro, but DJ-1 was not a target for Raf kinase. Oxidation of Cys-106 in DJ-1 was not affected by EGF treatment. These findings showed that DJ-1 is a positive regulator of the EGF/Ras/ERK pathway through targeting c-Raf. PMID:26048984

  13. Epidermal Growth Factor-dependent Activation of the Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Pathway by DJ-1 Protein through Its Direct Binding to c-Raf Protein.

    PubMed

    Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Kato-Ose, Izumi; Murata, Hiroaki; Maita, Hiroshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2015-07-17

    DJ-1 is an oncogene and also a causative gene for familial Parkinson disease. DJ-1 has various functions, and the oxidative status of cysteine at position 106 (Cys-106) is crucial for determination of the activation level of DJ-1. Although DJ-1 requires activated Ras for its oncogenic activity and although it activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, a cell growth pathway downstream of Ras, the precise mechanism underlying activation of the ERK pathway by DJ-1 is still not known. In this study, we found that DJ-1 directly bound to the kinase domain of c-Raf but not to Ras and that Cys-106 mutant DJ-1 bound to c-Raf more weakly than did wild-type DJ-1. Co-localization of DJ-1 with c-Raf in the cytoplasm was enhanced in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-treated cells. Knockdown of DJ-1 expression attenuated the phosphorylation level of c-Raf in EGF-treated cells, resulting in reduced activation of MEK and ERK1/2. Although EGF-treated DJ-1 knock-out cells also showed attenuated c-Raf activation, reintroduction of wild-type DJ-1, but not C106S DJ-1, into DJ-1 knock-out cells restored c-Raf activation in a DJ-1 binding activity in a c-Raf-dependent manner. DJ-1 was not responsible for activation of c-Raf in phorbol myristate acetate-treated cells. Furthermore, DJ-1 stimulated self-phosphorylation activity of c-Raf in vitro, but DJ-1 was not a target for Raf kinase. Oxidation of Cys-106 in DJ-1 was not affected by EGF treatment. These findings showed that DJ-1 is a positive regulator of the EGF/Ras/ERK pathway through targeting c-Raf.

  14. MicroRNA-17-92, a direct Ap-2α transcriptional target, modulates T-box factor activity in orofacial clefting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Bai, Yan; Li, Hong; Greene, Stephanie B; Klysik, Elzbieta; Yu, Wei; Schwartz, Robert J; Williams, Trevor J; Martin, James F

    2013-01-01

    Among the most common human congenital anomalies, cleft lip and palate (CL/P) affects up to 1 in 700 live births. MicroRNA (miR)s are small, non-coding RNAs that repress gene expression post-transcriptionally. The miR-17-92 cluster encodes six miRs that have been implicated in human cancers and heart development. We discovered that miR-17-92 mutant embryos had severe craniofacial phenotypes, including incompletely penetrant CL/P and mandibular hypoplasia. Embryos that were compound mutant for miR-17-92 and the related miR-106b-25 cluster had completely penetrant CL/P. Expression of Tbx1 and Tbx3, the DiGeorge/velo-cardio-facial (DGS) and Ulnar-mammary syndrome (UMS) disease genes, was expanded in miR-17-92 mutant craniofacial structures. Both Tbx1 and Tbx3 had functional miR seed sequences that mediated gene repression. Analysis of miR-17-92 regulatory regions uncovered conserved and functional AP-2α recognition elements that directed miR-17-92 expression. Together, our data indicate that miR-17-92 modulates expression of critical T-box transcriptional regulators during midface development and is itself a target of Bmp-signaling and the craniofacial pioneer factor AP-2α. Our data are the first genetic evidence that an individual miR or miR cluster is functionally important in mammalian CL/P.

  15. Ex vivo effects of low-dose rivaroxaban on specific coagulation assays and coagulation factor activities in patients under real life conditions.

    PubMed

    Mani, Helen; Hesse, Christian; Stratmann, Gertrud; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard

    2013-01-01

    Global coagulation assays display variable effects at different concentrations of rivaroxaban. The aim of this study is to quantify the ex vivo effects of low-dose rivaroxaban on thrombophilia screening assays and coagulation factor activities based on the administration time, and to show how to mask possible interferences. Plasma samples from 40 patients receiving rivaroxaban 10 mg daily were investigated to measure activities of clotting factor II, V, VII, VIII, IX, XI, XII and XIII; protein C- and protein S-levels; lupus anticoagulants; anticardiolipin IgG and IgM; D-dimer, heparin-platelet factor 4 (HPF4) antibodies and screening tests for von Willebrand disease (VWD). Two hours after rivaroxaban administration, the activities of clotting factors were significantly decreased to different extents, except for factor XIII. Dilution of plasma samples resulted in neutralisation of these interferences. The chromogenic protein C activity assay was not affected by rivaroxaban. Depending on the timing of tablet intake in relation to blood sampling protein S activity was measured falsely high when a clotting assay was used. False-positive results for lupus anticoagulants were observed depending on the assay system used and the administration time of rivaroxaban. ELISA-based assays such as anticardiolipin IgG and IgM, D-dimer, HPF4-antibodies and the turbidimetric assays for VWD were not affected by rivaroxaban. Specific haemostasis clotting tests should be performed directly prior to rivaroxaban intake. Assay optimisation in the presence of rivaroxaban can be achieved by plasma dilution. Immunologic assays are not influenced by rivaroxaban, while chromogenic assays can be used, when they do not depend on factor Xa.

  16. Matriptase activation connects tissue factor-dependent coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Sylvain M; Szabo, Roman; Lee, Melody; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Craik, Charles S; Bugge, Thomas H; Camerer, Eric

    2016-06-23

    The coagulation cascade is designed to sense tissue injury by physical separation of the membrane-anchored cofactor tissue factor (TF) from inactive precursors of coagulation proteases circulating in plasma. Once TF on epithelial and other extravascular cells is exposed to plasma, sequential activation of coagulation proteases coordinates hemostasis and contributes to host defense and tissue repair. Membrane-anchored serine proteases (MASPs) play critical roles in the development and homeostasis of epithelial barrier tissues; how MASPs are activated in mature epithelia is unknown. We here report that proteases of the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation transactivate the MASP matriptase, thus connecting coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling. Exposure of TF-expressing cells to factors (F) VIIa and Xa triggered the conversion of latent pro-matriptase to an active protease, which in turn cleaved the pericellular substrates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) and pro-urokinase. An activation pathway-selective PAR2 mutant resistant to direct cleavage by TF:FVIIa and FXa was activated by these proteases when cells co-expressed pro-matriptase, and matriptase transactivation was necessary for efficient cleavage and activation of wild-type PAR2 by physiological concentrations of TF:FVIIa and FXa. The coagulation initiation complex induced rapid and prolonged enhancement of the barrier function of epithelial monolayers that was dependent on matriptase transactivation and PAR2 signaling. These observations suggest that the coagulation cascade engages matriptase to help coordinate epithelial defense and repair programs after injury or infection, and that matriptase may contribute to TF-driven pathogenesis in cancer and inflammation.

  17. Sources of methane and nitrous oxide in California's Central Valley estimated through direct airborne flux and positive matrix factorization source apportionment of groundbased and regional tall tower measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Abhinav

    -San Joaquin River Delta in the Central Valley. Through analysis of these field measurements, this dissertation presents the apportionment of observed CH4 and N2O concentration enhancements into major source categories along with direct emissions estimates from airborne observations. We perform high-precision measurements of greenhouse gases using gas analyzers based on absorption spectroscopy, and other source marker volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using state of the art VOC measurement systems (e.g. proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry). We combine these measurements with a statistical source apportionment technique called positive matrix factorization (PMF) to evaluate and investigate the major local sources of CH4 and N2O during CalNex and Walnut Grove campaigns. In the CABERNET study, we combine measurements with an airborne approach to a well-established micrometeorological technique (eddy-covariance method) to derive CH4 fluxes over different source regions in the Central Valley. In the CalNex experiments, we demonstrate that dairy and livestock remains the largest source sector of non-CO2 greenhouse gases in the San Joaquin Valley contributing most of the CH4 and much of the measured N2O at Bakersfield. Agriculture is observed to provide another major source of N2O, while vehicle emissions are found to be an insignificant source of N2O, contrary to the current statewide greenhouse gas inventory which includes vehicles as a major source. Our PMF source apportionment also produces an evaporative/fugitive factor but its relative lack of CH4 contributions points to removal processes from vented emissions in the surrounding O&G industry and the overwhelming dominance of the dairy CH4 source. In the CABERNET experiments, we report enhancements of CH4 from a number of sources spread across the spatial domain of the Central Valley that improves our understanding of their distribution and relative strengths. We observe large enhancements of CH4 mixing ratios over the

  18. A Recombination Directionality Factor Controls the Cell Type-Specific Activation of σK and the Fidelity of Spore Development in Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Mónica; Kint, Nicolas; Pereira, Fátima C.; Saujet, Laure; Boudry, Pierre; Dupuy, Bruno; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The strict anaerobe Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhea, and the oxygen-resistant spores that it forms have a central role in the infectious cycle. The late stages of sporulation require the mother cell regulatory protein σK. In Bacillus subtilis, the onset of σK activity requires both excision of a prophage-like element (skinBs) inserted in the sigK gene and proteolytical removal of an inhibitory pro-sequence. Importantly, the rearrangement is restricted to the mother cell because the skinBs recombinase is produced specifically in this cell. In C. difficile, σK lacks a pro-sequence but a skinCd element is present. The product of the skinCd gene CD1231 shares similarity with large serine recombinases. We show that CD1231 is necessary for sporulation and skinCd excision. However, contrary to B. subtilis, expression of CD1231 is observed in vegetative cells and in both sporangial compartments. Nevertheless, we show that skinCd excision is under the control of mother cell regulatory proteins σE and SpoIIID. We then demonstrate that σE and SpoIIID control the expression of the skinCd gene CD1234, and that this gene is required for sporulation and skinCd excision. CD1231 and CD1234 appear to interact and both proteins are required for skinCd excision while only CD1231 is necessary for skinCd integration. Thus, CD1234 is a recombination directionality factor that delays and restricts skinCd excision to the terminal mother cell. Finally, while the skinCd element is not essential for sporulation, deletion of skinCd results in premature activity of σK and in spores with altered surface layers. Thus, skinCd excision is a key element controlling the onset of σK activity and the fidelity of spore development. PMID:27631621

  19. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: Certificate Number: 880318W1. 09043 International Business Machines Corporation IBM Development System for the Ada Language, Version 2.1.0 IBM 4381 under VM/HPO, Host IBM 4381 under MVS/XA, Target

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-28

    International Business Machines Corporation IBM Development System for the Ada Language, Version 2.1.0 IBM 4381 under VM/HPO, host IBM 4381 under MVS/XA, target...Program Office, AJPO 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side if necessary and identify by block number) International Business Machines Corporation, IBM...Standard ANSI/MIL-STD-1815A in the compiler listed in this declaration. I declare that International Business Machines Corporation is the owner of record

  20. The Impact of Direct Involvement I and Direct Involvement II Experiences on Secondary School Students' Social Capital, as Measured by Co-Cognitive Factors of the Operation Houndstooth Intervention Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Michelle M.; Heilbronner, Nancy N.

    2014-01-01

    A mixed-methods study grounded in Renzulli's Operation Houndstooth Intervention Theory examined the impact of different types of volunteer experiences on the six co-cognitive factors (Optimism, Courage, Romance With a Topic/Discipline, Sensitivity to Human Concerns, Physical/Mental Energy, and Vision/Sense of Destiny) associated with the…

  1. Factor XI and XII as antithrombotic targets

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Felicitas; Gailani, David; Renné, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Arterial and venous thrombosis are major causes of morbidity and mortality, and the incidence of thromboembolic diseases increases as a population ages. Thrombi are formed by activated platelets and fibrin. The latter is a product of the plasma coagulation system. Currently available anticoagulants such as heparins, vitamin K antagonists and inhibitors of thrombin or factor Xa target enzymes of the coagulation cascade that are critical for fibrin formation. However, fibrin is also necessary for terminating blood loss at sites of vascular injury. As a result, anticoagulants currently in clinical use increase the risk of bleeding, partially offsetting the benefits of reduced thrombosis. This review focuses on new targets for anticoagulation that are associated with minimal or no therapy-associated increased bleeding. Recent findings Data from experimental models using mice and clinical studies of patients with hereditary deficiencies of coagulation factors XI or XII have shown that both of these clotting factors are important for thrombosis, while having minor or no apparent roles in processes that terminate blood loss (hemostasis). Summary Hereditary deficiency of factor XII (Hageman factor) or factor XI, plasma proteases that initiate the intrinsic pathway of coagulation, impairs thrombus formation and provides protection from vascular occlusive events, while having a minimal impact on hemostasis. As the factor XII–factor XI pathway contributes to thrombus formation to a greater extent than to normal hemostasis, pharmacological inhibition of these coagulation factors may offer the exciting possibility of anticoagulation therapies with minimal or no bleeding risk. PMID:21730835

  2. Future direction of direct writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam-Soo; Han, Kenneth N.

    2010-11-01

    Direct write technology using special inks consisting of finely dispersed metal nanoparticles in liquid is receiving an undivided attention in recent years for its wide range of applicability in modern electronic industry. The application of this technology covers radio frequency identification-tag (RFID-tag), flexible-electronics, organic light emitting diodes (OLED) display, e-paper, antenna, bumpers used in flip-chip, underfilling, frit, miniresistance applications and biological uses, artificial dental applications and many more. In this paper, the authors have reviewed various direct write technologies on the market and discussed their advantages and shortfalls. Emphasis has given on microdispensing deposition write (MDDW), maskless mesoscale materials deposition (M3D), and ink-jet technologies. All of these technologies allow printing various patterns without employing a mask or a resist with an enhanced speed with the aid of computer. MDDW and M3D are capable of drawing patterns in three-dimension and MDDW, in particular, is capable of writing nanoinks with high viscosity. However, it is still far away for direct write to be fully implemented in the commercial arena. One of the hurdles to overcome is in manufacturing conductive inks which are chemically and physically stable, capable of drawing patterns with acceptable conductivity, and also capable of drawing patterns with acceptable adhesiveness with the substrates. The authors have briefly discussed problems involved in manufacturing nanometal inks to be used in various writing devices. There are numerous factors to be considered in manufacturing such inks. They are reducing agents, concentrations, oxidation, compact ability allowing good conductivity, and stability in suspension.

  3. Construction of a directional T vector for cloning PCR products and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiu-Yi; Liang, Zhi-Cheng; Zhang, Zhi; Zhou, Jiao-Jiao; Liu, Shi-Yu; Tian, Sheng-Li

    2015-05-01

    In order to clone PCR products and express them effectively in Escherichia coli, a directional cloning system was constructed by generating a T vector based on pQE-30Xa. The vector was prepared by inserting an XcmI cassette containing an endonuclease XcmI site, a kanamycin selective marker, a multiple-cloning-site (MCS) region and an opposite endonuclease XcmI site into the vector pQE-30Xa. The T vector pQE-T with single overhanging dT residues at both 3' ends was obtained by digesting with the restriction enzyme XcmI. For directional cloning, a BamHI site was introduced to the ends of the PCR products. A BamHI site was also located on the multiple cloning site of pQE-T. The PCR products were ligated with pQE-T. The directionally inserted recombinants were distinguished by using BamHI to digest the recombinants because there are two BamHI sites located on the both sides of PCR fragment. In order to identify the T-vector functions, the 14-3-3-ZsGreen and hRBP genes were amplified and a BamHI site was added to the ends of the genes to confirm this vector by ligation with pQE-T. Results showed that the 14-3-3-ZsGreen and hRBP were cloned to the vector pQE-T directly and corresponding proteins were successfully produced. It was here demonstrated that this directional vector is capable of gene cloning and is used to manipulate gene expression very easily. The methodology proposed here involves easy incorporation of the construct into other vectors in various hosts.

  4. Bleeding in patients using new anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents: risk factors and management.

    PubMed

    Levi, M M; Eerenberg, E; Löwenberg, E; Kamphuisen, P W

    2010-02-01

    The most important adverse effect of antithrombotic treatment is the occurrence of bleeding. In case of serious or even life-threatening bleeding in a patient who uses anticoagulant agents or when patient on anticoagulants needs to undergo an urgent invasive procedure, anticoagulant treatment can be reversed by various specific strategies. Heparin and heparin derivatives can be counteracted by protamine sulphate, whereas the anticoagulant effect of vitamin K antagonists may be neutralised by administration of vitamin K or prothrombin complex concentrates. The antihaemostatic effect of aspirin and other antiplatelet strategies can be corrected by the administration of platelet concentrate and/or desmopressin, if needed. Recently, a new generation of anticoagulants with a greater specificity towards activated coagulation factors has been introduced and most of these agents are currently being evaluated in clinical studies, showing promising results. The new-generation anticoagulants include specific inhibitors of factor IIa or factor Xa (including pentasaccharides) and antiplatelet agents belonging to the class of thienopyridine derivatives. A limitation of the new class of anti-IIa and anti-Xa agents may be the lack of an appropriate strategy to reverse the effect if a bleeding event occurs, although in some cases the administration of recombinant factor VIIa may be an option.

  5. Adenovirus DNA replication in vitro: site-directed mutagenesis of the nuclear factor I binding site of the Ad2 origin.

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, E; van Driel, W; Tromp, M; van Boom, J; van der Vliet, P C

    1985-01-01

    The template requirements for efficient adenovirus DNA replication were studied in vitro in a reconstituted system with cloned DNA fragments, containing the Ad2 origin region, as templates. Replication is enhanced by nuclear factor I, a cellular protein that binds specifically to the Ad2 origin. This stimulation is shown to be strongly dependent on the concentration of the adenovirus DNA binding protein. Using synthetic oligonucleotides we have constructed plasmids with base substitutions in the nuclear factor I binding region. Footprint analysis and competition filter binding studies show that two of the three small blocks of conserved nucleotides in this region are involved in the binding of nuclear factor I. The binding affinity can be influenced by the base composition of the degenerate region just outside these two blocks. In vitro initiation and DNA chain elongation experiments with the mutants demonstrate that binding of nuclear factor I to the Ad2 origin is necessary for stimulation. However, binding alone is not always sufficient since a mutation which only slightly disturbs binding is strongly impaired in stimulation of DNA replication by nuclear factor I. Images PMID:4040630

  6. Total hip arthroplasty via the direct anterior approach with Kerboull-type acetabular reinforcement device for an elderly female with factor XI deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Kei; Homma, Yasuhiro; Baba, Tomonori; Ando, Jun; Matsumoto, Mikio; Kobayashi, Hideo; Yuasa, Takahito; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of successful and uncomplicated total hip arthroplasty with an acetabular reinforcement device in an elderly patient with hip osteoarthritis already diagnosed with factor XI deficiency, which is a very rare bleeding disorder and at high risk of post-operative haemorrhage, and it poses a substantial challenge to surgeons as a consequence of the specific risks of infection and fixation failure. Moreover, bone fragility in elderly patient increases potential risk of adverse event. Fresh frozen plasma was used to supplement factor XI activity. Importantly, transfusion-transmitted disease such as having factor XI inhibitor was promptly surveyed prior to the supplement since the patient had previous history of the administration of fresh frozen plasma. Under prompt and effective peri-operative haemostasis, rigid implant fixation and rigorous attention to the prevention of infection seem to achieve the best possible outcomes for elderly patients with a bleeding disorder undergoing total hip arthroplasty. PMID:28186870

  7. Site amplification factors of whole Japan area estimated from spectral ratio of direct S-wave and their application to the real-time prediction of ground motion in Earthquake Early Warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiso, M.; Aoki, S.; Hoshiba, M.

    2014-12-01

    For applying the real-time prediction of ground motion proposed by Hoshiba (2013a, JGR) to Earthquake Early Warning, it is necessary to correct a site amplification factor in an observed waveform. In this study, we aim to estimate site amplification factors at whole area of Japan, and apply the real-time correction proposed by Hoshiba (2013b, BSSA) of site amplification factors to investigate their validity. To estimate site amplification factors, we used the spectral ratio of direct S-wave at two adjunct stations. We constructed a network with many pairs of stations, then solved the equations of the network in a least square sense. As a result, we successfully estimated site amplification factors almost whole of the Japan area, except a part of Hokkaido and Kyushu region, and Islands area. Next, we applied the real-time correction of site amplification factors in the observed waveforms of the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake (Mw 9.0). Distribution of site-corrected seismic intensity calculated in time domain (Kunugi et al., 2008) showed clear distance-dependent relation of seismic intensity, which was not found in the distribution of non-corrected seismic intensity. Finally, we compared the two waveforms recorded in the Ishikari Plain, Hokkaido region, Japan, with correction of site amplification factors. The features of waveform in one station was well reproduced from the waveform of other station with the correction of site amplification factor. Although there are some subjects, e.g. nonlinear behavior of the ground with strong ground motion and azimuth dependency of site amplification factors which are not considered in this study, estimated site amplification factors in this study is effective in real-time prediction of ground motion.

  8. Cardiac T-box factor Tbx20 directly interacts with Nkx2-5, GATA4, and GATA5 in regulation of gene expression in the developing heart.

    PubMed

    Stennard, Fiona A; Costa, Mauro W; Elliott, David A; Rankin, Scott; Haast, Saskia J P; Lai, Donna; McDonald, Lachlan P A; Niederreither, Karen; Dolle, Pascal; Bruneau, Benoit G; Zorn, Aaron M; Harvey, Richard P

    2003-10-15

    Tbx20 is a member of the T-box transcription factor family expressed in the forming hearts of vertebrate and invertebrate embryos. We report here analysis of Tbx20 expression during murine cardiac development and assessment of DNA-binding and transcriptional properties of Tbx20 isoforms. Tbx20 was expressed in myocardium and endocardium, including high levels in endocardial cushions. cDNAs generated by alternative splicing encode at least four Tbx20 isoforms, and Tbx20a uniquely carried strong transactivation and transrepression domains in its C terminus. Isoforms with an intact T-box bound specifically to DNA sites resembling the consensus brachyury half site, although with less avidity compared with the related factor, Tbx5. Tbx20 physically interacted with cardiac transcription factors Nkx2-5, GATA4, and GATA5, collaborating to synergistically activate cardiac gene expression. Among cardiac GATA factors, there was preferential synergy with GATA5, implicated in endocardial differentiation. In Xenopus embryos, enforced expression of Tbx20a, but not Tbx20b, led to induction of mesodermal and endodermal lineage markers as well as cell migration, indicating that the long Tbx20a isoform uniquely bears functional domains that can alter gene expression and developmental behaviour in an in vivo context. We propose that Tbx20 plays an integrated role in the ancient myogenic program of the heart, and has been additionally coopted during evolution of vertebrates for endocardial cushion development.

  9. A Factor Analytic Investigation of the BASC-2 Behavioral and Emotional Screening System Parent Form: Psychometric Properties, Practical Implications, and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdy, Erin; Chin, Jenna K.; Twyford, Jennifer M.; Dever, Bridget V.

    2011-01-01

    The Behavior Assessment System for Children, Second Edition (BASC-2) Behavioral and Emotional Screening System Parent Form (BESS Parent; Kamphaus & Reynolds, 2007) is a recently developed instrument designed to identify behavioral and emotional risk in students. To describe the underlying factor structure for this instrument, exploratory (EFA)…

  10. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha directly stimulates the overproduction of hepatic apolipoprotein B100-containing VLDL via impairment of hepatic insulin signaling.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin resistant states are commonly associated with both increased circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-a) and hepatic overproduction of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). In the present study, we examined the potential mechanistic link between TNF-a and hepatic overproduction of ap...

  11. TAF4, a subunit of transcription factor II D, directs promoter occupancy of nuclear receptor HNF4A during post-natal hepatocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Alpern, Daniil; Langer, Diana; Ballester, Benoit; Le Gras, Stephanie; Romier, Christophe; Mengus, Gabrielle; Davidson, Irwin

    2014-09-10

    The functions of the TAF subunits of mammalian TFIID in physiological processes remain poorly characterised. In this study, we describe a novel function of TAFs in directing genomic occupancy of a transcriptional activator. Using liver-specific inactivation in mice, we show that the TAF4 subunit of TFIID is required for post-natal hepatocyte maturation. TAF4 promotes pre-initiation complex (PIC) formation at post-natal expressed liver function genes and down-regulates a subset of embryonic expressed genes by increased RNA polymerase II pausing. The TAF4-TAF12 heterodimer interacts directly with HNF4A and in vivo TAF4 is necessary to maintain HNF4A-directed embryonic gene expression at post-natal stages and promotes HNF4A occupancy of functional cis-regulatory elements adjacent to the transcription start sites of post-natal expressed genes. Stable HNF4A occupancy of these regulatory elements requires TAF4-dependent PIC formation highlighting that these are mutually dependent events. Local promoter-proximal HNF4A-TFIID interactions therefore act as instructive signals for post-natal hepatocyte differentiation.

  12. Human nonsense-mediated mRNA decay factor UPF2 interacts directly with eRF3 and the SURF complex

    PubMed Central

    López-Perrote, Andrés; Castaño, Raquel; Melero, Roberto; Zamarro, Teresa; Kurosawa, Hitomi; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Uchiyama, Akiko; Aoyagi, Kyoko; Buchwald, Gretel; Kataoka, Naoyuki; Yamashita, Akio; Llorca, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is an mRNA degradation pathway that regulates gene expression and mRNA quality. A complex network of macromolecular interactions regulates NMD initiation, which is only partially understood. According to prevailing models, NMD begins by the assembly of the SURF (SMG1–UPF1–eRF1–eRF3) complex at the ribosome, followed by UPF1 activation by additional factors such as UPF2 and UPF3. Elucidating the interactions between NMD factors is essential to comprehend NMD, and here we demonstrate biochemically and structurally the interaction between human UPF2 and eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3). In addition, we find that UPF2 associates with SURF and ribosomes in cells, in an UPF3-independent manner. Binding assays using a collection of UPF2 truncated variants reveal that eRF3 binds to the C-terminal part of UPF2. This region of UPF2 is partially coincident with the UPF3-binding site as revealed by electron microscopy of the UPF2–eRF3 complex. Accordingly, we find that the interaction of UPF2 with UPF3b interferes with the assembly of the UPF2–eRF3 complex, and that UPF2 binds UPF3b more strongly than eRF3. Together, our results highlight the role of UPF2 as a platform for the transient interactions of several NMD factors, including several components of SURF. PMID:26740584

  13. A Land Plant-Specific Transcription Factor Directly Enhances Transcription of a Pathogenic Noncoding RNA Template by DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase II[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jie; Ji, Shaoyi; Wallace, Andrew J.; Wu, Jian; Li, Yi; Gopalan, Venkat; Ding, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Some DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (DdRPs) possess RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity, as was first discovered in the replication of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) RNA genome in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Recent studies revealed that this activity in bacteria and mammals is important for transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms. Here, we used PSTVd as a model to uncover auxiliary factors essential for RNA-templated transcription by DdRP. PSTVd replication in the nucleoplasm generates (−)-PSTVd intermediates and (+)-PSTVd copies. We found that the Nicotiana benthamiana canonical 9-zinc finger (ZF) Transcription Factor IIIA (TFIIIA-9ZF) as well as its variant TFIIIA-7ZF interacted with (+)-PSTVd, but only TFIIIA-7ZF interacted with (−)-PSTVd. Suppression of TFIIIA-7ZF reduced PSTVd replication, and overexpression of TFIIIA-7ZF enhanced PSTVd replication in planta. Consistent with the locale of PSTVd replication, TFIIIA-7ZF was found in the nucleoplasm and nucleolus, in contrast to the strictly nucleolar localization of TFIIIA-9ZF. Footprinting assays revealed that only TFIIIA-7ZF bound to a region of PSTVd critical for initiating transcription. Furthermore, TFIIIA-7ZF strongly enhanced the in vitro transcription of circular (+)-PSTVd by partially purified Pol II. Together, our results identify TFIIIA-7ZF as a dedicated cellular transcription factor that acts in DdRP-catalyzed RNA-templated transcription, highlighting both the extraordinary evolutionary adaptation of viroids and the potential of DdRPs for a broader role in cellular processes. PMID:27113774

  14. Alternative method for diagnosis of two polymorphisms in the human transforming growth factor-beta1 by PCR-mediated double site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hubacek, J A; Lacha, J

    2000-05-01

    Cytokine transforming growth factor-beta1 plays an important role in physiological processes during ontogenesis, cell differentiation, immune responses, carcinogenesis, inflammation, wound healing, fibroproduction, progression of renal insufficiency and arteriosclerotic lesion development. Its biological function is influenced through the two signal peptide polymorphisms. We describe a new, economical, easy and fast alternative method which allows detection of both polymorphisms from one PCR product with subsequent restriction analysis with two different restriction enzymes. This method could facilitate further research on the role of this cytokine in human disease.

  15. Core promoter-specific gene regulation: TATA box selectivity and Initiator-dependent bi-directionality of serum response factor-activated transcription.

    PubMed

    Xu, Muyu; Gonzalez-Hurtado, Elsie; Martinez, Ernest

    2016-04-01

    Gene-specific activation by enhancers involves their communication with the basal RNA polymerase II transcription machinery at the core promoter. Core promoters are diverse and may contain a variety of sequence elements such as the TATA box, the Initiator (INR), and the downstream promoter element (DPE) recognized, respectively, by the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and TBP-associated factors of the TFIID complex. Core promoter elements contribute to the gene selectivity of enhancers, and INR/DPE-specific enhancers and activators have been identified. Here, we identify a TATA box-selective activating sequence upstream of the human β-actin (ACTB) gene that mediates serum response factor (SRF)-induced transcription from TATA-dependent but not INR-dependent promoters and requires the TATA-binding/bending activity of TBP, which is otherwise dispensable for transcription from a TATA-less promoter. The SRF-dependent ACTB sequence is stereospecific on TATA promoters but activates in an orientation-independent manner a composite TATA/INR-containing promoter. More generally, we show that SRF-regulated genes of the actin/cytoskeleton/contractile family tend to have a TATA box. These results suggest distinct TATA-dependent and INR-dependent mechanisms of TFIID-mediated transcription in mammalian cells that are compatible with only certain stereospecific combinations of activators, and that a TBP-TATA binding mechanism is important for SRF activation of the actin/cytoskeleton-related gene family.

  16. Grb2 negatively regulates epidermal growth factor-induced phospholipase C-gamma1 activity through the direct interaction with tyrosine-phosphorylated phospholipase C-gamma1.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jang Hyun; Hong, Won-Pyo; Yun, Sanguk; Kim, Hyeon Soo; Lee, Jong-Ryul; Park, Jong Bae; Bae, Yun Soo; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2005-10-01

    Phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1) plays pivotal roles in cellular growth and proliferation. Upon the stimulation of growth factors and hormones, PLC-gamma1 is rapidly phosphorylated at three known sites; Tyr771, Tyr783 and Tyr1254 and its enzymatic activity is up-regulated. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that Grb2, an adaptor protein, specifically interacts with tyrosine-phosphorylated PLC-gamma1 at Tyr783. The association of Grb2 with PLC-gamma1 was induced by the treatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF). Replacement of Tyr783 with Phe completely blocked EGF-induced interaction of PLC-gamma1 with Grb2, indicating that tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-gamma1 at Tyr783 is essential for the interaction with Grb2. Interestingly, the depletion of Grb2 from HEK-293 cells by RNA interference significantly enhanced increased EGF-induced PLC-gamma1 enzymatic activity and mobilization of the intracellular Ca2+, while it did not affect EGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-gamma1. Furthermore, overexpression of Grb2 inhibited PLC-gamma1 enzymatic activity. Taken together, these results suggest Grb2, in addition to its key function in signaling through Ras, may have a negatively regulatory role on EGF-induced PLC-gamma1 activation.

  17. Childhood trauma and complex posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in older adults: A study of direct effects and social-interpersonal factors as potential mediators.

    PubMed

    Krammer, Sandy; Kleim, Birgit; Simmen-Janevska, Keti; Maercker, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Childhood traumatic events may lead to long-lasting psychological effects and contribute to the development of complex posttraumatic sequelae. These might be captured by the diagnostic concept of complex posttraumatic stress disorder (CPTSD) as an alternative to classic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). CPTSD comprises a further set of symptoms in addition to those of PTSD, namely, changes in affect, self, and interpersonal relationships. Previous empirical research on CPTSD has focused on middle-aged adults but not on older adults. Moreover, predictor models of CPTSD are still rare. The current study investigated the association between traumatic events in childhood and complex posttraumatic stress symptoms in older adults. The mediation of this association by 2 social-interpersonal factors (social acknowledgment as a survivor and dysfunctional disclosure) was investigated. These 2 factors focus on the perception of acknowledgment by others and either the inability to disclose traumatic experiences or the ability to do so only with negative emotional reactions. A total of 116 older individuals (age range = 59-98 years) who had experienced childhood traumatic events completed standardized self-report questionnaires indexing childhood trauma, complex trauma sequelae, social acknowledgment, and dysfunctional disclosure of trauma. The results showed that traumatic events during childhood were associated with later posttraumatic stress symptoms but with classic rather than complex symptoms. Social acknowledgment and dysfunctional disclosure partially mediated this relationship. These findings suggest that childhood traumatic stress impacts individuals across the life span and may be associated with particular adverse psychopathological consequences.

  18. Dynamic structure factor of density fluctuations from direct imaging very near (both above and below) the critical point of SF(6).

    PubMed

    Oprisan, Ana; Oprisan, Sorinel A; Bayley, Brittany; Hegseth, John J; Garrabos, Yves; Lecoutre-Chabot, Carole; Beysens, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Large density fluctuations were observed by illuminating a cylindrical cell filled with sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)), very near its liquid-gas critical point (|T-T(c)|< 300 μK) and recorded using a microscope with 3 μm spatial resolution. Using a dynamic structure factor algorithm, we determined from the recorded images the structure factor (SF), which measures the spatial distribution of fluctuations at different moments, and the correlation time of fluctuations. This method authorizes local measurements in contrast to the classical scattering techniques that average fluctuations over the illuminating beam. We found that during the very early stages of phase separation the SF scales with the wave vector q according to the Lorentzian q(-2), which shows that the liquid and vapor domains are just emerging. The critical wave number, which is related to the characteristic length of fluctuations, steadily decreases over time, supporting a sustained increase in the spatial scale of the fluctuating domains. The scaled evolution of the critical wave number obeys the universal evolution for the interconnected domains at high volume fraction with an apparent power law exponent of -0.35 ± 0.02. We also determined the correlation time of the fluctuations and inferred values for thermal diffusivity coefficient very near the critical point, above and below. The values were used to pinpoint the crossing of T(c) within 13 μK.

  19. ER egress of invariant chain isoform p35 requires direct binding to MHCII molecules and is inhibited by the NleA virulence factor of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Maryse; Gauthier, Catherine; Fortin, Jean-Simon; Genève, Laetitia; Kim, Kyungho; Gruenheid, Samantha; Kim, Jinoh; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2015-04-01

    Four invariant chain (Ii) isoforms assist the folding and trafficking of human MHC class II (MHCIIs). The main isoforms, Iip33 and Iip35, assemble in the ER into homo- and/or hetero-trimers. The sequential binding of up to three MHCII αβ heterodimers to Ii trimers results in the formation of pentamers, heptamers and nonamers. MHCIIs are required to overcome the p35-encoded di-arginine (RxR) ER retention motif and to allow anterograde trafficking of the complex. Here, we show that inactivation of the RxR motif requires a direct cis interaction between p35 and the MHCII, precluding ER egress of some unsaturated Ii trimers. Interestingly, as opposed to MHCII/p33 complexes, those including p35 remained in the ER when co-expressed with the NleA protein of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Taken together, our results demonstrate that p35 influences distinctively MHCII/Ii assembly and trafficking.

  20. Direct identification of bacteria in urine samples by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and relevance of defensins as interfering factors.

    PubMed

    Köhling, Hedda Luise; Bittner, Anna; Müller, Karl-Dieter; Buer, Jan; Becker, Markus; Rübben, Herbert; Rettenmeier, Albert Wolfgang; Mosel, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Standard methods for the identification of uropathogens that are based on the determination of metabolic activity require cultivation on agar plates, which often takes more than 1 day. If microbial growth on agar plates is slow, or if metabolic activity is impaired by adverse interactions resulting from the patient's condition or from medical treatment, the application of standard methods may lead to delayed or erroneous identification of bacteria. In recent studies, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has proven to be able to rapidly identify bacteria obtained from cultures. We tested the applicability of this analytical technique for the rapid identification of bacteria collected directly from urine samples and compared the results with those of conventional identification methods, such as the Vitek system, the MicroScan WalkAway system and the API system, and in some cases with the gas chromatographic determination of the bacterial long-chain fatty acid pattern. We analysed a total of 107 urine samples with bacterial counts ranging from 10(2) to ≥10(5) c.f.u. ml(-1). Mass spectrometric identification of bacteria was accomplished for 62 of these samples. In the mass spectra obtained from 40 of the 45 urine samples for which no identification result was achieved, a triplet of very intense peaks corresponding to the human α-defensins 1, 2 and 3 occurred at m/z values of around 3440 Da. This signal suppressed the intensity of the bacterial protein peaks and thus impaired database matching. Our results show that MALDI-TOF MS allows the reliable direct identification of bacteria in urine samples at concentrations as low as 10(3) c.f.u. ml(-1). In a subset of samples, human defensins may occur and impair the mass spectrometric identification of bacteria.

  1. The impact of system level factors on treatment timeliness: utilizing the Toyota Production System to implement direct intake scheduling in a semi-rural community mental health clinic.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Addie; Greeno, Catherine G; Goughler, Donald H; Yarzebinski, Kathleen; Zimmerman, Tina; Anderson, Carol

    2013-07-01

    This study examined the effect of using the Toyota Production System (TPS) to change intake procedures on treatment timeliness within a semi-rural community mental health clinic. One hundred randomly selected cases opened the year before the change and 100 randomly selected cases opened the year after the change were reviewed. An analysis of covariance demonstrated that changing intake procedures significantly decreased the number of days consumers waited for appointments (F(1,160) = 4.9; p = .03) from an average of 11 to 8 days. The pattern of difference on treatment timeliness was significantly different between adult and child programs (F(1,160) = 4.2; p = .04), with children waiting an average of 4 days longer than adults for appointments. Findings suggest that small system level changes may elicit important changes and that TPS offers a valuable model to improve processes within community mental health settings. Results also indicate that different factors drive adult and children's treatment timeliness.

  2. Transcription Factors SOD7/NGAL2 and DPA4/NGAL3 Act Redundantly to Regulate Seed Size by Directly Repressing KLU Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yueying; Du, Liang; Xu, Ran; Cui, Rongfeng; Hao, Jianjun; Sun, Caixia; Li, Yunhai

    2015-01-01

    Although seed size is one of the most important agronomic traits in plants, the genetic and molecular mechanisms that set the final size of seeds are largely unknown. We previously identified the ubiquitin receptor DA1 as a negative regulator of seed size, and the Arabidopsis thaliana da1-1 mutant produces larger seeds than the wild type. Here, we describe a B3 domain transcriptional repressor NGATHA-like protein (NGAL2), encoded by the suppressor of da1-1 (SOD7), which acts maternally to regulate seed size by restricting cell proliferation in the integuments of ovules and developing seeds. Overexpression of SOD7 significantly decreases seed size of wild-type plants, while the simultaneous disruption of SOD7 and its closest homolog DEVELOPMENT-RELATED PcG TARGET IN THE APEX4 (DPA4/NGAL3) increases seed size. Genetic analyses indicate that SOD7 and DPA4 act in a common pathway with the seed size regulator KLU to regulate seed growth, but do so independently of DA1. Further results show that SOD7 directly binds to the promoter of KLUH (KLU) in vitro and in vivo and represses the expression of KLU. Therefore, our findings reveal the genetic and molecular mechanisms of SOD7, DPA4, and KLU in seed size regulation and suggest that they are promising targets for seed size improvement in crops. PMID:25783029

  3. Directing 101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pintoff, Ernest

    Providing an introduction to anyone considering directing as a field of study or career, this book takes a broad look at the process of directing and encourages students and professionals alike to look outside of the movie industry for inspiration. Chapters in the book discuss selecting and acquiring material; budgeting and financing; casting and…

  4. Bovine alpha s1-casein gene sequences direct high level expression of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the milk of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Uusi-Oukari, M; Hyttinen, J M; Korhonen, V P; Västi, A; Alhonen, L; Jänne, O A; Jänne, J

    1997-01-01

    The generation is reported of transgenic mice expressing human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or human erythropoietin (EPO) under the control of bovine alpha s1-casein regulatory sequences. GM-CSF expression was specific to the mammary gland, and levels of human GM-CSF in transgenic mouse milk were in the range of mg ml-1. The specific activity of the milk GM-CSF was similar to that of the recombinant protein produced in Escherichia coli, and the glycosylation-derived size heterogeneity corresponded to that of the native human protein. In spite of the identical bovine regulatory sequences of the fusion genes, the levels of human EPO in transgenic mouse milk were 10(3)-10(6) times lower than those of GM-CSF, ranging from 0.003 to 3 micrograms ml-1. There appeared to be a positive correlation between the amount of EPO in the milk of lactating females and blood haematocrit values. In view of this, other type of constructs should be used to achieve more efficient EPO expression and to circumvent concomitantly-occurring adverse effects. In contrast, the high-level production of recombinant GM-CSF, its resemblance to the native mammalian protein, and mild adverse consequences of transgene expression imply that the current construct could be used for generation of larger GM-CSF transgenic animals to produce this protein in quantities sufficient for therapeutic purposes.

  5. TALENs-directed knockout of the full-length transcription factor Nrf1α that represses malignant behaviour of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yonggang; Qiu, Lu; Lü, Fenglin; Ru, Xufang; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Yu, Siwang; Zhang, Yiguo

    2016-04-11

    The full-length Nrf1α is processed into distinct isoforms, which together regulate genes essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and organ integrity, and liver-specific loss of Nrf1 in mice results in spontaneous hepatoma. Herein, we report that the human constitutive Nrf1α, rather than smaller Nrf1β/γ, expression is attenuated or abolished in the case of low-differentiated high-metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas. Therefore, Nrf1α is of importance in the physio-pathological origin and development, but its specific pathobiological function(s) remains elusive. To address this, TALENs-directed knockout of Nrf1α, but not Nrf1β/γ, is created in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The resulting Nrf1α(-/-) cells are elongated, with slender spindle-shapes and enlarged gaps between cells observed under scanning electron microscope. When compared with wild-type controls, the invasive and migratory abilities of Nrf1α(-/-) cells are increased significantly, along with the cell-cycle G2-M arrest and S-phase reduction, as accompanied by suppressed apoptosis. Despite a modest increase in the soft-agar colony formation of Nrf1α(-/-) cells, its loss-of-function markedly promotes malgrowth of the subcutaneous carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with hepatic metastasis. Together with molecular expression results, we thus suppose requirement of Nrf1α (and major derivates) for gene regulatory mechanisms repressing cancer cell process (e.g. EMT) and malignant behaviour (e.g. migration).

  6. TALENs-directed knockout of the full-length transcription factor Nrf1α that represses malignant behaviour of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yonggang; Qiu, Lu; Lü, Fenglin; Ru, Xufang; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Yu, Siwang; Zhang, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    The full-length Nrf1α is processed into distinct isoforms, which together regulate genes essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and organ integrity, and liver-specific loss of Nrf1 in mice results in spontaneous hepatoma. Herein, we report that the human constitutive Nrf1α, rather than smaller Nrf1β/γ, expression is attenuated or abolished in the case of low-differentiated high-metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas. Therefore, Nrf1α is of importance in the physio-pathological origin and development, but its specific pathobiological function(s) remains elusive. To address this, TALENs-directed knockout of Nrf1α, but not Nrf1β/γ, is created in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The resulting Nrf1α−/− cells are elongated, with slender spindle-shapes and enlarged gaps between cells observed under scanning electron microscope. When compared with wild-type controls, the invasive and migratory abilities of Nrf1α−/− cells are increased significantly, along with the cell-cycle G2-M arrest and S-phase reduction, as accompanied by suppressed apoptosis. Despite a modest increase in the soft-agar colony formation of Nrf1α−/− cells, its loss-of-function markedly promotes malgrowth of the subcutaneous carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with hepatic metastasis. Together with molecular expression results, we thus suppose requirement of Nrf1α (and major derivates) for gene regulatory mechanisms repressing cancer cell process (e.g. EMT) and malignant behaviour (e.g. migration). PMID:27065079

  7. Direct involvement of the CreA transcription factor in penicillin biosynthesis and expression of the pcbAB gene in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Cepeda-García, Cristina; Domínguez-Santos, Rebeca; García-Rico, Ramón O; García-Estrada, Carlos; Cajiao, Angela; Fierro, Francisco; Martín, Juan Francisco

    2014-08-01

    The transcription factor CreA is the main regulator responsible for carbon repression in filamentous fungi. CreA is a wide domain regulator that binds to regulatory elements in the promoters of target genes to repress their transcription. Penicillin biosynthesis and the expression of penicillin biosynthetic genes are subject to carbon repression. However, evidence of the participation of CreA in this regulation is still lacking, and previous studies on the promoter of the pcbC gene of Aspergillus nidulans indicated the lack of involvement of CreA in its regulation. Here we present clear evidence of the participation of CreA in carbon repression of penicillin biosynthesis and expression of the pcbAB gene, encoding the first enzyme of the pathway, in Penicillium chrysogenum. Mutations in cis of some of the putative CreA binding sites present in the pcbAB gene promoter fused to a reporter gene caused an important increase in the measured enzyme activity in glucose-containing medium, whereas activity in the medium with lactose was not affected. An RNAi strategy was used to attenuate the expression of the creA gene. Transformants expressing a small interfering RNA for creA showed higher penicillin production, and this increase was more evident when glucose was used as carbon source. These results confirm that CreA plays an important role in the regulation of penicillin biosynthesis in P. chrysogenum and opens the possibility of its utilization to improve the industrial production of this antibiotic.

  8. The Basic Leucine Zipper Domain Transcription Factor Atf1 Directly Controls Cdc13 Expression and Regulates Mitotic Entry Independently of Wee1 and Cdc25 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Sushobhana; Dey, Isha; Suresh, Megalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Progression into mitosis is a major point of regulation in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell cycle, and its proper control is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. Investigation of the G2/M progression event in S. pombe has revealed the existence of a complex regulatory process that is responsible for making the decision to enter mitosis. Newer aspects of this regulation are still being revealed. In this paper, we report the discovery of a novel mode of regulation of G2/M progression in S. pombe. We show that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-regulated transcription factor Atf1 is a regulator of Cdc13 (mitotic cyclin) transcription and is therefore a prominent player in the regulation of mitosis in S. pombe. We have used genetic approaches to study the effect of overexpression or deletion of Atf1 on the cell length and G2/M progression of S. pombe cells. Our results clearly show that Atf1 overexpression accelerates mitosis, leading to an accumulation of cells with shorter lengths. The previously known major regulators of entry into mitosis are the Cdc25 phosphatase and the Wee1 kinase, which modulate cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity. The significantly striking aspect of our discovery is that Atf1-mediated G2/M progression is independent of both Cdc25 and Wee1. We have shown that Atf1 binds to the Cdc13 promoter, leading to activation of Cdc13 expression. This leads to enhanced nuclear localization of CDK Cdc2, thereby promoting the G2/M transition. PMID:24728197

  9. Direct and indirect effects of climate on demography and early growth of Pinus sylvestris at the rear edge: changing roles of biotic and abiotic factors.

    PubMed

    Benavides, Raquel; Rabasa, Sonia G; Granda, Elena; Escudero, Adrián; Hódar, José A; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Rincón, Ana M; Zamora, Regino; Valladares, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Global change triggers shifts in forest composition, with warming and aridification being particularly threatening for the populations located at the rear edge of the species distributions. This is the case of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) in the Mediterranean Basin where uncertainties in relation to its dynamics under these changing scenarios are still high. We analysed the relative effect of climate on the recruitment patterns of Scots pine and its interactions with local biotic and abiotic variables at different spatial scales. Number of seedlings and saplings was surveyed, and their annual shoot growth measured in 96 plots located across altitudinal gradients in three different regions in the Iberian Peninsula. We found a significant influence of climate on demography and performance of recruits, with a non-linear effect of temperature on the presence of juveniles, and a positive effect of precipitation on their survival. Abundance of juveniles of P. sylvestris that underwent their first summer drought was skewed towards higher altitudes than the altitudinal mean range of the conspecific adults and the optimum elevation for seedlings' emergence. At local level, light availability did not influence juveniles' density, but it enhanced their growth. Biotic interactions were found between juveniles and the herb cover (competition) and between the number of newly emerged seedlings and shrubs (facilitation). Results also highlighted the indirect effect that climate exerts over the local factors, modulating the interactions with the pre-existing vegetation that were more evident at more stressful sites. This multiscale approach improves our understanding of the dynamics of these marginal populations and some management criteria can be inferred to boost their conservation under the current global warming.

  10. Protein Hit1, a novel box C/D snoRNP assembly factor, controls cellular concentration of the scaffolding protein Rsa1 by direct interaction

    PubMed Central

    Rothé, Benjamin; Saliou, Jean-Michel; Quinternet, Marc; Back, Régis; Tiotiu, Decebal; Jacquemin, Clémence; Loegler, Christine; Schlotter, Florence; Peña, Vlad; Eckert, Kelvin; Moréra, Solange; Dorsselaer, Alain Van; Branlant, Christiane; Massenet, Séverine; Sanglier-Cianférani, Sarah; Manival, Xavier; Charpentier, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Biogenesis of eukaryotic box C/D small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein particles (C/D snoRNPs) involves conserved trans-acting factors, which are proposed to facilitate the assembly of the core proteins Snu13p/15.5K, Nop58p/NOP58, Nop56p/NOP56 and Nop1p/Fibrillarin on box C/D small nucleolar RNAs (C/D snoRNAs). In yeast, protein Rsa1 acts as a platform, interacting with both the RNA-binding core protein Snu13 and protein Pih1 of the Hsp82–R2TP chaperone complex. In this work, a proteomic approach coupled with functional and structural studies identifies protein Hit1 as a novel Rsa1p-interacting partner involved in C/D snoRNP assembly. Hit1p contributes to in vivo C/D snoRNA stability and pre-RNA maturation kinetics. It associates with U3 snoRNA precursors and influences its 3′-end processing. Remarkably, Hit1p is required to maintain steady-state levels of Rsa1p. This stabilizing activity is likely to be general across eukaryotic species, as the human protein ZNHIT3(TRIP3) showing sequence homology with Hit1p regulates the abundance of NUFIP1, the Rsa1p functional homolog. The nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of the Rsa1p317–352–Hit1p70–164 complex reveals a novel mode of protein–protein association explaining the strong stability of the Rsa1p–Hit1p complex. Our biochemical data show that C/D snoRNAs and the core protein Nop58 can interact with the purified Snu13p–Rsa1p–Hit1p heterotrimer. PMID:25170085

  11. Homeobox A9 directly targeted by miR-196b regulates aggressiveness through nuclear Factor-kappa B activity in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seong-Lan; Lee, Dong Chul; Sohn, Hyun Ahm; Lee, Soo Young; Jeon, Hyo Sung; Lee, Joon H; Park, Chang Gyo; Lee, Hoi Young; Yeom, Young Il; Son, Ji Woong; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Kang, Jaeku

    2016-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are recognized as crucial posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression, and play critical roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors in various cancers. Here, we show that miR-196b is upregulated in mesenchymal-like-state non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and lung cancer tissues. Moreover, miR-196b upregulation stimulates cell invasion and a change in cell morphology to a spindle shape via loss of cell-to-cell contacts. We identified homeobox A9 (HOXA9) as a target gene of miR-196b by using public databases such as TargetScan, miRDB, and microRNA.org. HOXA9 expression is inversely correlated with miR-196b levels in clinical NSCLC samples as compared to that in corresponding control samples, and with the migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. Ectopic expression of HOXA9 resulted in a suppression of miR-196b-induced cell invasion, and HOXA9 reexpression increased E-cadherin expression. Furthermore, HOXA9 potently attenuated the expression of snail family zinc finger 2 (SNAI2/SLUG) and matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) by controlling the binding of nuclear factor-kappa B to the promoter of SLUG and MMP9 genes, respectively. Therefore, we suggest that HOXA9 plays a central role in controlling the aggressive behavior of lung cancer cells and that miR-196b can serve as a potential target for developing anticancer agents. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Growth suppression of human hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts by a monoclonal antibody CH12 directed to epidermal growth factor receptor variant III.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Wang, Huamao; Tan, Zhonghua; Hu, Suwen; Wang, Hai; Shi, Bizhi; Yang, Lin; Li, Peiyong; Gu, Jianren; Wang, Hongyang; Li, Zonghai

    2011-02-18

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered difficult to cure because it is resistant to radio- and chemotherapy and has a high recurrence rate after curative liver resection. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) has been reported to express in HCC tissues and cell lines. This article describes the efficacy of an anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody (mAb CH12) in the treatment of HCC xenografts with EGFRvIII expression and the underlying mechanism of EGFRvIII as an oncogene in HCC. The results demonstrated that CH12 bound preferentially to EGFRvIII with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 1.346 nm/liter. In addition, CH12 induces strong antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity in Huh7-EGFRvIII (with exogenous expression of EGFRvIII) and SMMC-7721 (with endogenous expression of EGFRvIII) cells. Notably, CH12 significantly inhibited the growth of Huh7-EGFRvIII and SMMC-7721 xenografts in vivo with a growth inhibition ratio much higher than C225, a U. S. Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-EGFR antibody. Treatment of the two HCC xenografts with CH12 significantly suppressed tumor proliferation and angiogenesis. Mechanistically, in vivo treatment with CH12 reduced the phosphorylation of constitutively active EGFRvIII, Akt, and ERK. Down-regulation of the apoptotic protectors Bcl-x(L), Bcl-2, and the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, as well as up-regulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27, were also observed after in vivo CH12 treatment. Collectively, these results indicate that the monoclonal antibody CH12 is a promising therapeutic agent for HCC with EGFRvIII expression.

  13. Growth Suppression of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Xenografts by a Monoclonal Antibody CH12 Directed to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Variant III*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Wang, Huamao; Tan, Zhonghua; Hu, Suwen; Wang, Hai; Shi, Bizhi; Yang, Lin; Li, Peiyong; Gu, Jianren; Wang, Hongyang; Li, Zonghai

    2011-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered difficult to cure because it is resistant to radio- and chemotherapy and has a high recurrence rate after curative liver resection. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) has been reported to express in HCC tissues and cell lines. This article describes the efficacy of an anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody (mAb CH12) in the treatment of HCC xenografts with EGFRvIII expression and the underlying mechanism of EGFRvIII as an oncogene in HCC. The results demonstrated that CH12 bound preferentially to EGFRvIII with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.346 nm/liter. In addition, CH12 induces strong antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity in Huh7-EGFRvIII (with exogenous expression of EGFRvIII) and SMMC-7721 (with endogenous expression of EGFRvIII) cells. Notably, CH12 significantly inhibited the growth of Huh7-EGFRvIII and SMMC-7721 xenografts in vivo with a growth inhibition ratio much higher than C225, a U. S. Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-EGFR antibody. Treatment of the two HCC xenografts with CH12 significantly suppressed tumor proliferation and angiogenesis. Mechanistically, in vivo treatment with CH12 reduced the phosphorylation of constitutively active EGFRvIII, Akt, and ERK. Down-regulation of the apoptotic protectors Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, and the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, as well as up-regulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27, were also observed after in vivo CH12 treatment. Collectively, these results indicate that the monoclonal antibody CH12 is a promising therapeutic agent for HCC with EGFRvIII expression. PMID:21163950

  14. The factor VIIIa C2 domain (residues 2228-2240) interacts with the factor IXa Gla domain in the factor Xase complex.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Tetsuhiro; Nogami, Keiji; Nishiya, Katsumi; Takeyama, Masahiro; Ogiwara, Kenichi; Sakata, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Akira; Shima, Midori

    2009-02-06

    Factor VIIIa functions as a cofactor for factor IXa in the phospholipid surface-dependent activation of factor X. Both the C2 domain of factor VIIIa and the Gla domain of factor IXa are involved in phospholipid binding and are required for the activation of factor X. In this study, we have examined the close relationship between these domains in the factor Xase complex. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based and surface plasmon resonance-based assays in the absence of phospholipid showed that Glu-Gly-Arg active site-modified factor IXa bound to immobilized recombinant C2 domain (rC2) dose-dependently (Kd = 108 nm). This binding ability was optimal under physiological conditions. A monoclonal antibody against the Gla domain of factor IXa inhibited binding by approximately 95%, and Gla domainless factor IXa failed to bind to rC2. The addition of monoclonal antibody or rC2 with factor VIIIa inhibited factor IXa-catalyzed factor X activation in the absence of phospholipid. Inhibition was not evident, however, in similar experiments in the absence of factor VIIIa, indicating that the C2 domain interacted with the Gla domain of factor IXa. A fragment designated C2-(2182-2259), derived from V8 protease-cleaved rC2, bound to Glu-Gly-Arg active site-modified factor IXa. Competitive assays, using overlapping synthetic peptides encompassing residues 2182-2259, demonstrated that peptide 2228-2240 significantly inhibited both this binding and factor Xa generation, independently of phospholipid. Our results indicated that residues 2228-2240 in the factor VIIIa C2 domain constitutes an interactive site for the Gla domain of factor IXa. The findings provide the first evidence for an essential role for this interaction in factor Xase assembly.

  15. Identification of new autoantibody specificities directed at proteins involved in the transforming growth factor β pathway in patients with systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs), usually detected by indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells, are identified in 90% of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Thus, approximately 10% of SSc patients have no routinely detectable autoantibodies, and for 20% to 40% of those with detectable ANAs, the ANAs do not have identified specificity (unidentified ANAs). In this work, we aimed to identify new target autoantigens in SSc patients. Methods Using a proteomic approach combining two-dimensional electrophoresis and immunoblotting with HEp-2 cell total and enriched nuclear protein extracts as sources of autoantigens, we systematically analysed autoantibodies in SSc patients. Sera from 45 SSc patients were tested in 15 pools from groups of three patients with the same phenotype. A sera pool from 12 healthy individuals was used as a control. Proteins of interest were identified by mass spectrometry and analysed using Pathway Studio software. Results We identified 974 and 832 protein spots in HEp-2 cell total and enriched nuclear protein extracts, respectively. Interestingly, α-enolase was recognised by immunoglobulin G (IgG) from all pools of patients in both extracts. Fourteen and four proteins were recognised by IgG from at least 75% of the 15 pools in total and enriched nuclear protein ex