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Sample records for direct imaging di

  1. Direct imaging of exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Lagrange, Anne-Marie

    2014-04-28

    Most of the exoplanets known today have been discovered by indirect techniques, based on the study of the host star radial velocity or photometric temporal variations. These detections allowed the study of the planet populations in the first 5-8 AU from the central stars and have provided precious information on the way planets form and evolve at such separations. Direct imaging on 8-10 m class telescopes allows the detection of giant planets at larger separations (currently typically more than 5-10 AU) complementing the indirect techniques. So far, only a few planets have been imaged around young stars, but each of them provides an opportunity for unique dedicated studies of their orbital, physical and atmospheric properties and sometimes also on the interaction with the 'second-generation', debris discs. These few detections already challenge formation theories. In this paper, I present the results of direct imaging surveys obtained so far, and what they already tell us about giant planet (GP) formation and evolution. Individual and emblematic cases are detailed; they illustrate what future instruments will routinely deliver for a much larger number of stars. I also point out the limitations of this approach, as well as the needs for further work in terms of planet formation modelling. I finally present the progress expected in direct imaging in the near future, thanks in particular to forthcoming planet imagers on 8-10 m class telescopes.

  2. Direct imaging of explosives.

    PubMed

    Knapp, E A; Moler, R B; Saunders, A W; Trower, W P

    2000-01-01

    Any technique that can detect nitrogen concentrations can screen for concealed explosives. However, such a technique would have to be insensitive to metal, both encasing and incidental. If images of the nitrogen concentrations could be captured, then, since form follows function, a robust screening technology could be developed. However these images would have to be sensitive to the surface densities at or below that of the nitrogen contained in buried anti-personnel mines or of the SEMTEX that brought down Pan Am 103, approximately 200 g. Although the ability to image in three-dimensions would somewhat reduce false positives, capturing collateral images of carbon and oxygen would virtually assure that nitrogenous non-explosive material like fertilizer, Melmac dinnerware, and salami could be eliminated. We are developing such an instrument, the Nitrogen Camera, which has met experimentally these criteria with the exception of providing oxygen images, which awaits the availability of a sufficiently energetic light source. Our Nitrogen Camera technique uses an electron accelerator to produce photonuclear reactions whose unique decays it registers. Clearly if our Nitrogen Camera is made mobile, it could be effective in detecting buried mines, either in an active battlefield situation or in the clearing of abandoned military munitions. Combat operations require that a swathe the width of an armored vehicle, 5 miles deep, be screened in an hour, which is within our camera's scanning speed. Detecting abandoned munitions is technically easier as it is free from the onerous speed requirement. We describe here our Nitrogen Camera and show its 180 pixel intensity images of elemental nitrogen in a 200 g mine simulant and in a 125 g stick of SEMTEX. We also report on our progress in creating a lorry transportable 70 MeV electron racetrack microtron, the principal enabling technology that will allow our Nitrogen Camera to be deployed in the field.

  3. Direct Imaging of Giant Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Motohide

    Since the first detection of exoplanets around a Sun-like star 51 Peg in 1995, their detection and characterization are mainly led by indirect methods such as radial velocity and transit methods. However, recent progresses of observational techniques have finally enabled the direct imaging observations of giant planets of solar-system-scale orbit (with their semi-major axes less than about 50 AU) around A-type stars (e.g., Marois et al. 2008, 2010) and G-type stars (e.g., Kuzuhara et al. 2013). Direct imaging is useful to obtain the physical and atmospheric parameters of exoplanets. In fact not only colors but also a medium-resolution spectroscopy of such planets has been successfully obtained for their atmospheric characterization (Barman et al. 2013). Their masses are typically a few to ~10 Jupiter masses and they orbit at a Saturn- to-Pluto distance. Therefore, like hot-Jupiters and super-Earths they are unlike any solar-system planets, and called wide-orbit giant planets. A recent large search for planets and disk on the Subaru 8.2-m telescope (SEEDS project) has detected a 3-5 Jupiter-masses planet around a Sun-like star GJ 504 (Kuzuhara et al. 2013). It is the coolest planetary companion so far directly imaged and its near-infrared color is “bluer” than that of other directly imaged planets. In this contribution, I will review the recent progresses on direct imaging of exoplanets, highlight the results of the SEEDS project, and discuss the future developments.

  4. Direct Thrombus Imaging in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jongseong; Park, Jung E.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Kim, Dong-Eog

    2016-01-01

    There is an emergent need for imaging methods to better triage patients with acute stroke for tissue-plasminogen activator (tPA)-mediated thrombolysis or endovascular clot retrieval by directly visualizing the size and distribution of cerebral thromboemboli. Currently, magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT) angiography visualizes the obstruction of blood flow within the vessel lumen rather than the thrombus itself. The present visualization method, which relies on observation of the dense artery sign (the appearance of cerebral thrombi on a non-enhanced CT), suffers from low sensitivity. When translated into the clinical setting, direct thrombus imaging is likely to enable individualized acute stroke therapy by allowing clinicians to detect the thrombus with high sensitivity, assess the size and nature of the thrombus more precisely, serially monitor the therapeutic effects of thrombolysis, and detect post-treatment recurrence. This review is intended to provide recent updates on stroke-related direct thrombus imaging using MR imaging, positron emission tomography, or CT. PMID:27733029

  5. Directional synthetic aperture flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov

    2004-09-01

    A method for flow estimation using synthetic aperture imaging and focusing along the flow direction is presented. The method can find the correct velocity magnitude for any flow angle, and full color flow images can be measured using only 32 to 128 pulse emissions. The approach uses spherical wave emissions with a number of defocused elements and a linear frequency-modulated pulse (chirp) to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The received signals are dynamically focused along the flow direction and these signals are used in a cross-correlation estimator for finding the velocity magnitude. The flow angle is manually determined from the B-mode image. The approach can be used for both tissue and blood velocity determination. The approach was investigated using both simulations and a flow system with a laminar flow. The flow profile was measured with a commercial 7.5 MHz linear array transducer. A plastic tube with an internal diameter of 17 mm was used with an EcoWatt 1 pump generating a laminar, stationary flow. The velocity profile was measured for flow angles of 90 and 60 degrees. The RASMUS research scanner was used for acquiring radio frequency (RF) data from 128 elements of the array, using 8 emissions with 11 elements in each emission. A 20-micros chirp was used during emission. The RF data were subsequently beamformed off-line and stationary echo canceling was performed. The 60-degree flow with a peak velocity of 0.15 m/s was determined using 16 groups of 8 emissions, and the relative standard deviation was 0.36% (0.65 mm/s). Using the same setup for purely transverse flow gave a standard deviation of 1.2% (2.1 mm/s). Variation of the different parameters revealed the sensitivity to number of lines, angle deviations, length of correlation interval, and sampling interval. An in vivo image of the carotid artery and jugular vein of a healthy 29-year-old volunteer was acquired. A full color flow image using only 128 emissions could be made with a high

  6. Direct imaging of photonic nanojets.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Patrick; Wenger, Jérôme; Devilez, Alexis; Pianta, Martina; Stout, Brian; Bonod, Nicolas; Popov, Evgueni; Rigneault, Hervé

    2008-05-12

    We report the direct experimental observation of photonic nanojets created by single latex microspheres illuminated by a plane wave at a wavelength of 520 nm. Measurements are performed with a fast scanning confocal microscope in detection mode, where the detection pinhole defines a diffraction-limited observation volume that is scanned in three dimensions over the microsphere vicinity. From the collected stack of images, we reconstruct the full 3 dimensional photonic nanojet beam. Observations are conducted for polystyrene spheres of 1, 3 and 5 microm diameter deposited on a glass substrate, the upper medium being air or water. Experimental results are compared to calculations performed using the Mie theory. We measure nanojet sizes as small as 270 nm FWHM for a 3 microm sphere at a wavelength lambda of 520 nm. The beam keeps a subwavelength FWHM over a propagation distance of more than 3 lambda, displaying all the specificities of a photonic nanojet.

  7. Direct characterization of cotton fabrics treated with di-epoxide by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Min; Chéry, Joronia; Keresztes, Ivan; Zax, David B; Frey, Margaret W

    2017-10-15

    A non-acid-based, di-functional epoxide, neopentyl glycol diglycidyl ether (NPGDGE), was used to modify cotton fabrics. Direct characterization of the modified cotton was conducted by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) without grinding the fabric into a fine powder. NaOH and MgBr2 were compared in catalyzing the reaction between the epoxide groups of NPGDGE and the hydroxyl groups of cellulose. Possible reaction routes were discussed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that while the MgBr2-catalyzed reaction resulted in self-polymerization of NPGDGE, the NaOH-catalyzed reaction did not. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that at high NaOH concentration cellulose restructures from allomorph I to II. NMR studies verified the incorporation of NPGDGE into cotton fabrics with a clear NMR signal, and confirmed that at higher NaOH concentration the efficiency of grafting of NPGDGE was increased. This demonstrates that use of solid state NMR directly on woven fabric samples can simultaneously characterize chemical modification and crystalline polymorph of cotton. No loss of tensile strength was observed for cotton fabrics modified with NPGDGE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mapping Directly Imaged Giant Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostov, Veselin; Apai, Dániel

    2013-01-01

    With the increasing number of directly imaged giant exoplanets, the current atmosphere models are often not capable of fully explaining the spectra and luminosity of the sources. A particularly challenging component of the atmosphere models is the formation and properties of condensate cloud layers, which fundamentally impact the energetics, opacity, and evolution of the planets. Here we present a suite of techniques that can be used to estimate the level of rotational modulations these planets may show. We propose that the time-resolved observations of such periodic photometric and spectroscopic variations of extrasolar planets due to their rotation can be used as a powerful tool to probe the heterogeneity of their optical surfaces. In this paper, we develop simulations to explore the capabilities of current and next-generation ground- and space-based instruments for this technique. We address and discuss the following questions: (1) what planet properties can be deduced from the light curve and/or spectra, and in particular can we determine rotation periods, spot coverage, spot colors, and spot spectra?; (2) what is the optimal configuration of instrument/wavelength/temporal sampling required for these measurements?; and (3) can principal component analysis be used to invert the light curve and deduce the surface map of the planet? Our simulations describe the expected spectral differences between homogeneous (clear or cloudy) and patchy atmospheres, outline the significance of the dominant absorption features of H2O, CH4, and CO, and provide a method to distinguish these two types of atmospheres. Assuming surfaces with and without clouds for most currently imaged planets the current models predict the largest variations in the J band. Simulated photometry from current and future instruments is used to estimate the level of detectable photometric variations. We conclude that future instruments will be able to recover not only the rotation periods, cloud cover

  9. MAPPING DIRECTLY IMAGED GIANT EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Kostov, Veselin; Apai, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    With the increasing number of directly imaged giant exoplanets, the current atmosphere models are often not capable of fully explaining the spectra and luminosity of the sources. A particularly challenging component of the atmosphere models is the formation and properties of condensate cloud layers, which fundamentally impact the energetics, opacity, and evolution of the planets. Here we present a suite of techniques that can be used to estimate the level of rotational modulations these planets may show. We propose that the time-resolved observations of such periodic photometric and spectroscopic variations of extrasolar planets due to their rotation can be used as a powerful tool to probe the heterogeneity of their optical surfaces. In this paper, we develop simulations to explore the capabilities of current and next-generation ground- and space-based instruments for this technique. We address and discuss the following questions: (1) what planet properties can be deduced from the light curve and/or spectra, and in particular can we determine rotation periods, spot coverage, spot colors, and spot spectra?; (2) what is the optimal configuration of instrument/wavelength/temporal sampling required for these measurements?; and (3) can principal component analysis be used to invert the light curve and deduce the surface map of the planet? Our simulations describe the expected spectral differences between homogeneous (clear or cloudy) and patchy atmospheres, outline the significance of the dominant absorption features of H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, and CO, and provide a method to distinguish these two types of atmospheres. Assuming surfaces with and without clouds for most currently imaged planets the current models predict the largest variations in the J band. Simulated photometry from current and future instruments is used to estimate the level of detectable photometric variations. We conclude that future instruments will be able to recover not only the rotation periods

  10. Future Directions for Astronomical Image Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Eric

    2000-01-01

    In the "Future Directions for Astronomical Image Displav" project, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatories (NOAO) evolved our existing image display program into fully extensible. cross-platform image display software. We also devised messaging software to support integration of image display into astronomical analysis systems. Finally, we migrated our software from reliance on Unix and the X Window System to a platform-independent architecture that utilizes the cross-platform Tcl/Tk technology.

  11. Image rejects in general direct digital radiography

    PubMed Central

    Rosanowsky, Tine Blomberg; Jensen, Camilla; Wah, Kenneth Hong Ching

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of rejected images is an indicator of image quality and unnecessary imaging at a radiology department. Image reject analysis was frequent in the film era, but comparably few and small studies have been published after converting to digital radiography. One reason may be a belief that rejects have been eliminated with digitalization. Purpose To measure the extension of deleted images in direct digital radiography (DR), in order to assess the rates of rejects and unnecessary imaging and to analyze reasons for deletions, in order to improve the radiological services. Material and Methods All exposed images at two direct digital laboratories at a hospital in Norway were reviewed in January 2014. Type of examination, number of exposed images, and number of deleted images were registered. Each deleted image was analyzed separately and the reason for deleting the image was recorded. Results Out of 5417 exposed images, 596 were deleted, giving a deletion rate of 11%. A total of 51.3% were deleted due to positioning errors and 31.0% due to error in centering. The examinations with the highest percentage of deleted images were the knee, hip, and ankle, 20.6%, 18.5%, and 13.8% respectively. Conclusion The reject rate is at least as high as the deletion rate and is comparable with previous film-based imaging systems. The reasons for rejection are quite different in digital systems. This falsifies the hypothesis that digitalization would eliminates rejects. A deleted image does not contribute to diagnostics, and therefore is an unnecessary image. Hence, the high rates of deleted images have implications for management, training, education, as well as for quality. PMID:26500784

  12. Image rejects in general direct digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Bjørn; Rosanowsky, Tine Blomberg; Jensen, Camilla; Wah, Kenneth Hong Ching

    2015-10-01

    The number of rejected images is an indicator of image quality and unnecessary imaging at a radiology department. Image reject analysis was frequent in the film era, but comparably few and small studies have been published after converting to digital radiography. One reason may be a belief that rejects have been eliminated with digitalization. To measure the extension of deleted images in direct digital radiography (DR), in order to assess the rates of rejects and unnecessary imaging and to analyze reasons for deletions, in order to improve the radiological services. All exposed images at two direct digital laboratories at a hospital in Norway were reviewed in January 2014. Type of examination, number of exposed images, and number of deleted images were registered. Each deleted image was analyzed separately and the reason for deleting the image was recorded. Out of 5417 exposed images, 596 were deleted, giving a deletion rate of 11%. A total of 51.3% were deleted due to positioning errors and 31.0% due to error in centering. The examinations with the highest percentage of deleted images were the knee, hip, and ankle, 20.6%, 18.5%, and 13.8% respectively. The reject rate is at least as high as the deletion rate and is comparable with previous film-based imaging systems. The reasons for rejection are quite different in digital systems. This falsifies the hypothesis that digitalization would eliminates rejects. A deleted image does not contribute to diagnostics, and therefore is an unnecessary image. Hence, the high rates of deleted images have implications for management, training, education, as well as for quality.

  13. Circular Data Images for Directional Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morpet, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Directional data includes vectors, points on a unit sphere, axis orientation, angular direction, and circular or periodic data. The theoretical statistics for circular data (random points on a unit circle) or spherical data (random points on a unit sphere) are a recent development. An overview of existing graphical methods for the display of directional data is given. Cross-over occurs when periodic data are measured on a scale for the measurement of linear variables. For example, if angle is represented by a linear color gradient changing uniformly from dark blue at -180 degrees to bright red at +180 degrees, the color image will be discontinuous at +180 degrees and -180 degrees, which are the same location. The resultant color would depend on the direction of approach to the cross-over point. A new graphical method for imaging directional data is described, which affords high resolution without color discontinuity from "cross-over". It is called the circular data image. The circular data image uses a circular color scale in which colors repeat periodically. Some examples of the circular data image include direction of earth winds on a global scale, rocket motor internal flow, earth global magnetic field direction, and rocket motor nozzle vector direction vs. time.

  14. Future directions for positive body image research.

    PubMed

    Halliwell, Emma

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of positive body image research during the last 10 years represents an important shift in the body image literature. The existing evidence provides a strong empirical basis for the study of positive body image and research has begun to address issues of age, gender, ethnicity, culture, development, and intervention in relation to positive body image. This article briefly reviews the existing evidence before outlining directions for future research. Specifically, six areas for future positive body image research are outlined: (a) conceptualization, (b) models, (c) developmental factors, (d) social interactions, (e) cognitive processing style, and (f) interventions. Finally, the potential role of positive body image as a protective factor within the broader body image literature is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The structure of DNA by direct imaging

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Monica; Falqui, Andrea; Moretti, Manola; Limongi, Tania; Allione, Marco; Genovese, Alessandro; Lopatin, Sergei; Tirinato, Luca; Das, Gobind; Torre, Bruno; Giugni, Andrea; Gentile, Francesco; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    The structure of DNA was determined in 1953 by x-ray fiber diffraction. Several attempts have been made to obtain a direct image of DNA with alternative techniques. The direct image is intended to allow a quantitative evaluation of all relevant characteristic lengths present in a molecule. A direct image of DNA, which is different from diffraction in the reciprocal space, is difficult to obtain for two main reasons: the intrinsic very low contrast of the elements that form the molecule and the difficulty of preparing the sample while preserving its pristine shape and size. We show that through a preparation procedure compatible with the DNA physiological conditions, a direct image of a single suspended DNA molecule can be obtained. In the image, all relevant lengths of A-form DNA are measurable. A high-resolution transmission electron microscope that operates at 80 keV with an ultimate resolution of 1.5 Å was used for this experiment. Direct imaging of a single molecule can be used as a method to address biological problems that require knowledge at the single-molecule level, given that the average information obtained by x-ray diffraction of crystals or fibers is not sufficient for detailed structure determination, or when crystals cannot be obtained from biological molecules or are not sufficient in understanding multiple protein configurations. PMID:26601243

  16. Directional Joint Bilateral Filter for Depth Images

    PubMed Central

    Le, Anh Vu; Jung, Seung-Won; Won, Chee Sun

    2014-01-01

    Depth maps taken by the low cost Kinect sensor are often noisy and incomplete. Thus, post-processing for obtaining reliable depth maps is necessary for advanced image and video applications such as object recognition and multi-view rendering. In this paper, we propose adaptive directional filters that fill the holes and suppress the noise in depth maps. Specifically, novel filters whose window shapes are adaptively adjusted based on the edge direction of the color image are presented. Experimental results show that our method yields higher quality filtered depth maps than other existing methods, especially at the edge boundaries. PMID:24971470

  17. Directional imaging of the retinal cone mosaic.

    PubMed

    Vohnsen, Brian; Iglesias, Ignacio; Artal, Pablo

    2004-05-01

    We describe a near-IR scanning laser ophthalmoscope that allows the retinal cone mosaic to be imaged in the human eye in vivo without the use of wave-front correction techniques. The method takes advantage of the highly directional quality of cone photoreceptors that permits efficient coupling of light to individual cones and subsequent detection of most directional components of the backscattered light produced by the light-guiding effect of the cones. We discuss details of the system and describe cone-mosaic images obtained under different conditions.

  18. Future Directions for Astronomical Image Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Eric

    1997-01-01

    In our "Future Directions for Astronomical Image Display" project, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatories (NOAO) will evolve our existing image display software into a fully extensible, cross-platform image display server that can run stand-alone or be integrated seamlessly into astronomical analysis systems. We will build a Plug-in Image Extension (PIE) server for astronomy, consisting of a modular image display engine that can be customized using "plug-in" technology. We will create plug-ins that reproduce all the current functionality of SAOtng. We also will devise a messaging system and a set of distributed, shared data objects to support integrating the PIE server into astronomical analysis systems. Finally, we will migrate our PIE server, plug-ins, and messaging software from Unix and the X Window System to a platform-independent architecture that utilizes cross-platform technology such as Tcl/Tk or Java.

  19. Direct labeling and visualization of blood vessels with lipophilic carbocyanine dye DiI

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiwen; Song, Ying; Zhao, Lian; Gaidosh, Gabriel; Laties, Alan M; Wen, Rong

    2009-01-01

    We describe a protocol to rapidly and reliably visualize blood vessels in experimental animals. Blood vessels are directly labeled by cardiac perfusion using a specially formulated aqueous solution containing 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI), a lipophilic carbocyanine dye, which incorporates into endothelial cell membranes upon contact. By lateral diffusion, DiI also stains membrane structures, including angiogenic sprouts and pseudopodial processes that are not in direct contact. Tissues can be immediately examined by conventional and confocal fluorescence microscopy. High-quality serial optical sections using confocal microscopy are obtainable from thick tissue sections, especially at low magnification, for three-dimensional reconstruction. It takes less than 1 h to stain the vasculature in a whole animal. Compared with alternative techniques to visualize blood vessels, including space-occupying materials such as India ink or fluorescent dye-conjugated dextran, the corrosion casting technique, endothelial cell-specific markers and lectins, the present method simplifies the visualization of blood vessels and data analysis. PMID:18846097

  20. Discrete directional wavelet bases for image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragotti, Pier L.; Velisavljevic, Vladan; Vetterli, Martin; Beferull-Lozano, Baltasar

    2003-06-01

    The application of the wavelet transform in image processing is most frequently based on a separable construction. Lines and columns in an image are treated independently and the basis functions are simply products of the corresponding one dimensional functions. Such method keeps simplicity in design and computation, but is not capable of capturing properly all the properties of an image. In this paper, a new truly separable discrete multi-directional transform is proposed with a subsampling method based on lattice theory. Alternatively, the subsampling can be omitted and this leads to a multi-directional frame. This transform can be applied in many areas like denoising, non-linear approximation and compression. The results on non-linear approximation and denoising show very interesting gains compared to the standard two-dimensional analysis.

  1. Two Mirrors: Infinite Images of DiCaprio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadeev, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Movies are mostly viewed for entertainment. Mixing entertainment and physics gets students excited as we look at a famous movie scene from a different point of view. The following is a link to a fragment from the 2010 motion picture "Inception": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3tBBhYJeAw. The following problem, based on images in facing…

  2. Two Mirrors: Infinite Images of DiCaprio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadeev, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Movies are mostly viewed for entertainment. Mixing entertainment and physics gets students excited as we look at a famous movie scene from a different point of view. The following is a link to a fragment from the 2010 motion picture "Inception": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3tBBhYJeAw. The following problem, based on images in facing…

  3. Two Mirrors: Infinite Images of DiCaprio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeev, Pavel

    2015-11-01

    Movies are mostly viewed for entertainment. Mixing entertainment and physics gets students excited as we look at a famous movie scene from a different point of view. The following is a link to a fragment from the 2010 motion picture "Inception": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3tBBhYJeAw. The following problem, based on images in facing mirrors from that movie, was given to high school students studying geometric objects.

  4. Vibrio cholerae VpsT Regulates Matrix Production and Motility by Directly Sensing Cyclic di-GMP

    SciTech Connect

    Krasteva, P.; Fong, J; Shikuma, N; Beyhan, S; Navarro, M; Yildiz, F; Sondermann, H

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms can switch from a planktonic, free-swimming life-style to a sessile, colonial state, called a biofilm, which confers resistance to environmental stress. Conversion between the motile and biofilm life-styles has been attributed to increased levels of the prokaryotic second messenger cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), yet the signaling mechanisms mediating such a global switch are poorly understood. Here we show that the transcriptional regulator VpsT from Vibrio cholerae directly senses c-di-GMP to inversely control extracellular matrix production and motility, which identifies VpsT as a master regulator for biofilm formation. Rather than being regulated by phosphorylation, VpsT undergoes a change in oligomerization on c-di-GMP binding.

  5. Direct imaging of extra-solar planets

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; Max, V.E.; Brase, J.M.; Caffano, C.J.; Gavel, D.T.; Macintosh, B.A.

    1997-03-01

    Direct imaging of extra-solar planets may be possible with the new generation of large ground-based telescopes equipped with state- of- the-art adaptive optics (AO) systems to compensate for the blurring effect of the Earth`s atmosphere. The first of these systems is scheduled to begin operation in 1998 on the 10 in Keck II telescope. In this paper, general formulas for high-contrast imaging with AO systems are presented and used to calculate the sensitivity of the Keck AO system. The results of these calculations show that the Keck AO system should achieve the sensitivity necessary to detect giant planets around several nearby bright stars.

  6. DIRECTLY IMAGING TIDALLY POWERED MIGRATING JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Subo; Katz, Boaz; Socrates, Aristotle

    2013-01-10

    Upcoming direct-imaging experiments may detect a new class of long-period, highly luminous, tidally powered extrasolar gas giants. Even though they are hosted by {approx} Gyr-'old' main-sequence stars, they can be as 'hot' as young Jupiters at {approx}100 Myr, the prime targets of direct-imaging surveys. They are on years-long orbits and presently migrating to 'feed' the 'hot Jupiters'. They are expected from 'high-e' migration mechanisms, in which Jupiters are excited to highly eccentric orbits and then shrink semimajor axis by a factor of {approx}10-100 due to tidal dissipation at close periastron passages. The dissipated orbital energy is converted to heat, and if it is deposited deep enough into the atmosphere, the planet likely radiates steadily at luminosity L {approx} 100-1000 L{sub Jup}(2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} L{sub Sun }) during a typical {approx} Gyr migration timescale. Their large orbital separations and expected high planet-to-star flux ratios in IR make them potentially accessible to high-contrast imaging instruments on 10 m class telescopes. {approx}10 such planets are expected to exist around FGK dwarfs within {approx}50 pc. Long-period radial velocity planets are viable candidates, and the highly eccentric planet HD 20782b at maximum angular separation {approx}0.''08 is a promising candidate. Directly imaging these tidally powered Jupiters would enable a direct test of high-e migration mechanisms. Once detected, the luminosity would provide a direct measurement of the migration rate, and together with mass (and possibly radius) estimate, they would serve as a laboratory to study planetary spectral formation and tidal physics.

  7. Direct Exoplanet Detection with Binary Differential Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodigas, Timothy J.; Weinberger, Alycia; Mamajek, Eric E.; Males, Jared R.; Close, Laird M.; Morzinski, Katie; Hinz, Philip M.; Kaib, Nathan

    2015-10-01

    Binaries are typically excluded from direct imaging exoplanet surveys. However, the recent findings of Kepler and radial velocity programs show that planets can and do form in binary systems. Here, we suggest that visual binaries offer unique advantages for direct imaging. We show that Binary Differential Imaging (BDI), whereby two stars are imaged simultaneously at the same wavelength within the isoplanatic patch at a high Strehl ratio, offers improved point spread function (PSF) subtraction that can result in increased sensitivity to planets close to each star. We demonstrate this by observing a young visual binary separated by 4″ with MagAO/Clio-2 at 3.9 μm, where the Strehl ratio is high, the isoplanatic patch is large, and giant planets are bright. Comparing BDI to angular differential imaging (ADI), we find that BDI’s 5σ contrast is ˜0.5 mag better than ADI’s within ˜1″ for the particular binary we observed. Because planets typically reside close to their host stars, BDI is a promising technique for discovering exoplanets in stellar systems that are often ignored. BDI is also 2-4× more efficient than ADI and classical reference PSF subtraction, since planets can be detected around both the target and PSF reference simultaneously. We are currently exploiting this technique in a new MagAO survey for giant planets in 140 young nearby visual binaries. BDI on a space-based telescope would not be limited by isoplanatism effects and would therefore be an even more powerful tool for imaging and discovering planets. This paper includes data obtained at the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  8. Transdermal Uptake of Diethyl Phthalate and Di(n-butyl) Phthalate Directly from Air: Experimental Verification

    PubMed Central

    Bekö, Gabriel; Koch, Holger M.; Salthammer, Tunga; Schripp, Tobias; Toftum, Jørn; Clausen, Geo

    2015-01-01

    Background Fundamental considerations indicate that, for certain phthalate esters, dermal absorption from air is an uptake pathway that is comparable to or greater than inhalation. Yet this pathway has not been experimentally evaluated and has been largely overlooked when assessing uptake of phthalate esters. Objectives This study investigated transdermal uptake, directly from air, of diethyl phthalate (DEP) and di(n-butyl) phthalate (DnBP) in humans. Methods In a series of experiments, six human participants were exposed for 6 hr in a chamber containing deliberately elevated air concentrations of DEP and DnBP. The participants either wore a hood and breathed air with phthalate concentrations substantially below those in the chamber or did not wear a hood and breathed chamber air. All urinations were collected from initiation of exposure until 54 hr later. Metabolites of DEP and DnBP were measured in these samples and extrapolated to parent phthalate intakes, corrected for background and hood air exposures. Results For DEP, the median dermal uptake directly from air was 4.0 μg/(μg/m3 in air) compared with an inhalation intake of 3.8 μg/(μg/m3 in air). For DnBP, the median dermal uptake from air was 3.1 μg/(μg/m3 in air) compared with an inhalation intake of 3.9 μg/(μg/m3 in air). Conclusions This study shows that dermal uptake directly from air can be a meaningful exposure pathway for DEP and DnBP. For other semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) whose molecular weight and lipid/air partition coefficient are in the appropriate range, direct absorption from air is also anticipated to be significant. Citation Weschler CJ, Bekö G, Koch HM, Salthammer T, Schripp T, Toftum J, Clausen G. 2015. Transdermal uptake of diethyl phthalate and di(n-butyl) phthalate directly from air: experimental verification. Environ Health Perspect 123:928–934; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409151 PMID:25850107

  9. Medical imaging at risk from European directive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevil, Stephen

    2009-09-01

    The recent Forum article by Denis Le Bihan ("Threats to ultra-high-field MRI" August pp16-17) is a valuable addition to the ongoing debate about the impact on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the European Commission's Physical Agents (EMF) directive. When this directive was introduced in 2004, exposure limits for static magnetic fields were excluded, because it was known that guidance published by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) in 1994 was being revised. It is likely that the new ICNIRP guidelines, to which Le Bihan refers, will now be incorporated into the directive. If so, this could indeed impact on ultra-highfield MRI, in which Europe has a worldleading position.

  10. Weighting interferometric data for direct imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Frédéric

    2013-08-01

    The new generation interferometric arrays such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) are composed of a large number of telescopes and their configurations are optimized for Fourier plane (a.k.a. uv-plane) coverage. As a consequence, solving for the missing information in the uv-plane is becoming less critical and the imaging algorithms can be revisited. The situation is getting similar to that encountered with single filled aperture telescopes and it is becoming possible to make images in a direct way. In this article a new weighting method is introduced to obtain "pseudo-clean" images without using prior information to solve for the Fourier transform of the source. This method is similar but not equivalent to the successive application of robust weighting and tapering at different scales. The idea is to weight the data to compensate for the imperfect distribution of natural weights in the uv-plane. The price to pay for this direct imaging technique is that the final point spread function (PSF or beam) may not follow a simple analytical shape such as a Gaussian (but this is also the case in optical astronomy) and some sensitivity is lost (but this is the case with any imaging algorithm in interferometry). Two parameters are introduced to control the trade-off between imaging quality and sensitivity, namely a threshold parameter and a coupling parameter. This method is applied to simulated ALMA observations with 16, 32 and 50 antennas. As expected this method is found to be more efficient with more antennas and for more compact configurations because the uv-plane coverage is more complete. With 50 antennas in compact configuration it is possible to reduce the amplitude of the inner sidelobes (outer sidelobes) by a factor >6 (>2) compared to natural weighting for ~10 % loss in sensitivity, leading to sidelobes lower than 1.6 % of the main lobe peak value. With 16 antennas only, the method can still be used to reduce the inner sidelobes of a

  11. Directly Estimating Endmembers for Compressive Hyperspectral Images

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongwei; Fu, Ning; Qiao, Liyan; Peng, Xiyuan

    2015-01-01

    The large volume of hyperspectral images (HSI) generated creates huge challenges for transmission and storage, making data compression more and more important. Compressive Sensing (CS) is an effective data compression technology that shows that when a signal is sparse in some basis, only a small number of measurements are needed for exact signal recovery. Distributed CS (DCS) takes advantage of both intra- and inter- signal correlations to reduce the number of measurements needed for multichannel-signal recovery. HSI can be observed by the DCS framework to reduce the volume of data significantly. The traditional method for estimating endmembers (spectral information) first recovers the images from the compressive HSI and then estimates endmembers via the recovered images. The recovery step takes considerable time and introduces errors into the estimation step. In this paper, we propose a novel method, by designing a type of coherent measurement matrix, to estimate endmembers directly from the compressively observed HSI data via convex geometry (CG) approaches without recovering the images. Numerical simulations show that the proposed method outperforms the traditional method with better estimation speed and better (or comparable) accuracy in both noisy and noiseless cases. PMID:25905699

  12. Polaroid Graphics Imaging Direct Digital Color Proofing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Patrick F.

    1989-04-01

    Good morning ladies and gentlemen. I represent Polaroid Graphics Imaging, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Polaroid Corporation. We wish to thank Ken Cloud and the SPIE for the opportunity to speak today. Several criterion are fundamental in the role for Direct Digital Color Proofing (DDCP), First, the DDCP must represent a first generation hardcopy of the exact color information in the production stream. If must, as it's name suggests be an exact, proof (hence the name direct) of the electronic or digital information which would otherwise be directed toward film working. It is after all the most critical means to evaluate the quality of whatever pagination, scanner or color work which has gone be for it. Second, the DDCP must represent an opportunity. That opportunity is to reconvene the production stream and move to film making, optical or magnetic storage, or satellite transmission with the confidence that the DDCP is identical to some conventional counterpart. In the case of film it must match a conventional proof and press sheet, dot for dot. Otherwise it is merely an exercise in interpretation. For magnetic or optical storage and satellite transmission there must be assurance that at any opportunity either a duplicate DDCP or a conventional film/proof could reproduce earlier results. Finally as the printed product is the final goal and direct to press is evolving in direct to plate and direct to gravure printing the DDCP must share the half toner lineage of these products. Thirdly and hardly least, the whole purpose for DDCP is increased productivity. However, our industry struggles to maintain individuality and variety. Somehow DDCP must balance these forces.

  13. MKIDs for Direct Imaging of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, Benjamin A.; Meeker, Seth; Strader, Matthew; Szypryt, Paul; Walter, Alex; Bockstiegel, Clint; Collura, Giulia; Mawet, Dimitri; Jensen-Clem, Rebecca; Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Serabyn, Eugene

    2015-12-01

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) are single photon counting, energy resolving detectors applicable from the optical through near-IR. MKIDs are especially interesting for exoplanet direct imaging due to their read noise free, high speed, energy resolved near-IR photon counting in reasonably large formats. The first MKID instrument, ARCONS, has been taking data on the Palomar 200” for several years. There are currently two UVOIR MKID instruments fully funded and under construction for direct imaging of planets, DARKNESS for the Palomar coronagraphs and MEC for Subaru’s SCExAO. Operating an MKID camera behind these coronagraphs will allow an effective 2 kHz frame rate with minimal latency, allowing fast real-time nulling of atmospheric speckles. Simulations show this could improve contrast ratios by up to a factor of 100. In this this talk I will discuss the current state of these cameras as well as their expected scientific yield. In particular, MEC with SCExAO on Subaru may be capable of detecting Jupiter analogs in reflected light within the next 2 years.

  14. Mass Determination Of Directly Imaged Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Tobias; Neuhauser, R.; Seifahrt, A.

    2011-09-01

    About 20 sub-stellar companions with large separations (> 50 AU) to their young primary stars and brown dwarfs are confirmed by both common proper motion and late-M / early-L type spectra. The origin and early evolution of these objects is still under debate. While often these sub-stellar companions are regarded as brown dwarfs, they could possibly also be massive planets, the mass estimates are very uncertain so far. They are companions to primary stars or brown dwarfs in young associations and star forming regions like Taurus, Upper Scorpius, the TW Hya association, Beta Pic moving group, TucHor association, Lupus, Ophiuchus, and Chamaeleon, hence their ages and distances are well known, in contrast to free-floating brown dwarfs. Here we present how mass estimates of such young directly imaged companions can be derived, using e.g. evolutionary models, which are however currently almost uncalibrated by direct mass measurements of young objects. An empirical classification by medium-resolution spectroscopy is currently not possible, because a spectral sequence that is taking the lower gravity into account, is not existing. This problem leads to an apparent mismatch between spectra of old field type objects and young low-mass companions at the same effective temperature, hampering a determination of temperature and surface gravity independent from models. We show that from spectra of the objects, using the advantages of light concentration by an AO-assisted integral field spectrograph, temperature, extinction, metallicity and surface gravity can be derived using non-equilibrium radiative transfer atmosphere models as comparison and that this procedure as well allows a mass determination in combination with the luminosities found by the direct observations, as has recently been done by us for several young sub-stellar companions, as e.g. GQ Lup, CT Cha or UScoCTIO 108.

  15. Direct quantification of mono- and di-D-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate by high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kong, L Y; Su, B G; Bao, Z B; Xing, H B; Yang, Y W; Ren, Q L

    2011-12-02

    A simple and direct reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method with UV detection was developed and validated for the determination of mono- and di-D-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS 1000) in TPGS mixture. Before the HPLC analysis, mono- and di-TPGS 1000 were separated by simulated moving bed (SMB) chromatography system and characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The mass spectrometric results confirmed that the molar mass distribution of TPGS prepared in our laboratory was very close to that of the product of Eastman Chemical Company with similar n¯ (average polymerization degree), M(n)¯ (number-average molecular weight) and M(w)¯ (weight-average molecular weight). The HPLC analysis was carried out on a C30 analytical column with mobile phases comprised of acetonitrile (A) and isopropanol (B) in gradient conditions. Validation of the analytical method was done on the following parameters: system suitability, linearity, limits of detection and quantification, accuracy and precision, method robustness and solution stability. The linearity of the calibration curves for mono- and di-TPGS 1000 from both sources was found to be good (r(2)>0.9996). The recovery values were from 94.6% to 103.3% for mono-TPGS, and 93.5% to 103.3% for di-TPGS. This method could be successfully used in the direct quantification of mono- and di-TPGS in TPGS 1000 mixture using TPGS standards with similar molecular mass distributions although derived from different sources. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Implementation of a direct-imaging and FX correlator for the BEST-2 array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, G.; Hickish, J.; Magro, A.; Price, D.; Zarb Adami, K.

    2014-04-01

    A new digital backend has been developed for the Basic Element for SKA Training II (BEST-2) array at Radiotelescopi di Medicina, INAF-IRA, Italy, which allows concurrent operation of an FX correlator, and a direct-imaging correlator and beamformer. This backend serves as a platform for testing some of the spatial Fourier transform concepts which have been proposed for use in computing correlations on regularly gridded arrays. While spatial Fourier transform-based beamformers have been implemented previously, this is, to our knowledge, the first time a direct-imaging correlator has been deployed on a radio astronomy array. Concurrent observations with the FX and direct-imaging correlator allow for direct comparison between the two architectures. Additionally, we show the potential of the direct-imaging correlator for time-domain astronomy, by passing a subset of beams though a pulsar and transient detection pipeline. These results provide a timely verification for spatial Fourier transform-based instruments that are currently in commissioning. These instruments aim to detect highly redshifted hydrogen from the epoch of reionization and/or to perform wide-field surveys for time-domain studies of the radio sky. We experimentally show the direct-imaging correlator architecture to be a viable solution for correlation and beamforming.

  17. Direct Imaging of Warm Extrasolar Planets

    SciTech Connect

    Macintosh, B

    2005-04-11

    One of the most exciting scientific discoveries in the last decade of the twentieth century was the first detection of planets orbiting a star other than our own. By now more than 130 extrasolar planets have been discovered indirectly, by observing the gravitational effects of the planet on the radial velocity of its parent star. This technique has fundamental limitations: it is most sensitive to planets close to their star, and it determines only a planet's orbital period and a lower limit on the planet's mass. As a result, all the planetary systems found so far are very different from our own--they have giant Jupiter-sized planets orbiting close to their star, where the terrestrial planets are found in our solar system. Such systems have overturned the conventional paradigm of planet formation, but have no room in them for habitable Earth-like planets. A powerful complement to radial velocity detections of extrasolar planets will be direct imaging--seeing photons from the planet itself. Such a detection would allow photometric measurements to determine the temperature and radius of a planet. Also, direct detection is most sensitive to planets in wide orbits, and hence more capable of seeing solar systems resembling our own, since a giant planet in a wide orbit does not preclude the presence of an Earth-like planet closer to the star. Direct detection, however, is extremely challenging. Jupiter is roughly a billion times fainter than our sun. Two techniques allowed us to overcome this formidable contrast and attempt to see giant planets directly. The first is adaptive optics (AO) which allows giant earth-based telescopes, such as the 10 meter W.M. Keck telescope, to partially overcome the blurring effects of atmospheric turbulence. The second is looking for young planets: by searching in the infrared for companions to young stars, we can see thermal emission from planets that are still warm with the heat of their formation. Together with a UCLA team that leads the

  18. Optical imaging: current applications and future directions.

    PubMed

    Luker, Gary D; Luker, Kathryn E

    2008-01-01

    Optical techniques, such as bioluminescence and fluorescence, are emerging as powerful new modalities for molecular imaging in disease and therapy. Combining innovative molecular biology and chemistry, researchers have developed optical methods for imaging a variety of cellular and molecular processes in vivo, including protein interactions, protein degradation, and protease activity. Whereas optical imaging has been used primarily for research in small-animal models, there are several areas in which optical molecular imaging will translate to clinical medicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances in optical techniques for molecular imaging and the potential impact for clinical medicine.

  19. The Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT): protocol for a cluster randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Wilma S; Ford, Ian; Sattar, Naveed; Hollingsworth, Kieren G; Adamson, Ashley; Sniehotta, Falko F; McCombie, Louise; Brosnahan, Naomi; Ross, Hazel; Mathers, John C; Peters, Carl; Thom, George; Barnes, Alison; Kean, Sharon; McIlvenna, Yvonne; Rodrigues, Angela; Rehackova, Lucia; Zhyzhneuskaya, Sviatlana; Taylor, Roy; Lean, Mike E J

    2016-02-16

    Despite improving evidence-based practice following clinical guidelines to optimise drug therapy, Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) still exerts a devastating toll from vascular complications and premature death. Biochemical remission of T2DM has been demonstrated with weight loss around 15kg following bariatric surgery and in several small studies of non-surgical energy-restriction treatments. The non-surgical Counterweight-Plus programme, running in Primary Care where obesity and T2DM are routinely managed, produces >15 kg weight loss in 33% of all enrolled patients. The Diabetes UK-funded Counterpoint study suggested that this should be sufficient to reverse T2DM by removing ectopic fat in liver and pancreas, restoring first-phase insulin secretion. The Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT) was designed to determine whether a structured, intensive, weight management programme, delivered in a routine Primary Care setting, is a viable treatment for achieving durable normoglycaemia. Other aims are to understand the mechanistic basis of remission and to identify psychological predictors of response. Cluster-randomised design with GP practice as the unit of randomisation: 280 participants from around 30 practices in Scotland and England will be allocated either to continue usual guideline-based care or to add the Counterweight-Plus weight management programme, which includes primary care nurse or dietitian delivery of 12-20weeks low calorie diet replacement, food reintroduction, and long-term weight loss maintenance. Main inclusion criteria: men and women aged 20-65 years, all ethnicities, T2DM 0-6years duration, BMI 27-45 kg/m(2). Tyneside participants will undergo Magnetic Resonance (MR) studies of pancreatic and hepatic fat, and metabolic studies to determine mechanisms underlying T2DM remission. Co-primary endpoints: weight reduction ≥ 15 kg and HbA1c <48 mmol/mol at one year. Further follow-up at 2 years. This study will establish whether a structured weight

  20. Confocal imaging of transmembrane voltage by SEER of di-8-ANEPPS

    PubMed Central

    Manno, Carlo; Figueroa, Lourdes; Fitts, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Imaging, optical mapping, and optical multisite recording of transmembrane potential (Vm) are essential for studying excitable cells and systems. The naphthylstyryl voltage-sensitive dyes, including di-8-ANEPPS, shift both their fluorescence excitation and emission spectra upon changes in Vm. Accordingly, they have been used for monitoring Vm in nonratioing and both emission and excitation ratioing modes. Their changes in fluorescence are usually much less than 10% per 100 mV. Conventional ratioing increases sensitivity to between 3 and 15% per 100 mV. Low sensitivity limits the value of these dyes, especially when imaged with low light systems like confocal scanners. Here we demonstrate the improvement afforded by shifted excitation and emission ratioing (SEER) as applied to imaging membrane potential in flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers of adult mice. SEER—the ratioing of two images of fluorescence, obtained with different excitation wavelengths in different emission bands—was implemented in two commercial confocal systems. A conventional pinhole scanner, affording optimal setting of emission bands but less than ideal excitation wavelengths, achieved a sensitivity of up to 27% per 100 mV, nearly doubling the value found by conventional ratioing of the same data. A better pair of excitation lights should increase the sensitivity further, to 35% per 100 mV. The maximum acquisition rate with this system was 1 kHz. A fast “slit scanner” increased the effective rate to 8 kHz, but sensitivity was lower. In its high-sensitivity implementation, the technique demonstrated progressive deterioration of action potentials upon fatiguing tetani induced by stimulation patterns at >40 Hz, thereby identifying action potential decay as a contributor to fatigue onset. Using the fast implementation, we could image for the first time an action potential simultaneously at multiple locations along the t-tubule system. These images resolved the radially varying lag

  1. Direct imaging of localized surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Sinan; Karademir, Ertugrul; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2011-09-01

    In this Letter, we report on dark field imaging of localized surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in plasmonic waveguiding bands formed by plasmonic coupled cavities. We image the light scattered from SPPs in the plasmonic cavities excited by a tunable light source. Tuning the excitation wavelength, we measure the localization and dispersion of the plasmonic cavity mode. Dark field imaging has been achieved in the Kretschmann configuration using a supercontinuum white-light laser equipped with an acoustooptic tunable filter. Polarization dependent spectroscopic reflection and dark field imaging measurements are correlated and found to be in agreement with finite-difference time-domain calculations.

  2. Distance informed Track-Weighted Imaging (diTWI): a framework for sensitising streamline information to neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Bell, Christopher; Pannek, Kerstin; Fay, Michael; Thomas, Paul; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Salvado, Olivier; Gal, Yaniv; Coulthard, Alan; Crozier, Stuart; Rose, Stephen

    2014-02-01

    Track-Weighted Imaging (TWI), where voxel intensity is based on image metrics encoded along streamline trajectories, provides a mechanism to study white matter disease. However, with generalised streamline weighting, it is difficult to localise the precise anatomical source and spread of injury or neuropathology. This limitation can be overcome by modulating the voxel weight based on the distance of the voxel from a given anatomical location along the tract, which we term diTWI: distance informed Track-Weighted Imaging. The location of known neuropathology can be delineated on any given imaging modality (e.g. MRI or PET). To demonstrate the clinical utility of this approach, we measured tumour cell infiltration along WM fibre tracts in 13 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma and 1 patient with Anaplastic Astrocytoma. TWI and diTWI maps were generated using information obtained from dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (area under the curve, AUC) and diffusivity maps (ADC and FA) with tumour boundaries automatically extracted using a logistic regression classifier. The accuracy of the derived tumour volumes was compared to those generated using 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[(18)F]-fluoro-l-phenylalanine (FDOPA) PET imaging. The accuracy of the tumour volumes generated from the diTWI maps was superior to volumes derived from the TWI, geometric distance or baseline AUC, FA and ADC maps. The relative overlap and relative dissimilarity rates for the diTWI generated tumour volumes after classification were found to be 82.3±15.3% (range 69.1-91.9) and 16.9±8.8% (range 7.9-37.5), respectively. These findings show that diTWI maps provide a useful framework for localising neuropathological processes occurring along WM pathways.

  3. Role of Imaging and Cytogenetics in Evaluation of DiGeorge Syndrome - A Rare Entity in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Rajoo; Babu, Sellappan Rajamanickam; Ilanchezhian, Subramanian; Radhakrishnan, Prabhu Radhan

    2015-01-01

    DiGeorge syndrome is a congenital genetic disorder that affects the endocrine system, mainly the thymus and parathyroid glands. The syndrome produces different symptoms, which vary in severity and character between patients. It manifests with craniofacial dysmorphism and defects in the heart, parathyroid, and thymus. Patients can present with a palatal deformity and nasal speech. This rare entity is caused mainly due to deletion of chromosome 22q11.2. Radiographic evaluation of DiGeorge syndrome is necessary to define aberrant anatomy, evaluate central nervous system, craniofacial abnormalities, musculoskeletal system, and cardiothoracic contents. It also helps in planning surgical procedures and surgical reconstructions. We report a case of DiGeorge syndrome in a 4-month-old neonate and discuss the clinical, imaging, and cytogenetic findings that helped in the diagnosis of this rare entity.

  4. Synthesis of Phenanthrothiazoles and 1,2-Di(heteroaryl)benzenes through Successive Pd-Catalyzed Direct Arylations.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xinzhe; Soulé, Jean-François; Doucet, Henri

    2017-03-15

    Palladium-catalyzed direct arylation of 4-(2-bromophenyl)-2-methylthiazole proceeds with high efficiency at the thiazolyl C5 position using aryl bromides as the aryl source. This transformation provides simple access to 4-(2-bromophenyl)-2-methyl-5-arylthiazoles, which can be further converted into phenanthrothiazoles via palladium-catalyzed intramolecular direct arylation. When the direct arylation of 4-(2-bromophenyl)-2-methyl-5-arylthiazoles is conducted in the presence of an external heteroarene such as thiazoles, thiophenes, or imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines, the intermolecular arylation of such external heteroarenes proceeds faster than the intramolecular reaction, allowing the formation of 1,2-di(heteroaryl)benzene derivatives.

  5. Direct Estimation of Kinetic Parametric Images for Dynamic PET

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guobao; Qi, Jinyi

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) can monitor spatiotemporal distribution of radiotracer in vivo. The spatiotemporal information can be used to estimate parametric images of radiotracer kinetics that are of physiological and biochemical interests. Direct estimation of parametric images from raw projection data allows accurate noise modeling and has been shown to offer better image quality than conventional indirect methods, which reconstruct a sequence of PET images first and then perform tracer kinetic modeling pixel-by-pixel. Direct reconstruction of parametric images has gained increasing interests with the advances in computing hardware. Many direct reconstruction algorithms have been developed for different kinetic models. In this paper we review the recent progress in the development of direct reconstruction algorithms for parametric image estimation. Algorithms for linear and nonlinear kinetic models are described and their properties are discussed. PMID:24396500

  6. Pixel extraction based integral imaging with controllable viewing direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chao-Chao; Deng, Huan; Wang, Qiong-Hua

    2012-09-01

    We propose pixel extraction based integral imaging with a controllable viewing direction. The proposed integral imaging can provide viewers three-dimensional (3D) images in a very small viewing angle. The viewing angle and the viewing direction of the reconstructed 3D images are controlled by the pixels extracted from an elemental image array. Theoretical analysis and a 3D display experiment of the viewing direction controllable integral imaging are carried out. The experimental results verify the correctness of the theory. A 3D display based on the integral imaging can protect the viewer’s privacy and has huge potential for a television to show multiple 3D programs at the same time.

  7. Confusion in Direct Imaging of Earth-Clones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaopei; Shao, M.; Catanzarite, J.

    2010-05-01

    It is an important and necessary goal to image Earth-clones and to further study atmospheres of those exoplanets. It is, however, arguable whether direct imaging can discover and characterize Earth-like planets alone, or if direct imaging definitely needs astrometric discoveries of Earth-clones first. Several proposed imaging missions for searching Earth-clones are evaluated in this work. Challenging issues in direct imaging of Earth-clones are discussed. In particular, confusing issues in direct imaging coming from background objects, distant M, T, L types of stars, faint brown dwarfs and multiple planets are investigated. Also, the impacts of zodiacal and exozodiacal dust clouds on signal-to-noise ratios of direct imaging are analyzed. There is no doubt that the best strategy to explore Earth-clones uses discoveries of Earth-clones by an astrometry mission first, which is then followed by an imaging mission to improve Earth-clones’ orbital parameters and to further characterize their physical parameters. We believe that the synergy of direct imaging of Earth-clones with astrometry is the most effective observation strategy to search for and investigate Earth-clones in the foreseeable future.

  8. Seeing SPIOs Directly In Vivo with Magnetic Particle Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bo; Yu, Elaine; Orendorff, Ryan; Lu, Kuan; Konkle, Justin J; Tay, Zhi Wei; Hensley, Daniel; Zhou, Xinyi Y; Chandrasekharan, Prashant; Saritas, Emine U; Goodwill, Patrick W; Hazle, John D; Conolly, Steven M

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new molecular imaging technique that directly images superparamagnetic tracers with high image contrast and sensitivity approaching nuclear medicine techniques-but without ionizing radiation. Since its inception, the MPI research field has quickly progressed in imaging theory, hardware, tracer design, and biomedical applications. Here, we describe the history and field of MPI, outline pressing challenges to MPI technology and clinical translation, highlight unique applications in MPI, and describe the role of the WMIS MPI Interest Group in collaboratively advancing MPI as a molecular imaging technique. We invite interested investigators to join the MPI Interest Group and contribute new insights and innovations to the MPI field.

  9. Current challenges and future directions in cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Wann, Samuel; Tunio, Javed

    2010-07-01

    Imaging is one of the most important accomplishments of medicine during the last 1000 years. The contribution of modern imaging to progress in the delivery of health care is unquestioned. However, we need to refine our use of imaging, limiting its use to those occasions when it can contribute directly or indirectly to improving and lengthening the lives of patients. Technology prowess in imaging alone is not sufficient to deliver value to individuals or to society. Continued investment in imaging technology requires critical appraisal of its use in clinical decision making and patient outcomes.

  10. Current challenges and future directions in cardiac imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wann, Samuel; Tunio, Javed

    2010-01-01

    Imaging is one of the most important accomplishments of medicine during the last 1000 years. The contribution of modern imaging to progress in the delivery of health care is unquestioned. However, we need to refine our use of imaging, limiting its use to those occasions when it can contribute directly or indirectly to improving and lengthening the lives of patients. Technology prowess in imaging alone is not sufficient to deliver value to individuals or to society. Continued investment in imaging technology requires critical appraisal of its use in clinical decision making and patient outcomes. PMID:23960604

  11. Compressive sensing for direct millimeter-wave holographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Lingbo; Wang, Yingxin; Shen, Zongjun; Zhao, Ziran; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2015-04-10

    Direct millimeter-wave (MMW) holographic imaging, which provides both the amplitude and phase information by using the heterodyne mixing technique, is considered a powerful tool for personnel security surveillance. However, MWW imaging systems usually suffer from the problem of high cost or relatively long data acquisition periods for array or single-pixel systems. In this paper, compressive sensing (CS), which aims at sparse sampling, is extended to direct MMW holographic imaging for reducing the number of antenna units or the data acquisition time. First, following the scalar diffraction theory, an exact derivation of the direct MMW holographic reconstruction is presented. Then, CS reconstruction strategies for complex-valued MMW images are introduced based on the derived reconstruction formula. To pursue the applicability for near-field MMW imaging and more complicated imaging targets, three sparsity bases, including total variance, wavelet, and curvelet, are evaluated for the CS reconstruction of MMW images. We also discuss different sampling patterns for single-pixel, linear array and two-dimensional array MMW imaging systems. Both simulations and experiments demonstrate the feasibility of recovering MMW images from measurements at 1/2 or even 1/4 of the Nyquist rate.

  12. OH radical imaging in a DI diesel engine and the structure of the early diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Dec, J.E.; Coy, E.B.

    1996-03-01

    Laser-sheet imaging studies have considerably advanced our understanding of diesel combustion; however, the location and nature of the flame zones within the combusting fuel jet have been largely unstudied. To address this issue, planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging of the OH radical has been applied to the reacting fuel jet of a direct-injection diesel engine of the ``heavy-duty`` size class, modified for optical access. An Nd:YAG-based laser system was used to pump the overlapping Q{sub 1}9 and Q{sub 2}8 lines of the (1,0) band of the A{yields}X transition at 284.01 nm, while the fluorescent emission from both the (0,O) and (1, I) bands (308 to 320 nm) was imaged with an intensified video camera. This scheme allowed rejection of elastically scattered laser light, PAH fluorescence, and laser-induced incandescence. OH PLIF is shown to be an excellent diagnostic for diesel diffusion flames. The signal is strong, and it is confined to a narrow region about the flame front because the threebody recombination reactions that reduce high flame-front OH concentrations to equilibrium levels occur rapidly at diesel pressures. No signal was evident in the fuel-rich premixed flame regions where calculations and burner experiments indicate that OH concentrations will be below detectable limits. Temporal sequences of OH PLIF images are presented showing the onset and development of the early diffusion flame up to the time that soot obscures the images. These images show that the diffusion flame develops around the periphery of the-downstream portion of the reacting fuel jet about half way through the premixed burn spike. Although affected by turbulence, the diffusion flame remains at the jet periphery for the rest of the imaged sequence.

  13. Directional bilateral filters for smoothing fluorescence microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, Manasij; Mohan, Kavya; Seelamantula, Chandra Sekhar

    2015-08-01

    Images obtained through fluorescence microscopy at low numerical aperture (NA) are noisy and have poor resolution. Images of specimens such as F-actin filaments obtained using confocal or widefield fluorescence microscopes contain directional information and it is important that an image smoothing or filtering technique preserve the directionality. F-actin filaments are widely studied in pathology because the abnormalities in actin dynamics play a key role in diagnosis of cancer, cardiac diseases, vascular diseases, myofibrillar myopathies, neurological disorders, etc. We develop the directional bilateral filter as a means of filtering out the noise in the image without significantly altering the directionality of the F-actin filaments. The bilateral filter is anisotropic to start with, but we add an additional degree of anisotropy by employing an oriented domain kernel for smoothing. The orientation is locally adapted using a structure tensor and the parameters of the bilateral filter are optimized for within the framework of statistical risk minimization. We show that the directional bilateral filter has better denoising performance than the traditional Gaussian bilateral filter and other denoising techniques such as SURE-LET, non-local means, and guided image filtering at various noise levels in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR). We also show quantitative improvements in low NA images of F-actin filaments.

  14. A photoacoustic imaging reconstruction method based on directional total variation with adaptive directivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Zhang, Chen; Wang, Yuanyuan

    2017-05-30

    In photoacoustic tomography (PAT), total variation (TV) based iteration algorithm is reported to have a good performance in PAT image reconstruction. However, classical TV based algorithm fails to preserve the edges and texture details of the image because it is not sensitive to the direction of the image. Therefore, it is of great significance to develop a new PAT reconstruction algorithm to effectively solve the drawback of TV. In this paper, a directional total variation with adaptive directivity (DDTV) model-based PAT image reconstruction algorithm, which weightedly sums the image gradients based on the spatially varying directivity pattern of the image is proposed to overcome the shortcomings of TV. The orientation field of the image is adaptively estimated through a gradient-based approach. The image gradients are weighted at every pixel based on both its anisotropic direction and another parameter, which evaluates the estimated orientation field reliability. An efficient algorithm is derived to solve the iteration problem associated with DDTV and possessing directivity of the image adaptively updated for each iteration step. Several texture images with various directivity patterns are chosen as the phantoms for the numerical simulations. The 180-, 90- and 30-view circular scans are conducted. Results obtained show that the DDTV-based PAT reconstructed algorithm outperforms the filtered back-projection method (FBP) and TV algorithms in the quality of reconstructed images with the peak signal-to-noise rations (PSNR) exceeding those of TV and FBP by about 10 and 18 dB, respectively, for all cases. The Shepp-Logan phantom is studied with further discussion of multimode scanning, convergence speed, robustness and universality aspects. In-vitro experiments are performed for both the sparse-view circular scanning and linear scanning. The results further prove the effectiveness of the DDTV, which shows better results than that of the TV with sharper image edges and

  15. Integration of multimodality images: success and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chin-Tu

    1993-07-01

    The concept of multi-modality image integration, in which images obtained from different sensors are co-registered spatially and various aspects of object characteristics revealed by individual imaging techniques are synergistically fused in order to yield new information, has received considerable attention in recent years. The initial success was made in visualizing integrated brain images which show the overlay of physiological information from PET or SPECT with anatomical information from CT or MRI, providing new knowledge of correlates of brain function and brain structure that was difficult to access previously. Extension of this concept to cardiac and pulmonary imaging is still in its infancy. One additional difficulty in dealing with cardiac/pulmonary data sets is the issue of motion. However, some features in periodic motion may offer additional information for the purpose of spatial co-registration. In addition to visualization of the fused image data in 2-D and 3-D, future directions in the arena of image integration from multiple modalities include multi-modal image reconstruction, multi-modal image segmentation and feature extraction, and other image analysis tasks that incorporate information available from multiple sources.

  16. Hypertelescopes: The Challenge of Direct Imaging at High Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labeyrie, A.

    2013-03-01

    Sparse optical interferometric arrays of many apertures can produce direct images in the densified-pupil mode, also called "hypertelescope" mode. Pending the introduction of adaptive optics for cophasing, indirect images can also be reconstructed with speckle imaging techniques. But adaptive phasing is preferable, when a sufficiently bright guide star is available. Several wave sensing techniques, by-products of those used on monolithic telescopes for some of them, are potentially usable. For cophased direct images of very faint sources in the absence of a natural guide star, a modified form of the Laser Guide Star techniques demonstrated on conventional and segmented telescopes is described. Preliminary testing in laboratory suggests further investigation. Recorded images, assumed co-phased, are also improvable post-detection with optical aperture-synthesis techniques such as Earth rotation synthesis, where data from successive exposures are combined incoherently. Nevertheless, the gain becomes modest if hundreds of sub-apertures are used. Image deconvolution techniques are also applicable, if suitably modified as demonstrated by Aime et al. (2012), and Mary (2012). Their modified deconvolution algorithms can extend the Direct Imaging Field (also called Clean Field) of hypertelescopes. More sub-apertures at given collecting area, implying that their size is reduced, improve the direct-imaging performance. The predictable trend thus favors systems combining hundreds of sub-apertures of modest size, if workable designs can be evolved. One such design, the "Ubaye Hypertelescope" entering the initial testing phase in the southern Alps, has a fixed spherical meta-mirror with a 57 m effective aperture, expandable to 200 m. Preliminary results suggest that larger versions, whether spherical or active paraboloidal, can reach a kilometric aperture size at terrestrial sites having a suitable concave topography. In space, hypertelescope meta-apertures spanning up to 100 000

  17. Image compression with directional lifting on separated sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jieying; Wang, Nengchao

    2007-11-01

    A novel image compression scheme is presented that the directional sections are separated and transformed differently from the rest of image. The discrete directions of anisotropic pixels are calculated and then grouped to compact directional sections. One dimensional (1-D) adaptive directional lifting is continuously applied along orientations of direction sections other than applying 1-D wavelet transform alternately in two dimensions for the whole image. For the rest sections, 2-D adaptive lifting filters are applied according to pixels' positions. Our single embedded coding stream can be truncated exactly for any bit rate. Experiments have showed that large coefficients can be significantly reduced along directional sections by our transform which makes energy more compact than traditional wavelet transform. Though rate-distortion (R-D) optimization isn't exploited, the PSNR is still comparable to that of JPEG-2000 with 9/7 filters at high bit rates. And at low bit rates, the visual quality is better than that of JPEG-2000 for along directional sections both blurring and ringing artifacts can be avoided and edge preservation is good.

  18. Adaptive directional lifting-based wavelet transform for image coding.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wenpeng; Wu, Feng; Wu, Xiaolin; Li, Shipeng; Li, Houqiang

    2007-02-01

    We present a novel 2-D wavelet transform scheme of adaptive directional lifting (ADL) in image coding. Instead of alternately applying horizontal and vertical lifting, as in present practice, ADL performs lifting-based prediction in local windows in the direction of high pixel correlation. Hence, it adapts far better to the image orientation features in local windows. The ADL transform is achieved by existing 1-D wavelets and is seamlessly integrated into the global wavelet transform. The predicting and updating signals of ADL can be derived even at the fractional pixel precision level to achieve high directional resolution, while still maintaining perfect reconstruction. To enhance the ADL performance, a rate-distortion optimized directional segmentation scheme is also proposed to form and code a hierarchical image partition adapting to local features. Experimental results show that the proposed ADL-based image coding technique outperforms JPEG 2000 in both PSNR and visual quality, with the improvement up to 2.0 dB on images with rich orientation features.

  19. Direct Imaging of Electron States in Open Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, N.; Brunner, R.; Burke, A. M.; Akis, R.; Meisels, R.; Ferry, D. K.; Ochiai, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We use scanning gate microscopy to probe the ballistic motion of electrons within an open GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dot. Conductance maps are recorded by scanning a biased tip over the open quantum dot while a magnetic field is applied. We show that, for specific magnetic fields, the measured conductance images resemble the classical transmitted and backscattered trajectories and their quantum mechanical analogue. In addition, we prove experimentally, with this direct measurement technique, the existence of pointer states. The demonstrated direct imaging technique is essential for the fundamental understanding of wave function scarring and quantum decoherence theory.

  20. Direct Sub-Angstrom Imaging of a Crystal Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Nellist, Peter D.; Chisholm, Matthew F; Dellby, N.; Krivanek, O. L.; Murfitt, M. F.; Szilagyi, Z. S.; Lupini, Andrew R; Borisevich, Albina Y; Sides, Jr., William H.; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2004-01-01

    Despite the use of electrons with wavelengths of just a few picometers, spatial resolution in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) has been limited by spherical aberration to typically around 0.15 nanometer. Individual atomic columns in a crystalline lattice can therefore only be imaged for a few low-order orientations, limiting the range of defects that can be imaged at atomic resolution. The recent development of spherical aberration correctors for transmission electron microscopy allows this limit to be overcome. We present direct images from an aberration-corrected scanning TEM that resolve a lattice in which the atomic columns are separated by less than 0.1 nanometer.

  1. Direct linear algebraic deconvolution imaging of Compton telescope data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, D. D.; Buchholz, J.; O'Neill, T. J.; Tümer, O. T.; White, R. S.; Zych, A. D.; Wheaton, W. A.

    A general direct linear algebraic deconvolution method for imaging Compton gamma-ray telescope event data is described. This method gives an image of the gamma ray source distribution that is linearly related to the binned event data. Two algorithms for imposing the positivity constraint are investigated and compared; the Non-negative Least Squares method of Lawson and Hanson (1974) and the Inequality Constrained Generalized Least Squares method of Werner (1990). The latter is applied here to CGRO COMPTEL event data for Viewing Period # 1 centered on the Crab Nebula. Preliminary flux images and their statistical significant are presented.

  2. VIDA: A Direct Spectro-Imager for the VLTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardièere, Olivier; Schneider, Jean

    In order to exploit the unique full forthcoming VLTI infrastructure (4 to 8 telescopes with AO and cophasing system), we propose VIDA, a near-IR direct imaging instrument using an all-to-one beam combiner and single-mode fibers. The pupil densification technique is used to concentrate all the flux in the field accessible by the VLTI array in one observation. This optimal use of photons provides more luminous and contrasted snapshot images than the Fizeau mode. Thanks to its snapshot capabilities ant its better sensitivity, this innovative instrument should open new investigation fields for the VLTI, as faint extragalactic sources studying and hot jupiters coronagraphic imaging

  3. Dosimetry and image quality assessment in a direct radiography system

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; de Oliveira, Marcio Alves; Paixão, Lucas; Teixeira, Maria Helena Araújo; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the mean glandular dose with a solid state detector and the image quality in a direct radiography system, utilizing phantoms. Materials and Methods Irradiations were performed with automatic exposure control and polymethyl methacrylate slabs with different thicknesses to calculate glandular dose values. The image quality was evaluated by means of the structures visualized on the images of the phantoms. Results Considering the uncertainty of the measurements, the mean glandular dose results are in agreement with the values provided by the equipment and with internationally adopted reference levels. Results obtained from images of the phantoms were in agreement with the reference values. Conclusion The present study contributes to verify the equipment conformity as regards dose values and image quality. PMID:25741119

  4. An efficient feedback calibration algorithm for direct imaging radio telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, Adam P.; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Bowman, Judd D.; Morales, Miguel F.

    2017-10-01

    We present the E-field Parallel Imaging Calibration (EPICal) algorithm, which addresses the need for a fast calibration method for direct imaging radio astronomy correlators. Direct imaging involves a spatial fast Fourier transform of antenna signals, alleviating an O(Na ^2) computational bottleneck typical in radio correlators, and yielding a more gentle O(Ng log _2 Ng) scaling, where Na is the number of antennas in the array and Ng is the number of gridpoints in the imaging analysis. This can save orders of magnitude in computation cost for next generation arrays consisting of hundreds or thousands of antennas. However, because antenna signals are mixed in the imaging correlator without creating visibilities, gain correction must be applied prior to imaging, rather than on visibilities post-correlation. We develop the EPICal algorithm to form gain solutions quickly and without ever forming visibilities. This method scales as the number of antennas, and produces results comparable to those from visibilities. We use simulations to demonstrate the EPICal technique and study the noise properties of our gain solutions, showing they are similar to visibility-based solutions in realistic situations. By applying EPICal to 2 s of Long Wavelength Array data, we achieve a 65 per cent dynamic range improvement compared to uncalibrated images, showing this algorithm is a promising solution for next generation instruments.

  5. Chromatic visualization of reflectivity variance within hybridized directional OCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhijani, Vikram S.; Roorda, Austin; Bayabo, Jan Kristine; Tong, Kevin K.; Rivera-Carpio, Carlos A.; Lujan, Brandon J.

    2013-03-01

    This study presents a new method of visualizing hybridized images of retinal spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) data comprised of varied directional reflectivity. Due to the varying reflectivity of certain retinal structures relative to angle of incident light, SDOCT images obtained with differing entry positions result in nonequivalent images of corresponding cellular and extracellular structures, especially within layers containing photoreceptor components. Harnessing this property, cross-sectional pathologic and non-pathologic macular images were obtained from multiple pupil entry positions using commercially-available OCT systems, and custom segmentation, alignment, and hybridization algorithms were developed to chromatically visualize the composite variance of reflectivity effects. In these images, strong relative reflectivity from any given direction visualizes as relative intensity of its corresponding color channel. Evident in non-pathologic images was marked enhancement of Henle's fiber layer (HFL) visualization and varying reflectivity patterns of the inner limiting membrane (ILM) and photoreceptor inner/outer segment junctions (IS/OS). Pathologic images displayed similar and additional patterns. Such visualization may allow a more intuitive understanding of structural and physiologic processes in retinal pathologies.

  6. Fuel Cross Leak of Direct Di-methyl-ether Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, Yasuyuki; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Haraguchi, Tadao

    Fuel cross leak through a polymer electrolyte membrane of the direct dimethyl ether fuel cell (DDFC) was investigated and was found to be approximately one-tenth that of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Three phenomena known to appear in the DMFC were also observed in the DDFC. These were (1) fuel cross leak due to the diffusion which increases with the fuel concentration on an open circuit condition, (2) electro-osmotic cross leak, which increases with the current density and fuel concentration, and (3) decrease of fuel cross leak with the increase of the current density due to fuel consumption at low fuel concentration. The decreased fuel cross leak realized by using Nafion ®117 as a membrane and the low fuel concentration of 11% resulted in an increase of the Farady efficiency of the DDFC of up to 90% at a current density of 80mA/cm2. The CO2 quantity at the anode outlet of the operating DDFC was slightly less than 2 mol per 12 protons, as estimated from an electrochemical reaction on the anode. The CO2 quantity at the cathode outlet was also investigated. The CO2 cross leak increased with current density at every CO2 concentration and the diffusion appeared to be the dominant phenomenon of the CO2 cross leak.

  7. Retinex Image Processing: Improved Fidelity To Direct Visual Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-Ur; Woodell, Glenn A.

    1996-01-01

    Recorded color images differ from direct human viewing by the lack of dynamic range compression and color constancy. Research is summarized which develops the center/surround retinex concept originated by Edwin Land through a single scale design to a multi-scale design with color restoration (MSRCR). The MSRCR synthesizes dynamic range compression, color constancy, and color rendition and, thereby, approaches fidelity to direct observation.

  8. Direct trabecular meshwork imaging in porcine eyes through multiphoton gonioscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masihzadeh, Omid; Ammar, David A.; Kahook, Malik Y.; Gibson, Emily A.; Lei, Tim C.

    2013-03-01

    The development of technologies to characterize the ocular aqueous outflow system (AOS) is important for the understanding of the pathophysiology of glaucoma. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) offers the advantage of high-resolution, label-free imaging with intrinsic image contrast because the emitted signals result from the specific biomolecular content of the tissue. Previous attempts to use MPM to image the murine irido-corneal region directly through the sclera have suffered from degradation in image resolution due to scattering of the focused laser light. As a result, transscleral MPM has limited ability to observe fine structures in the AOS. In this work, the porcine irido-corneal angle was successfully imaged through the transparent cornea using a gonioscopic lens to circumvent the highly scattering scleral tissue. The resulting high-resolution images allowed the detailed structures in the trabecular meshwork (TM) to be observed. Multimodal imaging by two-photon autofluorescence and second harmonic generation allowed visualization of different features in the TM without labels and without disruption of the TM or surrounding tissues. MPM gonioscopy is a promising noninvasive imaging tool for high-resolution studies of the AOS, and research continues to explore the potential for future clinical applications in humans.

  9. Blind Source Separation Algorithms for PSF Subtraction from Direct Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Jacob; Ranganathan, Nikhil; Savransky, Dmitry; Ruffio, Jean-Baptise; Macintosh, Bruce; GPIES Team

    2017-01-01

    The principal difficulty with detecting planets via direct imaging is that the target signal is similar in magnitude, or fainter, than the noise sources in the image. To compensate for this, several methods exist to subtract the PSF of the host star and other confounding noise sources. One of the most effective methods is Karhunen-Loève Image Processing (KLIP). The core algorithm within KLIP is Principal Component Analysis, which is a member of a class of algorithms called Blind Source Separation (BSS).We examine three other BSS algorithms that may potentially also be used for PSF subtraction: Independent Component Analysis, Stationary Subspace Analysis, and Common Spatial Pattern Filtering. The underlying principles of each of the algorithms is discussed, as well as the processing steps needed to achieve PSF subtraction. The algorithms are examined both as primary PSF subtraction techniques, as well as additional postprocessing steps used with KLIP.These algorithms have been used on data from the Gemini Planet Imager, analyzing images of β Pic b. To build a reference library, both Angular Differential Imaging and Spectral Differential Imaging were used. To compare to KLIP, three major metrics are examined: computation time, signal-to-noise ratio, and astrometric and photometric biases in different image regimes (e.g., speckle-dominated compared to Poisson-noise dominated). Preliminary results indicate that these BSS algorithms improve performance when used as an enhancement for KLIP, and that they can achieve similar SNR when used as the primary method of PSF subtraction.

  10. Direct laser additive fabrication system with image feedback control

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, Michelle L.; Hofmeister, William H.; Knorovsky, Gerald A.; MacCallum, Danny O.; Schlienger, M. Eric; Smugeresky, John E.

    2002-01-01

    A closed-loop, feedback-controlled direct laser fabrication system is disclosed. The feedback refers to the actual growth conditions obtained by real-time analysis of thermal radiation images. The resulting system can fabricate components with severalfold improvement in dimensional tolerances and surface finish.

  11. Method to directly radiolabel antibodies for diagnostic imaging and therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, M.L.

    1991-04-30

    This patent describes a method for directly labeling proteins with radionuclides for use in diagnostic imaging and therapy. It comprises: the steps of incubating a protein-containing solution with a solution of sodium ascorbate; adding a required quantity of reduced radionuclide to the incubated protein-containing solution and incubating.

  12. DIRECT IMAGING CONSTRAINTS ON THE PUTATIVE EXOPLANET 14 Her C

    SciTech Connect

    Rodigas, Timothy J.; Males, Jared R.; Hinz, Philip M.; Knox, Russell P.; Mamajek, Eric E.

    2011-05-01

    We present results of deep direct imaging of the radial velocity (RV) planet-host star 14 Her (=GJ 614, HD 145675), obtained in the L' band with the Clio-2 camera and the MMT adaptive optics system. This star has one confirmed planet and an unconfirmed outer companion, suggested by residuals in the RV data. The orbital parameters of the unconfirmed object are not well constrained since many mass/semimajor axis configurations can fit the available data. The star has been directly imaged several times, but none of the campaigns has ruled out sub-stellar companions. With {approx}2.5 hr of integration, we rule out at 5{sigma} confidence {approx}>18 M{sub J} companions beyond {approx}25 AU, based on the Baraffe et al. COND mass-luminosity models. Combining our detection limits with fits to the RV data and analytic dynamical analysis, we constrain the orbital parameters of 14 Her c to be 3 {approx}< m/M{sub J} {approx}<42, 7 {approx}< a/AU {approx}<25, and e {approx}< 0.5. A wealth of information can be obtained from RV/direct imaging overlap, especially with deep imaging as this work shows. The collaboration between RV and direct imaging will become more important in the coming years as the phase space probed by each technique converges. Future studies involving RV/imaging overlap should be sure to consider the effects of a potential planet's projected separation, as quoting limits assuming face-on orientation will be misleading.

  13. Data Images and Other Graphical Displays for Directional Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morphet, Bill; Symanzik, Juergen

    2005-01-01

    Vectors, axes, and periodic phenomena have direction. Directional variation can be expressed as points on a unit circle and is the subject of circular statistics, a relatively new application of statistics. An overview of existing methods for the display of directional data is given. The data image for linear variables is reviewed, then extended to directional variables by displaying direction using a color scale composed of a sequence of four or more color gradients with continuity between sequences and ordered intuitively in a color wheel such that the color of the 0deg angle is the same as the color of the 360deg angle. Cross over, which arose in automating the summarization of historical wind data, and color discontinuity resulting from the use a single color gradient in computational fluid dynamics visualization are eliminated. The new method provides for simultaneous resolution of detail on a small scale and overall structure on a large scale. Example circular data images are given of a global view of average wind direction of El Nino periods, computed rocket motor internal combustion flow, a global view of direction of the horizontal component of earth's main magnetic field on 9/15/2004, and Space Shuttle solid rocket motor nozzle vectoring.

  14. Direct Images, Fields of Hilbert Spaces, and Geometric Quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempert, László; Szőke, Róbert

    2014-04-01

    Geometric quantization often produces not one Hilbert space to represent the quantum states of a classical system but a whole family H s of Hilbert spaces, and the question arises if the spaces H s are canonically isomorphic. Axelrod et al. (J. Diff. Geo. 33:787-902, 1991) and Hitchin (Commun. Math. Phys. 131:347-380, 1990) suggest viewing H s as fibers of a Hilbert bundle H, introduce a connection on H, and use parallel transport to identify different fibers. Here we explore to what extent this can be done. First we introduce the notion of smooth and analytic fields of Hilbert spaces, and prove that if an analytic field over a simply connected base is flat, then it corresponds to a Hermitian Hilbert bundle with a flat connection and path independent parallel transport. Second we address a general direct image problem in complex geometry: pushing forward a Hermitian holomorphic vector bundle along a non-proper map . We give criteria for the direct image to be a smooth field of Hilbert spaces. Third we consider quantizing an analytic Riemannian manifold M by endowing TM with the family of adapted Kähler structures from Lempert and Szőke (Bull. Lond. Math. Soc. 44:367-374, 2012). This leads to a direct image problem. When M is homogeneous, we prove the direct image is an analytic field of Hilbert spaces. For certain such M—but not all—the direct image is even flat; which means that in those cases quantization is unique.

  15. Subband directional vector quantization in radiological image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akrout, Nabil M.; Diab, Chaouki; Prost, Remy; Goutte, Robert; Amiel, Michel

    1992-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a new scheme for image compression. The method is very efficient for images which have directional edges such as the tree-like structure of the coronary vessels in digital angiograms. This method involves two steps. First, the original image is decomposed at different resolution levels using a pyramidal subband decomposition scheme. For decomposition/reconstruction of the image, free of aliasing and boundary errors, we use an ideal band-pass filter bank implemented in the Discrete Cosine Transform domain (DCT). Second, the high-frequency subbands are vector quantized using a multiresolution codebook with vertical and horizontal codewords which take into account the edge orientation of each subband. The proposed method reduces the blocking effect encountered at low bit rates in conventional vector quantization.

  16. Imaging diagnosis of dural and direct cavernous carotid fistulae*

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Daniela; Monsignore, Lucas Moretti; Nakiri, Guilherme Seizem; Cruz, Antonio Augusto Velasco e; Colli, Benedicto Oscar; Abud, Daniel Giansante

    2014-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae of the cavernous sinus are rare and difficult to diagnose. They are classified into dural cavernous sinus fistulae or direct carotid-cavernous fistulae. Despite the similarity of symptoms between both types, a precise diagnosis is essential since the treatment is specific for each type of fistula. Imaging findings are remarkably similar in both dural cavernous sinus fistulae and carotid-cavernous fistulae, but it is possible to differentiate one type from the other. Amongst the available imaging methods (Doppler ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and digital subtraction angiography), angiography is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of cavernous sinus arteriovenous fistulae. The present essay is aimed at didactically presenting the classification and imaging findings of cavernous sinus arteriovenous fistulae. PMID:25741093

  17. Direct imaging of multiple planets orbiting the star HR 8799.

    PubMed

    Marois, Christian; Macintosh, Bruce; Barman, Travis; Zuckerman, B; Song, Inseok; Patience, Jennifer; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René

    2008-11-28

    Direct imaging of exoplanetary systems is a powerful technique that can reveal Jupiter-like planets in wide orbits, can enable detailed characterization of planetary atmospheres, and is a key step toward imaging Earth-like planets. Imaging detections are challenging because of the combined effect of small angular separation and large luminosity contrast between a planet and its host star. High-contrast observations with the Keck and Gemini telescopes have revealed three planets orbiting the star HR 8799, with projected separations of 24, 38, and 68 astronomical units. Multi-epoch data show counter clockwise orbital motion for all three imaged planets. The low luminosity of the companions and the estimated age of the system imply planetary masses between 5 and 13 times that of Jupiter. This system resembles a scaled-up version of the outer portion of our solar system.

  18. Direct imaging of multiple planets orbiting the star HR 8799

    SciTech Connect

    Marois, C; Macintosh, B; Barman, T; Zuckerman, B; Song, I; Patience, J; Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R

    2008-10-14

    Direct imaging of exoplanetary systems is a powerful technique that can reveal Jupiter-like planets in wide orbits, can enable detailed characterization of planetary atmospheres, and is a key step towards imaging Earth-like planets. Imaging detections are challenging due to the combined effect of small angular separation and large luminosity contrast between a planet and its host star. High-contrast observations with the Keck and Gemini telescopes have revealed three planets orbiting the star HR 8799, with projected separations of 24, 38, and 68 astronomical units. Multi-epoch data show counter-clockwise orbital motion for all three imaged planets. The low luminosity of the companions and the estimated age of the system imply planetary masses between 5 and 13 times that of Jupiter. This system resembles a scaled-up version of the outer portion of our Solar System.

  19. Complex direct comb spectroscopy with a virtually imaged phased array.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Sarah K; Anstie, James D; Hébert, Nicolas Bourbeau; White, Richard T; Genest, Jérôme; Luiten, Andre N

    2016-03-15

    We demonstrate a simple interferometric technique to directly measure the complex optical transmittance over a large spectral range using a frequency-comb spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array. A Michelson interferometer encodes the phase deviations induced by a sample contained in one of its arms into an interferogram image. When combined with an additional image taken from each arm separately, along with a frequency-calibration image, this allows full reconstruction of the sample's optical transfer function. We demonstrate the technique with a vapor cell containing H13C14N, producing transmittance and phase spectra spanning 2.9 THz (∼23  nm) with ∼1 GHz resolution.

  20. Assessing positive body image: Contemporary approaches and future directions.

    PubMed

    Webb, Jennifer B; Wood-Barcalow, Nichole L; Tylka, Tracy L

    2015-06-01

    Empirical and clinical interest in positive body image has burgeoned in recent years. This focused attention is generating various measures and methods for researchers and psychotherapists to assess an array of positive body image constructs in populations of interest. No resource to date has integrated the available measures and methods for easy accessibility and comparison. Therefore, this article reviews contemporary scales for the following positive body image constructs: body appreciation, positive rational acceptance, body image flexibility, body functionality, attunement (body responsiveness, mindful self-care), positive/self-accepting body talk, body pride, body sanctification, broad conceptualization of beauty, and self-perceived body acceptance by others. Guidelines for the qualitative assessment of positive body image and recommendations for integrating positive body image assessment within psychotherapy and applied research settings are also offered. The article concludes with articulating broad future directions for positive body image assessment, including ideas for expanding its available measures, methods, and dynamic expressions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Statistical length measurement method by direct imaging of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bengio, E Amram; Tsentalovich, Dmitri E; Behabtu, Natnael; Kleinerman, Olga; Kesselman, Ellina; Schmidt, Judith; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Pasquali, Matteo

    2014-05-14

    The influence of carbon nanotube (CNT) length on their macroscopic properties requires an accurate methodology for CNT length measurement. So far, existing techniques are limited to short (less than a few micrometers) CNTs and sample preparation methods that bias the measured values. Here, we show that the average length of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be measured by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) of CNTs in chlorosulfonic acid. The method consists of dissolving at low concentration CNTs in chlorosulfonic acid (a true solvent), imaging the individual CNTs by cryo-TEM, and processing and analyzing the images to determine CNT length. By measuring the total CNT contour length and number of CNT ends in each image, and by applying statistical analysis, we extend the method to cases where each CNT is long enough to span many cryo-TEM images, making the direct length measurement of an entire CNT impractical. Hence, this new technique can be used effectively to estimate samples in a wide range of CNT lengths, although we find that cryo-TEM imaging may bias the measurement towards longer CNTs, which are easier to detect. Our statistical method is also applied to AFM images of CNTs to show that, by using only a few AFM images, it yields estimates that are consistent with literature techniques, based on individually measuring a higher number of CNTs.

  2. Laser direct imaging of the printed electrical circuits on PCB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbucha, R.; Kocik, M.; Mizeraczyk, J.; Kozioł, G.; Borecki, J.

    2005-09-01

    The increasing demands for miniaturization and better functionality of electronic components and devices have a significant effect on the requirements facing the Printed Circuit Board (PCB) industry. PCB manufactures are driving for producing high density interconnect (HDI) boards at significantly reduced cost and reduced implementation time. The interconnection complexity of the PCB is still growing and today calls for 50/50 μm or 25/25 μm technology are real. Imaging of HDI boards poses a rapid increasing challenge on PCB manufactures due to line width and space getting smaller and mainly to tighter registration requirements. Existing technologies are unable to offer the acceptable solution. Nowadays the Laser Direct Imaging (LDI) technology is considered as an answer for these challenges. LDI is a process of imaging circuitry pattern directly on the PCB without the use of a phototool. The exposure of the photo-sensitive resist is carried out using a laser beam that is scanned across photoresist surface and switched on and off by means of a computer control system according to the electrical circuit pattern. Usually the laser used in the LDI generates the UV line, which is suitable for the commonly available photoresists. In this paper we present an introduction to LDI technology as well as an experiment consisted in an attempt to use a UV Nd:YAG laser (λ=355 nm) for direct imaging of conductive pattern on the PCB covered by photosensitive resist.

  3. SEEDS -- Direct Imaging Survey for Exoplanets and Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helminiak, K. G.; Kuzuhara, M.; Kudo, T.; Tamura, M.; Usuda, T.; Hashimoto, J.; Matsuo, T.; McElwain, M. W.; Momose, M.; Tsukagoshi, T.

    2015-01-01

    Exoplanets on wide orbits (r ≳ 10 AU) can be revealed by high-contrast direct imaging, which is efficient for their detailed detections and characterizations compared with indirect techniques. The SEEDS campaign, using the 8.2-m Subaru Telescope , is one of the most extensive campaigns to search for wide-orbit exoplanets via direct imaging. Since 2009 to date, the campaign has surveyed exoplanets around stellar targets selected from the solar neighborhood, moving groups, open clusters, and star-forming regions. It also surveys exoplanets in planetary systems with debris disks . The survey is designed to perform observations of ˜500 stars, covering the age range of 1 Myr to a few Gyr. As a result of the observations performed so far, SEEDS has detected new sub-stellar companions , including planets with properties that are unique compared with the previously directly imaged exoplanets. High-contrast imaging by SEEDS has also provided better characterizations of exoplanet systems identified by indirect techniques.

  4. The RNA binding protein CsrA controls cyclic di-GMP metabolism by directly regulating the expression of GGDEF proteins.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Kristina; Edwards, Adrianne N; Simm, Roger; Romeo, Tony; Römling, Ute; Melefors, Ojar

    2008-10-01

    The carbon storage regulator CsrA is an RNA binding protein that controls carbon metabolism, biofilm formation and motility in various eubacteria. Nevertheless, in Escherichia coli only five target mRNAs have been shown to be directly regulated by CsrA at the post-transcriptional level. Here we identified two new direct targets for CsrA, ycdT and ydeH, both of which encode proteins with GGDEF domains. A csrA mutation caused mRNA levels of ycdT and ydeH to increase more than 10-fold. RNA mobility shift assays confirmed the direct and specific binding of CsrA to the mRNA leaders of ydeH and ycdT. Overexpression of ycdT and ydeH resulted in a more than 20-fold increase in the cellular concentration of the second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP), implying that both proteins possess diguanylate cyclase activity. Phenotypic characterization revealed that both proteins are involved in the regulation of motility in a c-di-GMP-dependent manner. CsrA was also found to regulate the expression of five additional GGDEF/EAL proteins and a csrA mutation led to modestly increased cellular levels of c-di-GMP. All together, these data demonstrate a global role for CsrA in the regulation of c-di-GMP metabolism by regulating the expression of GGDEF proteins at the post-transcriptional level.

  5. Image analysis software versus direct anthropometry for breast measurements.

    PubMed

    Quieregatto, Paulo Rogério; Hochman, Bernardo; Furtado, Fabianne; Machado, Aline Fernanda Perez; Sabino Neto, Miguel; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2014-10-01

    To compare breast measurements performed using the software packages ImageTool(r), AutoCAD(r) and Adobe Photoshop(r) with direct anthropometric measurements. Points were marked on the breasts and arms of 40 volunteer women aged between 18 and 60 years. When connecting the points, seven linear segments and one angular measurement on each half of the body, and one medial segment common to both body halves were defined. The volunteers were photographed in a standardized manner. Photogrammetric measurements were performed by three independent observers using the three software packages and compared to direct anthropometric measurements made with calipers and a protractor. Measurements obtained with AutoCAD(r) were the most reproducible and those made with ImageTool(r) were the most similar to direct anthropometry, while measurements with Adobe Photoshop(r) showed the largest differences. Except for angular measurements, significant differences were found between measurements of line segments made using the three software packages and those obtained by direct anthropometry. AutoCAD(r) provided the highest precision and intermediate accuracy; ImageTool(r) had the highest accuracy and lowest precision; and Adobe Photoshop(r) showed intermediate precision and the worst accuracy among the three software packages.

  6. Mapping individual cosmid DNAs by direct AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Allison, D P; Kerper, P S; Doktycz, M J; Thundat, T; Modrich, P; Larimer, F W; Johnson, D K; Hoyt, P R; Mucenski, M L; Warmack, R J

    1997-05-01

    Individual cosmid clones have been restriction mapped by directly imaging, with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a mutant EcoRI endonuclease site-specifically bound to DNA. Images and data are presented that locate six restriction sites, predicted from gel electrophoresis, on a 35-kb cosmid isolated from mouse chromosome 7. Measured distances between endonuclease molecules bound to lambda DNA, when compared to known values, demonstrate the accuracy of AFM mapping to better than 1%. These results may be extended to identify other important site-specific protein-DNA interactions, such as transcription factor and mismatch repair enzyme binding, difficult to resolve by current techniques.

  7. ON THE DIRECT IMAGING OF TIDALLY HEATED EXOMOONS

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Mary Anne; Turner, Edwin L.

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate the ability of existing and planned telescopes, on the ground and in space, to directly image tidally heated exomoons orbiting gas-giant exoplanets. Tidally heated exomoons can plausibly be far more luminous than their host exoplanet and as much as 0.1% as bright as the system's stellar primary if it is a low mass star. Because emission from exomoons can be powered by tidal forces, they can shine brightly at arbitrarily large separations from the system's stellar primary with temperatures of several hundreds degrees Kelvin or even higher in extreme cases. Furthermore, these high temperatures can occur in systems that are billions of years old. Tidally heated exomoons may thus be far easier targets for direct imaging studies than giant exoplanets which must be both young and at a large projected separation (typically at least tens of AU) from their primary to be accessible to current generation direct imaging studies. For example, the (warm) Spitzer Space Telescope and the next generation of ground based instruments could detect an exomoon roughly the size of the Earth at a temperature Almost-Equal-To 600 K and a distance Almost-Equal-To 5 pc in the K, L, and M bands at the 5{sigma} confidence level with a one hour exposure; in more favorable but still plausible cases, detection at distances of tens of parsecs is feasible. Future mid-infrared space telescopes, such as James Webb Space Telescope and SPICA, will be capable of directly imaging tidally heated exomoons around the nearest two dozen stars with a brightness temperature {>=}300 K and R {>=} 1 R{sub Circled-Plus} orbiting at {>=}12 AU from the primary star at a 5{sigma} confidence level in a 10{sup 4} s integration. In addition it is possible that some of the exoplanets which have already been directly imaged are actually tidally heated exomoons or blends of such objects with hot young planets. If such exomoons exist and are sufficiently common (i.e., nearby), it may well be far easier to

  8. A novel approach to image neural activity directly by MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manbir; Sungkarat, Witaya

    2005-04-01

    Though an approach to image the electrical activity of neurons directly by detecting phase shifts in MRI was first reported in 1991, results to-date remain equivocal due to the low signal-to-noise ratio. The objective of this work was to develop a stimulus-presentation and data acquisition strategy specially geared to detect phase-dispersion effects of neuronal currents within 10-100 ms following stimulation. The key feature is to set the repeated MR data acquisition time TR and the stimulus presentation interval (TI) slightly different from each other so that the time at which images are acquired shifts gradually from one acquisition to the next with respect to stimulus onset. For example, at TR=275ms and 4 Hz stimulus presentation (TI=250ms), initial synchronization of the stimulus onset and MR acquisition would result in the first image being acquired at a latency of 0+/- (temporal width of data acquisition window), second image at a latency of 25ms, third image at a latency of 50ms and so on up to a latency of 250ms, at which time the stimulus and data acquisition times would become re-synchronized to once again acquire an image at latency=0. Human data were acquired on a 1.5T GE EXCITE scanner from two 8mm thick contiguous slices bracketing the calcarine fissure during a checkerboard flashing at 4 Hz. Preliminary results show activity in the visual cortex at latencies consistent with EEG studies, suggesting the potential of this methodology to image neural activity directly.

  9. Diffusion-direction-dependent imaging: a novel MRI approach for peripheral nerve imaging.

    PubMed

    Skorpil, Mikael; Engström, Mathias; Nordell, Anders

    2007-04-01

    A novel magnetic resonance imaging approach, called diffusion-direction-dependent imaging (DDI), is introduced. Due to inherent anisotropic diffusion properties, peripheral nerves can be visualized on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The largest signal attenuation on DTI correlates with the direction of a nerve fiber, and the least signal attenuation correlates with the direction perpendicular to the nerve fiber. Since low signal-to-noise ratio is a concern in peripheral nerve DTI, we explored a new approach focusing on the perpendicular diffusion direction. A 36-gradient diffusion direction scheme was used. A mean expected curve specific for peripheral nerves was calculated based on the sciatic nerve and its division into the common peroneal nerve and the tibial nerve in three healthy volunteers. By a simple postprocessing method, a comparison of the mean expected curve and the measured curve was made voxel by voxel, and the sciatic nerve and its division were reconstructed, excluding other tissues. More studies are needed to investigate whether other postprocessing methods or other diffusion direction schemes are more suited for peripheral nerve imaging with DDI. Further studies may also be of interest to investigate whether DDI can be a complementary method to conventional T(1)-weighted and T(2)-weighted sequences in the imaging of peripheral nerve pathology or even in the visualization of other tissues, possibly with different diffusion direction schemes.

  10. Direct Imaging of Laser-driven Ultrafast Molecular Rotation.

    PubMed

    Mizuse, Kenta; Fujimoto, Romu; Mizutani, Nobuo; Ohshima, Yasuhiro

    2017-02-04

    We present a method for visualizing laser-induced, ultrafast molecular rotational wave packet dynamics. We have developed a new 2-dimensional Coulomb explosion imaging setup in which a hitherto-impractical camera angle is realized. In our imaging technique, diatomic molecules are irradiated with a circularly polarized strong laser pulse. The ejected atomic ions are accelerated perpendicularly to the laser propagation. The ions lying in the laser polarization plane are selected through the use of a mechanical slit and imaged with a high-throughput, 2-dimensional detector installed parallel to the polarization plane. Because a circularly polarized (isotropic) Coulomb exploding pulse is used, the observed angular distribution of the ejected ions directly corresponds to the squared rotational wave function at the time of the pulse irradiation. To create a real-time movie of molecular rotation, the present imaging technique is combined with a femtosecond pump-probe optical setup in which the pump pulses create unidirectionally rotating molecular ensembles. Due to the high image throughput of our detection system, the pump-probe experimental condition can be easily optimized by monitoring a real-time snapshot. As a result, the quality of the observed movie is sufficiently high for visualizing the detailed wave nature of motion. We also note that the present technique can be implemented in existing standard ion imaging setups, offering a new camera angle or viewpoint for the molecular systems without the need for extensive modification.

  11. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Nirupama; Needles, Andrew; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2011-01-01

    Targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound (molecular ultrasound) is an emerging imaging strategy that combines ultrasound technology with novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents for assessing biological processes at the molecular level. Molecular ultrasound contrast agents are nano- or micro-sized particles that are targeted to specific molecular markers by adding high-affinity binding ligands onto the surface of the particles. Following intravenous administration, these targeted ultrasound contrast agents accumulate at tissue sites overexpressing specific molecular markers, thereby enhancing the ultrasound imaging signal. High spatial and temporal resolution, real-time imaging, non-invasiveness, relatively low costs, lack of ionizing irradiation and wide availability of ultrasound systems are advantages compared to other molecular imaging modalities. In this article we review current concepts and future directions of molecular ultrasound imaging, including different classes of molecular ultrasound contrast agents, ongoing technical developments of preclinical and clinical ultrasound systems , the potential of molecular ultrasound for imaging different diseases at the molecular level, and the translation of molecular ultrasound into the clinic. PMID:20541656

  12. Molecular ultrasound imaging: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, N; Needles, A; Willmann, J K

    2010-07-01

    Targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound (molecular ultrasound) is an emerging imaging strategy that combines ultrasound technology with novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents for assessing biological processes at the molecular level. Molecular ultrasound contrast agents are nano- or micro-sized particles that are targeted to specific molecular markers by adding high-affinity binding ligands onto the surface of the particles. Following intravenous administration, these targeted ultrasound contrast agents accumulate at tissue sites overexpressing specific molecular markers, thereby enhancing the ultrasound imaging signal. High spatial and temporal resolution, real-time imaging, non-invasiveness, relatively low costs, lack of ionising irradiation and wide availability of ultrasound systems are advantages compared to other molecular imaging modalities. In this article we review current concepts and future directions of molecular ultrasound imaging, including different classes of molecular ultrasound contrast agents, ongoing technical developments of pre-clinical and clinical ultrasound systems, the potential of molecular ultrasound for imaging different diseases at the molecular level, and the translation of molecular ultrasound into the clinic. Copyright 2010 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Image denoising using a directional adaptive diffusion filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Cuifang; Shi, Caicheng; He, Peikun

    2006-11-01

    Partial differential equations (PDEs) are well-known due to their good processing results which it can not only smooth the noise but also preserve the edges. But the shortcomings of these processes came to being noticed by people. In some sense, PDE filter is called "cartoon model" as it produces an approximation of the input image, use the same diffusion model and parameters to process noise and signal because it can not differentiate them, therefore, the image is naturally modified toward piecewise constant functions. A new method called a directional adaptive diffusion filter is proposed in the paper, which combines PDE mode with wavelet transform. The undecimated discrete wavelet transform (UDWT) is carried out to get different frequency bands which have obviously directional selectivity and more redundancy details. Experimental results show that the proposed method provides a performance better to preserve textures, small details and global information.

  14. Performance analysis of an inexpensive Direct Imaging Transmission Ion Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Patrick; Pallone, Arthur

    2013-03-01

    A direct imaging transmission ion microscope (DITIM) is built from a modified webcam and a commercially available polonium-210 antistatic device mounted on an optics rail. The performance of the DITIM in radiographic mode is analyzed in terms of the line spread function (LSF) and modulation transfer function (MTF) for an opaque edge. Limitations of, potential uses for, and suggested improvements to the DITIM are also discussed. Faculty sponsor

  15. RESOLVING THE DELTA ANDROMEDAE SPECTROSCOPIC BINARY WITH DIRECT IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Bottom, Michael; Mawet, Dimitri; Kuhn, Jonas; Mennesson, Bertrand; Shelton, Jean C.; Wallace, J. Kent; Serabyn, Eugene

    2015-08-10

    We present a direct image of the innermost companion to the red giant δ Andromedae using the Stellar Double Coronagraph at the Palomar Observatory. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo based algorithm to simultaneously reduce the data and perform astrometry and photometry of the companion. We determine that the companion is most likely a main sequence K-type star and is certainly not the previously hypothesized white dwarf.

  16. Fluorescence coupling for direct imaging of electrocatalytic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Guerrette, Joshua P; Percival, Stephen J; Zhang, Bo

    2013-01-16

    Here we report the use of fluorescence microscopy and closed bipolar electrodes to reveal electrochemical and electrocatalytic activity on large electrochemical arrays. We demonstrate fluorescence-enabled electrochemical microscopy (FEEM) as a new electrochemical approach for imaging transient and heterogeneous electrochemical processes. This method uses a bipolar electrode mechanism to directly couple a conventional oxidation reaction, e.g., the oxidation of ferrocene, to a special fluorogenic reduction reaction. The generation of the fluorescent product on the cathodic pole enables one to directly monitor an electrochemical process with optical microscopy. We demonstrate the use of this method on a large electrochemical array containing thousands or more parallel bipolar microelectrodes to enable spatially and temporally resolved electrochemical imaging. We first image molecular transport of a redox analyte in solution using an array containing roughly 1000 carbon fiber ultramicroelectrodes. We then carry out a simple electrocatalysis experiment to show how FEEM can be used for electrocatalyst screening. This new method could prove useful for imaging transient electrochemical events, such as fast exocytosis events on single and networks of neurons, and for parallel, high-throughput screening of new electrocatalysts.

  17. Direct and transgenerational effects of low doses of perinatal di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) on social behaviors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Rodney W.; Sumner, Susan S.; Rissman, Emilie F.

    2017-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is an endocrine disrupting chemical commonly used as a plasticizer in medical equipment, food packaging, flooring, and children’s toys. DEHP exposure during early development has been associated with adverse neurobehavioral outcomes in children. In animal models, early exposure to DEHP results in abnormal development of the reproductive system as well as altered behavior and neurodevelopment. Based on these data, we hypothesized that developmental exposure to DEHP would decrease social interactions and increase anxiety-like behaviors in mice in a dose-dependent manner, and that the effects would persist over generations. C57BL/6J mice consumed one of three DEHP doses (0, 5, 40, and 400 μg/kg body weight) throughout pregnancy and during the first ten days of lactation. The two higher doses yielded detectable levels of DEHP metabolites in serum. Pairs of mice from control, low, and high DEHP doses were bred to create three dose lineages in the third generation (F3). Average anogenital index (AGI: anogenital distance/body weight) was decreased in F1 males exposed to the low dose of DEHP and in F1 females exposed to the highest dose. In F1 mice, juvenile pairs from the two highest DEHP dose groups displayed fewer socially investigative behaviors and more exploratory behaviors as compared with control mice. The effect of DEHP on these behaviors was reversed in F3 mice as compared with F1 mice. F1 mice exposed to low and medium DEHP doses spent more time in the closed arms of the elevated plus maze than controls, indicating increased anxiety-like behavior. The generation-dependent effects on behavior and AGI suggest complex mechanisms by which DEHP directly impacts reproductive and neurobehavioral development and influences germline-inherited traits. PMID:28199414

  18. Imaging of Temporomandibular Joint: Approach by Direct Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Bruschetta, Daniele; Vaccarino, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to conduct a morphological analysis of the temporomandibular joint, a highly specialized synovial joint that permits movement and function of the mandible. Materials and Methods: We have studied the temporom-andibular joint anatomy, directly on the living, from 3D images obtained by medical imaging Computed Tomography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance acquisition, and subsequent re-engineering techniques 3D Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering. Data were analysed with the goal of being able to isolate, identify and distinguish the anatomical structures of the joint, and get the largest possible number of information utilizing software for post-processing work. Results: It was possible to reproduce anatomy of the skeletal structures, as well as through acquisitions of Magnetic Resonance Imaging; it was also possible to visualize the vascular, muscular, ligamentous and tendinous components of the articular complex, and also the capsule and the fibrous cartilaginous disc. We managed the Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering, not only to obtain three-dimensional images for colour and for resolution comparable to the usual anatomical preparations, but also a considerable number of anatomical, minuter details, zooming, rotating and cutting the same images with linking, graduating the colour, transparency and opacity from time to time. Conclusion: These results are encouraging to stimulate further studies in other anatomical districts. PMID:25664280

  19. Two-direction nonlocal model for image denoising.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuande; Feng, Xiangchu; Wang, Weiwei

    2013-01-01

    Similarities inherent in natural images have been widely exploited for image denoising and other applications. In fact, if a cluster of similar image patches is rearranged into a matrix, similarities exist both between columns and rows. Using the similarities, we present a two-directional nonlocal (TDNL) variational model for image denoising. The solution of our model consists of three components: one component is a scaled version of the original observed image and the other two components are obtained by utilizing the similarities. Specifically, by using the similarity between columns, we get a nonlocal-means-like estimation of the patch with consideration to all similar patches, while the weights are not the pairwise similarities but a set of clusterwise coefficients. Moreover, by using the similarity between rows, we also get nonlocal-autoregression-like estimations for the center pixels of the similar patches. The TDNL model leads to an alternative minimization algorithm. Experiments indicate that the model can perform on par with or better than the state-of-the-art denoising methods.

  20. Susceptibility-weighted imaging: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Saifeng; Buch, Sagar; Chen, Yongsheng; Choi, Hyun-Seok; Dai, Yongming; Habib, Charbel; Hu, Jiani; Jung, Joon-Yong; Luo, Yu; Utriainen, David; Wang, Meiyun; Wu, Dongmei; Xia, Shuang; Haacke, E Mark

    2017-04-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a method that uses the intrinsic nature of local magnetic fields to enhance image contrast in order to improve the visibility of various susceptibility sources and to facilitate diagnostic interpretation. It is also the precursor to the concept of the use of phase for quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM). Nowadays, SWI has become a widely used clinical tool to image deoxyhemoglobin in veins, iron deposition in the brain, hemorrhages, microbleeds and calcification. In this article, we review the basics of SWI, including data acquisition, data reconstruction and post-processing. In particular, the source of cusp artifacts in phase images is investigated in detail and an improved multi-channel phase data combination algorithm is provided. In addition, we show a few clinical applications of SWI for the imaging of stroke, traumatic brain injury, carotid vessel wall, siderotic nodules in cirrhotic liver, prostate cancer, prostatic calcification, spinal cord injury and intervertebral disc degeneration. As the clinical applications of SWI continue to expand both in and outside the brain, the improvement of SWI in conjunction with QSM is an important future direction of this technology. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Beyond Kepler: Direct Imaging of Earth-like Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belikov, Ruslan

    2012-01-01

    Is there another Earth out there? Is there life on it? People have been asking these questions for over two thousand years, and we finally stand on the verge of answering them. The Kepler space telescope is NASA's first mission designed to study Earthlike exoplanets (exo-Earths), and it will soon tell us how often exo-Earths occur in the habitable zones of their stars. The next natural step after Kepler is spectroscopic characterization of exo-Earths, which would tell us whether they possess an atmosphere, oxygen, liquid water, as well as other biomarkers. In order to do this, directly imaging an exo-Earth may be necessary (at least for Sun-like stars). Directly imaging an exo-Earth is challenging and likely requires a flagship-size optical space telescope with an unprecedented imaging system capable of achieving contrasts of 1(exp 10) very close to the diffraction limit. Several coronagraphs and external occulters have been proposed to meet this challenge and are in development. After first overviewing the history and current state of the field, my talk will focus on the work proceeding at the Ames Coronagraph Experiment (ACE) at the NASA Ames Research Center, where we are developing the Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph in a collaboration with JPL. PIAA is a powerful technique with demonstrated aggressive performance that defines the state of the art at small inner working angles. At ACE, we have achieved contrasts of 2(exp -8) with an inner working angle of 2 lambda/D and 1(exp -6) at 1.4 lambda/D. On the path to exo-Earth imaging, we are also pursuing a smaller telescope concept called EXCEDE (EXoplanetary Circumstellar Environments and Disk Explorer), which was recently selected for technology development (Category III) by NASA's Explorer program. EXCEDE will do fundamental science on debris disks as well as serve as a technological and scientific pathfinder for an exo-Earth imaging mission.

  2. Solid ionic matrixes for direct tissue analysis and MALDI imaging.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, R; Tabet, J C; Ducoroy, P; Hendra, J B; Salzet, M; Fournier, I

    2006-02-01

    Direct analysis of tissue by MALDI-MS allows the acquisition of its biomolecular profile while maintaining the integrity of the tissue, giving cellular localization, and avoiding tedious extraction and purification steps. However, direct tissue analysis generally leads to some extent to a lowered spectral quality due to variation in thickness, freezing tissue date, and nature of the tissue. We present here new technical developments for the direct tissue analysis of peptides with ionic liquid made of matrix mixtures (alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA)/2-amino-4-methyl-5-nitropyridine and alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid/N,N-dimethylaniline (CHCA/DANI)). The properties of these direct tissue analysis matrixes, especially CHCA/aniline when compared to CHCA, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and sinapinic acid, are as follows: (1) better spectral quality in terms of resolution, sensitivity, intensity, noise, number of compounds detected, and contaminant tolerance, (2) better crystallization on tissues, i.e., coverage capacity, homogeneity of crystallization, homogeneity of crystal sizes, and time of crystallization, (3) better analysis duration in term of vacuum stability, (4) better resistance to laser irradiation especially for high-frequency lasers, (5) better ionic yield in negative mode, and (6) enough fragmentation yield to use the PSD mode on sections to get structural information. Applied to MALDI imaging on a MALDI LIFT-TOF with a 50-Hz laser frequency, these ionic matrixes have allowed the realization of a new type of image in both polarities and reflector mode using the same tissue section. These results give a new outlook on peptide tissue profiling by MS, characterization of compounds from tissue slices, and MALDI-MS high-quality imaging.

  3. First Human Experience with Directly Image-able Iodinated Embolization Microbeads.

    PubMed

    Levy, Elliot B; Krishnasamy, Venkatesh P; Lewis, Andrew L; Willis, Sean; Macfarlane, Chelsea; Anderson, Victoria; van der Bom, Imramsjah Mj; Radaelli, Alessandro; Dreher, Matthew R; Sharma, Karun V; Negussie, Ayele; Mikhail, Andrew S; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H; Wood, Bradford J

    2016-08-01

    To describe first clinical experience with a directly image-able, inherently radio-opaque microspherical embolic agent for transarterial embolization of liver tumors. LC Bead LUMI™ is a new product based upon sulfonate-modified polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel microbeads with covalently bound iodine (~260 mg I/ml). 70-150 μ LC Bead LUMI™ iodinated microbeads were injected selectively via a 2.8 Fr microcatheter to near complete flow stasis into hepatic arteries in three patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, carcinoid, or neuroendocrine tumor. A custom imaging platform tuned for LC LUMI™ microbead conspicuity using a cone beam CT (CBCT)/angiographic C-arm system (Allura Clarity FD20, Philips) was used along with CBCT embolization treatment planning software (EmboGuide, Philips). LC Bead LUMI™ image-able microbeads were easily delivered and monitored during the procedure using fluoroscopy, single-shot radiography (SSD), digital subtraction angiography (DSA), dual-phase enhanced and unenhanced CBCT, and unenhanced conventional CT obtained 48 h after the procedure. Intra-procedural imaging demonstrated tumor at risk for potential under-treatment, defined as paucity of image-able microbeads within a portion of the tumor which was confirmed at 48 h CT imaging. Fusion of pre- and post-embolization CBCT identified vessels without beads that corresponded to enhancing tumor tissue in the same location on follow-up imaging (48 h post). LC Bead LUMI™ image-able microbeads provide real-time feedback and geographic localization of treatment in real time during treatment. The distribution and density of image-able beads within a tumor need further evaluation as an additional endpoint for embolization.

  4. Direction-dependent localization errors in SPECT images

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, Justin; Bowsher, James; Yin Fangfang

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is being investigated for imaging inside radiation therapy treatment rooms to localize biological targets. Here, computer simulations were used to analyze locational and directional dependencies in localization errors and to assess the effects of spatial resolution modeling and observer normalization on localization performance. Methods: SPECT images of the XCAT phantom, containing 12 hot tumors, were reconstructed with detector response function compensation (DRC) and without DRC (nDRC). Numerical observers were forced to select the most suspicious tumor location, using normalized cross correlation (NXC) or un-normalized cross correlation (XC), from 3 cm diameter search volumes that each contained only one tumor. For each tumor site, localization was optimized as a function of the iteration number and postreconstruction smoothing. Localization error, the distance between true and estimated tumor positions, was calculated across the ensembles of 80 images. Direction-dependent localization bias and precision were estimated from the image ensemble. Results: For the six superficial tumors in close proximity to the detector trajectory, mean localization errors were <2 mm and were lowest or comparable using DRC-NXC, though differences from DRC-XC and nDRC-NXC were not statistically significant. DRC-NXC did provide statistically significantly better localization than nDRC-XC for five of these six tumors. At the other six sites where attenuation was more severe and the distance was generally greater between the tumor and detector, DRC typically did not show better localization than nDRC. Observer normalization improved the localization substantially for a tumor near the hotter heart. Localization errors were anisotropic and dependent on tumor location relative to the detector trajectory. Conclusions: This computer-simulation study compared localization performance for normalized and un-normalized numerical

  5. Restoration of Poissonian images using alternating direction optimization.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Mário A T; Bioucas-Dias, José M

    2010-12-01

    Much research has been devoted to the problem of restoring Poissonian images, namely for medical and astronomical applications. However, the restoration of these images using state-of-the-art regularizers (such as those based upon multiscale representations or total variation) is still an active research area, since the associated optimization problems are quite challenging. In this paper, we propose an approach to deconvolving Poissonian images, which is based upon an alternating direction optimization method. The standard regularization [or maximum a posteriori (MAP)] restoration criterion, which combines the Poisson log-likelihood with a (nonsmooth) convex regularizer (log-prior), leads to hard optimization problems: the log-likelihood is nonquadratic and nonseparable, the regularizer is nonsmooth, and there is a nonnegativity constraint. Using standard convex analysis tools, we present sufficient conditions for existence and uniqueness of solutions of these optimization problems, for several types of regularizers: total-variation, frame-based analysis, and frame-based synthesis. We attack these problems with an instance of the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM), which belongs to the family of augmented Lagrangian algorithms. We study sufficient conditions for convergence and show that these are satisfied, either under total-variation or frame-based (analysis and synthesis) regularization. The resulting algorithms are shown to outperform alternative state-of-the-art methods, both in terms of speed and restoration accuracy.

  6. Weighted Model Components for Gradient Direction Matching in Overhead Images

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, C W; Nikolaev, S; Paglieroni, D W

    2006-03-17

    Gradient direction matching (GDM) is the main target identification algorithm used in the Image Content Engine project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. GDM is a 3D solid model-based edge-matching algorithm which does not require explicit edge extraction from the source image. The GDM algorithm is presented, identifying areas where performance enhancement seems possible. Improving the process of producing model gradient directions from the solid model by assigning different weights to different parts of the model is an extension tested in the current study. Given a simple geometric model, we attempt to determine, without obvious semantic clues, if different weight values produce significantly better matching accuracy, and how those weights should be assigned to produce the best matching accuracy. Two simple candidate strategies for assigning weights are proposed--pixel-weighted and edge-weighted. We adjust the weights of the components in a simple model of a tractor/semi-trailer using relevance feedback to produce an optimal set of weights for this model and a particular test image. The optimal weights are then compared with pixel and edge-weighting strategies to determine which is most suitable and under what circumstances.

  7. Diffusion imaging quality control via entropy of principal direction distribution

    PubMed Central

    Oguz, Ipek; Smith, Rachel G.; Verde, Audrey R.; Dietrich, Cheryl; Gupta, Aditya; Escolar, Maria L.; Piven, Joseph; Pujol, Sonia; Vachet, Clement; Gouttard, Sylvain; Gerig, Guido; Dager, Stephen; McKinstry, Robert C.; Paterson, Sarah; Evans, Alan C.; Styner, Martin A.

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion MR imaging has received increasing attention in the neuroimaging community, as it yields new insights into the microstructural organization of white matter that are not available with conventional MRI techniques. While the technology has enormous potential, diffusion MRI suffers from a unique and complex set of image quality problems, limiting the sensitivity of studies and reducing the accuracy of findings. Furthermore, the acquisition time for diffusion MRI is longer than conventional MRI due to the need for multiple acquisitions to obtain directionally encoded Diffusion Weighted Images (DWI). This leads to increased motion artifacts, reduced signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and increased proneness to a wide variety of artifacts, including eddy-current and motion artifacts, “venetian blind” artifacts, as well as slice-wise and gradient-wise inconsistencies. Such artifacts mandate stringent Quality Control (QC) schemes in the processing of diffusion MRI data. Most existing QC procedures are conducted in the DWI domain and/or on a voxel level, but our own experiments show that these methods often do not fully detect and eliminate certain types of artifacts, often only visible when investigating groups of DWI's or a derived diffusion model, such as the most-employed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Here, we propose a novel regional QC measure in the DTI domain that employs the entropy of the regional distribution of the principal directions (PD). The PD entropy quantifies the scattering and spread of the principal diffusion directions and is invariant to the patient's position in the scanner. High entropy value indicates that the PDs are distributed relatively uniformly, while low entropy value indicates the presence of clusters in the PD distribution. The novel QC measure is intended to complement the existing set of QC procedures by detecting and correcting residual artifacts. Such residual artifacts cause directional bias in the measured PD and here

  8. Direct model fitting to combine dithered ACS images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, H.; Wucknitz, O.

    2013-08-01

    The information lost in images of undersampled CCD cameras can be recovered with the technique of "dithering". A number of subexposures is taken with sub-pixel shifts in order to record structures on scales smaller than a pixel. The standard method to combine such exposures, "Drizzle", averages after reversing the displacements, including rotations and distortions. More sophisticated methods are available to produce, e.g., Nyquist sampled representations of band-limited inputs. While the combined images produced by these methods can be of high quality, their use as input for forward-modelling techniques in gravitational lensing is still not optimal, because the residual artefacts still affect the modelling results in unpredictable ways. In this paper we argue for an overall modelling approach that takes into account the dithering and the lensing without the intermediate product of a combined image. As one building block we introduce an alternative approach to combine dithered images by direct model fitting with a least-squares approach including a regularization constraint. We present tests with simulated and real data that show the quality of the results. The additional effects of gravitational lensing and the convolution with an instrumental point spread function can be included in a natural way, avoiding the possible systematic errors of previous procedures.

  9. Photoacoustic lifetime imaging for direct in vivo tissue oxygen monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qi; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2015-03-01

    Measuring the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in tissue may provide physicians with essential information about the physiological state of tissue. However, currently available methods for measuring or imaging tissue pO2 have significant limitations, preventing them from being widely used in clinics. Recently, we have reported a direct and noninvasive in vivo imaging modality based on the photoacoustic lifetime which overcomes certain drawbacks of the existing methods. The technique maps the excited triplet state of oxygen-sensitive dye, thus reflecting the spatial and temporal distributions of tissue oxygen. Here, we present two studies which apply photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) to monitor changes of tissue oxygen induced by external modulations. The first study modulates tissue oxygen by controlling the percentage of oxygen a normal mouse inhales. We demonstrate that PALI is able to reflect the change in oxygen level with respect to normal, oxygen-rich, and oxygen-poor breathing conditions. The second study involves an acute ischemia model using a thin thread tied around the hindlimb of a normal mouse to reduce the blood flow. PALI images were acquired before, during, and after the restriction. The drop of tissue pO2 and recovery from hypoxia due to reperfusion were tracked and observed by PALI.

  10. Direct-Solve Image-Based Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    A method of wavefront sensing (more precisely characterized as a method of determining the deviation of a wavefront from a nominal figure) has been invented as an improved means of assessing the performance of an optical system as affected by such imperfections as misalignments, design errors, and fabrication errors. The method is implemented by software running on a single-processor computer that is connected, via a suitable interface, to the image sensor (typically, a charge-coupled device) in the system under test. The software collects a digitized single image from the image sensor. The image is displayed on a computer monitor. The software directly solves for the wavefront in a time interval of a fraction of a second. A picture of the wavefront is displayed. The solution process involves, among other things, fast Fourier transforms. It has been reported to the effect that some measure of the wavefront is decomposed into modes of the optical system under test, but it has not been reported whether this decomposition is postprocessing of the solution or part of the solution process.

  11. SPIFI: a direct-detection imaging spectrometer for submillimeter wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Bradford, C Matt; Stacey, Gordon J; Swain, Mark R; Nikola, Thomas; Bolatto, Alberto D; Jackson, James M; Savage, Maureen L; Davidson, Jacqueline A; Ade, Peter A R

    2002-05-01

    The South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) is the first instrument of its kind-a direct-detection imaging spectrometer for astronomy in the submillimeter band. SPIFI's focal plane is a square array of 25 silicon bolometers cooled to 60 mK; the spectrometer consists of two cryogenic scanning Fabry-Perot interferometers in series with a 60-mK bandpass filter. The instrument operates in the short submillimeter windows (350 and 450 microm) available from the ground, with spectral resolving power selectable between 500 and 10,000. At present, SPIFI's sensitivity is within a factor of 1.5-3 of the photon background limit, comparable with the best heterodyne spectrometers. The instrument's large bandwidth and mapping capability provide substantial advantages for specific astrophysical projects, including deep extragalactic observations. We present the motivation for and design of SPIFI and its operational characteristics on the telescope.

  12. SPIFI: a direct-detection imaging spectrometer for submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, C. Matt; Stacey, Gordon J.; Swain, Mark R.; Nikola, Thomas; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Jackson, James M.; Savage, Maureen L.; Davidson, Jacqueline A.; Ade, Peter A. R.

    2002-05-01

    The South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) is the first instrument of its kind--a direct-detection imaging spectrometer for astronomy in the submillimeter band. SPIFI's focal plane is a square array of 25 silicon bolometers cooled to 60 mK; the spectrometer consists of two cryogenic scanning Fabry-Perot interferometers in series with a 60-mK bandpass filter. The instrument operates in the short submillimeter windows (350 and 450 mum) available from the ground, with spectral resolving power selectable between 500 and 10,000. At present, SPIFI's sensitivity is within a factor of 1.5-3 of the photon background limit, comparable with the best heterodyne spectrometers. The instrument's large bandwidth and mapping capability provide substantial advantages for specific astrophysical projects, including deep extragalactic observations. We present the motivation for and design of SPIFI and its operational characteristics on the telescope.

  13. Colors of Alien Worlds from Direct Imaging Exoplanet Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Renyu

    2016-01-01

    Future direct-imaging exoplanet missions such as WFIRST will measure the reflectivity of exoplanets at visible wavelengths. Most of the exoplanets to be observed will be located further away from their parent stars than is Earth from the Sun. These "cold" exoplanets have atmospheric environments conducive for the formation of water and/or ammonia clouds, like Jupiter in the Solar System. I find the mixing ratio of methane and the pressure level of the uppermost cloud deck on these planets can be uniquely determined from their reflection spectra, with moderate spectral resolution, if the cloud deck is between 0.6 and 1.5 bars. The existence of this unique solution is useful for exoplanet direct imaging missions for several reasons. First, the weak bands and strong bands of methane enable the measurement of the methane mixing ratio and the cloud pressure, although an overlying haze layer can bias the estimate of the latter. Second, the cloud pressure, once derived, yields an important constraint on the internal heat flux from the planet, and thus indicating its thermal evolution. Third, water worlds having H2O-dominated atmospheres are likely to have water clouds located higher than the 10-3 bar pressure level, and muted spectral absorption features. These planets would occupy a confined phase space in the color-color diagrams, likely distinguishable from H2-rich giant exoplanets by broadband observations. Therefore, direct-imaging exoplanet missions may offer the capability to broadly distinguish H2-rich giant exoplanets versus H2O-rich super-Earth exoplanets, and to detect ammonia and/or water clouds and methane gas in their atmospheres.

  14. Colors of Alien Worlds from Direct Imaging Exoplanet Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Renyu

    2015-08-01

    Future direct-imaging exoplanet missions such as WFIRST/AFTA, Exo-C, and Exo-S will measure the reflectivity of exoplanets at visible wavelengths. Most of the exoplanets to be observed will be located further away from their parent stars than is Earth from the Sun. These “cold” exoplanets have atmospheric environments conducive for the formation of water and/or ammonia clouds, like Jupiter in the Solar System. I find the mixing ratio of methane and the pressure level of the uppermost cloud deck on these planets can be uniquely determined from their reflection spectra, with moderate spectral resolution, if the cloud deck is between 0.6 and 1.5 bars. The existence of this unique solution is useful for exoplanet direct imaging missions for several reasons. First, the weak bands and strong bands of methane enable the measurement of the methane mixing ratio and the cloud pressure, although an overlying haze layer can bias the estimate of the latter. Second, the cloud pressure, once derived, yields an important constraint on the internal heat flux from the planet, and thus indicating its thermal evolution. Third, water worlds having H2O-dominated atmospheres are likely to have water clouds located higher than the 10-3 bar pressure level, and muted spectral absorption features. These planets would occupy a confined phase space in the color-color diagrams, likely distinguishable from H2-rich giant exoplanets by broadband observations. Therefore, direct-imaging exoplanet missions may offer the capability to broadly distinguish H2-rich giant exoplanets versus H2O-rich super-Earth exoplanets, and to detect ammonia and/or water clouds and methane gas in their atmospheres.

  15. Direct imaging constraints on planet populations detected by microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quanz, S. P.; Lafrenière, D.; Meyer, M. R.; Reggiani, M. M.; Buenzli, E.

    2012-05-01

    Context. Results from gravitational microlensing suggested the existence of a large population of free-floating planetary mass objects. The main conclusion from this work was partly based on constraints from a direct imaging survey. This survey determined upper limits for the frequency of stars that harbor giant exoplanets at large orbital separations. Aims: We want to verify to what extent upper limits from direct imaging do indeed constrain the microlensing results. Methods: We examine the current derivation of the upper limits used in the microlensing study and re-analyze the data from the corresponding imaging survey. We focus on the mass and semi-major axis ranges that are most relevant in context of the microlensing results. We also consider new results from a recent M-dwarf imaging survey as these objects are typically the host stars for planets detected by microlensing. Results: We find that the upper limits currently applied in context of the microlensing results are probably underestimated. This means that a larger fraction of stars than assumed may harbor gas giant planets at larger orbital separations. Also, the way the upper limit is currently used to estimate the fraction of free-floating objects is not strictly correct. If the planetary surface density of giant planets around M-dwarfs is described as dfPlanet ∝ aβda, we find that β ≲ 0.5-0.6 is consistent with results from different observational studies probing semi-major axes between ~0.03-30 AU. Conclusions: Having a higher upper limit on the fraction of stars that may have gas giant planets at orbital separations probed by the microlensing data implies that more of the planets detected in the microlensing study are potentially bound to stars rather than free-floating. The current observational data are consistent with a rising planetary surface density for giant exoplanets around M-dwarfs out to ~30 AU. Future direct imaging surveys will show out to what semi-major axis the above mentioned

  16. Direct imaging of myocardial ischemia: a potential new paradigm in nuclear cardiovascular imaging.

    PubMed

    Jain, Diwakar; He, Zuo-Xiang

    2008-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has been in clinical use for over 30 years, serving as an effective, reliable, and relatively simple tool for diagnosis, risk stratification, and long-term follow-up of patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease. However, a unique strength of nuclear imaging is its ability to provide tools for imaging biochemical and metabolic processes and receptor and transporter functions at molecular and cellular levels in intact organisms under a wide variety of physiologic conditions. Despite their high resolution and technical sophistication, other imaging modalities currently do not have this capability. Metabolic imaging techniques using radiolabeled free fatty acid and glucose analogs provide a unique ability to image myocardial ischemia directly in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. These techniques can potentially overcome some of the limitations of currently used stress-rest perfusion imaging and also provide a unique opportunity to detect and image an episode of ischemia in the preceding hours even in the absence of other markers of ongoing myocardial ischemia. We describe recent studies using fluorine 18-labeled deoxyglucose and iodine 123 beta-methyl-p-iodophenyl-pentadecanoic acid for imaging myocardial ischemia.

  17. Search for Exoplanets around Young Stellar Objects by Direct Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyama, Taichi; Tamura, Motohide; Hashimoto, Jun; Kuzuhara, Masayuki

    2015-12-01

    SEEDS project, exploring exoplanets and protoplanetary disks with Subaru/HiCIAO, has observed about 500 stars by Direct Imaging from 2009 Dec to 2015 Apr. Among these targets we explore around Young Stellar Objects (YSOs; age ≦ 10Myr) which often have the protoplanetary disks where planets are being formed in order to detect young exoplanets and to understand the formation process. We analyzed 66 YSOs (about 100 data in total) with LOCI data reduction. We will report the results (companion candidates and detection limit) of our exploration.

  18. Direct imaging of quantum wires nucleated at diatomic steps

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, S. I.; Varela, M.; Sales, D. L.; Ben, T.; Pizarro, J.; Galindo, P. L.; Fuster, D.; Gonzalez, Y.; Gonzalez, L.; Pennycook, S. J.

    2007-10-01

    Atomic steps at growth surfaces are important heterogeneous sources for nucleation of epitaxial nano-objects. In the presence of misfit strain, we show that the nucleation process takes place preferentially at the upper terrace of the step as a result of the local stress relaxation. Evidence for strain-induced nucleation comes from the direct observation by postgrowth, atomic resolution, Z-contrast imaging of an InAs-rich region in a nanowire located on the upper terrace surface of an interfacial diatomic step.

  19. Magnetic particle imaging: current developments and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Duschka, Robert L; Ahlborg, Mandy; Bringout, Gael; Debbeler, Christina; Graeser, Matthias; Kaethner, Christian; Lüdtke-Buzug, Kerstin; Medimagh, Hanne; Stelzner, Jan; Buzug, Thorsten M; Barkhausen, Jörg; Vogt, Florian M; Haegele, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a novel imaging method that was first proposed by Gleich and Weizenecker in 2005. Applying static and dynamic magnetic fields, MPI exploits the unique characteristics of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). The SPIONs’ response allows a three-dimensional visualization of their distribution in space with a superb contrast, a very high temporal and good spatial resolution. Essentially, it is the SPIONs’ superparamagnetic characteristics, the fact that they are magnetically saturable, and the harmonic composition of the SPIONs’ response that make MPI possible at all. As SPIONs are the essential element of MPI, the development of customized nanoparticles is pursued with the greatest effort by many groups. Their objective is the creation of a SPION or a conglomerate of particles that will feature a much higher MPI performance than nanoparticles currently available commercially. A particle’s MPI performance and suitability is characterized by parameters such as the strength of its MPI signal, its biocompatibility, or its pharmacokinetics. Some of the most important adjuster bolts to tune them are the particles’ iron core and hydrodynamic diameter, their anisotropy, the composition of the particles’ suspension, and their coating. As a three-dimensional, real-time imaging modality that is free of ionizing radiation, MPI appears ideally suited for applications such as vascular imaging and interventions as well as cellular and targeted imaging. A number of different theories and technical approaches on the way to the actual implementation of the basic concept of MPI have been seen in the last few years. Research groups around the world are working on different scanner geometries, from closed bore systems to single-sided scanners, and use reconstruction methods that are either based on actual calibration measurements or on theoretical models. This review aims at giving an overview of current developments and

  20. Magnetic particle imaging: current developments and future directions.

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Duschka, Robert L; Ahlborg, Mandy; Bringout, Gael; Debbeler, Christina; Graeser, Matthias; Kaethner, Christian; Lüdtke-Buzug, Kerstin; Medimagh, Hanne; Stelzner, Jan; Buzug, Thorsten M; Barkhausen, Jörg; Vogt, Florian M; Haegele, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a novel imaging method that was first proposed by Gleich and Weizenecker in 2005. Applying static and dynamic magnetic fields, MPI exploits the unique characteristics of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). The SPIONs' response allows a three-dimensional visualization of their distribution in space with a superb contrast, a very high temporal and good spatial resolution. Essentially, it is the SPIONs' superparamagnetic characteristics, the fact that they are magnetically saturable, and the harmonic composition of the SPIONs' response that make MPI possible at all. As SPIONs are the essential element of MPI, the development of customized nanoparticles is pursued with the greatest effort by many groups. Their objective is the creation of a SPION or a conglomerate of particles that will feature a much higher MPI performance than nanoparticles currently available commercially. A particle's MPI performance and suitability is characterized by parameters such as the strength of its MPI signal, its biocompatibility, or its pharmacokinetics. Some of the most important adjuster bolts to tune them are the particles' iron core and hydrodynamic diameter, their anisotropy, the composition of the particles' suspension, and their coating. As a three-dimensional, real-time imaging modality that is free of ionizing radiation, MPI appears ideally suited for applications such as vascular imaging and interventions as well as cellular and targeted imaging. A number of different theories and technical approaches on the way to the actual implementation of the basic concept of MPI have been seen in the last few years. Research groups around the world are working on different scanner geometries, from closed bore systems to single-sided scanners, and use reconstruction methods that are either based on actual calibration measurements or on theoretical models. This review aims at giving an overview of current developments and future directions

  1. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE CAPTURES FIRST DIRECT IMAGE OF A STAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is the first direct image of a star other than the Sun, made with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Called Alpha Orionis, or Betelgeuse, it is a red supergiant star marking the shoulder of the winter constellation Orion the Hunter (diagram at right). The Hubble image reveals a huge ultraviolet atmosphere with a mysterious hot spot on the stellar behemoth's surface. The enormous bright spot, more than ten times the diameter of Earth, is at least 2,000 Kelvin degrees hotter than the surface of the star. The image suggests that a totally new physical phenomenon may be affecting the atmospheres of some stars. Follow-up observations will be needed to help astronomers understand whether the spot is linked to oscillations previously detected in the giant star, or whether it moves systematically across the star's surface under the grip of powerful magnetic fields. The observations were made by Andrea Dupree of the Harvard- Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA, and Ronald Gilliland of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, MD, who announced their discovery today at the 187th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in San Antonio, Texas. The image was taken in ultraviolet light with the Faint Object Camera on March 3, 1995. Hubble can resolve the star even though the apparent size is 20,000 times smaller than the width of the full Moon -- roughly equivalent to being able to resolve a car's headlights at a distance of 6,000 miles. Betelgeuse is so huge that, if it replaced the Sun at the center of our Solar System, its outer atmosphere would extend past the orbit of Jupiter (scale at lower left). Credit: Andrea Dupree (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA), Ronald Gilliland (STScI), NASA and ESA Image files in GIF and JPEG format and captions may be accessed on Internet via anonymous ftp from oposite.stsci.edu in /pubinfo.

  2. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE CAPTURES FIRST DIRECT IMAGE OF A STAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is the first direct image of a star other than the Sun, made with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Called Alpha Orionis, or Betelgeuse, it is a red supergiant star marking the shoulder of the winter constellation Orion the Hunter (diagram at right). The Hubble image reveals a huge ultraviolet atmosphere with a mysterious hot spot on the stellar behemoth's surface. The enormous bright spot, more than ten times the diameter of Earth, is at least 2,000 Kelvin degrees hotter than the surface of the star. The image suggests that a totally new physical phenomenon may be affecting the atmospheres of some stars. Follow-up observations will be needed to help astronomers understand whether the spot is linked to oscillations previously detected in the giant star, or whether it moves systematically across the star's surface under the grip of powerful magnetic fields. The observations were made by Andrea Dupree of the Harvard- Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA, and Ronald Gilliland of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, MD, who announced their discovery today at the 187th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in San Antonio, Texas. The image was taken in ultraviolet light with the Faint Object Camera on March 3, 1995. Hubble can resolve the star even though the apparent size is 20,000 times smaller than the width of the full Moon -- roughly equivalent to being able to resolve a car's headlights at a distance of 6,000 miles. Betelgeuse is so huge that, if it replaced the Sun at the center of our Solar System, its outer atmosphere would extend past the orbit of Jupiter (scale at lower left). Credit: Andrea Dupree (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA), Ronald Gilliland (STScI), NASA and ESA Image files in GIF and JPEG format and captions may be accessed on Internet via anonymous ftp from oposite.stsci.edu in /pubinfo.

  3. Advances in Focal Plane Wavefront Estimation for Directly Imaging Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldorado Riggs, A. J.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Groff, Tyler Dean

    2015-01-01

    To image cold exoplanets directly in visible light, an instrument on a telescope needs to suppress starlight by about 9 orders of magnitude at small separations from the star. A coronagraph changes the point spread function to create regions of high contrast where exoplanets or disks can be seen. Aberrations on the optics degrade the contrast by several orders of magnitude, so all high-contrast imaging systems incorporate one or more deformable mirrors (DMs) to recover regions of high contrast. With a coronagraphic instrument planned for the WFIRST-AFTA space telescope, there is a pressing need for faster, more robust estimation and control schemes for the DMs. Non-common path aberrations limit conventional phase conjugation schemes to medium star-to-planet contrast ratios of about 1e-6. High-contrast imaging requires estimation and control of both phase and amplitude in the same beam path as the science camera. Field estimation is a challenge since only intensity is measured; the most common approach, including that planned for WFIRST-AFTA, is to use DMs to create diversity, via pairs of small probe shapes, thereby allowing disambiguation of the electric field. Most implementations of DM Diversity require at least five images per electric field estimate and require narrowband measurements. This paper describes our new estimation algorithms that improve the speed (by using fewer images) and bandwidth of focal plane wavefront estimation. For narrowband estimation, we are testing nonlinear, recursive algorithms such as an iterative extended Kalman filter (IEKF) to use three images each iteration and build better, more robust estimates. We are also exploring the use of broadband estimation without the need for narrowband sub-filters and measurements. Here we present simulations of these algorithms with realistic noise and small signals to show how they might perform for WFIRST-AFTA. Once validated in simulations, we will test these algorithms experimentally in

  4. Planet Diversity Yields with Space-based Direct Imaging Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Hébrard, Eric; Stark, Chris; Robinson, Tyler D.; Roberge, Aki; Mandell, Avi; McElwain, Michael W.; Clampin, Mark; Meadows, Victoria; Arney, Giada; Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope Science Team, Exoplanet Climate Group

    2016-01-01

    In this presentation, we will estimate the yield for a diversity of planets from future space-based flagship telescopes. We first divvy up planets into categories that are based on current observables, and that should impact the spectra we hope to observe in the future. The two main classification parameters we use here are the size of a planet and the energy flux into the planet's atmosphere. These two parameters are measureable or inferable from present-day observations, and should have a strong influence on future spectroscopy observations from JWST, WFIRST (with a coronagraph and/or starshade), and concept flagship missions that would fly some time after WFIRST. This allows us to calculate "ηplanet" values for each kind of planet. These η values then allow calculations of the expected yields from direct imaging missions, by leveraging the models and prior work by Stark and colleagues (2014, 2015). That work estimated the yields for potentially Earth-like worlds (i.e. of a size and stellar irradiation consistent with definitions of the habitable zone) for telescopes with a variety of observational parameters. We will do the same thing here, but for a wider variety of planets. This will allow us to discuss the implications of architecture and instrument properties on the diversity of worlds that future direct imaging missions would observe.

  5. Lattice parameters from direct-space images at two tilts.

    PubMed

    Qin, W; Fraundorf, P

    2003-04-01

    Lattices in three dimensions are oft studied from the "reciprocal space" perspective of diffraction. Today, the full lattice of a crystal can often be inferred from direct-space information about three sets of non-parallel lattice planes. Such data can come from electron-phase (or less easily Z contrast images) taken at two tilts, provided that one image shows two non-parallel lattice periodicities, and the other shows a periodicity not coplanar with the first two. We outline here protocols for measuring the 3D parameters of cubic lattice types in this way. For randomly oriented nano-crystals with cell side greater than twice the continuous transfer limit, orthogonal +/-15 degrees and +/-10 degrees tilt ranges might allow one to measure 3D parameters of all such lattice types in a specimen from only two well-chosen images. The strategy is illustrated by measuring the lattice parameters of a 10nm WC(1-x) crystal in a plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposited thin film.

  6. Human genome sequencing with direct x-ray holographic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1993-06-08

    Direct holographic imaging of biological materials is widely applicable to the study of the structure, properties and action of genetic material. This particular application involves the sequencing of the human genome where prospective genomic imaging technology is composed of three subtechnologies, name an x-ray holographic camera, suitable chemistry and enzymology for the preparation of tagged DNA samples, and the illuminator in the form of an x-ray laser. We report appropriate x-ray camera, embodied by the instrument developed by MCR, is available and that suitable chemical and enzymatic procedures exist for the preparation of the necessary tagged DNA strands. Concerning the future development of the x-ray illuminator. We find that a practical small scale x-ray light source is indeed feasible. This outcome requires the use of unconventional physical processes in order to achieve the necessary power-compression in the amplifying medium. The understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly. Importantly, although the x-ray source does not currently exist, the understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly and the research has established the basic scaling laws that will determine the properties of the x-ray illuminator. When this x-ray source becomes available, an extremely rapid and cost effective instrument for 3-D imaging of biological materials can be applied to a wide range of biological structural assays, including the base-pair sequencing of the human genome and many questions regarding its higher levels of organization.

  7. Wide Giant Planets are Rare: Planet Demographics from Direct Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biller, Beth

    2015-08-01

    The previous generation of direct imaging surveys probed samples of 100-200 stars with AO-driven coronagraphic imaging and advanced techniques such as Angular Differential Imaging (ADI) (e.g. surveys such as SEEDS, IDPS, the NICI Science Campaign, among others). These surveys found that wide giant planets are comparatively rare, especially at separations > 50 AU: for instance, Biller et al. 2013 find for a sample of 78 young moving group stars that the the frequency of 1-20 M Jup companions at semi-major axes from 10-150 AU is <18% at a 95.4% confidence level using DUSTY models and <6% at a 95.4% using COND models. As next generation planet-finding cameras such as GPI at Gemini, SPHERE at VLT, project 1640, and SceXAO at Suburu come online, our understanding of wide planet populations is likely to undergo a rapid evolution, especially for planets at separations of 10-50 AU. New large-scale surveys (400-500 stars) are now underway with these new instruments, e.g. NIRSUR with SPHERE and GPIES with GPI. In this talk, I will review the previous generation of surveys and the statistical results that they have yielded. I will also discuss prospects for the new generation of ongoing surveys.

  8. Direct interpretation of near-field optical images.

    PubMed

    Dereux, A; Devaux, E; Weeber, J C; Goudonnet, J P; Girard, C

    2001-05-01

    The interpretation of the detection process in near-field optical microscopy is reviewed on the basis of a discussion about the possibility of establishing direct comparisons between experimental images and the solutions of Maxwell equations or the electromagnetic local density of states. On the basis of simple physical arguments, it is expected that the solutions of Maxwell equations should agree with images obtained by collecting mode near-field microscopes, while the electromagnetic local density of states should be considered to provide a practical interpretation of illumination mode near-field microscopes. We review collecting mode near-field microscope images where the conditions to obtain good agreement with the solutions of Maxwell equations have indeed been identified. In this context of collecting mode near-field microscopes, a fundamentally different functionality between dielectric and gold-coated tips has been clearly identified experimentally by checking against the solutions of Maxwell equations. It turns out that dielectric tips detect a signal proportional to the optical electric field intensity, whereas gold-coated tips detect a signal proportional to the optical magnetic field intensity. The possible implications of this surprising phenomenon are discussed.

  9. Ambient Mass Spectrometry Imaging Using Direct Liquid Extraction Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Lanekoff, Ingela

    2015-11-13

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful analytical technique that enables label-free spatial localization and identification of molecules in complex samples.1-4 MSI applications range from forensics5 to clinical research6 and from understanding microbial communication7-8 to imaging biomolecules in tissues.1, 9-10 Recently, MSI protocols have been reviewed.11 Ambient ionization techniques enable direct analysis of complex samples under atmospheric pressure without special sample pretreatment.3, 12-16 In fact, in ambient ionization mass spectrometry, sample processing (e.g., extraction, dilution, preconcentration, or desorption) occurs during the analysis.17 This substantially speeds up analysis and eliminates any possible effects of sample preparation on the localization of molecules in the sample.3, 8, 12-14, 18-20 Venter and co-workers have classified ambient ionization techniques into three major categories based on the sample processing steps involved: 1) liquid extraction techniques, in which analyte molecules are removed from the sample and extracted into a solvent prior to ionization; 2) desorption techniques capable of generating free ions directly from substrates; and 3) desorption techniques that produce larger particles subsequently captured by an electrospray plume and ionized.17 This review focuses on localized analysis and ambient imaging of complex samples using a subset of ambient ionization methods broadly defined as “liquid extraction techniques” based on the classification introduced by Venter and co-workers.17 Specifically, we include techniques where analyte molecules are desorbed from solid or liquid samples using charged droplet bombardment, liquid extraction, physisorption, chemisorption, mechanical force, laser ablation, or laser capture microdissection. Analyte extraction is followed by soft ionization that generates ions corresponding to intact species. Some of the key advantages of liquid extraction techniques include the ease

  10. The LEECH Exoplanet Imaging Survey: Characterization of the Coldest Directly Imaged Exoplanet, GJ 504 b, and Evidence for Superstellar Metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Morley, Caroline V.; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Leisenring, Jarron; Buenzli, Esther; Bonnefoy, Mickael; Bailey, Vanessa; Hinz, Philip; Defrére, Denis; Esposito, Simone; Apai, Dániel; Biller, Beth; Brandner, Wolfgang; Close, Laird; Crepp, Justin R.; De Rosa, Robert J.; Desidera, Silvano; Eisner, Josh; Fortney, Jonathan; Freedman, Richard; Henning, Thomas; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Kopytova, Taisiya; Lupu, Roxana; Maire, Anne-Lise; Males, Jared R.; Marley, Mark; Morzinski, Katie; Oza, Apurva; Patience, Jenny; Rajan, Abhijith; Rieke, George; Schertl, Dieter; Schlieder, Joshua; Stone, Jordan; Su, Kate; Vaz, Amali; Visscher, Channon; Ward-Duong, Kimberly; Weigelt, Gerd; Woodward, Charles E.

    2016-02-01

    As gas giant planets and brown dwarfs radiate away the residual heat from their formation, they cool through a spectral type transition from L to T, which encompasses the dissipation of cloud opacity and the appearance of strong methane absorption. While there are hundreds of known T-type brown dwarfs, the first generation of directly imaged exoplanets were all L type. Recently, Kuzuhara et al. announced the discovery of GJ 504 b, the first T dwarf exoplanet. GJ 504 b provides a unique opportunity to study the atmosphere of a new type of exoplanet with a ˜500 K temperature that bridges the gap between the first directly imaged planets (˜1000 K) and our own solar system's Jupiter (˜130 K). We observed GJ 504 b in three narrow L-band filters (3.71, 3.88, and 4.00 μm), spanning the red end of the broad methane fundamental absorption feature (3.3 μm) as part of the LBTI Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt (LEECH) exoplanet imaging survey. By comparing our new photometry and literature photometry with a grid of custom model atmospheres, we were able to fit GJ 504 b's unusual spectral energy distribution for the first time. We find that GJ 504 b is well fit by models with the following parameters: Teff = 544 ± 10 K, g < 600 m s-2, [M/H] = 0.60 ± 0.12, cloud opacity parameter of fsed = 2-5, R = 0.96 ± 0.07 RJup, and log(L) = -6.13 ± 0.03 L⊙, implying a hot start mass of 3-30 Mjup for a conservative age range of 0.1-6.5 Gyr. Of particular interest, our model fits suggest that GJ 504 b has a superstellar metallicity. Since planet formation can create objects with nonstellar metallicities, while binary star formation cannot, this result suggests that GJ 504 b formed like a planet, not like a binary companion. The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are the University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrophisica, Italy; LBT

  11. Analysis of High Contrast Imaging Techniques for Space Based Direct Planetary Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Gezari, Dan Y.; Nisenson, P.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report on our ongoing investigations of a number of techniques for direct detection and imaging of Earth-like planets around nearby stellar sources. Herein, we give a quantitative analysis of these techniques and compare and contrast them via computer simulations. The techniques we will be reporting on are Bracewell Interferometry, Nisenson Apodized Square Aperture, and Coronagraphic masking techniques. We parameterize our results with respect to wavelength, aperture size, effects of mirror speckle, both mid- and high-spatial frequency, detector and photon noise as well pointing error. The recent numerous detections of Jupiter and Saturn like planets has driven a resurgence in research of space based high contrast imaging techniques for direct planetary imaging. Work is currently ongoing for concepts for NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder mission and a number of study teams have been funded. The authors are members of one team.

  12. Direct imaging with a hypertelescope of red supergiant stellar surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, F.; Chiavassa, A.; Mourard, D.; Tarmoul, N.

    2010-07-01

    High angular resolution images obtained with a hypertelescope can strongly constrain the radiative-hydrodynamics simulations of red supergiant (RSG) stars, in terms of intensity contrast, granulation size and temporal variations of the convective motions that are visible on their surface. The characterization of the convective pattern in RSGs is crucial to solve the mass-loss mechanism which contributes heavily to the chemical enrichment of the Galaxy. We show here how the astrophysical objectives and the array configuration are highly dependent to design a hypertelescope. For a given field of view and a given resolution, there is a trade-off between the array geometry and the number of required telescopes to optimize either the (u,v) coverage (to recover the intensity distribution) or the dynamic range (to recover the intensity contrast). To obtain direct snapshot images of Betelgeuse with a hypertelescope, a regular and uniform layout of telescopes is the best array configuration to recover the intensity contrast and the distribution of both large and small granulation cells, but it requires a huge number of telescopes (several hundreds or thousands). An annular configuration allows a reasonable number of telescopes (lower than one hundred) to recover the spatial structures but it provides a low-contrast image. Concerning the design of a pupil densifier to combine all the beams, the photometric fluctuations are not critical (Delta photometry < 50%) contrary to the residual piston requirements (OPD < λ/8) which requires the development of an efficient cophasing system to fully exploit the imaging capability of a hypertelecope.

  13. Direct thermal imaging of circumstellar discs and exo-planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantin, Eric; Siebenmorgen, Ralf; Cavarroc, Celine; Sterzik, Michael F.

    2008-07-01

    The phase A study of a mid infrared imager and spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), called METIS, was endorsed in May 2008. Two key science drivers of METIS are: a) direct thermal imaging of exo-planets and b) characterization of circumstellar discs from the early proto-planetary to the late debris phase. Observations in the 10μm atmospheric window (N band) require a contrast ratio between stellar light and emitted photons from the exo-planet or the disc of ~ 105. At shorter wavelengths the contrast between star and reflected light from the planet-disc system exceeds >~ 107 posing technical challenges. By means of end-to-end detailed simulations we demonstrate that the superb spatial resolution of a 42m telescope in combination with stellar light rejection methods such as coronagraphic or differential imaging will allow detections at 10μm for a solar type system down to a star-planet separation of 0.1" and a mass limit for irradiated planets of 1 Jupiter (MJ) mass. In case of self-luminous planets observations are possible further out e.g. at the separation limit of JWST of ~ 0.7", METIS will detect planets >~5MJ. This allows to derive a census of all such exo-planets by means of thermal imaging in a volume limited sample of up to 6pc. In addition, METIS will provide the possibility to study the chemical composition of atmospheres of exo-planets using spectroscopy at moderate spectral resolution (λ/Δλ ~ 100) for the brightest targets. Based on detailed performance and sensitivity estimates, we demonstrate that a mid-infrared instrument on an ELT is perfectly suited to observe gravitationally created structures such as gaps in proto- and post- planetary discs, in a complementary way to space missions (e.g. JWST, SOFIA) and ALMA which can only probe the cold dust emission further out.

  14. Direct imaging and spectroscopic characterization of habitable planets with ELTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Lozi, Julien

    2015-12-01

    While the ~1e10 reflected light contrast between Earth-like planets and Sun-like stars is extremely challenging to overcome for ground-based telescopes, habitable planets around lower-mass stars can be "only" a 10 million times fainter than their host stars. Thanks to the small angular resolution offered by upcoming extremely large telescopes (ELTs) and recent advances in wavefront control and coronagraphic techniques, direct imaging and spectroscopic characterization of habitable planets will be possible around nearby M-type stars. Deep (~1e-8) contrast can be achieved by combining (1) sensitive fast visible light wavefront sensing (extreme-AO) with (2) kHz speckle control in the near-IR and (3) high efficiency coronagraphy. Spectroscopy will measure abundances of water, oxygen and methane, measure the planet rotation period, orbit, and identify main surface features through time-domain spectrophotometry.The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO (SCExAO) system is a technology precursor to such a habitable planet imager for ELTs, and is currently under active development. By combining small inner working angle coronagraphy, visible-WFS based extreme-AO and fast speckle control, it will include the key elements of a future ELT system able to image and characterize habitable planets. We describe a technical plan to evolve SCExAO into a habitable planet imager for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), which is aimed at providing such scientific capability during the 2020 decade, and inform the design, deployment and scientific operation of a more capable Extreme-AO instrument.

  15. Direct SAR mapping by thermoacoustic imaging: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Simone A; Picot, Paul A; Thornton, Michael M; Rutt, Brian K

    2016-10-25

    To develop a new method capable of directly measuring specific absorption rate (SAR) deposited in tissue using the thermoacoustic signal induced by short radiofrequency (RF) pulse excitation. A detailed model based on the thermoacoustic wave generation and propagation is presented. We propose a new concept for direct measurement of SAR, to be used as a safety assessment/monitoring tool for MRI. The concept involves the use of short bursts of RF energy and the measurement of the resulting thermoacoustic excitation pattern by an array of ultrasound transducers, followed by image reconstruction to yield the 3D SAR distribution. We developed a simulation framework to model this thermoacoustic SAR mapping concept and verified the concept in vitro. Simulations show good agreement between reconstructed and original SAR distributions with an error of 4.2, 7.2, and 8.4% of the mean SAR values in axial, sagittal, and coronal planes and support the feasibility of direct experimental mapping of SAR distributions in vivo. The in vitro experiments show good agreement with theory (r(2)  = 0.52). A novel thermoacoustic method for in vivo mapping of local SAR patterns in MRI has been proposed and verified in simulation and in a phantom experiment. Magn Reson Med, 2016. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. Safety, pharmacokinetic and dosimetry evaluation of the proposed thrombus imaging agent 99mTc-DI-DD-3B6/22-80B3 Fab'.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, David J; Smart, Richard C; Tsui, Wendy W; Gerometta, Michael; Eisenberg, Paul R; Scott, Andrew M

    2006-06-01

    (99m)Tc-DI-DD-3B6/22-80B3 (Thromboview, hereafter abbreviated to (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab') is a humanised, radiolabelled monoclonal antibody Fab' fragment with high affinity and specificity for the D-dimer domain of cross-linked fibrin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of four increasing doses of (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab' in healthy volunteers. Thirty-two healthy volunteers (18-70 years; 16 male, 16 female) received a single intravenous injection of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 or 4.0 mg of (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab'. Safety outcomes (vital signs, electrocardiography, haematology, biochemistry, adverse events and development of human anti-human antibodies) were assessed up to 30 days post injection. Blood and urine samples were collected up to 48 h post injection. Gamma camera images were acquired at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 24 h post injection. Dosimetry was performed using standard MIRD methodology. No adverse events considered to be drug related were observed. Human anti-human antibody was not detectable in any subject during the follow-up period. (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab' had a rapid initial plasma clearance (t (1/2)alpha=1 h). The pharmacokinetic profile of the Fab' fragment was generally linear across the four dose cohorts. By 24 h, 30-35% of the administered radioactivity appeared in the urine. There was marked renal accumulation with time, but no specific uptake was identified within other normal tissues. The effective dose was 9 mSv/750 MBq. (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab' is well tolerated, is rapidly cleared and exhibits clinically acceptable dosimetry-characteristics well suited to a potential thrombus imaging agent.

  17. A novel approach for direct reconstruction of parametric images for myocardial blood flow from PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Su, Kuan-Hao; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Fang, Yu-Hua Dean

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and evaluate a novel direct reconstruction method to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of parametric images in dynamic positron-emission tomography (PET), especially for applications in myocardial perfusion studies. Simulation studies were used to test the performance in SNR and computational efficiency for different methods. The NCAT phantom was used to generate simulated dynamic data. Noise realization was performed in the sinogram domain and repeated for 30 times with four different noise levels by varying the injection dose (ID) from standard ID to 1/8 of it. The parametric images were calculated by (1) three direct methods that compute the kinetic parameters from the sinogram and (2) an indirect method, which computes the kinetic parameter with pixel-by-pixel curve fitting in image space using weighted least-squares. The first direct reconstruction maximizes the likelihood function using trust-region-reflective (TRR) algorithm. The second approach uses tabulated parameter sets to generate precomputed time-activity curves for maximizing the likelihood functions. The third approach, as a newly proposed method, assumes separable complete data to derive the M-step for maximizing the likelihood. The proposed method with the separable complete data performs similarly to the other two direct reconstruction methods in terms of the SNR, providing a 5%-10% improvement as compared to the indirect parametric reconstruction under the standard ID. The improvement of SNR becomes more obvious as the noise level increases, reaching more than 30% improvement under 1/8 ID. Advantage of the proposed method lies in the computation efficiency by shortening the time requirement to 25% of the indirect approach and 3%-6% of other direct reconstruction methods. With results provided from this simulation study, direct reconstruction of myocardial blood flow shows a high potential for improving the parametric image quality for clinical use.

  18. Numerical GPR Imaging through Directional Antenna Systems in Complex Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comite, Davide; Murgia, Federica; Barbara, Martina; Catapano, Ilaria; Soldovieri, Francesco; Galli, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    The capability of imaging hidden targets and interfaces in non-accessible and complex scenarios is a topic of increasing interest for several practical applications, such as civil engineering, geophysics, and planetary explorations [1]. In this frame, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) has been proven as an efficient and reliable technique, also thanks to the development of effective imaging procedures based on linear modeling of the scattering phenomenon, which is usually considered as activated by ideal sources [1],[2]. Actually, such modeling simplifications are rarely verified in typical operative scenarios, when a number of heterogeneous targets can interact each other and with the surrounding environment, producing undesired contributions such as clutter and ghosts targets. From a physical viewpoint, these phenomena are mainly due to multipath contributions at the receiving antenna system, and different solutions have been proposed to mitigate these effects on the final image reconstruction (see, e.g., [2] and references therein). In this work we investigate on the possible improvements achievable when the directional features of the transmitting antenna system are taken into account in the imaging algorithm. Following and extending the recent investigations illustrated in [2] and [3], we consider in particular arrays of antennas, made by arbitrary types of elements, as activating the scattering phenomenon: hence, the effects of neglecting or accounting for the inherent directional radiation of the considered array are investigated as regards the accuracy of the final reconstruction of targets. Taking into account the resolution losses linked to the relevant synthetic aperture, we analyze the possibility of improving the quality of imaging, mitigating the presence of spurious contributions. By implementing a 'synthetic setup' that analyzes the scenarios under test through different electromagnetic CAD tools (mainly CST Microwave Studio and gprMax), it has been

  19. Synthesis and cell imaging applications of fluorescent mono/di/tri-heterocyclyl-2,6-dicyanoanilines.

    PubMed

    Pisal, Mahesh M; Annadate, Ritesh A; Athalye, Meghana C; Kumar, Deepak; Chavan, Subhash P; Sarkar, Dhiman; Borate, Hanumant B

    2017-02-15

    Synthesis of 3,4,5-triheterocyclyl-2,6-dicyanoanilines, starting from heterocyclic aldehydes and 1,2-diheterocycle-substituted ethanones, is described. 2,6-Dicyanoanilines with one or two heterocyclic substituents have also been synthesized. It was found that some of these molecules have selective cell-staining properties useful for cell imaging applications. The compounds 1g, 10f and 11 were found to stain cytoplasm of the cells in contact but not the nucleus while the compound 12 showed affinity to apoptotic cells resulting in blue fluorescence. The cell imaging results with compound 12 were similar to Annexin V-FITC, a known reagent containing recombinant Annexin V conjugated to green-fluorescent FITC dye, used for detection of apoptotic cells. These compounds were found to be non-cytotoxic and have potential application as cell imaging agents.

  20. Direct imaging of slow, stored and stationary EIT polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Geoff T.; Cho, Young-Wook; Su, Jian; Everett, Jesse; Robins, Nicholas; Lam, Ping Koy; Buchler, Ben

    2017-09-01

    Stationary and slow light effects are of great interest for quantum information applications. Using laser-cooled Rb87 atoms, we performed side imaging of our atomic ensemble under slow and stationary light conditions, which allows direct comparison with numerical models. The polaritons were generated using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), with stationary light generated using counter-propagating control fields. By controlling the power ratio of the two control fields, we show fine control of the group velocity of the stationary light. We also compare the dynamics of stationary light using monochromatic and bichromatic control fields. Our results show negligible difference between the two situations, in contrast to previous work in EIT-based systems.

  1. Challenges in Discerning Atmospheric Composition in Directly Imaged Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    One of the justifications motivating efforts to detect and characterize young extrasolar giant planets has been to measure atmospheric composition for comparison with that of the primary star. If the enhancement of heavy elements in the atmospheres of extrasolar giant planets, like it is for their solar system analogs, is inversely proportional to mass, then it is likely that these worlds formed by core accretion. However in practice it has been very difficult to constrain metallicity because of the complex effect of clouds. Cloud opacity varies both vertically and, in some cases, horizontally through the atmosphere. Particle size and composition, both of which impact opacity, are difficult challenges both for forward modeling and retrieval studies. In my presentation I will discuss systematic efforts to improve cloud studies to enable more reliable determinations of atmospheric composition. These efforts are relevant both to discerning composition of directly imaged young planets from ground based telescopes and future space based missions, such as WFIRST and LUVOIR.

  2. Direct imaging of lateral movements of AMPA receptors inside synapses

    PubMed Central

    Tardin, Catherine; Cognet, Laurent; Bats, Cécile; Lounis, Brahim; Choquet, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Trafficking of AMPA receptors in and out of synapses is crucial for synaptic plasticity. Previous studies have focused on the role of endo/exocytosis processes or that of lateral diffusion of extra-synaptic receptors. We have now directly imaged AMPAR movements inside and outside synapses of live neurons using single- molecule fluorescence microscopy. Inside individual synapses, we found immobile and mobile receptors, which display restricted diffusion. Extra-synaptic receptors display free diffusion. Receptors could also exchange between these membrane compartments through lateral diffusion. Glutamate application increased both receptor mobility inside synapses and the fraction of mobile receptors present in a juxtasynaptic region. Block of inhibitory transmission to favor excitatory synaptic activity induced a transient increase in the fraction of mobile receptors and a decrease in the proportion of juxtasynaptic receptors. Altogether, our data show that rapid exchange of receptors between a synaptic and extra-synaptic localization occurs through regulation of receptor diffusion inside synapses. PMID:12970178

  3. Exozodiacal Dust and Direct Imaging of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Direct imaging of extrasolar planets means contending with dust from extrasolar asteroids and comets. This 'exozodiacal dust' creates a structured background light that can easily outshine the light from an exoEarth and confuse a planet-search mission like TPF or TOPS. But exozodiacal dust can be both friend and foe: planets can stir dust clouds into patterns that reveal the presence of the planet and constrain its mass and orbit. I'll describe some recent research on this topic: 3-D dynamical models of dust clouds with planets and searches for exozodiacal dust with the Keck Interferometer. The author also offers a prediction for the typical zodiacal dust background found around solar analogs, based on seafloor sediment data.

  4. Exoplanet Community Report on Direct Infrared Imaging of Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchi, William C.; Lawson, Peter R.

    2009-01-01

    Direct infrared imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets will allow for detailed characterization of the atmospheric constituents of more than 200 nearby Earth-like planets, more than is possible with any other method under consideration. A flagship mission based on larger passively cooled infrared telescopes and formation flying technologies would have the highest angular resolution of any concept under consideration. The 2008 Exoplanet Forum committee on Direct Infrared Imaging of Exoplanets recommends: (1) a vigorous technology program including component development, integrated testbeds, and end-to-end modeling in the areas of formation flying and mid-infrared nulling; (2) a probe-scale mission based on a passively cooled structurally connected interferometer to be started within the next two to five years, for exoplanetary system characterization that is not accessible from the ground, and which would provide transformative science and lay the engineering groundwork for the flagship mission with formation flying elements. Such a mission would enable a complete exozodiacal dust survey (<1 solar system zodi) in the habitable zone of all nearby stars. This information will allow for a more efficient strategy of spectral characterization of Earth-sized planets for the flagship missions, and also will allow for optimization of the search strategy of an astrometric mission if such a mission were delayed due to cost or technology reasons. (3) Both the flagship and probe missions should be pursued with international partners if possible. Fruitful collaboration with international partners on mission concepts and relevant technology should be continued. (4) Research and Analysis (R&A) should be supported for the development of preliminary science and mission designs. Ongoing efforts to characterize the the typical level of exozodiacal light around Sun-like stars with ground-based nulling technology should be continued.

  5. Exoplanet Community Report on Direct Infrared Imaging of Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchi, William C.; Lawson, Peter R.

    2009-01-01

    Direct infrared imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets will allow for detailed characterization of the atmospheric constituents of more than 200 nearby Earth-like planets, more than is possible with any other method under consideration. A flagship mission based on larger passively cooled infrared telescopes and formation flying technologies would have the highest angular resolution of any concept under consideration. The 2008 Exoplanet Forum committee on Direct Infrared Imaging of Exoplanets recommends: (1) a vigorous technology program including component development, integrated testbeds, and end-to-end modeling in the areas of formation flying and mid-infrared nulling; (2) a probe-scale mission based on a passively cooled structurally connected interferometer to be started within the next two to five years, for exoplanetary system characterization that is not accessible from the ground, and which would provide transformative science and lay the engineering groundwork for the flagship mission with formation flying elements. Such a mission would enable a complete exozodiacal dust survey (<1 solar system zodi) in the habitable zone of all nearby stars. This information will allow for a more efficient strategy of spectral characterization of Earth-sized planets for the flagship missions, and also will allow for optimization of the search strategy of an astrometric mission if such a mission were delayed due to cost or technology reasons. (3) Both the flagship and probe missions should be pursued with international partners if possible. Fruitful collaboration with international partners on mission concepts and relevant technology should be continued. (4) Research and Analysis (R&A) should be supported for the development of preliminary science and mission designs. Ongoing efforts to characterize the the typical level of exozodiacal light around Sun-like stars with ground-based nulling technology should be continued.

  6. Direct Imaging Searches with the Apodizing Phase Plate Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenworthy, M.; Meshkat, T.; Otten, , G.; Codona, J.

    2014-03-01

    The sensitivity of direct imaging searches for extrasolar planets is limited by the presence of diffraction rings from the primary star. Coronagraphs are angular filters that minimise these diffraction structures whilst allowing light from faint companions to shine through. The Apodizing Phase Plate (APP; Kenworthy 2007) coronagraph is a simple pupil plane optic that suppresses diffraction over a 180 degree region around each star simultaneously, providing easy beam switching observations and requiring no time consuming optical alignment at the telescope. We will present our results on using the APP at the Very Large Telescope in surveys for extrasolar planets around A/F and debris disk hosting stars in the L' band (3.8 microns) in the Southern Hemisphere, where we reach a contrast of 12 magnitudes at 0.5 arcseconds (Meshkat 2013). In Leiden, we are also developing the next generation of broadband achromatic coronagraphs that can simultaneously image both sides of the star using Vector APPs (Snik 2012, Otten 2012). Recent laboratory results showing the potential of this technology for future ELTs will also be presented.

  7. Rapamycin/DiR loaded lipid-polyaniline nanoparticles for dual-modal imaging guided enhanced photothermal and antiangiogenic combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinping; Guo, Fang; Yu, Meng; Liu, Li; Tan, Fengping; Yan, Ran; Li, Nan

    2016-09-10

    Imaging-guided photothermal therapy (PTT) has promising application for treating tumors. Nevertheless, so far imaging-guided photothermal drug-delivery systems have been developed with limited success for tumor chemo-photothermal therapy. In this study, as the proof-of-concept, a stimuli-responsive tumor-targeting rapamycin/DiR loaded lipid-polyaniline nanoparticle (RDLPNP) for dual-modal imaging-guided enhanced PTT efficacy is reported for the first time. In this system, polyaniline (PANI) with π-π electronic conjugated system and effective photothermal efficiency is chosen as the appropriate model receptor of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and loaded cyanine probe (e.g., 1,1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindotricarbocyanine iodide, DiR) acts as the donor of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF). In addition, rapamycin (RAPA), which is used as the antiangiogenesis chemotherapeutic drug, can cutdown the tumor vessels and delay tumor growth obviously. After intravenous treatment of RDLPNPs into Hela tumor bearing mice, fluorescent (from DiR) and enhanced photoacoustic (from DLPNPs) signals were found in tumor site over time, which reached to peak at the 6h time point. After irradiating with an NIR laser, a good anti-tumor effect was observed owing to the enhanced photothermal and antiangiogenic effect of RDLPNPs. These results show that the multifunctional nanoparticle can be used as a promising imaging-guided photothermal drug delivery nanoplatform for cancer therapy.

  8. Directional x-ray dark-field imaging of strongly ordered systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Torben Haugaard; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; David, Christian; Rutishauser, Simon; Deyhle, Hans; Reznikova, Elena; Mohr, Juergen

    2010-12-01

    Recently a novel grating based x-ray imaging approach called directional x-ray dark-field imaging was introduced. Directional x-ray dark-field imaging yields information about the local texture of structures smaller than the pixel size of the imaging system. In this work we extend the theoretical description and data processing schemes for directional dark-field imaging to strongly scattering systems, which could not be described previously. We develop a simple scattering model to account for these recent observations and subsequently demonstrate the model using experimental data. The experimental data includes directional dark-field images of polypropylene fibers and a human tooth slice.

  9. Separation of multiple images via directional guidance using structured prism and pyramid arrays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyemin; Seo, Hyein; Kang, Sunghwan; Yoon, Hyunsik

    2016-09-05

    We propose a new concept of separating images through a directional guide of multi-visuals by using structured prism or pyramid arrays. By placing prism arrays onto two different image arrays, the two collective images below the facets are guided to different directions. Using optical calculations, we identify a condition for successful image separation. Transparent pyramid arrays are used to separate four images into four directions. The direction of refracted rays can be controlled by the refractive index of prisms and liquid filled into the voids. In addition, the images can be switched by stretching and releasing an elastomeric prism array.

  10. Direct selection of conserved cDNAs from the DiGeorge critical region: isolation of a novel CDC45-like gene.

    PubMed

    McKie, J M; Wadey, R B; Sutherland, H F; Taylor, C L; Scambler, P J

    1998-08-01

    We have used a modified direct selection technique to detect transcripts that are both evolutionary conserved and developmentally expressed. The enrichment for homologous mouse cDNAs by use of human genomic DNA as template is shown to be an efficient and rapid approach for generating transcript maps. Deletions of human 22q11 are associated with several clinical syndromes, with overlapping phenotypes, for example, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) and DiGeorge syndrome (DGS). A large number of transcriptional units exist within the defined critical region, many of which have been identified previously by direct selection. However, no single obvious candidate gene for the VCFS/DGS phenotype has yet been found. Our technique has been applied to the DiGeorge critical region and has resulted in the isolation of a novel candidate gene, Cdc45l2, similar to yeast Cdc45p. [The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the EMBL data library under accession nos. AJ0223728 and AF0223729.

  11. On the Composition of Young, Directly Imaged Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, J. I.; Marley, M. S.; Zahnle, K.; Line, M. R.; Fortney, J. J.; Barman, T. S.; Visscher, C.; Lewis, N. K.; Wolff, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has seen significant progress on the direct detection and characterization of young, self-luminous giant planets at wide orbital separations from their host stars. Some of these planets show evidence for disequilibrium processes like transport-induced quenching in their atmospheres; photochemistry may also be important, despite the typically large orbital distances. Disequilibrium chemical processes such as these can alter the expected composition, spectral behavior, thermal structure, and cooling history of the planets, and can potentially confuse determinations of bulk elemental ratios, which provide important insights into planet-formation mechanisms. Using a thermo/photochemical kinetics and transport model, we investigate the extent to which disequilibrium chemical processes affect the composition and spectra of directly imaged giant exoplanets. Results for specific "young Jupiters" such as HR 8799 b and c and 51 Eri b are presented, as are general trends as a function of planetary effective temperature, surface gravity, incident ultraviolet flux, and strength of deep atmospheric convection. We find that quenching is very important on young Jupiters, leading to CO/CH4 and N2/NH3 ratios much greater than; and H2O mixing ratios a factor of a few less than chemical equilibrium predictions. Photochemistry can also be important on such planets, with CO2 and HCN being key photochemical products. Carbon dioxide becomes a particularly major constituent when stratospheric temperatures are low and recycling of water following H2O photolysis becomes stifled. Young Jupiters with effective temperatures less than 700 degrees Kelvin are in a particularly interesting photochemical regime that differs from both transiting hot Jupiters and our own solar-system giant planets.

  12. ATMOSPHERIC DYNAMICS OF BROWN DWARFS AND DIRECTLY IMAGED GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Showman, Adam P.; Kaspi, Yohai

    2013-10-20

    A variety of observations provide evidence for vigorous motion in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and directly imaged giant planets. Motivated by these observations, we examine the dynamical regime of the circulation in the atmospheres and interiors of these objects. Brown dwarfs rotate rapidly, and for plausible wind speeds, the flow at large scales will be rotationally dominated. We present three-dimensional, global, numerical simulations of convection in the interior, which demonstrate that at large scales, the convection aligns in the direction parallel to the rotation axis. Convection occurs more efficiently at high latitudes than low latitudes, leading to systematic equator-to-pole temperature differences that may reach ∼1 K near the top of the convection zone. The interaction of convection with the overlying, stably stratified atmosphere will generate a wealth of atmospheric waves, and we argue that, as in the stratospheres of planets in the solar system, the interaction of these waves with the mean flow will cause a significant atmospheric circulation at regional to global scales. At large scales, this should consist of stratified turbulence (possibly organizing into coherent structures such as vortices and jets) and an accompanying overturning circulation. We present an approximate analytic theory of this circulation, which predicts characteristic horizontal temperature variations of several to ∼50 K, horizontal wind speeds of ∼10-300 m s{sup –1}, and vertical velocities that advect air over a scale height in ∼10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} s. This vertical mixing may help to explain the chemical disequilibrium observed on some brown dwarfs. Moreover, the implied large-scale organization of temperature perturbations and vertical velocities suggests that near the L/T transition, patchy clouds can form near the photosphere, helping to explain recent observations of brown-dwarf variability in the near-IR.

  13. On the Composition of Young, Directly Imaged Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, J. I.; Marley, M. S.; Zahnle, K.; Line, M. R.; Fortney, J. J.; Barman, T. S.; Visscher, C.; Lewis, N. K.; Wolff, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    The past decade has seen significant progress on the direct detection and characterization of young, self-luminous giant planets at wide orbital separations from their host stars. Some of these planets show evidence for disequilibrium processes like transport-induced quenching in their atmospheres; photochemistry may also be important, despite the large orbital distances. These disequilibrium chemical processes can alter the expected composition, spectral behavior, thermal structure, and cooling history of the planets, and can potentially confuse determinations of bulk elemental ratios, which provide important insights into planet-formation mechanisms. Using a thermo/photochemical kinetics and transport model, we investigate the extent to which disequilibrium chemistry affects the composition and spectra of directly imaged giant exoplanets. Results for specific “young Jupiters” such as HR 8799 b and 51 Eri b are presented, as are general trends as a function of planetary effective temperature, surface gravity, incident ultraviolet flux, and strength of deep atmospheric convection. We find that quenching is very important on young Jupiters, leading to CO/CH4 and N2/NH3 ratios much greater than, and H2O mixing ratios a factor of a few less than, chemical-equilibrium predictions. Photochemistry can also be important on such planets, with CO2 and HCN being key photochemical products. Carbon dioxide becomes a major constituent when stratospheric temperatures are low and recycling of water via the {{{H}}}2 + OH reaction becomes kinetically stifled. Young Jupiters with effective temperatures ≲ 700 K are in a particularly interesting photochemical regime that differs from both transiting hot Jupiters and our own solar-system giant planets.

  14. The direct relationship between output power and current carrying capability of rotor bars in HTS induction/synchronous motor with the use of DI-BSCCO tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Nagao, K.; Nishimura, T.; Ogama, Y.; Kawamoto, M.; Okazaki, T.; Ayai, N.; Oyama, H.

    2008-08-01

    We report on the direct relationship between output power and the current carrying capability of a squirrel-cage HTS induction/synchronous motor based on experiment. The secondary windings are fabricated by use of so-called DI-BSCCO tapes, and the conventional (normal conducting) stator, three-phase and four-pole, is utilized. The tests are carried out in liquid nitrogen for two kinds of HTS windings, in which the number of HTS rotor bars is varied. It is directly shown that the output power is proportional to the rotor bars' critical current at 77 K. In other words, the torque can be enlarged by increasing the critical current of the HTS rotor bars.

  15. Design challenges and gaps in standards in developing an interoperable zero footprint DI thin client for use in image-enabled electronic health record solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Arun; Koff, David; Bak, Peter; Bender, Duane; Castelli, Jane

    2015-03-01

    The deployment of regional and national Electronic Health Record solutions has been a focus of many countries throughout the past decade. A major challenge for these deployments has been support for ubiquitous image viewing. More specifically, these deployments require an imaging solution that can work over the Internet, leverage any point of service device: desktop, tablet, phone; and access imaging data from any source seamlessly. Whereas standards exist to enable ubiquitous image viewing, few if any solutions exist that leverage these standards and meet the challenge. Rather, most of the currently available web based DI viewing solutions are either proprietary solutions or require special plugins. We developed a true zero foot print browser based DI viewing solution based on the Web Access DICOM Objects (WADO) and Cross-enterprise Document Sharing for Imaging (XDS-I.b) standards to a) demonstrate that a truly ubiquitous image viewer can be deployed; b) identify the gaps in the current standards and the design challenges for developing such a solution. The objective was to develop a viewer, which works on all modern browsers on both desktop and mobile devices. The implementation allows basic viewing functionalities of scroll, zoom, pan and window leveling (limited). The major gaps identified in the current DICOM WADO standards are a lack of ability to allow any kind of 3D reconstruction or MPR views. Other design challenges explored include considerations related to optimization of the solution for response time and low memory foot print.

  16. Novel instrument concepts for characterizing directly imaged exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Christoph U.

    2016-08-01

    Current high-contrast exoplanet imagers are optimized to find new exoplanets; they minimize diffracted starlight in a large area around a star. I present four novel instrumental approaches that are optimized to characterize these discoveries by minimizing starlight in a small area around the known location of an exoplanet: 1) coronagraphs that remove virtually all starlight over an octave in wavelength while transmitting more than 90% of the exoplanet signal; 2) holographic wavefront sensors that measure aberrations in the science focal plane; 3) ultra-fast adaptive optics systems that minimize these aberrations; and 4) direct minimization of the remaining starlight. By integrating these technologies with a high spectral- resolution, integral-field spectrograph that can resolve the Doppler shift and the polarization difference between the starlight and the reflected light from the exoplanet, it will be possible to determine the atmospheric composition, temperature and velocity structures of exoplanets and their spin rotation rate and orbital velocity. This will ultimately allow the upcoming extremely large telescopes to characterize rocky exoplanets in the habitable zone to look for signatures of life.

  17. Hypertelescope architectures for direct imaging at high angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labeyrie, Antoine; Arnold, Luc; Riaud, Pierre; Lardière, Olivier; Borkowski, Virginie; Gilet, Sohie; Dejonghe, Julien; Le Coroller, Hervé

    Optical arrays having many apertures, small compared to their spacings, can provide direct images with full luminosity if utilized according to the "densified pupil" or ``hypertelescope" scheme. On Earth, flat sites larger than 10km can be equipped with numerous mobile telescopes, or fixed telescopes with mobile beam combiners. Also of interest, although smaller, are instruments using a crater or other natural depression in a way similar to Arecibo's radio-telescope but with a diluted primary mirrror. These may be seen as "exploded" versions of machines such as the OWL. At equal collecting area, they provide the same limiting magnitude with 10 or 20 times improved angular resolution. A candidate design, called CARLINA, having the collecting area of the OWL is under study. Space versions of the latter type of architecture are also proposed to the space agencies for projects DARWIN and Terrestrial Planet Finder. Second-generation versions spanning several hundred kilometers, will in principle be capable of resolving details of Earth-like exo-planets.

  18. Atmospheric Circulation of Brown Dwarfs and Directly Imaged Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, A. P.; Kaspi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of observations now provide evidence for vigorous motion in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and directly imaged giant planets. Motivated by these observations, we examine the dynamical regime of the circulation in the atmospheres and interiors of these objects. Brown dwarfs rotate rapidly, and for plausible wind speeds, the flow at large scales will be rotationally dominated, exhibiting geostrophic balance between pressure gradient and Coriolis forces. We present three-dimensional, global, anelastic numerical simulations of convection in the interior. Fundamental theory, scaling arguments, and our anelastic simulations all demonstrate that, at large scales, the convection aligns in the direction parallel to the rotation axis. Convection occurs more efficiently at high latitudes than low latitudes, leading to systematic equator-to-pole temperature differences that may reach ~1 K near the top of the convection zone. The rotation significantly modifies the convective properties. The interaction of convection with the overlying, stably stratified atmosphere will generate a wealth of atmospheric waves, and we argue that, just as in the stratospheres of planets in the solar system, the interaction of these waves with the mean flow will lead to a significant atmospheric circulation at regional to global scales. At scales exceeding thousands of km, this should consist of geostrophically balanced, stratified turbulence (possibly organizing into coherent structures such as vortices and jets) and an accompanying overturning circulation. We present a semi-quantitative, analytic theory of this circulation as a function of the wave-driving efficiency. When applied to Jupiter, the theory predicts horizontal temperature perturbations of ~3K and wind speeds of ~50 m/sec, similar to those observed in Jupiter's stratosphere. For brown dwarfs, we predict characteristic horizontal temperature variations of several to ~50 K, horizontal wind speeds of ~10-300 m/sec, and

  19. High-speed four-color infrared digital imaging for studying in-cylinder processes in a DI diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, K. T.

    1995-07-01

    The study was to investigate in-cylinder events of a direct injection-type diesel engine by using a new high-speed infrared (IR) digital imaging systems for obtaining information that was difficult to achieve by the conventional devices. For this, a new high-speed dual-spectra infrared digital imaging system was developed to simultaneously capture two geometrically identical (in respective spectral) sets of IR images having discrete digital information in a (64x64) matrix at rates as high as over 1,800 frames/sec each with exposure period as short as 20 micron sec. At the same time, a new advanced four-color W imaging system was constructed. The first two sets of spectral data were the radiation from water vapor emission bands to compute the distributions of temperature and specie in the gaseous mixture and the remaining two sets of data were to find the instantaneous temperature distribution over the cylinder surface. More than eight reviewed publications have been produced to report many new findings including: Distributions of Water Vapor and Temperature in a Flame; End Gas Images Prior to Onset of Knock; Effect of MTBE on Diesel Combustion; Impact of Oxygen Enrichment on In-cylinder Reactions; Spectral IR Images of Spray Plume; Residual Gas Distribution; Preflame Reactions in Diesel Combustion; Preflame Reactions in the End Gas of an SI Engine; Postflame Oxidation; and Liquid Fuel Layers during Combustion in an SI Engine. In addition, some computational analysis of diesel combustion was performed using KIVA-II program in order to compare results from the prediction and the measurements made using the new IR imaging diagnostic tool.

  20. Inflammatory bowel disease imaging: Current practice and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Kilcoyne, Aoife; Kaplan, Jess L; Gee, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the role of imaging in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including detection of extraluminal complications and extraintestinal manifestations of IBD, assessment of disease activity and treatment response, and discrimination of inflammatory from fibrotic strictures. IBD is a chronic idiopathic disease affecting the gastrointestinal tract that is comprised of two separate, but related intestinal disorders; Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. The paper discusses, in detail the pros and cons of the different IBD imaging modalities that need to be considered in order to optimize the imaging and clinical evaluation of patients with IBD. Historically, IBD evaluation of the bowel has included imaging to assess the portions of the small bowel that are inaccessible to optical endoscopic visualization. This traditionally was performed using barium fluoroscopic techniques; however, cross-sectional imaging techniques (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) are being increasingly utilized for IBD evaluation because they can simultaneously assess mural and extramural IBD manifestations. Recent advances in imaging technology, that continue to improve the ability of imaging to noninvasively follow disease activity and treatment response, are also discussed. This review article summarizes the current imaging approach in inflammatory bowel disease as well as the role of emerging imaging modalities. PMID:26811637

  1. Combining direct imaging and radial velocity data towards a full exploration of the giant planet population. I. Method and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannier, J.; Lagrange, A. M.; Bonavita, M.; Borgniet, S.; Delorme, P.; Meunier, N.; Desidera, S.; Messina, S.; Chauvin, G.; Keppler, M.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Thanks to the detections of more than 3000 exoplanets these last 20 yr, statistical studies have already highlighted some properties of the distribution of the planet parameters. Nevertheless, few studies have yet investigated the planet populations from short to large separations around the same star since this requires the use of different detection techniques that usually target different types of stars. Aims: We wish to develop a tool that combines direct and indirect methods so as to correctly investigate the giant planet populations at all separations. Methods: We developed the MESS2 code, a Monte Carlo simulation code combining radial velocity and direct imaging data obtained at different epochs for a given star to estimate the detection probability of giant planets spanning a wide range of physical separations. It is based on the generation of synthetic planet populations. Results: We apply MESS2 on a young M1-type, the nearby star AU Mic observed with HARPS and NACO/ESO. We show that giant planet detection limits are significantly improved at intermediate separations (≈20 au in the case of AU Mic). We show that the traditional approach of analyzing the RV and DI detection limits independently systematically overestimates the planet detection limits and hence planet occurrence rates. The use of MESS2 allows us to obtain correct planet occurrence rates in statistical studies, making use of multi-epoch DI data and/or RV measurements. We also show that MESS2 can optimize the schedule of future DI observations.

  2. Direct parallel image reconstructions for spiral trajectories using GRAPPA.

    PubMed

    Heidemann, Robin M; Griswold, Mark A; Seiberlich, Nicole; Krüger, Gunnar; Kannengiesser, Stephan A R; Kiefer, Berthold; Wiggins, Graham; Wald, Lawrence L; Jakob, Peter M

    2006-08-01

    The use of spiral trajectories is an efficient way to cover a desired k-space partition in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Compared to conventional Cartesian k-space sampling, it allows faster acquisitions and results in a slight reduction of the high gradient demand in fast dynamic scans, such as in functional MRI (fMRI). However, spiral images are more susceptible to off-resonance effects that cause blurring artifacts and distortions of the point-spread function (PSF), and thereby degrade the image quality. Since off-resonance effects scale with the readout duration, the respective artifacts can be reduced by shortening the readout trajectory. Multishot experiments represent one approach to reduce these artifacts in spiral imaging, but result in longer scan times and potentially increased flow and motion artifacts. Parallel imaging methods are another promising approach to improve image quality through an increase in the acquisition speed. However, non-Cartesian parallel image reconstructions are known to be computationally time-consuming, which is prohibitive for clinical applications. In this study a new and fast approach for parallel image reconstructions for spiral imaging based on the generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (GRAPPA) methodology is presented. With this approach the computational burden is reduced such that it becomes comparable to that needed in accelerated Cartesian procedures. The respective spiral images with two- to eightfold acceleration clearly benefit from the advantages of parallel imaging, such as enabling parallel MRI single-shot spiral imaging with the off-resonance behavior of multishot acquisitions. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Evaluation of the veracity of one work by the artist Di Cavalcanti through non-destructive techniques: XRF, imaging and brush stroke analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiya, E. A. M.; Campos, P. H. O. V.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Appoloni, C. R.; Lopes, F.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents systematic studies and analysis that contributed to the identification of the forgery of a work by the artist Emiliano Augusto Cavalcanti de Albuquerque e Melo, known as Di Cavalcanti. The use of several areas of expertise such as brush stroke analysis ("pinacologia"), applied physics, and art history resulted in an accurate diagnosis for ascertaining the authenticity of the work entitled "Violeiro" (1950). For this work we used non-destructive methods such as techniques of infrared, ultraviolet, visible and tangential light imaging combined with chemical analysis of the pigments by portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and graphic gesture analysis. Each applied method of analysis produced specific information that made possible the identification of materials and techniques employed and we concluded that this work is not consistent with patterns characteristic of the artist Di Cavalcanti.

  4. Directional binary wavelet patterns for biomedical image indexing and retrieval.

    PubMed

    Murala, Subrahmanyam; Maheshwari, R P; Balasubramanian, R

    2012-10-01

    A new algorithm for medical image retrieval is presented in the paper. An 8-bit grayscale image is divided into eight binary bit-planes, and then binary wavelet transform (BWT) which is similar to the lifting scheme in real wavelet transform (RWT) is performed on each bitplane to extract the multi-resolution binary images. The local binary pattern (LBP) features are extracted from the resultant BWT sub-bands. Three experiments have been carried out for proving the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. Out of which two are meant for medical image retrieval and one for face retrieval. It is further mentioned that the database considered for three experiments are OASIS magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) database, NEMA computer tomography (CT) database and PolyU-NIRFD face database. The results after investigation shows a significant improvement in terms of their evaluation measures as compared to LBP and LBP with Gabor transform.

  5. Megavoltage 2D topographic imaging: An attractive alternative to megavoltage CT for the localization of breast cancer patients treated with TomoDirect.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Philippe; Le Pennec, Fabien; Hui, Susanta K; Dehaynin, Nicolas; Jarnet, Delphine; Gantier, Matthieu; Niederst, Claudine; Mazzara, Christophe; Baudrier, Etienne; Noblet, Vincent

    2017-07-01

    To show the usefulness of topographic 2D megavoltage images (MV2D) for the localization of breast cancer patients treated with TomoDirect (TD), a radiotherapy treatment technique with fixed-angle beams performed on a TomoTherapy system. A method was developed to quickly localize breast cancer patients treated with TD by registering the MV2D images produced before a TD treatment with reference images reconstructed from a kilovoltage CT simulation scanner and by using the projection of the beam-eye-view TD treatment field. Dose and image quality measurements were performed to determine the optimal parameters for acquiring MV2D images. A TD treatment was simulated on a chest phantom equipped with a breast attachment. MVCT and MV2D images were performed for 7 different shifted positions of the phantom and registered by 10 different operators with the simulation kilovoltage CT images. Compared to MVCT, MV2D imaging reduces the dose by a factor of up to 45 and the acquisition time by a factor of up to 49. Comparing the registration shift values obtained for the phantom images obtained with MVCT in the coarse mode to those obtained with MV2D, the mean difference is 1.0±1.1mm, -1.1mm±1.1, and -0.1±2.2mm, respectively, in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions. With dual advantages (very fast imaging and a potentially reduced dose to the heart and contralateral organs), MV2D topographic images may be an attractive alternative to MVCT for the localization of breast cancer patients treated with TomoDirect. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Direct imaging of APP proteolysis in living cells.

    PubMed

    Parenti, Niccoló; Del Grosso, Ambra; Antoni, Claudia; Cecchini, Marco; Corradetti, Renato; Pavone, Francesco S; Calamai, Martino

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a multifactorial disorder caused by the interaction of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. The formation of cytotoxic oligomers consisting of Aβ peptide is widely accepted as being one of the main key events triggering the development of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ peptide production results from the specific proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Deciphering the factors governing the activity of the secretases responsible for the cleavage of APP is still a critical issue. Kits available commercially measure the enzymatic activity of the secretases from cells lysates, in vitro. By contrast, we have developed a prototypal rapid bioassay that provides visible information on the proteolytic processing of APP directly in living cells. APP was fused to a monomeric variant of the green fluorescent protein and a monomeric variant of the red fluorescent protein at the C-terminal and N-terminal (mChAPPmGFP), respectively. Changes in the proteolytic processing rate in transfected human neuroblastoma and rat neuronal cells were imaged with confocal microscopy as changes in the red/green fluorescence intensity ratio. The significant decrease in the mean red/green ratio observed in cells over-expressing the β-secretase BACE1, or the α-secretase ADAM10, fused to a monomeric blue fluorescent protein confirms that the proteolytic site is still accessible. Specific siRNA was used to evaluate the contribution of endogenous BACE1. Interestingly, we found that the degree of proteolytic processing of APP is not completely homogeneous within the same single cell, and that there is a high degree of variability between cells of the same type. We were also able to follow with a fluorescence spectrometer the changes in the red emission intensity of the extracellular medium when BACE1 was overexpressed. This represents a complementary approach to fluorescence microscopy for rapidly detecting changes in the proteolytic processing of

  7. Reconstructing chromosphere concentration images directly by continuous-wave diffuse optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Li, Ang; Zhang, Quan; Culver, Joseph P; Miller, Eric L; Boas, David A

    2004-02-01

    We present an algorithm to reconstruct chromosphere concentration images directly rather than following the traditional two-step process of reconstructing wavelength-dependent absorption coefficient images and then calculating chromosphere concentration images. This procedure imposes prior spectral information into the image reconstruction that results in a dramatic improvement in the image contrast-to-noise ratio of better than 100%. We demonstrate this improvement with simulations and a dynamic blood phantom experiment.

  8. Molecular imaging of breast cancer: present and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Alcantara, David; Leal, Manuel Pernia; García-Bocanegra, Irene; García-Martín, Maria L.

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past few decades and now play a central role in clinical oncology. But the truly transformative power of imaging in the clinical management of cancer patients lies ahead. Today, imaging is at a crossroads, with molecularly targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Molecular imaging will allow clinicians to not only see where a tumor is located in the body, but also to visualize the expression and activity of specific molecules (e.g., proteases and protein kinases) and biological processes (e.g., apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis) that influence tumor behavior and/or response to therapy. Breast cancer, the most common cancer among women and a research area where our group is actively involved, is a very heterogeneous disease with diverse patterns of development and response to treatment. Hence, molecular imaging is expected to have a major impact on this type of cancer, leading to important improvements in diagnosis, individualized treatment, and drug development, as well as our understanding of how breast cancer arises. PMID:25566530

  9. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Present and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcantara, David; Pernia Leal, Manuel; Garcia, Irene; Garcia-Martin, Maria Luisa

    2014-12-01

    Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past few decades and now play a central role in clinical oncology. But the truly transformative power of imaging in the clinical management of cancer patients lies ahead. Today, imaging is at a crossroads, with molecularly targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Molecular imaging will allow clinicians to not only see where a tumour is located in the body, but also to visualize the expression and activity of specific molecules (e.g. proteases and protein kinases) and biological processes (e.g. apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis) that influence tumour behavior and/or response to therapy. Breast cancer, the most common cancer among women and a research area where our group is actively involved, is a very heterogeneous disease with diverse patterns of development and response to treatment. Hence, molecular imaging is expected to have a major impact on this type of cancer, leading to important improvements in diagnosis, individualized treatment, and drug development, as well as our understanding of how breast cancer arises.

  10. Future Directions In Image Management: Medical And Practical Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, J. J.; Eikman, E. A.; Shaff, M. I.; James, A. E.

    1983-05-01

    The volume of data produced by new imaging modalities has far outstripped the ability of most departments to effectively utilize the images produced. The problem is further exacerbated by the fact that the diagnostic procedures have become progressively less invasive and traumatic and are being applied to an ever larger patient population. The decrease in cost and the rise in technological capability of computer systems in recent years has provided imaging specialists with the opportunity to create network systems for the storage and recall of diagnostic images. This paper examines the philosophy of image storage from the standpoint of the medical, legal, and practical questions. A proposal is made that not all images are equal and that some deserve to be archived for longer periods than others. The practical problem of using a video display for diagnostic readout, aside from the classical questions of resolution and response time, is discussed. A proposal is also made that two data bases might be created; one which provides rapid access to the clinically relevant images (i.e., the two or three that demonstrate pathology) and one which may require much longer to access, but which contains all the archived data.

  11. Direct Penguin Counting Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, C. U.; Kim, H. C.; Kim, J. H.; Hong, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents an application of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) images to monitor penguin colony in Baton Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica. The area around Narębski Point located on the southeast coast of Barton Peninsula was designated as Antarctic Specially Protected Area No. 171 (ASPA 171), and Chinstrap and Gentoo penguins inhabit in this area. The UAV images were acquired in a part of ASPA 171 from four flights in a single day, Jan 18, 2014. About 360 images were mosaicked as an image of about 3 cm spatial resolution and then a subset including representative penguin rookeries was selected. The subset image was segmented based on gradient map of pixel values, and spectral and spatial attributes were assigned to each segment. The object based image analysis (OBIA) was conducted with consideration of spectral attributes including mean and minimum values of each segment and various shape attributes such as area, length, compactness and roundness to detect individual penguin. The segments indicating individual penguin were effectively detected on rookeries with high contrasts in the spectral and shape attributes. The importance of periodic and precise monitoring of penguins has been recognized because variations of their populations reflect environmental changes and disturbance from human activities. Utilization of very high resolution imaging method shown in this study can be applied to other penguin habitats in Antarctica, and the results will be able to support establishing effective environmental management plans.

  12. Directly Imaging Planets with SCExAO: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Thayne M.; Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Lozi, Julien; Tamura, Motohide; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Uyama, Taichi; Garcia, Eugenio

    2017-01-01

    We present the first science results from the newly commissioned Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics project, an experimental system dedicated to image faint jovian planets around nearby stars. SCExAO is now achieving true extreme AO capability. We describe the typical performance of SCExAO, the first images of benchmark exoplanets and planet-forming disks, and SCExAO’s first science results. Finally, we briefly chart the path forward for SCExAO to achieve its full scientific capability, including imaging mature planets in reflected light.

  13. Direct imaging of APP proteolysis in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Parenti, Niccoló; Del Grosso, Ambra; Antoni, Claudia; Cecchini, Marco; Corradetti, Renato; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a multifactorial disorder caused by the interaction of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. The formation of cytotoxic oligomers consisting of Aβ peptide is widely accepted as being one of the main key events triggering the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Aβ peptide production results from the specific proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Deciphering the factors governing the activity of the secretases responsible for the cleavage of APP is still a critical issue. Kits available commercially measure the enzymatic activity of the secretases from cells lysates, in vitro. By contrast, we have developed a prototypal rapid bioassay that provides visible information on the proteolytic processing of APP directly in living cells. APP was fused to a monomeric variant of the green fluorescent protein and a monomeric variant of the red fluorescent protein at the C-terminal and N-terminal (mChAPPmGFP), respectively. Changes in the proteolytic processing rate in transfected human neuroblastoma and rat neuronal cells were imaged with confocal microscopy as changes in the red/green fluorescence intensity ratio. The significant decrease in the mean red/green ratio observed in cells over-expressing the β-secretase BACE1, or the α-secretase ADAM10, fused to a monomeric blue fluorescent protein confirms that the proteolytic site is still accessible. Specific siRNA was used to evaluate the contribution of endogenous BACE1. Interestingly, we found that the degree of proteolytic processing of APP is not completely homogeneous within the same single cell, and that there is a high degree of variability between cells of the same type. We were also able to follow with a fluorescence spectrometer the changes in the red emission intensity of the extracellular medium when BACE1 was overexpressed. This represents a complementary approach to fluorescence microscopy for rapidly detecting changes in the proteolytic processing

  14. 12-Month-Old Infants' Perception of Attention Direction in Static Video Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hofsten, Claes; Dahlstrom, Emma; Fredriksson, Ylva

    2005-01-01

    Twelve-month-old infants' ability to perceive gaze direction in static video images was investigated. The images showed a woman who performed attention-directing actions by looking or pointing toward 1 of 4 objects positioned in front of her (2 on each side). When the model just pointed at the objects, she looked straight ahead, and when she just…

  15. RNA-based fluorescent biosensors for live cell imaging of second messengers cyclic di-GMP and cyclic AMP-GMP.

    PubMed

    Kellenberger, Colleen A; Wilson, Stephen C; Sales-Lee, Jade; Hammond, Ming C

    2013-04-03

    Cyclic dinucleotides are an important class of signaling molecules that regulate a wide variety of pathogenic responses in bacteria, but tools for monitoring their regulation in vivo are lacking. We have designed RNA-based fluorescent biosensors for cyclic di-GMP and cyclic AMP-GMP by fusing the Spinach aptamer to variants of a natural GEMM-I riboswitch. In live cell imaging experiments, these biosensors demonstrate fluorescence turn-on in response to cyclic dinucleotides, and they were used to confirm in vivo production of cyclic AMP-GMP by the enzyme DncV.

  16. Functional imaging using the retinal function imager: direct imaging of blood velocity, achieving fluorescein angiography-like images without any contrast agent, qualitative oximetry, and functional metabolic signals.

    PubMed

    Izhaky, David; Nelson, Darin A; Burgansky-Eliash, Zvia; Grinvald, Amiram

    2009-07-01

    The Retinal Function Imager (RFI; Optical Imaging, Rehovot, Israel) is a unique, noninvasive multiparameter functional imaging instrument that directly measures hemodynamic parameters such as retinal blood-flow velocity, oximetric state, and metabolic responses to photic activation. In addition, it allows capillary perfusion mapping without any contrast agent. These parameters of retinal function are degraded by retinal abnormalities. This review delineates the development of these parameters and demonstrates their clinical applicability for noninvasive detection of retinal function in several modalities. The results suggest multiple clinical applications for early diagnosis of retinal diseases and possible critical guidance of their treatment.

  17. Direct optical imaging of structural inhomogeneities in crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Grigorev, A M

    2016-05-10

    A method for optical imaging of structural inhomogeneities in crystalline materials is proposed, based on the differences in the optical properties of the structural inhomogeneity and the homogeneous material near the fundamental absorption edge of the crystalline material. The method can be used to detect defects in both semiconductors and insulators.

  18. Direct Imaging of Minority Charge Carrier Transport in Luminescent Semiconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    public release; distribution is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) A quantitative method for extracting minority...Physics iv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v ABSTRACT A quantitative method for extracting minority...35 1. Imaging Drift........................................................................... 35 2. Quantitative ( )µτ Extraction

  19. Through Wall Imaging: Historical Perspective and Future Directions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    is to provide detailed information in areas that cannot be seen using conventional measures. Borrowing from successes in geological and medical ... imaging environments, researchers are applying radio frequency (RF) and other sensing modes to penetrate wall materials and make intelligent decisions about

  20. Multi-scale contrast enhancement of oriented features in 2D images using directional morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Susanta; Praveen, S. R. Sai

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-scale contrast enhancement scheme for improving the visual quality of directional features present in 2D gray scale images. Directional morphological filters are employed to locate and extract the scale-specific image features with different orientations which are subsequently stored in a set of feature images. The final enhanced image is constructed by weighted combination of these feature images with the original image. While construction, the feature images corresponding to progressively smaller scales are made to have higher proportion of contribution through the use of progressively larger weights. The proposed method has been formulated, implemented and executed on a set of real 2D gray scale images with oriented features. The experimental results visually establish the efficacy of the method. The proposed method has been compared with other similar methods both on subjective and objective basis and the overall performance is found to be satisfactory.

  1. Half-time Tc-99m sestamibi imaging with a direct conversion molecular breast imaging system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In an effort to reduce necessary acquisition time to perform molecular breast imaging (MBI), we compared diagnostic performance of MBI performed with standard 10-min-per-view acquisitions and half-time 5-min-per-view acquisitions, with and without wide beam reconstruction (WBR) processing. Methods Eighty-two bilateral, two-view MBI studies were reviewed. Studies were performed with 300 MBq Tc-99 m sestamibi and a direct conversion molecular breast imaging (DC-MBI) system. Acquisitions were 10 min-per-view; the first half of each was extracted to create 5-min-per-view datasets, and WBR processing was applied. The 10-min-, 5-min-, and 5-min-per-view WBR studies were independently interpreted in a randomized, blinded fashion by two radiologists. Assessments of 1 to 5 were assigned; 4 and 5 were considered test positive. Background parenchymal uptake, lesion type, distribution of non-mass lesions, lesion intensity, and image quality were described. Results Considering detection of all malignant and benign lesions, 5 min-per-view MBI had lower sensitivity (mean of 70% vs. 85% (p ≤ 0.04) for two readers) and lower area under curve (AUC) (mean of 92.7 vs. 99.6, p ≤ 0.01) but had similar specificity (p = 1.0). WBR processing did not alter sensitivity, specificity, or AUC obtained at 5 min-per-view. Overall agreement in final assessment between 5-min-per-view and 10-min-per-view acquisition types was near perfect (κ = 0.82 to 0.89); however, fair to moderate agreement was observed for assessment category 3 (probably benign) (κ = 0.24 to 0.48). Of 33 malignant lesions, 6 (18%) were changed from assessment of 4 or 5 with 10-min-per-view MBI to assessment of 3 with 5-min-per-view MBI. Image quality of 5-min-per-view studies was reduced compared to 10-min-per-view studies for both readers (3.24 vs. 3.98, p < 0.0001 and 3.60 vs. 3.91, p < 0.0001). WBR processing improved image quality for one reader (3.85 vs. 3.24, p < 0

  2. Half-time Tc-99m sestamibi imaging with a direct conversion molecular breast imaging system.

    PubMed

    Hruska, Carrie B; Conners, Amy Lynn; Jones, Katie N; Weinmann, Amanda L; Lingineni, Ravi K; Carter, Rickey E; Rhodes, Deborah J; O'Connor, Michael K

    2014-01-15

    In an effort to reduce necessary acquisition time to perform molecular breast imaging (MBI), we compared diagnostic performance of MBI performed with standard 10-min-per-view acquisitions and half-time 5-min-per-view acquisitions, with and without wide beam reconstruction (WBR) processing. Eighty-two bilateral, two-view MBI studies were reviewed. Studies were performed with 300 MBq Tc-99 m sestamibi and a direct conversion molecular breast imaging (DC-MBI) system. Acquisitions were 10 min-per-view; the first half of each was extracted to create 5-min-per-view datasets, and WBR processing was applied.The 10-min-, 5-min-, and 5-min-per-view WBR studies were independently interpreted in a randomized, blinded fashion by two radiologists. Assessments of 1 to 5 were assigned; 4 and 5 were considered test positive. Background parenchymal uptake, lesion type, distribution of non-mass lesions, lesion intensity, and image quality were described. Considering detection of all malignant and benign lesions, 5 min-per-view MBI had lower sensitivity (mean of 70% vs. 85% (p ≤ 0.04) for two readers) and lower area under curve (AUC) (mean of 92.7 vs. 99.6, p ≤ 0.01) but had similar specificity (p = 1.0). WBR processing did not alter sensitivity, specificity, or AUC obtained at 5 min-per-view.Overall agreement in final assessment between 5-min-per-view and 10-min-per-view acquisition types was near perfect (κ = 0.82 to 0.89); however, fair to moderate agreement was observed for assessment category 3 (probably benign) (κ = 0.24 to 0.48). Of 33 malignant lesions, 6 (18%) were changed from assessment of 4 or 5 with 10-min-per-view MBI to assessment of 3 with 5-min-per-view MBI. Image quality of 5-min-per-view studies was reduced compared to 10-min-per-view studies for both readers (3.24 vs. 3.98, p < 0.0001 and 3.60 vs. 3.91, p < 0.0001). WBR processing improved image quality for one reader (3.85 vs. 3.24, p < 0.0001). Although similar

  3. Candidate gravitational microlensing events for future direct lens imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, C. B.; Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Park, H.; Han, C.; Sumi, T.; Koshimoto, N.; Udalski, A.; Tsapras, Y.; Bozza, V.; Abe, F.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Ling, C. H.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; and others

    2014-10-10

    The mass of the lenses giving rise to Galactic microlensing events can be constrained by measuring the relative lens-source proper motion and lens flux. The flux of the lens can be separated from that of the source, companions to the source, and unrelated nearby stars with high-resolution images taken when the lens and source are spatially resolved. For typical ground-based adaptive optics (AO) or space-based observations, this requires either inordinately long time baselines or high relative proper motions. We provide a list of microlensing events toward the Galactic bulge with high relative lens-source proper motion that are therefore good candidates for constraining the lens mass with future high-resolution imaging. We investigate all events from 2004 to 2013 that display detectable finite-source effects, a feature that allows us to measure the proper motion. In total, we present 20 events with μ ≳ 8 mas yr{sup –1}. Of these, 14 were culled from previous analyses while 6 are new, including OGLE-2004-BLG-368, MOA-2005-BLG-36, OGLE-2012-BLG-0211, OGLE-2012-BLG-0456, MOA-2012-BLG-532, and MOA-2013-BLG-029. In ≲12 yr from the time of each event the lens and source of each event will be sufficiently separated for ground-based telescopes with AO systems or space telescopes to resolve each component and further characterize the lens system. Furthermore, for the most recent events, comparison of the lens flux estimates from images taken immediately to those estimated from images taken when the lens and source are resolved can be used to empirically check the robustness of the single-epoch method currently being used to estimate lens masses for many events.

  4. Candidate Gravitational Microlensing Events for Future Direct Lens Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, C. B.; Park, H.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Tsapras, Y.; Han, C.; Gaudi, B. S.; Bozza, V.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Tsurumi, N.; Wada, K.; Yamai, N.; Yock, P. C. M.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; OGLE Collaboration; Almeida, L. A.; Bos, M.; Choi, J.-Y.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Friedmann, M.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jablonski, F.; Jung, Y. K.; Kaspi, S.; Lee, C.-U.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Shin, I.-G.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Tan, T.-G.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; μFUN Collaboration; Allan, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Dominik, M.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Street, R. A.; RoboNet Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    The mass of the lenses giving rise to Galactic microlensing events can be constrained by measuring the relative lens-source proper motion and lens flux. The flux of the lens can be separated from that of the source, companions to the source, and unrelated nearby stars with high-resolution images taken when the lens and source are spatially resolved. For typical ground-based adaptive optics (AO) or space-based observations, this requires either inordinately long time baselines or high relative proper motions. We provide a list of microlensing events toward the Galactic bulge with high relative lens-source proper motion that are therefore good candidates for constraining the lens mass with future high-resolution imaging. We investigate all events from 2004 to 2013 that display detectable finite-source effects, a feature that allows us to measure the proper motion. In total, we present 20 events with μ >~ 8 mas yr-1. Of these, 14 were culled from previous analyses while 6 are new, including OGLE-2004-BLG-368, MOA-2005-BLG-36, OGLE-2012-BLG-0211, OGLE-2012-BLG-0456, MOA-2012-BLG-532, and MOA-2013-BLG-029. In lsim12 yr from the time of each event the lens and source of each event will be sufficiently separated for ground-based telescopes with AO systems or space telescopes to resolve each component and further characterize the lens system. Furthermore, for the most recent events, comparison of the lens flux estimates from images taken immediately to those estimated from images taken when the lens and source are resolved can be used to empirically check the robustness of the single-epoch method currently being used to estimate lens masses for many events.

  5. Cardiac MR imaging: current status and future direction.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Maythem; Van, Tu Anh; Krug, Roland; Hetts, Steven W; Wilson, Mark W

    2015-08-01

    Coronary artery disease is currently a worldwide epidemic with increasing impact on healthcare systems. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences give complementary information on LV function, regional perfusion, angiogenesis, myocardial viability and orientations of myocytes. T2-weighted short-tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR), fat suppression and black blood sequences have been frequently used for detecting edematous area at risk (AAR) of infarction. T2 mapping, however, indicated that the edematous reaction in acute myocardial infarct (AMI) is not stable and warranted the use of edematous area in evaluating therapies. On the other hand, cine MRI demonstrated reproducible data on LV function in healthy volunteers and LV remodeling in patients. Noninvasive first pass perfusion, using exogenous tracer (gadolinium-based contrast media) and arterial spin labeling MRI, using endogenous tracer (water), are sensitive and useful techniques for evaluating myocardial perfusion and angiogenesis. Recently, new strategies have been developed to quantify myocardial viability using T1-mapping and equilibrium contrast enhanced MR techniques because existing delayed contrast enhancement MRI (DE-MRI) sequences are limited in detecting patchy microinfarct and diffuse fibrosis. These new techniques were successfully used for characterizing diffuse myocardial fibrosis associated with myocarditis, amyloidosis, sarcoidosis heart failure, aortic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, congenital heart disease, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and hypertension). Diffusion MRI provides information regarding microscopic tissue structure, while diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) helps to characterize the myocardium and monitor the process of LV remodeling after AMI. Novel trends in hybrid imaging, such as cardiac positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI and optical imaging/MRI, are recently under intensive investigation. With the promise of higher spatial

  6. Cardiac MR imaging: current status and future direction

    PubMed Central

    Van, Tu Anh; Krug, Roland; Hetts, Steven W.; Wilson, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is currently a worldwide epidemic with increasing impact on healthcare systems. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences give complementary information on LV function, regional perfusion, angiogenesis, myocardial viability and orientations of myocytes. T2-weighted short-tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR), fat suppression and black blood sequences have been frequently used for detecting edematous area at risk (AAR) of infarction. T2 mapping, however, indicated that the edematous reaction in acute myocardial infarct (AMI) is not stable and warranted the use of edematous area in evaluating therapies. On the other hand, cine MRI demonstrated reproducible data on LV function in healthy volunteers and LV remodeling in patients. Noninvasive first pass perfusion, using exogenous tracer (gadolinium-based contrast media) and arterial spin labeling MRI, using endogenous tracer (water), are sensitive and useful techniques for evaluating myocardial perfusion and angiogenesis. Recently, new strategies have been developed to quantify myocardial viability using T1-mapping and equilibrium contrast enhanced MR techniques because existing delayed contrast enhancement MRI (DE-MRI) sequences are limited in detecting patchy microinfarct and diffuse fibrosis. These new techniques were successfully used for characterizing diffuse myocardial fibrosis associated with myocarditis, amyloidosis, sarcoidosis heart failure, aortic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, congenital heart disease, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and hypertension). Diffusion MRI provides information regarding microscopic tissue structure, while diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) helps to characterize the myocardium and monitor the process of LV remodeling after AMI. Novel trends in hybrid imaging, such as cardiac positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI and optical imaging/MRI, are recently under intensive investigation. With the promise of higher spatial

  7. Direct estimation of evoked hemoglobin changes by multimodality fusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, Theodore J.; Diamond, Solomon G.; Boas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades, both diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD)-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methods have been developed as noninvasive tools for imaging evoked cerebral hemodynamic changes in studies of brain activity. Although these two technologies measure functional contrast from similar physiological sources, i.e., changes in hemoglobin levels, these two modalities are based on distinct physical and biophysical principles leading to both limitations and strengths to each method. In this work, we describe a unified linear model to combine the complimentary spatial, temporal, and spectroscopic resolutions of concurrently measured optical tomography and fMRI signals. Using numerical simulations, we demonstrate that concurrent optical and BOLD measurements can be used to create cross-calibrated estimates of absolute micromolar deoxyhemoglobin changes. We apply this new analysis tool to experimental data acquired simultaneously with both DOT and BOLD imaging during a motor task, demonstrate the ability to more robustly estimate hemoglobin changes in comparison to DOT alone, and show how this approach can provide cross-calibrated estimates of hemoglobin changes. Using this multimodal method, we estimate the calibration of the 3 tesla BOLD signal to be −0.55% ± 0.40% signal change per micromolar change of deoxyhemoglobin. PMID:19021411

  8. Differential polarization direct imaging of FU Ori type YSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guangwei; Takami, Michihiro; Scicluna, Peter; Karr, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    FU Orionis objects (FUors) are distinguished from other young stellar objects due to their outbursts. They can surge in brightness by multiple magnitudes in a short time. Thus FUors have always been considered the strongest evidence which suggests unsteady accretion process in low mass young stellar objects (YSO). However the accreting process of FUors are not well understood. We present high resolution (~0.1 arcseconds) observations of 5 FUors (FU Ori, V1057cyg, V1515cyg, V1735cyg, Z Cma) in near infrared bandpasses (J,H,K) using the Subaru telescope. Through using polarization differential imaging and coronagraphy techniques, we were able to obtain high contrast images of circumstellar environment around central young stars. After image processing, we found interesting structures (stream, tail, fragment, etc) in the circumstellar disks. These structures are indications for dynamical interaction, potential outflow cavities and disk fragmentation. More importantly, these disk features can provide us with insight into the accretion process and where outbursts originate.

  9. Synthesis of substituted imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazines via mono-, di-, and directed remote metalation strategies.

    PubMed

    Board, Johnathan; Wang, Jian-Xin; Crew, Andrew P; Jin, Meizhong; Foreman, Kenneth; Mulvihill, Mark J; Snieckus, Victor

    2009-11-19

    Imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazines 1 undergo regioselective C3-metalation and C5/C3-dimetalation to afford a range of functionalized derivatives 2a-2g (Table 1 ), and 4a-4d (Table 2 ). Under similar conditions, the C3-methyl derivatives 2a and 5 undergo surprising regioselective C5-deprotonation to afford, after electrophile quench, products 4b and 6a-6p (Table 3 ), results that are rationalized by quantum mechanical calculations. Benzamide 7b, obtained from such metalation chemistry followed by Suzuki cross coupling, undergoes directed remote metalation-cyclization to afford 8, representing the hitherto unknown triazadibenzo[cd,f]azulen-7(6H)-one tricyclic ring system.

  10. Exoplanet Direct Imaging: Coronagraph Probe Mission Study EXO-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl R.

    2013-01-01

    Flagship mission for spectroscopy of ExoEarths is a long-term priority for space astrophysics (Astro2010). Requires 10(exp 10) contrast at 3 lambda/D separation, ( (is) greater than 10,000 times beyond HST performance) and large telescope (is) greater than 4m aperture. Big step. Mission for spectroscopy of giant planets and imaging of disks requires 10(exp 9) contrast at 3 lambda/D (already demonstrated in lab) and (is) approximately 1.5m telescope. Should be much more affordable, good intermediate step.Various PIs have proposed many versions of the latter mission 17 times since 1999; no unified approach.

  11. Direct imaging of small scatterers using reduced time dependent data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakoni, Fioralba; Rezac, Jacob D.

    2017-06-01

    We introduce qualitative methods for locating small objects using time dependent acoustic near field waves. These methods have reduced data collection requirements compared to typical qualitative imaging techniques. In particular, we only collect scattered field data in a small region surrounding the location from which an incident field was transmitted. The new methods are partially theoretically justified and numerical simulations demonstrate their efficacy. We show that these reduced data techniques give comparable results to methods which require full multistatic data and that these time dependent methods require less scattered field data than their time harmonic analogs.

  12. Direct observation of up-conversion via femtosecond photoelectron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuzhu; Knopp, Gregor; Gerber, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Ultrafast relaxation dynamics in 2-methylfuran has been investigated by time-resolved photoelectron imaging. An "up" internal conversion from a low-lying state into a higher-lying one has been observed experimentally. Temporal photoelectron kinetic-energy distributions and angular distributions of the photoelectrons are analyzed. In the up-conversion process, the vibrational energy in the initial state is converted to the electronic energy of the final state during the energy transfer. And the time scale for the up-conversion process is estimated by the observed onset delay for the corresponding photoelectron bands.

  13. [The image of a good pharmacist in the works of Saladin di Ascoli and Valerius Cordus].

    PubMed

    Bartunek, Anton; Šimon, František

    2017-01-01

    Separation of pharmacy from medicine induced the requirements formulation for an ideal pharmacist. Two prominent authors did so, Saladin di Ascoli (the first half of the XVth century) in the work Compendium aromatariorum (1488) and Valerius Cordus (1515-1544) in the work Dispensatorium pharmacopolarum (1546). Both of them formulate similar postulates of both professional and ethical nature, namely a knowledge of Latin, good education, experience, good character traits, need of satisfied marriage; both say that the pharmacist is required to be a good Christian, they condemn alcohol, relationships with women, poisons and abortifacients, remember right relationship to money. In addition, Cordus adds a good financial situation. Their considerations had a great impact on further development of pharmacy across Europe.Key words: Saladin di Ascoli Valerius Cordus ideal pharmacist.

  14. Hard-X-ray directional dark-field imaging using the speckle scanning technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-03-13

    X-ray dark-field imaging can provide inaccessible and complementary information compared to conventional absorption contrast imaging. However, extraction of the dark-field signal is difficult, and sophisticated optics are often required. In this Letter, we report a novel approach to generate high-quality dark-field images using a simple membrane. The dark-field image is extracted from the maximum correlation coefficient by applying a cross-correlation algorithm to a stack of speckle images collected by scanning a membrane in a transverse direction to the incident x-ray beam. The new method can also provide directional dark-field information, which is extremely useful for the study of strongly ordered systems. The potential of the proposed technique for nondestructive x-ray imaging is demonstrated by imaging representative samples.

  15. Band-Limited Masks and Direct Imaging of Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc J.

    2009-01-01

    Band-limited masks have become the baseline design for what is now called "classical TPF" and also the N|RCamcomnagraphonJW8 .This technology remains one of the most promising paths for direct detection ofmxop|anedm and disks. I'll describe some of the latest progress in the implementation of this technique and what we have learned about where it can and can not be effectively applied.

  16. Band-Limited Masks and Direct Imaging of Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc J.

    2009-01-01

    Band-limited masks have become the baseline design for what is now called "classical TPF" and also the N|RCamcomnagraphonJW8 .This technology remains one of the most promising paths for direct detection ofmxop|anedm and disks. I'll describe some of the latest progress in the implementation of this technique and what we have learned about where it can and can not be effectively applied.

  17. Method to directly radiolabel antibodies for diagnostic imaging and therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, M.L.

    1994-05-03

    The invention is a novel method and kit for directly radiolabeling proteins such as antibodies or antibody fragments for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The method comprises incubating a protein-containing solution with a solution of sodium ascorbate; adding a required quantity of reduced radionuclide to the incubated protein. A kit is also provided wherein the protein and/or reducing agents may be in lyophilized form. No Drawings

  18. Method to directly radiolabel antibodies for diagnostic imaging and therapy

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, Mathew L.

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a novel method and kit for directly radiolabeling proteins such as antibodies or antibody fragments for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The method comprises incubating a protein-containing solution with a solution of sodium ascorbate; adding a required quantity of reduced radionuclide to the incubated protein. A kit is also provided wherein the protein and/or reducing agents may be in lyophilized form.

  19. Method to directly radiolabel antibodies for diagnostic imaging and therapy

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, Mathew L.

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a novel method and kit for directly radiolabeling proteins such as antibodies or antibody fragments for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The method comprises incubating a protein-containing solution with a solution of sodium ascorbate; adding a required quantity of reduced radionuclide to the incubated protein. A kit is also provided wherein the protein and/or reducing agents may be in lyophilized form.

  20. Crosswell Imaging Technology & Advanced DSR Navigation for Horizontal Directional Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Stolarczyk

    2008-08-08

    The objective of Phase II is to develop and demonstrate real-time measurement-while-drilling (MWD) for guidance and navigation of drill strings during horizontal drilling operations applicable to both short and long holes. The end product of Phase II is a functional drill-string assembly outfitted with a commercial version of Drill String Radar (DSR). Project Objectives Develop and demonstrate a dual-phase methodology of in-seam drilling, imaging, and structure confirmation. This methodology, illustrated in Figure 1, includes: (1) Using RIM to image between drill holes for seam thickness estimates and in-seam structures detection. Completed, February 2005; and (2) Using DSR for real-time MWD guidance and navigation of drillstrings during horizontal drilling operations. Completed, November 2008. As of November 2008, the Phase II portion of Contract DE-FC26-04NT42085 is about 99% complete, including milestones and tasks original outlined as Phase II work. The one percent deficiency results from MSHA-related approvals which have yet to be granted (at the time of reporting). These approvals are pending and are do not negatively impact the scope of work or project objectives.

  1. Shallow subsurface imaging of the Piano di Pezza active normal fault (central Italy) by high-resolution refraction and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time domain electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Fabio; Tulliani, Valerio; Fierro, Elisa; Sapia, Vincenzo; Civico, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    The Piano di Pezza fault is the north-westernmost segment of the >20 km long Ovindoli-Pezza active normal fault-system (central Italy). Although existing paleoseismic data document high vertical Holocene slip rates (~1 mm/yr) and a remarkable seismogenic potential of this fault, its subsurface setting and Pleistocene cumulative displacement are still poorly known. We investigated for the first time by means of high-resolution seismic and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) measurements the shallow subsurface of a key section of the Piano di Pezza fault. Our surveys cross a ~5 m-high fault scarp that was generated by repeated surface-rupturing earthquakes displacing some Late Holocene alluvial fans. We provide 2-D Vp and resistivity images which clearly show significant details of the fault structure and the geometry of the shallow basin infill material down to 50 m depth. We can estimate the dip (~50°) and the Holocene vertical displacement of the master fault (~10 m). We also recognize in the hangingwall some low-velocity/low-resistivity regions that we relate to packages of colluvial wedges derived from scarp degradation, which may represent the record of several paleo-earthquakes older than the Late Holocene events previously recognized by paleoseismic trenching. Conversely, due to the limited investigation depth of seismic and electrical tomography, the estimation of the cumulative amount of Pleistocene throw is hampered. Therefore, to increase the depth of investigation, we performed 7 TDEM measurements along the electrical profile using a 50 m loop size both in central and offset configuration. The recovered 1-D resistivity models show a good match with 2-D resistivity images in the near surface. Moreover, TDEM inversion results indicate that in the hangingwall, ~200 m away from the surface fault trace, the carbonate pre-Quaternary basement may be found at ~90-100 m depth. The combined approach of electrical and

  2. Color-direction patch-sparsity-based image inpainting using multidirection features.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhidan; He, Hongjie; Tai, Heng-Ming; Yin, Zhongke; Chen, Fan

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes a color-direction patch sparsity-based image in painting method to better maintain structure coherence, texture clarity, and neighborhood consistence of the in painted region of an image. The method uses super-wavelet transform to estimate the multi-direction features of a degraded image, and combines with color information to construct the weighted color-direction distance (WCDD) to measure the difference between two patches. Based on the WCDD, the color-direction structure sparsity is defined to obtain a more robust filling order and more suitable multiple candidate patches are searched. Then, the target patches are sparsely represented by the multiple candidate patches under neighborhood consistency constraints in both the color and the multi-direction spaces. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach on tasks such as scratch removal, text removal, block removal, and object removal. The effects of super-wavelet transforms and direction features are also investigated.

  3. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  4. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  5. Direct Image-To Registration Using Mobile Sensor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehl, C.; Buckley, S. J.; Gawthorpe, R. L.; Viola, I.; Howell, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    Adding supplementary texture and 2D image-based annotations to 3D surface models is a useful next step for domain specialists to make use of photorealistic products of laser scanning and photogrammetry. This requires a registration between the new camera imagery and the model geometry to be solved, which can be a time-consuming task without appropriate automation. The increasing availability of photorealistic models, coupled with the proliferation of mobile devices, gives users the possibility to complement their models in real time. Modern mobile devices deliver digital photographs of increasing quality, as well as on-board sensor data, which can be used as input for practical and automatic camera registration procedures. Their familiar user interface also improves manual registration procedures. This paper introduces a fully automatic pose estimation method using the on-board sensor data for initial exterior orientation, and feature matching between an acquired photograph and a synthesised rendering of the orientated 3D scene as input for fine alignment. The paper also introduces a user-friendly manual camera registration- and pose estimation interface for mobile devices, based on existing surface geometry and numerical optimisation methods. The article further assesses the automatic algorithm's accuracy compared to traditional methods, and the impact of computational- and environmental parameters. Experiments using urban and geological case studies show a significant sensitivity of the automatic procedure to the quality of the initial mobile sensor values. Changing natural lighting conditions remain a challenge for automatic pose estimation techniques, although progress is presented here. Finally, the automatically-registered mobile images are used as the basis for adding user annotations to the input textured model.

  6. Direct Imaging Search for Extrasolar Planets in the Pleiades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, Kodai; Matsuo, Taro; Shibai, Hiroshi; Itoh, Yoichi; Konishi, Mihokko; Sudo, Jun; Tanii, Ryoko; Fukagawa, Misato; Sumi, Takahiro; Kudo, Tomoyuki; hide

    2013-01-01

    We carried out an imaging survey for extrasolar planets around stars in the Pleiades (125 Myr, 135 pc) in the H and K(sub S) bands using HiCIAO combined with adaptive optics, AO188, on the Subaru telescope. We found 13 companion candidates fainter than 14.5 mag in the H band around 9 stars. Five of these 13 were confirmed to be background stars by measurement of their proper motion. One was not found in the second epoch observation, and thus was not a background or companion object. One had multi-epoch images, but the precision of its proper motion was not sufficient to conclude whether it was a background object. Four other candidates are waiting for second-epoch observations to determine their proper motion. Finally, the remaining two were confirmed to be 60 M(sub J) brown dwarf companions orbiting around HD 23514 (G0) and HII 1348 (K5), respectively, as had been reported in previous studies. In our observations, the average detection limit for a point source was 20.3 mag in the H band beyond 1.'' 5 from the central star. On the basis of this detection limit, we calculated the detection efficiency to be 90% for a planet with 6 to 12 Jovian masses and a semi-major axis of 50–1000 AU. For this reason we extrapolated the distribution of the planet mass and the semi-major axis derived from radial velocity observations, and adopted the planet evolution model Baraffe et al. (2003, A&A, 402, 701). Since there was no detection of a planet, we estimated the frequency of such planets to be less than 17.9% (2 sigma) around one star of the Pleiades cluster.

  7. An Approach to Knowledge-Directed Image Analysis,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-01

    finding of ships in a dock scene and the finding of ribs in a chest X-ray film. 1. knowled e-Directed-CPSZas Analysis ime analysis is t process of...8217. Imo Data Sketebmep Hodel~Structures Figure 1. Basic Layer Structure Since the best procedues far finding struc- turos, In real-orld isages are...synthesized sketcbmap or description; this is an instantiation of a subset of the model. Tje u6e1v therefore, contains know- ledge In the form of aLk

  8. Real-time intravascular ultrasound/photoacoustic imaging system with omni-directional light excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Li, Pai-Chi

    2012-02-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been investigated for intravascular applications. One of the main challenges is that the imaging frame rate is limited by the pulse repetition frequency (PRF), thus making real-time imaging difficult with most high-power solid-state pulse lasers. The goal of this study is to combine omni-directional optical excitation with a ring array transducer for high-frame-rate imaging, so that the image frame rate is the same as the laser PRF. In the preliminary study, we developed a real-time integrated IVUS/IVPA imaging system by modifying an IVUS system in combination with a high-speed Nd:YLF pulsed laser. In addition, an optical fiber with axicon-like distal tip is designed for omni-directional excitation. In this design, a PA image is acquired without rotating the laser light. The imaging frame rate of this integrated imaging system is 19 fps. Both US and PA images are recorded at the same time and co-registered in the fusion image. The US/PA images of tungsten wire, black tube and rabbit's atherosclerotic aorta were acquired with this integrated system to evaluate its imaging performance. The lateral/axial -6 dB resolution of US image is 2.56°/62.4μm. Resolution of PA imaging is 3.76°/91.5μm. The imaging system was also utilized to acquire IVUS/IVPA images of atherosclerotic rabbit's aorta in ex vivo study.

  9. Effect of image compression of direct digital lateral cephalograms on the identification of cephalometric points

    PubMed Central

    Saghaie, Sima; Ghaffari, Roshanak

    2014-01-01

    Background: With increase of digital imaging, the need for storage space and transmission speed also increases. Compressed images need less storage space and decrease the transmission time. However, compression could compromise image quality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of image compression on the identification of cephalometric points on direct digital lateral cephalogram images, compared with the digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Materials and Methods: In this analytical-descriptive study, 19 direct digital lateral cephalograms saved in DICOM format were used. They were converted to joint photographic experts group (JPEG) 2000 format with quality factors 85, 75, and 60 adding up to 76 images (DICOM, JPEG 85, 75, and 60). The images were randomized and eight cephalometric points were identified on each image by a professional, using the x-y coordinate system. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to investigate if there was a statistically significant difference in the location of cephalometric points between each group of images. All tests were applied at a significance level of 5%. Results: The results did not demonstrate any statistically significant difference in the identification of the eight cephalometric points between the DICOM images and the JPEG2000 quality factors 85, 75, and 60. Conclusion: JPEG2000 images of lateral cephalograms with quality factors 85, 75, and 60 did not demonstrate any alterations in the identification of cephalometric points compared with the DICOM format. JPEG2000 is a reliable file format for the compression of digital lateral cephalograms. PMID:24688556

  10. A line rate calculation method for arbitrary directional imaging of an Earth observing satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Moon-Jin; Kim, Eunghyun; Lim, Seong-Bin; Choi, Seok-Weon

    2016-10-01

    For an earth observing satellite, a line rate is the number of lines which the CCD of push broom type camera scans in a second. It can be easily calculated by ground velocity divided by ground sample distance. Accurate calculation of line rate is necessary to obtain high quality image using TDI CCD. The earth observing satellite has four types of imaging missions which are strip imaging, stereo imaging, multi-point imaging, and arbitrary directional imaging. For the first three types of imaging, ground scanning direction is aligned with satellite velocity direction. Therefore, if the orbit propagation and spacecraft attitude information are available, the ground velocity and ground sample distance could be easily calculated. However, the calculation method might not be applicable to the arbitrary directional imaging. In the arbitrary directional imaging mode, the ground velocity is not fixed value which could be directly derived by orbit information. Furthermore, the ground sample distance might not be easily calculated by simple trigonometry which is possible for the other types of imaging. In this paper, we proposed a line rate calculation method for the arbitrary directional imaging. We applied spherical geometry to derive the equation of ground point which is the intersection between the line of sight vector of the camera and earth surface. The derivative of this equation for time is the ground velocity except the factor of earth rotation. By adding this equation and earth rotation factor, the true ground velocity vector could be derived. For the ground sample distance, we applied the equation of circle and ellipse for yaw angle difference. The equation of circle is used for the yaw angle representation on the plane which is orthogonal to the line of sight vector. The equation of ellipse is used for the yaw angle representation on the ground surface. We applied the proposed method to the KOMPSAT-3A (Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite 3A) mission which is the first

  11. Simulating a Radial Velocity Precurser Survey for Target Yield Optimization for a Future Direct Imaging Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Patrick; Plavchan, Peter; Crepp, Justin R.; Dulz, Shannon; Stark, Chris; Kane, Stephen R.

    2017-01-01

    Future direct imaging mission concepts such as HabEx and LUVOIR aim to directly image and characterize Earth-analogs around nearby stars. With the scope and expense of these missions, the exoplanet yield is strongly dependent on the frequency of Earth-like planets and the a priori knowledge of which stars specifically host suitable planetary systems. Ground-based radial velocity surveys can potentially perform the pre-selection of direct imaging missions at a fraction of the cost of a blind direct imaging survey. We present a simulation of such a survey. We consider both the WIYN and Large Binocular Telescope, including weather conditions and limitations in telescope time, fitted with spectrometers of varying sensitivities including iLocator and NEID. We recover simulated planets and their orbital parameters, estimating the effectiveness of a pre-cursor radial velocity survey.

  12. Fast digital zooming system using directionally adaptive image interpolation and restoration.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonseok; Jeon, Jaehwan; Yu, Soohwan; Paik, Joonki

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a fast digital zooming system for mobile consumer cameras using directionally adaptive image interpolation and restoration methods. The proposed interpolation algorithm performs edge refinement along the initially estimated edge orientation using directionally steerable filters. Either the directionally weighted linear or adaptive cubic-spline interpolation filter is then selectively used according to the refined edge orientation for removing jagged artifacts in the slanted edge region. A novel image restoration algorithm is also presented for removing blurring artifacts caused by the linear or cubic-spline interpolation using the directionally adaptive truncated constrained least squares (TCLS) filter. Both proposed steerable filter-based interpolation and the TCLS-based restoration filters have a finite impulse response (FIR) structure for real time processing in an image signal processing (ISP) chain. Experimental results show that the proposed digital zooming system provides high-quality magnified images with FIR filter-based fast computational structure.

  13. Simultaneous magnetically directed drug convection and MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yathindranath, V.; Hegmann, T.; van Lierop, J.; Potter, K.; Fowler, C. B.; Moore, D. F.

    2009-10-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IO NPs) are of interest for their usefulness in biomedical applications. In this work, we have synthesized iron oxide nanocomposites surface-modified with different biocompatible polymers. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was physisorbed onto these IO NPs along with an excipient during freeze-drying. The mass transport of the protein attached to the iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles (IO cs-NPs) under a gradient magnetic field of an MRI instrument was observed in vitro and in an egg as a model system for a biological fluid. From the in vitro experiments in agarose gels, it was observed that the protein gets separated from the core during mass transport for some cs-IO, but co-migration was observed for PEG-modified IO cs-NPs. These experiments demonstrated proof-of-concept for the use of IO cs-NPs in magnetically directed drug convection.

  14. Direct imaging of isofrequency contours in photonic structures

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Emma C.; Igarashi, Yuichi; Zhen, Bo; Kaminer, Ido; Hsu, Chia Wei; Shen, Yichen; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-01-01

    The isofrequency contours of a photonic crystal are important for predicting and understanding exotic optical phenomena that are not apparent from high-symmetry band structure visualizations. We demonstrate a method to directly visualize the isofrequency contours of high-quality photonic crystal slabs that show quantitatively good agreement with numerical results throughout the visible spectrum. Our technique relies on resonance-enhanced photon scattering from generic fabrication disorder and surface roughness, so it can be applied to general photonic and plasmonic crystals or even quasi-crystals. We also present an analytical model of the scattering process, which explains the observation of isofrequency contours in our technique. Furthermore, the isofrequency contours provide information about the characteristics of the disorder and therefore serve as a feedback tool to improve fabrication processes. PMID:28138536

  15. Nanostructure Initiator Mass Spectrometry: Tissue Imaging and Direct Biofluid Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yanes, Oscar; Woo, Hin-Koon; Northen, Trent R.; Oppenheimer, Stacey R.; Shriver, Leah; Apon, Jon; Estrada, Mayra N.; Potchoiba, Michael J.; Steenwyk, Rick; Manchester, Marianne; Siuzdak, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Nanostructure initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) is a recently introduced matrix-free desorption/ionization platform that requires minimal sample preparation. Its application to xenobiotics and endogenous metabolites in tissues is demonstrated, where clozapine and N-desmethylclozapine were observed from mouse and rat brain sections. It has also been applied to direct biofluid analysis where ketamine and norketamine were observed from plasma and urine. Detection of xenobiotics from biofluids was made even more effective using a novel NIMS on-surface extraction method taking advantage of the hydrophobic nature of the initiator. Linear response and limit of detection were also evaluated for xenobiotics such as methamphetamine, codeine, alprazolam, and morphine, revealing that NIMS can be used for quantitative analysis. Overall, our results demonstrate the capacity of NIMS to perform sensitive, simple, and rapid analyses from highly complex biological tissues and fluids. PMID:19301920

  16. CONFIRMATION OF THE PLANET AROUND HD 95086 BY DIRECT IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Rameau, J.; Chauvin, G.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Boccaletti, A.; Quanz, S. P.; Currie, T.; Mawet, D.; Girard, J. H.; Bonnefoy, M.

    2013-12-20

    VLT/NaCo angular differential imaging at L' (3.8 μm) revealed a probable giant planet comoving with the young and early-type HD 95086, also known to harbor an extended debris disk. The discovery was based on the proper motion analysis of two datasets spanning 15 months. However, the second dataset suffered from bad atmospheric conditions, which limited the significance of the re-detection at the 3σ level. In this Letter, we report new VLT/NaCo observations of HD 95086 obtained on 2013 June 26 and 27 at L' to recover the planet candidate. We unambiguously re-detect the companion HD 95086 b with multiple independent pipelines at a signal-to-noise ratio greater than or equal to 5. Combined with previously reported measurements, our astrometry decisively shows that the planet is comoving with HD 95086 and inconsistent with a background object. With a revised mass of 5 ± 2 Jupiter masses, estimated from its L' photometry and ''hot-start'' models at 17 ± 4 Myr, HD 95086 b becomes a new benchmark for further physical and orbital characterization of young giant planets.

  17. Confirmation of the Planet around HD 95086 by Direct Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rameau, J.; Chauvin, G.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Meshkat, T.; Boccaletti, A.; Quanz, S. P.; Currie, T.; Mawet, D.; Girard, J. H.; Bonnefoy, M.; Kenworthy, M.

    2013-12-01

    VLT/NaCo angular differential imaging at L' (3.8 μm) revealed a probable giant planet comoving with the young and early-type HD 95086, also known to harbor an extended debris disk. The discovery was based on the proper motion analysis of two datasets spanning 15 months. However, the second dataset suffered from bad atmospheric conditions, which limited the significance of the re-detection at the 3σ level. In this Letter, we report new VLT/NaCo observations of HD 95086 obtained on 2013 June 26 and 27 at L' to recover the planet candidate. We unambiguously re-detect the companion HD 95086 b with multiple independent pipelines at a signal-to-noise ratio greater than or equal to 5. Combined with previously reported measurements, our astrometry decisively shows that the planet is comoving with HD 95086 and inconsistent with a background object. With a revised mass of 5 ± 2 Jupiter masses, estimated from its L' photometry and "hot-start" models at 17 ± 4 Myr, HD 95086 b becomes a new benchmark for further physical and orbital characterization of young giant planets. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under programs number 291.C-5023.

  18. [The hyperspectral camera side-scan geometric imaging in any direction considering the spectral mixing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Min; Zhang, Ai-Wu; Hu, Shao-Xing; Sun, Wei-Dong

    2014-07-01

    In order to correct the image distortion in the hyperspectral camera side-scan geometric Imaging, the image pixel geo-referenced algorithm was deduced in detail in the present paper, which is suitable to the linear push-broom camera side-scan imaging on the ground in any direction. It takes the orientation of objects in the navigation coordinates system into account. Combined with the ground sampling distance of geo-referenced image and the area of push broom imaging, the general process of geo-referenced image divided into grids is also presented. The new image rows and columns will be got through the geo-referenced image area dividing the ground sampling distance. Considering the error produced by round rule in the pixel grids generated progress, and the spectral mixing problem caused by traditional direct spectral sampling method in the process of image correction, the improved spectral sampling method based on the weighted fusion method was proposed. It takes the area proportion of adjacent pixels in the new generated pixel as coefficient and then the coefficients are normalized to avoid the spectral overflow. So the new generated pixel is combined with the geo-referenced adjacent pixels spectral. Finally the amounts of push-broom imaging experiments were taken on the ground, and the distortion images were corrected according to the algorithm proposed above. The results show that the linear image distortion correction algorithm is valid and robust. At the same time, multiple samples were selected in the corrected images to verify the spectral data. The results indicate that the improved spectral sampling method is better than the direct spectral sampling algorithm. It provides reference for the application of similar productions on the ground.

  19. Bi-directional two-dimensional/three-dimensional convertible integral imaging using scattering polarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Jiwoon; Hong, Jisoo; Park, Soon-gi; Min, Sung-Wook; Lee, Byoungho

    2012-10-01

    A bi-directional 2D/3D convertible integral imaging system is proposed. Two optical modules composed of a scattering polarizer and a linear polarizer are adopted, and 2D or 3D mode operation is easily changed by converting polarization states of the projected images. In the 2D mode, the incident light is scattered at the scattering polarizer and the scattered light facing the lens-array is blocked, a 2D image is observable only at the same side as the projector. In the 3D mode, the incident light with the transmission polarization is directly projected onto a lens-array, and the 3D images are integrated. Our proposed system is able to display the 3D images as well as the 2D images for the observers who are placed in front and rear side of the system.

  20. Asymmetries in the direction of saccades during perception of scenes and fractals: effects of image type and image features.

    PubMed

    Foulsham, Tom; Kingstone, Alan

    2010-04-07

    The direction in which people tend to move their eyes when inspecting images can reveal the different influences on eye guidance in scene perception, and their time course. We investigated biases in saccade direction during a memory-encoding task with natural scenes and computer-generated fractals. Images were rotated to disentangle egocentric and image-based guidance. Saccades in fractals were more likely to be horizontal, regardless of orientation. In scenes, the first saccade often moved down and subsequent eye movements were predominantly vertical, relative to the scene. These biases were modulated by the distribution of visual features (saliency and clutter) in the scene. The results suggest that image orientation, visual features and the scene frame-of-reference have a rapid effect on eye guidance. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Performance Analysis and Experimental Validation of the Direct Strain Imaging Method

    Treesearch

    Athanasios Iliopoulos; John G. Michopoulos; John C. Hermanson

    2013-01-01

    Direct Strain Imaging accomplishes full field measurement of the strain tensor on the surface of a deforming body, by utilizing arbitrarily oriented engineering strain measurements originating from digital imaging. In this paper an evaluation of the method’s performance with respect to its operating parameter space is presented along with a preliminary...

  2. Direct exoplanet imaging with small-angle Vortex coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defrere, Denis; Absil, Olivier; Mawet, Dimitri; Michael, Karlsson; Habraken, Serge; Surdej, Jean; Absil, Pierre-Antoine; Carlomagno, Brunella; Christieans, Valentin; Delacroix, Christian; Girard, Julien; Forsberg, Pontus; Gonzalez Gomez, Carlos; Hinz, Phil; Huby, Elsa; Jolivet, Alyssa; Milli, Julien; Pantin, Eric; Piron, Pierre; Serabyn, Eugene; Van Droogenbroeck, Marc; Vargas Catalan, Ernesto; Wertz, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Analysing the atmospheres of Earth and SuperEarth type planets for possible biomarkers will push us to the limits of current and future instrumentation. As the field matures, we must also upgrade our data analysis and interpretation techniques from their "ad-hoc" beginnings to a solid statistical foundation. This is particularly important for the optimal exploitation of future instruments, such as JWST and E-ELT. At the limits of low signal-to-noise, we are prone to two sources of biases: 1) Prior selection in the data reduction; 2) Prior constraints on the spectral retrieval. A unified set of tools addressing both points is required. To de-trend low S/N, correlated data, we demonstrated blind-source-separation (BSS) machine learning techniques to be a significant step forward. Both in photometry and spectroscopy. BSS finds applications in fields as diverse as medical imaging to cosmology. Applied to exoplanets, it allows us to resolve de-trending biases and demonstrate consistency between data sets that were previously found to be highly discrepant and subject to much debate. For the interpretation of the data, we developed a novel atmospheric retrieval suite, Tau-REx. Tau-REx implements an unbiased prior selections via a custom built pattern recognition software. A full subsequent mapping of the likelihood space (using cluster computing) allows us, for the first time, to fully study degeneracies and biases in emission and transmission spectroscopy. The development of a coherent end-to-end infrastructure is paramount to the characterisation of ever smaller and fainter foreign worlds. In this conference, I will discuss what we have learned for current observations and the need for unified statistical frameworks in the era of JWST, E-ELT.

  3. Direct imaging of structural domains in iron pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanatar, Makariy

    2010-03-01

    The parent compounds of iron-arsenide superconductors undergo first order structural transition between tetragonal and orthorhombic phases at a temperature, TS. In AFe2As2 (122) compounds (A=Ca,Sr,Ba) this occurs simultaneously with magnetic transition at TM. Using a combination of polarized light microscopy and spatially-resolved high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction we show the orthorhombic distortion leads to the formation of 45^o-type structural domains in both 122 and 1111 single crystals. Domains penetrate through the sample thickness in the c-direction and are not affected by crystal imperfections such as growth terraces. The domains form regular stripe patterns in the plane with a characteristic dimension of 10-50 μm. In a range of low Co-doped compositions structural domains and superconductivity coexist. With the increasing doping level the domain structure becomes more intertwined and fine due to a decrease in the orthorhombic distortion. This results in an energy landscape with maze-like spatial modulations favorable for pinning and intrinsically high critical current densities in the underdoped regime. M.A.Tanatar et al. Phys. Rev. B 79, 180508 (R) (2009). R. Prozorov et al. arxiv: 0909.0923, Phys. Rev.B accepted.

  4. a Systematic Comparison of Direct and Image-Based Georeferencing in Challenging Urban Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavegn, S.; Nebiker, S.; Haala, N.

    2016-06-01

    Image-based mobile mapping systems enable an efficient acquisition of georeferenced image sequences, which can be used for geo-data capture in subsequent steps. In order to provide accurate measurements in a given reference frame while e.g. aiming at high fidelity 3D urban models, high quality georeferencing of the captured multi-view image sequences is required. Moreover, sub-pixel accurate orientations of these highly redundant image sequences are needed in order to optimally perform steps like dense multi-image matching as a prerequisite for 3D point cloud and mesh generation. While direct georeferencing of image-based mobile mapping data performs well in open areas, poor GNSS coverage in urban canyons aggravates fulfilling these high accuracy requirements, even with high-grade inertial navigation equipment. Hence, we conducted comprehensive investigations aiming at assessing the quality of directly georeferenced sensor orientations as well as the expected improvement by image-based georeferencing in a challenging urban environment. Our study repeatedly delivered mean trajectory deviations of up to 80 cm. By performing image-based georeferencing using bundle adjustment for a limited set of cameras and a limited number of ground control points, mean check point residuals could be lowered from approx. 40 cm to 4 cm. Furthermore, we showed that largely automated image-based georeferencing is capable of detecting and compensating discontinuities in directly georeferenced trajectories.

  5. Direct production of graphene nanosheets for near infrared photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mehulkumar A; Yang, Hao; Chiu, Pui Lam; Mastrogiovanni, Daniel D T; Flach, Carol R; Savaram, Keerthi; Gomez, Lesly; Hemnarine, Ashley; Mendelsohn, Richard; Garfunkel, Eric; Jiang, Huabei; He, Huixin

    2013-09-24

    Hummers method is commonly used for the fabrication of graphene oxide (GO) from graphite particles. The oxidation process also leads to the cutting of graphene sheets into small pieces. From a thermodynamic perspective, it seems improbable that the aggressive, somewhat random oxidative cutting process could directly result in graphene nanosheets without destroying the intrinsic π-conjugated structures and the associated exotic properties of graphene. In Hummers method, both KMnO4 and NO2(+) (nitronium ions) in concentrated H2SO4 solutions act as oxidants via different oxidation mechanisms. From both experimental observations and theoretical calculations, it appears that KMnO4 plays a major role in the observed oxidative cutting and unzipping processes. We find that KMnO4 also limits nitronium oxidative etching of graphene basal planes, therefore slowing down graphene fracturing processes for nanosheet fabrication. By intentionally excluding KMnO4 and exploiting pure nitronium ion oxidation, aided by the unique thermal and kinetic effects induced by microwave heating, we find that graphite particles can be converted into graphene nanosheets with their π-conjugated aromatic structures and properties largely retained. Without the need of any postreduction processes to remove the high concentration of oxygenated groups that results from Hummers GO formation, the graphene nanosheets as-fabricated exhibit strong absorption, which is nearly wavelength-independent in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) regions, an optical property typical for intrinsic graphene sheets. For the first time, we demonstrate that strong photoacoustic signals can be generated from these graphene nanosheets with NIR excitation. The photo-to-acoustic conversion is weakly dependent on the wavelength of the NIR excitation, which is different from all other NIR photoacoustic contrast agents previously reported.

  6. Image reconstruction for coherent imaging for space surveillance and directed energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Richard; Gudimetla, V. S. Rao

    2016-09-01

    Imaging of distant objects in a terrestrial environment involves propagation of light through significant turbulence. Conventional methods for imaging for these applications are radar or focal plane imaging. Both of these methods have limitations, such as object rotation rate and post-processing. A different class of imaging approaches involving coherent illumination has several advantages (a) reduced sensitivity to illumination conditions, (b) reduced sensitivity to object rotation, (c) the use of arrayed receivers that are lighter and lower in cost, and (d) snapshot reconstruction of aberrated images with just one or a few frames. These advantages must be balanced by the challenges of speckle noise in the image reconstructions, and more difficult algorithms. Coherent pupil-plane and focal-plane techniques are investigated for image formation. The associated algorithms include root-reconstruction techniques, phase smoothing methods, polynomial fit approaches, blind iterative deconvolution, and multi-frame blind deconvolution (MFBD). These techniques and algorithms are surveyed for speed and quality of image formation.

  7. Vortex Image Processing (VIP) package for high-contrast direct imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Gonzalez, C.; Absil, O.; Wertz, O.

    2016-05-01

    VIP is a Python instrument-agnostic toolbox featuring a flexible framework for reproducible and robust data reduction. VIP currently supports three high-contrast imaging observational techniques: angular, reference-star and multi-spectral differential imaging. The code can be downloaded from our git repository on Github: http://github.com/vortex-exoplanet/VIP

  8. Content analysis of Australian direct-to-consumer websites for emerging breast cancer imaging devices.

    PubMed

    Vreugdenburg, Thomas D; Laurence, Caroline O; Willis, Cameron D; Mundy, Linda; Hiller, Janet E

    2014-09-01

    To describe the nature and frequency of information presented on direct-to-consumer websites for emerging breast cancer imaging devices. Content analysis of Australian website advertisements from 2 March 2011 to 30 March 2012, for three emerging breast cancer imaging devices: digital infrared thermal imaging, electrical impedance scanning and electronic palpation imaging. Type of imaging offered, device safety, device performance, application of device, target population, supporting evidence and comparator tests. Thirty-nine unique Australian websites promoting a direct-to-consumer breast imaging device were identified. Despite a lack of supporting evidence, 22 websites advertised devices for diagnosis, 20 advertised devices for screening, 13 advertised devices for prevention and 13 advertised devices for identifying breast cancer risk factors. Similarly, advertised ranges of diagnostic sensitivity (78%-99%) and specificity (44%-91%) were relatively high compared with published literature. Direct comparisons with conventional screening tools that favoured the new device were highly prominent (31 websites), and one-third of websites (12) explicitly promoted their device as a suitable alternative. Australian websites for emerging breast imaging devices, which are also available internationally, promote the use of such devices as safe and effective solutions for breast cancer screening and diagnosis in a range of target populations. Many of these claims are not supported by peer-reviewed evidence, raising questions about the manner in which these devices and their advertising material are regulated, particularly when they are promoted as direct alternatives to established screening interventions.

  9. Acceleration of the direct reconstruction of linear parametric images using nested algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guobao; Qi, Jinyi

    2010-03-07

    Parametric imaging using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) provides important information for biological research and clinical diagnosis. Indirect and direct methods have been developed for reconstructing linear parametric images from dynamic PET data. Indirect methods are relatively simple and easy to implement because the image reconstruction and kinetic modeling are performed in two separate steps. Direct methods estimate parametric images directly from raw PET data and are statistically more efficient. However, the convergence rate of direct algorithms can be slow due to the coupling between the reconstruction and kinetic modeling. Here we present two fast gradient-type algorithms for direct reconstruction of linear parametric images. The new algorithms decouple the reconstruction and linear parametric modeling at each iteration by employing the principle of optimization transfer. Convergence speed is accelerated by running more sub-iterations of linear parametric estimation because the computation cost of the linear parametric modeling is much less than that of the image reconstruction. Computer simulation studies demonstrated that the new algorithms converge much faster than the traditional expectation maximization (EM) and the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithms for dynamic PET.

  10. Directly imaging steeply-dipping fault zones in geothermal fields with multicomponent seismic data

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Ting; Huang, Lianjie

    2015-07-30

    For characterizing geothermal systems, it is important to have clear images of steeply-dipping fault zones because they may confine the boundaries of geothermal reservoirs and influence hydrothermal flow. Elastic reverse-time migration (ERTM) is the most promising tool for subsurface imaging with multicomponent seismic data. However, conventional ERTM usually generates significant artifacts caused by the cross correlation of undesired wavefields and the polarity reversal of shear waves. In addition, it is difficult for conventional ERTM to directly image steeply-dipping fault zones. We develop a new ERTM imaging method in this paper to reduce these artifacts and directly image steeply-dipping fault zones.more » In our new ERTM method, forward-propagated source wavefields and backward-propagated receiver wavefields are decomposed into compressional (P) and shear (S) components. Furthermore, each component of these wavefields is separated into left- and right-going, or downgoing and upgoing waves. The cross correlation imaging condition is applied to the separated wavefields along opposite propagation directions. For converted waves (P-to-S or S-to-P), the polarity correction is applied to the separated wavefields based on the analysis of Poynting vectors. Numerical imaging examples of synthetic seismic data demonstrate that our new ERTM method produces high-resolution images of steeply-dipping fault zones.« less

  11. Directly imaging steeply-dipping fault zones in geothermal fields with multicomponent seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ting; Huang, Lianjie

    2015-07-30

    For characterizing geothermal systems, it is important to have clear images of steeply-dipping fault zones because they may confine the boundaries of geothermal reservoirs and influence hydrothermal flow. Elastic reverse-time migration (ERTM) is the most promising tool for subsurface imaging with multicomponent seismic data. However, conventional ERTM usually generates significant artifacts caused by the cross correlation of undesired wavefields and the polarity reversal of shear waves. In addition, it is difficult for conventional ERTM to directly image steeply-dipping fault zones. We develop a new ERTM imaging method in this paper to reduce these artifacts and directly image steeply-dipping fault zones. In our new ERTM method, forward-propagated source wavefields and backward-propagated receiver wavefields are decomposed into compressional (P) and shear (S) components. Furthermore, each component of these wavefields is separated into left- and right-going, or downgoing and upgoing waves. The cross correlation imaging condition is applied to the separated wavefields along opposite propagation directions. For converted waves (P-to-S or S-to-P), the polarity correction is applied to the separated wavefields based on the analysis of Poynting vectors. Numerical imaging examples of synthetic seismic data demonstrate that our new ERTM method produces high-resolution images of steeply-dipping fault zones.

  12. Frequency response and directivity of highly sensitive optical microresonator detectors for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenheim, James A.; Li, Jing; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.

    2015-03-01

    Plano-convex optical microresonator detectors have been developed as an alternative to planar Fabry-Pérot (FP) sensors used in all-optical photoacoustic imaging systems with the potential to provide two or more orders-of-magnitude higher detection sensitivity. This study further characterises the performance of these detectors by investigating their normal incidence frequency response and frequency-dependent directivity. It is shown that sensors with thicknesses in the range ~50-320μm provide broadband, smooth frequency response characteristics and low directional sensitivity. This suggests that a photoacoustic imaging system based on microresonator detectors may be capable of imaging with similar performance to the FP system but with significantly higher sensitivity, paving the way to deep tissue imaging applications such as the clinical assessment of breast cancer and preclinical whole body small animal imaging.

  13. Multispectral x-ray imaging for core temperature and density maps retrieval in direct drive implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, Riccardo; Koch, Jeffrey A.; Izumi, Nobuhiko; Welser, Leslie A.; Mancini, Roberto C.; Delettrez, Jacques; Regan, Sean; Smalyuk, Vladimir

    2006-10-15

    We report on the experiments aimed at obtaining core temperature and density maps in direct drive implosions at the Omega laser facility using multimonochromatic x-ray imagers. These instruments use an array of pinholes and a flat multilayer mirror to provide unique multispectral images distributed over a wide spectral range. Using argon as a dopant in the direct-drive filled plastic shells produces emission images in the Ar He-{beta} and Ly-{beta} spectral regions. These images allow the retrieval of temperature and density maps of the plasma. We deployed three identical multimonochromatic x-ray imagers in a quasiorthogonal line-of-sight configuration to allow tomographic reconstruction of the structure of the imploding core.

  14. Decision net, directed graph, and neural net processing of imaging spectrometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, David; Liu, Shiaw-Dong; Yoneyama, Hideyuki; Barnard, Etienne

    1989-01-01

    A decision-net solution involving a novel hierarchical classifier and a set of multiple directed graphs, as well as a neural-net solution, are respectively presented for large-class problem and mixture problem treatments of imaging spectrometer data. The clustering method for hierarchical classifier design, when used with multiple directed graphs, yields an efficient decision net. New directed-graph rules for reducing local maxima as well as the number of perturbations required, and the new starting-node rules for extending the reachability and reducing the search time of the graphs, are noted to yield superior results, as indicated by an illustrative 500-class imaging spectrometer problem.

  15. Patient-directed Internet-based Medical Image Exchange: Experience from an Initial Multicenter Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Giampaolo; Patel, Anand S.; Lewis, Sara C.; Shi, Wei; Rasul, Rehana; Torosyan, Mary; Erickson, Bradley J.; Hiremath, Atheeth; Moskowitz, Alan J.; Tellis, Wyatt M.; Siegel, Eliot L.; Arenson, Ronald L.; Mendelson, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Inefficient transfer of personal health records among providers negatively impacts quality of health care and increases cost. This multicenter study evaluates the implementation of the first Internet-based image-sharing system that gives patients ownership and control of their imaging exams, including assessment of patient satisfaction. Materials and Methods Patients receiving any medical imaging exams in four academic centers were eligible to have images uploaded into an online, Internet-based personal health record. Satisfaction surveys were provided during recruitment with questions on ease of use, privacy and security, and timeliness of access to images. Responses were rated on a five-point scale and compared using logistic regression and McNemar's test. Results A total of 2562 patients enrolled from July 2012 to August 2013. The median number of imaging exams uploaded per patient was 5. Most commonly, exams were plain X-rays (34.7%), computed tomography (25.7%), and magnetic resonance imaging (16.1%). Of 502 (19.6%) patient surveys returned, 448 indicated the method of image sharing (Internet, compact discs [CDs], both, other). Nearly all patients (96.5%) responded favorably to having direct access to images, and 78% reported viewing their medical images independently. There was no difference between Internet and CD users in satisfaction with privacy and security and timeliness of access to medical images. A greater percentage of Internet users compared to CD users reported access without difficulty (88.3% vs. 77.5%, P < 0.0001). Conclusion A patient-directed, interoperable, Internet-based image-sharing system is feasible and surpasses the use of CDs with respect to accessibility of imaging exams while generating similar satisfaction with respect to privacy. PMID:26625706

  16. Patient-directed Internet-based Medical Image Exchange: Experience from an Initial Multicenter Implementation.

    PubMed

    Greco, Giampaolo; Patel, Anand S; Lewis, Sara C; Shi, Wei; Rasul, Rehana; Torosyan, Mary; Erickson, Bradley J; Hiremath, Atheeth; Moskowitz, Alan J; Tellis, Wyatt M; Siegel, Eliot L; Arenson, Ronald L; Mendelson, David S

    2016-02-01

    Inefficient transfer of personal health records among providers negatively impacts quality of health care and increases cost. This multicenter study evaluates the implementation of the first Internet-based image-sharing system that gives patients ownership and control of their imaging exams, including assessment of patient satisfaction. Patients receiving any medical imaging exams in four academic centers were eligible to have images uploaded into an online, Internet-based personal health record. Satisfaction surveys were provided during recruitment with questions on ease of use, privacy and security, and timeliness of access to images. Responses were rated on a five-point scale and compared using logistic regression and McNemar's test. A total of 2562 patients enrolled from July 2012 to August 2013. The median number of imaging exams uploaded per patient was 5. Most commonly, exams were plain X-rays (34.7%), computed tomography (25.7%), and magnetic resonance imaging (16.1%). Of 502 (19.6%) patient surveys returned, 448 indicated the method of image sharing (Internet, compact discs [CDs], both, other). Nearly all patients (96.5%) responded favorably to having direct access to images, and 78% reported viewing their medical images independently. There was no difference between Internet and CD users in satisfaction with privacy and security and timeliness of access to medical images. A greater percentage of Internet users compared to CD users reported access without difficulty (88.3% vs. 77.5%, P < 0.0001). A patient-directed, interoperable, Internet-based image-sharing system is feasible and surpasses the use of CDs with respect to accessibility of imaging exams while generating similar satisfaction with respect to privacy. Copyright © 2015 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Monte Carlo feasibility study for image guided surgery: from direct beta minus detection to Cerenkov luminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigliotti, C. R.; Altabella, L.; Boschi, F.; Spinelli, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this work is to compare the performances of different beta minus detection strategies for image guided surgery or ex vivo tissue analysis. In particular we investigated Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) with and without the use of a radiator, direct and indirect beta detection and bremsstrahlung imaging using beta emitters commonly employed in Nuclear Medicine. Monte Carlo simulations were implemented using the GAMOS plug-in for GEANT4 considering a slab of muscle and a radioactive source (32P or 90Y) placed at 0.5 mm depth. We estimated the gain that can be obtained in terms of produced photons using different materials placed on the slab used as Cerenkov radiators, we then focused on the number of exiting photons and their spatial distribution for the different strategies. The use of radiator to enhance Cerenkov signal reduces the spatial resolution because of the increased optical spread. We found that direct beta detection and CLI are best approaches in term of resolution while the use of a thin scintillator increases the signal but the spatial resolution is degraded. Bremsstrahlung presents lower signal and it does not represent the best choice for image guided surgery. CLI represents a more flexible approach for image guided surgery using or ex vivo tissue analysis using beta-emitter imaging.

  18. Direct method of three-dimensional imaging using the multiple-wavelength range-gated active imaging principle.

    PubMed

    Matwyschuk, Alexis

    2016-05-10

    The tomography executed with mono-wavelength active imaging systems uses the recording of several images to restore a three-dimensional (3D) scene. Thus, in order to show the depth in the scene, a different color is attributed to each recorded image. Therefore, the 3D restoration depends on the video frame rate of the camera. By using a multiple-wavelength range-gated active imaging system, it is possible to restore the 3D scene directly in a single image at the moment of recording with a video camera. Each emitted light pulse with a different wavelength corresponds to a visualized zone at a different distance in the scene. The camera shutter opens just once during the emission of light pulses with the different wavelengths. Thus, the restoration can be executed in real time with regard to the video frame rate of the camera. From an analytical model and from a graphical approach, we demonstrated the feasibility of this new method of 3D restoration. The non-overlapping conditions between two consecutive visualized zones are analyzed. The experimental test results confirm these different conditions and validate the theoretical principle to directly restore the 3D scene in a color image with a multiple-wavelength laser source, an RGB filter, and a triggerable intensified camera.

  19. Optical image compression based on adaptive directional prediction discrete wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Libao; Qiu, Bingchang

    2013-11-01

    The traditional lifting wavelet transform cannot effectively reconstruct the nonhorizontal and nonvertical high-frequency information of an image. In this paper, we present a new image compression method based on adaptive directional prediction discrete wavelet transform (ADP-DWT). We first design a directional prediction model to obtain the optimal transform direction of the lifting wavelet. Then, we execute the directional lifting transform along the optimal transform direction. The edge and texture energy can be reduced in the nonhorizontal and nonvertical directions of the high-frequency sub-bands. Finally, the wavelet coefficients are coded with the set partitioning in hierarchical trees (SPIHT) algorithm. The new method holds the advantages of both adaptive directional lifting (ADL) and direction-adaptive discrete wavelet transform (DA-DWT), and the computational complexity is far lower than that in these methods. For the images containing regular and fine textures or edges, the coding preformance of ADP-DWT is better than that of ADL and DA-DWT.

  20. A new type of remote sensors which allow directly forming certain statistical estimates of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlaskin, Boris; Guk, Elena; Karpenko, Andrey

    2010-10-01

    A new approach to the problems of statistical and structural pattern recognition, a signal processing and image analysis techniques has been considered. These problems are extremely important for tasks being solved by airborne and space borne remote sensing systems. Development of new remote sensors for image and signal processing is inherently connected with a possibility of statistical processing of images. Fundamentally new optoelectronic sensors "Multiscan" have been suggested in the present paper. Such sensors make it possible to form directly certain statistical estimates, which describe completely enough the different types of images. The sensors under discussion perform the Lebesgue-Stieltjes signal integration rather than the Cauchy-Riemann one. That permits to create integral functionals for determining statistical features of images. The use of the integral functionals for image processing provides a good agreement of obtained statistical estimates with required image information features. The Multiscan remote sensors allows to create a set of integral moments of an input image right up to high-order integral moments, to form a quantile representation of an input image, which provides a count number limited texture, to form a median, which provides a localisation of a low-contrast horizon line in fog, localisation of water flow boundary etc. This work presents both the description of the design concept of the new remote sensor and mathematical apparatus providing the possibility to create input image statistical features and integral functionals.

  1. Direct imaging with highly diluted apertures - I. Field-of-view limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardière, O.; Martinache, F.; Patru, F.

    2007-03-01

    Future optical interferometric instrumentations mainly rely on the availability of an efficient cophasing system: once available, what has so far postponed the relevance of direct imaging to an interferometer will vanish. This paper focuses on the actual limits of snapshot imaging, inherent to the use of a sparse aperture: the number of telescopes and the geometry of the array impose the maximum extent of the field of view (FOV) and the complexity of the sources. A second limitation may arise from the beam combination scheme. Comparing already available solutions, we show that the so-called hypertelescope mode (or densified pupil) is ideal. By adjusting the direct imaging FOV to the useful FOV offered by the array, the hypertelescope makes an optimal use of the collected photons. It optimizes signal-to-noise ratio, drastically improves the luminosity of images and makes the interferometer compatible with coronagraphy, without inducing any loss of useful FOV.

  2. [Influence exerted by MPG-directions on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)].

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Akiyoshi; Kodera, Shuuichi

    2009-07-20

    When diffusion tensor was analyzed, increasing motion probing gradient (MPG) directions and increasing signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as result might influence diffusion tensor calculation. This study determined that mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) are calculated by changing MPG-directions or SNR in the volunteer. There were no statistically significant differences in MD, which is calculated from all scanning parameters (p>0.05). FA of the caudate nucleus was similar as well. However, there were statistically significant differences between FA calculated from 31 MPG-directions and from 13 MPG-directions or less for the frontal lobe and caudate nucleus (p<0.05). If SNR of a trace image is 30 or more, FA wasn't affected by SNR (p>0.05). To calculate FA, minimum MPG-directions that were not statistically different compared with 31 MPG-directions were 15 MPG-directions (p<0.05).

  3. Analysis of highly directive photoconductive dipole antenna at terahertz frequency for sensing and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Isha; Ranjan Jha, Kumud; Singh, G.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we have analyzed a photoconductive dipole antenna at terahertz (THz) frequency for sensing and imaging applications. For these applications, to detect powdered explosives, there is a need to have an image of the object under detection with high resolution to distinguish suspicious items from the normal background. The THz antenna is one of the most important components in a THz sensing and imaging system and there is a need to have such a transmitting THz source with high directivity and optimum radiation efficiency. Therefore, to achieve this, we have explored three photoconductive dipole antenna configurations to enhance the directivity and radiation efficiency. With the use of a simple dipole antenna and silicon lens, we are able to achieve the directivity of 10.7dBi and radiation efficiency of 91.59% in both E-plane and H-plane.

  4. Direct Imaging of Stellar Surfaces: Results from the Stellar Imager (SI) Vision Mission Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth; Schrijver, Carolus; Karovska, Margarita

    2006-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a UV-Optical, Space-Based Interferometer designed to enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and stellar interiors (via asteroseismology) and of the Universe in general. SI is identified as a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission'' in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and as a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory'' in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap (May, 2005). The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes: The 0.1 mas resolution of this deep-space telescope will transform point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. SI's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. In this paper we will discuss the results of the SI Vision Mission Study, elaborating on the science goals of the SI Mission and a mission architecture that could meet those goals.

  5. VIP: Vortex Image Processing Package for High-contrast Direct Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Gonzalez, Carlos Alberto; Wertz, Olivier; Absil, Olivier; Christiaens, Valentin; Defrère, Denis; Mawet, Dimitri; Milli, Julien; Absil, Pierre-Antoine; Van Droogenbroeck, Marc; Cantalloube, Faustine; Hinz, Philip M.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Karlsson, Mikael; Surdej, Jean

    2017-07-01

    We present the Vortex Image Processing (VIP) library, a python package dedicated to astronomical high-contrast imaging. Our package relies on the extensive python stack of scientific libraries and aims to provide a flexible framework for high-contrast data and image processing. In this paper, we describe the capabilities of VIP related to processing image sequences acquired using the angular differential imaging (ADI) observing technique. VIP implements functionalities for building high-contrast data processing pipelines, encompassing pre- and post-processing algorithms, potential source position and flux estimation, and sensitivity curve generation. Among the reference point-spread function subtraction techniques for ADI post-processing, VIP includes several flavors of principal component analysis (PCA) based algorithms, such as annular PCA and incremental PCA algorithms capable of processing big datacubes (of several gigabytes) on a computer with limited memory. Also, we present a novel ADI algorithm based on non-negative matrix factorization, which comes from the same family of low-rank matrix approximations as PCA and provides fairly similar results. We showcase the ADI capabilities of the VIP library using a deep sequence on HR 8799 taken with the LBTI/LMIRCam and its recently commissioned L-band vortex coronagraph. Using VIP, we investigated the presence of additional companions around HR 8799 and did not find any significant additional point source beyond the four known planets. VIP is available at http://github.com/vortex-exoplanet/VIP and is accompanied with Jupyter notebook tutorials illustrating the main functionalities of the library.

  6. Vesicorectal fistula detected on direct radionuclide cystography--importance of fecal matter imaging.

    PubMed

    Aghaei, Atena; Sadeghi, Ramin; Saeedi, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    We report an 11 year old male patient with the history of imperforate anus, which was repaired surgically 4 years ago. He has been complaining of intermittent passing of urine into the rectum recently. The vesicorectal fistula in this patient was proven by imaging of the fecal matter post direct radionuclide cystography study. Our case showed that nuclear medicine imaging can be extended to unanimated objects such as patients' excrements or fluids with important diagnostic yields.

  7. Optic disc detection from normalized digital fundus images by means of a vessels' direction matched filter.

    PubMed

    Youssif, A R; Ghalwash, A Z; Ghoneim, A R

    2008-01-01

    Optic disc (OD) detection is a main step while developing automated screening systems for diabetic retinopathy. We present in this paper a method to automatically detect the position of the OD in digital retinal fundus images. The method starts by normalizing luminosity and contrast through out the image using illumination equalization and adaptive histogram equalization methods respectively. The OD detection algorithm is based on matching the expected directional pattern of the retinal blood vessels. Hence, a simple matched filter is proposed to roughly match the direction of the vessels at the OD vicinity. The retinal vessels are segmented using a simple and standard 2-D Gaussian matched filter. Consequently, a vessels direction map of the segmented retinal vessels is obtained using the same segmentation algorithm. The segmented vessels are then thinned, and filtered using local intensity, to represent finally the OD-center candidates. The difference between the proposed matched filter resized into four different sizes, and the vessels' directions at the surrounding area of each of the OD-center candidates is measured. The minimum difference provides an estimate of the OD-center coordinates. The proposed method was evaluated using a subset of the STARE project's dataset, containing 81 fundus images of both normal and diseased retinas, and initially used by literature OD detection methods. The OD-center was detected correctly in 80 out of the 81 images (98.77%). In addition, the OD-center was detected correctly in all of the 40 images (100%) using the publicly available DRIVE dataset.

  8. Determination of the Hubble Space Telescope effective conic-constant error from direct image measurements.

    PubMed

    Meinel, A B; Meinel, M P; Schulte, D H

    1993-04-01

    Direct measurement of discernible features in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imagery has enabled a self-consistent determination to be made of the effective conic constant of HST images taken with planetary camera 6 (PC-6) of the wide field and planetary camera. Before being corrected for the contribution from PC-6, the conic constant is - 1.01429 +/- 0.0002. The correction for PC-6 is less accurately determined but probably lies between -0.0002 and 0.0004. As a result the HST optics are characterized best by a conic constant of - 1.0140 +/- 0.0003 as obtained from direct image measurements.

  9. Multiresolution image representation using combined 2-D and 1-D directional filter banks.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuichi; Ikehara, Masaaki; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, effective multiresolution image representations using a combination of 2-D filter bank (FB) and directional wavelet transform (WT) are presented. The proposed methods yield simple implementation and low computation costs compared to previous 1-D and 2-D FB combinations or adaptive directional WT methods. Furthermore, they are nonredundant transforms and realize quad-tree like multiresolution representations. In applications on nonlinear approximation, image coding, and denoising, the proposed filter banks show visual quality improvements and have higher PSNR than the conventional separable WT or the contourlet.

  10. Early flame development image comparison of low calorific value syngas and CNG in DI SI gas engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    >Ftwi Yohaness Hagos, A. Rashid A.; Sulaiman, Shaharin A.

    2013-06-01

    The early flame development stage of syngas and CNG are analysed and compared from the flame images taken over 20° CA from the start of ignition. An imitated syngas with a composition of 19.2% H2, 29.6% CO, 5.3% CH4 and balance with nitrogen and carbon dioxide, which resembles the typical product of wood biomass gasification, was used in the study. A CCD camera triggered externally through the signals from the camshaft and crank angle sensors was used in capturing of the images. The engine was accessed through an endoscope access and a self-illumination inside the chamber. The results of the image analysis are further compared with the mass fraction burn curve of both syngas and CNG analysed from the pressure data. The analysis result of the flame image of syngas validates the double rapid burning stage of the mass fraction burn of syngas analysed from in-cylinder pressure data.

  11. Adaptive optics confocal fluorescence microscopy with direct wavefront sensing for brain tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xiaodong; Fernandez, Bautista; Chen, Diana C.; Azucena, Oscar; Fu, Min; Zuo, Yi; Kubby, Joel

    2011-03-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in deep tissue imaging for the study of neurons. Unfortunately, because of the inhomogeneous refractive index of the tissue, the aberrations degrade the resolution and brightness of the final image. In this paper, we describe an adaptive optics confocal fluorescence microscope (AOCFM) which can correct aberrations based on direct wavefront measurements using a point source reference beacon and a Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor (SHWS). Mouse brain tissues with different thicknesses are tested. After correction, both the signal intensity and contrast of the image are improved.

  12. Multisensor Super Resolution Using Directionally-Adaptive Regularization for UAV Images

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wonseok; Yu, Soohwan; Ko, Seungyong; Paik, Joonki

    2015-01-01

    In various unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging applications, the multisensor super-resolution (SR) technique has become a chronic problem and attracted increasing attention. Multisensor SR algorithms utilize multispectral low-resolution (LR) images to make a higher resolution (HR) image to improve the performance of the UAV imaging system. The primary objective of the paper is to develop a multisensor SR method based on the existing multispectral imaging framework instead of using additional sensors. In order to restore image details without noise amplification or unnatural post-processing artifacts, this paper presents an improved regularized SR algorithm by combining the directionally-adaptive constraints and multiscale non-local means (NLM) filter. As a result, the proposed method can overcome the physical limitation of multispectral sensors by estimating the color HR image from a set of multispectral LR images using intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) image fusion. Experimental results show that the proposed method provides better SR results than existing state-of-the-art SR methods in the sense of objective measures. PMID:26007744

  13. Fluorescence guided lymph node biopsy in large animals using direct image projection device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringhausen, Elizabeth; Wang, Tylon; Pitts, Jonathan; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-03-01

    The use of fluorescence imaging for aiding oncologic surgery is a fast growing field in biomedical imaging, revolutionizing open and minimally invasive surgery practices. We have designed, constructed, and tested a system for fluorescence image acquisition and direct display on the surgical field for fluorescence guided surgery. The system uses a near-infrared sensitive CMOS camera for image acquisition, a near-infra LED light source for excitation, and DLP digital projector for projection of fluorescence image data onto the operating field in real time. Instrument control was implemented in Matlab for image capture, processing of acquired data and alignment of image parameters with the projected pattern. Accuracy of alignment was evaluated statistically to demonstrate sensitivity to small objects and alignment throughout the imaging field. After verification of accurate alignment, feasibility for clinical application was demonstrated in large animal models of sentinel lymph node biopsy. Indocyanine green was injected subcutaneously in Yorkshire pigs at various locations to model sentinel lymph node biopsy in gynecologic cancers, head and neck cancer, and melanoma. Fluorescence was detected by the camera system during operations and projected onto the imaging field, accurately identifying tissues containing the fluorescent tracer at up to 15 frames per second. Fluorescence information was projected as binary green regions after thresholding and denoising raw intensity data. Promising results with this initial clinical scale prototype provided encouraging results for the feasibility of optical projection of acquired luminescence during open oncologic surgeries.

  14. Multisensor Super Resolution Using Directionally-Adaptive Regularization for UAV Images.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonseok; Yu, Soohwan; Ko, Seungyong; Paik, Joonki

    2015-05-22

    In various unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging applications, the multisensor super-resolution (SR) technique has become a chronic problem and attracted increasing attention. Multisensor SR algorithms utilize multispectral low-resolution (LR) images to make a higher resolution (HR) image to improve the performance of the UAV imaging system. The primary objective of the paper is to develop a multisensor SR method based on the existing multispectral imaging framework instead of using additional sensors. In order to restore image details without noise amplification or unnatural post-processing artifacts, this paper presents an improved regularized SR algorithm by combining the directionally-adaptive constraints and multiscale non-local means (NLM) filter. As a result, the proposed method can overcome the physical limitation of multispectral sensors by estimating the color HR image from a set of multispectral LR images using intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) image fusion. Experimental results show that the proposed method provides better SR results than existing state-of-the-art SR methods in the sense of objective measures.

  15. Experimental demonstration of an adaptive architecture for direct spectral imaging classification.

    PubMed

    Dunlop-Gray, Matthew; Poon, Phillip K; Golish, Dathon; Vera, Esteban; Gehm, Michael E

    2016-08-08

    Spectral imaging is a powerful tool for providing in situ material classification across a spatial scene. Typically, spectral imaging analyses are interested in classification, though often the classification is performed only after reconstruction of the spectral datacube. We present a computational spectral imaging system, the Adaptive Feature-Specific Spectral Imaging Classifier (AFSSI-C), which yields direct classification across the spatial scene without reconstruction of the source datacube. With a dual disperser architecture and a programmable spatial light modulator, the AFSSI-C measures specific projections of the spectral datacube which are generated by an adaptive Bayesian classification and feature design framework. We experimentally demonstrate multiple order-of-magnitude improvement of classification accuracy in low signal-to-noise (SNR) environments when compared to legacy spectral imaging systems.

  16. Feshbach enhanced s-wave scattering of fermions: direct observation with optimized absorption imaging

    PubMed Central

    Genkina, D; Aycock, LM; Stuhl, BK; Lu, H-I; Williams, RA; Spielman, IB

    2016-01-01

    We directly measured the normalized s-wave scattering cross-section of ultracold 40K atoms across a magnetic-field Feshbach resonance by colliding pairs of degenerate Fermi gases (DFGs) and imaging the scattered atoms. We extracted the scattered fraction for a range of bias magnetic fields, and measured the resonance location to be B0 = 20.206(15) mT with width Δ = 1.0(5) mT. To optimize the signal-to-noise ratio of atom number in scattering images, we developed techniques to interpret absorption images in a regime where recoil induced detuning corrections are significant. These imaging techniques are generally applicable to experiments with lighter alkalis that would benefit from maximizing signal-to-noise ratio on atom number counting at the expense of spatial imaging resolution. PMID:26903778

  17. Full-direct method for imaging pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guanglei; Pu, Huangsheng; Liu, Fei; Bai, Jing; He, Wei; Luo, Jianwen

    2015-02-23

    Images of pharmacokinetic parameters (also known as parametric images) in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can provide three-dimensional metabolic information for biological studies and drug development. However, the ill-posed nature of FMT and the high temporal variation of fluorophore concentration together make it difficult to obtain accurate parametric images in small animals in vivo. In this letter, we present a method to directly reconstruct the parametric images from the boundary measurements based on hybrid FMT/X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system. This method can not only utilize structural priors obtained from the XCT system to mitigate the ill-posedness of FMT but also make full use of the temporal correlations of boundary measurements to model the high temporal variation of fluorophore concentration. The results of numerical simulation and mouse experiment demonstrate that the proposed method leads to significant improvements in the reconstruction quality of parametric images.

  18. Full-direct method for imaging pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guanglei; Pu, Huangsheng; He, Wei; Liu, Fei; Luo, Jianwen; Bai, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Images of pharmacokinetic parameters (also known as parametric images) in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can provide three-dimensional metabolic information for biological studies and drug development. However, the ill-posed nature of FMT and the high temporal variation of fluorophore concentration together make it difficult to obtain accurate parametric images in small animals in vivo. In this letter, we present a method to directly reconstruct the parametric images from the boundary measurements based on hybrid FMT/X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system. This method can not only utilize structural priors obtained from the XCT system to mitigate the ill-posedness of FMT but also make full use of the temporal correlations of boundary measurements to model the high temporal variation of fluorophore concentration. The results of numerical simulation and mouse experiment demonstrate that the proposed method leads to significant improvements in the reconstruction quality of parametric images.

  19. Direct Imaging of Single Plasmonic Metal Nanoparticles in Capillary with Laser Light-Sheet Scattering Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xuan; Feng, Jingjing; Pan, Qi; Xiong, Bin; He, Yan; Yeung, Edward S

    2017-03-07

    Understanding the heterogeneous distribution of the physical and chemical properties of plasmonic metal nanoparticles is fundamentally important to their basic and applied research. Traditionally, they are obtained either indirectly via bulk spectroscopic measurements plus electron microscopic characterizations or through single molecule/particle imaging of nanoparticles immobilized on planar substrates. In this study, by using light-sheet scattering microscopy with a supercontinuum white laser, highly sensitive imaging of individual metal nanoparticles (MNPs) flowing inside a capillary, driven by either pressure or electric field, was achieved for the first time. We demonstrate that single plasmonic nanoparticles with different size or chemical modification could be differentiated through their electrophoretic mobility in a few minutes. This technique could potentially be applied to high throughput characterization and evaluation of single metal nanoparticles as well as their dynamic interactions with various local environments.

  20. Direct imaging with highly diluted apertures - II. Properties of the point spread function of a hypertelescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, F.; Tarmoul, N.; Mourard, D.; Lardière, O.

    2009-06-01

    In the future, optical stellar interferometers will provide true images thanks to larger number of telescopes and to advanced cophasing subsystems. These conditions are required to have sufficient resolution elements (resel) in the image and to provide direct images in the hypertelescope mode. It has already been shown that hypertelescopes provide snapshot images with a significant gain in sensitivity without inducing any loss of the useful field of view for direct imaging applications. This paper aims at studying the properties of the point spread functions of future large arrays using the hypertelescope mode. Numerical simulations have been performed and criteria have been defined to study the image properties. It is shown that the choice of the configuration of the array is a trade-off between the resolution, the halo level and the field of view. A regular pattern of the array of telescopes optimizes the image quality (low halo level and maximum encircled energy in the central peak), but decreases the useful field of view. Moreover, a non-redundant array is less sensitive to the space aliasing effect than a redundant array.

  1. Illumination Normalization of Face Image Based on Illuminant Direction Estimation and Improved Retinex

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jizheng; Mao, Xia; Chen, Lijiang; Xue, Yuli; Rovetta, Alberto; Caleanu, Catalin-Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Illumination normalization of face image for face recognition and facial expression recognition is one of the most frequent and difficult problems in image processing. In order to obtain a face image with normal illumination, our method firstly divides the input face image into sixteen local regions and calculates the edge level percentage in each of them. Secondly, three local regions, which meet the requirements of lower complexity and larger average gray value, are selected to calculate the final illuminant direction according to the error function between the measured intensity and the calculated intensity, and the constraint function for an infinite light source model. After knowing the final illuminant direction of the input face image, the Retinex algorithm is improved from two aspects: (1) we optimize the surround function; (2) we intercept the values in both ends of histogram of face image, determine the range of gray levels, and stretch the range of gray levels into the dynamic range of display device. Finally, we achieve illumination normalization and get the final face image. Unlike previous illumination normalization approaches, the method proposed in this paper does not require any training step or any knowledge of 3D face and reflective surface model. The experimental results using extended Yale face database B and CMU-PIE show that our method achieves better normalization effect comparing with the existing techniques. PMID:25906370

  2. Imaging of deep venous thrombosis in patients using a radiolabelled anti-D-dimer Fab' fragment (99mTc-DI-DD3B6/22-80B3): results of a phase I trial.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, David; Socrates, Angelides; Eisenberg, Paul; Larcos, George; Roach, Paul; Gerometta, Michael; Smart, Richard; Tsui, Wendy; Scott, Andrew M

    2009-02-01

    (99m)Tc-DI-DD3B6/22-80B3 (ThromboView, hereafter abbreviated to (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab') is a radiolabelled humanised monoclonal Fab' fragment with affinity and specificity for D-dimer domains of cross-linked fibrin. Detection of thromboembolic events has been demonstrated in canine models. The study objectives were evaluation of safety and characterisation of biodistribution, immunogenicity and pharmacokinetic profile of increasing doses of (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab' in subjects with acute lower-limb DVT. Twenty-six patients with acute lower limb DVT were enrolled. Of these, 21 received a single intravenous dose of 0.5 mg (n = 6), 1.0 mg (n = 9) or 2 mg (n = 6) (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab'. Blood and urine samples and gamma camera images were collected to 24 h after administration for pharmacokinetic and dosimetry analysis. Vital signs, electrocardiography, hematological and biochemical data and human anti-human antibody (HAHA) levels were monitored for up to 30 days following administration. Patients were assigned to either planar or single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) imaging of the thorax at 4 h following injection. Thirty-five adverse events were reported in 15 of the 21 subjects. Those deemed possibly related to administration of (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab' included mild hypertension, mild elevation of LD (lactate dehydrogenase) and moderate elevation of ALT (alanine transaminase). HAHA assays remained negative. Pharmacokinetics and organ dosimetry were comparable to prior normal volunteer data. Localisation of Thromboview to sites of known thrombus was evident as early as 30 min post-injection. In subjects with acute DVT, (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab' was well tolerated with favourable characteristics for the detection of acute venous thrombosis.

  3. Direct neural current imaging in an intact cerebellum with magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Padmavathi; Nummenmaa, Aapo; Wells, William; Orbach, Darren; Orringer, Daniel; Mulkern, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect neuronal currents with high spatiotemporal resolution using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is important for studying human brain function in both health and disease. While significant progress has been made, we still lack evidence showing that it is possible to measure an MR signal time-locked to neuronal currents with a temporal waveform matching concurrently recorded local field potentials (LFPs). Also lacking is evidence that such MR data can be used to image current distribution in active tissue. Since these two results are lacking even in vitro, we obtained these data in an intact isolated whole cerebellum of turtle during slow neuronal activity mediated by metabotropic glutamate receptors using a gradient-echo EPI sequence (TR = 100 ms) at 4.7 T. Our results show that it is possible (1) to reliably detect an MR phase shift time course matching that of the concurrently measured LFP evoked by stimulation of a cerebellar peduncle, (2) to detect the signal in single voxels of 0.1 mm3, (3) to determine the spatial phase map matching the magnetic field distribution predicted by the LFP map, (4) to estimate the distribution of neuronal current in the active tissue from a group-average phase map, and (5) to provide a quantitatively accurate theoretical account of the measured phase shifts. The peak values of the detected MR phase shifts were 0.27–0.37°, corresponding to local magnetic field changes of 0.67–0.93 nT (for TE = 26 ms). Our work provides an empirical basis for future extensions to in vivo imaging of neuronal currents. PMID:26899788

  4. High-content analysis of single cells directly assembled on CMOS sensor based on color imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Saeki, Tatsuya; Sunaga, Yoshihiko; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-12-15

    A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor was applied to high-content analysis of single cells which were assembled closely or directly onto the CMOS sensor surface. The direct assembling of cell groups on CMOS sensor surface allows large-field (6.66 mm×5.32 mm in entire active area of CMOS sensor) imaging within a second. Trypan blue-stained and non-stained cells in the same field area on the CMOS sensor were successfully distinguished as white- and blue-colored images under white LED light irradiation. Furthermore, the chemiluminescent signals of each cell were successfully visualized as blue-colored images on CMOS sensor only when HeLa cells were placed directly on the micro-lens array of the CMOS sensor. Our proposed approach will be a promising technique for real-time and high-content analysis of single cells in a large-field area based on color imaging.

  5. Signal-to-Noise Behavior for Matches to Gradient Direction Models of Corners in Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D W; Manay, S

    2007-02-09

    Gradient direction models for corners of prescribed acuteness, leg length, and leg thickness are constructed by generating fields of unit vectors emanating from leg pixels that point normal to the edges. A novel FFT-based algorithm that quickly matches models of corners at all possible positions and orientations in the image to fields of gradient directions for image pixels is described. The signal strength of a corner is discussed in terms of the number of pixels along the edges of a corner in an image, while noise is characterized by the coherence of gradient directions along those edges. The detection-false alarm rate behavior of our corner detector is evaluated empirically by manually constructing maps of corner locations in typical overhead images, and then generating different ROC curves for matches to models of corners with different leg lengths and thicknesses. We then demonstrate how corners found with our detector can be used to quickly and automatically find families of polygons of arbitrary position, size and orientation in overhead images.

  6. Body image disturbance in children and adolescents with eating disorders. Current evidence and future directions.

    PubMed

    Legenbauer, Tanja; Thiemann, Pia; Vocks, Silja

    2014-01-01

    Body image is multifaceted and incorporates perceptual, affective, and cognitive components as well as behavioral features. Only few studies have examined the character of body-image disturbance in children/adolescents with eating disorders. It is unknown whether body-image disturbances in children/adolescent with eating disturbances are comparable to those of adult patients with eating disorders. Body-image disturbance might differ quantitatively and qualitatively according to the cognitive developmental status and the age of the individual. This paper provides an overview of the current evidence for body-image disturbance in children/adolescents with eating disorders, and how they compare with those adults with eating disorders. Current evidence indicates that older adolescent patients show similar deficits as adult patients with eating disorders, in particular for the attitudinal body-image component. However, evidence for a perceptual body-image disturbance in adolescent patients, in particular anorexia nervosa, is not conclusive. Reliable statements for childhood can hardly be made because clinical studies are not available. Investigations of body-image disturbance in children have focused on the predictive value for eating disorders. Limitations of the current evidence are discussed, and future directions for research and therapy are indicated.

  7. Model tags: direct three-dimensional tracking of heart wall motion from tagged magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Young, A A

    1999-12-01

    Although magnetic resonance tissue tagging is a useful tool for the non-invasive measurement of three-dimensional (3-D) heart wall motion, the clinical utility of current analysis techniques is limited by the prohibitively long time required for image analysis. A method was therefore developed for the reconstruction of 3-D heart wall motion directly from tagged magnetic resonance images, without prior identification of ventricular boundaries or tag stripe locations. The method utilized a finite-element model to describe the shape and motion of the heart. Initially, the model geometry was determined at the time of tag creation by fitting a small number of guide points which were placed interactively on the images. Model tags were then created within the model as material surfaces which defined the location of the magnetic tags. An objective function was derived to measure the degree of match between the model tags and the image stripes. The objective was minimized by allowing the model to deform directly under the influence of the images, utilizing an efficient method for calculating image-derived motion constraints. The model deformation could also be manipulated interactively by guide points. Experiments were performed using clinical images of a normal volunteer, as well as simulated images in which the true motion was specified. The root-mean-squared errors between the known and calculated displacement and strain for the simulated images were similar to those obtained using previous stripe-tracking and model-fitting methods. A significant improvement in analysis time was obtained for the normal volunteer and further improvements may allow the method to be applied in a 'real-time' clinical environment.

  8. Effective Alternating Direction Optimization Methods for Sparsity-Constrained Blind Image Deblurring

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Naixue; Liu, Ryan Wen; Liang, Maohan; Wu, Di; Liu, Zhao; Wu, Huisi

    2017-01-01

    Single-image blind deblurring for imaging sensors in the Internet of Things (IoT) is a challenging ill-conditioned inverse problem, which requires regularization techniques to stabilize the image restoration process. The purpose is to recover the underlying blur kernel and latent sharp image from only one blurred image. Under many degraded imaging conditions, the blur kernel could be considered not only spatially sparse, but also piecewise smooth with the support of a continuous curve. By taking advantage of the hybrid sparse properties of the blur kernel, a hybrid regularization method is proposed in this paper to robustly and accurately estimate the blur kernel. The effectiveness of the proposed blur kernel estimation method is enhanced by incorporating both the L1-norm of kernel intensity and the squared L2-norm of the intensity derivative. Once the accurate estimation of the blur kernel is obtained, the original blind deblurring can be simplified to the direct deconvolution of blurred images. To guarantee robust non-blind deconvolution, a variational image restoration model is presented based on the L1-norm data-fidelity term and the total generalized variation (TGV) regularizer of second-order. All non-smooth optimization problems related to blur kernel estimation and non-blind deconvolution are effectively handled by using the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM)-based numerical methods. Comprehensive experiments on both synthetic and realistic datasets have been implemented to compare the proposed method with several state-of-the-art methods. The experimental comparisons have illustrated the satisfactory imaging performance of the proposed method in terms of quantitative and qualitative evaluations. PMID:28106764

  9. Effective Alternating Direction Optimization Methods for Sparsity-Constrained Blind Image Deblurring.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Naixue; Liu, Ryan Wen; Liang, Maohan; Wu, Di; Liu, Zhao; Wu, Huisi

    2017-01-18

    Single-image blind deblurring for imaging sensors in the Internet of Things (IoT) is a challenging ill-conditioned inverse problem, which requires regularization techniques to stabilize the image restoration process. The purpose is to recover the underlying blur kernel and latent sharp image from only one blurred image. Under many degraded imaging conditions, the blur kernel could be considered not only spatially sparse, but also piecewise smooth with the support of a continuous curve. By taking advantage of the hybrid sparse properties of the blur kernel, a hybrid regularization method is proposed in this paper to robustly and accurately estimate the blur kernel. The effectiveness of the proposed blur kernel estimation method is enhanced by incorporating both the L 1 -norm of kernel intensity and the squared L 2 -norm of the intensity derivative. Once the accurate estimation of the blur kernel is obtained, the original blind deblurring can be simplified to the direct deconvolution of blurred images. To guarantee robust non-blind deconvolution, a variational image restoration model is presented based on the L 1 -norm data-fidelity term and the total generalized variation (TGV) regularizer of second-order. All non-smooth optimization problems related to blur kernel estimation and non-blind deconvolution are effectively handled by using the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM)-based numerical methods. Comprehensive experiments on both synthetic and realistic datasets have been implemented to compare the proposed method with several state-of-the-art methods. The experimental comparisons have illustrated the satisfactory imaging performance of the proposed method in terms of quantitative and qualitative evaluations.

  10. Direct UV/Optical Imaging of Stellar Surfaces: The Stellar Imager (SI) Vision Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Lyon, Richard G.; Schrijver, Carolus; Karovska, Margarita; Mozurkewich, David

    2007-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a UV/optical, space-based interferometer designed to enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. SI's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives, in support of the Living with a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in thc Universe. SI is a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory" in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap. We discuss herein the science goals of the SI Mission, a mission architecture that could meet those goals, and the technologies needed to enable this mission. Additional information on SI can be found at: http://hires.gsfc.nasa.gov/si/.

  11. Direct imaging of optimal photonic nanojets from core-shell microcylinders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-Yang; Hsiao, Kai-Lung

    2015-11-15

    We first experimentally evaluate the direct imaging of photonic nanojets from core-shell microcylinders. The optimal photonic nanojet with long length, a high intensity spot, and low divergence is observed at the designed gold-silver-coating microcylinder. A special microcylinder consists of multilayered metallic shells (gold, silver, and copper) and a dielectric core (polydimethylsiloxane) at a diameter of 5 μm and a height of 6 μm. The electromagnetic distributions inside and outside the core-shell microcylinders are calculated by using the finite-difference time-domain method. The direct-imaging measurements for photonic nanojets are performed with a scanning-optical-microscope system. Such core-shell microcylinders provide new pathways for high-resolution optical imaging, which are useful for biophotonics, plasmonics, and optical data storage.

  12. Direct imaging discovery of a Jovian exoplanet within a triple-star system.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Kevin; Apai, Dániel; Kasper, Markus; Kratter, Kaitlin; McClure, Melissa; Robberto, Massimo; Beuzit, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-12

    Direct imaging allows for the detection and characterization of exoplanets via their thermal emission. We report the discovery via imaging of a young Jovian planet in a triple-star system and characterize its atmospheric properties through near-infrared spectroscopy. The semimajor axis of the planet is closer relative to that of its hierarchical triple-star system than for any known exoplanet within a stellar binary or triple, making HD 131399 dynamically unlike any other known system. The location of HD 131399Ab on a wide orbit in a triple system demonstrates that massive planets may be found on long and possibly unstable orbits in multistar systems. HD 131399Ab is one of the lowest mass (4 ± 1 Jupiter masses) and coldest (850 ± 50 kelvin) exoplanets to have been directly imaged.

  13. Ambienti Circumstellari ed Interstellari di Supernovae di vario Tipo ed Applicazioni Astrofisiche

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffi, Francesca R.

    extra-galattiche per via puramente geometrica (Sparks 1994; 1996). Osservazioni da terra, in imaging e polarimetria, sono state utilizzate per selezionare un numero promettente di candidati, che mostrano emissione visibile alla posizione della supernova. Tali candidati sono promettenti non solo per l' applicazione del metodo descritto ma anche per dedurre informazioni circa le supernovae medesime e le relative popolazioni stellari.

  14. Prescription and choice of diagnostic imaging by physician specialty in Alzheimer's Centers (Unità di Valutazione Alzheimer - UVA) in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Frisoni, Giovanni B; Galluzzi, Samantha; Riello, Roberta

    2005-02-01

    Physician's specialty has been shown to have an effect on health outcomes and financial expenditure in a number of conditions. This is particularly true in the differential diagnosis of cognitive deterioration, in which technological procedures are needed. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of physician specialty on the prescription of diagnostic imaging (CT and MR) in patients with cognitive impairment, referred to Alzheimer Evaluation Units (Unità di Valutazione Alzheimer) in Northern Italy. An ad-hoc questionnaire was sent to UVA referents in northern Italy (Lombardy, Piedmont, Trentino, Emilia-Romagna and Veneto), requesting information on the frequency of prescriptions for CT and MR and reasons for the choice, on a 0 to 7 scale. The physician-in-charge was a neurologist in 22 and a geriatrician in 22 Alzheimer's centers. Intensive use of CT was similar in neurologists and geriatricians (64 vs 68%), whereas intensive use of MR was more frequent in neurologists (41 vs 10%; p = 0.03). Overall, organizational factors (availability of the scanner on-site and waiting list for imaging, mean weight = 1.6 +/- 1.4) were as important as patient-related factors (age, severity of cognitive impairment, and clinical suspicion of cerebrovascular disease, mean weight 1.7 +/- 1.4; p = 0.84). Sixty-five percent of neurologists based their choices between CT and MR on patient-related and 35% on organizational factors, whereas the opposite proportion was found for geriatricians (29 vs 71%, p = 0.04). The high weight of organizational factors on the prescription of diagnostic imaging is not consistent with an evidence-based diagnostic system.

  15. Direct reconstruction of cardiac PET kinetic parametric images using a preconditioned conjugate gradient approach.

    PubMed

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; Ouyang, Jinsong; Guerin, Bastien; Li, Quanzheng; Alpert, Nathaniel M; El Fakhri, Georges

    2013-10-01

    Our research goal is to develop an algorithm to reconstruct cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) kinetic parametric images directly from sinograms and compare its performance with the conventional indirect approach. Time activity curves of a NCAT phantom were computed according to a one-tissue compartmental kinetic model with realistic kinetic parameters. The sinograms at each time frame were simulated using the activity distribution for the time frame. The authors reconstructed the parametric images directly from the sinograms by optimizing a cost function, which included the Poisson log-likelihood and a spatial regularization terms, using the preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) algorithm with the proposed preconditioner. The proposed preconditioner is a diagonal matrix whose diagonal entries are the ratio of the parameter and the sensitivity of the radioactivity associated with parameter. The authors compared the reconstructed parametric images using the direct approach with those reconstructed using the conventional indirect approach. At the same bias, the direct approach yielded significant relative reduction in standard deviation by 12%-29% and 32%-70% for 50 × 10(6) and 10 × 10(6) detected coincidences counts, respectively. Also, the PCG method effectively reached a constant value after only 10 iterations (with numerical convergence achieved after 40-50 iterations), while more than 500 iterations were needed for CG. The authors have developed a novel approach based on the PCG algorithm to directly reconstruct cardiac PET parametric images from sinograms, and yield better estimation of kinetic parameters than the conventional indirect approach, i.e., curve fitting of reconstructed images. The PCG method increases the convergence rate of reconstruction significantly as compared to the conventional CG method.

  16. Direct reconstruction of cardiac PET kinetic parametric images using a preconditioned conjugate gradient approach

    PubMed Central

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; Ouyang, Jinsong; Guerin, Bastien; Li, Quanzheng; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Our research goal is to develop an algorithm to reconstruct cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) kinetic parametric images directly from sinograms and compare its performance with the conventional indirect approach. Methods: Time activity curves of a NCAT phantom were computed according to a one-tissue compartmental kinetic model with realistic kinetic parameters. The sinograms at each time frame were simulated using the activity distribution for the time frame. The authors reconstructed the parametric images directly from the sinograms by optimizing a cost function, which included the Poisson log-likelihood and a spatial regularization terms, using the preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) algorithm with the proposed preconditioner. The proposed preconditioner is a diagonal matrix whose diagonal entries are the ratio of the parameter and the sensitivity of the radioactivity associated with parameter. The authors compared the reconstructed parametric images using the direct approach with those reconstructed using the conventional indirect approach. Results: At the same bias, the direct approach yielded significant relative reduction in standard deviation by 12%–29% and 32%–70% for 50 × 106 and 10 × 106 detected coincidences counts, respectively. Also, the PCG method effectively reached a constant value after only 10 iterations (with numerical convergence achieved after 40–50 iterations), while more than 500 iterations were needed for CG. Conclusions: The authors have developed a novel approach based on the PCG algorithm to directly reconstruct cardiac PET parametric images from sinograms, and yield better estimation of kinetic parameters than the conventional indirect approach, i.e., curve fitting of reconstructed images. The PCG method increases the convergence rate of reconstruction significantly as compared to the conventional CG method. PMID:24089922

  17. Testing zinc chloride as a new catalyst for direct synthesis of cellulose di- and tri-acetate in a solvent free system under microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    El Nemr, Ahmed; Ragab, Safaa; El Sikaily, Amany

    2016-10-20

    This research demonstrates the effect of ZnCl2 as a catalyst on the esterification of commercial cotton cellulose using acetic anhydride in order to obtain di- and tri-cellulose acetates under microwave irradiation. It was discovered that microwave irradiation significantly increased the yield and reduced the reaction time. It was found that the maximum yield for cellulose triacetates was 95.83% under the reaction conditions that were as follows: 3min reaction time, 200mg of ZnCl2 catalyst and 20ml of Ac2O for 5g cellulose. However, the cellulose acetate obtained in this manner had the highest DS (2.87). The cellulose di-acetate was produced with the maximum yield of 89.97% and with the highest DS (2.69) using 25ml Ac2O, 200mg of ZnCl2 for 5g cellulose and in 3min reaction time. The effect of some factors such as the amount of used catalyst, the quantity of acetic acid anhydride and the reaction time of the esterification process have been investigated. The production of di- and tri-cellulose acetate and the degree of substitution were confirmed using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The thermal stability was investigated using thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The molecular weight and the degree of polymerization were obtained using Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC). The analysis confirmed the successful synthesis of di- and tri-cellulose acetate without degradation during the reaction; these results were found to be in contrast to some recent studies. The present study reveals that ZnCl2 is a new catalyst; it is effective as well as inexpensive and is a low toxicity catalyst for usage in cellulose esterification.

  18. Viewing-angle-enhanced integral three-dimensional imaging along all directions without mechanical movement.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sungyong; Park, Jae-Hyeung; Choi, Heejin; Lee, Byoungho

    2003-06-16

    Integral three-dimensional (3D) imaging provides full-motion parallax, unlike other conventional stereoscopy-based techniques. To maximize this advantage, a 3D system with a wide view along all directions is required. We propose and demonstrate a new integral imaging (InIm) method to enhance the viewing angle along both horizontal and vertical directions. Elemental lens switching is performed by a combination of spatial and time multiplexing by use of double display devices and orthogonal polarizations. Experimental results show that the viewing angle of the system is enhanced along all directions without any mechanical movement or any cross talk between afterimages. We believe that the proposed method has the potential to facilitate practical use of the wideviewing InIm system.

  19. Design and implementation of magnetically maneuverable capsule endoscope system with direction reference for image navigation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhen-Jun; Ye, Bo; Sun, Yi; Zhang, Hong-Hai; Liu, Sheng

    2014-07-01

    This article describes a novel magnetically maneuverable capsule endoscope system with direction reference for image navigation. This direction reference was employed by utilizing a specific magnet configuration between a pair of external permanent magnets and a magnetic shell coated on the external capsule endoscope surface. A pair of customized Cartesian robots, each with only 4 degrees of freedom, was built to hold the external permanent magnets as their end-effectors. These robots, together with their external permanent magnets, were placed on two opposite sides of a "patient bed." Because of the optimized configuration based on magnetic analysis between the external permanent magnets and the magnetic shell, a simplified control strategy was proposed, and only two parameters, yaw step angle and moving step, were necessary for the employed robotic system. Step-by-step experiments demonstrated that the proposed system is capable of magnetically maneuvering the capsule endoscope while providing direction reference for image navigation.

  20. Discretized aperture mapping with a micro-lenses array for interferometric direct imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, Fabien; Antichi, Jacopo; Mawet, Dimitri; Jolissaint, Laurent; Carbillet, Marcel; Milli, Julien; Girard, Julien; Rabou, Patrick; Giro, Enrico; Mourard, Denis

    2014-08-01

    Discretized Aperture Mapping (DAM) appears as an original filtering technique easy to play with existing adaptive optics (AO) systems. In its essential DAM operates as an optical passive filter removing part of the phase residuals in the wavefront without introducing any difficult-to-align component in the Fourier conjugate of the entrance pupil plane. DAM reveals as a new interferometric technique combined with spatial filtering allowing direct imaging over a narrow field of view (FOV). In fact, the entrance pupil of a single telescope is divided into many sub-pupils so that the residual phase in each sub-pupil is filtered up to the DAM cut-off frequency. DAM enables to smooth the small scale wavefront defects which correspond to high spatial frequencies in the pupil plane and to low angular frequencies in the image plane. Close to the AO Nyquist frequency, such pupil plane spatial frequencies are not well measured by the wavefront sensor (WFS) due to aliasing. Once bigger than the AO Nyquist frequency, they are no more measured by the WFS due to the fitting limit responsible for the narrow AO FOV. The corresponding image plane angular frequencies are not transmitted by DAM and are useless to image small FOVs, as stated by interferometry. That is why AO and DAM are complementary assuming that the DAM cut-off frequency is equal to the AO Nyquist frequency. Here we describe the imaging capabilities when DAM is placed downstream an AO system, over a convenient pupil which precedes the scientific detector. We show firstly that the imaging properties are preserved on a narrow FOV allowing direct imaging throughout interferometry. Then we show how the residual pupil plane spatial frequencies bigger than the AO Nyquist one are filtered out, as well as the residual halo in the image is dimmed.

  1. Improvement of spatial resolution in the longitudinal direction for isotropic imaging in helical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Ota, Takamasa; Fujii, Misako; Kazama, Masahiro; Okumura, Miwa; Johkoh, Takeshi

    2007-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to confirm the isotropic spatial resolution of multislice CT with a 0.5 mm slice thickness. Isotropic spatial resolution means that the spatial resolution in the transaxial plane (X-Y plane) and that in the longitudinal direction (Z direction) are equivalent. To obtain point spread function (PSF) values in the X-Y-Z directions, three-dimensional voxel data were obtained by helical scanning of a bead phantom. The modulation transfer function (MTF) values were then obtained by three-dimensional Fourier transform of the PSF. Evaluation of the spatial resolution in the X-Y-Z directions by the MTF values showed that the spatial resolution in the Z direction does not depend on the reconstruction kernel used. It was also found that the spatial resolution in the Z direction, as compared with that in the X-Y plane, is superior with the standard kernel for the abdomen and is inferior with the high-definition kernel for the ears/bones. By performing sharpening filter processing in the Z direction with a high-definition kernel, comparable spatial resolution could be obtained in the X-Y-Z directions. It was confirmed that adjusting the spatial resolution in the Z direction with the reconstruction kernel used is an effective method for isotropic imaging.

  2. The impact of space-time speckle to the resolution in range and azimuth direction on synthetic aperture imaging ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qian; Zhou, Yu; Sun, Jianfeng; Zhi, Ya'nan; Ma, Xiaoping; Sun, Zhiwei; Lu, Dong; Liu, Liren

    2013-09-01

    As synthetic aperture imaging ladar employs the linear chirp laser signal, it is inevitably impacted by the space-time varying speckle effect. In many SAIL two-dimensional reconstructed images, the laser speckle effect severely reduces the image quality. In this paper, we analyze and simulate the influence of space-time speckle effect to the resolution element imaging both in range direction and in azimuth direction. Expressions for two-dimensional data collection contained space-time speckle effect are obtained, and computer simulation results of resolution degradation both in range direction and in cross-range direction are presented.

  3. Direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain: Feasibility investigation for HARP-AMFPI

    PubMed Central

    Wronski, M. M.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors are investigating the concept of a direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain for low-dose x-ray imaging. It consists of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor partitioned into a thick drift region for x-ray-to-charge conversion and a relatively thin region called high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP) in which the charge undergoes avalanche multiplication. An active matrix of thin film transistors is used to read out the electronic image. The authors call the proposed imager HARP active matrix flat panel imager (HARP-AMFPI). The key advantages of HARP-AMFPI are its high spatial resolution, owing to the direct-conversion a-Se layer, and its programmable avalanche gain, which can be enabled during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise and disabled during high dose radiography to prevent saturation of the detector elements. This article investigates key design considerations for HARP-AMFPI. The effects of electronic noise on the imaging performance of HARP-AMFPI were modeled theoretically and system parameters were optimized for radiography and fluoroscopy. The following imager properties were determined as a function of avalanche gain: (1) the spatial frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency; (2) fill factor; (3) dynamic range and linearity; and (4) gain nonuniformities resulting from electric field strength nonuniformities. The authors results showed that avalanche gains of 5 and 20 enable x-ray quantum noise limited performance throughout the entire exposure range in radiography and fluoroscopy, respectively. It was shown that HARP-AMFPI can provide the required gain while maintaining a 100% effective fill factor and a piecewise dynamic range over five orders of magnitude (10−7–10−2 R∕frame). The authors have also shown that imaging performance is not significantly affected by the following: electric field strength nonuniformities, avalanche noise for x-ray energies above 1 keV and direct

  4. Direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain: feasibility investigation for HARP-AMFPI.

    PubMed

    Wronski, M M; Rowlands, J A

    2008-12-01

    The authors are investigating the concept of a direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain for low-dose x-ray imaging. It consists of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor partitioned into a thick drift region for x-ray-to-charge conversion and a relatively thin region called high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP) in which the charge undergoes avalanche multiplication. An active matrix of thin film transistors is used to read out the electronic image. The authors call the proposed imager HARP active matrix flat panel imager (HARP-AMFPI). The key advantages of HARP-AMFPI are its high spatial resolution, owing to the direct-conversion a-Se layer, and its programmable avalanche gain, which can be enabled during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise and disabled during high dose radiography to prevent saturation of the detector elements. This article investigates key design considerations for HARP-AMFPI. The effects of electronic noise on the imaging performance of HARP-AMFPI were modeled theoretically and system parameters were optimized for radiography and fluoroscopy. The following imager properties were determined as a function of avalanche gain: (1) the spatial frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency; (2) fill factor; (3) dynamic range and linearity; and (4) gain nonuniformities resulting from electric field strength nonuniformities. The authors results showed that avalanche gains of 5 and 20 enable x-ray quantum noise limited performance throughout the entire exposure range in radiography and fluoroscopy, respectively. It was shown that HARP-AMFPI can provide the required gain while maintaining a 100% effective fill factor and a piecewise dynamic range over five orders of magnitude (10(-7)-10(-2) R/frame). The authors have also shown that imaging performance is not significantly affected by the following: electric field strength nonuniformities, avalanche noise for x-ray energies above 1 keV and direct interaction

  5. Direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain: Feasibility investigation for HARP-AMFPI

    SciTech Connect

    Wronski, M. M.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-12-15

    The authors are investigating the concept of a direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain for low-dose x-ray imaging. It consists of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor partitioned into a thick drift region for x-ray-to-charge conversion and a relatively thin region called high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP) in which the charge undergoes avalanche multiplication. An active matrix of thin film transistors is used to read out the electronic image. The authors call the proposed imager HARP active matrix flat panel imager (HARP-AMFPI). The key advantages of HARP-AMFPI are its high spatial resolution, owing to the direct-conversion a-Se layer, and its programmable avalanche gain, which can be enabled during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise and disabled during high dose radiography to prevent saturation of the detector elements. This article investigates key design considerations for HARP-AMFPI. The effects of electronic noise on the imaging performance of HARP-AMFPI were modeled theoretically and system parameters were optimized for radiography and fluoroscopy. The following imager properties were determined as a function of avalanche gain: (1) the spatial frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency; (2) fill factor; (3) dynamic range and linearity; and (4) gain nonuniformities resulting from electric field strength nonuniformities. The authors results showed that avalanche gains of 5 and 20 enable x-ray quantum noise limited performance throughout the entire exposure range in radiography and fluoroscopy, respectively. It was shown that HARP-AMFPI can provide the required gain while maintaining a 100% effective fill factor and a piecewise dynamic range over five orders of magnitude (10{sup -7}-10{sup -2} R/frame). The authors have also shown that imaging performance is not significantly affected by the following: electric field strength nonuniformities, avalanche noise for x-ray energies above 1 keV and direct

  6. Laser direct imaging of high density patterns on PCB covered by photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbucha, R.; Kocik, M.; Mizeraczyk, J.; Koziol, G.; Borecki, J.

    2007-03-01

    The increasing demands for miniaturization and better functionality of electronic components and devices have a significant effect on the requirements facing the printed circuit board (PCB) industry. PCB manufactures are driving for producing high density interconnect (HDI) boards at significantly reduced cost and reduced implementation time. The interconnection complexity of the PCB is still growing and today calls for 50/50 μm or 25/25 μm technology are real. Existing technologies are unable to offer acceptable solution. Recently the Laser Direct Imaging (LDI) technology is considered as an answer for these challenges. LDI is a process of imaging electric circuits directly on PCB without the use of a phototool or mask. The exposure of the photo-sensitive resist is carried out using a laser beam that is scanned across photoresist surface and switched on and off by means of a computer control system according to the electrical circuit pattern. Usually the laser used in the LDI generates a UV line, which is suitable to the commonly available photoresists. In this paper we present the laboratory system for Laser Direct Imaging and also the recent results on imaging the circuitry pattern on the PCB covered by a photosensitive resist.

  7. Direct-conversion flat-panel x-ray imaging: reduction of noise by presampling filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, John A.; Ji, Winston G.; Zhao, Wei; Lee, Denny L. Y.

    2000-04-01

    Large area flat panel solid-state detectors are being studied for digital radiography and fluoroscopy. Such systems use active matrix arrays to readout latent charge images created either by direct conversion of x-ray energy to charge in a photoconductor or indirectly using a phosphor and individual photodiodes on the active matrix array. Our work has utilized the direct conversion method because of its simplicity and the higher resolution possible due to the electrostatic collection of secondary quanta. Aliasing of noise occurs in current designs of direct detectors based on amorphous selenium ((alpha) -Se) because of its high intrinsic resolution. This aliasing leads to a decrease in detective quantum efficiency (DQE) as frequency increases. It has been predicted, using a previously developed model of the complete imaging system, that appropriately controlled spatial filtration can reduce this aliased noise and hence increase DQE at the Nyquist frequency, fNY. Our purpose is to experimentally verify this concept by implementing presampling filtration in a practical flat panel system. An (alpha) -Se based flat panel imager is modified by incorporating an insulating layer between the active matrix and the (alpha) -Se layer to introduce a predetermined amount of presampling burring. The modified imager is evaluated using standard linear analysis tools, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS) and DQE(f), and the results are compared to theoretical predictions.

  8. Direct Raman imaging spectroscopy of lung cancer cells and apoptotic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Yusuke; Furihata, Chie; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2009-02-01

    A Raman spectroscopic technique enables to observe intracellular molecules without fixation or labeling procedures in situ. We demonstrated a classification of human lung cancer cells with Raman spectroscopy and principal component analysis. Normal lung cell-lines and 4 pathological types of cancer cell-lines were seeded on culture dishes and examined. It was as a preliminary study for direct Raman imaging spectroscopy, which could be available for clinical use, to diagnose cancer. The result suggests that Raman spectroscopy could be a complementary method for immunohistology study. We also constructed a new direct Raman imaging system consisting of a high sensitive CCD image sensor, narrow band pass-filters, and a background-free electrically tunable Ti:Sapphire laser. The observation wavelengths can be switched immediately for the purpose of malignancy rapid diagnosis or real time measurement for apoptotic cells. The potential ability of the direct Raman imaging system is supposed to evaluate apoptosis by UV irradiation and anticancer drug-treatment for living lung cancer cells.

  9. Investigating Non-Equilibrium Fluctuations of Nanocolloids in a Magnetic Field Using Direct Imaging Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Ashley; Oprisan, Ana; Oprisan, Sorinel; Rice-Oprisan College of Charleston Team

    Nanoparticles of iron oxide have a high surface area and can be controlled by an external magnetic field. Since they have a fast response to the applied magnetic field, these systems have been used for numerous in vivo applications, such as MRI contrast enhancement, tissue repair, immunoassay, detoxification of biological fluids, hyperthermia, drug delivery, and cell separation. We performed three direct imaging experiments in order to investigate the concentration-driven fluctuations using magnetic nanoparticles in the absence and in the presence of magnetic field. Our direct imaging experimental setup involved a glass cell filled with magnetic nanocolloidal suspension and water with the concentration gradient oriented against the gravitational field and a superluminescent diode (SLD) as the light source. Nonequilibrium concentration-driven fluctuations were recorded using a direct imaging technique. We used a dynamic structure factor algorithm for image processing in order to compute the structure factor and to find the power law exponents. We saw evidence of large concentration fluctuations and permanent magnetism. Further research will use the correlation time to approximate the diffusion coefficient for the free diffusion experiment. Funded by College of Charleston Department of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities SURF grant.

  10. COSMIC: A Multiobject Spectrograph and Direct Imaging Camera for the 5 Meter Hale Telescope Prime Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kells, W.; Dressler, A.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Carr, D.; Koch, E.; Epps, H.; Hilyard, D.; Pardeilhan, G.

    1998-12-01

    We describe the design, construction, and operation of the Carnegie Observatories Spectroscopic Multislit and Imaging Camera (COSMIC) for the prime focus of the Hale 5 m telescope at Palomar Observatory. COSMIC is a reimaging grism spectrograph with a 13.65 arcmin square field of view, which can also be used as a direct imaging camera with a 9.75 arcmin square field of view. The wavelength coverage extends from 350 nm to almost 1 μm the detector is a thinned, back-illuminated SITe 2048x2048 CCD with high quantum efficiency and excellent cosmetics. Multislit aperture masks are produced photographically, with spectra of up to ~50 objects fitted on a single row of a slit mask. The instrument exhibits very little flexure and uses an active thermal control to maintain focus over a wide range of ambient temperature. In direct mode COSMIC is typically used with Kron-Cousins, Gunn, and narrow bandpass filters. The instrument achieves throughputs of greater than 50% for direct imaging and, in spectroscopic mode, a peak efficiency at 5500 Å of slightly better than 24% of light falling on the 5 m mirror. COSMIC is optimized for faint-object imaging, down to Gunn r=26 mag, and multiobject spectroscopy, down to r=23 mag, with typically 30 objects per spectroscopic exposure.

  11. Space Telescope Design to Directly Image the Habitable Zone of Alpha Centauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendek, Eduardo A.; Belikov, Ruslan; Lozi, Julien; Thomas, Sandrine; Males, Jared; Weston, Sasha; McElwain, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The scientific interest in directly imaging and identifying Earth-like planets within the Habitable Zone (HZ) around nearby stars is driving the design of specialized direct imaging missions such as ACESAT, EXO-C, EXO-S and AFTA-C. The inner edge of Alpha Cen A&B Habitable Zone is found at exceptionally large angular separations of 0.7" and 0.4" respectively. This enables direct imaging of the system with a 0.3m class telescope. Contrast ratios on the order of 10(exp 10) are needed to image Earth-brightness planets. Low-resolution (5-band) spectra of all planets may allow establishing the presence and amount of an atmosphere. This star system configuration is optimal for a specialized small, and stable space telescope that can achieve high-contrast but has limited resolution. This paper describes an innovative instrument design and a mission concept based on a full Silicon Carbide off-axis telescope, which has a Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization coronagraph embedded in the telescope. This architecture maximizes stability and throughput. A Multi-Star Wave Front algorithm is implemented to drive a deformable mirror controlling simultaneously diffracted light from the on-axis and binary companion star. The instrument has a Focal Plane Occulter to reject starlight into a high precision pointing control camera. Finally we utilize a Orbital Differential Imaging (ODI) post-processing method that takes advantage of a highly stable environment (Earth-trailing orbit) and a continuous sequence of images spanning 2 years, to reduce the final noise floor in post processing to approximately 2e-11 levels, enabling high confidence and at least 90% completeness detections of Earth-like planets.

  12. Space telescope design to directly image the habitable zone of Alpha Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendek, Eduardo A.; Belikov, Ruslan; Lozi, Julien; Thomas, Sandrine; Males, Jared; Weston, Sasha; McElwain, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The scientific interest in directly imaging and identifying Earth-like planets within the Habitable Zone (HZ) around nearby stars is driving the design of specialized direct imaging missions such as ACESAT, EXO-C, EXO-S and AFTA-C. The inner edge of Alpha Cen A and B Habitable Zone is found at exceptionally large angular separations of 0.7" and 0.4" respectively. This enables direct imaging of the system with a 0.3m class telescope. Contrast ratios on the order of 1010 are needed to image Earth-brightness planets. Low-resolution (5-band) spectra of all planets may allow establishing the presence and amount of an atmosphere. This star system configuration is optimal for a specialized small, and stable space telescope that can achieve high-contrast but has limited resolution. This paper describes an innovative instrument design and a mission concept based on a full Silicon Carbide off-axis telescope, which has a Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization coronagraph embedded in the telescope. This architecture maximizes stability and throughput. A Multi-Star Wave Front algorithm is implemented to drive a deformable mirror controlling simultaneously diffracted light from the on-axis and binary companion star. The instrument has a Focal Plane Occulter to reject starlight into a highprecision pointing control camera. Finally we utilize a Orbital Differential Imaging (ODI) post-processing method that takes advantage of a highly stable environment (Earth-trailing orbit) and a continuous sequence of images spanning 2 years, to reduce the final noise floor in post processing to ~2e-11 levels, enabling high confidence and at least 90% completeness detections of Earth-like planets.

  13. Space Telescope Design to Directly Image the Habitable Zone of Alpha Centauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendek, Eduardo A.; Belikov, Ruslan; Lozi, Julien; Thomas, Sandrine; Males, Jared; Weston, Sasha; McElwain, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The scientific interest in directly imaging and identifying Earth-like planets within the Habitable Zone (HZ) around nearby stars is driving the design of specialized direct imaging missions such as ACESAT, EXO-C, EXO-S and AFTA-C. The inner edge of Alpha Cen A&B Habitable Zone is found at exceptionally large angular separations of 0.7" and 0.4" respectively. This enables direct imaging of the system with a 0.3m class telescope. Contrast ratios on the order of 10(exp 10) are needed to image Earth-brightness planets. Low-resolution (5-band) spectra of all planets may allow establishing the presence and amount of an atmosphere. This star system configuration is optimal for a specialized small, and stable space telescope that can achieve high-contrast but has limited resolution. This paper describes an innovative instrument design and a mission concept based on a full Silicon Carbide off-axis telescope, which has a Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization coronagraph embedded in the telescope. This architecture maximizes stability and throughput. A Multi-Star Wave Front algorithm is implemented to drive a deformable mirror controlling simultaneously diffracted light from the on-axis and binary companion star. The instrument has a Focal Plane Occulter to reject starlight into a high precision pointing control camera. Finally we utilize a Orbital Differential Imaging (ODI) post-processing method that takes advantage of a highly stable environment (Earth-trailing orbit) and a continuous sequence of images spanning 2 years, to reduce the final noise floor in post processing to approximately 2e-11 levels, enabling high confidence and at least 90% completeness detections of Earth-like planets.

  14. Resampling technique in the orthogonal direction for down-looking Synthetic Aperture Imaging Ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangyuan; Sun, Jianfeng; Lu, Zhiyong; Zhang, Ning; Cai, Guangyu; Sun, Zhiwei; Liu, Liren

    2015-09-01

    The implementation of down-looking Synthetic Aperture Imaging Ladar(SAIL) uses quadratic phase history reconstruction in the travel direction and linear phase modulation reconstruction in the orthogonal direction. And the linear phase modulation in the orthogonal direction is generated by the shift of two cylindrical lenses in the two polarization-orthogonal beams. Therefore, the fast-moving of two cylindrical lenses is necessary for airborne down-looking SAIL to match the aircraft flight speed and to realize the compression of the orthogonal direction, but the quick start and the quick stop of the cylindrical lenses must greatly damage the motor and make the motion trail non-uniform. To reduce the damage and get relatively well trajectory, we make the motor move like a sinusoidal curve to make it more realistic movement, and through a resampling interpolation imaging algorithm, we can transform the nonlinear phase to linear phase, and get good reconstruction results of point target and area target in laboratory. The influences on imaging quality in different sampling positions when the motor make a sinusoidal motion and the necessity of the algorithm are analyzed. At last, we perform a comparison of the results of two cases in resolution.

  15. Translation invariant directional framelet transform combined with Gabor filters for image denoising.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Yang, Xiaoyuan; Guo, Yuhua

    2014-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of a directional lifting transform for wavelet frames. A nonsubsampled lifting structure is developed to maintain the translation invariance as it is an important property in image denoising. Then, the directionality of the lifting-based tight frame is explicitly discussed, followed by a specific translation invariant directional framelet transform (TIDFT). The TIDFT has two framelets ψ1, ψ2 with vanishing moments of order two and one respectively, which are able to detect singularities in a given direction set. It provides an efficient and sparse representation for images containing rich textures along with properties of fast implementation and perfect reconstruction. In addition, an adaptive block-wise orientation estimation method based on Gabor filters is presented instead of the conventional minimization of residuals. Furthermore, the TIDFT is utilized to exploit the capability of image denoising, incorporating the MAP estimator for multivariate exponential distribution. Consequently, the TIDFT is able to eliminate the noise effectively while preserving the textures simultaneously. Experimental results show that the TIDFT outperforms some other frame-based denoising methods, such as contourlet and shearlet, and is competitive to the state-of-the-art denoising approaches.

  16. THE STRUCTURE OF A SELF-GRAVITATING PROTOPLANETARY DISK AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR DIRECT IMAGING OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, Takayuki

    2011-09-20

    We consider the effects of self-gravity on the hydrostatic balance in the vertical direction of a gaseous disk and discuss the possible signature of the self-gravity that may be captured by direct imaging observations of protoplanetary disks in the future. In this paper, we consider a vertically isothermal disk in order to isolate the effects of self-gravity. The specific disk model we consider in this paper is the one with a radial surface density gap, at which the Toomre's Q-parameter of the disk varies rapidly in the radial direction. We calculate the vertical structure of the disk including the effects of self-gravity. We then calculate the scattered light and the dust thermal emission. We find that if the disk is massive enough and the effects of self-gravity come into play, a weak bump-like structure at the gap edge appears in the near-infrared (NIR) scattered light, while no such bump-like structure is seen in the submillimeter (sub-mm) dust continuum image. The appearance of the bump is caused by the variation of the height of the surface in the NIR wavelength. If such a bump-like feature is detected in future direct imaging observations, combined with sub-mm observations, it will give us useful information about the physical states of the disk.

  17. How to Directly Image a Habitable Planet Around Alpha Centauri with a 30cm Space Telescope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, R.; Bendek, E.; Thomas, S.; Black, D.

    2014-12-01

    More than 1,700 exoplanets have been discovered to date, including a handful of potentially habitable ones. There is on average more than one planet per star, and estimates of occurrence rates for potentially habitable planets (eta_Earth) from the Kepler mission range between 5 and 50%. Several mission concepts have been studied to directly image planets around nearby stars. Direct imaging enables spectroscopic detection of biomarkers such as atmospheric oxygen and methane, which would be highly suggestive of extraterrestrial life. It is commonly thought that directly imaging a potentially habitable exoplanet requires telescopes with apertures of at least 1m, costing at least $1B, and launching no earlier than the 2020s. A notable exception to this is Alpha Centauri. The system contains two Sun-like stars with a wide separation that allows dynamically stable habitable zones around either star. Habitable zones span about 0.5-1" in stellocentric angle, 3x wider than around any other FGKM star. A 30cm visible light space telescope is sufficient to resolve the habitable zone and detect a potentially habitable planet in minutes with ideal components, or days with realistic ones. We are developing a mission concept called ACEND (Alpha Centauri Direct Imager) consisting of a 30cm primary, a Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization coronagraph, and a wavefront control system. It is designed to suppress the light leak from both stars and directly image their planetary systems in 3 color channels, including the capability to detect potentially habitable planets. Color imaging is sufficient to differentiate Venus-like, Earth-like, and Mars-like planets from each other and establish the presence of Earth-pressure atmosphere through Rayleigh scattering. Two factors make it possible to realize the requirements of ACEND (most notably 10^10 contrast) on a small budget and fast schedule: (a) ACEND will collect a long continuous sequence of images on Alpha Centauri A and B for 2 years

  18. Direct x-ray sensing CCD array for intraoral dental x-ray imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, John D.; Williams, Donald W.; Langford, D. S.

    1994-05-01

    A commercial prototype electronic intraoral dental x-ray imaging system employing a direct sensing CCD array has been developed. Image quality parameters were measured using x-ray sources at the National Institute of Standard and Technology radiation physical department in Gaithersburg, MD. Detector response to x-rays in the 10 to 70 keV energy range was measured. The beam hardening effects of human anatomy on a typical 70 kVp spectra was measured using a tissue-equivalent dental phantom.

  19. Super-resolution fluorescence imaging of directly labelled DNA: from microscopy standards to living cells.

    PubMed

    Flors, C

    2013-07-01

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is ideally suited to study the complex organization of cell DNA in the 10-100 nm range. Novel methods to image directly labelled DNA, instead of DNA-associated proteins, are being developed and refined. This minireview provides an update of recent progress in super-resolution fluorescence imaging methods for DNA. These developments should allow a deeper understanding of chromatin structure and widen the scope of biological processes that may be investigated with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. © 2013 The Author Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  20. Detection and direct identification of liquid contaminants at standoff distances with an imaging polarimetric spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiang, Eugene; Oberbeck, Adam; Akagi, Jason; Knobbe, Ed

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate a remote sensing method, based on an imaging polarimetric spectrometer, to determine the complex refractive index of materials. The approach represents an adaptation of a technique used in semiconductor ellipsometry. Our experimental demonstration setup comprises a Sagnac-type LWIR spatial interferometer (8 - 12 micron) designed for hyperspectral imaging in emission and reflection. The method facilitates direct measurement of the complex refractive index and the thickness of a layer. Presented work focuses on SF96, a liquid surrogate for toxic chemicals, but the method is generally applicable to solids, including soils, and to any substrate with a general bidirectional reflectance distribution function.

  1. Direct imaging in interferometry: technical aspects and preliminary results of a fibered pupil densifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, Fabien; Mourard, Denis; Delage, Laurent; Reynaud, François; Clausse, Jean-Michel; Bonneau, Daniel; Dubreuil, Michael; Roussel, Alain; Hugues, Yves; Bosio, Sandra; Bresson, Yves; Lardière, Olivier

    2006-06-01

    We present a test bench designed to study the performances of interferometric recombination systems, mainly for direct imaging applications (hypertelescope principle). It aims at comparing the aperture synthesis, Fizeau and densified pupils beam combination schemes. It allows identification of the technical requirements like photometry and cophasing correction of the future imaging recombiners for large arrays. A densified assembly has been designed in the visible wavelengths, using a multi-apertures mask associated with a wavefront sensor. It allows pupil rearrangement and spatial filtering by using single mode fibers. The technical specifications and the conception of the fiber densifier are described here, with a particular attention to the correction of the differential chromatic dispersion.

  2. Inorganic chemistry in nuclear imaging and radiotherapy: current and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Valerie; Demoin, Dustin W.; Hoffman, Timothy J; Jurisson, Silvia S

    2013-01-01

    Summary Radiometals play an important role in diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. This field of radiochemistry is multidisciplinary, involving radiometal production, separation of the radiometal from its target, chelate design for complexing the radiometal in a biologically stable environment, specific targeting of the radiometal to its in vivo site, and nuclear imaging and/or radiotherapy applications of the resultant radiopharmaceutical. The critical importance of inorganic chemistry in the design and application of radiometal-containing imaging and therapy agents is described from a historical perspective to future directions. PMID:25382874

  3. Inorganic chemistry in nuclear imaging and radiotherapy: current and future directions.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Valerie; Demoin, Dustin W; Hoffman, Timothy J; Jurisson, Silvia S

    2012-08-01

    Radiometals play an important role in diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. This field of radiochemistry is multidisciplinary, involving radiometal production, separation of the radiometal from its target, chelate design for complexing the radiometal in a biologically stable environment, specific targeting of the radiometal to its in vivo site, and nuclear imaging and/or radiotherapy applications of the resultant radiopharmaceutical. The critical importance of inorganic chemistry in the design and application of radiometal-containing imaging and therapy agents is described from a historical perspective to future directions.

  4. Effect of direct neuroradiologist participation in physician marketing on imaging volumes in outpatient radiology.

    PubMed

    Grignon, L; Keiper, M; Vavricek, J; Horsley, W; Murphy, R; Grignon, A; Yu, F

    2014-08-01

    Over the past several years, decreased demand for and increased supply of imaging services has increased competition among outpatient imaging centers in the United States. This study hypothesizes that using a radiology sales representative and neuroradiologist as a team in marketing and sales will increase imaging referrals in outpatient imaging. From January to December 2009, baseline monthly physician referral data of CT and MR scans of 19 referring clinicians (neurologists, neurosurgeons, and anesthesiologists) to an outpatient radiology group were collected. During that time, a nonphysician radiology sales representative visited the referring clinicians' offices every 2 weeks. From January to June 2010, the same radiology sales representative visited the referring clinicians' offices every 2 weeks but was accompanied by a neuroradiologist once a month. From July 2010 to June 2011, the same radiology sales representative visited the referring clinicians' offices twice a month without a neuroradiologist. Cross-sectional imaging referral volumes were approximately 2.5 times greater during the 6-month period using the neuroradiologist for direct physician-to-physician marketing when compared with the volumes achieved with the sales representative alone, and continued neuroradiologist involvement in marketing and sales is required to maintain referral volumes over time. The impact on imaging referral volumes during the 6-month use of the neuroradiologist for direct physician-to-physician marketing in this study supports the assertion that neuroradiologist visits are an important element in establishing and maintaining a relationship with the referring clinician's office and thereby maximizing imaging referrals. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  5. Direct parametric reconstruction in dynamic PET myocardial perfusion imaging: in vivo studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petibon, Yoann; Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2017-05-01

    Dynamic PET myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) used in conjunction with tracer kinetic modeling enables the quantification of absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF). However, MBF maps computed using the traditional indirect method (i.e. post-reconstruction voxel-wise fitting of kinetic model to PET time-activity-curves-TACs) suffer from poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Direct reconstruction of kinetic parameters from raw PET projection data has been shown to offer parametric images with higher SNR compared to the indirect method. The aim of this study was to extend and evaluate the performance of a direct parametric reconstruction method using in vivo dynamic PET MPI data for the purpose of quantifying MBF. Dynamic PET MPI studies were performed on two healthy pigs using a Siemens Biograph mMR scanner. List-mode PET data for each animal were acquired following a bolus injection of ~7-8 mCi of 18F-flurpiridaz, a myocardial perfusion agent. Fully-3D dynamic PET sinograms were obtained by sorting the coincidence events into 16 temporal frames covering ~5 min after radiotracer administration. Additionally, eight independent noise realizations of both scans—each containing 1/8th of the total number of events—were generated from the original list-mode data. Dynamic sinograms were then used to compute parametric maps using the conventional indirect method and the proposed direct method. For both methods, a one-tissue compartment model accounting for spillover from the left and right ventricle blood-pools was used to describe the kinetics of 18F-flurpiridaz. An image-derived arterial input function obtained from a TAC taken in the left ventricle cavity was used for tracer kinetic analysis. For the indirect method, frame-by-frame images were estimated using two fully-3D reconstruction techniques: the standard ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction algorithm on one side, and the one-step late maximum a posteriori (OSL-MAP) algorithm on the other

  6. Markov random field models for directional field and singularity extraction in fingerprint images.

    PubMed

    Dass, Sarat C

    2004-10-01

    A Bayesian formulation is proposed for reliable and robust extraction of the directional field in fingerprint images using a class of spatially smooth priors. The spatial smoothness allows for robust directional field estimation in the presence of moderate noise levels. Parametric template models are suggested as candidate singularity models for singularity detection. The parametric models enable joint extraction of the directional field and the singularities in fingerprint impressions by dynamic updating of feature information. This allows for the detection of singularities that may have previously been missed, as well as better aligning the directional field around detected singularities. A criteria is presented for selecting an optimal block size to reduce the number of spurious singularity detections. The best rates of spurious detection and missed singularities given by the algorithm are 4.9% and 7.1%, respectively, based on the NIST 4 database.

  7. Direct design of two freeform optical surfaces for wide field of view line imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yunfeng; Thienpont, Hugo; Duerr, Fabian

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-fields direct design method aiming to calculate two freeform surfaces with an entrance pupil incorporated for wide field of view on-axis line imaging applications. Both infinite and finite conjugate objectives can be designed with this approach. Since a wide angle imaging system requires more than few discrete perfect imaging points, the multi-fields design approach is based on partial coupling of multiple fields, which guarantees a much more balanced imaging performance over the full field of view. The optical path lengths (OPLs) and image points of numerous off-axis fields are calculated during the procedure, thus very few initial parameters are needed. The procedure to calculate such a freeform lens is explained in detail. We have designed an exemplary monochromatic single lens to demonstrate the functionality of the design method. A rotationally symmetric counterpart following the same specifications is compared in terms of RMS spot radius to demonstrate the clear benefit that freeform lens brings to on-axis line imaging systems. In addition, a practical achromatic wide angle objective is designed by combining our multi-fields design method with classic optical design strategies, serving as a very good starting point for further optimization in a commercial optical design program. The results from the perspective of aberrations plots and MTF values show a very good and well balanced performance over the full field of view.

  8. Efficient completion for corrupted low-rank images via alternating direction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Zhao, Lei; Xu, Duanqing; Lu, Dongming

    2014-05-01

    We propose an efficient and easy-to-implement method to settle the inpainting problem for low-rank images following the recent studies about low-rank matrix completion. In general, our method has three steps: first, corresponding to the three channels of RGB color space, an incomplete image is split into three incomplete matrices; second, each matrix is restored by solving a convex problem derived from the nuclear norm relaxation; at last, the three recovered matrices are merged to produce the final output. During the process, in order to efficiently solve the nuclear norm minimization problem, we employ the alternating direction method. Except for the basic image inpainting problem, we also enable our method to handle cases where corrupted images not only have missing values but also have noisy entries. Our experiments show that our method outperforms the existing inpainting techniques both quantitatively and qualitatively. We also demonstrate that our method is capable of processing many other situations, including block-wise low-rank image completion, large-scale image restoration, and object removal.

  9. Direct Imaging of Phase Objects Enables Conventional Deconvolution in Bright Field Light Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hernández Candia, Carmen Noemí; Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio

    2014-01-01

    In transmitted optical microscopy, absorption structure and phase structure of the specimen determine the three-dimensional intensity distribution of the image. The elementary impulse responses of the bright field microscope therefore consist of separate absorptive and phase components, precluding general application of linear, conventional deconvolution processing methods to improve image contrast and resolution. However, conventional deconvolution can be applied in the case of pure phase (or pure absorptive) objects if the corresponding phase (or absorptive) impulse responses of the microscope are known. In this work, we present direct measurements of the phase point- and line-spread functions of a high-aperture microscope operating in transmitted bright field. Polystyrene nanoparticles and microtubules (biological polymer filaments) serve as the pure phase point and line objects, respectively, that are imaged with high contrast and low noise using standard microscopy plus digital image processing. Our experimental results agree with a proposed model for the response functions, and confirm previous theoretical predictions. Finally, we use the measured phase point-spread function to apply conventional deconvolution on the bright field images of living, unstained bacteria, resulting in improved definition of cell boundaries and sub-cellular features. These developments demonstrate practical application of standard restoration methods to improve imaging of phase objects such as cells in transmitted light microscopy. PMID:24558478

  10. Direct tissue oxygen monitoring by in vivo photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qi; Morgounova, Ekaterina; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2014-03-01

    Tissue oxygen plays a critical role in maintaining tissue viability and in various diseases, including response to therapy. Images of oxygen distribution provide the history of tissue hypoxia and evidence of oxygen availability in the circulatory system. Currently available methods of direct measuring or imaging tissue oxygen all have significant limitations. Previously, we have reported a non-invasive in vivo imaging modality based on photoacoustic lifetime. The technique maps the excited triplet state of oxygen-sensitive dye, thus reflects the spatial and temporal distribution of tissue oxygen. We have applied PALI on tumor hypoxia in small animals, and the hypoxic region imaged by PALI is consistent with the site of the tumor imaged by ultrasound. Here, we present two studies of applying PALI to monitor changes of tissue oxygen by modulations. The first study involves an acute ischemia model using a thin thread tied around the hind limb of a normal mouse to reduce the blood flow. PALI images were acquired before, during, and after the restriction. The drop of muscle pO2 and recovery from hypoxia due to reperfusion were observed by PALI tracking the same region. The second study modulates tissue oxygen by controlling the percentage of oxygen the mouse inhales. We demonstrate that PALI is able to reflect the change of oxygen level with respect to both hyperbaric and hypobaric conditions. We expect this technique to be very attractive for a range of clinical applications in which tissue oxygen mapping would improve therapy decision making and treatment planning.

  11. Image-Guided Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Yokoo, Takeshi; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Yuji; Ogawa, Kohei; Shinagawa, Yoko; Inoue, Ryosuke; Terai, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Hydrodynamics-based delivery has been used as an experimental tool to express transgene in small animals. This in vivo gene transfer method is useful for functional analysis of genetic elements, therapeutic effect of oligonucleotides, and cancer cells to establish the metastatic cancer animal model for experimental research. Recent progress in the development of image-guided procedure for hydrodynamics-based gene delivery in large animals directly supports the clinical applicability of this technique. This review summarizes the current status and recent progress in the development of hydrodynamics-based gene delivery and discusses the future directions for its clinical application. PMID:26308044

  12. Characterization and optimization of a thin direct electron detector for fast imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dourki, I.; Westermeier, F.; Schopper, F.; Richter, R. H.; Andricek, L.; Ninkovic, J.; Treis, J.; Koffmane, C.; Wassatsch, A.; Peric, I.; Epp, S. W.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2017-03-01

    Direct electron detectors are increasingly used to explore the dynamics of macromolecules in real space and real time using transmission electron microscopy. The purpose of this work is to optimize the most suitable detector configuration of a thin silicon detector by Monte Carlo Simulations. Several simulations were performed to achieve an advanced detector geometry that reduces significantly the background signal due to backscattered electrons resulting in an enhanced imaging performance of the detector. Utilizing DEPFET (DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor) technology and the novel ideas for the optimized detector geometry, a unique direct hit electron detector is currently being produced.

  13. Direction operator-based switching filters for removing the impulse noise from the corrupted image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang Cheng; Qiu, Hong Tong; He, Guang Jin

    2011-12-01

    A novel switching-based filter is proposed in this work to remove the impulse noise from the corrupted image. First, samples in 5×5 filter window are fully considered to detect whether the center is corrupted by impulse noise or not. Then, the detected noise free samples in the 5×5 filter window, aligned in the main direction, are weighted more heavily than those that are not on the main direction when using the median operation to suppress the impulse noise. At last, simulation results demonstrated that this algorithm outperforms many other methods in terms of both quantitative and qualitative aspects.

  14. Direct Imaging of Dynamic Glassy Behavior in a Strained Manganite Film.

    PubMed

    Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Sheng, Zhigao; Yang, Yongliang; Lai, Keji; Ma, Eric Yue; Cui, Yong-Tao; Kelly, Michael A; Nakamura, Masao; Kawasaki, Masashi; Tokura, Yoshinori; Tang, Qiaochu; Zhang, Kun; Li, Xinxin; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2015-12-31

    Complex many-body interaction in perovskite manganites gives rise to a strong competition between ferromagnetic metallic and charge-ordered phases with nanoscale electronic inhomogeneity and glassy behaviors. Investigating this glassy state requires high-resolution imaging techniques with sufficient sensitivity and stability. Here, we present the results of a near-field microwave microscope imaging on the strain-driven glassy state in a manganite film. The high contrast between the two electrically distinct phases allows direct visualization of the phase separation. The low-temperature microscopic configurations differ upon cooling with different thermal histories. At sufficiently high temperatures, we observe switching between the two phases in either direction. The dynamic switching, however, stops below the glass transition temperature. Compared with the magnetization data, the phase separation was microscopically frozen, while spin relaxation was found in a short period of time.

  15. Direct injection of indicators for calcium imaging at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Gregory T

    2012-07-01

    Calcium imaging is a technique in which Ca(2+)-binding molecules are loaded into live cells and as they bind Ca(2+) they "indicate" the concentration of free calcium through a change in either the intensity or the wavelength of light emitted (fluorescence or bioluminescence). There are several possible methods for loading synthetic Ca(2+) indicators into subcellular compartments, including topical application of membrane-permeant Ca(2+) indicators, forward-filling of dextran conjugates, and direct injection. Calcium imaging is a highly informative technique in neurobiology because Ca(2+) is involved in many neuronal signaling pathways and serves as the trigger for neurotransmitter release. This article describes the direct injection of Ca(2+) indicators at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ). This technique allows rapid loading of most Ca(2+) indicators, but there are drawbacks in that it is a difficult technique to master and requires additional electrophysiological equipment. Also, Ca(2+) indicators that are easily injected are usually susceptible to compartmentalization.

  16. Direct imaging of topological edge states in cold-atom systems

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Nathan; Dalibard, Jean; Dauphin, Alexandre; Gerbier, Fabrice; Lewenstein, Maciej; Zoller, Peter; Spielman, Ian B.

    2013-01-01

    Detecting topological order in cold-atom experiments is an ongoing challenge, the resolution of which offers novel perspectives on topological matter. In material systems, unambiguous signatures of topological order exist for topological insulators and quantum Hall devices. In quantum Hall systems, the quantized conductivity and the associated robust propagating edge modes—guaranteed by the existence of nontrivial topological invariants—have been observed through transport and spectroscopy measurements. Here, we show that optical-lattice-based experiments can be tailored to directly visualize the propagation of topological edge modes. Our method is rooted in the unique capability for initially shaping the atomic gas and imaging its time evolution after suddenly removing the shaping potentials. Our scheme, applicable to an assortment of atomic topological phases, provides a method for imaging the dynamics of topological edge modes, directly revealing their angular velocity and spin structure. PMID:23569266

  17. Direct Imaging of Dynamic Glassy Behavior in a Strained Manganite Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Sheng, Zhigao; Yang, Yongliang; Lai, Keji; Ma, Eric Yue; Cui, Yong-Tao; Kelly, Michael A.; Nakamura, Masao; Kawasaki, Masashi; Tokura, Yoshinori; Tang, Qiaochu; Zhang, Kun; Li, Xinxin; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2015-12-01

    Complex many-body interaction in perovskite manganites gives rise to a strong competition between ferromagnetic metallic and charge-ordered phases with nanoscale electronic inhomogeneity and glassy behaviors. Investigating this glassy state requires high-resolution imaging techniques with sufficient sensitivity and stability. Here, we present the results of a near-field microwave microscope imaging on the strain-driven glassy state in a manganite film. The high contrast between the two electrically distinct phases allows direct visualization of the phase separation. The low-temperature microscopic configurations differ upon cooling with different thermal histories. At sufficiently high temperatures, we observe switching between the two phases in either direction. The dynamic switching, however, stops below the glass transition temperature. Compared with the magnetization data, the phase separation was microscopically frozen, while spin relaxation was found in a short period of time.

  18. Direct imaging of topological edge states in cold-atom systems.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Nathan; Dalibard, Jean; Dauphin, Alexandre; Gerbier, Fabrice; Lewenstein, Maciej; Zoller, Peter; Spielman, Ian B

    2013-04-23

    Detecting topological order in cold-atom experiments is an ongoing challenge, the resolution of which offers novel perspectives on topological matter. In material systems, unambiguous signatures of topological order exist for topological insulators and quantum Hall devices. In quantum Hall systems, the quantized conductivity and the associated robust propagating edge modes--guaranteed by the existence of nontrivial topological invariants--have been observed through transport and spectroscopy measurements. Here, we show that optical-lattice-based experiments can be tailored to directly visualize the propagation of topological edge modes. Our method is rooted in the unique capability for initially shaping the atomic gas and imaging its time evolution after suddenly removing the shaping potentials. Our scheme, applicable to an assortment of atomic topological phases, provides a method for imaging the dynamics of topological edge modes, directly revealing their angular velocity and spin structure.

  19. Resolving the Crab Nebula with Direct Hard X-Ray Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Dietz, Kurtis L.; Apple, Jeff A.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Weisskopf, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We report the first direct hard (25--60 keV) X-ray imaging observation of the Crab Nebula that resolves structure to approximately 0.25 pc. The observation was performed over a 1.4 hour period during a balloon flight from Ft. Sumner, NM, on 2007 May 27. The source was detected in the energy band above the atmospheric cutoff at approx.25 keV and below the mirror graze angle cutoff at approx.60 keV. The image shows elongation about 25 degrees E of N in the direction along the plane of the torus (and perpendicular to the jet axis) with a slight surface-brightness enhancement NE of the pulsar. The spectrum within a 1.7 arcminute radius region centered on the Crab pulsar can be fitted with a Gamma=2 power law absorbed by an atmospheric column consistent with the balloon altitude at the time of observation.

  20. Direct imaging of two-phase flows by electrical impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleghim, Paulo, Jr.; Hervieu, Eric

    1998-09-01

    This paper presents a two-phase flow direct imaging sensor, based on multiple electrical impedance measurements. The electrode configuration is optimized to provide imaged information on the phase distribution within the probe's sensing volume. As a consequence, the time evolution of the flow topology can be represented by simply plotting the signals corresponding to the peripheral impedance measurements, and therefore needs no numerical reconstruction from the experimental data. Several transient tests are performed in a two-phase air-water loop. They demonstrate that the sensor exhibits not only large structures such as slugs and plugs, but also some finer details such as the wavy or rugged interface in stratified flow, or liquid film drainage during the transition between intermittent and annular flows. The methodology proposed in this work constitutes a simple and inexpensive alternative to tomographic imaging techniques, and is thus fully adapted to online process monitoring of multiphase flow systems.

  1. Direct imaging of topological edge states at a bilayer graphene domain wall.

    PubMed

    Yin, Long-Jing; Jiang, Hua; Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2016-06-17

    The AB-BA domain wall in gapped graphene bilayers is a rare naked structure hosting topological electronic states. Although it has been extensively studied in theory, a direct imaging of its topological edge states is still missing. Here we image the topological edge states at the graphene bilayer domain wall by using scanning tunnelling microscope. The simultaneously obtained atomic-resolution images of the domain wall provide us unprecedented opportunities to measure the spatially varying edge states within it. The one-dimensional conducting channels are observed to be mainly located around the two edges of the domain wall, which is reproduced quite well by our theoretical calculations. Our experiment further demonstrates that the one-dimensional topological states are quite robust even in the presence of high magnetic fields. The result reported here may raise hopes of graphene-based electronics with ultra-low dissipation.

  2. Direct imaging of neural currents using ultra-low field magnetic resonance techniques

    DOEpatents

    Volegov, Petr L.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Mosher, John C.; Espy, Michelle A.; Kraus, Jr., Robert H.

    2009-08-11

    Using resonant interactions to directly and tomographically image neural activity in the human brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques at ultra-low field (ULF), the present inventors have established an approach that is sensitive to magnetic field distributions local to the spin population in cortex at the Larmor frequency of the measurement field. Because the Larmor frequency can be readily manipulated (through varying B.sub.m), one can also envision using ULF-DNI to image the frequency distribution of the local fields in cortex. Such information, taken together with simultaneous acquisition of MEG and ULF-NMR signals, enables non-invasive exploration of the correlation between local fields induced by neural activity in cortex and more `distant` measures of brain activity such as MEG and EEG.

  3. Accuracy analysis of direct georeferenced UAV images utilising low-cost navigation sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briese, Christian; Wieser, Martin; Verhoeven, Geert; Glira, Philipp; Doneus, Michael; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2014-05-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), also known as unmanned airborne systems (UAS) or remotely piloted airborne systems (RPAS), are an established platform for close range airborne photogrammetry. Compared to manned platforms, the acquisition of local remote sensing data by UAVs is a convenient and very flexible option. For the application in photogrammetry UAVs are typically equipped with an autopilot and a lightweight digital camera. The autopilot includes several navigation sensors, which might allow an automated waypoint flight and offer a systematic data acquisition of the object resp. scene of interest. Assuming a sufficient overlap between the captured images, the position (3 coordinates: x, y, z) and the orientation (3 angles: roll, pitch, yaw) of the images can be estimated within a bundle block adjustment. Subsequently, coordinates of observed points that appear in at least two images, can be determined by measuring their image coordinates or a dense surface model can be generated from all acquired images by automated image matching. For the bundle block adjustment approximate values of the position and the orientation of the images are needed. To gather this information, several methods exist. We introduce in this contribution one of them: the direct georeferencing of images by using the navigation sensors (mainly GNSS and INS) of a low-cost on-board autopilot. Beside automated flights, the autopilot offers the possibility to record the position and the orientation of the platform during the flight. These values don't correspond directly to those of the images. To compute the position and the orientation of the images two requirements must be fulfilled. First the misalignment angles and the positional differences between the camera and the autopilot must be determined (mounting calibration). Second the synchronization between the camera and the autopilot has to be established. Due to the limited accuracy of the navigation sensors, a small number of ground

  4. Ultrasonic Imaging and Theoretical Prediction of Orthotropic Plate Stiffness in all Planar Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Deason, Vance Albert; Mukdadi, O.; Datta, S. K.

    2000-07-01

    Exact and approximate theoretical analysis of the wavelengths of plate wave mode propagation in all planar directions for the dispersive antisymmetric Lamb wave mode are compared with measurements from a laser ultrasonic imaging approach that records the out of plane ultrasonic motion over a large area in a single frame without scanning. Good agreement is demonstrated, based on independent determination of the elastic constants, for two different types of paper.

  5. Cross-media Translation Based on the Mental Image Directed Semantic Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hironaka, Daisuke; Yokota, Masao

    In general, it is not always easy for people to communicate each other comprehensively by limited information media. In such a case, employment of another information medium is very helpful and therefore cross-media translation is very important during such a communication. This paper presents the method and experiment of cross-media translation based on MIDST(Mental Image Directed Semantic Theory), where natural language texts about static positional relations of physical objects are systematically interpreted into 2-D pictures.

  6. Direct targeting of proteins to lipid droplets demonstrated by time-lapse live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Torahiko; Kuroda, Kazumichi; Ikeda, Masanori; Kato, Nobuyuki; Shimizu, Kazufumi; Makishima, Makoto

    2013-11-01

    A protein that specifically targets lipid droplets (LDs) was created by connecting two domains of nonstructural protein 4B containing amphipathic helices from hepatitis C virus. We demonstrated its direct targeting and accumulation to the LD surface by time-lapse live cell imaging, comparable to those observed with adipose differentiation-related protein. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An alternative approach to determine attainable resolution directly from HREM images.

    PubMed

    Wang, A; Turner, S; Van Aert, S; Van Dyck, D

    2013-10-01

    The concept of resolution in high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) is the power to resolve neighboring atoms. Since the resolution is related to the width of the point spread function of the microscope, it could in principle be determined from the image of a point object. However, in electron microscopy there are no ideal point objects. The smallest object is an individual atom. If the width of an atom is much smaller than the resolution of the microscope, this atom can still be considered as a point object. As the resolution of the microscope enters the sub-Å regime, information about the microscope is strongly entangled with the information about the atoms in HREM images. Therefore, we need to find an alternative method to determine the resolution in an object-independent way. In this work we propose to use the image wave of a crystalline object in zone axis orientation. Under this condition, the atoms of a column act as small lenses so that the electron beam channels through the atom column periodically. Because of this focusing, the image wave of the column can be much more peaked than the constituting atoms and can thus be a much more sensitive probe to measure the resolution. Our approach is to use the peakiness of the image wave of the atom column to determine the resolution. We will show that the resolution can be directly linked to the total curvature of the atom column wave. Moreover, we can then directly obtain the resolution of the microscope given that the contribution from the object is known, which is related to the bounding energy of the atom. The method is applied on an experimental CaTiO₃ image wave. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A new direct pixel-based focusing method for medical ultrasound imaging: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, YuHwa; Piao, Chunsheng; Kim, TaeWan; Chang, Jin Ho; Song, Tai-Kyong; Yoo, Yangmo

    2011-03-01

    In medical ultrasound imaging, scan conversion is used to geometrically transform polar coordinate ultrasound data into Cartesian raster data for display. In scan conversion, Moiré undersampling artifacts can be avoided by using various interpolation techniques such as nearest neighbor and bilinear. However, this interpolation-based scan conversion introduces blurring of fine details in ultrasound images. In this paper, a new beamforming technique, named compounded direct pixel beamforming (CDPB), is proposed to remove blurring artifacts from scan conversion. In CDPB, receive focusing is performed directly on each display pixel in Cartesian coordinates with raw radio-frequency (RF) data from two adjacent transmit firings so that artifacts from scan conversion can be substantially removed. To evaluate the proposed CDPB method, 64-channel pre-beamformed RF data were captured by a commercial ultrasound machine (SA-9900, Medison Corp., Seoul, Korea) from a tissue mimicking phantom (ATS Laboratories, Bridgeport, CT, USA). To quantify the performance of the proposed method, the information entropy contrast (IEC) value was measured. From the experiments, the proposed method provided IEC improvement by 2.8 over the conventional scan conversion method. These results indicate that the proposed new beamforming method could be used for enhancing the image quality in medical ultrasound imaging.

  9. Carotid artery B-mode ultrasound image segmentation based on morphology, geometry and gradient direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunarya, I. Made Gede; Yuniarno, Eko Mulyanto; Purnomo, Mauridhi Hery; Sardjono, Tri Arief; Sunu, Ismoyo; Purnama, I. Ketut Eddy

    2017-06-01

    Carotid Artery (CA) is one of the vital organs in the human body. CA features that can be used are position, size and volume. Position feature can used to determine the preliminary initialization of the tracking. Examination of the CA features can use Ultrasound. Ultrasound imaging can be operated dependently by an skilled operator, hence there could be some differences in the images result obtained by two or more different operators. This can affect the process of determining of CA. To reduce the level of subjectivity among operators, it can determine the position of the CA automatically. In this study, the proposed method is to segment CA in B-Mode Ultrasound Image based on morphology, geometry and gradient direction. This study consists of three steps, the data collection, preprocessing and artery segmentation. The data used in this study were taken directly by the researchers and taken from the Brno university's signal processing lab database. Each data set contains 100 carotid artery B-Mode ultrasound image. Artery is modeled using ellipse with center c, major axis a and minor axis b. The proposed method has a high value on each data set, 97% (data set 1), 73 % (data set 2), 87% (data set 3). This segmentation results will then be used in the process of tracking the CA.

  10. Cryogenic-temperature electron microscopy direct imaging of carbon nanotubes and graphene solutions in superacids.

    PubMed

    Kleinerman, O; Parra-Vasquez, A Nicholas G; Green, M J; Behabtu, N; Schmidt, J; Kesselman, E; Young, C C; Cohen, Y; Pasquali, M; Talmon, Y

    2015-07-01

    Cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a powerful tool for imaging liquid and semiliquid systems. While cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) is a standard technique in many fields, cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) is still not that widely used and is far less developed. The vast majority of systems under investigation by cryo-EM involve either water or organic components. In this paper, we introduce the use of novel cryo-TEM and cryo-SEM specimen preparation and imaging methodologies, suitable for highly acidic and very reactive systems. Both preserve the native nanostructure in the system, while not harming the expensive equipment or the user. We present examples of direct imaging of single-walled, multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphene, dissolved in chlorosulfonic acid and oleum. Moreover, we demonstrate the ability of these new cryo-TEM and cryo-SEM methodologies to follow phase transitions in carbon nanotube (CNT)/superacid systems, starting from dilute solutions up to the concentrated nematic liquid-crystalline CNT phases, used as the 'dope' for all-carbon-fibre spinning. Originally developed for direct imaging of CNTs and graphene dissolution and self-assembly in superacids, these methodologies can be implemented for a variety of highly acidic systems, paving a way for a new field of nonaqueous cryogenic electron microscopy. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Anisotropic conductivity tensor imaging in MREIT using directional diffusion rate of water molecules.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh In; Jeong, Woo Chul; Sajib, Saurav Z K; Kim, Hyung Joong; Woo, Eung Je

    2014-06-21

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is an emerging method to visualize electrical conductivity and/or current density images at low frequencies (below 1 KHz). Injecting currents into an imaging object, one component of the induced magnetic flux density is acquired using an MRI scanner for isotropic conductivity image reconstructions. Diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI) measures the intrinsic three-dimensional diffusion property of water molecules within a tissue. It characterizes the anisotropic water transport by the effective diffusion tensor. Combining the DT-MRI and MREIT techniques, we propose a novel direct method for absolute conductivity tensor image reconstructions based on a linear relationship between the water diffusion tensor and the electrical conductivity tensor. We first recover the projected current density, which is the best approximation of the internal current density one can obtain from the measured single component of the induced magnetic flux density. This enables us to estimate a scale factor between the diffusion tensor and the conductivity tensor. Combining these values at all pixels with the acquired diffusion tensor map, we can quantitatively recover the anisotropic conductivity tensor map. From numerical simulations and experimental verifications using a biological tissue phantom, we found that the new method overcomes the limitations of each method and successfully reconstructs both the direction and magnitude of the conductivity tensor for both the anisotropic and isotropic regions.

  12. Low end interactive image-directed neurosurgery. Update on rudimentary augmented reality used in epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Doyle, W K

    1996-01-01

    Our experience with a very low end interactive image-directed (IIDS) neurosurgical system is presented. The system was developed by the author and consists of a personal desktop computer and a magnetic field digitizer. This low cost solution was pursued as an alternative to available commercial devices which were expensive and not readily modifiable for novel ideas and new applications targeted for Epilepsy surgery. The rationale and description of the system was presented last year at Medicine Meets Virtual Reality III. Included in that detailed report were the fundamental mathematics forming the basics of transformation between the surgical and the digital data spaces. Since then the system has been used in an additional 20 cases now totaling 40 in all. Its advantages and short comings will be described. The theoretical advantages of magnetic field technology over other localization methods is reviewed. Also, our experience with alternative low cost off-the-shelf interfacing devices and other related modifications are described. We have accumulated clinical data to suggest that craniotomy sizes have been reduced, electrode placement has been improved, and that interactive image-directed techniques offer advantages over other common intra-operative localization modalities such as ultrasound. Our conclusion is that interactive image-directed techniques improve neurosurgery and that inexpensive enabling technology is already available providing the technological substrate for low cost devices using virtual reality notions for surgery and medicine. This particular technology offers advantages to traditional surgical techniques demonstrating the attractiveness of rudimentary virtual reality medical applications.

  13. Sub-Surface Microwave Imaging Using Four-Slot Vivaldi Antenna with Improved Directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Zubair; Kumar, Pankaj; Akhtar, M. Jaleel

    2017-01-01

    The conventional tapered slot Vivaldi antenna is well known for its ultra-wide band characteristics with low directivity. To improve the directivity of the conventional Vivaldi antenna, a four-slot Vivaldi antenna (FSVA) is proposed here to operate in the frequency range of 2-11 GHz. For feeding the FSVA, a binomial three-section V-shaped even mode power divider with progressing T-junctions is also designed and tested here, which is then integrated with the antenna. The proposed antenna prototype is designed and fabricated on a 1-mm thick FR-4 substrate (ɛr=4.3, tanδ=0.025), and the return loss and radiation characteristics are investigated in the anechoic environment. The measured result shows a good agreement with the numerical simulation performed using the EM Simulator i. e. CST MWS-2015. It is found that the directivity of FSVA is approximately doubled as compared to that of the conventional Vivaldi antenna having the same dimensions. From the application point of view, the fabricated antenna is used to image various metallic objects hidden inside the sand using a vector network analyzer and associated RF components. The obtained 2D microwave images of the test media successfully show that the hidden objects can effectively be located and detected using the proposed FSVA in conjunction with a simple imaging scheme.

  14. Retrieving direct and diffuse radiation with the use of sky imager pictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Kalisch, John; Lorenz, Elke

    2015-04-01

    A machine-learning approach for retrieving direct and diffuse irradiance from pictures taken by a ground-based whole-sky imagery (sky imager) is investigated in the present work. The use of sky imagers for shortest-term local solar irradiance forecasts is a growing field in research and industry. Accurate predictions of surface solar irradiance fluctuations up to 30 minutes ahead are important for a variety of solar energy and power grid applications. Sky imager picture analyses provide very high resolution binary cloud masks, but have limitations in deriving aerosol and cloud optical properties. In a first approach, surface solar irradiance was retrieved from the binary cloud masks with the use of clear sky and overcast irradiance calculations. With this method, forecast performance improvements over persistence could be achieved especially for broken cloud situations. These situations are characterized by inhomogeneous cloud patterns contributing to surface solar irradiance deviating from the clear sky or overcast levels. The accurate estimation of the radiative components will therefore improve the irradiance retrievals. One year of measurements at the University of Oldenburg was used as a robust data basis for this new approach. The data sets consists of direct, diffuse and global horizontal irradiance measured with a sample rate of 1 Hz. In order to account for diurnal and seasonal variations radiation measurements are normalized to the clear-sky conditions. Hemispheric images were taken every 10 s by a sky imager mounted close to the radiometers. The proposed approach uses image features like the average pixel intensity of the whole image and the circumsolar area, analyses of the gray-level co-occurence matrix (GLCM), information of the RGB and HSV color space and the analysed cloud fraction. In order to estimate normalized direct and diffuse radiation, a k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) regression algorithm is applied. The performance of this model is evaluated by

  15. Coherent superposition in grating-based directional dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Malecki, Andreas; Potdevin, Guillaume; Biernath, Thomas; Eggl, Elena; Grande Garcia, Eduardo; Baum, Thomas; Noël, Peter B; Bauer, Jan S; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2013-01-01

    X-ray dark-field scatter imaging allows to gain information on the average local direction and anisotropy of micro-structural features in a sample well below the actual detector resolution. For thin samples the morphological interpretation of the signal is straight forward, provided that only one average orientation of sub-pixel features is present in the specimen. For thick samples, however, where the x-ray beam may pass structures of many different orientations and dimensions, this simple assumption in general does not hold and a quantitative description of the resulting directional dark-field signal is required to draw deductions on the morphology. Here we present a description of the signal formation for thick samples with many overlying structures and show its validity in experiment. In contrast to existing experimental work this description follows from theoretical predictions of a numerical study using a Fourier optics approach. One can easily extend this description and perform a quantitative structural analysis of clinical or materials science samples with directional dark-field imaging or even direction-dependent dark-field CT.

  16. [Image quality and detection performance of a direct digital radiography system].

    PubMed

    Ideguchi, Tadamitsu; Matsuda, Katsuhiko; Himuro, Kazuhiko; Kuwahara, Rie; Miyazaki, Hidetsune; Hazeyama, Hiroyuki; Kumazawa, Seiji; Kawaji, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Akira; Matsumoto, Masao; Higashida, Yoshiharu

    2006-03-20

    The physical characteristics of a direct amorphous Selenium (a-Se) digital fluoroscopy and radiography system were investigated. Pre-sampled modulation transfer functions (MTF) were measured using a slit method. Noise power spectra were determined for different input exposures by fast Fourier transform of uniformly exposed samples. The MTFs of direct digital radiography systems showed significantly higher values than those of indirect digital radiography and screen-film systems. The direct digital radiography systems showed higher noise levels compared with those of indirect systems under roughly the same exposure conditions. Contrast-detail analysis was performed to compare detection by direct digital radiography systems with that of the screen-film (FUJI HG-M2/UR2) systems. The average contrast-detail curves of digital and film images were obtained from the results of observation. Image quality figures (IQF) were also calculated from the individual observer performance tests. The results indicated that digital contrast-detail curves and IQF are, on average, are equal those of the screen-film system.

  17. On the theory of temporal aberrations for electron optical imaging systems by using direct integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liwei; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Zhiquan; Monastyrskiy, Mikhail A.; Schelev, Mikhail Y.

    2005-03-01

    A new approach to the theory of temporal aberration for the dynamic electron optical imaging systems is given in the present paper. A new definition of temporal aberrations is given in which a certain initial energy of electron emission along the axial direction ɛz1(0<=ɛz1<=ɛ0max) is considered. A new method to calculate the temporal aberration coefficients of dynamic electron optical imaging system, which is named "Direct Integral Method", is also presented. All of the formulae of the temporal aberration coefficients deduced from "Direct Integral Method" and "-Variation Method" have been verified by an electrostatic concentric spherical system model, and contrasted with the analytical solutions. Results show that these two methods have got identical solution and the solutions of temporal aberration coefficients of first and second-order are the same with the analytical solutions. Thus it can be concluded these two methods given by us are equivalent and correct, but the "Direct Integral Method" is related to solve integral expressions, which is more convenient for computation and could be suggested to use in the practical design.

  18. Wide-field direct CCD observations supporting the Astro-1 Space Shuttle mission's Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintzen, Paul; Angione, Ron; Talbert, Freddie; Cheng, K.-P.; Smith, Eric; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1993-01-01

    Wide field direct CCD observations are being obtained to support and complement the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) images provided by Astro's Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) during a Space Shuttle flight in December 1990. Because of the wide variety of projects addressed by UIT, the fields observed include (1) galactic supernova remnants such as the Cygnus Loop and globular clusters such as Omega Cen and M79; (2) the Magellanic Clouds, M33, M81, and other galaxies in the Local Group; and (3) rich clusters of galaxies, principally the Perseus cluster and Abell 1367. Ground-based observations have been obtained for virtually all of the Astro-1 UIT fields. The optical images allow identification of individual UV sources in each field and provide the long baseline in wavelength necessary for accurate analysis of UV-bright sources. To facilitate use of our optical images for analysis of UIT data and other projects, we plan to archive them, with the UIT images, at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), where they will be universally accessible via anonymous FTP. The UIT, one of three telescopes comprising the Astro spacecraft, is a 38-cm f/9 Ritchey-Chretien telescope on which high quantum efficiency, solar-blind image tubes are used to record VUV images on photographic film. Five filters with passbands centered between 1250A and 2500A provide both VUV colors and a measurement of extinction via the 2200A dust feature. The resulting calibrated VUV pictures are 40 arcminutes in diameter at 2.5 arcseconds resolution. The capabilities of UIT, therefore, complement HST's WFPC: the latter has 40 times greater collecting area, while UIT's usable field has 170 times WFPC's field area.

  19. Direction identification in radio images of cosmic-ray air showers detected with LOPES and KASCADE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigl, A.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Asch, T.; Auffenberg, J.; Badea, F.; Bähren, L.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Brüggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buitink, S.; Butcher, H.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Falcke, H.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kickelbick, D.; Kolotaev, Y.; Krömer, O.; Kuijpers, J.; Lafebre, S.; Łuczak, P.; Manewald, M.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Meurer, C.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Over, S.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rautenberg, J.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Saftoiu, A.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, F.; Sima, O.; Singh, K.; Stümpert, M.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; van Buren, J.; Walkowiak, W.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Zabierowski, J.; Zensus, J. A.

    2008-08-01

    Aims: We want to understand the emission mechanism of radio emission from air showers to determine the origin of high-energy cosmic rays. Therefore, we study the geometry of the air shower radio emission measured with LOPES and search for systematic effects between the direction determined on the radio signal and the direction provided by the particle detector array KASCADE. Methods: We produce 4D radio images on time-scales of nanoseconds using digital beam-forming. Each pixel of the image is calculated for three spatial dimensions and as a function of time. The third spatial dimension is obtained by calculating the beam focus for a range of curvature radii fitted to the signal wave front. We search this multi-dimensional parameter space for the direction of maximum coherence of the air shower radio signal and compare it to the direction provided by KASCADE. Results: The maximum radio emission of air showers is obtained for curvature radii being larger than 3 km. We find that the direction of the emission maximum can change when optimizing the curvature radius. This dependence dominates the statistical uncertainty for the direction determination with LOPES. Furthermore, we find a tentative increase of the curvature radius to lower elevations, where the air showers pass through a larger atmospheric depth. The distribution of the offsets between the directions of both experiments is found to decrease linearly with increasing signal-to-noise ratio. Significantly increased offsets and enhanced signal strengths are found in events which were modified by strong electric fields in thunderstorm clouds. Conclusions: We conclude that the angular resolution of LOPES is sufficient to determine the direction which maximizes the observed electric field amplitude. However, the statistical uncertainty of the directions is not determined by the resolution of LOPES, but by the uncertainty of the curvature radius. We do not find any systematic deviation between the directions

  20. Using direct imaging to investigate the formation and migration histories of gas giant exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Henry

    2016-10-01

    Gas giant exoplanets are found around their host stars at orbital separations spanning more than four orders of magnitude (0.01 to 100 AU). However, it is not known whether the planets at the extreme ends of this range could have formed in situ or if they instead formed closer to ice lines between 1-10 AU and then migrated to their present day locations. In this study, we use two direct imaging surveys to explore the potential origins of hot Jupiters and to characterize the population of gas giant planets beyond the ice line. In our first survey, we focus on the role of stellar companions in hot Jupiter formation and migration. We determine that less than 20% of hot Jupiters have stellar companions capable of inducing migration via Kozai-Lidov oscillations. In addition, we find that hot Jupiter hosts are three times more likely to have a stellar companion between 50-2000 AU than field stars, suggesting that binary star systems may be favorable environments for gas giant planet formation. In our second study, we present the results from the first year of a two-year direct imaging planet survey of 200 young M-dwarf stars. By imaging in L-band (3.8 micron) and taking advantage of the new 80 milliarcsecond inner working angle "vortex" coronagraph on Keck NIRC2, we are sensitive to young planets with masses between 1-10 Jupiter masses with projected separations between 1-10 AU. We can compare the semi-major axis distribution of directly imaged planets beyond 10 AU to that of intermediate period gas giants from radial velocity surveys and determine whether or not these two populations form a continuous distribution. If so, this would imply these populations share common formation (core accretion) and migration channels.

  1. Using direct imaging to investigate the formation and migration histories of gas giant exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Henry

    2017-01-01

    Gas giant exoplanets are found around their host stars at orbital separations spanning more than four orders of magnitude (0.01 to 100 AU). However, it is not known whether the planets at the extreme ends of this range could have formed in situ or if they instead formed closer to ice lines between 1-10 AU and then migrated to their present day locations. In this study, we use two direct imaging surveys to explore the potential origins of hot Jupiters and to characterize the population of gas giant planets beyond the ice line. In our first survey, we focus on the role of stellar companions in hot Jupiter formation and migration. We determine that less than 20% of hot Jupiters have stellar companions capable of inducing migration via Kozai-Lidov oscillations. In addition, we find that hot Jupiter hosts are three times more likely to have a stellar companion between 50-2000 AU than field stars, suggesting that binary star systems may be favorable environments for gas giant planet formation. In our second study, we present the results from the first year of a two-year direct imaging planet survey of 200 young M-dwarf stars. By imaging in L-band (3.8 micron) and taking advantage of the new 80 milliarcsecond inner working angle "vortex" coronagraph on Keck NIRC2, we are sensitive to young planets with masses between 1-10 Jupiter masses with projected separations between 1-10 AU. We can compare the semi-major axis distribution of directly imaged planets beyond 10 AU to that of intermediate period gas giants from radial velocity surveys and determine whether or not these two populations form a continuous distribution. If so, this would imply these populations share common formation (core accretion) and migration channels.

  2. Analysis of image versus position, scale and direction reveals pattern texture anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehoucq, Roland; Weiss, Jerome; Dubrulle, Berengere; Amon, Axelle; Le Bouil, Antoine; Crassous, Jerome; Amitrano, David; Graner, Francois

    2014-12-01

    Pattern heterogeneities and anisotropies often carry significant physical information. We provide a toolbox which: (i) cumulates analysis in terms of position, direction and scale; (ii) is as general as possible; (iii) is simple and fast to understand, implement, execute and exploit. It consists in dividing the image into analysis boxes at a chosen scale; in each box an ellipse (the inertia tensor) is fitted to the signal and thus determines the direction in which the signal is more present. This tensor can be averaged in position and/or be used to study the dependence with scale. This choice is formally linked with Leray transforms and anisotropic wavelet analysis. Such protocol is intutively interpreted and consistent with what the eye detects: relevant scales, local variations in space, priviledged directions. It is fast and parallelizable. Its several variants are adaptable to the user's data and needs. It is useful to statistically characterize anisotropies of 2D or 3D patterns in which individual objects are not easily distinguished, with only minimal pre-processing of the raw image, and more generally applies to data in higher dimensions. It is less sensitive to edge effects, and thus better adapted for a multiscale analysis down to small scale boxes, than pair correlation function or Fourier transform. Easy to understand and implement, it complements more sophisticated methods such as Hough transform or diffusion tensor imaging. We use it on various fracture patterns (sea ice cover, thin sections of granite, granular materials), to pinpoint the maximal anisotropy scales. The results are robust to noise and to user choices. This toolbox could turn also useful for granular materials, hard condensed matter, geophysics, thin films, statistical mechanics, characterisation of networks, fluctuating amorphous systems, inhomogeneous and disordered systems, or medical imaging, among others.

  3. Why Alpha Centauri is a Particularly Good Target for Direct Imaging of Exoplanets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, R.; Bendek, E.; Thomas, S.; Males, J.

    2015-12-01

    Several mission concepts are being studied to directly image planets around nearby stars. It is commonly thought that directly imaging a potentially habitable exoplanet around a Sun-like star requires space telescopes with apertures of at least 1m. A notable exception to this is Alpha Centauri (A and B), which is an extreme outlier among FGKM stars in terms of apparent habitable zone size: the habitable zones are ~3x wider in apparent size than around any other FGKM star and are thus in theory accessible to much smaller telescopes. Alpha Centauri is also an extreme outlier in terms of how bright its planets are. For example, an Earth-like planet would be several magnitudes brighter around Alpha Centauri than around any other Sun-like star. Alpha Centauri lies in the galactic plane but its high brightness and proper motion make confusion with background stars unlikely, and extinction by our own galaxy makes confusion with extragalactic sources unlikely. The high brightness also helps any planet stand out against exozodiacal light. Alpha Centauri B has a (probable) planet, which establishes that a planetary system has formed in the system despite the multiplicity of the system. Dynamical simulations show that the habitable zones around both Alpha Centauri A and B are stable, and RV measurements rule out any large planets in the system that may have disrupted the formation of habitable planets. Recently developed high contrast techniques enable the detection of planets in multi-star systems, enabling imaging planets around Alpha Centauri. In particular, a small ~30-45cm visible light space telescope equipped with a modern high performance coronagraph or starshade is sufficient to directly image any potentially habitable planet that may exist in the system.

  4. Contrast and resolution in direct Fresnel diffraction phase-contrast imaging with partially coherent x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Han Shensheng; Yu Hong; Cheng Jing; Gao Chen; Luo Zhenlin

    2004-10-01

    A general treatment of x-ray image formation by direct Fresnel diffraction with partially coherent hard x rays is presented. Contrast and resolution are the criteria used to specify the visibility of an image, which depend primarily on the spatial coherence of the illumination and the distance from object to the image, with chromatic coherence of lesser importance. The dependence of the quality of phase-contrast images on the parameters of in-line imaging configuration is described quantitatively. The influence of spatial coherence of hard x-ray source on the imaging quality is also discussed based on the partially coherent direct Fresnel diffraction phase-contrast imaging theory. Experimental results are also presented for phase-contrast x-ray images with partially coherent hard x rays.

  5. Developing a Method to Generate Indoorgml Data from the Omni-Directional Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.; Lee, J.

    2015-10-01

    Recently, many applications for indoor space are developed. The most realistic way to service an indoor space application is on the omni-directional image so far. Due to limitations of positioning technology and indoor space modelling, however, indoor navigation service can't be implemented properly. In 2014, IndoorGML is approved as an OGC's standard. This is an indoor space data model which is for the indoor navigation service. Nevertheless, the IndoorGML is defined, there is no method to generate the IndoorGML data except manually. This paper is aimed to propose a method to generate the IndoorGML data semi-automatically from the omni-directional image. In this paper, image segmentation and classification method are adopted to generate the IndoorGML data. The edge detection method is used to extract the features from the image. After doing the edge detection method, image classification method with ROI is adopted to find the features that we want. The following step is to convert the extracted area to the point which is regarded as state and connect to shooting point's state. This is the IndoorGML data at the shooting point. It can be expanded to the floor's IndoorGML data by connecting the each shooting points after repeating the process. Also, IndoorGML data of building can be generated by connecting the floor's IndoorGML data. The proposed method is adopted at the testbed, and the IndoorGML data is generated. By using the generated IndoorGML data, it can be applied to the various applications for indoor space information service.

  6. WE-AB-303-08: Direct Lung Tumor Tracking Using Short Imaging Arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, C; Huang, C; Keall, P; Feain, I

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Most current tumor tracking technologies rely on implanted markers, which suffer from potential toxicity of marker placement and mis-targeting due to marker migration. Several markerless tracking methods have been proposed: these are either indirect methods or have difficulties tracking lung tumors in most clinical cases due to overlapping anatomies in 2D projection images. We propose a direct lung tumor tracking algorithm robust to overlapping anatomies using short imaging arcs. Methods: The proposed algorithm tracks the tumor based on kV projections acquired within the latest six-degree imaging arc. To account for respiratory motion, an external motion surrogate is used to select projections of the same phase within the latest arc. For each arc, the pre-treatment 4D cone-beam CT (CBCT) with tumor contours are used to estimate and remove the contribution to the integral attenuation from surrounding anatomies. The position of the tumor model extracted from 4D CBCT of the same phase is then optimized to match the processed projections using the conjugate gradient method. The algorithm was retrospectively validated on two kV scans of a lung cancer patient with implanted fiducial markers. This patient was selected as the tumor is attached to the mediastinum, representing a challenging case for markerless tracking methods. The tracking results were converted to expected marker positions and compared with marker trajectories obtained via direct marker segmentation (ground truth). Results: The root-mean-squared-errors of tracking were 0.8 mm and 0.9 mm in the superior-inferior direction for the two scans. Tracking error was found to be below 2 and 3 mm for 90% and 98% of the time, respectively. Conclusions: A direct lung tumor tracking algorithm robust to overlapping anatomies was proposed and validated on two scans of a lung cancer patient. Sub-millimeter tracking accuracy was observed, indicating the potential of this algorithm for real-time guidance

  7. How to Directly Image a Habitable Planet Around Alpha Centauri with a ~30cm Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Ruslan; Acend Team, Acesat Team

    2015-01-01

    Several mission concepts are being studied to directly image planets around nearby stars. Direct imaging enables spectroscopic detection of biomarkers such as atmospheric oxygen and methane, which would be highly suggestive of extraterrestrial life. It is commonly thought that directly imaging a potentially habitable exoplanet requires telescopes with apertures of at least 1m, costing at least 1B, and launching no earlier than the 2020s.A notable exception to this is Alpha Centauri (A and B), which is an extreme outlier among FGKM stars in terms of apparent habitable zone size. Specifically, Alpha Centauri habitable zones span about 0.5-1' in stellocentric angle, ~3x wider than around any other FGKM star. This enables a ~30cm visible light space telescope equipped with a modern high performance coronagraph or starshade to resolve the habitable zone at high contrast and directly image any potentially habitable planet that may exist in the system. Due to the extreme apparent brightness of the stars, exposure times can be as short as minutes with ideal components, or days with realistic ones. This makes it possible to do color photometry on potentially habitable planets sufficient to differentiate Venus-like, Earth-like, and Mars-like planets from each other and establish the presence of Earth-pressure atmosphere through Rayleigh scattering.The raw contrast requirements for such an instrument can be relaxed to 1e-8 if the mission spends 2 years collecting tens of thousands of images on the same target, enabling a factor of 500-1000 speckle suppression in post processing. The light leak from both stars is controllable with a special wavefront control algorithm known as Multi-Star Wavefront Control (MSWC), which independently suppresses diffraction and aberrations from both stars using independent modes on the deformable mirror (see Thomas et al. at this conference).The presentation will describe the general studies and calculations in more detail and briefly present

  8. Direct Imaging discovery of a second planet candidate around the possibly transiting planet host CVSO 30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, T. O. B.; Neuhäuser, R.; Briceño, C.; Vogt, N.; Raetz, St.; Seifahrt, A.; Ginski, C.; Mugrauer, M.; Buder, S.; Adam, C.; Hauschildt, P.; Witte, S.; Helling, Ch.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Direct imaging has developed into a very successful technique for the detection of exoplanets in wide orbits, especially around young stars. Directly imaged planets can be both followed astrometrically on their orbits and observed spectroscopically and thus provide an essential tool for our understanding of the early solar system. Aims: We surveyed the 25 Ori association for direct-imaging companions. This association has an age of only few million years. Among other targets, we observed CVSO 30, which has recently been identified as the first T Tauri star found to host a transiting planet candidate. Methods: We report on photometric and spectroscopic high-contrast observations with the Very Large Telescope, the Keck telescopes, and the Calar Alto observatory. They reveal a directly imaged planet candidate close to the young M3 star CVSO 30. Results: The JHK-band photometry of the newly identified candidate is at better than 1σ consistent with late-type giants, early-T and early-M dwarfs, and free-floating planets. Other hypotheses such as galaxies can be excluded at more than 3.5σ. A lucky imaging z' photometric detection limit z' = 20.5 mag excludes early-M dwarfs and results in less than 10 MJup for CVSO 30 c if bound. We present spectroscopic observations of the wide companion that imply that the only remaining explanation for the object is that it is the first very young (<10 Myr) L - T-type planet bound to a star, meaning that it appears bluer than expected as a result of a decreasing cloud opacity at low effective temperatures. Only a planetary spectral model is consistent with the spectroscopy, and we deduce a best-fit mass of 4-5 Jupiter masses (total range 0.6-10.2 Jupiter masses). Conclusions: This means that CVSO 30 is the first system in which both a close-in and a wide planet candidate are found to have a common host star. The orbits of the two possible planets could not be more different: they have orbital periods of 10.76 h and about 27

  9. Image quality of a prototype direct conversion detector for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainprize, James G.; Ford, Nancy L.; Yin, Shi; Tumer, Tumay O.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    1999-05-01

    A digital mammography system in which the x-ray sensitive device is a solid-state direct conversion detector is under development. This detector is a 1 mm thick silicon photodiode array hybridized to a CCD read-out, with a 50 micrometer pixel pitch. The detector is designed to be used in a slot-scanned system using time-delay integration (TDI) for signal acquisition. To handle the large signal generated in the photodiode, a novel read-out technique was used, in which charge was integrated 'on-chip' over a small number of rows, and the output of each of these sections was digitally summed 'off-chip' to produce the total integrated signal for each pixel in the image. This two-stage integration process not only allows easy acquisition of large signals, it effectively increases bit depth from 12 bits (for a single section) to approximately 16 (for the total integrated signal). The image quality of the device has been measured and compared to predictions based on cascaded linear systems theory. The resolution of the new detector was determined from the modulation transfer function (MTF) which was obtained from over-sampled edge spread functions (ESF). The ESF was measured in both the scan and slot directions from four repeated images of a tantalum edge. Noise power spectra (NPS) were determined from 40 repeated flat-field images at each of several x-ray exposures. By combining the MTF and NPS measurements, the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) was also determined. The MTF in the non-scanned direction was found to greater than 20% at 10 mm-1 and slightly lower in the scanned direction (approximately equals 10% at 10 mm-1). In all cases, the DQE was at least comparable to film-screen mammography receptors. The DQE at 120 mR detector exposure at zero spatial frequency ranged from 0.4 to 0.6 depending on the sample tested. Electronic noise was fairly low, contributing to less than plus or minus 7 ADU (out of a possible 98304 ADU). Future work will involve re-designing the

  10. Direct imaging of glycans in Arabidopsis roots via click labeling of metabolically incorporated azido-monosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Hoogenboom, Jorin; Berghuis, Nathalja; Cramer, Dario; Geurts, Rene; Zuilhof, Han; Wennekes, Tom

    2016-10-10

    Carbohydrates, also called glycans, play a crucial but not fully understood role in plant health and development. The non-template driven formation of glycans makes it impossible to image them in vivo with genetically encoded fluorescent tags and related molecular biology approaches. A solution to this problem is the use of tailor-made glycan analogs that are metabolically incorporated by the plant into its glycans. These metabolically incorporated probes can be visualized, but techniques documented so far use toxic copper-catalyzed labeling. To further expand our knowledge of plant glycobiology by direct imaging of its glycans via this method, there is need for novel click-compatible glycan analogs for plants that can be bioorthogonally labelled via copper-free techniques. Arabidopsis seedlings were incubated with azido-containing monosaccharide analogs of N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, L-fucose, and L-arabinofuranose. These azido-monosaccharides were metabolically incorporated in plant cell wall glycans of Arabidopsis seedlings. Control experiments indicated active metabolic incorporation of the azido-monosaccharide analogs into glycans rather than through non-specific absorption of the glycan analogs onto the plant cell wall. Successful copper-free labeling reactions were performed, namely an inverse-electron demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction using an incorporated N-acetylglucosamine analog, and a strain-promoted azide-alkyne click reaction. All evaluated azido-monosaccharide analogs were observed to be non-toxic at the used concentrations under normal growth conditions. Our results for the metabolic incorporation and fluorescent labeling of these azido-monosaccharide analogs expand the possibilities for studying plant glycans by direct imaging. Overall we successfully evaluated five azido-monosaccharide analogs for their ability to be metabolically incorporated in Arabidopsis roots and their imaging after fluorescent labeling. This expands

  11. Application of adaptive kinetic modelling for bias propagation reduction in direct 4D image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotasidis, F. A.; Matthews, J. C.; Reader, A. J.; Angelis, G. I.; Zaidi, H.

    2014-10-01

    Parametric imaging in thoracic and abdominal PET can provide additional parameters more relevant to the pathophysiology of the system under study. However, dynamic data in the body are noisy due to the limiting counting statistics leading to suboptimal kinetic parameter estimates. Direct 4D image reconstruction algorithms can potentially improve kinetic parameter precision and accuracy in dynamic PET body imaging. However, construction of a common kinetic model is not always feasible and in contrast to post-reconstruction kinetic analysis, errors in poorly modelled regions may spatially propagate to regions which are well modelled. To reduce error propagation from erroneous model fits, we implement and evaluate a new approach to direct parameter estimation by incorporating a recently proposed kinetic modelling strategy within a direct 4D image reconstruction framework. The algorithm uses a secondary more general model to allow a less constrained model fit in regions where the kinetic model does not accurately describe the underlying kinetics. A portion of the residuals then is adaptively included back into the image whilst preserving the primary model characteristics in other well modelled regions using a penalty term that trades off the models. Using fully 4D simulations based on dynamic [15O]H2O datasets, we demonstrate reduction in propagation-related bias for all kinetic parameters. Under noisy conditions, reductions in bias due to propagation are obtained at the cost of increased noise, which in turn results in increased bias and variance of the kinetic parameters. This trade-off reflects the challenge of separating the residuals arising from poor kinetic modelling fits from the residuals arising purely from noise. Nonetheless, the overall root mean square error is reduced in most regions and parameters. Using the adaptive 4D image reconstruction improved model fits can be obtained in poorly modelled regions, leading to reduced errors potentially propagating

  12. Application of adaptive kinetic modelling for bias propagation reduction in direct 4D image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kotasidis, F A; Matthews, J C; Reader, A J; Angelis, G I; Zaidi, H

    2014-10-21

    Parametric imaging in thoracic and abdominal PET can provide additional parameters more relevant to the pathophysiology of the system under study. However, dynamic data in the body are noisy due to the limiting counting statistics leading to suboptimal kinetic parameter estimates. Direct 4D image reconstruction algorithms can potentially improve kinetic parameter precision and accuracy in dynamic PET body imaging. However, construction of a common kinetic model is not always feasible and in contrast to post-reconstruction kinetic analysis, errors in poorly modelled regions may spatially propagate to regions which are well modelled. To reduce error propagation from erroneous model fits, we implement and evaluate a new approach to direct parameter estimation by incorporating a recently proposed kinetic modelling strategy within a direct 4D image reconstruction framework. The algorithm uses a secondary more general model to allow a less constrained model fit in regions where the kinetic model does not accurately describe the underlying kinetics. A portion of the residuals then is adaptively included back into the image whilst preserving the primary model characteristics in other well modelled regions using a penalty term that trades off the models. Using fully 4D simulations based on dynamic [(15)O]H2O datasets, we demonstrate reduction in propagation-related bias for all kinetic parameters. Under noisy conditions, reductions in bias due to propagation are obtained at the cost of increased noise, which in turn results in increased bias and variance of the kinetic parameters. This trade-off reflects the challenge of separating the residuals arising from poor kinetic modelling fits from the residuals arising purely from noise. Nonetheless, the overall root mean square error is reduced in most regions and parameters. Using the adaptive 4D image reconstruction improved model fits can be obtained in poorly modelled regions, leading to reduced errors potentially propagating

  13. Bimodal Modulation and Continuous Stimulation in Optical Imaging to Map Direction Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Vanni, M. P.; Provost, J.; Casanova, C.; Lesage, F.

    2009-01-01

    In the visual system, neurons with similar functional properties such as orientation and direction selectivity are clustered together to form modules. Optical imaging recordings in combination with episodic paradigms have been previously used to estimate direction selectivity, a fundamental property of visual neurons. The major drawback of the episodic approach is that the extraction of the signal from various forms of physiological noise is difficult, leading to a poor estimation of direction. Recent work, based on periodic stimulation and Fourier decomposition improved the extraction of periodic stimulus responses from noise and thus, reduced the recording time considerably. Given the success of this new paradigm in mapping orientation, the present study evaluated its reliability to measure direction selectivity in the visual cortex of anesthetised cats. Here, a model that exploits the harmonics of the Fourier decomposition is proposed where the first harmonic is related to direction responses, and the second to orientation. As expected, the first harmonic was absent when a static stimulus was presented. Contrarily, the first harmonic was present when moving stimuli were presented and the amplitude was greater with random dots kinematograms than with drifting gratings. The phase of the first harmonic showed a good agreement with direction preference measured by episodic paradigm. The ratio of the first/the second harmonic amplitude, related to a direction index, was weaker in fracture. It was also weaker in areas of the ventral pathway (areas 17 and 21a) where direction selectivity is known to be reduced. These results indicate that a periodic paradigm can be easily used to measure specific parameters in optical signals, particularly in situations when short acquisition periods are needed. PMID:19782756

  14. Direct Imaging Confirmation and Characterization of a Dust-Enshrouded Exoplanet Orbiting Fomalhaut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Thayne M.; Debes, J. H.; Rodigas, T.; Burrows, A. S.; Itoh, Y.; Fukagawa, M.; Kenyon, S.; Kuchner, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    We present Subaru/IRCS J band data for Fomalhaut and a (re)reduction of archival 2004--2006 HST/ACS data first presented by Kalas et al. (2008). We confirm the existence of a candidate exoplanetary companion, Fomalhaut b, in both the 2004 and 2006 F606W data sets at a high signal-to-noise. Additionally, we confirm the detection at F814W and present a new detection in F435W. Fomalhaut b's space motion may be consistent with it being in an apsidally-aligned, non debris ring-crossing orbit, although new astrometry is required for firmer conclusions. We cannot confirm that Fomalhaut b exhibits 0.7-0.8 mag variability. The new, combined optical SED and IR upper limits confirm that emission identifying Fomalhaut b originates from starlight scattered by small dust, but this dust must be bound to a massive body. The new Subaru upper limits and IRAC/4.5 μm upper limits imply M < 2 M_{J}, but this is still consistent with the range of Fomalhaut b masses it would need to sculpt the disk. Much like for the protoplanet LkCa 15 b, Fomalhaut b is very plausibly ``a planet identified from direct imaging" even if current images of it do not, strictly speaking, show thermal emission from a directly imaged planet.

  15. Direct Imaging Confirmation and Characterization of a Dust-enshrouded Candidate Exoplanet Orbiting Fomalhaut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Thayne; Debes, John; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Burrows, Adam; Itoh, Yoichi; Fukagawa, Misato; Kenyon, Scott J.; Kuchner, Marc; Matsumura, Soko

    2012-12-01

    We present Subaru/IRCS J-band data for Fomalhaut and a (re)reduction of archival 2004-2006 HST/ACS data first presented by Kalas et al. We confirm the existence of a candidate exoplanet, Fomalhaut b, in both the 2004 and 2006 F606W data sets at a high signal-to-noise ratio. Additionally, we confirm the detection at F814W and present a new detection in F435W. Fomalhaut b's space motion may be consistent with it being in an apsidally aligned, non-debris ring-crossing orbit, although new astrometry is required for firmer conclusions. We cannot confirm that Fomalhaut b exhibits 0.7-0.8 mag variability cited as evidence for planet accretion or a semi-transient dust cloud. The new, combined optical spectral energy distribution and IR upper limits confirm that emission identifying Fomalhaut b originates from starlight scattered by small dust, but this dust is most likely associated with a massive body. The Subaru and IRAC/4.5 μm upper limits imply M < 2 MJ , still consistent with the range of Fomalhaut b masses needed to sculpt the disk. Fomalhaut b is very plausibly "a planet identified from direct imaging" even if current images of it do not, strictly speaking, show thermal emission from a directly imaged planet.

  16. Directly Reconstructing Principal Components of Heterogeneous Particles from Cryo-EM Images

    PubMed Central

    Tagare, Hemant D.; Kucukelbir, Alp; Sigworth, Fred J.; Wang, Hongwei; Rao, Murali

    2015-01-01

    Structural heterogeneity of particles can be investigated by their three-dimensional principal components. This paper addresses the question of whether, and with what algorithm, the three-dimensional principal components can be directly recovered from cryo-EM images. The first part of the paper extends the Fourier slice theorem to covariance functions showing that the three-dimensional covariance, and hence the principal components, of a heterogeneous particle can indeed be recovered from two-dimensional cryo-EM images. The second part of the paper proposes a practical algorithm for reconstructing the principal components directly from cryo-EM images without the intermediate step of calculating covariances. This algorithm is based on maximizing the (posterior) likelihood using the Expectation-Maximization algorithm. The last part of the paper applies this algorithm to simulated data and to two real cryo-EM data sets: a data set of the 70S ribosome with and without Elongation Factor-G (EF-G), and a data set of the inluenza virus RNA dependent RNA Polymerase (RdRP). The first principal component of the 70S ribosome data set reveals the expected conformational changes of the ribosome as the EF-G binds and unbinds. The first principal component of the RdRP data set reveals a conformational change in the two dimers of the RdRP. PMID:26049077

  17. Directional ocean wave measurements in a coastal setting using a focused array imaging radar

    SciTech Connect

    Frasier, S.J.; Liu, Y.; Moller, D.; McIntosh, R.E.; Long, C.

    1995-03-01

    A unique focused array imaging Doppler radar was used to measure directional spectra of ocean surface waves in a nearshore experiment performed on the North Carolina Outer Banks. Radar images of the ocean surface`s Doppler velocity were used to generate two dimensional spectra of the radial component of the ocean surface velocity field. These are compared to simultaneous in-situ measurements made by a nearby array of submerged pressure sensors. Analysis of the resulting two-dimensional spectra include comparisons of dominant wave lengths, wave directions, and wave energy accounting for relative differences in water depth at the measurement locations. Limited estimates of the two-dimensional surface displacement spectrum are derived from the radar data. The radar measurements are analogous to those of interferometric synthetic aperture radars (INSAR), and the equivalent INSAR parameters are shown. The agreement between the remote and in-situ measurements suggests that an imaging Doppler radar is effective for these wave measurements at near grazing incidence angles.

  18. Directly reconstructing principal components of heterogeneous particles from cryo-EM images.

    PubMed

    Tagare, Hemant D; Kucukelbir, Alp; Sigworth, Fred J; Wang, Hongwei; Rao, Murali

    2015-08-01

    Structural heterogeneity of particles can be investigated by their three-dimensional principal components. This paper addresses the question of whether, and with what algorithm, the three-dimensional principal components can be directly recovered from cryo-EM images. The first part of the paper extends the Fourier slice theorem to covariance functions showing that the three-dimensional covariance, and hence the principal components, of a heterogeneous particle can indeed be recovered from two-dimensional cryo-EM images. The second part of the paper proposes a practical algorithm for reconstructing the principal components directly from cryo-EM images without the intermediate step of calculating covariances. This algorithm is based on maximizing the posterior likelihood using the Expectation-Maximization algorithm. The last part of the paper applies this algorithm to simulated data and to two real cryo-EM data sets: a data set of the 70S ribosome with and without Elongation Factor-G (EF-G), and a data set of the influenza virus RNA dependent RNA Polymerase (RdRP). The first principal component of the 70S ribosome data set reveals the expected conformational changes of the ribosome as the EF-G binds and unbinds. The first principal component of the RdRP data set reveals a conformational change in the two dimers of the RdRP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Edge guided image reconstruction in linear scan CT by weighted alternating direction TV minimization.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ailong; Wang, Linyuan; Zhang, Hanming; Yan, Bin; Li, Lei; Xi, Xiaoqi; Li, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Linear scan computed tomography (CT) is a promising imaging configuration with high scanning efficiency while the data set is under-sampled and angularly limited for which high quality image reconstruction is challenging. In this work, an edge guided total variation minimization reconstruction (EGTVM) algorithm is developed in dealing with this problem. The proposed method is modeled on the combination of total variation (TV) regularization and iterative edge detection strategy. In the proposed method, the edge weights of intermediate reconstructions are incorporated into the TV objective function. The optimization is efficiently solved by applying alternating direction method of multipliers. A prudential and conservative edge detection strategy proposed in this paper can obtain the true edges while restricting the errors within an acceptable degree. Based on the comparison on both simulation studies and real CT data set reconstructions, EGTVM provides comparable or even better quality compared to the non-edge guided reconstruction and adaptive steepest descent-projection onto convex sets method. With the utilization of weighted alternating direction TV minimization and edge detection, EGTVM achieves fast and robust convergence and reconstructs high quality image when applied in linear scan CT with under-sampled data set.

  20. DIRECT IMAGING CONFIRMATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A DUST-ENSHROUDED CANDIDATE EXOPLANET ORBITING FOMALHAUT

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Thayne; Debes, John; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Burrows, Adam; Itoh, Yoichi; Fukagawa, Misato; Kenyon, Scott J.; Kuchner, Marc; Matsumura, Soko

    2012-12-01

    We present Subaru/IRCS J-band data for Fomalhaut and a (re)reduction of archival 2004-2006 HST/ACS data first presented by Kalas et al. We confirm the existence of a candidate exoplanet, Fomalhaut b, in both the 2004 and 2006 F606W data sets at a high signal-to-noise ratio. Additionally, we confirm the detection at F814W and present a new detection in F435W. Fomalhaut b's space motion may be consistent with it being in an apsidally aligned, non-debris ring-crossing orbit, although new astrometry is required for firmer conclusions. We cannot confirm that Fomalhaut b exhibits 0.7-0.8 mag variability cited as evidence for planet accretion or a semi-transient dust cloud. The new, combined optical spectral energy distribution and IR upper limits confirm that emission identifying Fomalhaut b originates from starlight scattered by small dust, but this dust is most likely associated with a massive body. The Subaru and IRAC/4.5 {mu}m upper limits imply M < 2 M{sub J} , still consistent with the range of Fomalhaut b masses needed to sculpt the disk. Fomalhaut b is very plausibly 'a planet identified from direct imaging' even if current images of it do not, strictly speaking, show thermal emission from a directly imaged planet.

  1. Direction-Dependent Effects In Wide-Field Wideband Full-Stokes Radio Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannathan, P.; Bhatanagar, S.; Rau, U.; Taylor, R.

    2015-09-01

    Synthesis imaging in radio astronomy is affected by instrumental and atmospheric effects which introduce direction-dependent (DD) gains.The antenna power pattern varies both as a function of time and frequency. The broad-band time varying nature of the antenna power pattern when not corrected leads to gross errors in full Stokes imaging and flux estimation. In this poster we explore the errors that arise in image deconvolution while not accounting for the time and frequency dependence of the antenna power pattern. Simulations were conducted with the wide-band full Stokes power pattern of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) antennas to demonstrate the level of errors arising from direction-dependent gains and their non-neglegible impact on upcoming sky surveys such as the VLASS. DD corrections through hybrid projection algorithms are computationally expensive to perform. A highly parallel implementation through high performance computing architectures is the only feasible way of applying these corrections to the large data sizes of these upcoming surveys.

  2. Reprocessing of Archival Direct Imaging Data of Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safsten, Emily; Stephens, Denise C.

    2017-01-01

    Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) stars are intermediate mass (2-10 solar mass) pre-main sequence stars with circumstellar disks. They are the higher mass analogs of the better-known T Tauri stars. Observing planets within these young disks would greatly aid in understanding planet formation processes and timescales, particularly around massive stars. So far, only one planet, HD 100546b, has been confirmed to orbit a HAeBe star. With over 250 HAeBe stars known, and several observed to have disks with structures thought to be related to planet formation, it seems likely that there are as yet undiscovered planetary companions within the circumstellar disks of some of these young stars.Direct detection of a low-luminosity companion near a star requires high contrast imaging, often with the use of a coronagraph, and the subtraction of the central star's point spread function (PSF). Several processing algorithms have been developed in recent years to improve PSF subtraction and enhance the signal-to-noise of sources close to the central star. However, many HAeBe stars were observed via direct imaging before these algorithms came out. We present here current work with the PSF subtraction program PynPoint, which employs a method of principal component analysis, to reprocess archival images of HAeBe stars to increase the likelihood of detecting a planet in their disks.

  3. Subaru Direct Imaging Survey of Wide-Orbit Exoplanets and Solar-System-Scale Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Motohide

    2015-08-01

    SEEDS (Strategic Explorations of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru) is the first Subaru Strategic Program, whose aim is to conduct a direct imaging survey for giant planets as well as protoplanetary/debris disks at a few to a few tens of AU region around 500 nearby solar-type or more massive young stars devoting 120 Subaru nights for 5 years from 2009. The targets are composed of five categories spanning the ages of ~1 Myr to ~1 Gyr. Some RV-planet targets with older ages are also observed. We describe this survey and present its main results. The topics include (1) statistic of wide-orbit planets, (2) detection and characterization of one of the most lowest-mass planet via direct imaging. (3) detection of a super-Jupiter around the most massive star ever imaged, (4) detection of companions around retrograde exoplanet, (5) the discovery of unprecedentedly detailed structures of more than a dozen of protoplanetary disks and some debris disks. The detected structures such as wide gaps and spirals arms of a Solar-system scale could be signpost of planet.

  4. Direct imaging of the magnetization reversal in microwires using all-MOKE microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupakiewicz, A.; Chizhik, A.; Tekielak, M.; Zhukov, A.; Gonzalez, J.; Maziewski, A.

    2014-10-01

    We report a method of imaging of the magnetization reversal process using analysis of real-time images of magnetic domain structures in cylindrically shaped microwires. This method uses wide-field polarizing optical microscopy and is based on the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). The aperture diaphragm in MOKE microscope was used to control the incident angles of the light rays that reached the non-planar surface of the microwire and also determined the MOKE geometries. The movement of the non-central position of the hole in this diaphragm leads to a change in the orientation of the plane of incidence of the light along the perpendicular or the parallel direction to the axial direction of the wire. The visualization of the surface magnetic domain structures is obtained using polar and longitudinal MOKE geometries. The hysteresis loops were obtained by plotting the averaged image contrast as a function of the external magnetic field. The separation of the all-magnetization components is performed using different MOKE geometries in a microscope. We demonstrate the use of vector magnetometry to analyze the orientation of the magnetization in a cylindrically shaped microwire under the influence of an external magnetic field.

  5. Atmospheric circulation of brown dwarfs and directly imaged extrasolar giant planets with active clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xianyu; Showman, Adam

    2016-10-01

    Observational evidence have suggested active meteorology in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs (BDs) and directly imaged extrasolar giant planets (EGPs). In particular, a number of surveys for brown dwarfs showed that near-IR brightness variability is common for L and T dwarfs. Directly imaged EGPs share similar observations, and can be viewed as low-gravity versions of BDs. Clouds are believed to play the major role in shaping the thermal structure, dynamics and near-IR flux of these atmospheres. So far, only a few studies have been devoted to atmospheric circulation and the implications for observations of BDs and directly EGPs, and yet no global model includes a self-consistent active cloud formation. Here we present preliminary results from the first global circulation model applied to BDs and directly imaged EGPs that can properly treat absorption and scattering of radiation by cloud particles. Our results suggest that horizontal temperature differences on isobars can reach up to a few hundred Kelvins, with typical horizontal length scale of the temperature and cloud patterns much smaller than the radius of the object. The combination of temperature anomaly and cloud pattern can result in moderate disk-integrated near-IR flux variability. Wind speeds can reach several hundred meters per second in cloud forming layers. Unlike Jupiter and Saturn, we do not observe stable zonal jet/banded patterns in our simulations. Instead, our simulated atmospheres are typically turbulent and dominated by transient vortices. The circulation is sensitive to the parameterized cloud microphysics. Under some parameter combinations, global-scale atmospheric waves can be triggered and maintained. These waves induce global-scale temperature anomalies and cloud patterns, causing large (up to several percent) disk-integrated near-IR flux variability. Our results demonstrate that the commonly observed near-IR brightness variability for BDs and directly imaged EGPs can be explained by the

  6. Anisotropic Margin Expansions in 6 Anatomic Directions for Oropharyngeal Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yock, Adam D.; Garden, Adam S.; Court, Laurence E.; Beadle, Beth M.; Zhang, Lifei; Dong, Lei

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to determine the expansions in 6 anatomic directions that produced optimal margins considering nonrigid setup errors and tissue deformation for patients receiving image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of the oropharynx. Methods and Materials: For 20 patients who had received IGRT to the head and neck, we deformably registered each patient's daily images acquired with a computed tomography (CT)-on-rails system to his or her planning CT. By use of the resulting vector fields, the positions of volume elements within the clinical target volume (CTV) (target voxels) or within a 1-cm shell surrounding the CTV (normal tissue voxels) on the planning CT were identified on each daily CT. We generated a total of 15,625 margins by dilating the CTV by 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 mm in the posterior, anterior, lateral, medial, inferior, and superior directions. The optimal margins were those that minimized the relative volume of normal tissue voxels positioned within the margin while satisfying 1 of 4 geometric target coverage criteria and 1 of 3 population criteria. Results: Each pair of geometric target coverage and population criteria resulted in a unique, anisotropic, optimal margin. The optimal margin expansions ranged in magnitude from 1 to 5 mm depending on the anatomic direction of the expansion and on the geometric target coverage and population criteria. Typically, the expansions were largest in the medial direction, were smallest in the lateral direction, and increased with the demand of the criteria. The anisotropic margin resulting from the optimal set of expansions always included less normal tissue than did any isotropic margin that satisfied the same pair of criteria. Conclusions: We demonstrated the potential of anisotropic margins to reduce normal tissue exposure without compromising target coverage in IGRT to the head and neck.

  7. Direct Imaging Detection of Methane in the Atmosphere of GJ 504 b

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janson, Markus; Brandt, Timothy; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Spiegel, David; Thalmann, Christian; Currie, Thayne; Bonnefoy, Mickael; Zimmerman, Neil; Sorahana, Satoko; Kotani, Takayuki; Schlieder, Joshua; Hashimoto, Jun; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Carson, Joseph; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; McElwain, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Most exoplanets detected by direct imaging so far have been characterized by relatively hot (approximately greater than1000 K) and cloudy atmospheres. A surprising feature in some of their atmospheres has been a distinct lack of methane, possibly implying non-equilibrium chemistry. Recently, we reported the discovery of a planetary companion to the Sun-like star GJ 504 using Subaru/HiCIAO within the SEEDS survey. The planet is substantially colder (less than 600 K) than previously imaged planets, and has indications of fewer clouds, which implies that it represents a new class of planetary atmospheres with expected similarities to late T-type brown dwarfs in the same temperature range. If so, one might also expect the presence of significant methane absorption, which is characteristic of such objects. Here, we report the detection of deep methane absorption in the atmosphere of GJ 504 b, using the Spectral Differential Imaging mode of HiCIAO to distinguish the absorption feature around 1.6 micrometers. We also report updated JHK photometry based on new K(sub s)-band data and a re-analysis of the existing data. The results support the notion that GJ 504 b has atmospheric properties distinct from other imaged exoplanets, and will become a useful reference object for future planets in the same temperature range.

  8. Direct electron imaging in electron microscopy with monolithic active pixel sensors.

    PubMed

    Deptuch, G; Besson, A; Rehak, P; Szelezniak, M; Wall, J; Winter, M; Zhu, Y

    2007-08-01

    A new imaging device for dynamic electron microscopy is in great demand. The detector should provide the experimenter with images having sufficient spatial resolution at high speed. Immunity to radiation damage, accumulated during exposures, is critical. Photographic film, a traditional medium, is not adequate for studies that require large volumes of data or rapid recording and charge coupled device (CCD) cameras have limited resolution, due to phosphor screen coupling. CCD chips are not suitable for direct recording due to their extreme sensitivity to radiation damage. This paper discusses characterization of monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) as well as in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The tested devices were two versions of the MIMOSA V (MV) chip. This 1M pixel device features pixel size of 17 x 17 microm(2) and was designed in a 0.6 microm CMOS process. The active layer for detection is a thin (less than 20 microm) epitaxial layer, limiting the broadening of the electron beam. The first version of the detector was a standard imager with electronics, passivation and interconnection layers on top of the active region; the second one was bottom-thinned, reaching the epitaxial layer from the bottom. The electron energies used range from a few keV to 30 keV for SEM and from 40 to 400 keV for TEM. Deterioration of the image resolution due to backscattering was quantified for different energies and both detector versions.

  9. DIRECT IMAGING DETECTION OF METHANE IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF GJ 504 b

    SciTech Connect

    Janson, Markus; Brandt, Timothy D.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Spiegel, David S.; Thalmann, Christian; Currie, Thayne; Bonnefoy, Mickaël; Zimmerman, Neil; Schlieder, Joshua; Brandner, Wolfgang; Feldt, Markus; Sorahana, Satoko; Kotani, Takayuki; Hashimoto, Jun; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Egner, Sebastian; Abe, Lyu; Carson, Joseph C.; Goto, Miwa; and others

    2013-11-20

    Most exoplanets detected by direct imaging thus far have been characterized by relatively hot (≳1000 K) and cloudy atmospheres. A surprising feature in some of their atmospheres has been a distinct lack of methane, possibly implying non-equilibrium chemistry. Recently, we reported the discovery of a planetary companion to the Sun-like star GJ 504 using Subaru/HiCIAO within the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru survey. The planet is substantially colder (<600 K) than previously imaged planets, and has indications of fewer clouds, which implies that it represents a new class of planetary atmospheres with expected similarities to late T-type brown dwarfs in the same temperature range. If so, one might also expect the presence of significant methane absorption, which is characteristic of such objects. Here, we report the detection of deep methane absorption in the atmosphere of GJ 504 b, using the Spectral Differential Imaging mode of HiCIAO to distinguish the absorption features around 1.6 μm. We also report updated JHK photometry based on new K {sub s}-band data and a re-analysis of the existing data. The results support the notion that GJ 504 b has atmospheric properties distinct from other imaged exoplanets, and will become a useful reference object for future planets in the same temperature range.

  10. Directional Histogram Ratio at Random Probes: A Local Thresholding Criterion for Capillary Images

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Na; Silva, Jharon; Gu, Yu; Gerber, Scott; Wu, Hulin; Gelbard, Harris; Dewhurst, Stephen; Miao, Hongyu

    2013-01-01

    With the development of micron-scale imaging techniques, capillaries can be conveniently visualized using methods such as two-photon and whole mount microscopy. However, the presence of background staining, leaky vessels and the diffusion of small fluorescent molecules can lead to significant complexity in image analysis and loss of information necessary to accurately quantify vascular metrics. One solution to this problem is the development of accurate thresholding algorithms that reliably distinguish blood vessels from surrounding tissue. Although various thresholding algorithms have been proposed, our results suggest that without appropriate pre- or post-processing, the existing approaches may fail to obtain satisfactory results for capillary images that include areas of contamination. In this study, we propose a novel local thresholding algorithm, called directional histogram ratio at random probes (DHR-RP). This method explicitly considers the geometric features of tube-like objects in conducting image binarization, and has a reliable performance in distinguishing small vessels from either clean or contaminated background. Experimental and simulation studies suggest that our DHR-RP algorithm is superior over existing thresholding methods. PMID:23525856

  11. Calculation of grain boundary normals directly from 3D microstructure images

    DOE PAGES

    Lieberman, E. J.; Rollett, A. D.; Lebensohn, R. A.; ...

    2015-03-11

    The determination of grain boundary normals is an integral part of the characterization of grain boundaries in polycrystalline materials. These normal vectors are difficult to quantify due to the discretized nature of available microstructure characterization techniques. The most common method to determine grain boundary normals is by generating a surface mesh from an image of the microstructure, but this process can be slow, and is subject to smoothing issues. A new technique is proposed, utilizing first order Cartesian moments of binary indicator functions, to determine grain boundary normals directly from a voxelized microstructure image. In order to validate the accuracymore » of this technique, the surface normals obtained by the proposed method are compared to those generated by a surface meshing algorithm. Specifically, the local divergence between the surface normals obtained by different variants of the proposed technique and those generated from a surface mesh of a synthetic microstructure constructed using a marching cubes algorithm followed by Laplacian smoothing is quantified. Next, surface normals obtained with the proposed method from a measured 3D microstructure image of a Ni polycrystal are used to generate grain boundary character distributions (GBCD) for Σ3 and Σ9 boundaries, and compared to the GBCD generated using a surface mesh obtained from the same image. Finally, the results show that the proposed technique is an efficient and accurate method to determine voxelized fields of grain boundary normals.« less

  12. Calculation of grain boundary normals directly from 3D microstructure images

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E. J.; Rollett, A. D.; Lebensohn, R. A.; Kober, E. M.

    2015-03-11

    The determination of grain boundary normals is an integral part of the characterization of grain boundaries in polycrystalline materials. These normal vectors are difficult to quantify due to the discretized nature of available microstructure characterization techniques. The most common method to determine grain boundary normals is by generating a surface mesh from an image of the microstructure, but this process can be slow, and is subject to smoothing issues. A new technique is proposed, utilizing first order Cartesian moments of binary indicator functions, to determine grain boundary normals directly from a voxelized microstructure image. In order to validate the accuracy of this technique, the surface normals obtained by the proposed method are compared to those generated by a surface meshing algorithm. Specifically, the local divergence between the surface normals obtained by different variants of the proposed technique and those generated from a surface mesh of a synthetic microstructure constructed using a marching cubes algorithm followed by Laplacian smoothing is quantified. Next, surface normals obtained with the proposed method from a measured 3D microstructure image of a Ni polycrystal are used to generate grain boundary character distributions (GBCD) for Σ3 and Σ9 boundaries, and compared to the GBCD generated using a surface mesh obtained from the same image. Finally, the results show that the proposed technique is an efficient and accurate method to determine voxelized fields of grain boundary normals.

  13. Joint geometric and photometric direct image registration based on Lie algebra parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chenxi; Shi, Zelin; Liu, Yunpeng

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we consider direct image registration problem which estimate the geometric and photometric transformations between two images. The efficient second-order minimization method (ESM) is based on a second-order Taylor series of image differences without computing the Hessian under brightness constancy assumption. This can be done due to the fact that the considered geometric transformations is Lie group and can be parameterized by its Lie algebra. In order to deal with lighting changes, we extend ESM to the compositional dual efficient second-order minimization method (CDESM). In our approach, the photometric transformations is parameterized by its Lie algebra with compositional operation, which is similar to that of geometric transformations. Our algorithm can give a second-order approximation of image differences with respect to geometric and photometric parameters. The geometric and photometric parameters are simultaneously obtained by non-linear least-square optimization. Our algorithm preserves the advantages of the original ESM method which has high convergence rate and large capture radius. Experimental results show that our algorithm is more robust to lighting changes and has higher registration accuracy compared to previous algorithms.

  14. Direct 75 milliarcsecond images from the Multiple Mirror Telescope with adaptive optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd-Hart, M.; Dekany, R.; Mcleod, B.; Wittman, D.; Colucci, D.; Mccarthy, D.; Angel, R.

    1993-01-01

    We report results from an adaptive optics system designed to provide imaging at the diffraction limit of resolution in the near-infrared at the Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT). For the present experiment, the aperture consisted of five of the six primary mirrors of the MMT, operating as a coherently phased array. The largest components of the atmospherically induced wave-front aberration are the fluctuations in mean phase between the segments. These errors were derived in real time from the Fourier transform of short-exposure stellar images at 2.2 microns and corrected at an image of the telescope pupil with piston motion from a segmented adaptive mirror. At a correction rate of 43 Hz, this level of adaptive control resulted in an integrated image with a clear diffraction-limited component of 0.075 arcsec FWHM. This stabilized component is present directly in the light arriving at the detector and is not the result of postprocessing. We discuss future improvements to our adaptive wave-front control and its application to astronomical observations.

  15. Tomographic image reconstruction from incomplete view data by convex projections and direct fourier inversion.

    PubMed

    Sezan, M; Stark, H

    1984-01-01

    We consider the problem of reconstructing CAT imagery by the direct Fourier method (DFM) when not all view data are available. To restore the missing information we use the method of projections onto convex sets (POCS). POCS is a recursive image restoration technique that finds a solution consistent with the measured data and a priori known constraints in both the space and Fourier domain. Because DFM reconstruction is a frequency-domain technique it is ideally matched to POCS restoration when, for one reason or another, we are forced to generate an image from a less than complete set of view data. We design and apply an algorithm (PRDF) which interpolates/extrapolates the missing Fourier domain information by POCS and reconstructs an image by DFM. A simulated human thorax cross section is restored and reconstructed. The restorations using POCS are compared with the Gerchberg-Papoulis extrapolation method and shown to be superior. Applications of PRDF to other types of medical imaging modalities are discussed.

  16. Direct Geolocation of Satellite Images with the EO-CFI Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Miguel, Eduardo; Prado, Elena; Estebanez, Monica; Martin, Ana I.; Gonzalez, Malena

    2016-08-01

    The INTA Remote Sensing Laboratory has implemented a tool for the direct geolocation of satellite images. The core of the tool is a C code based on the "Earth Observation Mission CFI SW" from ESA. The tool accepts different types of inputs for satellite attitude (euler angles, quaternions, default attitude models). Satellite position can be provided either in ECEF or ECI coordinates. The line of sight of each individual detector is imported from an external file or is generated by the tool from camera parameters. Global DEM ACE2 is used to define ground intersection of the LOS.The tool has been already tailored for georeferencing images from the forthcoming Spanish Earth Observation mission SEOSat/Ingenio, and for the camera APIS onboard the INTA cubesat OPTOS. The next step is to configure it for the geolocation of Sentinel 2 L1b images.The tool has been internally validated by different means. This validation shows that the tool is suitable for georeferencing images from high spatial resolution missions. As part of the validation efforts, a code for simulating orbital info for LEO missions using EO-CFI has been produced.

  17. Direct volume access by an improved electro-holography image generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hideya; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Hideki; Ueda, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Eiji

    1995-04-01

    A CAD system with electronic holography is expected to provide ideal designing environments to feel and touch truly 3D images directly. However, interactivity and real-time computation of holographic fringe patterns are the essential requirements to realize it. This paper presents two different types of 3D images creating system. One consists of a 3D pointing device and an electro-holography system with an acousto-optical modulator which was proposed by Prof. Benton in 1989. The other consists of a 3D pointing device and an electro-holography system with a liquid crystal device. We also propose an effective method not depending on the total number of points in the scene and apply it to the designing tool by only appending points in a electro-holography system with a 3D input device.

  18. Atmospheric aerosol and molecular backscatter imaging effects on direct detection LADAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youmans, Douglas G.

    2015-05-01

    Backscatter from atmospheric aerosols and molecular nitrogen and oxygen causes "clutter" noise in direct detection ladar applications operating within the atmosphere. The backscatter clutter is more pronounced in multiple pulse, high PRF ladars where pulse-averaging is used to increase operating range. As more and more pulses are added to the wavetrain the backscatter increases. We analyze the imaging of a transmitted Gaussian laser-mode multi-pulse wave-train scatteried off of aerosols and molecules at the focal plane including angular-slew rate resulting from optical tracking, angular lead-angle, and bistatic-optics spatial separation. The defocused backscatter images, from those pulses closest to the receiver, are analyzed using a simple geometrical optics approximation. Methods for estimating the aerosol number density versus altitude and the volume backscatter coefficient of the aerosols are also discussed.

  19. Dual-core steered non-rigid registration for multi-modal images via bi-directional image synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaohuan; Yang, Jianhua; Gao, Yaozong; Guo, Yanrong; Wu, Guorong; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-10-01

    In prostate cancer radiotherapy, computed tomography (CT) is widely used for dose planning purposes. However, because CT has low soft tissue contrast, it makes manual contouring difficult for major pelvic organs. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides high soft tissue contrast, which makes it ideal for accurate manual contouring. Therefore, the contouring accuracy on CT can be significantly improved if the contours in MRI can be mapped to CT domain by registering MRI with CT of the same subject, which would eventually lead to high treatment efficacy. In this paper, we propose a bi-directional image synthesis based approach for MRI-to-CT pelvic image registration. First, we use patch-wise random forest with auto-context model to learn the appearance mapping from CT to MRI domain, and then vice versa. Consequently, we can synthesize a pseudo-MRI whose anatomical structures are exactly same with CT but with MRI-like appearance, and a pseudo-CT as well. Then, our MRI-to-CT registration can be steered in a dual manner, by simultaneously estimating two deformation pathways: 1) one from the pseudo-CT to the actual CT and 2) another from actual MRI to the pseudo-MRI. Next, a dual-core deformation fusion framework is developed to iteratively and effectively combine these two registration pathways by using complementary information from both modalities. Experiments on a dataset with real pelvic CT and MRI have shown improved registration performance of the proposed method by comparing it to the conventional registration methods, thus indicating its high potential of translation to the routine radiation therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Moderate Resolution Spectroscopy of Directly Imaged Exoplanets: Formation, Chemistry, and Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopacky, Quinn

    More than twenty years after the discovery of the first planet orbiting a star other than the Sun, it is now clear that extrasolar planets are ubiquitous. With each new discovery, new questions are raised about planet formation and evolution that challenge commonly held assumptions. Few currently known exoplanets reside at separations beyond the ice line, forcing extrapolation when developing a theory to explain planet formation on all scales. In the next several years, the number of known exoplanets at wide separations will increase dramatically as a new era in exoplanet discovery commences - the era of direct imaging. By using techniques to achieve high angular resolution on large (8-10 meter) ground based telescopes, it is now possible to resolve and study the light coming from widely separated gas giant planets at unprecedented levels of detail. Our group has pioneered observational and theoretical techniques that have provided spectra of directly imaged planets at resolutions and SNR that are rarely obtained for exoplanets. By using adaptive optics fed integral field spectrographs, we have extracted spectra at R 4000 in the near infrared, resolving individual molecular features from species such as water, carbon monoxide, and methane. These species have been used for detailed measurements of the ratio of carbon and oxygen in these planetary spectra. We propose to advance beyond these initial measurements and pursue a systematic program of near-infrared spectroscopy covering a suite of directly imaged exoplanets at similarly high spectral resolutions. Multiple surveys with newly commissioned instruments for direct imaging are now underway with the goal of substantially increasing the number of known directly imaged giant planets. The photometric and/or very low resolution spectroscopic data provided by these surveys are useful for rough planet characterization. Advancing our understanding of these planets, however, is best achieved through higher spectral

  1. Direct Three-Dimensional Image Reconstruction and Electronic System of a Spherical High-Resolution PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuekui Ed.

    In the past decade tremendous efforts have been made to improve the performance of Positron Emission Tomography (PET). To increase photon capture efficiency and thus the intrinsic sensitivity, oblique or cross-plane coincidences are now detected and recorded with, for example, a spherical PET (S-PET) design. This requires direct three-dimensional volume image reconstruction and a high-performance electronic system. There are two types of algorithms for achieving direct three-dimensional volume image reconstruction, namely, parallel beam reconstruction and cone beam reconstruction. The advantages of the cone beam reconstruction algorithm are that it reduces the amount of data rebinning necessary and it improves spatial resolution by virtue of its geometrical structure. In this study, we propose a new analytical three-dimensional cone beam reconstruction algorithm for truncated spherical detection geometry. The basic idea of the proposed algorithm is the formation of a spatially invariant 3D blurred backprojected volumetric image by the use of the weighted backprojection of cone beam projection data and subsequent 3D filtering using an acceptance angle dependent rho filter. This approach is extended to other truncated 3D PET geometries such as truncated cylindrical geometry and Fresnel aperture-SPET (F-SPET) geometry. The proposed algorithm is derived analytically and is computationally efficient. Performance of the algorithm is evaluated by the reconstruction of 3D volumetric images from simulated data from arbitrarily truncated spherical detector geometries. In this study, we also review parallel and cone beam 3D algorithms proposed by others. As part of the high-resolution and high-sensitivity spherical F-SPET project, a partial one modular layer prototype system has been completed. The electronic designs, efficient detector calibration schemes and final resolution performance is reported in this study.

  2. Direct Reconstruction of CT-Based Attenuation Correction Images for PET With Cluster-Based Penalties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo Mee; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2017-03-01

    Extremely low-dose (LD) CT acquisitions used for PET attenuation correction have high levels of noise and potential bias artifacts due to photon starvation. This paper explores the use of a priori knowledge for iterative image reconstruction of the CT-based attenuation map. We investigate a maximum a posteriori framework with cluster-based multinomial penalty for direct iterative coordinate decent (dICD) reconstruction of the PET attenuation map. The objective function for direct iterative attenuation map reconstruction used a Poisson log-likelihood data fit term and evaluated two image penalty terms of spatial and mixture distributions. The spatial regularization is based on a quadratic penalty. For the mixture penalty, we assumed that the attenuation map may consist of four material clusters: air + background, lung, soft tissue, and bone. Using simulated noisy sinogram data, dICD reconstruction was performed with different strengths of the spatial and mixture penalties. The combined spatial and mixture penalties reduced the root mean squared error (RMSE) by roughly two times compared with a weighted least square and filtered backprojection reconstruction of CT images. The combined spatial and mixture penalties resulted in only slightly lower RMSE compared with a spatial quadratic penalty alone. For direct PET attenuation map reconstruction from ultra-LD CT acquisitions, the combination of spatial and mixture penalties offers regularization of both variance and bias and is a potential method to reconstruct attenuation maps with negligible patient dose. The presented results, using a best-case histogram suggest that the mixture penalty does not offer a substantive benefit over conventional quadratic regularization and diminishes enthusiasm for exploring future application of the mixture penalty.

  3. Beginning a new chapter in the characterization of directly imaged exoplanets: the science of MIRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielski, Camilla; Baudino, Jean-Loup; Lagage, Pierre-Olivier; Boccaletti, Anthony; Bézard, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    The next major space facility to characterize the atmosphere of exoplanets will be the JWST. Among its instruments the Mid-Infrared instrument (MIRI) will perform the first ever characterization of young giant exoplanets observed by direct imaging in the 5 -28 microns wavelength range.Retrieving the precise set of parameters of these objects, such as luminosity, temperature, surface gravity, mass, and age is extremely important as it supplies information about the initial entropy of the planets and hence it allows us to shed light on their formation mechanism.The new extreme adaptive optic cameras (e.g. SPHERE, GPI) are already providing excellent constraints on these parameters, but the spectral window in which they are operating is limited to near IR so that the uncertainties are still significant. Therefore, since observations taken on a longer wavelength range are mandatory for reducing them, MIRI will be playing a key role in this new chapter of exoplanetary characterization.Furthermore, MIRI will give us the opportunity to probe for the first time the presence of ammonia in the atmosphere of the coldest known young giants (T < 1000 K). Notice that the ammonia spectral signature is a further useful indicator of equilibrium and temperature in the planetary atmosphere.In this work we have used the Exoplanet Radiative-convective Equilibrium Model (Exo-REM), developed by Baudino et al. (2015) and tailored for directly imaged exoplanets, to quantify the constraints on the planetary parameters that MIRI will bring.We simulated the MIRI coronographic and Low-resolution spectrometer observations for a set of 13 known directly imaged exoplanetary systems. Subsequently, taking into account various source of noise and the photometric precision, we show to which accuracy the exoplanetary parameters (temperature, gravity, chemical composition) can be determined when adding MIRI observations, and we provide the significance of the ammonia detection.

  4. Simulation of a method to directly image exoplanets around multiple stars systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sandrine J.; Bendek, Eduardo; Belikov, Ruslan

    2014-08-01

    Direct imaging of extra-solar planets has now become a reality, especially with the deployment and commissioning of the first generation of specialized ground-based instruments such as the GPI, SPHERE, P1640 and SCExAO. These systems will allow detection of planets 107 times fainter than their host star. For space- based missions, such as EXCEDE, EXO-C, EXO-S, WFIRST/AFTA, different teams have shown in laboratories contrasts reaching 10-10 within a few diffraction limits from the star using a combination of a coronagraph to suppress light coming from the host star and a wavefront control system. These demonstrations use a de- formable mirror (DM) to remove residual starlight (speckles) created by the imperfections of telescope. However, all these current and future systems focus on detecting faint planets around a single host star or unresolved bi- naries/multiples, while several targets or planet candidates are located around nearby binary stars such as our neighbor star Alpha Centauri. Until now, it has been thought that removing the light of a companion star is impossible with current technology, excluding binary star systems from target lists of direct imaging missions. Direct imaging around binaries/multiple systems at a level of contrast allowing Earth-like planet detection is challenging because the region of interest, where a dark zone is essential, is contaminated by the light coming from the hosts star companion. We propose a method to simultaneously correct aberrations and diffraction of light coming from the target star as well as its companion star in order to reveal planets orbiting the target star. This method works even if the companion star is outside the control region of the DM (beyond its half-Nyquist frequency), by taking advantage of aliasing effects.

  5. Direct x-ray imaging system using an amplified metal-oxide-semiconductor imager in the 4-13-nm wavelength region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haga, Tsuneyuki; Kinoshita, Hiroo

    1995-10-01

    We describe a direct x-ray imaging system that uses an amplified metal-oxide-semiconductor imager to detect soft x rays directly for real-time imaging. From the absolute sensitivity of this system as measured through the use of a monochromatic synchrotron radiation beam and a GaAsP Schottky-type photodiode, the minimum sensitivity at a wavelength of 13 nm was estimated to be greater than 108 photons mm-2. This is sufficient to detect soft x rays directly for real-time imaging. Onion cell observations at wavelengths of 4.3 and 4.6 nm indicate that x-ray absorption by the carbon in the cells was detected. This is a promising imaging system for the soft x-ray region in which conventional CCD's are difficult to use.

  6. Connecting Young Brown Dwarfs and Directly Imaged Gas-Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Michael; Dupuy, Trent; Allers, Katelyn; Aller, Kimberly; Best, William; Magnier, Eugene

    2015-12-01

    Direct detections of gas-giant exoplanets and discoveries of young (~10-100 Myr) field brown dwarfs from all-sky surveys are strengthening the link between the exoplanet and brown dwarf populations, given the overlapping ages, masses, temperatures, and surface gravities. In light of the relatively small number of directly imaged planets and the modest associated datasets, the large census of young field brown dwarfsprovides a compelling laboratory for enriching our understanding of both classes of objects. However, work to date on young field objects has typically focused on individual discoveries.We present a large comprehensive study of the youngest field brown dwarfs, comprising both previously known objects and our new discoveries from the latest wide-field surveys (Pan-STARRS-1 and WISE). With masses now extending down to ~5 Jupiter masses, these objects have physical properties that largely overlap young gas-giant planets and thus are promising analogs for studying exoplanet atmospheres at unparalleled S/N, spectral resolution, and wavelength coverage. We combine high-quality spectra and parallaxes to determine spectral energy distributions, luminosities, temperatures, and ages for young field objects. We demonstrate that this population spans a continuum in the color-magnitude diagram, thereby forming a bridge between the hot and cool extremes of directly imaged planets. We find that the extremely dusty properties of the planets around 2MASS J1207-39 and HR 8799 do occur in some young brown dwarfs, but these properties do not have a simple correspondence with age, perhaps contrary to expectations. We find young field brown dwarfs can have unusually low temperatures and suggest a new spectral type-temperature scale appropriate for directly imaged planets.To help provide a reference for extreme-contrast imaging surveys, we establish a grid of spectral standards and benchmarks, based on membership in nearby young moving groups, in order to calibrate gravity

  7. Direct Imaging of Deformation and Disorder in Extended-Chain Polymer Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    Lenhert, T. J. Resch, and W. W. Adams, "Molecular Packing and Crystalline Order in Polybenzobisoxazole and Polybenzobisthiazole Fibers ", in...WL-TR-91-4011 AiAh 1A0 DIRECT IMAGING OF DEFORMATION AND DISORDER IN EXTENDED-CHAIN POLYMER FIBERS David C. Martin Department of Polymer Science and...Deformation and Disorder in Extended-Chain Polymer Fibers 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) David C. Martin 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year

  8. THE LEECH EXOPLANET IMAGING SURVEY: CHARACTERIZATION OF THE COLDEST DIRECTLY IMAGED EXOPLANET, GJ 504 b, AND EVIDENCE FOR SUPERSTELLAR METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Leisenring, Jarron; Bailey, Vanessa; Hinz, Philip; Defrére, Denis; Apai, Dániel; Close, Laird; Eisner, Josh; Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Buenzli, Esther; Bonnefoy, Mickael; Biller, Beth; Brandner, Wolfgang; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Esposito, Simone; Crepp, Justin R.; De Rosa, Robert J.; Desidera, Silvano; and others

    2016-02-01

    As gas giant planets and brown dwarfs radiate away the residual heat from their formation, they cool through a spectral type transition from L to T, which encompasses the dissipation of cloud opacity and the appearance of strong methane absorption. While there are hundreds of known T-type brown dwarfs, the first generation of directly imaged exoplanets were all L type. Recently, Kuzuhara et al. announced the discovery of GJ 504 b, the first T dwarf exoplanet. GJ 504 b provides a unique opportunity to study the atmosphere of a new type of exoplanet with a ∼500 K temperature that bridges the gap between the first directly imaged planets (∼1000 K) and our own solar system's Jupiter (∼130 K). We observed GJ 504 b in three narrow L-band filters (3.71, 3.88, and 4.00 μm), spanning the red end of the broad methane fundamental absorption feature (3.3 μm) as part of the LBTI Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt (LEECH) exoplanet imaging survey. By comparing our new photometry and literature photometry with a grid of custom model atmospheres, we were able to fit GJ 504 b's unusual spectral energy distribution for the first time. We find that GJ 504 b is well fit by models with the following parameters: T{sub eff} = 544 ± 10 K, g < 600 m s{sup −2}, [M/H] = 0.60 ± 0.12, cloud opacity parameter of f{sub sed} = 2–5, R = 0.96 ± 0.07 R{sub Jup}, and log(L) = −6.13 ± 0.03 L{sub ⊙}, implying a hot start mass of 3–30 M{sub jup} for a conservative age range of 0.1–6.5 Gyr. Of particular interest, our model fits suggest that GJ 504 b has a superstellar metallicity. Since planet formation can create objects with nonstellar metallicities, while binary star formation cannot, this result suggests that GJ 504 b formed like a planet, not like a binary companion.

  9. Direct Imaging of DNA/Lipid Complexes Interacting with Liposome Surfaces and Fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Alison J.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.; Rädler, Joachim; George, Cyril X.; Safinya, Cyrus R.; Samuel, Charles E.

    1996-03-01

    Video-enhanced light microscopy techniques (phase contrast, differential interference contrast, and fluorescence) were used for direct imaging of the structure and dynamics of nucleic acid-cationic liposome complexes both on liposomes (a model cell) and within the cytoplasm of Mouse L929 Fibroblasts. The experiments are designed to enable us to correlate the complex's structure to the transfection efficiencies (i.e. the uptake and expression of nucleic acid) in animal cells. The ultimate goal of the project is to design an optimal non-viral vector (carrier of nucleic acids). Fluorescence labeling of both the lipid and nucleic acid components is used for visualization experiments at the level of single complexes interacting with a single cell (e.g. a giant liposome or an isolated mammalian cell). This allows us to follow the temporal path of a complex. Direct motion versus random Brownian diffusion are readily distinguished. Micropipettes were used for placement of cells and microinjection into cells.

  10. A digital receiver module with direct data acquisition for magnetic resonance imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weinan; Sun, Hongyu; Wang, Weimin

    2012-10-01

    A digital receiver module for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with detailed hardware implementations is presented. The module is based on a direct sampling scheme using the latest mixed-signal circuit design techniques. A single field-programmable gate array chip is employed to perform software-based digital down conversion for radio frequency signals. The modular architecture of the receiver allows multiple acquisition channels to be implemented on a highly integrated printed circuit board. To maintain the phase coherence of the receiver and the exciter in the context of direct sampling, an effective phase synchronization method was proposed to achieve a phase deviation as small as 0.09°. The performance of the described receiver module was verified in the experiments for both low- and high-field (0.5 T and 1.5 T) MRI scanners and was compared to a modern commercial MRI receiver system.

  11. Image-guided spine surgery: state of the art and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Shafizadeh, Sven; Rixen, Dieter; Paffrath, Thomas; Bouillon, Bertil; Steinhausen, Eva S.; Baethis, Holger

    2009-01-01

    Navigation technology is a widely available tool in spine surgery and has become a part of clinical routine in many centers. The issue of where and when navigation technology should be used is still an issue of debate. It is the aim of this study to give an overview on the current knowledge concerning the technical capabilities of image-guided approaches and to discuss possible future directions of research and implementation of this technique. Based on a Medline search total of 1,462 publications published until October 2008 were retrieved. The abstracts were scanned manually for relevance to the topics of navigated spine surgery in the cervical spine, the thoracic spine, the lumbar spine, as well as ventral spine surgery, radiation exposure, tumor surgery and cost-effectivity in navigated spine surgery. Papers not contributing to these subjects were deleted resulting in 276 papers that were included in the analysis. Image-guided approaches have been investigated and partially implemented into clinical routine in virtually any field of spine surgery. However, the data available is mostly limited to small clinical series, case reports or retrospective studies. Only two RCTs and one metaanalysis have been retrieved. Concerning the most popular application of image-guided approaches, pedicle screw insertion, the evidence of clinical benefit in the most critical areas, e.g. the thoracic spine, is still lacking. In many other areas of spine surgery, e.g. ventral spine surgery or tumor surgery, image-guided approaches are still in an experimental stage. The technical development of image-guided techniques has reached a high level as the accuracies that can be achieved technically meet the anatomical demands. However, there is evidence that the interaction between the surgeon (‘human factor’) and the navigation system is a source of inaccuracy. It is concluded that more effort needs to be spend to understand this interaction. PMID:19763640

  12. Direct digital lateral cephalometry: the effects of JPEG compression on image quality.

    PubMed

    Wenger, N A; Tewson, D H T K; McDonald, F

    2006-07-01

    This study used an aluminium test object to assess the effect of the Joint Photographics Expert Group (JPEG) compression algorithm, on direct digital cephalometric image quality. The aluminium block of 15 steps, with 20 holes in each step was radiographed in a Planmeca Proline 2002 digital cephalometric machine with Dimaxis2 software. Six different JPEG compression ratios were used to capture the cephalometric images. These ratios were 60%, 70%, 80%, 90%, TOP QUALITY JPEG (TQJPEG 98%) and TIFF (uncompressed). The images were taken at 68 kV and 12 mA with a 7 s exposure. Six experienced observers viewed the monitor displayed images, which were presented randomly. This was repeated one month later. The number of holes detected by each observer was plotted against each compression ratio. Intra-observer and inter-observer reproducibility was calculated using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Differences between the compression ratios were assessed using a Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance. When comparing intra-observer reproducibility, it was found that there were only four of 36 comparisons that showed a statistically significant difference (Observer 1: 60% (P=0.004), TQJPEG (P=0.019); Observer 2: TIFF (P=0.005); Observer 3: 90% (P=0.007)). Statistically, there was no significant difference with inter-observer reproducibility. There was no statistically significant difference between the image quality obtained from each compression ratio. The results showed that JPEG compression does not have any effect on the perceptibility of landmarks in the aluminium test object used in this study.

  13. Projection imaging with directional electron and proton beams emitted from an ultrashort intense laser-driven thin foil target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Choi, I. W.; Daido, H.; Nakamura, T.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Yogo, A.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Daito, I.; Bulanov, S. V.; Sung, J. H.; Lee, S. K.; Yu, T. J.; Jeong, T. M.; Kim, I. J.; Kim, C. M.; Kang, S. W.; Pae, K. H.; Oishi, Y.; Lee, J.

    2015-02-01

    Projection images of a metal mesh produced by directional MeV electron beam together with directional proton beam, emitted simultaneously from a thin foil target irradiated by an ultrashort intense laser, are recorded on an imaging plate for the electron imaging and on a CR-39 nuclear track detector for the proton imaging. The directional electron beam means the portion of the electron beam which is emitted along the same direction (i.e., target normal direction) as the proton beam. The mesh patterns are projected to each detector by the electron beam and the proton beam originated from tiny virtual sources of ~20 µm and ~10 µm diameters, respectively. Based on the observed quality and magnification of the projection images, we estimate sizes and locations of the virtual sources for both beams and characterize their directionalities. To carry out physical interpretation of the directional electron beam qualitatively, we perform 2D particle-in-cell simulation which reproduces a directional escaping electron component, together with a non-directional dragged-back electron component, the latter mainly contributes to building a sheath electric field for proton acceleration. The experimental and simulation results reveal various possible applications of the simultaneous, synchronized electron and proton sources to radiography and pump-probe measurements with temporal resolution of ~ps and spatial resolution of a few tens of µm.

  14. Handheld directional reflectometer: an angular imaging device to measure BRDF and HDR in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattison, Phillip R.; Dombrowski, Mark S.; Lorenz, James M.; Davis, Keith J.; Mann, Harley C.; Johnson, Philip; Foos, Bryan

    1998-10-01

    Many applications require quantitative measurements of surface light scattering, including quality control on production lines, inspection of painted surfaces, inspection of field repairs, etc. Instruments for measuring surface scattering typically fall into two main categories, namely bidirectional reflectometers, which measure the angular distribution of scattering, and hemispherical directional reflectometers, which measure the total scattering into the hemisphere above the surface. Measurement of the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) gives the greatest insight into how light is scattered from a surface. Measurements of BRDF, however, are typically very lengthy measurements taken by moving a source and detector to map the scattering. Since BRDF has four angular degrees of freedom, such measurements can require hours to days to complete. Instruments for measuring BRDF are also typically laboratory devices, although a field- portable bi-directional reflectometer does exist. Hemispherical directional reflectance (HDR) is a much easier measurement to make, although care must be taken to use the proper methodology when measuring at wavelengths beyond 10 micrometer, since integrating spheres (typically used to make such measurements) are very energy inefficient and lose their integrating properties at very long wavelengths. A few field- portable hemispherical directional reflectometers do exist, but typically measure HDR only at near-normal angles. Boeing Defense and Space Group and Surface Optics Corporation, under a contract from the Air Force Research Laboratory, have developed a new hand-held instrument capable of measuring both BRDF and HDR using a unique, patented angular imaging technique. A combination of an hemi-ellipsoidal mirror and an additional lens translate the angular scatter from a surface into a two-dimensional spatial distribution, which is recorded by an imaging array. This configuration fully maps the scattering from a half

  15. Image based weighted center of proximity versus directly measured knee contact location during simulated gait

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongsheng; Chen, Tony; Koff, Matthew F.; Hutchinson, Ian D.; Gilbert, Susannah; Choi, Dan; Warren, Russell F.; Rodeo, Scott A.; Maher, Suzanne A.

    2014-01-01

    To understand the mechanical consequences of knee injury requires a detailed analysis of the effect of that injury on joint contact mechanics during activities of daily living. Three-dimensional (3D) knee joint geometric models have been combined with knee joint kinematics to dynamically estimate the location of joint contact during physiological activities – using a weighted center of proximity (WCoP) method. However, the relationship between the estimated WCoP and the actual location of contact has not been defined. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between knee joint contact location as estimated using the image-based WCoP method, and a directly measured weighted center of contact (WCoC) method during simulated walking. To achieve this goal, we created knee specific models of six human cadaveric knees from magnetic resonance imaging. All knees were then subjected to physiological loads on a knee simulator intended to mimic gait. Knee joint motion was captured using a motion capture system. Knee joint contact stresses were synchronously recorded using a thin electronic sensor throughout gait, and used to compute WCoC for the medial and lateral plateaus of each knee. WCoP was calculated by combining knee kinematics with the MRI-based knee specific model. Both metrics were compared throughout gait using linear regression. The anteroposterior (AP) location of WCoP was significantly correlated with that of WCoC on both tibial plateaus in all specimens (P < 0.01, 95% confidence interval of Person’s coefficient r > 0), but the correlation was not significant in the mediolateral (ML) direction for 4/6 knees (P > 0.05). Our study demonstrates that while the location of joint contact obtained from 3D knee joint contact model, using the WCoP method, is significantly correlated with the location of actual contact stresses in the AP direction, that relationship is less certain in the ML direction. PMID:24837219

  16. Direct Reconstruction of CT-based Attenuation Correction Images for PET with Cluster-Based Penalties

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Mee; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Extremely low-dose CT acquisitions for the purpose of PET attenuation correction will have a high level of noise and biasing artifacts due to factors such as photon starvation. This work explores a priori knowledge appropriate for CT iterative image reconstruction for PET attenuation correction. We investigate the maximum a posteriori (MAP) framework with cluster-based, multinomial priors for the direct reconstruction of the PET attenuation map. The objective function for direct iterative attenuation map reconstruction was modeled as a Poisson log-likelihood with prior terms consisting of quadratic (Q) and mixture (M) distributions. The attenuation map is assumed to have values in 4 clusters: air+background, lung, soft tissue, and bone. Under this assumption, the MP was a mixture probability density function consisting of one exponential and three Gaussian distributions. The relative proportion of each cluster was jointly estimated during each voxel update of direct iterative coordinate decent (dICD) method. Noise-free data were generated from NCAT phantom and Poisson noise was added. Reconstruction with FBP (ramp filter) was performed on the noise-free (ground truth) and noisy data. For the noisy data, dICD reconstruction was performed with the combination of different prior strength parameters (β and γ) of Q- and M-penalties. The combined quadratic and mixture penalties reduces the RMSE by 18.7% compared to post-smoothed iterative reconstruction and only 0.7% compared to quadratic alone. For direct PET attenuation map reconstruction from ultra-low dose CT acquisitions, the combination of quadratic and mixture priors offers regularization of both variance and bias and is a potential method to derive attenuation maps with negligible patient dose. However, the small improvement in quantitative accuracy relative to the substantial increase in algorithm complexity does not currently justify the use of mixture-based PET attenuation priors for reconstruction of CT

  17. DIRECT IMAGING IN THE HABITABLE ZONE AND THE PROBLEM OF ORBITAL MOTION

    SciTech Connect

    Males, Jared R.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Close, Laird M.

    2013-07-01

    High contrast imaging searches for exoplanets have been conducted on 2.4-10 m telescopes, typically at H band (1.6 {mu}m) and used exposure times of {approx}1 hr to search for planets with semi-major axes of {approx}> 10 AU. We are beginning to plan for surveys using extreme-AO systems on the next generation of 30 m class telescopes, where we hope to begin probing the habitable zones (HZs) of nearby stars. Here we highlight a heretofore ignorable problem in direct imaging: planets orbit their stars. Under the parameters of current surveys, orbital motion is negligible over the duration of a typical observation. However, this motion is not negligible when using large diameter telescopes to observe at relatively close stellar distances (1-10 pc), over the long exposure times (10-20 hr) necessary for direct detection of older planets in the HZ. We show that this motion will limit our achievable signal-to-noise ratio and degrade observational completeness. Even on current 8 m class telescopes, orbital motion will need to be accounted for in an attempt to detect HZ planets around the nearest Sun-like stars {alpha} Cen A and B, a binary system now known to harbor at least one planet. Here we derive some basic tools for analyzing this problem, and ultimately show that the prospects are good for de-orbiting a series of shorter exposures to correct for orbital motion.

  18. THE TRENDS HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING SURVEY. II. DIRECT DETECTION OF THE HD 8375 TERTIARY

    SciTech Connect

    Crepp, Justin R.; Johnson, John Asher; Yantek, Scott M.; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoff W.; Isaacson, Howard; Fischer, Debra A.; Wright, Jason T.; Feng Ying

    2013-07-01

    We present the direct imaging detection of a faint tertiary companion to the single-lined spectroscopic binary HD 8375 AB. Initially noticed as an 53 m s{sup -1} yr{sup -1} Doppler acceleration by Bowler et al., we have obtained high-contrast adaptive optics observations at Keck using NIRC2 that spatially resolve HD 8375 C from its host(s). Astrometric measurements demonstrate that the companion shares a common proper-motion. We detect orbital motion in a clockwise direction. Multiband relative photometry measurements are consistent with an early M-dwarf spectral type ({approx}M1V). Our combined Doppler and imaging observations place a lower-limit of m {>=} 0.297 M{sub Sun} on its dynamical mass. We also provide a refined orbit for the inner pair using recent radial velocity measurements obtained with the High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer. HD 8375 is one of many triple-star systems that are apparently missing in the solar neighborhood.

  19. Adaptive Optics for Direct Detection of Extrasolar Planets: The Gemini Planet Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Macintosh, B; Graham, J; Palmer, D; Doyon, R; Gavel, D; Larkin, J; Oppenheimer, B; Saddlemyer, L; Wallace, J K; Bauman, B; Erikson, D; Poyneer, L; Sivaramakrishnan, A; Soummer, R; Veran, J

    2007-04-24

    The direct detection of photons emitted or reflected by extrasolar planets, spatially resolved from their parent star, is a major frontier in the study of other solar systems. Direct detection will provide statistical information on planets in 5-50 AU orbits, inaccessible to current Doppler searches, and allow spectral characterization of radius, temperature, surface gravity, and perhaps composition. Achieving this will require new dedicated high-contrast instruments. One such system under construction is the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI.) This combines a high-order/high-speed adaptive optics system to control wavefront errors from the Earth's atmosphere, an advanced coronagraph to block diffraction, ultrasmooth optics, a precision infrared interferometer to measure and correct systematic errors, and a integral field spectrograph/polarimeter to image and characterize target planetary systems. We predict that GPI will be able to detect planets with brightness less than 10{sup -7} of their parent star, sufficient to observe warm self-luminous planets around a large population of targets.

  20. An image-based multi-directional reflectance measurement setup for flexible objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sole, Aditya S.; Farup, Ivar; Tominaga, Shoji

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents an image-based method to measure reflectance of a homogeneous flexible object material (usually used in packaging). A point light source and a commercially available RGB camera is used to illuminate and measure the radiance reflected from the object surface in multiple reflection directions. By curving the flexible object onto a cylinder of known radius we are able to record radiance at multiple reflection angles in a faster way. In order to estimate the reflectance and to characterise the material, a spectralon reference tile is used. The spectralon tile is assumed to be homogenous and has near lambertain surface properties. Using Lambert's cosine law, irradiance at a given point on the object surface is calculated. This information is then used to calculate a BRDF using Phong reflection model to describe the sample surface reflection properties. The measurement setup is described and discussed in this paper along with its use to estimate a BRDF for a given material/substrate. Results obtained indicate that the proposed image-based technique works well to measure light reflected at different planar angles and record information to estimate the BRDF of the sample materials that can be modelled using Phong reflection model. The object material properties, sample curvature and camera resolution decides the number of incident and reflection angles at which the bi-directional reflectance, or the material BRDF, can be estimated using this method.

  1. Direct Imaging of a Two-Dimensional Silica Glass on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, P. Y.; Kurasch, S.; Srivastava, A.; Skakalova, V.; Kotakoski, J.; Krasheninnikov, A. V.; Hovden, R. M.; Mao, Q.; Meyer, J. C.; Smet, J.; Muller, D. A.; Kaiser, U.

    2012-02-01

    Large-area graphene substrates [1] are a promising lab bench for synthesizing and characterizing novel low-dimensional materials such as two-dimensional (2D) glasses. Unlike 2D crystals such as graphene, 2D glasses are almost entirely unexplored--yet they have enormous applicability for understanding amorphous structures, which are difficult to probe in 3D. We report direct observations of the structure of an amorphous 2D silica supported on graphene. To our knowledge, these results represent the first discovery of an extended 2D glass. The 2D glass enables aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy, producing the first atomically-resolved experimental images of a glass. The images strikingly resemble Zachariasen's seminal 1932 cartoons of a 2D continuous random network glass [2] and allow direct structural analyses not possible in 3D glassy materials. DFT calculations indicate that van der Waals interactions with graphene energetically favor the 2D structure over bulk SiO2, suggesting that graphene can be instrumental in stabilizing new 2D materials. [1] J. C. Meyer et al., Nature 454, 319--322 (2008). [2] W. H. Zachariasen, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 54, 3841--3851 (1932).

  2. Direct monitoring changes of salbutamol concentration in serum by chemiluminescent imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Canli; Zhang, Ruichao; Na, Na; Delanghe, Joris R; Ouyang, Jin

    2011-07-15

    We report in this manuscript, the use of direct ammonium persulfate-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) imaging, to monitor changes to measure serum salbutamol concentration in subjects of different haptoglobin (Hp) phenotypes at different dosing time. It was noted that CL generated from Hp was decreased due to salbutamol's reducibility, which was used for monitoring salbutamol concentration in serum. The serum from the subjects treated by oral administration of salbutamol, was collected at different dosing time and was separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) prior to the CL detection. According to CL images, samples were separated into three groups based on the Hp phenotypes. The curves of CL signal intensity versus time were obtained for each group, and we demonstrated that there were more significant variables on binding ability between groups. The maximum salbutamol concentration in the serum appeared after 4h, which was in agreement with the literature. In addition, the binding constants of salbutamol to Hp were determined by a fluorescence-based method, whose results were in agreement with the phenomenon of the greater salbutamol metabolism rate for Group Hp 1-1 than Group Hp 2-2. The presented method can monitor changes of salbutamol concentration in serum directly, making the procedures much simple, convenient, rapid and has the property of lower cost. It provided us with excellent reference information for the individual dosage regimen of different Hp groups, which hopefully could become a potential method for further pharmaceutical research.

  3. Adaptive optics for direct detection of extrasolar planets: the Gemini Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macintosh, Bruce; Graham, James; Palmer, David; Doyon, Rene; Gavel, Don; Larkin, James; Oppenheimer, Ben; Saddlemyer, Leslie; Wallace, J. Kent; Bauman, Brian; Erikson, Darren; Poyneer, Lisa; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Soummer, Rémi; Veran, Jean-Pierre

    2007-04-01

    The direct detection of photons emitted or reflected by extrasolar planets, spatially resolved from their parent star, is a major frontier in the study of other solar systems. Direct detection will provide statistical information on planets in 5 50 AU orbits, inaccessible to current Doppler searches, and allow spectral characterization of radius, temperature, surface gravity, and perhaps composition. Achieving this will require new, dedicated, high-contrast instruments. One such system under construction is the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). This combines a high-order/high-speed adaptive optics system to control wavefront errors from the Earth's atmosphere, an advanced coronagraph to block diffraction, ultrasmooth optics, a precision infrared interferometer to measure and correct systematic errors, and a integral field spectrograph/polarimeter to image and characterize target planetary systems. We predict that GPI will be able to detect planets with brightness less than 10-7 of their parent star, sufficient to observe warm self-luminous planets around a large population of targets. To cite this article: B. Macintosh et al., C. R. Physique 8 (2007).

  4. 4 pi direction sensitive gamma imager with RENA-3 readout ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yanfeng; Li, Wen; Yanoff, Brian; Gordon, Jeffrey; Castleberry, Donald

    2007-09-01

    A 4π direction-sensitive gamma imager is presented, using a 1 cm 3 3D CZT detector from Yinnel Tech and the RENA-3 readout ASIC from NOVA R&D. The measured readout system electronic noise is around 4-5 keV FWHM for all anode channels. The measured timing resolution between two channels within a single ASIC is around 10 ns and the resolution is 30 ns between two separate ASIC chips. After 3D material non-uniformity and charge trapping corrections, the measured single-pixel-event energy resolution is around 1% for Cs-137 at 662 keV using a 1 cm 3 CZT detector from Yinnel Tech with an 8 x 8 anode pixel array at 1.15 mm pitch. The energy resolution for two pixel events is 2.9%. A 10 uCi Cs-137 point source was moved around the detector to test the image reconstruction algorithms and demonstrate the source direction detection capability. Accurate source locations were reconstructed with around 200 two-pixel events within a total energy window +/-10 keV around the 662 keV full energy peak. The angular resolution FWHM at four of the five positions tested was between 0.05-0.07 steradians.

  5. Mid-callosal plane determination using preferred directions from diffusion tensor images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, André L.; Rittner, Letícia; Lotufo, Roberto A.; Appenzeller, Simone

    2015-03-01

    The corpus callosum is the major brain structure responsible for inter{hemispheric communication between neurons. Many studies seek to relate corpus callosum attributes to patient characteristics, cerebral diseases and psychological disorders. Most of those studies rely on 2D analysis of the corpus callosum in the mid-sagittal plane. However, it is common to find conflicting results among studies, once many ignore methodological issues and define the mid-sagittal plane based on precary or invalid criteria with respect to the corpus callosum. In this work we propose a novel method to determine the mid-callosal plane using the corpus callosum internal preferred diffusion directions obtained from diffusion tensor images. This plane is analogous to the mid-sagittal plane, but intended to serve exclusively as the corpus callosum reference. Our method elucidates the great potential the directional information of the corpus callosum fibers have to indicate its own referential. Results from experiments with five image pairs from distinct subjects, obtained under the same conditions, demonstrate the method effectiveness to find the corpus callosum symmetric axis relative to the axial plane.

  6. A Space Mission Concept to Directly Image the Habitable Zone of Alpha Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendek, E.; Belikov, R.; Males, J.; Thomas, S.; Lozi, J.

    2015-12-01

    The inner edge of Alpha Cen A&B Habitable Zone is found at exceptionally large angular separations of 0.7" and 0.4" respectively. This enables direct imaging of the system with a 30cm class telescope. Contrast ratios in the order of 1010 are needed to image Earth-brightness planets. Low-resolution (5-band) spectra of all planets, will allow establishing the presence and amount of an atmosphere. This star system configuration is optimal for a specialized small, and stable space telescope, that can achieve high-contrast but has limited resolution. This paper describes an innovative instrument design and a mission concept based on a full Silicon Carbide off-axis telescope, which has a Phase Induce Amplitude Apodization coronagraph embedded in the telescope. This architecture maximizes stability and throughput. The Multi-Star Wave Front algorithm is implemented to drive a deformable mirror controlling simultaneously diffracted light from the on-axis and binary companion star. The instrument has a Focal Plane Occulter to reject starlight into a Low Order Wavefront Sensor that delivers high-precision pointing control. Finally we utilize the ODI post-processing method that takes advantage of a highly stable environment (Earth-trailing orbit) and a continuous sequence of images spanning 2 years, to reduce the final noise floor in post processing to ~2e-11 levels, enabling high confidence and at least 90% completeness detections of Earth-like planets.

  7. Direct imaging of structure and dynamics in a colloidal dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goree, John

    1997-03-01

    Micron-size plastic spheres immersed in a weakly-ionized gas-discharge plasma behave like a colloidal suspension. In this so-called dusty plasma, the particles interact by a screened Coulomb repulsion, and they arrange themselves in a crystalline lattice, which has a melting transition. The plasma is made by applying high voltage to a horizontal metal electrode in a vacuum chamber filled with a noble gas at a pressure of about 1 mBar, and 9.4 μm spherical particles are shaken into it. Due to a lack of bouyancy, particles sediment into a thin 2D suspension. They are illuminated by a sheet of laser light and imaged using video microscopy. Imaging and particle behavior are similar to 2D colloidal crystal experiments. The dusty plasma has the advantages of being optically thin (its very low volume fraction allows direct imaging of the entire suspension) and not being overdamped by the ambient fluid (allowing fast experiments and an adjustable temperature). In two-dimensional melting, we find that in the crystal phase the defects are free dislocations, and as the system becomes more disordered, they form condensed defect structures, which appear to be liquid-like domain walls separating crystalline domains.

  8. Direct Portal Vein Thrombosis Visualization with T2*-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuanming; Hu, Alice; Haacke, Mark; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Jun; Zhou, Daiquan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To investigate the feasibility of direct magnetic resonance portal vein thrombosis (PVT) visualization with T2*-weighted imaging (T2*WI) without contrast agent. METHODS: Thirty patients with PVT were included in this study. All of them were imaged with contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) as well as non-contrast MRI T1, T2 and T2*WI. Imaging data was independently analyzed by two experienced radiologists. T2*WI of all PVT was compared slice-by-slice with each of the comparison sequences (T1WI, T2WI and CE-CT) on the following categories: the location, size, boundary, and conspicuity of thrombus and portal veins. RESULTS: The average score of PVT visualization in T2*WI was higher than T1WI and T2WI in location, size, boundary and conspicuity (t = 7.54 - 84.16, P<0.05), and higher than CE-CT in boundary and conspicuity (t = 3.03- 6.98, P<0.05). For portal vein visualization, there was no significant score difference in left, middle and right portal veins between CE-CT and T2*WI (t = -1.76- 1.35, P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest T2*WI can characterize PVT accurately with high quality without the use of intravenous contrast agents. PMID:24046533

  9. Direct three-dimensional imaging of structure in a strongly-coupled dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, R. A.; Goree, J.; Pieper, J. B.

    1996-11-01

    Using direct imaging of 9 μ m plastic spheres suspended in low-power Krypton discharges, we have constructed three-dimensional images showing the crystalline structure of a strongly-coupled dusty plasma. The spheres, which are highly charged and levitated by the electrode sheath, form a strongly-coupled system. A horizontal laser sheet illuminates a slice through the suspension, and a video camera views at 90^circ . Using a vertical stack of digitized images of particles in equally-spaced horizontal planes, we reconstructed the 3-D structure. We found bcc (body-centered cubic) and simple hexagonal structures coexisting in the same suspension. This coexistence is attributed to a bistability owing to an attractive potential region downstream of a charged grain in the presence of flowing ions. The probability of the system arranging in itself in the bcc or simple hexagonal phases is found to depend on the rf power that is used to sustain the discharge, and this in turn affects the particle charge and Debye length.(J. B. Pieper, J. Goree, R. A. Quinn, submitted to Phys. Rev. E) Work supported by NSF and NASA

  10. Jupiter’s Phase Variations from Cassini: A Testbed for Future Direct-imaging Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorga, L. C.; Jackiewicz, J.; Rages, K.; West, R. A.; Knowles, B.; Lewis, N.; Marley, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    We present empirical phase curves of Jupiter from ∼0° to 140° as measured in multiple optical bandpasses by Cassini/Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) during the Millennium flyby of Jupiter in late 2000 to early 2001. Phase curves are of interest for studying the energy balance of Jupiter and understanding the scattering behavior of the planet as an exoplanet analog. We find that Jupiter is significantly darker at partial phases than an idealized Lambertian planet by roughly 25% and is not well fit by Jupiter-like exoplanet atmospheric models across all wavelengths. We provide analytic fits to Jupiter’s phase function in several Cassini/ISS imaging filter bandpasses. In addition, these observations show that Jupiter’s color is more variable with phase angle than predicted by models. Therefore, the color of even a near Jupiter-twin planet observed at a partial phase cannot be assumed to be comparable to that of Jupiter at full phase. We discuss how the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope and other future direct-imaging missions can enhance the study of cool giants.

  11. Particle sizing of pharmaceutical aerosols via direct imaging of particle settling velocities.

    PubMed

    Fishler, Rami; Verhoeven, Frank; de Kruijf, Wilbur; Sznitman, Josué

    2017-08-16

    We present a novel method for characterizing in near real-time the aerodynamic particle size distributions from pharmaceutical inhalers. The proposed method is based on direct imaging of airborne particles followed by a particle-by-particle measurement of settling velocities using image analysis and particle tracking algorithms. Due to the simplicity of the principle of operation, this method has the potential of circumventing potential biases of current real-time particle analyzers (e.g. Time of Flight analysis), while offering a cost effective solution. The simple device can also be constructed in laboratory settings from off-the-shelf materials for research purposes. To demonstrate the feasibility and robustness of the measurement technique, we have conducted benchmark experiments whereby aerodynamic particle size distributions are obtained from several commercially-available dry powder inhalers (DPIs). Our measurements yield size distributions (i.e. MMAD and GSD) that are closely in line with those obtained from Time of Flight analysis and cascade impactors suggesting that our imaging-based method may embody an attractive methodology for rapid inhaler testing and characterization. In a final step, we discuss some of the ongoing limitations of the current prototype and conceivable routes for improving the technique. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Human genome sequencing with direct x-ray holographic imaging. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1993-06-08

    Direct holographic imaging of biological materials is widely applicable to the study of the structure, properties and action of genetic material. This particular application involves the sequencing of the human genome where prospective genomic imaging technology is composed of three subtechnologies, name an x-ray holographic camera, suitable chemistry and enzymology for the preparation of tagged DNA samples, and the illuminator in the form of an x-ray laser. We report appropriate x-ray camera, embodied by the instrument developed by MCR, is available and that suitable chemical and enzymatic procedures exist for the preparation of the necessary tagged DNA strands. Concerning the future development of the x-ray illuminator. We find that a practical small scale x-ray light source is indeed feasible. This outcome requires the use of unconventional physical processes in order to achieve the necessary power-compression in the amplifying medium. The understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly. Importantly, although the x-ray source does not currently exist, the understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly and the research has established the basic scaling laws that will determine the properties of the x-ray illuminator. When this x-ray source becomes available, an extremely rapid and cost effective instrument for 3-D imaging of biological materials can be applied to a wide range of biological structural assays, including the base-pair sequencing of the human genome and many questions regarding its higher levels of organization.

  13. Polarization of Directly Imaged Young Giant Planets as a Probe of Mass, Rotation, and Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark Scott; Sengupta, Sujan

    2012-01-01

    Young, hot gas giant planets at large separations from their primaries have been directly imaged around several nearby stars. More such planets will likely be detected by ongoing and new imaging surveys with instruments such as the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). Efforts continue to model the spectra of these planets in order to constrain their masses, effective temperatures, composition, and cloud structure. One potential tool for analyzing these objects, which has received relatively less attention, is polarization. Linear polarization of gas giant exoplanets can arise from the combined influences of light scattering by atmospheric dust and a rotationally distorted shape. The oblateness of gas giant planet increases of course with rotation rate and for fixed rotation also rises with decreasing gravity. Thus young, lower mass gas giant planets with youthful inflated radii could easily have oblateness greater than that of Saturn s 10%. We find that polarizations of over 1% may easily be produced in the near-infrared in such cases. This magnitude of polarization may be measurable by GPI and other instruments. Thus if detected, polarization of a young Jupiter places constraints on the combination of its gravity, rotation rate, and degree of cloudiness. We will present results of our multiple scattering analysis coupled with a self-consistent dusty atmospheric models to demonstrate the range of polarizations that might be expected from resolved exoplanets and the range of parameter space that such observations may inform.

  14. Flight Demonstration of a Milli-Arcsecond Optical Pointing System for Direct Exoplanet Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, Christopher; Chakrabarti, S.; Cook, T.; Hicks, B.

    2012-01-01

    The PICTURE (Planetary Imaging Concept Testbed Using a Rocket Experiment) sounding rocket attempted to use a white-light nulling interferometer to image the exozodiacal dust disk of Epsilon Eridani (K2V, 3.22 pc) in reflected visible light down to an inner radius of 3 AU. PICTURE launched from White Sands Missile Range on October 8th, 2011. Unfortunately, the main science telemetry channel was lost seconds into flight and no science data was recovered. However, on-board diagnostic data does show that PICTURE successfully demonstrated a fast (200 Hz) optical tracking system that provided 2 milli-arcsecond in-flight pointing stability, a thousand-fold improvement over the raw pointing of the rocket's attitude control system (ACS). The PICTURE flight provides heritage for a technology that will be a key component for many future direct exoplanet imaging missions. We present a spectral analysis of the 200 Hz tracking data in comparison to the 50 Hz ACS gyro data and we provide a precise measurement of the true ACS performance at frequencies higher than 5 Hz where the ACS gyros become noise limited. This work is funded by NASA grant: NNG05WC17G.

  15. Direct Fluorescent Imaging of Translocation and Unwinding by Individual DNA Helicases.

    PubMed

    Pavankumar, T L; Exell, J C; Kowalczykowski, S C

    2016-01-01

    The unique translocation and DNA unwinding properties of DNA helicases can be concealed by the stochastic behavior of enzyme molecules within the necessarily large populations used in ensemble experiments. With recent technological advances, the direct visualization of helicases acting on individual DNA molecules has contributed significantly to the current understanding of their mechanisms of action and biological functions. The combination of single-molecule techniques that enable both manipulation of individual protein or DNA molecules and visualization of their actions has made it possible to literally see novel and unique biochemical characteristics that were previously masked. Here, we describe the execution and use of single-molecule fluorescence imaging techniques, focusing on methods that include optical trapping in conjunction with epifluorescent imaging, and also surface immobilization in conjunction with total internal reflection fluorescence visualization. Combined with microchannel flow cells and microfluidic control, these methods allow individual fluorescently labeled protein and DNA molecules to be imaged and tracked, affording measurement of DNA unwinding and translocation at single-molecule resolution.

  16. Direct imaging of the cold jovian (?) companion GJ504b with VLT/SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnefoy, Mickaël

    2015-12-01

    In 2008, the Subaru/SEEDS survey reported the direct imaging discovery of a Jovian exoplanet around the Sun-like star GJ 504. With a mass of 3-10 MJup and projected separation of 43.5 AU, this object challenges the core-accretion paradigm. This is the only known nearly mature (age ≫ 50 Myr) gas giant planet imaged so far. The very low (500 K) estimated temperature of the object makes it a benchmark for the study of the physical and chemical processes at play into the non-irradiated atmospheres of gas giants.We will present new SPHERE dual-band imaging data on the system gathered from 0.95 to 2.25 microns. The data enable to detect the companion and complete its spectral energy distribution. We use them to refine the effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity estimates for the object. This in turns enables to discuss the nature of the companion. We also set constraints on additional companions in the system.

  17. High resolution biomedical imaging system with direct detection of x-rays via a charge coupled device

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.; McKay, T.A.

    1998-04-21

    An imaging system is provided for direct detection of x-rays from an irradiated biological tissue. The imaging system includes an energy source for emitting x-rays toward the biological tissue and a charge coupled device (CCD) located immediately adjacent the biological tissue and arranged transverse to the direction of irradiation along which the x-rays travel. The CCD directly receives and detects the x-rays after passing through the biological tissue. The CCD is divided into a matrix of cells, each of which individually stores a count of x-rays directly detected by the cell. The imaging system further includes a pattern generator electrically coupled to the CCD for reading a count from each cell. A display device is provided for displaying an image representative of the count read by the pattern generator from the cells of the CCD. 13 figs.

  18. High resolution biomedical imaging system with direct detection of x-rays via a charge coupled device

    DOEpatents

    Atac, Muzaffer; McKay, Timothy A.

    1998-01-01

    An imaging system is provided for direct detection of x-rays from an irradiated biological tissue. The imaging system includes an energy source for emitting x-rays toward the biological tissue and a charge coupled device (CCD) located immediately adjacent the biological tissue and arranged transverse to the direction of irradiation along which the x-rays travel. The CCD directly receives and detects the x-rays after passing through the biological tissue. The CCD is divided into a matrix of cells, each of which individually stores a count of x-rays directly detected by the cell. The imaging system further includes a pattern generator electrically coupled to the CCD for reading a count from each cell. A display device is provided for displaying an image representative of the count read by the pattern generator from the cells of the CCD.

  19. Two-Color Infrared Digital Imaging for Determination of In-Cylinder Temperature and Species during Compression and Combustion Periods of DI Diesel Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-13

    combustion processes that dictate the engine’s efficiency and emissions. For example, the low oxygen content and high- temperature in the residual gas ...Combustion Periods of a DI Diesel Engine ,. fq.O" 6. AUTHOR(S) K. T. Rhee, H. Jiang and Y.I. Jeong 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) S...ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) In order to determine the spatial and temporal distributions of temperature and species in a DI diesel engine combustion

  20. Direct Imaging of Cerebral Thromboemboli Using Computed Tomography and Fibrin-targeted Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Yeon; Ryu, Ju Hee; Schellingerhout, Dawid; Sun, In-Cheol; Lee, Su-Kyoung; Jeon, Sangmin; Kim, Jiwon; Kwon, Ick Chan; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Ahn, Cheol-Hee; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kim, Dong-Eog

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the current standard for time-critical decision-making in stroke patients, informing decisions on thrombolytic therapy with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), which has a narrow therapeutic index. We aimed to develop a CT-based method to directly visualize cerebrovascular thrombi and guide thrombolytic therapy. Glycol-chitosan-coated gold nanoparticles (GC-AuNPs) were synthesized and conjugated to fibrin-targeting peptides, forming fib-GC-AuNP. This targeted imaging agent and non-targeted control agent were characterized in vitro and in vivo in C57Bl/6 mice (n = 107) with FeCl3-induced carotid thrombosis and/or embolic ischemic stroke. Fibrin-binding capacity was superior with fib-GC-AuNPs compared to GC-AuNPs, with thrombi visualized as high density on microCT (mCT). mCT imaging using fib-GC-AuNP allowed the prompt detection and quantification of cerebral thrombi, and monitoring of tPA-mediated thrombolytic effect, which reflected histological stroke outcome. Furthermore, recurrent thrombosis could be diagnosed by mCT without further nanoparticle administration for up to 3 weeks. fib-GC-AuNP-based direct cerebral thrombus imaging greatly enhance the value and information obtainable by regular CT, has multiple uses in basic / translational vascular research, and will likely allow personalized thrombolytic therapy in clinic by a) optimizing tPA-dosing to match thrombus burden, b) enabling the rational triage of patients to more radical therapies such as endovascular clot-retrieval, and c) potentially serving as a theranostic platform for targeted delivery of concurrent thrombolysis. PMID:26199648

  1. Direct magnetic resonance detection of myelin and prospects for quantitative imaging of myelin density

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Michael J.; Ong, Henry H.; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Hackney, David B.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has previously demonstrated its potential for indirectly mapping myelin density, either by relaxometric detection of myelin water or magnetization transfer. Here, we investigated whether myelin can be detected and possibly quantified directly. We identified the spectrum of myelin in the spinal cord in situ as well as in myelin lipids extracted via a sucrose gradient method, and investigated its spectral properties. High-resolution solution NMR spectroscopy showed the extract composition to be in agreement with myelin’s known chemical make-up. The 400-MHz 1H spectrum of the myelin extract, at 20 °C (room temperature) and 37 °C, consists of a narrow water resonance superimposed on a broad envelope shifted ∼3.5 ppm upfield, suggestive of long-chain methylene protons. Superimposed on this signal are narrow components resulting from functional groups matching the chemical shifts of the constituents making up myelin lipids. The spectrum could be modeled as a sum of super-Lorentzians with a T2* distribution covering a wide range of values (0.008–26 ms). Overall, there was a high degree of similarity between the spectral properties of extracted myelin lipids and those found in neural tissue. The normalized difference spectrum had the hallmarks of membrane proteins, not present in the myelin extract. Using 3D radially ramp-sampled proton MRI, with a combination of adiabatic inversion and echo subtraction, the feasibility of direct myelin imaging in situ is demonstrated. Last, the integrated signal from myelin suspensions is shown, both spectroscopically and by imaging, to scale with concentration, suggesting the potential for quantitative determination of myelin density. PMID:22628562

  2. Infrared image to evaluate the selective (directional) freezing due to localized injection of thermally important solutions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-Fu; Liu, Jing; Zhou, Yi-Xin

    2005-01-01

    Cryosurgery is a minimally invasive surgical technique that employs the destructive effect of freezing to eradicate benign or malignant tumors which are difficult or even impossible to be extirpated by conventional surgery. Recently, we proposed a method for flexibly controlling the freezing scale during cryosurgery by percutaneously injecting thermally important functional solutions into the target tissues. This method can also help modify the direction of the iceball formation which is desirable for a successful cryosurgery for treating tumors with complex anatomical structure. To evaluate the effect of controlling the size, shape and direction of the iceball formation by injecting solutions with specific thermal properties into the target tissues, a medical infrared thermometer was introduced in this paper to map the temperature profile over the whole surface above the treated area. The cryosurgical procedure was performed using a minimally invasive cryoprobe cooled by liquid nitrogen in order to obtain a deep regional freezing. Meanwhile, one thermocouple was also amounted in the tip of the probe to record the transient temperature in order to detect the freezing and thawing effect on the tissues. The obtained infrared image was applied to monitor and evaluate the whole process. Simulation experiments on biological tissues (fresh pork and liver) were performed in vitro and four different liquids were injected into the test materials, which were distilled water, an aqueous suspension of aluminum nano-particles in water, ethanol and a 10% solution of the cryoprotective agent dimethylsulfoxide, (Me2SO), respectively. It was clearly demonstrated that the localized injection of an appropriate solution could effectively regulate the tumor-killing area via directional freezing. The study also suggested that infrared imaging can be used as an effective way to monitor and evaluate the selective freezing process, which will provide important information to help enhance

  3. WEIRD : Wide orbit Exoplanet search with InfraRed Direct imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Frédérique; Artigau, Etienne; Rameau, Julien; Lafrenière, David; Albert, Loic; Naud, Marie-Eve; Gagné, Jonathan; Malo, Lison; Doyon, Rene; Beichman, Charles; Delorme, Philippe; Janson, Markus

    2015-12-01

    We currently do not know what does the emission spectrum of a young 1 Jupiter-mass planet look like, as no such object has yet been directly imaged. Arguably, the most useful Jupiter-mass planet would be one that is bound to a star of known age, distance and metallicity but which has an orbit large enough (100-5000 UA) that it can be studied as an "isolated" object. We are therefore searching for the most extreme planetary systems. We are currently gathering a large dataset to try to identify such objects through deep [3.6] and [4.5] imaging from SPITZER and deep seeing-limited J (with Flamingos 2 and WIRCam) and z imaging (with GMOS-S and MegaCam) of all 181 known confirmed members of a known young association (<120 Myr) within 70pc of the Sun. Our study will reveal distant planetary companions, over the reveal distant PMCs up to 5000 AU. AU separation range, through their distinctively red z-J and [4.5]-[3.6] colors. The sensitivity limits of our combined Spitzer+ground-based program will allow detection of planets with masses as low as 1 Mjup with very low contamination rates. Here we present some preliminary results of our survey. This approach is unique in the community and will give us an overview of the architecture of the outer part of planetary systems that were never probed before. Our survey will provide benchmark young Saturn and Jupiter for imaging and spectroscopy with the JWST

  4. Direct Imaging of ER Calcium with Targeted-Esterase Induced Dye Loading (TED)

    PubMed Central

    Samtleben, Samira; Jaepel, Juliane; Fecher, Caroline; Andreska, Thomas; Rehberg, Markus; Blum, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Visualization of calcium dynamics is important to understand the role of calcium in cell physiology. To examine calcium dynamics, synthetic fluorescent Ca2+ indictors have become popular. Here we demonstrate TED (= targeted-esterase induced dye loading), a method to improve the release of Ca2+ indicator dyes in the ER lumen of different cell types. To date, TED was used in cell lines, glial cells, and neurons in vitro. TED bases on efficient, recombinant targeting of a high carboxylesterase activity to the ER lumen using vector-constructs that express Carboxylesterases (CES). The latest TED vectors contain a core element of CES2 fused to a red fluorescent protein, thus enabling simultaneous two-color imaging. The dynamics of free calcium in the ER are imaged in one color, while the corresponding ER structure appears in red. At the beginning of the procedure, cells are transduced with a lentivirus. Subsequently, the infected cells are seeded on coverslips to finally enable live cell imaging. Then, living cells are incubated with the acetoxymethyl ester (AM-ester) form of low-affinity Ca2+ indicators, for instance Fluo5N-AM, Mag-Fluo4-AM, or Mag-Fura2-AM. The esterase activity in the ER cleaves off hydrophobic side chains from the AM form of the Ca2+ indicator and a hydrophilic fluorescent dye/Ca2+ complex is formed and trapped in the ER lumen. After dye loading, the cells are analyzed at an inverted confocal laser scanning microscope. Cells are continuously perfused with Ringer-like solutions and the ER calcium dynamics are directly visualized by time-lapse imaging. Calcium release from the ER is identified by a decrease in fluorescence intensity in regions of interest, whereas the refilling of the ER calcium store produces an increase in fluorescence intensity. Finally, the change in fluorescent intensity over time is determined by calculation of ΔF/F0. PMID:23685703

  5. Low Dose PET Image Reconstruction with Total Variation Using Alternating Direction Method

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xingjian; Wang, Chenye; Hu, Hongjie; Liu, Huafeng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a total variation (TV) minimization strategy is proposed to overcome the problem of sparse spatial resolution and large amounts of noise in low dose positron emission tomography (PET) imaging reconstruction. Two types of objective function were established based on two statistical models of measured PET data, least-square (LS) TV for the Gaussian distribution and Poisson-TV for the Poisson distribution. To efficiently obtain high quality reconstructed images, the alternating direction method (ADM) is used to solve these objective functions. As compared with the iterative shrinkage/thresholding (IST) based algorithms, the proposed ADM can make full use of the TV constraint and its convergence rate is faster. The performance of the proposed approach is validated through comparisons with the expectation-maximization (EM) method using synthetic and experimental biological data. In the comparisons, the results of both LS-TV and Poisson-TV are taken into consideration to find which models are more suitable for PET imaging, in particular low-dose PET. To evaluate the results quantitatively, we computed bias, variance, and the contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) and drew profiles of the reconstructed images produced by the different methods. The results show that both Poisson-TV and LS-TV can provide a high visual quality at a low dose level. The bias and variance of the proposed LS-TV and Poisson-TV methods are 20% to 74% less at all counting levels than those of the EM method. Poisson-TV gives the best performance in terms of high-accuracy reconstruction with the lowest bias and variance as compared to the ground truth (14.3% less bias and 21.9% less variance). In contrast, LS-TV gives the best performance in terms of the high contrast of the reconstruction with the highest CRC. PMID:28005929

  6. The Planets Around Low-Mass Stars (PALMS) Direct Imaging Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Liu, M. C.; Shkolnik, E.; Mann, A.; Tamura, M.

    2013-01-01

    Direct imaging is the only method to study the outer architecture (>10 AU) of extrasolar planetary systems in a targeted fashion. Previous imaging surveys have primarily focused on intermediate- and high-mass stars because of the relative dearth of known nearby young M dwarfs. As a result, even though M dwarfs make up 70% of stars in our galaxy, there are few constraints on the population of giant planets at moderate separations (10-100 AU) in this stellar mass regime. We present results from an ongoing high-contrast adaptive optics imaging survey targeting newly identified nearby (<35 pc) young (<300 Myr) M dwarfs with Keck-2/NIRC2 and Subaru/HiCIAO. We have already discovered four young brown dwarf companions with masses between 30-70 Mjup; two of these are members of the ~120 Myr AB Dor moving group, and another one will yield a dynamical mass in the near future. Follow-up optical and near-infrared spectroscopy of these companions reveal spectral types of late-M to early-L and spectroscopic indicators of youth such as angular H-band morphologies, weak J-band alkali lines, and Li absorption and Halpha emission in one target. Altogether our survey is sensitive to planet masses a few times that of Jupiter at separations down to ~10 AU. With a sample size of roughly 80 single M dwarfs, this program represents the deepest and most extensive imaging search for planets around young low-mass stars to date.

  7. Direct imaging of ER calcium with targeted-esterase induced dye loading (TED).

    PubMed

    Samtleben, Samira; Jaepel, Juliane; Fecher, Caroline; Andreska, Thomas; Rehberg, Markus; Blum, Robert

    2013-05-07

    Visualization of calcium dynamics is important to understand the role of calcium in cell physiology. To examine calcium dynamics, synthetic fluorescent Ca(2+) indictors have become popular. Here we demonstrate TED (= targeted-esterase induced dye loading), a method to improve the release of Ca(2+) indicator dyes in the ER lumen of different cell types. To date, TED was used in cell lines, glial cells, and neurons in vitro. TED bases on efficient, recombinant targeting of a high carboxylesterase activity to the ER lumen using vector-constructs that express Carboxylesterases (CES). The latest TED vectors contain a core element of CES2 fused to a red fluorescent protein, thus enabling simultaneous two-color imaging. The dynamics of free calcium in the ER are imaged in one color, while the corresponding ER structure appears in red. At the beginning of the procedure, cells are transduced with a lentivirus. Subsequently, the infected cells are seeded on coverslips to finally enable live cell imaging. Then, living cells are incubated with the acetoxymethyl ester (AM-ester) form of low-affinity Ca(2+) indicators, for instance Fluo5N-AM, Mag-Fluo4-AM, or Mag-Fura2-AM. The esterase activity in the ER cleaves off hydrophobic side chains from the AM form of the Ca(2+) indicator and a hydrophilic fluorescent dye/Ca(2+) complex is formed and trapped in the ER lumen. After dye loading, the cells are analyzed at an inverted confocal laser scanning microscope. Cells are continuously perfused with Ringer-like solutions and the ER calcium dynamics are directly visualized by time-lapse imaging. Calcium release from the ER is identified by a decrease in fluorescence intensity in regions of interest, whereas the refilling of the ER calcium store produces an increase in fluorescence intensity. Finally, the change in fluorescent intensity over time is determined by calculation of ΔF/F0.

  8. Real-time direct and diffraction X-ray imaging of irregular silicon wafer breakage

    PubMed Central

    Rack, Alexander; Scheel, Mario; Danilewsky, Andreas N.

    2016-01-01

    Fracture and breakage of single crystals, particularly of silicon wafers, are multi-scale problems: the crack tip starts propagating on an atomic scale with the breaking of chemical bonds, forms crack fronts through the crystal on the micrometre scale and ends macroscopically in catastrophic wafer shattering. Total wafer breakage is a severe problem for the semiconductor industry, not only during handling but also during temperature treatments, leading to million-dollar costs per annum in a device production line. Knowledge of the relevant dynamics governing perfect cleavage along the {111} or {110} faces, and of the deflection into higher indexed {hkl} faces of higher energy, is scarce due to the high velocity of the process. Imaging techniques are commonly limited to depicting only the state of a wafer before the crack and in the final state. This paper presents, for the first time, in situ high-speed crack propagation under thermal stress, imaged simultaneously in direct transmission and diffraction X-ray imaging. It shows how the propagating crack tip and the related strain field can be tracked in the phase-contrast and diffracted images, respectively. Movies with a time resolution of microseconds per frame reveal that the strain and crack tip do not propagate continuously or at a constant speed. Jumps in the crack tip position indicate pinning of the crack tip for about 1–2 ms followed by jumps faster than 2–6 m s−1, leading to a macroscopically observed average velocity of 0.028–0.055 m s−1. The presented results also give a proof of concept that the described X-ray technique is compatible with studying ultra-fast cracks up to the speed of sound. PMID:27006774

  9. THE SYNERGY OF DIRECT IMAGING AND ASTROMETRY FOR ORBIT DETERMINATION OF EXO-EARTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Michael; Catanzarite, Joseph; Pan Xiaopei E-mail: joseph.catanzarite@jpl.nasa.go

    2010-09-01

    The holy grail of exoplanet searches is an exo-Earth, an Earth mass planet in the habitable zone (HZ) around a nearby star. Mass is one of the most important characteristics of a planet and can only be measured by observing the motion of the star around the planet-star center of gravity. The planet's orbit can be measured either by imaging the planet at multiple epochs or by measuring the position of the star at multiple epochs by space-based astrometry. The measurement of an exoplanet's orbit by direct imaging is complicated by a number of factors. One is the inner working angle (IWA). A space coronagraph or interferometer imaging an exo-Earth can separate the light from the planet from the light from the star only when the star-planet separation is larger than the IWA. Second, the apparent brightness of a planet depends on the orbital phase. A single image of a planet cannot tell us whether the planet is in the HZ or distinguish whether it is an exo-Earth or a Neptune-mass planet. Third is the confusion that may arise from the presence of multiple planets. With two images of a multiple planet system, it is not possible to assign a dot to a planet based only on the photometry and color of the planet. Finally, the planet-star contrast must exceed a certain minimum value in order for the planet to be detected. The planet may be unobservable even when it is outside the IWA, such as when the bright side of the planet is facing away from us in a 'crescent' phase. In this paper we address the question: 'Can a prior astrometric mission that can identify which stars have Earth-like planets significantly improve the science yield of a mission to image exo-Earths?' In the case of the Occulting Ozone Observatory, a small external occulter mission that cannot measure spectra, we find that the occulter mission could confirm the orbits of {approx}4 to {approx}5 times as many exo-Earths if an astrometric mission preceded it to identify which stars had such planets. In the case

  10. Improving signal-to-noise in the direct imaging of exoplanets and circumstellar disks with MLOCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahhaj, Zahed; Cieza, Lucas A.; Mawet, Dimitri; Yang, Bin; Canovas, Hector; de Boer, Jozua; Casassus, Simon; Ménard, François; Schreiber, Matthias R.; Liu, Michael C.; Biller, Beth A.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Hayward, Thomas L.

    2015-09-01

    We present a new algorithm designed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of point and extended source detections around bright stars in direct imaging data.One of our innovations is that we insert simulated point sources into the science images, which we then try to recover with maximum S/N. This improves the S/N of real point sources elsewhere in the field. The algorithm, based on the locally optimized combination of images (LOCI) method, is called Matched LOCI or MLOCI. We show with Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) data on HD 135344 B and Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager (NICI) data on several stars that the new algorithm can improve the S/N of point source detections by 30-400% over past methods. We also find no increase in false detections rates. No prior knowledge of candidate companion locations is required to use MLOCI. On the other hand, while non-blind applications may yield linear combinations of science images that seem to increase the S/N of true sources by a factor >2, they can also yield false detections at high rates. This is a potential pitfall when trying to confirm marginal detections or to redetect point sources found in previous epochs. These findings are relevant to any method where the coefficients of the linear combination are considered tunable, e.g., LOCI and principal component analysis (PCA). Thus we recommend that false detection rates be analyzed when using these techniques. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (USA), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  11. Effect of Cu pad morphology on direct-Cu pillar formation in CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunmi; Kim, Areum; Cui, Eunwha; Lee, Ukjae; Son, Hyung Bin; Hahn, Sang June; Pyo, Sung Gyu

    2014-09-01

    We report the feasibility of forming Ni bumps directly on Cu pads in CMOS image sensor (CIS) logic elements formed by Cu wires with diameters of less than 65 nm. The direct Ni bump process proposed in this study simplifies the fabrication process and reduces costs by eliminating the need for Al pad process. In addition, this process can secure the margin of the final layer, enabling the realization of thin camera modules. In this study, we evaluated the effect of pad annealing on the direct formation of Ni bumps over Cu pads. The results suggest that the morphology of the Cu pad varies depending on the annealing sequence, and post-passivation annealing resulted in fewer defects than pad etch annealing. The shear stress of the Ni bumps was 57.77 mgf/m2, which is six times greater than the corresponding reference value. Furthermore, we evaluated the reliability of a chip with an anisotropic conductive film (ACF) and a non-conducting paste (NCP) by using high-temperature storage (HTS), thermal cycling (TC), and wet high-temperature storage (WHTS) reliability tests. The evaluation results suggest the absence of abnormalities in all samples. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. A common cis-acting sequence in the DiGeorge critical region regulates bi-directional transcription of UFD1L and CDC45L.

    PubMed

    Kunte, A; Ivey, K; Yamagishi, C; Garg, V; Yamagishi, H; Srivastava, D

    2001-10-01

    Two to three megabase deletions on chromosome 22q11 are the cytogenetic findings most commonly associated with cardiac and craniofacial defects in humans. The constellation of clinical findings associated with these deletions is termed the 22q11 deletion syndrome. We had earlier described a patient with the 22q11 deletion phenotype who was hemizygous for an atypical 20 kb microdeletion in this region. The deletion included coding regions of two genes organized head-to-head, UFD1L and CDC45L, along with an 884 bp CpG-rich intervening region. Based on this genomic organization, we hypothesized that both genes may be co-expressed and co-regulated by sequences within this region. We demonstrate that expression of both genes is enhanced in a similar pattern in precursors of structures affected by the deletion. The intergenic region is sufficient to direct transcription most strongly in the developing pharyngeal arches and limb buds of transgenic mice and can also direct bi-directional transcriptional activation in a neural crest-derived cell line. Deletion analyses revealed that a 404 bp fragment closest to UFD1L is necessary and sufficient to direct this bi-directional transcriptional activity. These results reveal the presence of a conserved regulatory region in the 22q11 deletion locus that can direct simultaneous transcription of genes involved in ubiquitin mediated protein processing (UFD1L) and cell cycle control (CDC45L).

  13. Astrophysical false positives in direct imaging for exoplanets: a white dwarf close to a rejuvenated star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurlo, A.; Vigan, A.; Hagelberg, J.; Desidera, S.; Chauvin, G.; Almenara, J. M.; Biazzo, K.; Bonnefoy, M.; Carson, J. C.; Covino, E.; Delorme, P.; D'Orazi, V.; Gratton, R.; Mesa, D.; Messina, S.; Moutou, C.; Segransan, D.; Turatto, M.; Udry, S.; Wildi, F.

    2013-06-01

    Context. As is the case for all techniques involved in the research for exoplanets, direct imaging has to take into account the probability of so-called astrophysical false positives, which are phenomena that mimic the signature of the objects we are seeking. Aims: In this work we present the case of a false positive found during a direct-imaging survey conducted with VLT/NACO. A promising exoplanet candidate was detected around the K2-type star HD 8049 in July 2010. Its contrast of ΔH = 7.05 at 1.57 arcsec allowed us to assume a 35 MJup companion at 50 projected AU, for the nominal system age and heliocentric distance. Methods: To check whether it was gravitationally bound to the host star, as opposed to an unrelated background object, we re-observed the system one year later and concluded a high probability of a bound system. We also used radial velocity measurements of the host star, spanning a time range of ~30 yr, to constrain the companion's mass and orbital properties, as well as to probe the host star's spectral age indicators and general spectral energy distribution. We also obtained U-band imaging with EFOSC and near-infrared spectroscopy for the companion. Results: Combining all these information we conclude that the companion of HD 8049 is a white dwarf (WD) with temperature Teff = 18 800 ± 2100 K and mass MWD = 0.56 ± 0.08 M⊙. The significant radial velocity trend combined with the imaging data indicates that the most probable orbit has a semi-major axis of about 50 AU. The discrepancy between the age indicators speaks against a bona-fide young star. The moderately high level of chromospheric activity and fast rotation, mimicking the properties of a young star, might be induced by the exchange of mass with the progenitor of the WD. This example demonstrates some of the challenges in determining accurate age estimates and identifications of faint companions. Based on observations collected at La Silla and Paranal Observatory, ESO (Chile): Programs

  14. Atmospheric Circulation of Brown Dwarfs and Directly Imaged Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, X.; Showman, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Growing observations of brown dwarfs (BDs) and directly imaged extrasolar giant planets (EGPs), such as brightness variability and surface maps have provided evidence for strong atmospheric circulation on these worlds. Previous studies that serve to understand the atmospheric circulation of BDs include modeling of convection from the interior and its interactions with stably stratified atmospheres. These models show that such interactions can drive an atmospheric circulation, forming zonal jets and/or vortices. However, these models are dry, not including condensation of various chemical species. Condensation of water has previously been shown to play an important role on driving the zonal jets on four giant planets in our solar system. As such, condensation cycles of various chemical species are believed to be an important source in driving the atmospheric circulation of BDs and directly imaged EGPs. Here we present results from three-dimensional simulations for the stably stratified atmospheres of BDs and EGPs based on a general circulation model that includes the effect of a condensate cycle. Large-scale latent heating and molecular weight effect due to condensation of a single species are treated explicitly. We examine the circulation patterns caused by large-scale latent heating which results from condensation of silicate vapor in hot dwarfs and water vapor in the cold dwarfs. By varying the abundance of condensable vapor and the radiative timescale, we conclude that under normal conditions of BDs (near 1x solar abundance and relatively short radiative timescale), latent heating alone by silicate vapors is unable to drive a global circulation, leaving a quiescent atmosphere, because of the suppression to moist instability by downward transport of dry air. Models with high abundance of condensates (~5x solar) and relatively long radiative timescale, which may be the case of directly imaged EGPs, tend to maintain an active hydrological cycle and develop zonal

  15. Direct Imaging of Exoplanets around Alpha Centauri and Other Multiple Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendek, E.; Thomas, S.; Belikov, R.

    2014-03-01

    We propose to demonstrate a new method to directly image planets in multiple-star systems such as Alpha Centauri. A (sun-like) star is 10 billion times brighter than an Earth-like planet that may be orbiting around it. In any real telescope, diffraction and glare from that star completely swamps the miniscule brightness of the planet, similar to how a searchlight swamps the light of a nearby firefly. Several starlight suppression systems have been demonstrated in the laboratory that can remove the leakage of light from a star down to 1010 contrast, enabling Earth-like planet detection [1], but only for single-star systems. These systems employ a combination of a coronagraph to suppress the star and a wavefront control system based on a deformable mirror (DM) to remove residual starlight (speckles) created by the imperfections of telescope optics. Removal of speckles by the DM can only occur up to the spatial frequency range of the deformable mirror (half- Nyquist). The challenge with double-star (or multi-star) systems is that the off-axis companion star lies outside the DM's control region and thus preventing the DM to remove the speckles from the off-axis star. Until now, it has been thought that removing the light of a companion star is impossible with current technology, excluding binary star systems from target lists of direct imaging missions, and so binary star systems are often excluded from target lists of direct imaging missions. Our solution uses the deformable mirror (DM) in a regime outside its nominal spatial control range, where the DM experiences what is typically a harmful side effect: aliasing. Our innovation is that we use aliasing as a feature, rather than a bug, modulating and removing speckles that are several Nyquist frequencies away from the off-axis star (while simultaneously removing the light from the on-axis star using conventional methods.) This solution potentially enables the detection of biomarkers on Earth-like planets (if they

  16. Evaluating the Improvement in Shear Wave Speed Image Quality Using Multidimensional Directional Filters in the Presence of Reflection Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Lipman, Samantha L.; Rouze, Ned C.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.

    2017-01-01

    Shear waves propagating through interfaces where there is a change in stiffness cause reflected waves that can lead to artifacts in shear wave speed (SWS) reconstructions. Two-dimensional (2-D) directional filters are commonly used to reduce in-plane reflected waves; however, SWS artifacts arise from both in- and out-of-imaging-plane reflected waves. Herein, we introduce 3-D shear wave reconstruction methods as an extension of the previous 2-D estimation methods and quantify the reduction in image artifacts through the use of volumetric SWS monitoring and 4-D-directional filters. A Gaussian acoustic radiation force impulse excitation was simulated in phantoms with Young’s modulus (E) of 3 kPa and a 5-mm spherical lesion with E = 6, 12, or 18.75 kPa. The 2-D-, 3-D-, and 4-D-directional filters were applied to the displacement profiles to reduce in-and out-of-plane reflected wave artifacts. Contrast-to-noise ratio and SWS bias within the lesion were calculated for each reconstructed SWS image to evaluate the image quality. For 2-D SWS image reconstructions, the 3-D-directional filters showed greater improvements in image quality than the 2-D filters, and the 4-D-directional filters showed marginal improvement over the 3-D filters. Although 4-D-directional filters can further reduce the impact of large magnitude out-of-plane reflection artifacts in SWS images, computational overhead and transducer costs to acquire 3-D data may outweigh the modest improvements in image quality. The 4-D-directional filters have the largest impact in reducing reflection artifacts in 3-D SWS volumes. PMID:28458448

  17. Evaluating the Improvement in Shear Wave Speed Image Quality Using Multidimensional Directional Filters in the Presence of Reflection Artifacts.

    PubMed

    Lipman, Samantha L; Rouze, Ned C; Palmeri, Mark L; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2016-08-01

    Shear waves propagating through interfaces where there is a change in stiffness cause reflected waves that can lead to artifacts in shear wave speed (SWS) reconstructions. Two-dimensional (2-D) directional filters are commonly used to reduce in-plane reflected waves; however, SWS artifacts arise from both in- and out-of-imaging-plane reflected waves. Herein, we introduce 3-D shear wave reconstruction methods as an extension of the previous 2-D estimation methods and quantify the reduction in image artifacts through the use of volumetric SWS monitoring and 4-D-directional filters. A Gaussian acoustic radiation force impulse excitation was simulated in phantoms with Young's modulus (E) of 3 kPa and a 5-mm spherical lesion with E = 6, 12, or 18.75 kPa. The 2-D-, 3-D-, and 4-D-directional filters were applied to the displacement profiles to reduce in-and out-of-plane reflected wave artifacts. Contrast-to-noise ratio and SWS bias within the lesion were calculated for each reconstructed SWS image to evaluate the image quality. For 2-D SWS image reconstructions, the 3-D-directional filters showed greater improvements in image quality than the 2-D filters, and the 4-D-directional filters showed marginal improvement over the 3-D filters. Although 4-D-directional filters can further reduce the impact of large magnitude out-of-plane reflection artifacts in SWS images, computational overhead and transducer costs to acquire 3-D data may outweigh the modest improvements in image quality. The 4-D-directional filters have the largest impact in reducing reflection artifacts in 3-D SWS volumes.

  18. Segmentation of a class of ophthalmological images using a directional variance operator and co-occurrence arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paplinski, Andrew P.; Boyce, James F.

    1997-11-01

    The posterior capsule opacification images considered are images of the membrane encapsulating an artificial lens implanted during cataract surgery in place of the natural lens. The images are taken to monitor the state of the patient's vision after the surgery. Subsequent to the surgery, the membrane of the posterior capsule may become opacified, thus degrading the patient's vision. We discuss the methodology used and the results obtained in the segmentation of the images into transparent and opacified regions. The opacification is primarily characterized by its texture, therefore a directional standard deviation operator is applied to an image giving rise to a family of 'conjugate' images. From these images, the multi-dimensional histogram (co- occurrence) array is calculated and subsequently approximated by Gaussian distributions to form the basis for the segmentation step.

  19. Jupiter's Phase Variations from Cassini: a testbed for future direct-imaging missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorga, Laura; Jackiewicz, Jason; Rages, Kathy; West, Robert A.; Knowles, Ben; Lewis, Nikole K.; Marley, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    Phase curves are important for our understanding of the energy balance and scattering behavior of an exoplanet's atmosphere. In preparation for future direct-imaging missions of Jupiter-like planets, in particular WFIRST, we present phase curves of Jupiter from 0--150 degrees as measured in multiple optical bandpasses by Cassini/ISS during the Millennium flyby of Jupiter in late 2000 to early 2001. We demonstrate and confirm that Jupiter is not well represented by a Lambertian phase function and that its color is more variable with phase angle than predicted by Jupiter-like models. This indicates that a Jupiter-twin observed near quadrature may not be as straightforward to classify as a Jupiter-like planet and comment on the implications for future missions.

  20. Direct imaging of domain wall pinning in artificially created asymmetric potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, D. E.; O'Brien, L.; Ladak, S.; Zeissler, K.; Tyliszczak, T.; Jausovec, A.-V.; Zeng, H. T.; Lewis, E. R.; Sampaio, J.; Fernandez-Pacheco, A.; Petit, D.; Cowburn, R. P.; Branford, W. R.

    2011-03-01

    Domain walls (DWs) in ferromagnetic nanowires are ideal candidates for a wide variety of technological applications including high density data storage devices. To realise functional DW devices the processes associated with DW pinning must be understood and controlled. Magnetostatic pinning of DWs has already been observed experimentally using spatially resolved MOKE measurements. Using high resolution scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) we were able to directly image DWs in NiFe nanowires pinned in asymmetric potentials which were created by nano-patterning additional ferromagnetic wires perpendicular to the DW conduit. Tailoring the pinning potential in this way allows us to probe the rigidity of the DW in the region of the pinning site, increasing our understanding of DW deformation in magnetostatic traps and paving the way for future commercial applications.

  1. Uniformity of LED light illumination in application to direct imaging lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ting-Ming; Chang, Shenq-Tsong; Tsay, Ho-Lin; Hsu, Ming-Ying; Chen, Fong-Zhi

    2016-09-01

    Direct imaging has widely applied in lithography for a long time because of its simplicity and easy-maintenance. Although this method has limitation of lithography resolution, it is still adopted in industries. Uniformity of UV irradiance for a designed area is an important requirement. While mercury lamps were used as the light source in the early stage, LEDs have drawn a lot of attention for consideration from several aspects. Although LED has better and better performance, arrays of LEDs are required to obtain desired irradiance because of limitation of brightness for a single LED. Several effects are considered that affect the uniformity of UV irradiance such as alignment of optics, temperature of each LED, performance of each LED due to production uniformity, and pointing of LED module. Effects of these factors are considered to study the uniformity of LED Light Illumination. Numerical analysis is performed by assuming a serious of control factors to have a better understanding of each factor.

  2. Direct Imaging of Carbon Nanotube Liquid-Crystalline Phase Development in True Solutions.

    PubMed

    Kleinerman, Olga; Liberman, Lucy; Behabtu, Natnael; Pasquali, Matteo; Cohen, Yachin; Talmon, Yeshayahu

    2017-04-13

    Using direct-imaging cryogenic transmission and scanning electron microscopy, we show different stages of liquid-crystalline phase development in progressively more concentrated solutions of carbon nanotubes in chlorosulfonic acid: a dilute phase of individually dissolved carbon nanotubes; semidilute and concentrated isotropic phases; coexisting concentrated isotropic and nematic phases in local equilibrium with each other; and a fully liquid-crystalline phase. Nanometric resolution of cryogenic electron microscopy reveals carbon nanotube self-assembly into liquid-crystalline domains of several nanometers in width at very early stages. We find significant differences in carbon nanotube liquid-crystalline domain morphology as a function of the carbon nanotube aspect ratio, diameter, and degree of purity.

  3. Strain distribution in InP grown on patterned Si: Direct visualization by cathodoluminescence wavelength imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundmann, M.; Christen, J.; Heinrichsdorff, F.; Krost, A.; Bimberg, D.

    1994-02-01

    InP has been grown on patterned Si substrates using a low temperature metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process which insures compatibility with integrated circuit technology. Two different patterns are investigated: wet chemically etched V-grooves and SiO2-masked dry etched grooves. Reduction of feature size leads to drastic defect reduction and quantum efficiencies up to those of homoepitaxially grown InP. Strain relaxation and quantum efficiency are directly visualized by cathololuminescence wavelength imaging. On (001)-and {111}-facets of V-grooves distinct relaxation of the tensile thermally induced strain are found. Surprisingly, in the bottom of V-grooves, close to or even at the InP/Si interface, a high quantum efficiency is found with a recombination time constant typical for thick InP layers of high crystallographic quality.

  4. Direct imaging of Joule heating dynamics and temperature profiling inside a carbon nanotube interconnect.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro M F J; Gautam, Ujjal K; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2011-08-09

    Understanding resistive (or Joule) heating in fundamental nanoelectronic blocks, such as carbon nanotubes, remains a major challenge, particularly in regard to their structural and thermal variations during prolonged periods of electrical stress. Here we show real-time imaging of the associated effects of Joule heating in the channel of carbon nanotube interconnects. First, electrical contacts to nanotubes entirely filled with a sublimable material are made inside a transmission electron microscope. On exposure to a high current density, resistive hotspots are identified on (or near) the contact points. These later migrate and expand along the carbon nanotube, as indicated by the localized sublimation of the encapsulated material. Using the hotspot edges as markers, it is possible to estimate the internal temperature profiles of the nanotube. Simple and direct, our method provides remarkable spatial and temporal insights into the dynamics of resistive hotspots and millisecond-paced thermal variations occurring inside nanoscaled tubular interconnects.

  5. Effect of condensate cycles in driving atmospheric circulation on brown dwarfs and directly imaged giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xianyu; Showman, Adam

    2014-11-01

    Growing observations of brown dwarfs and directly imaged giant planets, including properties of the L/T transition, chemical disequilibrium, brightness variability, and surface maps have provided evidence for strong atmospheric circulation on these worlds. Previous studies that serve to understand the atmospheric circulation of brown dwarfs include modeling of convection from the interior both in a two-dimensional and global fashion, a two-layer shallow water model and a global circulation model with dry thermal perturbation at the bottom of atmosphere. These models show that interactions between the stably stratified layer and the convective interior can drive an atmospheric circulation, including zonal jets and/or vortices. However, these models are dry models, not including the condensation cycles such as silicate and iron in hot dwarfs. Condensation of water has previously been shown to play an important role on driving the zonal jets on four giant planets in our solar system. As such, condensation cycles of various species is believed to be an important source in driving the atmospheric circulation of brown dwarfs and directly imaged planets as well. Here we present results from three-dimensional simulations for the stably stratified atmospheres of brown dwarfs based on a general circulation model that includes the effect of a condensate cycle. Large-scale latent heating and molecular weight effect due to condensation of a single species are treated explicitly in our model. We examine the atmospheric circulation patterns of brown dwarfs caused by large-scale latent heating that results from condensation of silicates in hot dwarfs and water in the cold dwarfs. By varying the parameters such as abundances of condensates, effective temperature and rotational period, we explore possible configurations of the circulation, and determine implications for the observed cloud patchiness and brightness variability for brown dwarfs.

  6. A New Omni-Directional EMAT for Ultrasonic Lamb Wave Tomography Imaging of Metallic Plate Defects

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Songling; Wei, Zheng; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Shen

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new omni-directional electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) for the ultrasonic Lamb wave (ULW) tomography imaging (TI) of defects in metallic plates. The proposed EMAT is composed of a permanent magnet and a coil with a contra-flexure structure. This new EMAT coil structure is used for omni-directional ULW transmission and reception and ULW TI for the first time. The theoretical background and the working principles of this EMAT are presented and analyzed. The experimental results of its use on a 3 mm thick aluminum plate indicate that the EMAT with a contra-flexure coil (CFC) can transmit and receive a pure single A0 mode ULW with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Thus, the extraction of the projection data used for ULW TI may be performed accurately. The circumferential consistency of the projection data is only slightly influenced by the distortion of the eddy current field that is induced by the new CFC with an irregular shape. When the new EMAT array is used for ULW TI using the cross-hole method and SIRT arithmetic, a desirable imaging quality can be achieved, and the estimated size of an artificial corrosion defect agreed well with its actual value. The relation between the reconstruction resolution and the number of the new EMATs used is analyzed. More TI experiments are carried out when the aluminum plate defect is in two different locations relative to the EMAT array, for the further investigation of the performances of the new EMATs. PMID:24561398

  7. Spacer-free BODIPY fluorogens in antimicrobial peptides for direct imaging of fungal infection in human tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mendive-Tapia, Lorena; Zhao, Can; Akram, Ahsan R.; Preciado, Sara; Albericio, Fernando; Lee, Martin; Serrels, Alan; Kielland, Nicola; Read, Nick D; Lavilla, Rodolfo; Vendrell, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent antimicrobial peptides are promising structures for in situ, real-time imaging of fungal infection. Here we report a fluorogenic probe to image Aspergillus fumigatus directly in human pulmonary tissue. We have developed a fluorogenic Trp-BODIPY amino acid with a spacer-free C-C linkage between Trp and a BODIPY fluorogen, which shows remarkable fluorescence enhancement in hydrophobic microenvironments. The incorporation of our fluorogenic amino acid in short antimicrobial peptides does not impair their selectivity for fungal cells, and enables rapid and direct fungal imaging without any washing steps. We have optimized the stability of our probes in human samples to perform multi-photon imaging of A. fumigatus in ex vivo human tissue. The incorporation of our unique BODIPY fluorogen in biologically relevant peptides will accelerate the development of novel imaging probes with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26956772

  8. Multi-Wave and Hybrid Imaging Techniques: A New Direction for Nondestructive Testing and Structural Health Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuhua; Deng, Yiming; Cao, Jing; Xiong, Xin; Bai, Libing; Li, Zhaojun

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the state-of-the-art multi-wave and hybrid imaging techniques in the field of nondestructive evaluation and structural health monitoring were comprehensively reviewed. A new direction for assessment and health monitoring of various structures by capitalizing the advantages of those imaging methods was discussed. Although sharing similar system configurations, the imaging physics and principles of multi-wave phenomena and hybrid imaging methods are inherently different. After a brief introduction of nondestructive evaluation (NDE), structure health monitoring (SHM) and their related challenges, several recent advances that have significantly extended imaging methods from laboratory development into practical applications were summarized, followed by conclusions and discussion on future directions. PMID:24287536

  9. Automatic Evaluation of Collagen Fiber Directions from Polarized Light Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Novak, Kamil; Polzer, Stanislav; Tichy, Michal; Bursa, Jiri

    2015-08-01

    Mechanical properties of the arterial wall depend largely on orientation and density of collagen fiber bundles. Several methods have been developed for observation of collagen orientation and density; the most frequently applied collagen-specific manual approach is based on polarized light (PL). However, it is very time consuming and the results are operator dependent. We have proposed a new automated method for evaluation of collagen fiber direction from two-dimensional polarized light microscopy images (2D PLM). The algorithm has been verified against artificial images and validated against manual measurements. Finally the collagen content has been estimated. The proposed algorithm was capable of estimating orientation of some 35 k points in 15 min when applied to aortic tissue and over 500 k points in 35 min for Achilles tendon. The average angular disagreement between each operator and the algorithm was -9.3±8.6° and -3.8±8.6° in the case of aortic tissue and -1.6±6.4° and 2.6±7.8° for Achilles tendon. Estimated mean collagen content was 30.3±5.8% and 94.3±2.7% for aortic media and Achilles tendon, respectively. The proposed automated approach is operator independent and several orders faster than manual measurements and therefore has the potential to replace manual measurements of collagen orientation via PLM.

  10. Flight demonstration of a milliarcsecond pointing system for direct exoplanet imaging.

    PubMed

    Mendillo, Christopher B; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy A; Hicks, Brian A; Lane, Benjamin F

    2012-10-10

    We present flight results from the optical pointing control system onboard the Planetary Imaging Concept Testbed Using a Rocket Experiment (PICTURE) sounding rocket. PICTURE (NASA mission number: 36.225 UG) was launched on 8 October 2011, from White Sands Missile Range. It attempted to directly image the exozodiacal dust disk of ϵ Eridani (K2V, 3.22 pc) down to an inner radius of 1.5 AU using a visible nulling coronagraph. The rocket attitude control system (ACS) provided 627 milliarcsecond (mas) RMS body pointing (~2'' peak-to-valley). The PICTURE fine pointing system (FPS) successfully stabilized the telescope beam to 5.1 mas (0.02λ/D) RMS using an angle tracker camera and fast steering mirror. This level of pointing stability is comparable to that of the Hubble Space Telescope. We present the hardware design of the FPS, a description of the limiting noise sources and a power spectral density analysis of the FPS and rocket ACS in-flight performance.

  11. Slipping objects in image registration: improved motion field estimation with direction-dependent regularization.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Ehrhardt, Jan; Werner, Rene; Handels, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    The computation of accurate motion fields is a crucial aspect in 4D medical imaging. It is usually done using a non-linear registration without further modeling of physiological motion properties. However, a globally homogeneous smoothing (regularization) of the motion field during the registration process can contradict the characteristics of motion dynamics. This is particularly the case when two organs slip along each other which leads to discontinuities in the motion field. In this paper, we present a diffusion-based model for incorporating physiological knowledge in image registration. By decoupling normal- and tangential-directed smoothing, we are able to estimate slipping motion at the organ borders while ensuring smooth motion fields in the inside and preventing gaps to arise in the field. We evaluate our model focusing on the estimation of respiratory lung motion. By accounting for the discontinuous motion of visceral and parietal pleurae, we are able to show a significant increase of registration accuracy with respect to the target registration error (TRE).

  12. Direct Imaging and Interferometric Followup of Our Closest Low-Mass Stellar Neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J.

    2014-04-01

    Luhman 16 AB is a L/T brown dwarf binary system at only 2 pc from us. Discovered a year ago thanks to WISE (Luhman 2013), it has already been extensively studied (spectral types, variability, cloud map, etc. a total of 8 refereed publications). In this contribution I tackle the possibility of following up such target with the state of the art high contrast imaging and interferometric techniques. Though the system isn't young, it is so close and its components have mild effective temperature that we can probe for planetary-mass companions down to solar system scales. I will present results from our deep NACO L'-band search and expose our strategy and attempt with VLTI/PIONIER H-band (four 8m telescopes) to reach the habitable zone (~0.005 AU) and provide direct upper limits on the diameter of both Luhman A and B. Finally I will discuss the possibility of tackling such objects with the coming generation of high contrast imagers.

  13. Deconvolving images with unknown boundaries using the alternating direction method of multipliers.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Mariana S C; Figueiredo, Mario

    2013-08-01

    The alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) has recently sparked interest as a flexible and efficient optimization tool for inverse problems, namely, image deconvolution and reconstruction under non-smooth convex regularization. ADMM achieves state-of-the-art speed by adopting a divide and conquer strategy, wherein a hard problem is split into simpler, efficiently solvable sub-problems (e.g., using fast Fourier or wavelet transforms, or simple proximity operators). In deconvolution, one of these sub-problems involves a matrix inversion (i.e., solving a linear system), which can be done efficiently (in the discrete Fourier domain) if the observation operator is circulant, i.e., under periodic boundary conditions. This paper extends ADMM-based image deconvolution to the more realistic scenario of unknown boundary, where the observation operator is modeled as the composition of a convolution (with arbitrary boundary conditions) with a spatial mask that keeps only pixels that do not depend on the unknown boundary. The proposed approach also handles, at no extra cost, problems that combine the recovery of missing pixels (i.e., inpainting) with deconvolution. We show that the resulting algorithms inherit the convergence guarantees of ADMM and illustrate its performance on non-periodic deblurring (with and without inpainting of interior pixels) under total-variation and frame-based regularization.

  14. SPOTS: Search for Planets Orbiting Two Stars A Direct Imaging Survey for Circumbinary Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, C.; Desidera, S.; Bergfors, C.; Boccaletti, A.; Bonavita, M.; Carson, J. C.; Feldt, M.; Goto, M.; Henning, T.; Janson, M.; Mordasini, C.

    2013-09-01

    Over the last decade, a vast amount of effort has been poured into gaining a better understanding of the fre- quency and diversity of extrasolar planets. Yet, most of these studies focus on single stars, leaving the population of planets in multiple systems poorly explored. This investigational gap persists despite the fact that both theoretical and observational evidence suggest that such systems represent a significant fraction of the overall planet population. With SPOTS, the Search for Planets Orbiting Two Stars, we are now carrying out the first direct imaging campaign dedicated to circumbinary planets. Our long-term goals are to survey 66 spectroscopic binaries in H-band with VLT NaCo and VLT SPHERE over the course of 4-5 years. This will establish first constraints on the wide-orbit circumbinary planet population, and may yield the spectacular first image of a bona fide circumbinary planet. Here we report on the results of the first two years of the SPOTS survey, as well as on our ongoing observation program.

  15. Direct spectral imaging of plasmonic nanohole arrays for real-time sensing.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Spencer T; Rich, Isabel S; Lindquist, Nathan C

    2016-05-06

    Plasmon-enhanced optical transmission through arrays of nano-structured holes has led to the development of a new generation of optical sensors. In this paper, to dramatically simplify the standard optical setups of these sensors, we position the nanoholes, an LED illumination source and a spacer layer directly on top of a CMOS imager chip. Transmitted light diffracts from the nanohole array, spreading into a spectrum over the space of a millimeter to land on the imager as a full spectrum. Our chip is used as a sensor in both a liquid and a gas environment. The spectrum is monitored in real-time and the plasmon-enhanced transmission peaks shift upon exposure to different concentrations of glycerol-in-water solutions or ethanol vapors in nitrogen. While liquids provide good refractive index contrast for sensing, to enhance sensitivity to solvent vapors, we filled the nanoholes with solvatochromic dyes. This on-chip solution circumvents the bulky components (e.g. microscopes, coupling optics, and spectrometers) needed for traditional plasmonic sensing setups, uses the nanohole array as both the sensing surface and a diffraction grating, and maintains good sensitivity. Finally, we show simultaneous sensing from two side-by-side locations, demonstrating potential for multiplexing and lab on a chip integration.

  16. A method of directly extracting multiwave angle-domain common-image gathers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianguang; Wang, Yun

    2017-08-01

    Angle-domain common-image gathers (ADCIGs) can provide an effective way for migration velocity analysis and amplitude versus angle analysis in oil-gas seismic exploration. On the basis of multi-component Gaussian beam prestack depth migration (GB-PSDM), an alternative method of directly extracting multiwave ADCIGs is presented in this paper. We first introduce multi-component GB-PSDM, where a wavefield separation is proceeded to obtain the separated PP- and PS-wave seismic records before migration imaging for multiwave seismic data. Then, the principle of extracting PP- and PS-ADCIGs using GB-PSDM is presented. The propagation angle can be obtained using the real-value travel time of Gaussian beam in the course of GB-PSDM, which can be used to calculate the incidence and reflection angles. Two kinds of ADCIGs can be extracted for the PS-wave, one of which is P-wave incidence ADCIGs and the other one is S-wave reflection ADCIGs. In this paper, we use the incident angle to plot the ADCIGs for both PP- and PS-waves. Finally, tests of synthetic examples show that the method introduced here is accurate and effective.

  17. Direct imaging of a two-dimensional silica glass on graphene.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pinshane Y; Kurasch, Simon; Srivastava, Anchal; Skakalova, Viera; Kotakoski, Jani; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V; Hovden, Robert; Mao, Qingyun; Meyer, Jannik C; Smet, Jurgen; Muller, David A; Kaiser, Ute

    2012-02-08

    Large-area graphene substrates provide a promising lab bench for synthesizing, manipulating, and characterizing low-dimensional materials, opening the door to high-resolution analyses of novel structures, such as two-dimensional (2D) glasses, that cannot be exfoliated and may not occur naturally. Here, we report the accidental discovery of a 2D silica glass supported on graphene. The 2D nature of this material enables the first atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy of a glass, producing images that strikingly resemble Zachariasen's original 1932 cartoon models of 2D continuous random network glasses. Atomic-resolution electron spectroscopy identifies the glass as SiO(2) formed from a bilayer of (SiO(4))(2-) tetrahedra and without detectable covalent bonding to the graphene. From these images, we directly obtain ring statistics and pair distribution functions that span short-, medium-, and long-range order. Ab initio calculations indicate that van der Waals interactions with graphene energetically stabilizes the 2D structure with respect to bulk SiO(2). These results demonstrate a new class of 2D glasses that can be applied in layered graphene devices and studied at the atomic scale.

  18. Mapping the crop row direction by using Formosat-2 panchromatic images.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais-Sicre, C.; Baup, F.; Fieuzal, R.

    2012-04-01

    The detection of crop row direction is a key factor for landscape analyses from satellite images. In optical and microwave frequency domains, Kimes and al, 1983 and Ulaby and al, 1984 shown the strong impact of the crop row orientation on the optical reflectance (Bidirectional reflectance distribution function) and on the radar backscattering coefficient (from L to X band). Consequently, it is particularly important to consider this parameter for remote sensing analyses but also in the physical and empirical approaches intended to the estimation of biophysical parameters (vegetation biomass, humidity, soil moisture content, tillage, runoff, erosion…) at the agricultural field scale. The studied area is located near Toulouse (South-west of France) in a region of alluvial plains and hills, which are mostly mixed farming and governed by a temperate climate with an annual rainfall of about 600mm per year. The region is composed of a wide variety of irrigated and non-irrigated crops (wheat, sunflower, corn, hemp…). Agricultural fields are strongly contrasted in terms of geometric forms, surface area (from 1ha to 50ha), type of soils, slopes... The remote sensing analyses are based on a time series of 13 panchromatic Formosat-2 images, acquired with a spatial resolution of 2 meters, and processed with a TOA (Top of Atmosphere) radiometric correction. Ground data are collected, the closest of satellite acquisitions, over 232 plots during the MCM'10 experiment (Multispectral Crop Monitoring, http://www.cesbio.ups-tlse.fr/us/mcm.html) conducted by the CESBIO laboratory in 2010. The proposed approach consists in estimating row direction, by using directional convolution filters and operators of mathematical morphology. First of all, one date capabilities is discussed, improved by multi-temporal analyses. Then, an original method is proposed for extrapolating the estimated row direction to the scene (over the Formosat-2 swath). Best results, obtained for multi

  19. Skin cancer texture analysis of OCT images based on Haralick, fractal dimension and the complex directional field features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raupov, Dmitry S.; Myakinin, Oleg O.; Bratchenko, Ivan A.; Kornilin, Dmitry V.; Zakharov, Valery P.; Khramov, Alexander G.

    2016-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is usually employed for the measurement of tumor topology, which reflects structural changes of a tissue. We investigated the possibility of OCT in detecting changes using a computer texture analysis method based on Haralick texture features, fractal dimension and the complex directional field method from different tissues. These features were used to identify special spatial characteristics, which differ healthy tissue from various skin cancers in cross-section OCT images (B-scans). Speckle reduction is an important pre-processing stage for OCT image processing. In this paper, an interval type-II fuzzy anisotropic diffusion algorithm for speckle noise reduction in OCT images was used. The Haralick texture feature set includes contrast, correlation, energy, and homogeneity evaluated in different directions. A box-counting method is applied to compute fractal dimension of investigated tissues. Additionally, we used the complex directional field calculated by the local gradient methodology to increase of the assessment quality of the diagnosis method. The complex directional field (as well as the "classical" directional field) can help describe an image as set of directions. Considering to a fact that malignant tissue grows anisotropically, some principal grooves may be observed on dermoscopic images, which mean possible existence of principal directions on OCT images. Our results suggest that described texture features may provide useful information to differentiate pathological from healthy patients. The problem of recognition melanoma from nevi is decided in this work due to the big quantity of experimental data (143 OCT-images include tumors as Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC), Malignant Melanoma (MM) and Nevi). We have sensitivity about 90% and specificity about 85%. Further research is warranted to determine how this approach may be used to select the regions of interest automatically.

  20. Exoplanet Meteorology: Characterizing The Atmospheres Of Directly Imaged Sub-Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Abhijith

    2017-05-01

    The field of exoplanet science has matured over the past two decades with over 3500 confirmed exoplanets. However, many fundamental questions regarding the composition, and formation mechanism remain unanswered. Atmospheres are a window into the properties of a planet, and spectroscopic studies can help resolve many of these questions. For the first part of my dissertation, I participated in two studies of the atmospheres of brown dwarfs to search for weather variations. To understand the evolution of weather on brown dwarfs we conducted a multi- epoch study monitoring four cool brown dwarfs to search for photometric variability. These cool brown dwarfs are predicted to have salt and sulfide clouds condensing in their upper atmosphere and we detected one high amplitude variable. Combining observations for all T5 and later brown dwarfs we note a possible correlation between variability and cloud opacity.For the second half of my thesis, I focused on characterizing the atmospheres of directly imaged exoplanets. In the first study Hubble Space Telescope data on HR8799, in wavelengths unobservable from the ground, provide constraints on the presence of clouds in the outer planets. Next, I present research done in collaboration with the Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey (GPIES) team including an exploration of the instrument contrast against environmental parameters, and an examination of the environment of the planet in the HD 106906 system. By analyzing archival HST data and examining the near-infrared colors of HD 106906b, we conclude that the companion shows weak evidence of a circumplanetary dust disk or cloud. Finally, I measure the properties of the low mass directly imaged planet 51 Eridani b. We combined published J, H spectra with updated LP photometry, new K1, K2 spectra, and MS photometry. The new data confirms that the planet has redder than similar pectral type objects, which might be due to the planet still transitioning from to L-to-T. Model

  1. The International Deep Planet Survey. II. The frequency of directly imaged giant exoplanets with stellar mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galicher, R.; Marois, C.; Macintosh, B.; Zuckerman, B.; Barman, T.; Konopacky, Q.; Song, I.; Patience, J.; Lafrenière, D.; Doyon, R.; Nielsen, E. L.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Radial velocity and transit methods are effective for the study of short orbital period exoplanets but they hardly probe objects at large separations for which direct imaging can be used. Aims: We carried out the international deep planet survey of 292 young nearby stars to search for giant exoplanets and determine their frequency. Methods: We developed a pipeline for a uniform processing of all the data that we have recorded with NIRC2/Keck II, NIRI/Gemini North, NICI/Gemini South, and NACO/VLT for 14 yr. The pipeline first applies cosmetic corrections and then reduces the speckle intensity to enhance the contrast in the images. Results: The main result of the international deep planet survey is the discovery of the HR 8799 exoplanets. We also detected 59 visual multiple systems including 16 new binary stars and 2 new triple stellar systems, as well as 2279 point-like sources. We used Monte Carlo simulations and the Bayesian theorem to determine that 1.05+2.80-0.70% of stars harbor at least one giant planet between 0.5 and 14 MJ and between 20 and 300 AU. This result is obtained assuming uniform distributions of planet masses and semi-major axes. If we consider power law distributions as measured for close-in planets instead, the derived frequency is 2.30+5.95-1.55%, recalling the strong impact of assumptions on Monte Carlo output distributions. We also find no evidence that the derived frequency depends on the mass of the hosting star, whereas it does for close-in planets. Conclusions: The international deep planet survey provides a database of confirmed background sources that may be useful for other exoplanet direct imaging surveys. It also puts new constraints on the number of stars with at least one giant planet reducing by a factor of two the frequencies derived by almost all previous works. Tables 11-15 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  2. Direct imaging of Pt single atoms adsorbed on TiO2 (110) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chang, Teng-Yuan; Tanaka, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Ryo; Toyoura, Kazuaki; Matsunaga, Katsuyuki; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Shibata, Naoya

    2014-01-08

    Noble metal nanoparticles (e.g., gold and platinum) supported on TiO2 surfaces are utilized in many technological applications such as heterogeneous catalysts. To fully understand their enhanced catalytic activity, it is essential to unravel the interfacial interaction between the metal atoms and TiO2 surfaces at the level of atomic dimensions. However, it has been extremely difficult to directly characterize the atomic-scale structures that result when individual metal atoms are adsorbed on the TiO2 surfaces. Here, we show direct atomic-resolution images of individual Pt atoms adsorbed on TiO2 (110) surfaces using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Subangstrom spatial resolution enables us to identify five different Pt atom adsorption sites o