Science.gov

Sample records for direct product experience

  1. Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production by Direct Sunlight: A Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koca, Atif; Sahin, Musa

    2003-11-01

    The demand for hydrogen will increase within the next decades as a result of the necessity to produce clean and environmentally and economically accepted fuels from natural and renewable energy resources. In principle, hydrogen has the potential to play an important role in future energy systems because of the diversity of its applications, the variety of ways in which it can be stored, its general environmental advantages, and especially because of the possibility of producing hydrogen by splitting water using photocatalysts and solar energy. Methods and techniques of photocatalytic reactions are covered in some detail in many undergraduate chemistry programs. However, many times in instructional settings, little attention is given to how it is used for the production of hydrogen. In the present investigation a photocatalytic hydrogen production experiment suitable for use in undergraduate chemistry laboratories is described. The experiment can be used to introduce students to the concept of a renewable and sustainable hydrogen energy system of the future, as well as its production techniques, and to demonstrate the use of a CdS/ZnS photocatalyst system for photocatalytic hydrogen production from direct sunlight.

  2. Searches for direct stop production within the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondero, Paolo; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC, in conjunction with the discovery of the Higgs boson is looking for signs of physics which go beyond the Standard Model of Electroweak interactions. Among possible theories for physics beyond Standard Model, Supersymmetry seems to be the most promising one. This theory indeed addresses the Standard Model naturalness problem and offers a perfect candidate for the dark matter. Within this scenario the search for a supersymmetric partner of the top quark, called stop, plays a key role. The ATLAS Experiment has developed a dedicated strategy for the discovery of this particle, focusing on achieving a complete coverage of the available parameter space for this particle, based on the combined search for all of its possible decay modes. The results obtained using the complete ATLAS 2012 statistics will be presented, targeting different decay modes and explaining the procedure to obtain the exclusion limits on the existence of a supersymmetric partner of the top quark at the electroweak scale.

  3. Direct dynamics simulations of the product channels and atomistic mechanisms for the OH(-) + CH3I reaction. Comparison with experiment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jing; Sun, Rui; Siebert, Matthew R; Otto, Rico; Wester, Roland; Hase, William L

    2013-08-15

    Electronic structure and direct dynamics calculations were used to study the potential energy surface and atomic-level dynamics for the OH(-) + CH3I reactions. The results are compared with crossed molecular beam, ion imaging experiments. The DFT/B97-1/ECP/d level of theory gives reaction energetics in good agreement with experiment and higher level calculations, and it was used for the direct dynamics simulations that were performed for reactant collision energies of 2.0, 1.0, 0.5, and 0.05 eV. Five different pathways are observed in the simulations, forming CH3OH + I(-), CH2I(-) + H2O, CH2 + I(-) + H2O, IOH(-) + CH3, and [CH3--I--OH](-). The SN2 first pathway and the proton-transfer second pathway dominate the reaction dynamics. Though the reaction energetics favor the SN2 pathway, the proton-transfer pathway is more important except for the lowest collision energy. The relative ion yield determined from the simulations is in overall good agreement with experiment. Both the SN2 and proton-transfer pathways occur via direct rebound, direct stripping, and indirect mechanisms. Except for the highest collision energy, 70-90% of the indirect reaction for the SN2 pathway occurs via formation of the hydrogen-bonded OH(-)---HCH2I prereaction complex. For the proton-transfer pathway the indirect reaction is more complex with the roundabout mechanism and formation of the OH(-)---HCH2I and CH2I(-)---HOH complexes contributing to the reaction. The majority of the SN2 reaction is direct at 2.0, 1.0, and 0.5 eV, dominated by stripping. At 0.05 eV the two direct mechanisms and the indirect mechanisms have nearly equal contributions. The majority of the proton-transfer pathway is direct stripping at 2.0, 1.0, and 0.5 eV, but the majority of the reaction is indirect at 0.05 eV. The product relative translational energy distributions are in good agreement with experiment for both the SN2 and proton-transfer pathways. For both, direct reaction preferentially transfers the product

  4. Direct thermal water splitting by concentrated solar radiation for hydrogen production. Phase O: Proof of concept experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genequand, P.

    1980-01-01

    The direct production of hydrogen from water and solar energy concentrated into a high temperature aperture is described. A solar powered reactor able to dissociate water vapor and to separate the reaction product at high temperature was developed, and direct water splitting has been achieved in a laboratory reactor. Water vapor and radiative heating from a carbon dioxide laser are fed into the reactor, and water vapor enriched in hydrogen and water vapor enriched in oxygen are produced. The enriched water vapors are separated through a separation membrane, a small disc of zirconium dioxide heated to a range of 1800 k to 2800 k. To avoid water vapor condensation within the reactor, the total pressure within the reactor was limited to 0.15 torr. A few modifications would enable the reactor to be operated at an increased pressure of a few torrs. More substantial modifications would allow for a reaction pressure of 0.1 atmosphere.

  5. Learning to dislike safe water products: results from a randomized controlled trial of the effects of direct and peer experience on willingness to pay.

    PubMed

    Luoto, Jill; Mahmud, Minhaj; Albert, Jeff; Luby, Stephen; Najnin, Nusrat; Unicomb, Leanne; Levine, David I

    2012-06-05

    Low-cost point-of-use (POU) safe water products have the potential to reduce waterborne illness, but adoption by the global poor remains low. We performed an eight-month randomized trial of four low-cost household water treatment products in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Intervention households (n = 600) received repeated educational messages about the importance of drinking safe water along with consecutive two-month free trials with each of four POU products in random order. Households randomly assigned to the control group (n = 200) did not receive free products or repeated educational messages. Households' willingness to pay for these products was quite low on average (as measured by bids in an incentive-compatible real-money auction), although a modest share was willing to pay the actual or expected retail price for low-cost chlorine-based products. Furthermore, contrary to our hypotheses that both one's own personal experience and the influence of one's peers would increase consumers' willingness to pay, direct experience significantly decreased mean bids by 18-55% for three of the four products and had no discernible effect on the fourth. Neighbor experience also did not increase bids. Widespread dissemination of safe water products is unlikely until we better understand the preferences and aspirations of these at-risk populations.

  6. Production-scale Direct Oxide Reduction demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Humiston, T.J.; Santi, D.J.; Long, J.L.; Thomas, R.L.; Delaney, I.C.

    1989-01-23

    A detailed, statistically valid, examination of the direct oxide reduction parameters affecting process yield and purity was planned and executed. Guidelines for attaining yields approaching 100% are presented. Feed oxide, percent excess calcium, and stirrer design affected yield and product purity. Experiments were performed in production-scale equipment utilizing 800 grams of plutonium dioxide per charge. 1 ref., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Direct Absorption Receiver flow experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, J. M.; Tyner, C. E.; Couch, W. A.

    1987-09-01

    In a solar central receiver system Direct Absorption Receiver (DAR), the heat absorbing fluid (a blackened molten nitrate salt) flows in a thin film down a vertical panel (rather than through tubes as in conventional receiver designs) and absorbs the concentrated solar flux directly. To better understand flow phenomena in this type of receiver, we are conducting flow tests using water (because its flow properties are similar to molten salt) and a 3 MWt solar-heated DAR panel research experiment using salt. In this paper we discuss the results of the water flow testing, including manifold development, film stability, wave phenomena, and wind and natural convection effects on flow. In addition, we describe the design of the panel research experiment and planned testing.

  8. Hadron production experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Boris A.

    2013-02-01

    The HARP and NA61/SHINE hadroproduction experiments as well as their implications for neutrino physics are discussed. HARP measurements have already been used for predictions of neutrino beams in K2K and MiniBooNE/SciBooNE experiments and are also being used to improve the atmospheric neutrino flux predictions and to help in the optimization of neutrino factory and super-beam designs. First measurements released recently by the NA61/SHINE experiment are of significant importance for a precise prediction of the J-PARC neutrino beam used for the T2K experiment. Both HARP and NA61/SHINE experiments provide also a large amount of input for validation and tuning of hadron production models in Monte-Carlo generators.

  9. Stereographic projections and direct products.

    PubMed

    Kettle, S F

    2001-09-01

    The concept of stereographic projections of point groups is reviewed. If the focus of attention is moved from the symmetry-equivalence of points to the symmetry operations inter-relating points, it is possible to give simple diagrams of irreducible representations, at least for many axial groups. This approach may be elaborated by the use of trigonometric basis functions, when these may be shown on similar stereographic-related diagrams. These two simple steps enable some insights into direct products; in particular, it is possible to give a diagrammatic representation of an antisymmetric direct product.

  10. Introducing DIASCoPE: Directly Integrated Acoustic System Combined with Pressure Experiments — Changing the Paradigm from Product to Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, M. L.; Baldwin, K. J.; Huebsch, W. B.; Tercé, N.; Bejina, F.; Bystricky, M.; Chen, H.; Vaughan, M. T.; Weidner, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the properties and behaviors of materials and multi-phase aggregates under conditions of high pressure and temperature is vital to unraveling the mysteries that lie beneath the surface of the planet. Advances in in situexperimental techniques using synchrotron radiation at these extreme conditions have helped to provide answers to fundamental questions that were previously unattainable. Synchrotron-based ultrasonic interferometry measurements have proven to be especially important in determining acoustic velocities and thermoelastic properties of materials at high pressures and temperatures. However, due to relatively slow data collection times, it has been difficult to measure the effects of processes as they occur, and instead the measurement is made on the end product of these processes. DIASCoPE is an important step toward addressing this problem.Over the last three years, we have designed and developed an on-board ultrasonic acoustic velocity measurement system that cuts data collection time down by over an order of magnitude. We can now measure P- and S-wave travel times in samples at extreme conditions in less than one second. Moreover, the system has been fully integrated with the multi-anvil apparatus and the EPICS control system at beamline X17B2 of the National Synchrotron Light Source, allowing for greater ease of control andfull automation of experimental data collection. The DIASCoPE has completed the testing and commissioning phase, and the first data collected using this powerful new system will be presented here.DIASCoPE represents a major step forward in acoustic velocity collection time reduction that will finally allow us to begin to witness what effects various processes in the deep Earth may have on the physical properties of materials at extreme conditions as they occur. These new capabilities will allow us to change the focus of study from the product to the process itself and will lead to a greater understanding of the

  11. APT radionuclide production experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Gavron, A.; King, J.D.

    1994-07-02

    Tritium ({sup 3}H, a heavy isotope of hydrogen) is produced by low energy neutron-induced reactions on various elements. One such reaction is n+{sup 3}He {yields}>{sup 3}H+{sup 1}H in which {sup 3}He is transmuted to tritium. Another reaction, which has been used in reactor production of tritium, is the n+{sup 6}Li {yields}> {sup 3}H+{sup 4}He reaction. Accelerator Production of Tritium relies on a high-energy proton beam to produce these neutrons using the spallation reaction, in which high-energy proton beam to produce these neutrons using the spallation reaction, in which high-energy protons reacting with a heavy nucleus produce a shower of low-energy neutrons and a lower-mass residual nucleus. It is important to quantify the residual radionuclides produced in the spallation target for two reasons. From an engineering point of view, one must understand short-lived isotopes that may contribute to decay heat. From a safety viewpoint, one must understand what nuclei and decay gammas are produced in order to design adequate shielding, to estimate ultimate waste disposal problems, and to predict possible effects due to accidental dispersion during operation. The authors have performed an experiment to measure the production of radioisotopes in stopping-length W and Pb targets irradiated by a 800 MeV proton beam, and are comparing the results to values obtained from calculations using LAHET and MCNP. The experiment was designed to pay particular attention to the short half-life radionuclides, which have not been previously measured. In the following, they present details of the experiment, explain how they analyzed the data and obtain the results, how they perform the calculations, and finally, how the experimental data agree with the calculations.

  12. Polar-direct-drive simulations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Marozas, J.A.; Marshall, F.J.; Craxton, R.S.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Skupsky, S.; Bonino, M.J.; Collins, T.J.B.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Knauer, J.P.; McCrory, R.L.; McKenty, P.W.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Noyes, S.G.; Radha, P.B.; Sangster, T.C.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.

    2006-05-15

    Polar direct drive (PDD) [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] will allow direct-drive ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)] as it is configured for x-ray drive. Optimal drive uniformity is obtained via a combination of beam repointing, pulse shapes, spot shapes, and/or target design. This article describes progress in the development of standard and 'Saturn' [R. S. Craxton and D. W. Jacobs-Perkins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 0952002 (2005)] PDD target designs. Initial evaluation of experiments on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 66, 508 (1995)] and simulations were carried out with the two-dimensional hydrodynamics code SAGE [R. S. Craxton et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056304 (2005)]. This article adds to this body of work by including fusion particle production and transport as well as radiation transport within the two-dimensional DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 032702 (2005)] hydrodynamics simulations used to model experiments. Forty OMEGA beams arranged in six rings to emulate the NIF x-ray-drive configuration are used to perform direct-drive implosions of CH shells filled with D{sub 2} gas. Target performance was diagnosed with framed x-ray backlighting and by the measured fusion yield. Saturn target experiments have resulted in {approx}75% of the yield from energy-equivalent, symmetrically irradiated implosions. The results of the two-dimensional PDD simulations performed with DRACO are in good agreement with experimental x-ray radiographs. DRACO is being used to further optimize standard PDD designs. In addition, DRACO simulations of NIF-scale PDD designs show ignition with a gain of 20 and the development of a 40 {mu}m radius, 10 keV region with a neutron-averaged {rho}r of 1270 mg/cm{sup 2} near stagnation.

  13. Direct Photon Production in a Nuclear Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaofeng

    The photon is a very good probe of short distance physics in strong interactions. It can be produced directly at short-distance or through fragmentation processes. Through one-loop order in perturbation theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), this thesis provides complete analytic expressions for both the inclusive and the isolated prompt photon production cross sections in hadronic final states of e^+e ^- annihilations. It is the first time that the full angular dependence of the cross sections is derived. Extraction of photon fragmentation functions from e^+e ^- annihilations is addressed. Using e ^+e^--->gamma+X as an example, this work demonstrates for the first time that conventional perturbative QCD factorization breaks down for isolated photon production in e^+e ^- annihilations in a specific region of phase space. The impact of this breakdown for computations of prompt photon production in hadron-hadron reactions is also discussed. In hadron-nucleus collisions, high energy photons can be produced through a single hard scattering as well as through multiple scattering. The contribution from the multiple scattering can be presented in terms of multi-parton correlation functions. Using information on the multi-parton correlation functions extracted from photon-nucleus experiments, for the first time, the nuclear dependence of direct photon production in hadron-nucleus collisions was predicted without any free parameter, and was tested at Fermi Lab experiment E706.

  14. Experience and convergence in spiritual direction.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jean

    2015-02-01

    The practice of spiritual direction concerns the human experience of God. As praxis, spiritual direction has a long tradition in Western Christianity. It is a process rooted in spirituality with theology as its foundation. This paper explores the convergences between aspects of philosophy (contemplative awareness), psychology (Rogerian client-centered approach) and phenomenology. There are significant points of convergence between phenomenology and spiritual direction: first, in Ignatius of Loyola's phenomenological approach to his religious experience; second, in the appropriation by spiritual directors of concepts of epochē and empathy; third, in the process of "unpacking" religious experience within a spiritual direction interview.

  15. The Production of Criminological Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Joel H.; Visher, Christy A.

    2003-01-01

    Examined the production of crime and justice field experiments in the 1990s through data on criminological experiments funded by the National Institute of Justice from 1991 through 2000. Although funds increased in this period, the number of projects and amount of funds awarded to field experiments declines. Discusses reasons for this finding.…

  16. A Community Television Production Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins. Dept. of Technical Journalism.

    The major goal of the Basic Video Production Workshop program of the Denver Community Video Center was to communicate basic production skills, through the use of extensive hands-on experience, to people with little or no training in the use of visual media. The ideas and exercises presented in this manual focus on the design and completion of…

  17. Spectroscopy and Direct Products: Simpler yet Deeper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettle, Sidney F. A.

    2010-01-01

    When irreducible representations are given in diagrammatic form, it is possible to show direct products pictorially. By giving a similar description of the electric vector associated with a light wave, group-theoretical selection rules (the requirement of a totally symmetric direct product) can also be shown in pictorial form. The [upsilon](CO)…

  18. Spectroscopy and Direct Products: Simpler yet Deeper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettle, Sidney F. A.

    2010-01-01

    When irreducible representations are given in diagrammatic form, it is possible to show direct products pictorially. By giving a similar description of the electric vector associated with a light wave, group-theoretical selection rules (the requirement of a totally symmetric direct product) can also be shown in pictorial form. The [upsilon](CO)…

  19. The production of criminological experiments.

    PubMed

    Garner, Joel H; Visher, Christy A

    2003-06-01

    This article examines the production of crime and justice field experiments during the 1990s. Data were collected on the characteristics of criminological experiments funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the principal research agency of the U.S. Department of Justice, during the 10-year period from 1991 through 2000. The analyses find that, whereas the funds available for research and evaluation at the NIJ increased during this period, the number of projects and the amount of funds awarded supporting field experiments declined. The article describes the characteristics of the experiments funded and assesses the extent to which the reduced support can be attributed to the characteristics of NIJ research funding, research topics, researchers, or criminal justice operational agencies.

  20. Dark matter direct-detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrodán Undagoitia, Teresa; Rauch, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, several detector technologies have been developed with the quest to directly detect dark matter interactions and to test one of the most important unsolved questions in modern physics. The sensitivity of these experiments has improved with a tremendous speed due to a constant development of the detectors and analysis methods, proving uniquely suited devices to solve the dark matter puzzle, as all other discovery strategies can only indirectly infer its existence. Despite the overwhelming evidence for dark matter from cosmological indications at small and large scales, clear evidence for a particle explaining these observations remains absent. This review summarises the status of direct dark matter searches, focusing on the detector technologies used to directly detect a dark matter particle producing recoil energies in the keV energy scale. The phenomenological signal expectations, main background sources, statistical treatment of data and calibration strategies are discussed.

  1. Communication: direct comparison between theory and experiment for correlated angular and product-state distributions of the ground-state and stretching-excited O((3)P) + CH4 reactions.

    PubMed

    Czakó, Gábor

    2014-06-21

    Motivated by a recent experiment [H. Pan and K. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 191101 (2014)], we report a quasiclassical trajectory study of the O((3)P) + CH4(vk = 0, 1) → OH + CH3 [k = 1 and 3] reactions on an ab initio potential energy surface. The computed angular distributions and cross sections correlated to the OH(v = 0, 1) + CH3(v = 0) coincident product states can be directly compared to experiment for O + CH4(v3 = 0, 1). Both theory and experiment show that the ground-state reaction is backward scattered, whereas the angular distributions shift toward sideways and forward directions upon antisymmetric stretching (v3) excitation of the reactant. Theory predicts similar behavior for the O + CH4(v1 = 1) reaction. The simulations show that stretching excitation enhances the reaction up to about 15 kcal/mol collision energy, whereas the O + CH4(vk = 1) reactions produce smaller cross sections for OH(v = 1) + CH3(v = 0) than those of O + CH4(v = 0) → OH(v = 0) + CH3(v = 0). The former finding agrees with experiment and the latter awaits for confirmation. The computed cold OH rotational distributions of O + CH4(v = 0) are in good agreement with experiment.

  2. Communication: Direct comparison between theory and experiment for correlated angular and product-state distributions of the ground-state and stretching-excited O({sup 3}P) + CH{sub 4} reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Czakó, Gábor

    2014-06-21

    Motivated by a recent experiment [H. Pan and K. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 191101 (2014)], we report a quasiclassical trajectory study of the O({sup 3}P) + CH{sub 4}(v{sub k} = 0, 1) → OH + CH{sub 3} [k = 1 and 3] reactions on an ab initio potential energy surface. The computed angular distributions and cross sections correlated to the OH(v = 0, 1) + CH{sub 3}(v = 0) coincident product states can be directly compared to experiment for O + CH{sub 4}(v{sub 3} = 0, 1). Both theory and experiment show that the ground-state reaction is backward scattered, whereas the angular distributions shift toward sideways and forward directions upon antisymmetric stretching (v{sub 3}) excitation of the reactant. Theory predicts similar behavior for the O + CH{sub 4}(v{sub 1} = 1) reaction. The simulations show that stretching excitation enhances the reaction up to about 15 kcal/mol collision energy, whereas the O + CH{sub 4}(v{sub k} = 1) reactions produce smaller cross sections for OH(v = 1) + CH{sub 3}(v = 0) than those of O + CH{sub 4}(v = 0) → OH(v = 0) + CH{sub 3}(v = 0). The former finding agrees with experiment and the latter awaits for confirmation. The computed cold OH rotational distributions of O + CH{sub 4}(v = 0) are in good agreement with experiment.

  3. Communication: Direct comparison between theory and experiment for correlated angular and product-state distributions of the ground-state and stretching-excited O(3P) + CH4 reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czakó, Gábor

    2014-06-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment [H. Pan and K. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 191101 (2014)], we report a quasiclassical trajectory study of the O(3P) + CH4(vk = 0, 1) → OH + CH3 [k = 1 and 3] reactions on an ab initio potential energy surface. The computed angular distributions and cross sections correlated to the OH(v = 0, 1) + CH3(v = 0) coincident product states can be directly compared to experiment for O + CH4(v3 = 0, 1). Both theory and experiment show that the ground-state reaction is backward scattered, whereas the angular distributions shift toward sideways and forward directions upon antisymmetric stretching (v3) excitation of the reactant. Theory predicts similar behavior for the O + CH4(v1 = 1) reaction. The simulations show that stretching excitation enhances the reaction up to about 15 kcal/mol collision energy, whereas the O + CH4(vk = 1) reactions produce smaller cross sections for OH(v = 1) + CH3(v = 0) than those of O + CH4(v = 0) → OH(v = 0) + CH3(v = 0). The former finding agrees with experiment and the latter awaits for confirmation. The computed cold OH rotational distributions of O + CH4(v = 0) are in good agreement with experiment.

  4. Complete Photo-production Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D'Angelo, A.; Bartalini, O.; Fantini, A.; Schaerf, C.; Vegna, V.; Ardashev, K.; Bade, C.; Hicks, K.; Kizilgul, S.; Lucas, M.; Mahon, J.; Bellini, V.; Blecher, M.; Bocquet, J.-P.; Lleres, A.; Rebreyend, D.; Capogni, M.; Caracappa, A.; Kistner, O. C.; Miceli, L.

    2011-10-24

    The extraction of resonance parameters from meson photo-reaction data is a challenging effort, that would greatly benefit from the availability of several polarization observables, measured for each reaction channel on both proton and neutron targets. In the aim of obtaining such complete experiments, polarized photon beams and targets have been developed at facilities, worldwide. We report on the latest results from the LEGS and GRAAL collaborations, providing single and double polarization measurements on pseudo-scalar meson photo-production from the nucleon.

  5. Direct-execution architecture for production systems

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, W.E.; Merritt, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    In the artificial intelligence and robotics community a style of programming called event- or data-driven programming is widely used. Data-driven programs execute on a production system interpreter that is usually written in the list programming language LISP. The major inefficiencies of production systems are due to conventional computer architectures (designed for procedural programming) and the inefficiencies of LISP implementations. In this paper the authors explore the issues surrounding the design of a direct-execution architecture for production systems that might overcome some of these inefficiencies. 14 references.

  6. The Earth's velocity for direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, Christopher

    2014-02-01

    The Earth's velocity relative to the Sun in galactic coordinates is required in the rate calculation for direct detection experiments. We provide a rigorous derivation of this quantity to first order in the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit. We also discuss the effect of the precession of the equinoxes, which has hitherto received little explicit discussion. Comparing with other expressions in the literature, we confirm that the expression of Lee, Lisanti and Safdi is correct, while the expression of Lewin and Smith, the de facto standard expression, contains an error. For calculations of the absolute event rate, the leading order expression is sufficient while for modulation searches, an expression with the eccentricity is required for accurate predictions of the modulation phase.

  7. Direct Simulation of a Solidification Benchmark Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carozzani, Tommy; Gandin, Charles-André; Digonnet, Hugues; Bellet, Michel; Zaidat, Kader; Fautrelle, Yves

    2013-02-01

    A solidification benchmark experiment is simulated using a three-dimensional cellular automaton—finite element solidification model. The experiment consists of a rectangular cavity containing a Sn-3 wt pct Pb alloy. The alloy is first melted and then solidified in the cavity. A dense array of thermocouples permits monitoring of temperatures in the cavity and in the heat exchangers surrounding the cavity. After solidification, the grain structure is revealed by metallography. X-ray radiography and inductively coupled plasma spectrometry are also conducted to access a distribution map of Pb, or macrosegregation map. The solidification model consists of solutions for heat, solute mass, and momentum conservations using the finite element method. It is coupled with a description of the development of grain structure using the cellular automaton method. A careful and direct comparison with experimental results is possible thanks to boundary conditions deduced from the temperature measurements, as well as a careful choice of the values of the material properties for simulation. Results show that the temperature maps and the macrosegregation map can only be approached with a three-dimensional simulation that includes the description of the grain structure.

  8. Bayesian analysis of multiple direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arina, Chiara

    2014-12-01

    Bayesian methods offer a coherent and efficient framework for implementing uncertainties into induction problems. In this article, we review how this approach applies to the analysis of dark matter direct detection experiments. In particular we discuss the exclusion limit of XENON100 and the debated hints of detection under the hypothesis of a WIMP signal. Within parameter inference, marginalizing consistently over uncertainties to extract robust posterior probability distributions, we find that the claimed tension between XENON100 and the other experiments can be partially alleviated in isospin violating scenario, while elastic scattering model appears to be compatible with the frequentist statistical approach. We then move to model comparison, for which Bayesian methods are particularly well suited. Firstly, we investigate the annual modulation seen in CoGeNT data, finding that there is weak evidence for a modulation. Modulation models due to other physics compare unfavorably with the WIMP models, paying the price for their excessive complexity. Secondly, we confront several coherent scattering models to determine the current best physical scenario compatible with the experimental hints. We find that exothermic and inelastic dark matter are moderatly disfavored against the elastic scenario, while the isospin violating model has a similar evidence. Lastly the Bayes' factor gives inconclusive evidence for an incompatibility between the data sets of XENON100 and the hints of detection. The same question assessed with goodness of fit would indicate a 2 σ discrepancy. This suggests that more data are therefore needed to settle this question.

  9. PC25{trademark} product and manufacturing experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.W.; Riley, W.C.; Sandelli, G.J.

    1996-12-31

    Product and manufacturing experience accumulated since the beginning of PC25. A production in 1991 provides a strong base of demonstration and experience for establishing future improvements to the PC25 power plant.

  10. Direct fuel cell product design improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Maru, H.C.; Farooque, M.

    1996-12-31

    Significant milestones have been attained towards the technology development field testing and commercialization of direct fuel cell power plant since the 1994 Fuel Cell Seminar. Under a 5-year cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy signed in December 1994, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has been developing the design for a MW-scale direct fuel cell power plant with input from previous technology efforts and the Santa Clara Demonstration Project. The effort encompasses product definition in consultation with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group, potential customers, as well as extensive system design and packaging. Manufacturing process improvements, test facility construction, cell component scale up, performance and endurance improvements, stack engineering, and critical balance-of-plant development are also addressed. Major emphasis of this product design improvement project is on increased efficiency, compactness and cost reduction to establish a competitive place in the market. A 2.85 MW power plant with an efficiency of 58% and a footprint of 420 m{sup 2} has been designed. Component and subsystem testing is being conducted at various levels. Planning and preparation for verification of a full size prototype unit are in progress. This paper presents the results obtained since the last fuel cell seminar.

  11. Direct-illumination spherical-target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    A set of spherical target experiments was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of three techniques for achieving higher convergence implosions. They are (1) cryogenically frozen fuel layers, (2) submicron wavelength laser light, and (3) temporally tailored pulse shapes. A second set of experiments provides information about energy transport by thermal and suprathermal electrons and uses multilayered targets as an integral component of the diagnostics. These results, in conjunction with existing laser-target coupling data, provide a more comprehensive test of our understanding of laser plasma interaction, energy transport, and hydrodynamic response of small scale spherical laser fusion experiments.

  12. The DIRECT COURSE-TRINITY Seismic Experiment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    DIRECT COURSE event was sited in the eastern margin of the Jornada del Muerto Valley, approximately 6 km south of the TRINITY site, where the first...Propagation in the Tularosa and Jornada del Muerto Basins, South Central New Mexico, Final Technical Report to the Air Force Office of Scientific Research

  13. Direct Digital Control Liquid Level Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adb-El-Bary, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment to give students exposure to digital control widely used in industry but not given much attention in most undergraduate process control curricula. Students write their own control programs and experimentally determine the transfer functions for all system components. Also describes experimental apparatus used in the…

  14. Review of direct neutrino mass experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dragoun, O.

    2015-10-28

    Advantages and drawbacks of the kinematic methods of the neutrino mass determination are discussed. The meaning of the effective neutrino mass, resulting from measurements of the endpoint region of β-spectra is clarified. Current experimental constraints on the mass of active as well as sterile neutrinos are presented. Several new experiments are briefly outlined.

  15. The DRIFT Directional Dark Matter Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harton, John

    2014-03-01

    The DRIFT dark matter collaboration aims to detect the sidereal modulation of the dark matter signal through measurement of spatial components of the recoil nucleus direction from WIMP-nucleon interactions. DRIFT uses low-pressure negative-ion time projection chambers to measure recoil nuclei, and the recoiling nuclei, from a standard WIMP halo, would typically leave a millimeter-scale ionization track in the chamber. The rotation of the Earth on its axis combined with the motion of the solar system through the WIMP halo creates the sidereal modulation. This sidereal (``daily'') modulation is the change in average direction of the recoils over the course of the sidereal day, which for the DRIFT detector, located in England, changes from generally down to south once a (sidereal) day. Recent advances in background rejection are allowing DRIFT-IId to run background free. And measurement of the interaction location along the ion drift direction has recently been enabled by adding a small amount of oxygen to the drift gas. This talk will report on these recent advances and show current limits, as well as describe plans for future DRIFT detectors. Supported by the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.

  16. Status and Prospects for Hadron Production Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeter, Raphaeel

    2010-03-30

    The latest results from the HARP, MIPP and NA61 Hadron Production Experiments are reviewed and their implications for neutrinos physics experiments are discussed. We emphasize three neutrino sources: accelerator-based neutrino beams, advanced neutrino sources and atmospheric neutrinos. Finally, prospects from additional forthcoming hadron production measurements are presented.

  17. A direct broadcast satellite-audio experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaisnys, Arvydas; Abbe, Brian; Motamedi, Masoud

    1992-01-01

    System studies have been carried out over the past three years at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) on digital audio broadcasting (DAB) via satellite. The thrust of the work to date has been on designing power and bandwidth efficient systems capable of providing reliable service to fixed, mobile, and portable radios. It is very difficult to predict performance in an environment which produces random periods of signal blockage, such as encountered in mobile reception where a vehicle can quickly move from one type of terrain to another. For this reason, some signal blockage mitigation techniques were built into an experimental DAB system and a satellite experiment was conducted to obtain both qualitative and quantitative measures of performance in a range of reception environments. This paper presents results from the experiment and some conclusions on the effectiveness of these blockage mitigation techniques.

  18. Affective Productions of Mathematical Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walshaw, Margaret; Brown, Tony

    2012-01-01

    In underscoring the affective elements of mathematics experience, we work with contemporary readings of the work of Spinoza on the politics of affect, to understand what is included in the cognitive repertoire of the Subject. We draw on those resources to tell a pedagogical tale about the relation between cognition and affect in settings of…

  19. Affective Productions of Mathematical Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walshaw, Margaret; Brown, Tony

    2012-01-01

    In underscoring the affective elements of mathematics experience, we work with contemporary readings of the work of Spinoza on the politics of affect, to understand what is included in the cognitive repertoire of the Subject. We draw on those resources to tell a pedagogical tale about the relation between cognition and affect in settings of…

  20. Direct nuclear reaction experiments for stellar nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherubini, S.

    2017-09-01

    During the last two decades indirect methods where proposed and used in many experiments in order to measure nuclear cross sections between charged particles at stellar energies. These are among the lowest to be measured in nuclear physics. One of these methods, the Trojan Horse method, is based on the Quasi-Free reaction mechanism and has proved to be particularly flexible and reliable. It allowed for the measurement of the cross sections of various reactions of astrophysical interest using stable beams. The use and reliability of indirect methods become even more important when reactions induced by Radioactive Ion Beams are considered, given the much lower intensity generally available for these beams. The first Trojan Horse measurement of a process involving the use of a Radioactive Ion Beam dealt with the ^{18} F(p, α ^{15} O process in Nova conditions. To obtain pieces of information on this process, in particular about its cross section at Nova energies, the Trojan Horse method was applied to the ^{18} F(d, α ^{15} O)n three body reaction. In order to establish the reliability of the Trojan Horse method approach, the Treiman-Yang criterion is an important test and it will be addressed briefly in this paper.

  1. Antihydrogen production and precision experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, M.M.; Goldman, T.; Holzscheiter, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    The study of CPT invariance with the highest achievable precision in all particle sectors is of fundamental importance for physics. Equally important is the question of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. In recent years, impressive progress has been achieved in capturing antiprotons in specially designed Penning traps, in cooling them to energies of a few milli-electron volts, and in storing them for hours in a small volume of space. Positrons have been accumulated in large numbers in similar traps, and low energy positron or positronium beams have been generated. Finally, steady progress has been made in trapping and cooling neutral atoms. Thus the ingredients to form antihydrogen at rest are at hand. Once antihydrogen atoms have been captured at low energy, spectroscopic methods can be applied to interrogate their atomic structure with extremely high precision and compare it to its normal matter counterpart, the hydrogen atom. Especially the 1S-2S transition, with a lifetime of the excited state of 122 msec and thereby a natural linewidth of 5 parts in 10{sup 16}, offers in principle the possibility to directly compare matter and antimatter properties at a level of 1 part in 10{sup 16}.

  2. Data production models for the CDF experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Antos, J.; Babik, M.; Benjamin, D.; Cabrera, S.; Chan, A.W.; Chen, Y.C.; Coca, M.; Cooper, B.; Genser, K.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hou, S.; Hsieh, T.L.; Jayatilaka, B.; Kraan, A.C.; Lysak, R.; Mandrichenko, I.V.; Robson, A.; Siket, M.; Stelzer, B.; Syu, J.; Teng, P.K.; /Kosice, IEF /Duke U. /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /University Coll. London /Fermilab /Rockefeller U. /Michigan U. /Pennsylvania U. /Glasgow U. /UCLA /Tsukuba U. /New Mexico U.

    2006-06-01

    The data production for the CDF experiment is conducted on a large Linux PC farm designed to meet the needs of data collection at a maximum rate of 40 MByte/sec. We present two data production models that exploits advances in computing and communication technology. The first production farm is a centralized system that has achieved a stable data processing rate of approximately 2 TByte per day. The recently upgraded farm is migrated to the SAM (Sequential Access to data via Metadata) data handling system. The software and hardware of the CDF production farms has been successful in providing large computing and data throughput capacity to the experiment.

  3. Superiority of Vicarious over Direct Experience in Interpersonal Conflict Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braver, Sanford L.; Rohrer, Van

    1978-01-01

    A laboratory experiment compared the relative effects of observing and participating in a first Prisoner's Dilemma Game (PDG) on subsequent PDG encounters by the original observer and participant. Concludes that vicarious experience is superior to direct experience in producing responses that reduce interpersonal conflict. Available from: Sage…

  4. First, Get Your Feet Wet: The Effects of Learning from Direct and Indirect Experience on Team Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gino, Francesca; Argote, Linda; Miron-Spektor, Ella; Todorova, Gergana

    2010-01-01

    How does prior experience influence team creativity? We address this question by examining the effects of task experience acquired directly and task experience acquired vicariously from others on team creativity in a product-development task. Across three laboratory studies, we find that direct task experience leads to higher levels of team…

  5. Readability of Directions on Potentially Hazardous Household Products

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyrczak, Fred

    1976-01-01

    The study focused on an analysis of the readability of directions on harmful household products. High school students' reading ability was tested using eight sets of sample directions. The results of the study indicate a need for improving the students' ability to read directions on such products. (EC)

  6. Pi Zero and Direct Photon Production at High Transverse Moment

    SciTech Connect

    Zioulas, George

    1990-11-01

    The inclusive pizero and direct photon productions by 300 GeV/c $\\pi^-$ and $\\pi^+$ beams on a lithium target, were measured using the E705 spectrometer at Fermilab. The cross sections were determined by analyzing a fraction (20%) of the data recorded by the experiment during the 1987-1988 running period. The photons were measured by a high resolution electromagnetic calorimeter which consisted of scintillation and lead glass blocks. A fast trigger was designed and implemented to select events with high transverse energy depositions in the calorimeter. The invariant cross sections are presented as a function of the transverse momentum and the Feynman-x in the range between 4 to 7 GeV/c and -0.25 to 0.35 respectively. The results are compared to the measurements made by other experiments and to theoretical predictions within the framework of Quantum ChromoDynamics.

  7. Data Products for the OCTL to OICETS Optical Link Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalik, J.; Biswas, A.; Wilson, K.; Wright, M.; Roberts, T.

    2010-01-01

    JPL has developed a series of software and hardware tools to analyze and record data from a 50Mb/s down and 2 Mb/s up bi-directional optical link with the LUCE terminal onboard the LEO OICETS satellite. This paper presents the data products for this experiment including the system architecture and analysis of the actual data received.

  8. Data products for the OCTL to OICETS optical link experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalik, J.; Biswas, A.; Wilson, K.; Wright, M.; Roberts, W. T.

    2010-02-01

    JPL has developed a series of software and hardware tools to analyze and record data from a 50Mb/s down and 2 Mb/s up bi-directional optical link with the LUCE terminal onboard the LEO OICETS satellite. This paper presents the data products for this experiment including the system architecture and analysis of the actual data received.

  9. Direct firing of coal for power production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papay, L. T.

    1978-01-01

    The use of new technology and advanced emission control hardware to reduce emissions from the direct combustion of coal to produce electricity in California is considered. The technical feasibilty of a demonstration project on an existing 81-MW boiler is demonstrated.

  10. Products of direct liquefaction of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.G.; Eames, M.A.; Figueroa, C.; Gansley, R.R.; Schaleger, L.L.; Watt, D.W.

    1982-10-01

    Several methods of characterizing products of biomass liquefaction including GC-MS, wet analysis, infrared and various forms of liquid chromatography have been tried. Of these the SESC sequential elution technique has been particularly helpful in separating whole product oils into chemically distinguishable fractions. Variations in the distribution of SESC fractions have been used to show effects of changing conditions and changing feedstocks in biomass liquefaction. They have also been used to follow the effects of catalytic hydrogenation. Liquefaction of aspen results in higher yields than liquefaction of Douglas fir. The aspen oil product is richer in SESC fractions 1-4, is more fluid and has lower oxygen content. Catalytic hydrogenation is effective in increasing the percentage of oil in the more volatile SESC fractions 1-4.

  11. Abstract knowledge versus direct experience in processing of binomial expressions

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Emily; Levy, Roger

    2016-01-01

    We ask whether word order preferences for binomial expressions of the form A and B (e.g. bread and butter) are driven by abstract linguistic knowledge of ordering constraints referencing the semantic, phonological, and lexical properties of the constituent words, or by prior direct experience with the specific items in questions. Using forced-choice and self-paced reading tasks, we demonstrate that online processing of never-before-seen binomials is influenced by abstract knowledge of ordering constraints, which we estimate with a probabilistic model. In contrast, online processing of highly frequent binomials is primarily driven by direct experience, which we estimate from corpus frequency counts. We propose a trade-off wherein processing of novel expressions relies upon abstract knowledge, while reliance upon direct experience increases with increased exposure to an expression. Our findings support theories of language processing in which both compositional generation and direct, holistic reuse of multi-word expressions play crucial roles. PMID:27776281

  12. Abstract knowledge versus direct experience in processing of binomial expressions.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Emily; Levy, Roger

    2016-12-01

    We ask whether word order preferences for binomial expressions of the form A and B (e.g. bread and butter) are driven by abstract linguistic knowledge of ordering constraints referencing the semantic, phonological, and lexical properties of the constituent words, or by prior direct experience with the specific items in questions. Using forced-choice and self-paced reading tasks, we demonstrate that online processing of never-before-seen binomials is influenced by abstract knowledge of ordering constraints, which we estimate with a probabilistic model. In contrast, online processing of highly frequent binomials is primarily driven by direct experience, which we estimate from corpus frequency counts. We propose a trade-off wherein processing of novel expressions relies upon abstract knowledge, while reliance upon direct experience increases with increased exposure to an expression. Our findings support theories of language processing in which both compositional generation and direct, holistic reuse of multi-word expressions play crucial roles.

  13. Direct Production of Silicones From Sand

    SciTech Connect

    Larry N. Lewis; F.J. Schattenmann: J.P. Lemmon

    2001-09-30

    Silicon, in the form of silica and silicates, is the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. However the synthesis of silicones (scheme 1) and almost all organosilicon chemistry is only accessible through elemental silicon. Silicon dioxide (sand or quartz) is converted to chemical-grade elemental silicon in an energy intensive reduction process, a result of the exceptional thermodynamic stability of silica. Then, the silicon is reacted with methyl chloride to give a mixture of methylchlorosilanes catalyzed by cooper containing a variety of tract metals such as tin, zinc etc. The so-called direct process was first discovered at GE in 1940. The methylchlorosilanes are distilled to purify and separate the major reaction components, the most important of which is dimethyldichlorosilane. Polymerization of dimethyldichlorosilane by controlled hydrolysis results in the formation of silicone polymers. Worldwide, the silicones industry produces about 1.3 billion pounds of the basic silicon polymer, polydimethylsiloxane.

  14. Fixed-target hadron production experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Boris A.

    2015-08-01

    Results from fixed-target hadroproduction experiments (HARP, MIPP, NA49 and NA61/SHINE) as well as their implications for cosmic ray and neutrino physics are reviewed. HARP measurements have been used for predictions of neutrino beams in K2K and MiniBooNE/SciBooNE experiments and are also being used to improve predictions of the muon yields in EAS and of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes as well as to help in the optimization of neutrino factory and super-beam designs. Recent measurements released by the NA61/SHINE experiment are of significant importance for a precise prediction of the J-PARC neutrino beam used for the T2K experiment and for interpretation of EAS data. These hadroproduction experiments provide also a large amount of input for validation and tuning of hadron production models in Monte-Carlo generators.

  15. Directed forgetting in young children: evidence for a production deficiency.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Alp; Staudigl, Tobias; Samenieh, Anuscheh; Bäuml, Karl-Heinz T

    2010-12-01

    When people are cued to forget a previously studied list of items and to learn a new list instead, such cuing typically leads to forgetting of the first list and to memory enhancement of the second. In two experiments, we examined such listwise directed forgetting in children (and adults), using a forget cue that placed either high emphasis or low emphasis on the need to forget. In the low-emphasis condition, (adult-like) List 1 forgetting was present in fourth graders, but not in first graders (and kindergartners); in contrast, in the high-emphasis condition, (adult-like) List 1 forgetting was present from first grade on. Only fourth graders showed (adult-like) List 2 enhancement, regardless of task instruction. The finding that first graders showed List 1 forgetting only in the high-emphasis condition points to a production deficiency in first graders' directed forgetting, suggesting that the children are capable of intentional forgetting but fail to do so spontaneously. The finding that first graders showed List 1 forgetting without List 2 enhancement suggests that the two directed-forgetting effects are mediated by different processes with different developmental trajectories.

  16. Directed abstraction: Encouraging broad, personal generalizations following a success experience.

    PubMed

    Zunick, Peter V; Fazio, Russell H; Vasey, Michael W

    2015-07-01

    People with negative self-views may fail to generalize appropriately from success experiences (e.g., Wood, Heimpel, Newby-Clark, & Ross, 2005). We drew on theories regarding self-views (Swann, Griffin, Predmore, & Gaines, 1987) and abstraction (Semin & Fiedler, 1991), as well as past linguistic framing work (e.g., Marigold, Holmes, & Ross, 2007, 2010; Salancik, 1974), to create a new technique to encourage people with negative self-views to generalize broadly from a success experience to the self-concept. We call this technique directed abstraction. In Experiment 1, participants with negative self-views who completed a directed abstraction writing task following success feedback regarding a novel laboratory task generalized more from that success, reporting higher ability levels and greater expectations of future success in the relevant domain. In Experiment 2, directed abstraction produced similar results (including more positive self-related affect, e.g., pride) after participants recalled a past public speaking success. In Experiment 3, participants high in fear of public speaking gave two speeches in a context designed to be challenging yet also to elicit successful performances. Directed abstraction helped these participants generalize from their success to beliefs about their abilities, expectations about the future, and confidence as a speaker. In Experiment 4, directed abstraction following success on a verbal task increased persistence in the face of failure on a subsequent verbal task. We discuss implications for understanding how and when people generalize from a success, compare directed abstraction to existing interventions, and suggest practical applications for this influence technique. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Direct Experience Teaching in the Out-of-Doors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blomberg, Karin

    The method used to prove the value of direct experience teaching in the out-of-doors was taking children on short field trips and excursions and evaluating their attitudes and behavior as well as their accomplishments. Trips ranged from 10 minutes to 2 hours with a 6th grade class. The experiments took place for a period of 9 years (1955-1964).…

  18. Status and Prospects of the DMTPC Directional Dark Matter Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, J.

    2012-02-01

    The DMTPC directional dark matter detection experiment is a low-pressure CF4 gas time projection chamber, instrumented with charge and scintillation photon readout. This detector design strategy emphasizes reconstruction of WIMP-induced nuclear recoil tracks, in order to determine the direction of incident dark matter particles. Directional detection has the potential to make the definitive observation of dark matter using the unique angular signature of the dark matter wind, which is distinct from all known backgrounds. This talk will briefly review the experimental technique and current status of DMTPC.

  19. Physics from solar neutrinos in dark matter direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdeño, David G.; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Jubb, Thomas; Machado, Pedro A. N.; Vincent, Aaron C.; Bœhm, Céline

    2016-05-01

    The next generation of dark matter direct detection experiments will be sensitive to both coherent neutrino-nucleus and neutrino-electron scattering. This will enable them to explore aspects of solar physics, perform the lowest energy measurement of the weak angle sin2 θ W to date, and probe contributions from new theories with light mediators. In this article, we compute the projected nuclear and electron recoil rates expected in several dark matter direct detection experiments due to solar neutrinos, and use these estimates to quantify errors on future measurements of the neutrino fluxes, weak mixing angle and solar observables, as well as to constrain new physics in the neutrino sector. Our analysis shows that the combined rates of solar neutrino events in second generation experiments (SuperCDMS and LZ) can yield a measurement of the pp flux to 2.5% accuracy via electron recoil, and slightly improve the 8B flux determination. Assuming a low-mass argon phase, projected tonne-scale experiments like DARWIN can reduce the uncertainty on both the pp and boron-8 neutrino fluxes to below 1%. Finally, we use current results from LUX, SuperCDMS and CDMSlite to set bounds on new interactions between neutrinos and electrons or nuclei, and show that future direct detection experiments can be used to set complementary constraints on the parameter space associated with light mediators.

  20. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  1. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implicationsmore » of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.« less

  2. Scalar split WIMPs in future direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbani, Karim; Ghorbani, Hossein

    2016-03-01

    We consider a simple renormalizable dark matter model consisting of two real scalars with a mass splitting δ , interacting with the SM particles through the Higgs portal. We find a viable parameter space respecting all the bounds imposed by invisible Higgs decay experiments at the LHC, the direct detection experiments by XENON100 and LUX, and the dark matter relic abundance provided by WMAP and Planck. Despite the singlet scalar dark matter model that is fragile against the future direct detection experiments, the scalar split model introduced here survives such forthcoming bounds. We emphasize the role of the coannihilation processes and the mixing effects in this feature. For mDM˜63 GeV in this model we can explain as well the observed gamma-ray excess in the analyses of the Fermi-LAT data at Galactic latitudes 2 ° ≤|b |≤2 0 ° and Galactic longitudes |l |<2 0 ° .

  3. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, W.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective eld theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering or current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral di*erences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  4. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. Here. we demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  5. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  6. The South Channel Ocean Productivity EXperiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenney, Robert D.; Wishner, Karen F.

    The South Channel Ocean Productivity EXperiment (SCOPEX) was a multidisciplinary study of a whale-zooplankton predator-prey system in the southwestern Gulf of Maine, focusing on the oceanographic factors responsible for the development of dense patches of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus, which comprise the major prey resource for right whales ( Eubalaena glacialis). Three non-mutually exclusive hypotheses underlay the study: patch development is due to (1) extremely high in situ primary and secondary productivity; (2) large numbers of Calanus advected into the region and concentrated by hydrographic processes; and/or (3) a behavioral tendency of the copepods themselves to aggregate. The results confirmed the cooccurrence of right whales with high density Calanus patches, and also demonstrated that right whales fed on patches with higher proportions of larger lifestages. The physical oceanographic studies supported the advection hypothesis, possibly augmented by a tendency of Calanus to aggregate, but there was little evidence to support the productivity hypothesis.

  7. Workplace incivility and productivity losses among direct care staff.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Scott; Gates, Donna

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine incivility experienced by direct health care staff in their workplaces. The sample (N = 184) was 91% female and 77% White, with 71% of the participants having earned an associate degree or above and 81% being registered nurses. The Work Limitations Questionnaire and the Incivility in Healthcare Survey were distributed to all direct care staff at a major metropolitan hospital (22% response rate). Correlations were found between workplace incivility from direct supervisors and productivity (r = 0.284, p = .000) and workplace incivility from patients and productivity (r = 0.204, p = .006). Incivility from physicians, incivility from other direct care staff, and general environmental incivility were not shown to be significantly related to productivity. Demographics were not related to levels of workplace incivility. Workplace incivility from patients and management appears to have a greater impact on employees' productivity than workplace incivility from other sources.

  8. The effect of direct positron production on relativistic feedback rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodopiyanov, I. B.; Dwyer, J. R.; Lucia, R. J.; Cramer, E. S.; Arabshahi, S.; Rassoul, H.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic feedback produces a self-sustaining runaway electron discharge via the production of backward propagating positrons and back-scattered x-rays. To date, only positrons created from pair-production by gamma-rays interacting with the air have been considered. In contrast, direct pair-production involves the creation of electron-positron pairs directly from the interaction of energetic runaway electrons with nuclei, and so it does not require the generation of bremsstrahlung gamma-rays. For high electric fields, where the runaway electron avalanche length scales are short, pair-production involving bremsstrahlung gamma-rays makes a smaller contribution to the total relativistic feedback rates than at lower fields, since both the bremsstrahlung interaction and the pair-production need to occur over a short length. On the other hand, for high fields, because direct positron production only involves one interaction, it may make a significant contribution to relativistic feedback rates in some cases. In this poster, we shall present the direct positron production cross-sections and calculate the effects on the relativistic feedback rates due to this process.

  9. Laser-direct-driven quasi-isentropic experiments on aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Quanxi; Wang, Zhebin; Jiang, Shaoen Wang, Feng; Ye, Xisheng; Liu, Jingru

    2014-07-15

    Laser-direct-driven ramp compression experiments were performed on long temporally shaped laser pulses based on an analytical isentropic compression model. Upper pressure limits, the ablation pressure scaling law, and stress-density curves were studied. The validity of the analytical model used, the ablation pressure scaling law, and the phenomena of missing line-imaging velocity interferometer (VISAR) fringes in the experimental results are discussed.

  10. Closing supersymmetric resonance regions with direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kelso, Chris

    2014-01-01

    One of the few remaining ways that neutralinos could potentially evade constraints from direct detection experiments is if they annihilate through a resonance, as can occur if 2m{sub χ⁰} falls within about ~10% of either m{sub A/H}, m{sub h}, or m{sub Z}. Assuming a future rate of progress among direct detection experiments that is similar to that obtained over the past decade, we project that within 7 years the light Higgs and Z pole regions will be entirely closed, while the remaining parameter space near the A/H resonance will require that 2m{sub χ₀} be matched to the central value (near m{sub A}) to within less than 4%. At this rate of progress, it will be a little over a decade before multi-ton direct detection experiments will be able to close the remaining, highly-tuned, regions of the A/H resonance parameter space.

  11. Polar-direct-drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Myatt, J. F.; ...

    2015-05-11

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-direct-drive (PDD) concept [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] has been proposed. Ignition in PDD geometry requires direct-drive–specific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments to study the energetics and preheat in PDD implosions at the NIF have been performed. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beammore » geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Room-temperature, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells filled with D₂ gas were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ~500 to 750 kJ with peak powers of 120 to 180 TW and peak on-target irradiances at the initial target radius from 8 10¹⁴ to 1.2 10¹⁵W/cm². Results from these initial experiments are presented, including measurements of shell trajectory, implosion symmetry, and the level of hot-electron preheat in plastic and Si ablators. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray-trace to model oblique beams, and models for nonlocal electron transport and cross-beam energy transport (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data.« less

  12. Polar-direct-drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Myatt, J. F.; LePape, S.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Sangster, T. C.; Bates, J. W.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Casey, D. T.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Kalantar, D. H.; Karasik, M.; Kessler, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Knauer, J. P.; Kurz, C.; Lafon, M.; LaFortune, K. N.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meeker, J. F.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Obenschain, S.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Wallace, R. J.; Weaver, J.; Widmayer, C.; Skupsky, S.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2015-05-01

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-direct-drive (PDD) concept [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] has been proposed. Ignition in PDD geometry requires direct-drive–specific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments to study the energetics and preheat in PDD implosions at the NIF have been performed. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beam geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Room-temperature, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells filled with D2 gas were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ~500-750 kJ with peak powers of 120 to 180 TW and peak on-target irradiances at the initial target radius from 8 x 1014 to 1.2 x 1015 W/cm2. Results from these initial experiments are presented, including measurements of shell trajectory, implosion symmetry, and the level of hot-electron preheat in plastic and Si ablators. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray-trace to model oblique beams, and models for nonlocal electron transport and cross-beam energy transport (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data.

  13. Polar-direct-drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Myatt, J. F.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D. H.; and others

    2015-05-15

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-direct-drive (PDD) concept [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] has been proposed. Ignition in PDD geometry requires direct-drive–specific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments to study the energetics and preheat in PDD implosions at the NIF have been performed. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beam geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Room-temperature, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells filled with D{sub 2} gas were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ∼500 to 750 kJ with peak powers of 120 to 180 TW and peak on-target irradiances at the initial target radius from 8 × 10{sup 14} to 1.2 × 10{sup 15 }W/cm{sup 2}. Results from these initial experiments are presented, including measurements of shell trajectory, implosion symmetry, and the level of hot-electron preheat in plastic and Si ablators. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray-trace to model oblique beams, and models for nonlocal electron transport and cross-beam energy transport (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data.

  14. Polar-direct-drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Myatt, J. F.; LePape, S.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Sangster, T. C.; Bates, J. W.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Casey, D. T.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Kalantar, D. H.; Karasik, M.; Kessler, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Knauer, J. P.; Kurz, C.; Lafon, M.; LaFortune, K. N.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meeker, J. F.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Obenschain, S.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Wallace, R. J.; Weaver, J.; Widmayer, C.; Skupsky, S.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2015-05-11

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-direct-drive (PDD) concept [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] has been proposed. Ignition in PDD geometry requires direct-drive–specific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments to study the energetics and preheat in PDD implosions at the NIF have been performed. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beam geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Room-temperature, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells filled with D₂ gas were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ~500 to 750 kJ with peak powers of 120 to 180 TW and peak on-target irradiances at the initial target radius from 8 10¹⁴ to 1.2 10¹⁵W/cm². Results from these initial experiments are presented, including measurements of shell trajectory, implosion symmetry, and the level of hot-electron preheat in plastic and Si ablators. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray-trace to model oblique beams, and models for nonlocal electron transport and cross-beam energy transport (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data.

  15. Polar-direct-drive experiments on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Myatt, J. F.; LePape, S.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Sangster, T. C.; Bates, J. W.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Casey, D. T.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Kalantar, D. H.; Karasik, M.; Kessler, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Knauer, J. P.; Kurz, C.; Lafon, M.; LaFortune, K. N.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meeker, J. F.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Obenschain, S.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Wallace, R. J.; Weaver, J.; Widmayer, C.; Skupsky, S.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2015-05-01

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-direct-drive (PDD) concept [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] has been proposed. Ignition in PDD geometry requires direct-drive-specific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments to study the energetics and preheat in PDD implosions at the NIF have been performed. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beam geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Room-temperature, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells filled with D2 gas were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ˜500 to 750 kJ with peak powers of 120 to 180 TW and peak on-target irradiances at the initial target radius from 8 × 1014 to 1.2 × 1015 W/cm2. Results from these initial experiments are presented, including measurements of shell trajectory, implosion symmetry, and the level of hot-electron preheat in plastic and Si ablators. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray-trace to model oblique beams, and models for nonlocal electron transport and cross-beam energy transport (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data.

  16. Discretising the velocity distribution for directional dark matter experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanagh, Bradley J.

    2015-07-13

    Dark matter (DM) direct detection experiments which are directionally-sensitive may be the only method of probing the full velocity distribution function (VDF) of the Galactic DM halo. We present an angular basis for the DM VDF which can be used to parametrise the distribution in order to mitigate astrophysical uncertainties in future directional experiments and extract information about the DM halo. This basis consists of discretising the VDF in a series of angular bins, with the VDF being only a function of the DM speed v within each bin. In contrast to other methods, such as spherical harmonic expansions, the use of this basis allows us to guarantee that the resulting VDF is everywhere positive and therefore physical. We present a recipe for calculating the event rates corresponding to the discrete VDF for an arbitrary number of angular bins N and investigate the discretisation error which is introduced in this way. For smooth, Standard Halo Model-like distribution functions, only N=3 angular bins are required to achieve an accuracy of around 10–30% in the number of events in each bin. Shortly after confirmation of the DM origin of the signal with around 50 events, this accuracy should be sufficient to allow the discretised velocity distribution to be employed reliably. For more extreme VDFs (such as streams), the discretisation error is typically much larger, but can be improved with increasing N. This method paves the way towards an astrophysics-independent analysis framework for the directional detection of dark matter.

  17. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of directional wetting: Comparing simulations to experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, H. Patrick; Sotthewes, Kai; van Swigchem, Jeroen; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Kooij, E. Stefan

    2013-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Modeling (LBM) simulations were performed on the dynamic behavior of liquid droplets on chemically striped patterned surfaces, ultimately with the aim to develop a predictive tool enabling reliable design of future experiments. The simulations accurately mimic experimental results, which have shown that water droplets on such surfaces adopt an elongated shape due to anisotropic preferential spreading. Details of the contact line motion such as advancing of the contact line in the direction perpendicular to the stripes exhibit pronounced similarities in experiments and simulations. The opposite of spreading, i.e., evaporation of water droplets, leads to a characteristic receding motion first in the direction parallel to the stripes, while the contact line remains pinned perpendicular to the stripes. Only when the aspect ratio is close to unity, the contact line also starts to recede in the perpendicular direction. Very similar behavior was observed in the LBM simulations. Finally, droplet movement can be induced by a gradient in surface wettability. LBM simulations show good semiquantitative agreement with experimental results of decanol droplets on a well-defined striped gradient, which move from high- to low-contact angle surfaces. Similarities and differences for all systems are described and discussed in terms of the predictive capabilities of LBM simulations to model direction wetting.

  18. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of directional wetting: comparing simulations to experiments.

    PubMed

    Jansen, H Patrick; Sotthewes, Kai; van Swigchem, Jeroen; Zandvliet, Harold J W; Kooij, E Stefan

    2013-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Modeling (LBM) simulations were performed on the dynamic behavior of liquid droplets on chemically striped patterned surfaces, ultimately with the aim to develop a predictive tool enabling reliable design of future experiments. The simulations accurately mimic experimental results, which have shown that water droplets on such surfaces adopt an elongated shape due to anisotropic preferential spreading. Details of the contact line motion such as advancing of the contact line in the direction perpendicular to the stripes exhibit pronounced similarities in experiments and simulations. The opposite of spreading, i.e., evaporation of water droplets, leads to a characteristic receding motion first in the direction parallel to the stripes, while the contact line remains pinned perpendicular to the stripes. Only when the aspect ratio is close to unity, the contact line also starts to recede in the perpendicular direction. Very similar behavior was observed in the LBM simulations. Finally, droplet movement can be induced by a gradient in surface wettability. LBM simulations show good semiquantitative agreement with experimental results of decanol droplets on a well-defined striped gradient, which move from high- to low-contact angle surfaces. Similarities and differences for all systems are described and discussed in terms of the predictive capabilities of LBM simulations to model direction wetting.

  19. Discretising the velocity distribution for directional dark matter experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanagh, Bradley J.

    2015-07-01

    Dark matter (DM) direct detection experiments which are directionally-sensitive may be the only method of probing the full velocity distribution function (VDF) of the Galactic DM halo. We present an angular basis for the DM VDF which can be used to parametrise the distribution in order to mitigate astrophysical uncertainties in future directional experiments and extract information about the DM halo. This basis consists of discretising the VDF in a series of angular bins, with the VDF being only a function of the DM speed v within each bin. In contrast to other methods, such as spherical harmonic expansions, the use of this basis allows us to guarantee that the resulting VDF is everywhere positive and therefore physical. We present a recipe for calculating the event rates corresponding to the discrete VDF for an arbitrary number of angular bins N and investigate the discretisation error which is introduced in this way. For smooth, Standard Halo Model-like distribution functions, only N=3 angular bins are required to achieve an accuracy of around 01–30% in the number of events in each bin. Shortly after confirmation of the DM origin of the signal with around 50 events, this accuracy should be sufficient to allow the discretised velocity distribution to be employed reliably. For more extreme VDFs (such as streams), the discretisation error is typically much larger, but can be improved with increasing N. This method paves the way towards an astrophysics-independent analysis framework for the directional detection of dark matter.

  20. Simulations of NOVA direct-drive Rayleigh-Taylor experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, S.V.

    1990-11-03

    Directly driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth experiments being performed on NOVA have been simulated using the computer code, LASNEX. These experiments employ beams smoothed with random phase plates (RPP), and will later include smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). Samples are CH foils with or without imposed sinusoidal surface perturbations. Perturbation growth is diagnosed by means of x-ray backlighting. Calculated growth rates are fairly flat across the wavelength range of 20--80 {mu}m which can be accessed experimentally, and are moderately suppressed below classical growth rates. Perturbations of large enough initial amplitude that the contrast in the x-ray image is measurable from the start of the experiment quickly grow into the nonlinear regime. Smaller initial amplitudes result in a longer interval of linear growth, but the initial perturbation will not be detectable in the data. Structure which is predicted to develop from speckles in the RPP beam pattern, with and without SSD, is also presented.

  1. Ultraviolet radiation directly induces pigment production by cultured human melanocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, P.S.; Gilchrest, B.A.

    1987-10-01

    In humans the major stimulus for cutaneous pigmentation is ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Little is known about the mechanism underlying this response, in part because of the complexity of interactions in whole epidermis. Using a recently developed culture system, human melanocytes were exposed daily to a physiologic range of UVR doses from a solar simulator. Responses were determined 24 hours after the last exposure. There was a dose-related increase in melanin content per cell and uptake of /sup 14/C-DOPA, accompanied by growth inhibition. Cells from donors of different racial origin gave proportionately similar increases in melanin, although there were approximately tenfold differences in basal values. Light and electron microscopy revealed UVR-stimulated increases in dendricity as well as melanosome number and degree of melanization, analogous to the well-recognized melanocyte changes following sun exposure of intact skin. Similar responses were seen with Cloudman S91 melanoma cells, although this murine cell line required lower UVR dosages and fewer exposures for maximal stimulation. These data establish that UVR is capable of directly stimulating melanogenesis. Because cyclic AMP elevation has been associated in some settings with increased pigment production by cultured melanocytes, preliminary experiments were conducted to see if the effects of UVR were mediated by cAMP. Both alpha-MSH and isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), as positive controls, caused a fourfold increase in cAMP level in human melanocytes and/or S91 cells, but following a dose of UVR sufficient to stimulate pigment production there was no change in cAMP level up to 4 hours after exposure. Thus, it appears that the UVR-induced melanogenesis is mediated by cAMP-independent mechanisms.

  2. Brain estrogen production and the encoding of recent experience

    PubMed Central

    Vahaba, Daniel M.; Remage-Healey, Luke

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate central nervous system integrates cognition and behavior, and it also acts as both a source and target for steroid hormones like estrogens. Recent exploration of brain estrogen production in the context of learning and memory has revealed several common themes. First, across vertebrates, the enzyme that synthesizes estrogens is expressed in brain regions that are characterized by elevated neural plasticity and is also integral to the acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval of recent experiences. Second, measurement and manipulation of estrogens reveal that the period following recent sensory experience is linked to estrogenic signaling in brain circuits underlying both spatial and vocal learning. Local brain estrogen production within cognitive circuits may therefore be important for the acquisition and/or consolidation of memories, and new directions testing these ideas will be discussed. PMID:27453921

  3. DIRECT COURSE blast shelter entranceway and blast door experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kiger, S.A.; Hyde, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    The DIRECT COURSE Event is a high-explosive simulation of a 1-kt height-of-burst nuclear weapon. DIRECT COURSE is sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency and is scheduled for September 1983 at the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. Three entranceway experiments will be fielded, one full size complete with two blast doors to document structural response and loading in the simulated 1-kt blast environment. Also, two 1/10-scale models, one double and one single entrance configuration, will be used to obtain blast pressure data that can be scaled to a 1-Mt blast environment. Results from these experiments will be used to evaluate and improve structural response calculations for the 1-kt environment, and to obtain loading data for a 1-Mt environment. These data will be used to design entranceways and blast environment. Results from these experiments will be used to evaluate and improve structural response calculations for the 1-kt environment, and to obtain loading data for a 1-Mt environment. These data will be used to design entranceways and blast doors for the key worker blast shelter.

  4. Subsea production systems and the UMC experience

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.M.; Henery, D.

    1983-07-01

    The Underwater Manifold Center (UMC) project for the Central Cormorant field is the most advanced system of its kind and is unequalled in size, versatility, and sophistication. It incorporates a long list of pioneering technological features including reconnectable power couplers, satellite and template wells, remote Christmas tree and pipeline connections, long-distance chemical injection and TFL well-servicing capability, insulated pipelines, and a diverless maintenance system that uses a robot-like remote maintenance vehicle. In many respects the UMC is a symbol of recent advances in subsea production systems. Components and concepts developed for it will set a standard for and be applied to other subsea systems, and the UMC's performance, accordingly, will be watched closely by the industry, especially over the next few years. Beyond the technical realm, the UMC development has raised some broader strategic and economic issues of interest to those concerned with the development of subsea production systems in general. This article concentrates on a few of these issues to provide information and guidance based on the UMC project experiences: Why were subsea techniques used to develop the Central Cormorant field. How much did the UMC cost, and how can costs be reduced in the future. What was the single biggest concern of the project. What are the benefits and costs of satellite wells connected to the UMC. In what areas could the next UMC be improved. What key factors contributed to the project's success.

  5. Monthly modulation in dark matter direct-detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Britto, Vivian; Meyers, Joel E-mail: jmeyers@cita.utoronto.ca

    2015-11-01

    The signals in dark matter direct-detection experiments should exhibit modulation signatures due to the Earth's motion with respect to the Galactic dark matter halo. The annual and daily modulations, due to the Earth's revolution about the Sun and rotation about its own axis, have been explored previously. Monthly modulation is another such feature present in direct detection signals, and provides a nearly model-independent method of distinguishing dark matter signal events from background. We study here monthly modulations in detail for both WIMP and WISP dark matter searches, examining both the effect of the motion of the Earth about the Earth-Moon barycenter and the gravitational focusing due to the Moon. For WIMP searches, we calculate the monthly modulation of the count rate and show the effects are too small to be observed in the foreseeable future. For WISP dark matter experiments, we show that the photons generated by WISP to photon conversion have frequencies which undergo a monthly modulating shift which is detectable with current technology and which cannot in general be neglected in high resolution WISP searches.

  6. Krypton Production Cross Sections and Production Rates in Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilabert, E.; Lavielle, B.; Schiekel, Th.; Herpers, U.; Neumann, S.; Michel, R.

    1995-09-01

    The stacked-foil technique was used to measured proton induced excitation functions from Sr targets (SrF2). The irradiations were performed at the Laboratoire National Saturne in Saclay (F), the Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala (S) and the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen (CH) with primary energies from 45 to 400 MeV. After gamma-spectrometric measurement of short and medium-lived radionuclides and after sufficient cooling, stable and long lived Kr isotopes were measured at Centre Etude Nucleaire in Bordeaux (F). Deduced cross sections were corrected for the production of secondary protons and neutrons by a method developed by Lupke[1]. There are no literature data which can be compared with the cross sections from this work. Theoretical calculations of cross sections were performed using two approaches. The first one was using the hybrid model of preequilibrium reactions with the code AREL[2]. The second was using the Intra-Nuclear-Cascade/Evaporation model in the form of the High Energy Transport Code (HETC)[3]. This study shows that for energies above 200 MeV, the spallation model is better suited to explain the nuclear reactions whereas the preequilibrium model leads to underestimation of the experimental data. For energies above 200 MeV, HETC should be preferred to AREL calculations. In physical models describing galactic cosmic ray (GCR) interactions with matter [4], cross sections of both, proton and neutron-induced reactions, are important parameters. Using the measured cross sections for proton-induced reactions from this work and the experimental Kr depth profiles obtained from Sr targets in the LNS172 simulation experiment [5], we established a set of excitation functions for neutron-induced reactions, which now excellently describes the production rate depth profiles from the simulation experiment. Before measuring experimental cross sections for Kr from Sr, the theoretical depth profiles calculated with pure theoretical excitation functions showed

  7. Results from the DCH-1 (Direct Containment Heating) experiment. [Pressurized melt ejection and direct containment heating

    SciTech Connect

    Tarbell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.; Pilch, M.; Ross, J.E.; Oliver, M.S.; Lucero, D.A.; Kerley, T.E.; Arellano, F.E.; Gomez, R.D.

    1987-05-01

    The DCH-1 (Direct Containment Heating) test was the first experiment performed in the Surtsey Direct Heating Test Facility. The test involved 20 kg of molten core debris simulant ejected into a 1:10 scale model of the Zion reactor cavity. The melt was produced by a metallothermic reaction of iron oxide and aluminum powders to yield molten iron and alumina. The cavity model was placed so that the emerging debris propagated directly upwards along the vertical centerline of the chamber. Results from the experiment showed that the molten material was ejected from the caviity as a cloud of particles and aerosol. The dispersed debris caused a rapid pressurization of the 103-m/sup 3/ chamber atmosphere. Peak pressure from the six transducers ranged from 0.09 to 0.13 MPa (13.4 to 19.4 psig) above the initial value in the chamber. Posttest debris collection yielded 11.6 kg of material outside the cavity, of which approximately 1.6 kg was attributed to the uptake of oxygen by the iron particles. Mechanical sieving of the recovered debris showed a lognormal size distribution with a mass mean size of 0.55 mm. Aerosol measurements indicated a subsantial portion (2 to 16%) of the ejected mass was in the size range less than 10 m aerodynamic equivalent diameter.

  8. Configuring the National Ignition Facility for direct-drive experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Eimerl, D.

    1995-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a project whose primary mission is to provide an above-ground experimental capability for maintaining nuclear competence and weapons effects simulation, and to pursue the achievement of fusion ignition utilizing solid state lasers as the energy driver. In this facility a large number of laser beams are focused onto a small target located at the center of a spherical target chamber. The laser energy is delivered in a few billionths of a second, raising the temperature and density of the nuclear materials in the target to levels where significant thermonuclear energy is released. The thermonuclear reaction proceeds very rapidly, so that the target materials remain confined by their own inertia during the thermonuclear reaction. This type of approach is called inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The proposed project is described in a conceptual design report (CDR) that was released in May 1994. Early in FY95, a collaboration between the University of Rochester and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was established to study reconfiguring the NIF to accommodate direct-drive experiments. The present paper is a report to the scientific community, primarily the scientists and engineers working on the design of the NIF. It represents results from work in progress, specifically work completed by the end of the second quarter FY95. This report has two main sections. The first describes the target requirements on the laser drive, and the second part describes how the NIF laser can be configured to accommodate both indirect and direct drive. The report includes a description of the scientific basis for these conclusions. Though a complete picture does not exist, the present understanding is sufficient to conclude that the primary target requirements and laser functional requirements for indirect and direct drive are quite compatible. It is evidently straightforward to reconfigure the NIF to accommodate direct and indirect drive.

  9. Cytokines directly induce degranulation and superoxide production from human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Horie, S; Gleich, G J; Kita, H

    1996-08-01

    Cytokines are implicated in allergic diseases and can modulate effector functions of eosinophils stimulated by another agonist. However, little is known about the capacity of cytokines to directly trigger eosinophil degranulation. We attempted to determine whether cytokines can directly induce degranulation and superoxide production from eosinophils. Eosinophils from normal donors were incubated with various cytokines in albumin-coated tissue culture plates for 4 hours. To quantitate degranulation, the amounts of eosinophil-derived neurotoxin in supernatants were measured by radioimmunoassay. In addition, superoxide production was measured by superoxide dismutase-inhibitable reduction of cytochrome c. IL-5, IL-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor- alpha, and RANTES all induced eosinophil degranulation. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was the most potent and induced eosinophil-derived neurotoxin release comparable to that induced by secretory IgA beads, one of the most potent secretagogues for eosinophils. In addition, IL-5 and tumor necrosis factor- alpha were synergistic in their induction of eosinophil degranulation. In contrast, IL-1, IL-8, interferon- gamma, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha did not induce degranulation. Finally, IL-5, IL-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and tumor necrosis factor- alpha, but not RANTES, also induced superoxide production from eosinophils. Certain cytokines directly induce eosinophil degranulation and superoxide production in vitro. Therefore these cytokines may be important in the release of toxic granule proteins from eosinophils in allergic diseases.

  10. Pediatric advance directives: parents' knowledge, experience, and preferences.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Danica B; Pham, Phung K; Nager, Alan L

    2014-08-01

    To explore parents' and caregivers' experience, knowledge, and preferences regarding advance directives (ADs) for children who have chronic illness. We conducted a prospective, cross-sectional survey of parents and caregivers of children who have chronic illness. During ambulatory medical visits, participants were asked about previous AD experience and knowledge, future preferences regarding AD discussions, their child's past and current health status, and family demographics. Among 307 participants surveyed, previous AD experience was low, with 117 (38.1%) having heard of an AD, 54 (17.6%) having discussed one, and 77 (25.1%) having known someone who had an AD. Furthermore, 27 (8.8%) participants had an AD or living will of their own, and 8 (2.6%) reported that their chronically ill child had an AD. Previous AD knowledge was significantly more likely among parents and caregivers who had a college degree than those who did not have a high school diploma, yet significantly less likely among primarily Spanish-speaking parents and caregivers than those primarily English-speaking. Interest in creating an AD for the child was reported by 151 (49.2%) participants, and was significantly more likely among families who had more frequent emergency department visits over the previous year. The limited AD experience and knowledge of parents and caregivers of children who have chronic illness and their interest in creating an AD suggest an unmet need among families of children who have chronic illness, and an opportunity to enhance communication between families and medical teams regarding ADs and end-of-life care. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. Direct photon production in e+e- annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, E.; Ford, W. T.; Qi, N.; Read, A. L.; Smith, J. G.; Camporesi, T.; de Sangro, R.; Marini, A.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Ronga, F.; Blume, H. T.; Hurst, R. B.; Sleeman, J. C.; Venuti, J. P.; Wald, H. B.; Weinstein, Roy; Band, H. R.; Gettner, M. W.; Goderre, G. P.; Meyer, O. A.; Moromisato, J. H.; Shambroom, W. D.; von Goeler, E.; Ash, W. W.; Chadwick, G. B.; Clearwater, S. H.; Coombes, R. W.; Kaye, H. S.; Lau, K. H.; Leedy, R. E.; Lynch, H. L.; Messner, R. L.; Moss, L. J.; Muller, F.; Nelson, H. N.; Ritson, D. M.; Rosenberg, L. J.; Wiser, D. E.; Zdarko, R. W.; Groom, D. E.; Lee, H. Y.; Delfino, M. C.; Heltsley, B. K.; Johnson, J. R.; Lavine, T. L.; Maruyama, T.; Prepost, R.

    1985-01-01

    Direct photon production in hadronic events from e+e- annihilation has been studied at √s =29 GeV with use of the MAC detector at the PEP storage ring. A charge asymmetry A=(-12.3+/-3.5)% is observed in the final-state jets. The cross section and the charge asymmetry are in good agreement with the predictions of the fractionally charged quark-parton model. Both the charge asymmetry and total yield have been used to determine values of quark charges. Limits have been established for anomalous sources of direct photons.

  12. Patients' direct experiences as central elements of placebo analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Vase, Lene; Nørskov, Kathrine Næsted; Petersen, Gitte Laue; Price, Donald D.

    2011-01-01

    Placebo analgesic effects appear to be related to patients' perception of the therapeutic intervention. In this paper, we review quantitative findings of how the relationship with the physician and the verbal suggestions given for relief may influence patients' perception of a treatment and how patients' expectations and emotional feelings may affect treatment outcome. We also present qualitative data from interviews with patients who have experienced pain relief following a placebo or an active treatment. A special focus is given to the temporal development of placebo analgesia at psychological and neurophysiological levels. Finally, we discuss the extent to which the quantitative and qualitative findings supplement or contrast with each other, and we touch upon possible implications of patients' direct experience as central for placebo analgesia. PMID:21576149

  13. Direct observation of OH production from the ozonolysis of olefins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Neil M.; Kroll, Jesse H.; Anderson, James G.; Demerjian, Kenneth L.

    Ozone olefin reactions may be a significant source of OH in the urban atmosphere, but current evidence for OH production is indirect and contested. We report the first direct observation of OH radicals from the reaction of ozone with a series of olefins (ethene, isoprene, trans-2-butene and 2,3 dimethyl-2-butene) in 4-6 torr of nitrogen. Using LIF to directly observe the steady-state of OH produced by the initial ozone-olefin reaction and subsequently destroyed by the OH-olefin reaction, we are able to establish OH yields broadly consistent with indirect values. The identification of the OH is unequivocal, and there is no indication that it is produced by a secondary process. To support these observations, we present a complete ab-initio potential energy surface for the O3-ethene reaction, extending from the reactants to available products.

  14. Automatic Production Planning System to Achieve Flexible Direct Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamoto, Keiichi; Shirase, Keiichi; Wakamatsu, Hidefumi; Tsumaya, Akira; Arai, Eiji

    For shortening of production lead-time, it is needed to eliminate time and efforts for process and operation planning after product design. However, a conventional NC machine tool has no autonomy and intelligence to achieve direct machining operation or “Rapid Manufacturing”. Because CL data and cutting parameters for machining operation have to be determined precisely in process and operation planning. In this study, in order to realize an autonomous and intelligent machine tool, the digital copy milling system which allows to generate tool paths during machining operation, and the trouble free machining strategy which allows to adapt cutting parameters, have been developed. And, an automatic process and operation planning system has been developed to integrate with the functions mentioned. This planning system works on commercial CAD software, and a prototype of autonomous and intelligent machine tool can achieve direct machining operation or “Rapid Manufacturing” which does not require any effort to prepare an NC program.

  15. Simulations of NOVA direct-drive hydrodynamics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, S.V,; Glendinning, S.G.

    1991-04-15

    Directly driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth experiments being performed on NOVA have been simulated using the computer code, LASNEX. Foils with single-wavelength imposed surface perturbations have been driven with a single beam of 0.53 {mu}m light, employing smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). In addition to simulating foils with imposed surface perturbations, we have simulated flat foils driven by beams with time-dependent intensity modulation resulting from the NOVA implementation of SSD. These simulations show the development of large amplitude modulation of the target from residual intensity nonuniformities. Structure seeded by beam nonuniformity would overwhelm modulation resulting from imposed surface perturbations of sub-micron initial amplitude, but is predicted to develop sufficiently slowly that we expect to observe growth of perturbations with initial amplitudes of several microns. In other NOVA experiments, flat foils with an embedded brominated spectroscopic tracer layer are used in infer mass ablation rates. SSD drive is predicted to yield ablation rates in better agreement with 1-D simulations than drive from a beam with random phase plates (RPP) alone. Simulations of foils driven with RPP beams show enhanced ablation rates because modulation of the ablation front increases its surface area. Line emission from the seed is first seen at cold spots in the beam, which create protruding spikes at the ablation front. Simulation results will be compared with early experimental data. 5 refs., 14 figs.

  16. High-energy resummation in direct photon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diana, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    We present the computation of the direct photon production cross-section in perturbative QCD to all orders in the limit of high partonic center-of-mass energy. We show how the high-energy resummation can be performed consistently in the presence of a collinear singularity in the final state, we compare our results to the fixed order NLO cross-section in the MS¯ scheme, and we provide predictions at NNLO and beyond.

  17. Photoelectrochemical based direct conversion systems for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Kocha, S.; Peterson, M.; Arent, D.

    1996-10-01

    Photon driven, direct conversion systems consist of a light absorber and a water splitting catalyst as a monolithic system; water is split directly upon illumination. This one-step process eliminates the need to generate electricity externally and subsequently feed it to an electrolyzer. These configurations require only the piping necessary for transport of hydrogen to an external storage system or gas pipeline. This work is focused on multiphoton photoelectrochemical devices for production of hydrogen directly using sunlight and water. Two types of multijunction cells, one consisting of a-Si triple junctions and the other GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs homojunctions, were studied for the photoelectrochemical decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen from an aqueous electrolyte solution. To catalyze the water decomposition process, the illuminated surface of the device was modified either by addition of platinum colloids or by coating with ruthenium dioxide. These colloids have been characterized by gel electrophoresis.

  18. Using wet microalgae for direct biodiesel production via microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Yu, Tao; Li, Tao; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2013-03-01

    To address the large energy consumption of microalgae dewatering and to simplify the conventional two-step method (cellular lipid extraction and lipid transesterification) for biodiesel production, a novel process for the direct conversion of wet microalgae biomass into biodiesel by microwave irradiation is proposed. The influences of conventional thermal heating and microwave irradiation on biodiesel production from wet microalgae biomass were investigated. The effects of using the one-step (simultaneous lipid extraction and transesterification) and two-step methods were also studied. Approximately 77.5% of the wet microalgal cell walls were disrupted under microwave irradiation. The biodiesel production rate and yield from wet microalgae biomass obtained through the one-step process using microwave irradiation were 6-fold and 1.3-fold higher than those from wet microalgae obtained through the two-step process using conventional heating.

  19. Direct bioethanol production by amylolytic yeast Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Aruna, A; Nagavalli, M; Girijashankar, V; Ponamgi, S P D; Swathisree, V; Rao, L Venkateswar

    2015-03-01

    An attempt was made to produce bioethanol using optimized fermentation parameters and mutationally improved strain of Candida albicans. The mutant strain OMC3E6 obtained by UV irradiation followed by ethidium bromide successive mutations showed 2.6 times more glucoamylase secretion and 1.5 times more bioethanol production via direct conversion of starch. Enhanced hydrolysis of insoluble starch (72%) and potato starch (70%) was achieved with glucoamylase enzyme preparation from mutant C. albicans. In fermentation medium, the use of maltose, corn steep liquor, NaH2 PO4 , NaCl + MgSO4 and Triton X-100 has increased the glucoamylase production by the microbe. Under optimized conditions, C. albicans eventually produced 437 g ethanol kg(-1) potatoes. Earlier reports mentioned the use of thrice the quantity of starch as reported by us followed by more fermentation period (3-4 days) and demanded pretreatment of starch sources with alpha-amylase as well. Here, we simplified these three steps and obtained 73% conversion of insoluble starch into ethanol via direct conversion method in a period of 2 days without the involvement of cell immobilizations or enzyme pretreatment steps. Due to fast depletion of fossil fuels in the modern world, bioethanol usage as an alternate energy source is the need of the hour. For the first time, we report bioethanol production by Candida albicans via direct conversion of starchy biomass into ethanol along with enhanced starch-hydrolysing capacity and ethanol conversion ratio. So far, C. albicans was dealt in the field of clinical pathology, but here we successfully employed this organism to produce bioethanol from starchy agri-substrates. Optimizing fermentation parameters and improving the microbial strains through successive mutagenesis can improve the end product yield. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Cascade processes in stratified media: experiment and direct numerical simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibgatullin, Ilias; Brouzet, Christophe; Joubaud, Sylvain; Ermanyuk, Evgeny; Dauxois, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves may transfer substantial part of energy in oceans and astrophysical objects, influence the background stratification, and angular momentum. Internal waves can be generated by convection in astrophysical objects, by tidal motion and interaction with orography in oceans. Internal and inertial waves obey similar system of equations. Due to very particular type of dispersive relation and the way internal waves are reflected from surfaces, in confined domains the monochromatic internal waves after sequence of reflections may form closed paths, the "wave attractors" [1]. Presently, linear theory of wave attractors is quite elaborated and a principal interest of research is focused on nonlinear regimes and unstable configurations, overturning events and mixing. We have performed direct numerical simulation of wave attractors which closely reproduces experiments [2] being carried out in Ecole Normal Superior de Lyon (ENS de Lyon). Direct numerical simulation is realized with the help of spectral element approach and code nek5000. Triadic resonance is confirmed as the first instability which appears on the most energetic ray of the attractor at sufficiently large forcing. With further increase of the forcing amplitude the daughter waves also become unstable resulting in a sophisticated cascade process which was first observed experimentally. For very high forcing amplitude interaction of focused waves with the walls results in appearance of small-scale folded structures. Their interaction with principal flow is the subject of further research. 1. Maas, L. R. M. & Lam, F.-P. A., Geometric focusing of internal waves. J. Fluid Mech, 1995,. 300, 1-41 2. Scolan, H., Ermanyuk, E., Dauxois, T., 2013, Physical Review Letters, 110, 234501

  1. ATP drives direct photosynthetic production of 1-butanol in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Ethan I.; Liao, James C.

    2012-01-01

    While conservation of ATP is often a desirable trait for microbial production of chemicals, we demonstrate that additional consumption of ATP may be beneficial to drive product formation in a nonnatural pathway. Although production of 1-butanol by the fermentative coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent pathway using the reversal of β-oxidation exists in nature and has been demonstrated in various organisms, the first step of the pathway, condensation of two molecules of acetyl-CoA to acetoacetyl-CoA, is thermodynamically unfavorable. Here, we show that artificially engineered ATP consumption through a pathway modification can drive this reaction forward and enables for the first time the direct photosynthetic production of 1-butanol from cyanobacteria Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We further demonstrated that substitution of bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE2) with separate butyraldehyde dehydrogenase (Bldh) and NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (YqhD) increased 1-butanol production by 4-fold. These results demonstrated the importance of ATP and cofactor driving forces as a design principle to alter metabolic flux. PMID:22474341

  2. ATP drives direct photosynthetic production of 1-butanol in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ethan I; Liao, James C

    2012-04-17

    While conservation of ATP is often a desirable trait for microbial production of chemicals, we demonstrate that additional consumption of ATP may be beneficial to drive product formation in a nonnatural pathway. Although production of 1-butanol by the fermentative coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent pathway using the reversal of β-oxidation exists in nature and has been demonstrated in various organisms, the first step of the pathway, condensation of two molecules of acetyl-CoA to acetoacetyl-CoA, is thermodynamically unfavorable. Here, we show that artificially engineered ATP consumption through a pathway modification can drive this reaction forward and enables for the first time the direct photosynthetic production of 1-butanol from cyanobacteria Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We further demonstrated that substitution of bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE2) with separate butyraldehyde dehydrogenase (Bldh) and NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (YqhD) increased 1-butanol production by 4-fold. These results demonstrated the importance of ATP and cofactor driving forces as a design principle to alter metabolic flux.

  3. Beauty and charm production at fixed-target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Erik E. Gottschalk

    2003-12-10

    Fixed-target experiments continue to provide insights into the physics of particle production in strong interactions. The experiments are performed with different types of beam particles of varying energies, and many different target materials. Studies of beauty and charm production are of particular interest, since experimental results can be compared to perturbative QCD calculations. It is in this context that recent results from fixed-target experiments on beauty and charm production will be reviewed.

  4. SUSY under siege from direct and indirect WIMP detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Howard; Barger, Vernon; Serce, Hasan

    2016-12-01

    We examine updated prospects for detecting WIMPs in supersymmetric models via direct and indirect dark matter search experiments. We examine several historical and also still viable scenarios: projections for well-tempered neutralinos (WTN), projections from the MasterCode (MC), BayesFits (BF) and Fittino (FO) collaborations, nonthermal wino dark matter (NThW) and finally mixed axion-Higgsino dark matter from SUSY with radiatively driven naturalness (RNS). The WTN is ruled out by recent limits from XENON and LUX collaborations. The NThW scenario, previously on tenuous ground due to gamma-line searches, appears also ruled out by recent combined Fermi-LAT/MAGIC limits combined with new HESS results from continuum gamma rays. Substantial portions of MC parameter space and 1 TeV Higgsino parameter space from BF group are ruled out. The 100-300 GeV Higgsino-like WIMP from RNS survives due to its possible depleted local abundance (where the axion may make up the bulk of dark matter). Projections from ton-scale noble liquid detectors should discover or rule out WIMPs from the remaining parameter space of these surviving models.

  5. Status of the RBCC Direct-Connect Mixer Combustor Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James F.; Kamhawi, Hani; Krivanek, Thomas M.; Thomas, Scott R.; Smith, Timothy D.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing hydrogen based combined cycle propulsion technology for a single-stage-to-orbit launch vehicle application under a project called GTX. Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion systems incorporate one or more rocket engines into an airbreathing flow path to increase specific impulse as compared to an all rocket-powered vehicle. In support of this effort, an RBCC direct-connect test capability was established at the Engine Components Research Laboratory to investigate low speed, ejector ramjet, and initial ramjet operations and performance. The facility and test article enables the evaluation of two candidate low speed operating schemes; the simultaneous mixing and combustion (SMC) and independent ramjet stream (IRS). The SMC operating scheme is based on the fuel rich operations of the rocket where performance depends upon mixing between the rocket plume and airstream. In contrast, the IRS scheme fuels the airstream separately and uses the rocket plume to ignite the fuel-air mixture. This paper describes the test hardware and facility upgrades installed to support the RBCC tests. It also defines and discusses low speed technical challenges being addressed by the experiments. Finally, preliminary test results, including rocket risk mitigating tests, unfueled airflow tests, and the integrated system hot fire test will be presented.

  6. Production of heavy quarkonia in hadronic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhoded, A. K.; Luchinsky, A. V.; Poslavsky, S. V.

    2017-06-01

    Processes of single and pair production of heavy quarkonia under LHC conditions have been studied within nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics. Constraints on the matrix elements of color-singlet and color-octet states have been obtained by analyzing the existing experimental data. It has been shown that the leading contribution to the cross sections for these processes comes from the color singlet mechanism with the singlet matrix elements exceeding phenomenological values obtained from the solutions of potential models or experimental decay widths of the corresponding mesons. It has also been found that the contribution from color-octet states should be taken into account to describe the ratio of the cross sections for the production of tensor and axial charmonia. These results have been used to analyze the single production of bottomonia, the pair production of heavy quarkonia, and the production of vector charmonium in jets. The resulting theoretical predictions are in good agreement with experimental data.

  7. Direct photon production in high-energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Peitzmann, T.

    2016-01-22

    Direct photons have always been considered a promising probe for the very early phases of high-energy nuclear collisions. Prompt photons reveal information about the initial state and its possible modifications in nuclei. In this context they should be one of the best probes for effects of gluon saturation. Thermal photons emitted from the produced matter in nuclear collisions carry information on the temperature of the very early phase. In particular a simultaneous measurement of yield and elliptic flow of thermal photons can put strong constraints on the early time dynamics of the system. I review the status of results on direct photon measurements at RHIC and LHC and their interpretation. Prompt photons at high p{sub T} are consistent with expectations from NLO pQCD in pp and show no strong nuclear modifications in A–A collisions. Recent analysis at RHIC has shown very intriguing results for lower p{sub T}, with high thermal photon yield and strong elliptic flow of direct photons, which are not fully understood theoretically. Also the ALICE experiment at the LHC has measured a high yield of thermal photons. Furthermore I discuss prospects for future measurements of forward direct photons at the LHC.

  8. Ultrasonic assisted biodiesel production of microalgae by direct transesterification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalsum, Ummu; Mahfud, Mahfud; Roesyadi, Achmad

    2017-03-01

    Microalgae are considered as the third generation source of biofuel and an excellent candidate for biofuel production to replace the fossil energy. The use of ultrasonic in producing biodiesel by direct transesterification of Nannochloropsis occulata using KOH as catalyst and methanol as a solvent was investigated. The following condition were determined as an optimum by experimental evaluates:: 1: 15 microalga to methanol (molar ratio); 3% catalyst concentration at temperature 40°C after 30 minute of ultrasonication. The highest yield of biodiesel produced was 30.3%. The main components of methyl ester from Nannochloropsis occulata were palmitic (C16 :0),, oleic (C18:1), stearic (C18;0), arahidic (C20:0) and myristic (C14:0). This stated that the application of ultrasounic for direct transesterificaiton of microalgae effectively reduced the reaction time compared to the reported values of conventional heating systems.

  9. Distillate production of a simple direct solar still

    SciTech Connect

    McCracken, H. )

    1990-09-01

    The direct solar energy still discussed here is the product of lessons learned through hundreds of successful installations and shows a favorable optimization of the requirements of performance and cost. Typical annual average production in a wide range of climates in tropical and lower mid-latitude regions is projected to fall in a range of 4 to 6 liters per square meter per day (L/m{sup 2}/day). Figures show an array of standard, manufactured solar stills that have been in test operation for almost a year. Comparisons are presented between the older one, and the current model with cross-section drawings of the two. The author presents information on siting, design choices, and methods of predicting performance of his current model. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. A novel bi-directional promoter system allows tunable recombinant protein production in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Rajamanickam, Vignesh; Metzger, Karl; Schmid, Christian; Spadiut, Oliver

    2017-09-13

    The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris is a well-studied host organism for recombinant protein production, which is usually regulated either by a constitutive promoter (e.g. promoter of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase; PGAP) or an inducible promoter (e.g. promoter of alcohol oxidase 1; PAOX1). Both promoter systems have several advantages and disadvantages; with one of the main disadvantages being their lack of tunability. Various novel promoter systems, which are either inducible or de-repressed, allowing higher degrees of freedom, have been reported. Recently, bi-directional promoter systems in P. pastoris with two promoter systems regulating recombinant expression of one or more genes were developed. In this study, we introduce a novel bi-directional promoter system combining a modified catalase promoter system (PDC; derepressible and inducible) and the traditional PAOX1, allowing tunable recombinant protein production. We characterized a recombinant P. pastoris strain, carrying the novel bi-directional promoter system, during growth and production in three dynamic bioreactor cultivations. We cloned the model enzyme cellobiohydralase downstream of either promoter and applied different feeding strategies to determine the physiological boundaries of the strain. We succeeded in demonstrating tunability of recombinant protein production solely in response to the different feeding strategies and identified a mixed feed regime allowing highest productivity. In this feasibility study, we present the first controlled bioreactor experiments with a recombinant P. pastoris strain carrying a novel bi-directional promotor combination of a catalase promoter variant (PDC) and the traditional PAOX1. We demonstrated that this bi-directional promoter system allows tunable recombinant protein expression only in response to the available C-sources. This bi-directional promoter system offers a high degree of freedom for bioprocess design and development, making bi-directional

  11. Production of heavy quarkonia in hadronic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhoded, A. K.; Luchinsky, A. V.; Poslavsky, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    The phenomenology of the production of P-wave χ c,b mesons and S-wave η c,b mesons in highenergy hadron-hadron collisions was studied on the basis of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics (NRQCD). Available experimental data on χ c -meson production were analyzed, and nonperturbative NRQCDmatrix elements were determined from a fit to these data. It is shown that the observed transversemomentum ( pT) spectrum of χ c mesons is basically formed by color-singlet contributions. At the same time, the ratio σ( χ c2)/ σ( χ c1) depends greatly on color-octet contributions; this ratio therefore becomes a highly sensitive tool for separating different NRQCD contributions. Predictions for χ b -meson production are obtained on the basis of NRQCD scaling rules. For the case of η c -meson production, it is shown that the observed cross sections agree with the color-singlet model featuring phenomenological parameters.

  12. Direct Dark Matter Search with the XENON100 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Yuan

    Dark matter, a non-luminous, non-baryonic matter, is thought to constitute 23 % of the matter-energy components in the universe today. Except for its gravitational effects, the existence of dark matter has never been confirmed by any other means and its nature remains unknown. If a hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) were in thermal equilibrium in the early universe, it could have a relic abundance close to that of dark matter today, which provides a promising particle candidate of dark matter. Minimal Super-Symmetric extensions to the standard model predicts a stable particle with mass in the range 10 GeV/c2 to 1000 GeV/c2, and spin-independent cross-section with ordinary matter nucleon sigmax < 1 x 10--43 cm2. The XENON100 experiment deploys a Dual Phase Liquid Xenon Time Projection Chamber (LXeTPC) of 62 kg liquid xenon as its sensitive volume, to detect scintillation (S1) and ionization (S2) signals from WIMP dark matter particles directly scattering off xenon nuclei. The detector is located underground at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) in central Italy. 1.4 km of rock (3.7 km water equivalent) reduces the cosmic muon background by a factor of 106. The event-by-event 3D positioning capability of TPC allows volume fiducialization. With the self-shielding power of liquid xenon, as well as a 99 kg liquid xenon active veto, the electromagnetic radiation background is greatly suppressed. By utilizing the difference of (S2/S1) between electronic recoil and nuclear recoil, the expected WIMP signature, a small nuclear recoil energy deposition, could be discriminated from electronic recoil background with high efficiency. XENON100 achieved the lowest background rate (< 2.2 x 10--2 events/kg/day/keV) in the dark matter search region (< 40 keV) among all direct dark matter detectors. With 11.2 days of data, XENON100 already sets the world's best spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-section limit of 2.7 x 10--44 cm2 at WIMP mass 50 GeV/c 2

  13. Smoothing and roughening of slip surfaces in direct shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagy, Amir; Badt, Nir; Hatzor, Yossef H.

    2015-04-01

    Faults in the upper crust contain discrete slip surfaces which have absorbed a significant part of the shear displacement along them. Field measurements demonstrate that these surfaces are rough at all measurable scales and indicate that surfaces of relatively large-slip faults are statistically smoother than those of small-slip faults. However, post faulting and surface erosion process that might affect the geometry of outcrops cannot be discounted in such measurements. Here we present experimental results for the evolution of shear surface topography as function of slip distance and normal stress in direct shear experiments. A single prismatic fine grain limestone block is first fractured in tension mode using the four-point bending test methodology and then the fracture surface topography is scanned using a laser profilometer. We then shear the obtained tensile fracture surfaces in direct shear, ensuring the original fracture surfaces are in a perfectly matching configuration at the beginning of the shear test. First, shearing is conducted to distances varying from 5 to 15 mm under constant normal stress of 2MPa and a constant displacement rate of 0.05 mm/s using two closed-loop servo controlled hydraulic pistons, supplying normal and shear forces (Davidesko et al., 2014). In the tested configuration peak shear stress is typically attained after a shear displacement of about 2-3 mm, beyond which lower shear stress is required to continue shearing at the preset displacement rate of 0.05 mm/s as is typical for initially rough joints. Following some initial compression the interface begins to dilate and continues to do so until the end of the test. The sheared tensile fracture surface is then scanned again and the geometrical evolution, in term of RMS roughness and power spectral density (PSD) is analyzed. We show that shearing smooth the surface along all our measurements scales. The roughness ratio, measured by initial PSD / final PSD for each wavelength

  14. Production Experiences with the Cray-Enabled TORQUE Resource Manager

    SciTech Connect

    Ezell, Matthew A; Maxwell, Don E; Beer, David

    2013-01-01

    High performance computing resources utilize batch systems to manage the user workload. Cray systems are uniquely different from typical clusters due to Cray s Application Level Placement Scheduler (ALPS). ALPS manages binary transfer, job launch and monitoring, and error handling. Batch systems require special support to integrate with ALPS using an XML protocol called BASIL. Previous versions of Adaptive Computing s TORQUE and Moab batch suite integrated with ALPS from within Moab, using PERL scripts to interface with BASIL. This would occasionally lead to problems when all the components would become unsynchronized. Version 4.1 of the TORQUE Resource Manager introduced new features that allow it to directly integrate with ALPS using BASIL. This paper describes production experiences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the new TORQUE software versions, as well as ongoing and future work to improve TORQUE.

  15. Direct microsensor measurement of nitric oxide production by the osteoclast.

    PubMed

    Silverton, S F; Adebanjo, O A; Moonga, B S; Awumey, E M; Malinski, T; Zaidi, M

    1999-05-27

    Nitric oxide (NO) triggers marked osteoclast retraction which closely resembles that due to Ca2+. The effect of Ca2+ has been attributed to a stimulated release of NO. Here, we show for the first time, by direct measurement with a microsensor, that osteoclasts do indeed produce NO and that this production is enhanced by a high Ca2+. We also show that the Ca2+ ionophore, A23187, mimics the latter. Furthermore, osteoclasts on dentine produce more NO than osteoclasts on glass and NO release from dentine-plated osteoclasts is much less sensitive to stimulation by Ca2+. Finally, the microsomal Ca2+ store-depleting agent, thapsigargin, attenuates NO release only from osteoclasts on glass, suggesting that stored Ca2+ has the dominant effect in modulating NO release from non-resorbing cells. NO is a powerful inhibitor of bone resorption: a direct demonstration of its production is therefore strong evidence for a role in modulating osteoclast function. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  16. Human productivity experience and undersea habitat design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, T. C.; Spencer, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    Lessons learned from the Alaskan North Slope construction camps and the Western Regional Undersea Laboratory are analyzed with respect to possible improvements for space station interior space utilization and living areas. The human factors engineering aspects have a direct bearing on the condition of crew and occupants.

  17. Multinational Experiment 7: Catalog of Products

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-08

    the view that better mitigation approaches need to be developed and that adequate training and exercises focusing on the employment of these...been informed by various MNE campaigns is given below: o ACO Comprehensive Operations Planning Directive ( COPD ) – Interim, 17 December 2010 (from

  18. SRS analyses of direct-drive ICF experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, P.; Rosenberg, M.; Myatt, J.; Solodov, A.; Seka, W.; Chapman, T.; Hohenberger, M.; Masse, L.; Goyon, C.; Turnbull, D.; Regan, S.; Moody, J. D.

    2016-10-01

    A series of planar target experiments was recently conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to study the laser-plasma interactions processes responsible for the production of suprathermal electrons, and their scaling from experiments at the Omega facility to full-scale ICF experiments at the MJ level on the NIF. We will present experimental analyses and simulations of Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) in these planar target experiments. Our work indicates the presence of purely backscattered SRS refracted off nearly one-dimensional density gradients, as well as more complicated features such as side-scatter and scattering from non-1D features (e.g. edges) in the target. Simulations using ray- and paraxial-wave- based simulation codes are used to extrapolate the hot electron fraction from the SRS measurements, and point to SRS being the primary mechanism for the generation of suprathermal electrons in these experiments. We will also present analyses of spherical implosions experiments and provide extrapolations and implications for future full-scale direct-drive experiments at NIF. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Production of heavy quarkonia in hadronic experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Likhoded, A. K. Luchinsky, A. V. Poslavsky, S. V.

    2015-12-15

    The phenomenology of the production of P-wave χ{sub c,b} mesons and S-wave η{sub c,b} mesons in highenergy hadron–hadron collisions was studied on the basis of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics (NRQCD). Available experimental data on χ{sub c}-meson production were analyzed, and nonperturbative NRQCDmatrix elements were determined from a fit to these data. It is shown that the observed transversemomentum (pT) spectrum of χ{sub c} mesons is basically formed by color-singlet contributions. At the same time, the ratio σ(χ{sub c2})/σ(χ{sub c1}) depends greatly on color-octet contributions; this ratio therefore becomes a highly sensitive tool for separating different NRQCD contributions. Predictions for χ{sub b}-meson production are obtained on the basis of NRQCD scaling rules. For the case of η{sub c}-meson production, it is shown that the observed cross sections agree with the color-singlet model featuring phenomenological parameters.

  20. Beauty, charm and hyperon production at fixed-target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Erik Gottschalk

    2002-12-11

    Over the years fixed-target experiments have performed numerous studies of particle production in strong interactions. The experiments have been performed with different types of beam particles of varying energies, and many different target materials. Since the physics of particle production is still not understood, ongoing research of phenomena that we observe as beauty, charm and strange-particle production is crucial if we are to gain an understanding of these fundamental processes. It is in this context that recent results from fixed-target experiments on beauty, charm, and hyperon production will be reviewed.

  1. Criteria for evaluating experiments on crop production in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, W. L.; Koontz, H.; Wheeler, R.; Prince, R.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the development of criteria for successful CELSS experiments on crop production in space. Also, the development of a standard procedure to produce a given expected yield is examined. Factors influencing the success of CELSS experiments are discussed, including environmental limits to growth, efficient use of resources, data collection sensitivity, stress, and the space in which the experiment is performed. The implications of the study for designing CELSS food production systems are noted.

  2. Criteria for evaluating experiments on crop production in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, W. L.; Koontz, H.; Wheeler, R.; Prince, R.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the development of criteria for successful CELSS experiments on crop production in space. Also, the development of a standard procedure to produce a given expected yield is examined. Factors influencing the success of CELSS experiments are discussed, including environmental limits to growth, efficient use of resources, data collection sensitivity, stress, and the space in which the experiment is performed. The implications of the study for designing CELSS food production systems are noted.

  3. Pilot Experiments of Magnesia Direct Electryolysis in a 5KA Magnesium Reduction Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Huimin; Jia, Wellton; Liao, Chunfa; Ma, Ruixin; Yuan, Wenhui

    A new technique of magnesia direct electrolysis to produce magnesium with the LaCl3-MgCl2 system as support electrolyte published in Magnesium Technology 2004 has low energy consumption, high current efficiency and less pollution for the environment. In this paper, pilot experiments of the new technique of magnesia direct electrolysis in a 5kA magnesium electrolysis cell are conducted. The electrolyte is also the LaCl3-MgCl2 system. The experiment results indicate that the LaCl3-MgCl2 system is promising. These pilot experiments lay a good foundation for industrial comprehensive utilization of bischofite from Qinghai Lakes in China. In the meantime, the physico-chemical properties of LaCl3-MgCl2 bath system, electrolyte ionic species and electrode reactions of the magnesia direct electrolysis in the LaCl3-MgCl2 system are studied. The operational parameters of the new process are also compared with those of the common aluminum production process and MgCl2 electrolysis process.

  4. Genetically Directed Production of Recombinant, Isosteric and Nonhydrolysable Ubiquitin Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We describe the genetically directed incorporation of aminooxy functionality into recombinant proteins by using a mutant Methanosarcina barkeri pyrrolysyl‐tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair. This allows the general production of nonhydrolysable ubiquitin conjugates of recombinant origin by bioorthogonal oxime ligation. This was exemplified by the preparation of nonhydrolysable versions of diubiquitin, polymeric ubiquitin chains and ubiquitylated SUMO. The conjugates exhibited unrivalled isostery with the native isopeptide bond, as inferred from structural and biophysical characterisation. Furthermore, the conjugates functioned as nanomolar inhibitors of deubiquitylating enzymes and were recognised by linkage‐specific antibodies. This technology should provide a versatile platform for the development of powerful tools for studying deubiquitylating enzymes and for elucidating the cellular roles of diverse polyubiquitin linkages. PMID:27197715

  5. Engineering cyanobacteria for direct biofuel production from CO2.

    PubMed

    Savakis, Philipp; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2015-06-01

    For a sustainable future of our society it is essential to close the global carbon cycle. Oxidised forms of carbon, in particular CO2, can be used to synthesise energy-rich organic molecules. Engineered cyanobacteria have attracted attention as catalysts for the direct conversion of CO2 into reduced fuel compounds. Proof of principle for this approach has been provided for a vast range of commodity chemicals, mostly energy carriers, such as short chain and medium chain alcohols. More recently, research has focused on the photosynthetic production of compounds with higher added value, most notably terpenoids. Below we review the recent developments that have improved the state-of-the-art of this approach and speculate on future developments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Results and outline of multi-direction lidar system experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muranaka, W.; Kawahara, T.; Nozawa, S.

    2014-12-01

    Shinshu University, Nagoya University and RIKEN developed an all solid-state, high-power Na lidar for the temperature/wind measurements in the MLT region over the EISCAT radar site in Tromso (69 N), Norway. The lidar was launched at the radar site on October 2010, and the observation has been successfully done for successive four winter seasons. Current observation is five-direction mode, which observes a vertical direction, as well as directions of 30-degree tilted to the north, south, east and west. Now we try to upgrade the system to observe any direction in the sky using a new laser transmission system and a PC-controllable telescope. The transmission system is composed of two electric rotary stages and two mirrors with the vertical and horizontal axes to emit the laser. The pointing repeatability to the same direction was measured to be within 0.1 mrad. The azimuth and elevation of the telescope was adjusted using the position of some bright stars. The pointing repeatability of the telescope was confirmed to be about 0.3.mrad. Using a CCD camera, laser trajectory can be monitored with the telescope image so that we can tweak the direction. Current subject we are focusing on is to make automatic and successive observations to a set of directions in the sky. In this talk, we introduce our new lidar and will discuss the results of test observation mentioned above.

  7. Experiences in Nature: Resolute Second-Plane Directions toward Erdkinder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Gerard; Allen, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Gerard Leonard and Kathleen Allen describe a variety of nature experiences as a part of the Montessori elementary tradition, beginning with a warning about the way contemporary life constrains children's experience of nature. Through a lyrical rendering of the nature-based expressions of children, Leonard and Allen look at a variety of approaches…

  8. Microbial biodiesel production by direct methanolysis of oleaginous biomass.

    PubMed

    Thliveros, Panagiotis; Uçkun Kiran, Esra; Webb, Colin

    2014-04-01

    Biodiesel is usually produced by the transesterification of vegetable oils and animal fats with methanol, catalyzed by strong acids or bases. This study introduces a novel biodiesel production method that features direct base-catalyzed methanolysis of the cellular biomass of oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides Y4. NaOH was used as catalyst for transesterification reactions and the variables affecting the esterification level including catalyst concentration, reaction temperature, reaction time, solvent loading (methanol) and moisture content were investigated using the oleaginous yeast biomass. The most suitable pretreatment condition was found to be 4gL(-1) NaOH and 1:20 (w/v) dried biomass to methanol ratio for 10h at 50°C and under ambient pressure. Under these conditions, the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yield was 97.7%. Therefore, the novel method of direct base-catalyzed methanolysis of R. toruloides is a much simpler, less tedious and time-consuming, process than the conventional processes with higher FAME (biodiesel) conversion yield. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Certification of solar products - The Florida experience

    SciTech Connect

    POST,HAROLD N.; ROLAND,JAMES D.; VENTRE,GERARD G.; HUGGINS,JAMES C.

    2000-02-02

    Florida legislation enacted in 1976 directed the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) to develop standards for solar energy systems manufactured or sold in the state, establish criteria for testing the performance of solar energy systems, and provide a means to display compliance with approved performance tests for these systems. This mandate has been effectively implemented for both solar domestic water heating and solar pool heating systems. With growing interest and markets for photovoltaic systems, plans are presently being developed to expand the scope of the mandate to include photovoltaic technology. This paper discusses four complementary facets of a photovoltaic (PV) system certification program. They include PV module performance characterization and rating; PV system design review and approval; examination and authorization of photovoltaic system installers; and inspection and acceptance testing of PV system installation. The suggested photovoltaic system process builds on lessons learned from over 20 years of testing, certifying and labeling of solar thermal collectors, and the certification of solar thermal systems.

  10. Direct Experience with Nature and the Development of Biological Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longbottom, Sarah E.; Slaughter, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: An emerging consensus is that casual, direct contact with nature influences the development of children's biological knowledge. Here we review the existing literature on this topic, focusing on the effects of (a) rural versus urban rearing environments and (b) pet ownership and care on children's biological concepts and…

  11. Direct Experience with Nature and the Development of Biological Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longbottom, Sarah E.; Slaughter, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: An emerging consensus is that casual, direct contact with nature influences the development of children's biological knowledge. Here we review the existing literature on this topic, focusing on the effects of (a) rural versus urban rearing environments and (b) pet ownership and care on children's biological concepts and…

  12. Clinical experience with CD64-directed immunotherapy. An overview.

    PubMed

    Curnow, R T

    1997-01-01

    The class I IgG receptor (Fc gamma RI or CD64 receptor), which is present on key cytotoxic effector cells, has been shown to initiate the destruction of tumor cells in vitro and has been hypothesized to play a role in the destruction of antibody-coated cells such as platelets in idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP). This overview summarizes the clinical experience with CD64-directed immunotherapy in cancer patients with the bispecific antibodies MDX-447 [humanized Fab anti-CD64 x humanized Fab anti-(epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR)] and MDX-H210 (humanized Fab anti-DC64 x Fab anti-HER2/neu), and with the anti-CD64 monoclonal antibody (mAB) MDX-33 (H22) in the modulation of monocyte CD64 in vivo. In an ongoing phase I/II open-label trial with progressive dose escalation (1-15 mg/m2), patients with treatment refractory EGFR-positive cancers (renal cell carcinoma (RCC), head and neck, bladder, ovarian, prostate cancer and skin cancer) are treated weekly with intravenous MDX-447, with and without granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). MDX-447 has been found to be immunologically active at all doses, binding to circulating monocytes and neutrophils (when given with G-CSF), causing monocytopenia and stimulating increases in circulating plasma cytokines. MDX-447 is well tolerated, the primary toxicities being fever, chills, blood pressure lability, and pain/ myalgias. Of 36 patients evaluable for response, 9 have experienced stable disease of 3-6 month's duration. The optimal dose and the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) have yet to be defined; dose escalation continues to define better the dose, toxicity, and the potential therapeutic role of this bispecific antibody. Three MDX-H210 phase II trials are currently in progress, all using the intravenous dose of 15 mg/m2 given with granulocyte/macrophage (GM-CSF). These consist of one trial each in the treatment of RCC patients, patients with prostate cancer, and colorectal cancer patients, all of whom have

  13. Perceptions Regarding Supervised Experience Programs: Past Research and Future Direction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrick, R. Kirby; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A literature review found that (1) most school administrators, agricultural employers, and teachers value supervised occupational experience (SOE) programs; (2) agricultural teachers have primary responsibility for SOE but would like more released time; and (3) most teachers and administrators saw a need to expand the SOE concept and clientele.…

  14. Directly observed therapy for tuberculosis: the Harlem Hospital experience, 1993.

    PubMed Central

    el-Sadr, W; Medard, F; Berthaud, V; Barthaud, V

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. A directly observed therapy program was established at Harlem Hospital, New York, NY, in 1993 to promote high tuberculosis treatment completion rates. METHODS. The Harlem program used an on-site surrogate family model. Treatment completion rate, visit adherence rate, human immuno-deficiency virus seroprevalence, and time to sputum culture conversion were assessed. RESULTS. Out of 145 enrolled patients with suspected and confirmed tuberculosis, 95 (92 confirmed and 3 suspected) continued treatment. The visit adherence rate was 91.1 +/- 7.9%, with one patient (1%) lost to follow-up. CONCLUSION. High rates of treatment completion and visit adherence were achieved because of unique program characteristics. Thus, directly observed therapy is advocated as a means of ensuring treatment completion. PMID:8712276

  15. Experiment and analysis of directional effects on radiant heat transfer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toor, J. S.; Viskanta, R.

    1972-01-01

    Critical examination of the validity of the commonly used simplified models for predicting local and overall radiant heat interchange among real surfaces. The spectral local irradiation was measured at wavelengths of 3.08 and 4.51 microns in a configuration consisting of three plane parallel surfaces of finite extent. The test surfaces were gold with mechanical roughness and temperature varying from 0.02 to 7.1 microns and 77 to 760 K, respectively. Comparisons between experimental data and predictions for six different models ranging from the simple diffuse to the most detailed diffuse-plus-specular-directional-property model with specular component calculated according to Beckmann are presented. It is shown that the calculation of the overall irradiation using appropriate constant-property models agrees well with the experimental data to within combined experimental and analytical uncertainty. In general, it is concluded that for accurate prediction of local irradiation the directional characteristics of the surfaces must be considered.

  16. Direct drive foil implosion experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J.C.; Bartsch, R.R.; Benage, J.F.; Forman, P.R.; Gribble, R.F.; Hockaday, M.Y.P.; Hockaday, R.G.; Ladish, J.S.; Oona, H.; Parker, J.V.; Shlachter, J.S.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1993-05-01

    Pegasus II is the upgraded version of Pegasus, a pulsed power machine used in the Los Alamos Above Ground Experiments (AGEX) program. The goal of the program is to produce an intense (>100 TW) source of soft x-rays from the thermalization of the KE of a 1 to 10 MJ collapsing plasma source. The radiation pulse should have a maximum duration of several tens of nanoseconds and will be used in the study of fusion conditions and material properties. This paper addresses z-pinch experiments done on a capacitor bank where the radiating plasma source is formed by an imploding annular aluminum foil driven by the J {times} B forces generated by the current flowing through the foil.

  17. Remembering the earthquake: direct experience vs. hearing the news.

    PubMed

    Neisser, U; Winograd, E; Bergman, E T; Schreiber, C A; Palmer, S E; Weldon, M S

    1996-07-01

    Three groups of informants--two in California, one in Atlanta--recalled their experiences of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake shortly after the event and again 11/2 years later. The Californians' recalls of their own earthquake experiences were virtually perfect. Even their recalls of hearing the news of an earthquake-related event were very good: much higher than Atlantan recalls of hearing about the quake itself. Atlantans who had relatives in the affected area remembered significantly more than those who did not. These data show that personal involvement in the quake led to greatly improved recall, but do not show why. Many Californian informants reported low levels of stress/arousal during the event; arousal ratings were not significantly correlated with recall. The authors suggest that repeated narrative rehearsals may have played an important role.

  18. [Mothers and food advertising directed at children: perceptions and experiences].

    PubMed

    Castronuovo, Luciana; Gutkowski, Patricia; Tiscornia, Victoria; Allemandi, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze how food advertising is perceived by mothers from different socioeconomic sectors of the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Between May and November 2015, eight focus groups were conducted with the participation of 49 mothers of different education levels living in the study area. The results show how the purchasing decisions of mothers are influenced by the requests of their children, which are in turn prompted by food advertising and promotion. The study also shows how food advertising and promotion are combined with other environmental factors (greater supply of food products, "more demanding" children) that affect the decision-making process of mothers regarding their children's nutrition and foster the consumption of certain unhealthy products. This situation was observed in all the focus groups, without differences among education levels.

  19. Ames Coronagraph Experiment: Enabling Missions to Directly Image Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belikov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Technology to find biomarkers and life on other worlds is rapidly maturing. If there is a habitable planet around the nearest star, we may be able to detect it this decade with a small satellite mission. In the 2030 decade, we will likely know if there is life in our Galactic neighborhood (1000 nearest stars). The Ames Coronagraph Experiment is developing coronagraphic technologies to enable such missions.

  20. Limits on Learning Phonotactic Constraints from Recent Production Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warker, Jill A.; Dell, Gary S.; Whalen, Christine A.; Gereg, Samantha

    2008-01-01

    Adults can learn new artificial phonotactic constraints by producing syllables that exhibit the constraints. The experiments presented here tested the limits of phonotactic learning in production using speech errors as an implicit measure of learning. Experiment 1 tested a constraint in which the placement of a consonant as an onset or coda…

  1. Experience in independent power production: Two projects that closed

    SciTech Connect

    Kappaz, M.H.

    1994-12-31

    K and M Engineering and Consulting Corporation`s experience in independent power production is outlined. The following topics are discussed: the KMR Power Corporation, K and M strengths and strategy, key success factors, project experience, selected projects, and capital structure.

  2. Results from CERN experiment NA36 on strangeness production

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    Measurements of the production of strange particles in the reactions S + Pb and S + S at beam momentum 200GeV/c per nucleon are presented. A short description of CERN experiment NA36 and the methods of raw data analysis, is followed by physics results concentrating on the dependence of strange particle production on multiplicity. Transverse momentum distributions are also presented.

  3. Comments on the rank product method for analyzing replicated experiments.

    PubMed

    Koziol, James A

    2010-03-05

    Breitling et al. introduced a statistical technique, the rank product method, for detecting differentially regulated genes in replicated microarray experiments. The technique has achieved widespread acceptance and is now used more broadly, in such diverse fields as RNAi analysis, proteomics, and machine learning. In this note, we relate the rank product method to linear rank statistics and provide an alternative derivation of distribution theory attending the rank product method.

  4. Investigation of photochemical reaction products of glucose formed during direct UV detection in CE.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Thomas; Himmelsbach, Markus; Buchberger, Wolfgang W

    2016-04-01

    In CE, saccharides are accessible to direct UV detection due to a photochemical reaction in the detection window of the separation capillary resulting in the formation of UV absorbing substances. Employing a CE method that allows long in-capillary irradiation with subsequent UV and MS detection, the present study could identify several reaction products of glucose. Among these were UV absorbing substances so far unknown to be formed during direct UV detection with the chemical formulas C4 H6 O2 , C5 H6 O4 , C5 H8 O3, and C6 H8 O5 . Investigations of the impact of the irradiation time revealed differences between these reaction products suggesting differing reaction mechanisms especially for the smallest products. More detailed information could be obtained by experiments with isotope-labeled substrates performed to determine the parts of glucose that are converted to the particular reaction products. In addition, structural formulas for the reaction products were suggested based on HPLC-MS/MS measurements of off-line irradiated glucose solutions which revealed the existence of functional groups such as carboxylic acid or aldehyde groups.

  5. Direct containment heating experiments in Zion Nuclear Power Plant geometry using prototypic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, J.L.; McUmber, L.M.; Spencer, B.W.

    1993-12-31

    Direct Containment Heating (DCH) experiments have been completed which utilize prototypic core materials. The experiments reported on here are a continuation of the Integral Effects Testing (IET) DCH program. The experiments incorporated a 1/40 scale model of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant containment structures. The model included representations of the primary system volume, RPV lower head, cavity and instrument tunnel, and the lower containment structures. The experiments were steam driven. Iron-alumina thermite with chromium was used as a core melt stimulant in the earlier IET experiments. These earlier IET experiments at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) provided useful data on the effect of scale on DCH phenomena; however, a significant question concerns the potential experiment distortions introduced by the use of non-prototypic iron/alumina thermite. Therefore, further testing with prototypic materials has been carried out at ANL. Three tests have been completed, DCH-U1A, U1B and U2. DCH-U1A and U1B employed an inerted containment atmosphere and are counterpart to the IET-1RR test with iron/alumina thermite. DCH-U2 employed nominally the same atmosphere composition of its counterpart iron/alumina test, IET-6. All tests, with prototypic material, have produced lower peak containment pressure rises; 45, 111 and 185 kPa in U1A, U1B and U2, compared to 150 and 250 kPa IET-1RR and 6. Hydrogen production, due to metal-steam reactions, was 33% larger in U1B and U2 compared to IET-1RR and IET-6. The pressurization efficiency was consistently lower for the corium tests compared to the IET tests.

  6. Directional statistics for realistic weakly interacting massive particle direct detection experiments. II. 2D readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Ben; Green, Anne M.

    2005-12-01

    The direction dependence of the WIMP direct detection rate provides a powerful tool for distinguishing a WIMP signal from possible backgrounds. We study the number of events required to discriminate a WIMP signal from an isotropic background for a detector with 2-d readout using nonparametric circular statistics. We also examine the number of events needed to (i) detect a deviation from rotational symmetry, due to flattening of the Milky Way halo and (ii) detect a deviation in the mean direction due to a tidal stream. If the senses of the recoils are measured then of order 20--70 events (depending on the plane of the 2-d readout and the detector location) will be sufficient to reject isotropy of the raw recoil angles at 90% confidence. If the senses can not be measured these number increase by roughly 2 orders of magnitude (compared with an increase of 1 order of magnitude for the case of full 3-d readout). The distributions of the reduced angles, with the (time-dependent) direction of solar motion subtracted, are far more anisotropic, however, and if the isotropy tests are applied to these angles then the numbers of events required are similar to the case of 3-d readout. A deviation from rotational symmetry will only be detectable if the Milky Way halo is significantly flattened. The deviation in the mean direction due to a tidal stream is potentially detectable, however, depending on the density and direction of the stream. The meridian plane (which contains the Earth’s spin axis) is, for all detector locations, the optimum readout plane for rejecting isotropy. However readout in this plane can not be used for detecting flattening of the Milky Way halo or a stream with direction perpendicular to the galactic plane. In these cases the optimum readout plane depends on the detector location.

  7. Wiring photosystem I for direct solar hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Lubner, Carolyn E; Grimme, Rebecca; Bryant, Donald A; Golbeck, John H

    2010-01-26

    The generation of H(2) by the use of solar energy is a promising way to supply humankind's energy needs while simultaneously mitigating environmental concerns that arise due to climate change. The challenge is to find a way to connect a photochemical module that harnesses the sun's energy to a catalytic module that generates H(2) with high quantum yields and rates. In this review, we describe a technology that employs a "molecular wire" to connect a terminal [4Fe-4S] cluster of Photosystem I directly to a catalyst, which can be either a Pt nanoparticle or the distal [4Fe-4S] cluster of an [FeFe]- or [NiFe]-hydrogenase enzyme. The keys to connecting these two moieties are surface-located cysteine residues, which serve as ligands to Fe-S clusters and which can be changed through site-specific mutagenesis to glycine residues, and the use of a molecular wire terminated in sulfhydryl groups to connect the two modules. The sulfhydryl groups at the end of the molecular wire form a direct chemical linkage to a suitable catalyst or can chemically rescue a [4Fe-4S] cluster, thereby generating a strong coordination bond. Specifically, the molecular wire can connect the F(B) iron-sulfur cluster of Photosystem I either to a Pt nanoparticle or, by using the same type of genetic modification, to the differentiated iron atom of the distal [4Fe-4S].(Cys)(3)(Gly) cluster of hydrogenase. When electrons are supplied by a sacrificial donor, this technology forms the cathode of a photochemical half-cell that evolves H(2) when illuminated. If such a device were connected to the anode of a photochemical half-cell that oxidizes water, an in vitro solar energy converter could be realized that generates only O(2) and H(2) in the light. A similar methodology can be used to connect Photosystem I to other redox proteins that have surface-located [4Fe-4S] clusters. The controlled light-driven production of strong reductants by such systems can be used to produce other biofuels or to provide

  8. True Triaxial and Directional Shear Cell Experiments on Dry Sand

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    to investigate induced anisotropy. 74. These experiments were provided with labels ACDI through ACD5; ACEI through ACES; ACFl through ACFb; ACGI...2 % 5 ACD5 5.0 2 % ACE 1 ACEI 5.0 2 % 2 ACE2 5.0 2 % 3 ACE3 5.0 2 % 4 ACE4 5.0 2 % 5 ACES 5.0 2 % ACF 1 ACFI 5.0 2 % 2 ACF2 5.0 2% 3 ACF3 5.0 2 % 4

  9. Status of the DAMIC Direct Dark Matter Search Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; et al.

    2015-09-30

    The DAMIC experiment uses fully depleted, high resistivity CCDs to search for dark matter particles. With an energy threshold $\\sim$50 eV$_{ee}$, and excellent energy and spatial resolutions, the DAMIC CCDs are well-suited to identify and suppress radioactive backgrounds, having an unrivaled sensitivity to WIMPs with masses $<$6 GeV/$c^2$. Early results motivated the construction of a 100 g detector, DAMIC100, currently being installed at SNOLAB. This contribution discusses the installation progress, new calibration efforts near the threshold, a preliminary result with 2014 data, and the prospects for physics results after one year of data taking.

  10. Indirect detection of radiation sources through direct detection of radiolysis products

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Fischer, Larry E [Los Gatos, CA; Felter, Thomas E [Livermore, CA

    2010-04-20

    A system for indirectly detecting a radiation source by directly detecting radiolytic products. The radiation source emits radiation and the radiation produces the radiolytic products. A fluid is positioned to receive the radiation from the radiation source. When the fluid is irradiated, radiolytic products are produced. By directly detecting the radiolytic products, the radiation source is detected.

  11. History and experience: the direction of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Reichman, William E; Rose, Nathan S

    2012-07-01

    As the global population is projected to age substantially in coming decades, the number of individuals who will develop Alzheimer disease (AD) is expected to rise dramatically. We have come to understand that AD is likely to be multidetermined through interactions between heritable causal and susceptibility genes, environmental exposures, midlife health status, and lifestyle choices. In addition, mounting evidence suggests that the neuropathological processes characteristic of AD can be detected several years before the onset of clinical symptoms. Thus, AD is now considered to have presymptomatic, prodromal (mild cognitive impairment), and dementia phases. Through cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, volumetric neuroimaging, functional neuroimaging, and cognitive stress tests, individuals at significant risk for developing dementia can now be identified with greater sensitivity and specificity. Consequently, there is growing attention to identify interventions to halt or delay the onset of AD. The biological capacities of neurogenesis and neuroplasticity and the related concepts of brain and cognitive reserve provide a rationale for developing techniques to maintain or enhance the cognitive abilities of older persons to sufficiently prevent dementia. This has led to the emergence of a new "brain fitness" commercial industry in which "products" are being marketed and sold to consumers to "keep your brain sharp." However, most available brain fitness products have scant scientific evidence to support their effectiveness. Nevertheless, ongoing research advances do support the potential for memory and other intellectual functions to be strengthened and maintained through cognitive training, physical exercise, dietary choices, social engagement, and psychological stress reduction.

  12. Minimal NCSM Direct Photon Production in Proton-antiproton Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadou, I.; Mebarki, N.; Bekli, M. R.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we present the results of our calculations for the direct photons with proton-antiproton collision in Minimal Non-Commutative Standard Model at a center-of-mass energy √ s = 1.96 Tev. The analytical expression of the differential cross section of the two subprocesses is deduced after applying a series of rotation from the equatorial coordinates system to the laboratory frame. Subsequently, we have calculated the inclusive cross section in both space-space and space-time cases independently, by averaging over all unknown angles except the scattering angle and the colatitudes γ of electric-like vector ěc {θ }E and magnetic-like vector ěc {θ }B. Thus, comparison with the experimental CDF data of Tevatron allowed us to deduce two larges bounds on the non-commutativity parameter: {Λ}_{bound}^{space-space} =449.93± 29.20GeV and {Λ }_{bound}^{space-time} =459.83± 16.40 GeV. Moreover, the analysis between the difference experiment-theory and the purely non-commutative contribution, for γ varying between 0 ∘ to 90 ∘, allowed us to deduce a Pearson correlation coefficient: 0,58 ≤ ρ s p a c e-s p a c e ≤0,64 and 0,55 ≤ ρ s p a c e-t i m e ≤0,61. We deduce that the perpendicular to the earth rotation axis, given by γ = 90∘, is the preferred orientation of ěc {θ }E and ěc {θ }B.

  13. Minimal NCSM Direct Photon Production in Proton-antiproton Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadou, I.; Mebarki, N.; Bekli, M. R.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we present the results of our calculations for the direct photons with proton-antiproton collision in Minimal Non-Commutative Standard Model at a center-of-mass energy √ s = 1.96 Tev. The analytical expression of the differential cross section of the two subprocesses is deduced after applying a series of rotation from the equatorial coordinates system to the laboratory frame. Subsequently, we have calculated the inclusive cross section in both space-space and space-time cases independently, by averaging over all unknown angles except the scattering angle and the colatitudes γ of electric-like vector ěc {θ }E and magnetic-like vector ěc {θ }B. Thus, comparison with the experimental CDF data of Tevatron allowed us to deduce two larges bounds on the non-commutativity parameter: {Λ}_{bound}^{space-space} =449.93± 29.20GeV and {Λ }_{bound}^{space-time} =459.83± 16.40 { GeV}. Moreover, the analysis between the difference experiment-theory and the purely non-commutative contribution, for γ varying between 0 ∘ to 90 ∘, allowed us to deduce a Pearson correlation coefficient: 0,58 ≤ ρ s p a c e- s p a c e ≤0,64 and 0,55 ≤ ρ s p a c e- t i m e ≤0,61. We deduce that the perpendicular to the earth rotation axis, given by γ = 90∘, is the preferred orientation of ěc {θ }E and ěc {θ }B.

  14. Direct photon measurements by the D{O} experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Abachi, S.

    1996-07-01

    We report a measurement of the cross section for production of isolated photons with transverse energy E{sub T} > 12 GeV in the central (absolute value of {eta} < 0.9) and forward (1.6 < absolute value of {eta} < 2.5) rapidity regions for {bar p}p collisions at center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.8 TeV, using an integrated luminosity of 13 pb{sup {minus}1}. The cross section is compared with a next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD calculation. We also present preliminary measurements of the center of mass scattering angle distribution and of the correlations between the rapidity of the photon and that of the leading jet in the event.

  15. Recent field experiments with commercial satellite imagery direct downlink.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Anthony R; Amber, Samuel H

    US Pacific Command's strategy includes assistance to United States government relief agencies and nongovernment organizations during humanitarian aid and disaster relief operations in the Asia-Pacific region. Situational awareness during these operations is enhanced by broad interagency access to unclassified commercial satellite imagery. The Remote Ground Terminal-a mobile satellite downlink ground station-has undergone several technology demonstrations and participated in an overseas deployment exercise focused on a natural disaster scenario. This ground station has received new commercial imagery within 20 minutes, hastening a normally days-long process. The Army Geospatial Center continues to manage technology development and product improvement for the Remote Ground Terminal. Furthermore, this ground station is now on a technology transition path into the Distributed Common Ground System-Army program of record.

  16. Cosmogenic Neutron Production at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, I.; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Neutrons are an important background for underground experiments studying neutrino oscillations, neutrino-less double-beta decay, dark matter, and other rare-event signals. The poster will present the status of a study of neutron production by cosmogenic muons at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. The experiments configuration of multiple identical detectors at varying depths gives us the ability to measure neutron yield for different values of average muon energy within the same experiment. The current status of our study and future prospects will be discussed.

  17. Experiments on room temperature optical fiber-fiber direct bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jinping; Yan, Ping; Xiao, Qirong; Wang, Yaping; Gong, Mali

    2012-08-01

    High quality permanent connection between optical fibers is a significant issue in optics and communication. Studies on room temperature optical large diameter fiber-fiber direct bonding, which is essentially surface interactions of glass material, are presented here. Bonded fiber pairs are obtained for the first time through the bonding technics illustrated here. Two different kinds of bonding technics are provided-fresh surface (freshly grinded and polished) bonding and hydrophobic surface (activated by H2SO4 and HF) bonding. By means of fresh surface bonding, a bonded fiber pair with light transmitting efficiency of 98.1% and bond strength of 21.2 N is obtained. Besides, in the bonding process, chemical surface treatment of fibers' end surfaces is an important step. Therefore, various ways of surface treatment are analyzed and compared, based on atomic force microscopy force curves of differently disposed surfaces. According to the comparison, fresh surfaces are suggested as the prior choice in room temperature optical fiber-fiber bonding, owing to their larger adhesive force, attractive force, attractive distance, and adhesive range.

  18. Self-directed learning: A heretical experiment in teaching physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, M. P.

    1995-06-01

    An account is given of the instruction of university-level introductory physics courses according to an educational framework in which (1) curiosity-driven inquiry is recognized as an essential activity of both science and science teaching; (2) the principal role of the instructor is to provide students the incentive to learn science through their pursuit of personally meaningful questions; (3) the commission of errors is regarded as a natural concomitant to learning and is not penalized; (4) emphasis is placed on laboratory investigations that foster minimally restrictive free exploration rather than prescriptive adherence to formal procedure; (5) research skills are developed through out-of-class projects that involve literature search, experiment, and the modeling of real-world physical phenomena: (6) the precise and articulate use of language is regarded as seminal to communication in science (as it is in the humanities) and is promoted through activities that help develop written and oral language skills; (7) the evaluation of student performance is based on a portfolio of accomplished work rather than on the outcome of formal testing.

  19. Recent Results of Direct Nuclear Reaction Experiments for Stellar Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherubini, Silvio

    Nuclear cross sections between charged particles at stellar energies are among the faintest to be measured in nuclear physics. In order to overcome the experimental problems connected to these measurements, indirect methods where proposed and used in many experiments over the last decades. One of these, the Trojan Horse method, is based on the Quasi-Free reaction mechanism and proved to be particularly flexible and reliable and it allowed for the measurement of the cross sections of various reactions of astrophysical interest. The use and reliability of indirect methods become even more important when reactions induced by Radioactive Ion Beams are considered. As an example we will report here on the first measurement of 18F(p, α)15O process in Nova conditions by applying the Trojan Horse method to the 18F(d, α 15O)n reaction. In order to establish the reliability of such an approach, the Treiman-Yang criterion is an important test and it will also be addressed in this paper.

  20. Visual Experience Influences 12-Month-Old Infants' Perception of Goal-Directed Actions of Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako; Kawakita, Yuka; Okanda, Mako; Takeshita, Hideko

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether infants' own visual experiences affected their perception of the visual status of others engaging in goal-directed actions. In Experiment 1, infants viewed video clips of successful and failed goal-directed actions performed by a blindfolded adult, with half the infants having previously experienced…

  1. Visual Experience Influences 12-Month-Old Infants' Perception of Goal-Directed Actions of Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako; Kawakita, Yuka; Okanda, Mako; Takeshita, Hideko

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether infants' own visual experiences affected their perception of the visual status of others engaging in goal-directed actions. In Experiment 1, infants viewed video clips of successful and failed goal-directed actions performed by a blindfolded adult, with half the infants having previously experienced…

  2. A silicon sheet casting experiment. [for solar cell water production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, D. B.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sampson, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    The casting of silicon blanks for solar cells directly without slicing is an exciting concept. An experiment was performed to investigate the feasibility of developing a machine that casts wafers directly. A Czochralski furnace was modified to accept a graphite ingot-simulating fixture. Silicon was melted in the middle of the ingot simulator in a boron nitride mold. Sample castings showed reasonable crystal size. Solar cells were made from the cast blanks. The performance is reported.

  3. A silicon sheet casting experiment. [for solar cell water production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, D. B.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sampson, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    The casting of silicon blanks for solar cells directly without slicing is an exciting concept. An experiment was performed to investigate the feasibility of developing a machine that casts wafers directly. A Czochralski furnace was modified to accept a graphite ingot-simulating fixture. Silicon was melted in the middle of the ingot simulator in a boron nitride mold. Sample castings showed reasonable crystal size. Solar cells were made from the cast blanks. The performance is reported.

  4. Horizontal environmental assessment of building products in relation to the construction products directive (CPD).

    PubMed

    Schiopu, Nicoleta; Jayr, Emmanuel; Méhu, Jacques; Barna, Ligia; Moszkowicz, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    According to the European Construction Products Directive (89/106/EC), construction products must satisfy specified essential requirements (ER). To comply with ER 3, on hygiene, health and environment, the construction works must be designed and built in such a way that they will not be a threat to the hygiene and health of the occupants and neighbours, nor to the environment. Standardised test methods for the release of substances that are hazardous to health and environment need to be developed at the European level. A horizontal approach is considered the best route for such test development and consists of the development of a test method applicable for different products used in a certain scenario (across the fields of different Technical Committees). The work presented here regards the emission of pollutants towards soil and water and has been carried out on monolith products, based on three types of matrices: concrete, wood and metal (zinc). The aim of the work is to study the parameters (nature of leachant, temperature, liquid-to-solid ratio) that could influence the release behaviour of substances in water. The knowledge acquired from these tests will allow the identification of some parameters needed for the development of a horizontal test.

  5. Consistent simulation of direct-photon production in hadron collisions including associated two-jet production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odaka, Shigeru; Kurihara, Yoshimasa

    2016-05-01

    We have developed an event generator for direct-photon production in hadron collisions, including associated 2-jet production in the framework of the GR@PPA event generator. The event generator consistently combines γ + 2-jet production processes with the lowest-order γ + jet and photon-radiation (fragmentation) processes from quantum chromodynamics (QCD) 2-jet production using a subtraction method. The generated events can be fed to general-purpose event generators to facilitate the addition of hadronization and decay simulations. Using the obtained event information, we can simulate photon isolation and hadron-jet reconstruction at the particle (hadron) level. The simulation reasonably reproduces measurement data obtained at the large hadron collider (LHC) concerning not only the inclusive photon spectrum, but also the correlation between the photon and jet. The simulation implies that the contribution of the γ + 2-jet is very large, especially in low photon-pT ( ≲ 50 GeV) regions. Discrepancies observed at low pT, although marginal, may indicate the necessity for the consideration of further higher-order processes. Unambiguous particle-level definition of the photon-isolation condition for the signal events is desired to be given explicitly in future measurements.

  6. Direct production of fractionated and upgraded hydrocarbon fuels from biomass

    DOEpatents

    Felix, Larry G.; Linck, Martin B.; Marker, Terry L.; Roberts, Michael J.

    2014-08-26

    Multistage processing of biomass to produce at least two separate fungible fuel streams, one dominated by gasoline boiling-point range liquids and the other by diesel boiling-point range liquids. The processing involves hydrotreating the biomass to produce a hydrotreatment product including a deoxygenated hydrocarbon product of gasoline and diesel boiling materials, followed by separating each of the gasoline and diesel boiling materials from the hydrotreatment product and each other.

  7. Human experience and product usability: principles to assist the design of user-product interactions.

    PubMed

    Chamorro-Koc, Marianella; Popovic, Vesna; Emmison, Michael

    2009-07-01

    This paper introduces research that investigates how human experience influences people's understandings of product usability. It describes an experiment that employs visual representation of concepts to elicit participants' ideas of a product's use. Results from the experiment lead to the identification of relationships between human experience, knowledge, and context-of-use--relationships that influence designers' and users' concepts of product usability. These relationships are translated into design principles that inform the design activity with respect to the aspects of experience that trigger people's understanding of a product's use. A design tool (ECEDT) is devised to aid designers in the application of these principles. This tool is then trialled in the context of a design task in order to verify applicability of the findings.

  8. User Experience Evaluation Methods in Product Development (UXEM'09)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roto, Virpi; Väänänen-Vainio-Mattila, Kaisa; Law, Effie; Vermeeren, Arnold

    High quality user experience (UX) has become a central competitive factor of product development in mature consumer markets [1]. Although the term UX originated from industry and is a widely used term also in academia, the tools for managing UX in product development are still inadequate. A prerequisite for designing delightful UX in an industrial setting is to understand both the requirements tied to the pragmatic level of functionality and interaction and the requirements pertaining to the hedonic level of personal human needs, which motivate product use [2]. Understanding these requirements helps managers set UX targets for product development. The next phase in a good user-centered design process is to iteratively design and evaluate prototypes [3]. Evaluation is critical for systematically improving UX. In many approaches to UX, evaluation basically needs to be postponed until the product is fully or at least almost fully functional. However, in an industrial setting, it is very expensive to find the UX failures only at this phase of product development. Thus, product development managers and developers have a strong need to conduct UX evaluation as early as possible, well before all the parts affecting the holistic experience are available. Different types of products require evaluation on different granularity and maturity levels of a prototype. For example, due to its multi-user characteristic, a community service or an enterprise resource planning system requires a broader scope of UX evaluation than a microwave oven or a word processor that is meant for a single user at a time. Before systematic UX evaluation can be taken into practice, practical, lightweight UX evaluation methods suitable for different types of products and different phases of product readiness are needed. A considerable amount of UX research is still about the conceptual frameworks and models for user experience [4]. Besides, applying existing usability evaluation methods (UEMs) without

  9. Experience and grammatical agreement: statistical learning shapes number agreement production.

    PubMed

    Haskell, Todd R; Thornton, Robert; Macdonald, Maryellen C

    2010-02-01

    A robust result in research on the production of grammatical agreement is that speakers are more likely to produce an erroneous verb with phrases such as the key to the cabinets, with a singular noun followed by a plural one, than with phrases such as the keys to the cabinet, where a plural noun is followed by a singular. These asymmetries are thought to reflect core language production processes. Previous accounts have attributed error patterns to a syntactic number feature present on plurals but not singulars. An alternative approach is presented in which a process similar to structural priming contributes to the error asymmetry via speakers' past experiences with related agreement constructions. A corpus analysis and two agreement production studies test this account. The results suggest that agreement production is shaped by statistical learning from past language experience. Implications for accounts of agreement are discussed.

  10. Experience and grammatical agreement: Statistical learning shapes number agreement production

    PubMed Central

    Haskell, Todd R.; Thornton, Robert; MacDonald, Maryellen C.

    2009-01-01

    A robust result in research on the production of grammatical agreement is that speakers are more likely to produce an erroneous verb with phrases such as the key to the cabinets, with a singular noun followed by a plural one, than with phrases such as the keys to the cabinet, where a plural noun is followed by a singular. These asymmetries are thought to reflect core language production processes. Previous accounts have attributed error patterns to a syntactic number feature present on plurals but not singulars. An alternative approach is presented in which a process similar to structural priming contributes to the error asymmetry via speakers' past experiences with related agreement constructions. A corpus analysis and two agreement production studies test this account. The results suggest that agreement production is shaped by statistical learning from past language experience. Implications for accounts of agreement are discussed. PMID:19942213

  11. Zero-Direct-Carbon-Emission Aluminum Production by Solid Oxide Membrane-Based Electrolysis Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shizhao; Pal, Uday; Guan, Xiaofei

    A zero-direct-carbon-emission solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis process was designed and developed to produce high purity aluminum metal. An inert anode assembly containing liquid silver in a one-end-closed YSZ (yttria-stabilized zirconia) membrane tube and LSM (La0.8Sr0.2MnO3-δ)-Inconel inert anode current collector was immersed in an alumina containing molten fluoride flux. A proof-of-concept electrolysis experiment was performed to confirm the aluminum production by depositing liquid aluminum directly on a TiB2 cathode. An improved setup employing liquid aluminum cathode was subsequently used to produce high purity aluminum using the SOM electrolysis process. The membrane stability was confirmed using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. High purity aluminum (>99wt%) was produced and collected after the electrolysis.

  12. High Transverse Momentum Direct Photon Production at Fermilab Fixed-Target Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Apanasevich, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of the production of high transverse momentum direct photons and π0 mesons by proton beams at 530 and 800 GeV/c and π- beams at 515 GeV/c incident on beryllium, copper, and liquid hydrogen targets. The data were collected by Fermilab experiment E706 during the 1990 and 1991-92 fixed target runs. The apparatus included a large, finely segmented lead and liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter and a charged particle spectrometer featuring silicon strip detectors in the target region and proportional wire chambers and drift tubes downstream of a large aperture analysis magnet. The inclusive cross sections are presented as functions of transverse momentum and rapidity. The measurements are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations and to results from previous experiments.

  13. Direct coupling: a possible strategy to control fruit production in alternate bearing

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Awadhesh; Sakai, Kenshi; Hoshino, Yoshinobu

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the theoretical possibility of applying phenomenon of synchronization of coupled nonlinear oscillators to control alternate bearing in citrus. The alternate bearing of fruit crops is a phenomenon in which a year of heavy yield is followed by an extremely light one. This phenomenon has been modeled previously by the resource budget model, which describes a typical nonlinear oscillator of the tent map type. We have demonstrated how direct coupling, which could be practically realized through grafting, contributes to the nonlinear dynamics of alternate bearing, especially phase synchronization. Our results show enhancement of out-of-phase synchronization in production, which depends on initial conditions obtained under the given system parameters. Based on these numerical experiments, we propose a new method to control alternate bearing, say in citrus, thereby enabling stable fruit production. The feasibility of validating the current results through field experimentation is also discussed. PMID:28051141

  14. Direct coupling: a possible strategy to control fruit production in alternate bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Awadhesh; Sakai, Kenshi; Hoshino, Yoshinobu

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the theoretical possibility of applying phenomenon of synchronization of coupled nonlinear oscillators to control alternate bearing in citrus. The alternate bearing of fruit crops is a phenomenon in which a year of heavy yield is followed by an extremely light one. This phenomenon has been modeled previously by the resource budget model, which describes a typical nonlinear oscillator of the tent map type. We have demonstrated how direct coupling, which could be practically realized through grafting, contributes to the nonlinear dynamics of alternate bearing, especially phase synchronization. Our results show enhancement of out-of-phase synchronization in production, which depends on initial conditions obtained under the given system parameters. Based on these numerical experiments, we propose a new method to control alternate bearing, say in citrus, thereby enabling stable fruit production. The feasibility of validating the current results through field experimentation is also discussed.

  15. Perceptibility and the "Choice Experience": User Sensory Perceptions and Experiences Inform Vaginal Prevention Product Design.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Kate Morrow; Dunsiger, Shira; Vargas, Sara E; Fava, Joseph L; Shaw, Julia G; Rosen, Rochelle K; Kiser, Patrick F; Kojic, E Milu; Friend, David R; Katz, David F

    The development of pericoital (on demand) vaginal HIV prevention technologies remains a global health priority. Clinical trials to date have been challenged by nonadherence, leading to an inability to demonstrate product efficacy. The work here provides new methodology and results to begin to address this limitation. We created validated scales that allow users to characterize sensory perceptions and experiences when using vaginal gel formulations. In this study, we sought to understand the user sensory perceptions and experiences (USPEs) that characterize the preferred product experience for each participant. Two hundred four women evaluated four semisolid vaginal formulations using the USPE scales at four randomly ordered formulation evaluation visits. Women were asked to select their preferred formulation experience for HIV prevention among the four formulations evaluated. The scale scores on the Sex-associated USPE scales (e.g., Initial Penetration and Leakage) for each participant's selected formulation were used in a latent class model analysis. Four classes of preferred formulation experiences were identified. Sociodemographic and sexual history variables did not predict class membership; however, four specific scales were significantly related to class: Initial Penetration, Perceived Wetness, Messiness, and Leakage. The range of preferred user experiences represented by the scale scores creates a potential target range for product development, such that products that elicit scale scores that fall within the preferred range may be more acceptable, or tolerable, to the population under study. It is recommended that similar analyses should be conducted with other semisolid vaginal formulations, and in other cultures, to determine product property and development targets.

  16. The development of direction selectivity in ferret visual cortex requires early visual experience.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Fitzpatrick, David; White, Leonard E

    2006-05-01

    Development of the selective response properties that define columns in sensory cortex is thought to begin early in cortical maturation, without the need for experience. We investigated the development of direction selectivity in ferret visual cortex using optical imaging and electrophysiological techniques and found an exception to this view. Unlike orientation selectivity and ocular dominance, direction selectivity was not detected at eye opening. Direction selectivity emerged several days later and strengthened to adult levels over the following 2 weeks. Visual experience was essential for this process, as shown by the absence of direction selectivity in dark-reared ferrets. The impairment persisted in dark-reared ferrets that were given experience after this period, despite the recovery of response amplitude, preference and bandwidth for stimulus orientation, spatial and temporal frequency, and contrast. Visual experience in early postnatal life plays a necessary and unique role in the development of cortical direction selectivity.

  17. Direct electron-pair production by high energy heavy charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Dong, B. L.

    1989-01-01

    Direct electron pain production via virtual photons by moving charged particles is a unique electro-magnetic process having a substantial dependence on energy. Most electro-magnetic processes, including transition radiation, cease to be sensitive to the incident energy above 10 TeV/AMU. Thus, it is expected, that upon establishment of cross section and detection efficiency of this process, it may provide a new energy measuring technique above 10 TeV/AMU. Three accelerator exposures of emulsion chambers designed for measurements of direct electron-pains were performed. The objectives of the investigation were to provide the fundamental cross-section data in emulsion stacks to find the best-fit theoretical model, and to provide a calibration of measurements of direct electron-pairs in emulsion chamber configurations. This paper reports the design of the emulsion chambers, accelerator experiments, microscope measurements, and related considerations for future improvements of the measurements, and for possible applications to high energy cosmic ray experiments. Also discussed are the results from scanning 56m of emulsion tracks at 1200x magnification so that scanning efficiency is optimized. Measurements of the delta-ray range spectrum were also performed for much shorter track lengths, but with sufficiently large statistics in the number of measured delta-rays.

  18. Meson-production experiments at COSY-Jülich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büscher, M.

    2010-09-01

    Selected results from experiments at COSY-Jülich are presented: an attempt to measure the mass of the η meson with high precision (ANKE facility), first steps towards the detection of rare η decays (WASA), and several measurements of Kbar K-pair production (ANKE, COSY-11, MOMO).

  19. On the basis of experience: Built in product reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-02-01

    Rolls Royce product reliability is considered based on experience in supporting commercial gas turbine engines and airline customers during the years of its existence. Reliability on return on investment is addressed. The meaning of 'reliability' and 'return on investment' is discussed.

  20. Graphene Glass from Direct CVD Routes: Production and Applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingyu; Chen, Yubin; Priydarshi, Manish Kr; Gao, Teng; Song, Xiuju; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2016-12-01

    Recently, direct chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of graphene on various types of glasses has emerged as a promising route to produce graphene glass, with advantages such as tunable quality, excellent film uniformity and potential scalability. Crucial to the performance of this graphene-coated glass is that the outstanding properties of graphene are fully retained for endowing glass with new surface characteristics, making direct-CVD-derived graphene glass versatile enough for developing various applications for daily life. Herein, recent advances in the synthesis of graphene glass, particularly via direct CVD approaches, are presented. Key applications of such graphene materials in transparent conductors, smart windows, simple heating devices, solar-cell electrodes, cell culture medium, and water harvesters are also highlighted.

  1. A direct method for measuring acoustic ground impedance in long-range propagation experiments.

    PubMed

    Soh, Jin H; Gilbert, Kenneth E; Frazier, W M Garth; Talmadge, Carrick L; Waxler, Roger

    2010-11-01

    A method is reported for determining ground impedance in long-range propagation experiments by using the definition of impedance directly. The method is envisioned as way of measuring the impedence at multiple locations along the propagation path, using the signals broadcast during the experiment itself. In a short-range (10 m) test, the direct method was in good agreement with a more conventional model-based least-squares method. The utility of the direct method was demonstrated in a 400 m propagation experiment in a agricultural field. The resulting impedance was consistent with the impedance measured previously in the same field.

  2. The relative weights of direct and indirect experiences in the formation of environmental risk beliefs.

    PubMed

    Viscusi, W Kip; Zeckhauser, Richard J

    2015-02-01

    Direct experiences, we find, influence environmental risk beliefs more than the indirect experiences derived from outcomes to others. This disparity could have a rational basis. Or it could be based on behavioral proclivities in accord with the well-established availability heuristic or the vested-interest heuristic, which we introduce in this article. Using original data from a large, nationally representative sample, this article examines the perception of, and responses to, morbidity risks from tap water. Direct experiences have a stronger and more consistent effect on different measures of risk belief. Direct experiences also boost the precautionary response of drinking bottled water and drinking filtered water, while indirect experiences do not. These results are consistent with the hypothesized neglect of indirect experiences in other risk contexts, such as climate change.

  3. Direct transesterification of spent coffee grounds for biodiesel production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies of spent coffee grounds (SCGs) as a potential biodiesel feedstock in recent years mostly started from solvent extraction to obtain coffee oil, and then converted it into coffee biodiesel in two steps, acid esterification followed by alkaline transesterification. This paper presents a direct ...

  4. Software Product Lines: Experiences from the Eighth DoD Software Product Line Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    K. Bergey Sholom Cohen Patrick Donohoe Lawrence G. Jones December 2005 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A Approved for Public Release Distribution Unlimited...Software Product Lines: Experiences from the Eighth DoD Software Product Line Workshop CMU/SEI-2005-TR-023 ESC-TR-2005-023 John K. Bergey Sholom Cohen...Evaluation in DoD System Acquisitions - John Bergey , SEI ......................................................................................... 14

  5. Estimates of rates and errors for measurements of direct-. gamma. and direct-. gamma. + jet production by polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Beddo, M.E.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.G.

    1992-08-14

    Studies of inclusive direct-{gamma} production by pp interactions at RHIC energies were performed. Rates and the associated uncertainties on spin-spin observables for this process were computed for the planned PHENIX and STAR detectors at energies between {radical}s = 50 and 500 GeV. Also, rates were computed for direct-{gamma} + jet production for the STAR detector. The goal was to study the gluon spin distribution functions with such measurements. Recommendations concerning the electromagnetic calorimeter design and the need for an endcap calorimeter for STAR are made.

  6. Production of polyclonal antibodies directed to recombinant methionyl bovine somatotropin.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Pantaleón, C; Huet, A C; Kavanagh, O; Lei, H; Dervilly-Pinel, G; Le Bizec, B; Situ, C; Delahaut, Ph

    2013-01-25

    The administration of recombinant methionyl bovine somatotropin (rMbST) to dairy cows to increase milk yield remains a common practice in many countries including the USA, Brazil, Mexico, South Africa and Korea, whereas it has been forbidden within the European Union (EU) since 1999. A rapid screening immunoanalytical method capable of the unequivocal determination of rMbST in milk would be highly desirable in order to effectively monitor compliance with the EU-wide ban for home-made or imported dairy products. For decades, the production of specific antibodies for this recombinant isoform of bovine somatotropin (bST) has remained elusive, due to the high degree of sequence homology between both counterparts (e.g. methionine for rMbST in substitution of alanine in bST at the N-terminus). In this study, we compared several immunizing strategies for the production of specific polyclonal antibodies (pAbs), based on the use of the full-length recombinant protein, an rMbST N-terminus peptide fragment and a multiple antigen peptide (MAP) which consists of an oligomeric branching lysine core attached to the first two N-terminus amino acids of rMbST, methionine and phenylalanine (MF-MAP). The immunization with KLH-conjugated MF-MAP led to the production of the pAb with the highest rMbST/bST recognition ratio amongst the generated battery of antibodies. The pAb exhibited a specific binding ability to rMbST in a competitive antigen-coated ELISA format, which avidity was further improved after purification by rMbST N-terminus peptide-based affinity chromatography. These results suggest that immunodiscrimination between structurally related proteins can be achieved using immuno-enhanced immunogens such as MAPs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Photoelectrochemical based direct conversion systems for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Khaselev, O.; Bansal, A.; Kocha, S.; Turner, J.A.

    1998-08-01

    With an eye towards developing a photoelectrochemical system for hydrogen production using sunlight as the only energy input, two types of systems were studied, both involving multijunction devices. One set of cells consisted of a-Si triple junctions and the other a GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs tandem cell combination. Additional investigations were carried out on semiconductor surface modifications to move semiconductor band edges to more favorable energetic positions.

  8. Poker face of inelastic dark matter: Prospects at upcoming direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Daniele S. M.; Lisanti, Mariangela; Wacker, Jay G.

    2010-08-01

    The XENON100 and CRESST experiments will directly test the inelastic dark matter explanation for DAMA’s 8.9σ anomaly. This article discusses how predictions for direct detection experiments depend on uncertainties in quenching factor measurements, the dark matter interaction with the standard model, and the halo velocity distribution. When these uncertainties are accounted for, an order of magnitude variation is found in the number of expected events at CRESST and XENON100.

  9. Shifting from Production to Service to Experience-Based Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelis, Jannis; de Lima, Edson Pinheiro

    This chapter covers the shift in focus of value added business operations from ­production to services, and in turn, to experience-based operations where customer involvement itself becomes part of the offering. The shift has significant implications for how businesses are managed. The greater service focus affects the firm's unique value proposition, which necessitates considerations on strategy, supplier relations, post-sale offerings and so on. Meanwhile, the inclusion of customer ­experiences affect the way operations are designed and employed so that these are structurally systematically captured and capitalised.

  10. Primary healthcare NZ nurses' experiences of advance directives: understanding their potential role.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Raewyn; Banister, Elizabeth; de Vries, Kay

    2013-07-01

    Advance directives are one aspect of advance care planning designed to improve end of life care. The New Zealand Nurses Organisation released their first mission statement in 2010 concerning advance directives suggesting an increase in the use of these. A burgeoning older population, expected to rise over the next few years, places the primary healthcare nurse in a pivotal role to address the challenges in constructing advance directives. While literature supports the role for primary healthcare nurses in promoting advance directives, no research was found on this role in the New Zealand context. This paper presents results of a qualitative study conducted in New Zealand with 13 senior primary healthcare nurses with respect to their knowledge, attitudes, and experiences of advance directives. Results of the analysis revealed a dynamic process involving participants coming to understand their potential role in this area. This process included reflection on personal experience with advance directives; values and ethics related to end of life issues; and professional actions.

  11. High School Teachers with Significant Teaching Experience Support the Effectiveness of Direct Instructional Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolaros, John

    2014-01-01

    This research study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of direct instructional strategies regarding the achievement of students with ED. High school teachers with significant years of teaching experience in an urban setting support the effectiveness of direct instructional strategies. Teachers with 11-20 and 21-30 years of teaching…

  12. Zileuton, an oral 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, directly reduces sebum production.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, Ch C; Saborowski, A; Boschnakow, A

    2005-01-01

    Zileuton, a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, reduces the number of inflammatory lesions in moderate acne and inhibits the synthesis of sebaceous lipids. To detect whether zileuton directly reduces sebum synthesis. A 40-year-old female with mild disseminated sebaceous gland hyperplasia and seborrhea was treated with zileuton 4 x 600 mg/day over 2 weeks, was followed-up for 6 weeks after discontinuation of zileuton and was re-treated with low-dose isotretinoin 10 mg/2nd day over 5 weeks. Casual skin surface lipids and sebum synthesis were determined. Under treatment with zileuton increased casual skin surface lipids were normalized and synthesis of facial sebum was decreased. Six weeks after discontinuation of treatment casual skin surface lipids were increased again and synthesis of sebum returned to baseline. Subsequent low-dose isotretinoin treatment led to similar changes of casual skin surface lipids and sebum synthesis with zileuton already after 2 weeks. Zileuton directly inhibits sebum synthesis in a transient manner with a potency similar to low-dose isotretinoin at least in our patient.

  13. Traveling-Wave Direct Energy Converter for Fusion Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kunihiro; Katayama, Hideaki

    1999-11-01

    A Traveling-Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC), which is designed to recover kinetic energy of fusion protons escaped from a FRC/ D^3He fusion reactor, is studied by numerical calculation and computer simulation. To develop a simulation code, a transmission line loop for an electrostatic traveling wave is designed using lumped constant elements L, C, R. Electrostatic coupling between proton beam and circuits is treated by directly solving Poisson's equation. Circuit equations are transformed to temporal finite-difference equations, which are solved following the leap-flog scheme. Simulation results display desirable performance characteristics of the TWDEC. Traveling wave with a fixed frequency is excited spontaneously without any external electric power supply. High energy conversion rate of the TWDEC up to 0.8 is obtained both from orbit calculation and from computer simulation as a result of improvement of proton beam bunching. The wave keeps its equilibrium state under loading, and the wave responds to variation of the electric load stably.

  14. Experiences from Teaching Statistics Using Directed Projects in Greek Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghinis, D.; Chadjipantelis, Th.; Bersimis, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, we present the main findings of an experiment which involves teaching statistics in the 5th and 6th grade classes of Greek elementary schools. This experiment focused on the evaluation of the potentials of teaching statistical concepts and methods using directed projects.

  15. Premium distillate products from direct liquefaction of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, P.Z.; Winschel, R.A.; Klunder, E.B. |

    1994-08-01

    The net liquid products from modern coal liquefaction processes are lower boiling and have much lower end points (mostly under 400{degree}C) than crude petroleum. Coal liquids have very low concentrations of heteroatoms, particularly S, and metals, and are free of resids and asphaltenes. High yields of low-S (0.01--0.03 wt %) naphtha, kerosene, and diesel fuel fractions can be obtained simply by atmospheric distillation, with a total yield of light fuel fractions ranging from 68 to 82 LV% (W260D exclusive). The coal naphtha has a low aromatics content (5--13 LV%), readily meeting projected year-2000 requirements. Its low Reid vapor pressure allows light components from other sources to be blended. The coal light distillate of in appropriate boiling range will be a good low-S blending stock for the light diesel fuel pool. The heavy distillate can be refined into a low-S No. 4 diesel fuel/fuel oil. This fraction, along with the >343{degree}C atmospheric bottoms, can be catalytically cracked or hydrocracked to make light liquid fuels. Thus, modern coal liquids should no longer be envisioned as thick liquids (or even solids) with high concentrations of aromatics and asphaltenes. Products obtained from advanced coal liquefaction technologies are more like light naphthene-base petroleum, but with lower heteroatoms and metals contents, and they are free of resids. Coal liquids are likely to be co-refined in existing petroleum refineries; and hydroprocessing of various severities would be needed for different fractions to produce quality blending stocks for refinery fuel pools.

  16. A Fresnel collector process heat experiment at Capitol Concrete Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauger, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment is planned, conducted and evaluated to determine the feasibility of using a Power Kinetics' Fresnel concentrator to provide process heat in an industrial environment. The plant provides process steam at 50 to 60 psig to two autoclaves for curing masonry blocks. When steam is not required, the plant preheats hot water for later use. A second system is installed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory parabolic dish test site for hardware validation and experiment control. Experiment design allows for the extrapolation of results to varying demands for steam and hot water, and includes a consideration of some socio-technical factors such as the impact on production scheduling of diurnal variations in energy availability.

  17. Main Injector Particle Production Experiment (MIPP) at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Sonam

    2011-10-06

    The Main Injector Particle Production Experiment at Fermilab uses particle beams of charged pions, kaons, proton and anti-proton with beam momenta of 5 to 90 GeV/c and thin targets spanning the periodic table from (liquid) hydrogen to uranium to measure particle production cross sections in a full acceptance spectrometer with charged particle identification for particles from 0.1 to 120 GeV/c using Time Projection Chamber, Time of Flight, multicell Cherenkov, and Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors and Calorimeter for neutrons. Particle production using 120 GeV/c protons from Main Injector on the MINOS target was also measured. We describe the physics motivation to perform such cross section measurements and highlight the impact of hadronic interaction data on neutrino physics. Recent results on forward neutron cross sections and analysis of MINOS target data are also presented.

  18. Main Injector Particle Production Experiment (MIPP) at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Sonam; /Panjab U. /Fermilab

    2010-12-09

    The Main Injector Particle Production Experiment at Fermilab uses particle beams of charged pions, kaons, proton and anti-proton with beam momenta of 5 to 90 GeV/c and thin targets spanning the periodic table from (liquid) hydrogen to uranium to measure particle production cross sections in a full acceptance spectrometer with charged particle identification for particles from 0.1 to 120 GeV/c using Time Projection Chamber, Time of Flight, multicell Cherenkov, and Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors and Calorimeter for neutrons. Particle production using 120 GeV/c protons from Main Injector on the MINOS target was also measured. We describe the physics motivation to perform such cross section measurements and highlight the impact of hadronic interaction data on neutrino physics. Recent results on forward neutron cross sections and analysis of MINOS target data are also presented.

  19. The production and directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Trounson, Alan

    2006-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are being rapidly produced from chromosomally euploid, aneuploid, and mutant human embryos that are available from in vitro fertilization clinics treating patients for infertility or preimplantation genetic diagnosis. These hESC lines are an important resource for functional genomics, drug screening, and, perhaps eventually, cell and gene therapy. The methods for deriving hESCs are well established and repeatable and are relatively successful with a ratio of 1:10 to 1:2 new hESC lines produced from 4- to 8-d-old morula and blastocysts and from isolated inner cell mass cell clusters of human blastocysts. The hESCs can be formed and maintained on human somatic cells in humanized serum-free culture conditions and for several passages in cell-free culture systems. The hESCs can be transfected with DNA constructs. Their gene expression profiles are being described and immunological characteristics determined. They may be grown indefinitely in vitro while maintaining their original karyotype and epigenetic status, but this needs to be confirmed from time to time in long-term cultures. hESCs spontaneously differentiate in the absence of the appropriate cell feeder layer, when overgrown in culture and when isolated from the ESC colony. All three major embryonic lineages are produced in differentiating flat attachment cultures and unattached embryoid bodies. Cell progenitors of interest can be identified by markers, expression of reporter genes, and characteristic morphology, and the cells thereafter enriched for progenitor types and further culture to more mature cell types. Directed differentiation systems are well developed for ectodermal pathways that result in neural and glial cells and the mesendodermal pathway for cardiac muscle cells and many other cell types including hematopoietic progenitors and endothelial cells. Directed differentiation into endoderm has been more difficult to achieve, perhaps because of the lack of markers of

  20. Direct catalytic production of sorbitol from waste cellulosic materials.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Lucília Sousa; Órfão, José J de Melo; Pereira, Manuel Fernando Ribeiro

    2017-02-08

    Cotton wool, cotton textile, tissue paper and printing paper, all potential waste cellulosic materials, were directly converted to sorbitol using a Ru/CNT catalyst in the presence of H2 and using only water as solvent, without any acids. Conversions up to 38% were attained for the raw substrates, with sorbitol yields below 10%. Ball-milling of the materials disrupted their crystallinity, allowing reaching 100% conversion of cotton wool, cotton textile and tissue paper after 4h, with sorbitol yields around 50%. Mix-milling these materials with the catalyst greatly enhanced their conversion rate, and the materials were efficiently converted to sorbitol with a yield around 50% in 2h. However, ball- and mix-milled printing paper presented a conversion of only 50% after 5h, with sorbitol yields of 7%. Amounts of sorbitol of 0.525, 0.511 and 0.559g could be obtained from 1g of cotton wool, cotton textile and tissue paper, respectively.

  1. 77 FR 42016 - Product Change-Every Door Direct Mail-Retail

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-17

    ... Change--Every Door Direct Mail--Retail AGENCY: Postal Service\\TM\\. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Postal... Door Direct Mail--Retail to the market-dominant product list within the Mail Classification Schedule... Direct Mail--Retail to the Mail Classification Schedule, pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 3642. Documents are...

  2. Both Direct and Vicarious Experiences of Nature Affect Children's Willingness to Conserve Biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Soga, Masashi; Gaston, Kevin J; Yamaura, Yuichi; Kurisu, Kiyo; Hanaki, Keisuke

    2016-05-25

    Children are becoming less likely to have direct contact with nature. This ongoing loss of human interactions with nature, the extinction of experience, is viewed as one of the most fundamental obstacles to addressing global environmental challenges. However, the consequences for biodiversity conservation have been examined very little. Here, we conducted a questionnaire survey of elementary schoolchildren and investigated effects of the frequency of direct (participating in nature-based activities) and vicarious experiences of nature (reading books or watching TV programs about nature and talking about nature with parents or friends) on their affective attitudes (individuals' emotional feelings) toward and willingness to conserve biodiversity. A total of 397 children participated in the surveys in Tokyo. Children's affective attitudes and willingness to conserve biodiversity were positively associated with the frequency of both direct and vicarious experiences of nature. Path analysis showed that effects of direct and vicarious experiences on children's willingness to conserve biodiversity were mediated by their affective attitudes. This study demonstrates that children who frequently experience nature are likely to develop greater emotional affinity to and support for protecting biodiversity. We suggest that children should be encouraged to experience nature and be provided with various types of these experiences.

  3. Both Direct and Vicarious Experiences of Nature Affect Children’s Willingness to Conserve Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Soga, Masashi; Gaston, Kevin J.; Yamaura, Yuichi; Kurisu, Kiyo; Hanaki, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Children are becoming less likely to have direct contact with nature. This ongoing loss of human interactions with nature, the extinction of experience, is viewed as one of the most fundamental obstacles to addressing global environmental challenges. However, the consequences for biodiversity conservation have been examined very little. Here, we conducted a questionnaire survey of elementary schoolchildren and investigated effects of the frequency of direct (participating in nature-based activities) and vicarious experiences of nature (reading books or watching TV programs about nature and talking about nature with parents or friends) on their affective attitudes (individuals’ emotional feelings) toward and willingness to conserve biodiversity. A total of 397 children participated in the surveys in Tokyo. Children’s affective attitudes and willingness to conserve biodiversity were positively associated with the frequency of both direct and vicarious experiences of nature. Path analysis showed that effects of direct and vicarious experiences on children’s willingness to conserve biodiversity were mediated by their affective attitudes. This study demonstrates that children who frequently experience nature are likely to develop greater emotional affinity to and support for protecting biodiversity. We suggest that children should be encouraged to experience nature and be provided with various types of these experiences. PMID:27231925

  4. Direct production of graphene nanosheets for near infrared photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mehulkumar A; Yang, Hao; Chiu, Pui Lam; Mastrogiovanni, Daniel D T; Flach, Carol R; Savaram, Keerthi; Gomez, Lesly; Hemnarine, Ashley; Mendelsohn, Richard; Garfunkel, Eric; Jiang, Huabei; He, Huixin

    2013-09-24

    Hummers method is commonly used for the fabrication of graphene oxide (GO) from graphite particles. The oxidation process also leads to the cutting of graphene sheets into small pieces. From a thermodynamic perspective, it seems improbable that the aggressive, somewhat random oxidative cutting process could directly result in graphene nanosheets without destroying the intrinsic π-conjugated structures and the associated exotic properties of graphene. In Hummers method, both KMnO4 and NO2(+) (nitronium ions) in concentrated H2SO4 solutions act as oxidants via different oxidation mechanisms. From both experimental observations and theoretical calculations, it appears that KMnO4 plays a major role in the observed oxidative cutting and unzipping processes. We find that KMnO4 also limits nitronium oxidative etching of graphene basal planes, therefore slowing down graphene fracturing processes for nanosheet fabrication. By intentionally excluding KMnO4 and exploiting pure nitronium ion oxidation, aided by the unique thermal and kinetic effects induced by microwave heating, we find that graphite particles can be converted into graphene nanosheets with their π-conjugated aromatic structures and properties largely retained. Without the need of any postreduction processes to remove the high concentration of oxygenated groups that results from Hummers GO formation, the graphene nanosheets as-fabricated exhibit strong absorption, which is nearly wavelength-independent in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) regions, an optical property typical for intrinsic graphene sheets. For the first time, we demonstrate that strong photoacoustic signals can be generated from these graphene nanosheets with NIR excitation. The photo-to-acoustic conversion is weakly dependent on the wavelength of the NIR excitation, which is different from all other NIR photoacoustic contrast agents previously reported.

  5. Will the Europe Union's Traditional Herbal Medicinal Products Directive (Directive 2004/24/EC) be against traditional Chinese medicine in EU market?

    PubMed

    Xu, Juncai; Liu, Min; Xia, Zhijie

    2013-05-01

    As human civilization develops, biomedicine stays robust. Faced with the challenge of Europe Union's Traditional Herbal Medicinal Products Directive, if traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) wants to be still used as one kind of medicine to treat patients, China should be in line with scientific law, that is, each claim that TCM treats any disease or indication should be supported by the data of evidence-based randomized clinical trials. As a priority, there is an urgent need to conduct more scientific experiments and clinical trials to verify the concepts and mechanisms of TCM. Also, China is encouraged to get rid of non-scientific concepts and theories of TCM.

  6. Role for Visual Experience in the Development of Direction-Selective Circuits.

    PubMed

    Bos, Rémi; Gainer, Christian; Feller, Marla B

    2016-05-23

    Visually guided behavior can depend critically on detecting the direction of object movement. This computation is first performed in the retina where direction is encoded by direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs) that respond strongly to an object moving in the preferred direction and weakly to an object moving in the opposite, or null, direction (reviewed in [1]). DSGCs come in multiple types that are classified based on their morphologies, response properties, and targets in the brain. This study focuses on two types-ON and ON-OFF DSGCs. Though animals can sense motion in all directions, the preferred directions of DSGCs in adult retina cluster along distinct directions that we refer to as the cardinal axes. ON DSGCs have three cardinal axes-temporal, ventral, and dorsonasal-while ON-OFF DSGCs have four-nasal, temporal, dorsal, and ventral. How these preferred directions emerge during development is still not understood. Several studies have demonstrated that ON [2] and ON-OFF DSGCs are well tuned at eye-opening, and even a few days prior to eye-opening, in rabbits [3], rats [4], and mice [5-8], suggesting that visual experience is not required to produce direction-selective tuning. However, here we show that at eye-opening the preferred directions of both ON and ON-OFF DSGCs are diffusely distributed and that visual deprivation prevents the preferred directions from clustering along the cardinal axes. Our findings indicate a critical role for visual experience in shaping responses in the retina.

  7. Dose and sequence of simulation and direct care experiences among beginning nursing students: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Schlairet, Maura C; Fenster, Mark J

    2012-12-01

    Accumulating suggests human patient simulation is an effective instructional technique. Simulated clinical experiences may be a reasonable substitute for direct care experiences. Educators and regulators need to know what mix of simulation and direct care promotes learning and how these experiences can be designed to help nursing students achieve essential outcomes. The goal of this pilot study was to identify a model to promote development of clinical judgment among beginning nursing students. Principles related to types of learning and practice (blocked by type or interleaved) were used in exploring simulation and direct care design schema. Using a 50% interleaved simulation design schema, robust clinical judgment scores and positive perceptions of learning were identified among beginning students participating in a basic nursing concepts and skills course. Further study is warranted to determine whether this schema is effective in other nursing courses or with novice-level students from diverse health care disciplines. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Central exclusive production in the STAR experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, Rafal

    2017-03-01

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) performs studies of diffractive processes with the focus on the exclusive production of particles in central range of rapidity. In 2015 STAR collected 18 pb-1 of data in polarized proton+proton collisions at √{s }=200 GeV to measure Central Exclusive Production (CEP) process pp → pX p through Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) mechanism. The intact protons moving inside the RHIC beampipe after the collision were measured in silicon strip detectors (SSD), which were placed in the Roman Pot vessels. This enables full control over interaction kinematics and verification of the exclusivity of the reaction by measuring the total (missing) transverse momenta of all final state particles: the central diffractive system in the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and the forward protons in the Roman Pots. With the use of ionization energy loss in the TPC, dE/dx, it was possible to discriminate various production channels in pp → pX p reaction. This paper presents results on exclusive production of two charged particles (π+π- and K+ K-) in mid-rapidity region, -1 < η < 1, with small squared four-momentum transfer of forward protons, 0.03 < -t < 0.3 (GeV/c)2, obtained using 2.5% of full statistics.

  9. Effects of furrow irrigation on the growth, production, and water use efficiency of direct sowing rice.

    PubMed

    He, Chunlin

    2010-08-03

    Rice farming is the major crop production in Asia and is predicted to increase significantly in the near future in order to meet the demands for the increasing human population. Traditional irrigation methods used in rice farming often result in great water loss. New water-saving methods are urgently needed to reduce water consumption. Three field and pot experiments were conducted to evaluate the furrow irrigation (FI) system to improve water use efficiency (WUE) and production of direct sowing rice in southern China. Compared to the conventional irrigation (CI) system (continuous flooding irrigation), for every square hectometer of rice field, the FI system reduced water use by 3130 m3, or 48.1%, and increased grain production by 13.9% for an early cultivar. For a late cultivar, the FI system reduced water use by 2655 m3, or 40.6%, and an increase of grain production by 12.1%. The improved WUE in the FI system is attributed to (1) a significant reduction of irrigation rate, seepage, evaporation, and evapotranspiration; (2) a significant reduction in the reduced materials, such as ferrous ion (Fe2+), and therefore an increase in the vitality of the root system, evident by the increases in the number of white roots by 32.62%, and decreases in the number of black roots by 20.04% and yellow roots by 12.58%; the use of the FI system may also reduce humidity of the rice field and enhance gas transport in the soil and light penetration, which led to reduced rice diseases and increased leaf vitality; and (3) increases in tiller and effective spikes by 11.53% and the weight per thousand grains by 1.0 g. These findings suggest that the shallow FI system is a promising means for rice farming in areas with increasing water shortages.

  10. Two-plasmon decay mitigation in direct-drive inertial-confinement-fusion experiments using multilayer targets

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, R. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Henchen, R. J.; Katz, J.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Shaw, J.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-04-15

    Multilayer direct-drive inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) targets are shown to significantly reduce two-plasmon-decay (TPD) driven hot-electron production while maintaining high hydrodynamic efficiency. Implosion experiments on the OMEGA Laser used targets with silicon layered between an inner beryllium and outer silicon-doped plastic ablator. A factor of five reduction in hot-electron generation (> 50 keV) was observed in the multilayer targets relative to pure CH targets. Three-dimensional simulations of the TPD driven hot-electron production using a laser-plasma interaction code (LPSE) that includes nonlinear and kinetic effects show excellent agreement with the measurements. As a result, the simulations suggest that the reduction in hot-electron production observed in the multilayer targets is primarily due to increased electron-ion collisional damping.

  11. Two-Plasmon Decay Mitigation in Direct-Drive Inertial-Confinement-Fusion Experiments Using Multilayer Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follett, R. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Henchen, R. J.; Katz, J.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Shaw, J.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-04-01

    Multilayer direct-drive inertial-confinement-fusion targets are shown to significantly reduce two-plasmon decay (TPD) driven hot-electron production while maintaining high hydrodynamic efficiency. Implosion experiments on the OMEGA laser used targets with silicon layered between an inner beryllium and outer silicon-doped plastic ablator. A factor-of-5 reduction in hot-electron generation (>50 keV ) was observed in the multilayer targets relative to pure CH targets. Three-dimensional simulations of the TPD-driven hot-electron production using a laser-plasma interaction code (lpse) that includes nonlinear and kinetic effects show good agreement with the measurements. The simulations suggest that the reduction in hot-electron production observed in the multilayer targets is primarily caused by increased electron-ion collisional damping.

  12. Experience-dependent firing rate remapping generates directional selectivity in hippocampal place cells

    PubMed Central

    Navratilova, Zaneta; Hoang, Lan T.; Schwindel, C. Daniela; Tatsuno, Masami; McNaughton, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    When rodents engage in irregular foraging in an open-field environment, hippocampal principal cells exhibit place-specific firing that is statistically independent of the direction of traverse through the place field. When the path is restricted to a track, however, in-field rates differ substantially in opposite directions. Frequently, the representations of the track in the two directions are essentially orthogonal. We show that this directionally selective firing is not hard-wired, but develops through experience-dependent plasticity. During the rats' first pass in each direction, place fields were highly directionally symmetric, whereas over subsequent laps, the firing rates in the two directions gradually but substantially diverged. We conclude that, even on a restricted track, place cell firing is initially determined by allocentric position, and only later, the within-field firing rates change in response to differential sensory information or behavioral cues in the two directions. In agreement with previous data, place fields near local cues, such as textures on the track, developed less directionality than place fields on a uniform part of the track, possibly because the local cues reduced the net difference in sensory input at a given point. Directionality also developed in an open environment without physical restriction of the animal's path, when rats learned to run along a specified path. In this case, directionality developed later than on the running track, only after the rats began to run in a stereotyped manner. Although the average population firing rates exhibited little if any change over laps in either direction, the direction-specific firing rates in a given place field were up-or down-regulated with about equal probability and magnitude, which was independent in the two directions, suggesting some form of competitive mechanism (e.g., LTP/LTD) acting coherently on the set of synapses conveying external information to each cell. PMID:22363267

  13. Dark matter production from Goldstone boson interactions and implications for direct searches and dark radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Cely, Camilo; Ibarra, Alejandro; Molinaro, Emiliano E-mail: alejandro.ibarra@ph.tum.de

    2013-11-01

    The stability of the dark matter particle could be attributed to the remnant Z{sub 2} symmetry that arises from the spontaneous breaking of a global U(1) symmetry. This plausible scenario contains a Goldstone boson which, as recently shown by Weinberg, is a strong candidate for dark radiation. We show in this paper that this Goldstone boson, together with the CP-even scalar associated to the spontaneous breaking of the global U(1) symmetry, plays a central role in the dark matter production. Besides, the mixing of the CP-even scalar with the Standard Model Higgs boson leads to novel Higgs decay channels and to interactions with nucleons, thus opening the possibility of probing this scenario at the LHC and in direct dark matter search experiments. We carefully analyze the latter possibility and we show that there are good prospects to observe a signal at the future experiments LUX and XENON1T provided the dark matter particle was produced thermally and has a mass larger than ∼ 25 GeV.

  14. Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, James, P.

    2010-05-26

    Funding from DoE grant # FG0204-ER63721, Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO2, supposed several postdoctoral fellows and research activities at MBARI related to ocean CO2 disposal and the biological consequences of high ocean CO2 levels on marine organisms. Postdocs supported on the project included Brad Seibel, now an associate professor at the University of Rhode Island, Jeff Drazen, now an associate professor at the University of Hawaii, and Eric Pane, who continues as a research associate at MBARI. Thus, the project contributed significantly to the professional development of young scientists. In addition, we made significant progress in several research areas. We continued several deep-sea CO2 release experiments using support from DoE and MBARI, along with several collaborators. These CO2 release studies had the goal of broadening our understanding of the effects of high ocean CO2 levels on deep sea animals in the vicinity of potential release sites for direct deep-ocean carbon dioxide sequestration. Using MBARI ships and ROVs, we performed these experiments at depths of 3000 to 3600 m, where liquid CO2 is heavier than seawater. CO2 was released into small pools (sections of PVC pipe) on the seabed, where it dissolved and drifted downstream, bathing any caged animals and sediments in a CO2-rich, low-pH plume. We assessed the survival of organisms nearby. Several publications arose from these studies (Barry et al. 2004, 2005; Carman et al. 2004; Thistle et al. 2005, 2006, 2007; Fleeger et al. 2006, 2010; Barry and Drazen 2007; Bernhard et al. 2009; Sedlacek et al. 2009; Ricketts et al. in press; Barry et al, in revision) concerning the sensitivity of animals to low pH waters. Using funds from DoE and MBARI, we designed and fabricated a hyperbaric trap-respirometer to study metabolic rates of deep-sea fishes under high CO2 conditions (Drazen et al, 2005), as well as a gas-control aquarium system to support laboratory studies of the

  15. Review Process for the Registration and Use Directions for Floor Wipe Towelette Products

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This guidance provides Antimicrobials Division staff with guidance related to the registration requirements and use directions for presaturated/impregnated floor wipe towelette products. This document will be used for new and existing wipe registrations.

  16. Understanding Direct Emission Measurement Approaches for Upstream Oil and Gas Production Operations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extended Abstract for Air & Waste Management Association 105th Annual Conference & Exhibition, June 19-22, 2012, San Antonio, TX. This extended abstract describes a direct measurement study of production pad emissions near Greeley, CO, conducted by ARCADIS in coordination...

  17. Understanding Direct Emission Measurement Approaches for Upstream Oil and Gas Production Operations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extended Abstract for Air & Waste Management Association 105th Annual Conference & Exhibition, June 19-22, 2012, San Antonio, TX. This extended abstract describes a direct measurement study of production pad emissions near Greeley, CO, conducted by ARCADIS in coordination...

  18. Direct Final Rule; Voluntary Consensus Standards Update; Formaldehyde Emission Standards for Composite Wood Products

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Following is a pre-publication version of the direct final rule updating several voluntary consensus standards listed at 40 CFR § 770.99 and incorporated by reference in the Formaldehyde Emission Standards for Composite Wood Products rule.

  19. Direct ingestion method for enhancing production and bioavailability of resveratrol and other phytoalexins in Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Leifer, Ari; Barberio, Dana M

    2016-03-01

    Phytoalexins such as resveratrol and pterostilbene, produced de novo by many plant species, including grapevine (Vitis vinifera), play a role in plant defense against injury and pathogens. In human cell lines and in animal studies, phytoalexins have been shown to be highly beneficial, with protective effects against cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, hyperglycemia, as well as potential effects on longevity. However, in clinical studies, there are multiple factors that restrict this plethora of health benefits attributed to phytoalexins. One of these barriers is rapid metabolism in the intestines and liver. As a means to overcome this barrier, there is evidence that retaining resveratrol in the mouth for extended periods allows for higher plasma levels of resveratrol. Processing, transport or storage may cause degradation due to light and air exposure. When the berries have been picked, they may not be at their peak phytoalexin production due to lack of elicitor induction. To overcome these barriers inherent in phytoalexin production and uptake, it is proposed that berries and possibly the edible leaves be directly ingested off of a grapevine, without harvesting. In addition to the benefit of removing these barriers to potential health benefits, this method introduces a variety of known phytoalexin elicitors, in the form of plant wounding and human saliva, which may enhance the levels of phytoalexins dramatically. The combined effect of multiple phytoalexins may also play a role in enhanced health benefits. To test this hypothesis, experiments with direct ingestion would be performed, followed by testing the participants' plasma levels of resveratrol and potentially other phytoalexins. Proposed variables to be tested include: different subjects, elicitors, cultivars of grapevine, ripeness of fruit, and a range of time for the ingestion process. The potential implications include a direct means of obtaining, in clinically beneficial

  20. A woman's lived experience with directly observed therapy for tuberculosis-a case study.

    PubMed

    Zuñiga, Julie Ann

    2012-01-01

    This is a case study to investigate the lived experience of tuberculosis (TB) treatment for a Hispanic female. The theme was accumulating aggravation. Her daily life was interrupted with appointments and negative side effects. She had to wear a mask that made her feel isolated. She felt ignored by her doctors. Although she experienced the opposite feeling of being overly observed, the informant began to feel like she was always being watched. The participant described herself as paranoid due to the threat of imprisonment for nonadherence. The accumulating aggravation made the directly observed therapy short-course (DOTS) experience a difficulty and stressful experience.

  1. An experiment on particle and jet production at midrapidity

    SciTech Connect

    Kadija, K.; Paic, G.; Vranic, D. ); Brady, F.P.; Draper, J.E.; Romero, J.L. ); Carroll, J.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Gulmez, E.; Igo, G.J.; Trentalange, S.; Whitten, C. Jr. ); Cherney, M. ); Heck, W.; Renfordt, R.E.; Roehrich, D.; Stock, R.; Stroebele, H.; Wenig, S.

    1990-09-01

    The aim of this experiment is to search for signatures of Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. Since there is no single accepted signature for the QGP, it is essential to use a flexible detection system at RHIC that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The experiment will utilize two aspects of hadron production that are fundamentally new at RHIC: correlations between global observables on an event-by-event basis and the use of hard scattering of partons as a probe of the properties of high density nuclear matter. The event-by-event measurement of global observables--such as temperature, flavor composition, collision geometry, reaction dynamics, and energy or entropy density fluctuations--is possible because of the very high charged particle densities. Event-by-event fluctuations are expected in the vicinity of a phase change, so experiments must be sensitive to threshold-like features in experimental observables as a function of energy density. Full azimuthal coverage with good particle identification and continuous tracking is required to perform these measurements at momenta where the particle yields are maximal. Measurable jet yields at RHIC will allow investigations of hard QCD processes via both highly segmented calorimetry and high p{sub t} single particle measurements in a tracking system. A systematic study of particle and jet production will be carried out over a range of colliding nuclei from p + p through Au + Au, over a range of impact parameters from peripheral to central, and over the range of energies available at RHIC. Correlations between observables will be made on an event-by-event basis to isolate potentially interesting event types. In particular, correlations of jet properties with full event reconstruction may lead to some surprising new physics.

  2. On Ba(+) production in the CRIT 2 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, K.; Torbert, R. B.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of partical data from the CRIT 2 experiment, studying Alfven's critical ionization velocity (CIV) effect, shows that the density of newly created ions (presumably Ba(+) from the shaped-charge beam) is consistent with the increase in total plasma density measured by the independent RF plasma probe on board (Swenson et al., 1990) at the most active time period. We model this ion production using the measured electron flux data and the neutral barium model of Stenbaek-Nielsen et al. (1990a). To identify the main source mechanisms which may contribute most to the barium ionization, a simple model for the barium ion density at the payload location is developed based on Liouvilles theorem. We estimate that the electron impact ionization is responsible for 90% of the barium ion production observed by CRIT 2 in the first release and up to 45% in the second release. By employing a two-state approximation calculation (Rapp and Francis, 1962), the Ba-O(+) charge exchange cross section is found to range from about 2.0 X 10(exp -17) sq cm at a velocity of 4 km/s to 2.0 X 10(exp -15) sq cm at a velocity of 20 km/s. This result suggests that the Ba-O(+) charge exchange is probably dominant among all the non-CIV ionization processes. By considering the charge exchange process in our density model, the barrium ion densities are calculated for the two releases on CRIT II. The comparison between the model results and the observed data is found to be resonably consistent if the cross sections, as calculated above, are multiplied by 0.3 for the first release and 1.0 for the second release. Our result suggests that the charge exchange process could be the most important non-CIV ionization mechanism in the CRIT II experiment and it should be considered carefully case by case in CIV experiments.

  3. Production and trapping efficiency improvements for the He-6 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagdasarova, Yelena; Garcia, Alejandro; Pedersen, Joben; Smith, Eric; Storm, Derek; Swanson, Erik; Bailey, Kevin; Hong, Ran; Leredde, Arnaud; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Tom P.; Flechard, Xavier; Knecht, Andreas; Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar; Wauters, Frederik

    2016-09-01

    The He-6 experiment at the University of Washington aims to precisely measure the beta-neutrino angular correlation (aβν) in the beta decay of He-6, a parameter that is particularly sensitive to tensor-like currents in the electroweak interaction. The experiment is based on a coincidence detection of the beta and recoil ion emitted from laser trapped He-6 and seeks to ultimately measure aβν to the 0.1% level. In the last year, major efforts have been put into increasing the data acquisition rate in order to obtain statistics for a 1% measurement of aβν. The focus was on improving the the stability of the He-6 production target and increasing trapping efficiency with upgrades to the laser system. These improvements and the current status of the experiment, along with resulting data and calibration improvements, will be discussed. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract Nos. DE-AC02-06CH11357 and DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  4. Stages of Learning during a Self-Directed Stress Management Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Karl L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to document the stages of learning reflected through student journaling during a self-directed experience in stress management, and the relationship of those stages to a historical model. Methods: College students participating in a full-semester course in stress management theory were required to select a…

  5. Learning Oceanography from a Computer Simulation Compared with Direct Experience at Sea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winn, William; Stahr, Frederick; Sarason, Christian; Fruland, Ruth; Oppenheimer, Peter; Lee, Yen-Ling

    2006-01-01

    Considerable research has compared how students learn science from computer simulations with how they learn from "traditional" classes. Little research has compared how students learn science from computer simulations with how they learn from direct experience in the real environment on which the simulations are based. This study compared two…

  6. Interplay and characterization of Dark Matter searches at colliders and in direct detection experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Malik, Sarah A.; McCabe, Christopher; Araujo, Henrique; ...

    2015-05-18

    In our White Paper we present and discuss a concrete proposal for the consistent interpretation of Dark Matter searches at colliders and in direct detection experiments. Furthermore, based on a specific implementation of simplified models of vector and axial-vector mediator exchanges, this proposal demonstrates how the two search strategies can be compared on an equal footing.

  7. Self-Directed Learning and Prostate Cancer: A Thematic Analysis of the Experiences of Twelve Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rager, Kathleen B.

    2006-01-01

    Although self-directed learning is a common response for many of the 232,090 US men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year, very little is known about the nature of the experience for them. Four themes emerged from interviews with 12 prostate cancer patients describing their self-education efforts in regard to their disease. A…

  8. Self-Directed Learning and Prostate Cancer: A Thematic Analysis of the Experiences of Twelve Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rager, Kathleen B.

    2006-01-01

    Although self-directed learning is a common response for many of the 232,090 US men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year, very little is known about the nature of the experience for them. Four themes emerged from interviews with 12 prostate cancer patients describing their self-education efforts in regard to their disease. A…

  9. A Thematic Analysis of the Self-Directed Learning Experiences of 13 Breast Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rager, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Although self-directed learning is a common response for many of the 183000 American women who are diagnosed with breast cancer each year, very little is known about the nature of the experience for them. Four themes emerged from interviews with 13 breast cancer patients describing their self-education efforts in regard to their disease. A…

  10. Health Care Professionals' Death Attitudes, Experiences, and Advance Directive Communication Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    The study surveyed 135 health care professionals (74 nurses, 32 physicians, and 29 social workers) to examine their personal death attitudes and experiences in relation to their reported advance directive communication practice behavior. Negative correlations were found between collaborating with other health care professionals regarding the…

  11. Proposal of the Experiment on Direct Observation of e-cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Heifets, S.

    2004-09-28

    Measurements of the attenuation of the rf wave can be used for direct observation of the electron cloud in LER positron ring. A simple experiment is suggested. Estimates show that damping of the rf wave proportional to the density of the electron cloud should be possible to detect.

  12. Learning Oceanography from a Computer Simulation Compared with Direct Experience at Sea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winn, William; Stahr, Frederick; Sarason, Christian; Fruland, Ruth; Oppenheimer, Peter; Lee, Yen-Ling

    2006-01-01

    Considerable research has compared how students learn science from computer simulations with how they learn from "traditional" classes. Little research has compared how students learn science from computer simulations with how they learn from direct experience in the real environment on which the simulations are based. This study compared two…

  13. Status and Prospects of the EDELWEISS-III Direct WIMP Search Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juillard, A.

    2016-08-01

    EDELWEISS-III is a direct dark matter search experiment, running 800 g heat-and-ionization cryogenic germanium detectors equipped with Full InterDigitized electrodes (FID) for the rejection of near-surface events. We report a preliminary analysis for a subset of the data (35 kg\\cdot days) as well as future prospects for low-mass WIMPs seach.

  14. Health Care Professionals' Death Attitudes, Experiences, and Advance Directive Communication Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    The study surveyed 135 health care professionals (74 nurses, 32 physicians, and 29 social workers) to examine their personal death attitudes and experiences in relation to their reported advance directive communication practice behavior. Negative correlations were found between collaborating with other health care professionals regarding the…

  15. The Self-Directed Learning Experience of Mothers Whose Child Has Had a Paediatric Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Kenda S.

    2014-01-01

    This study employed qualitative research methodology to explore the experiences of mothers who self-directed their learning following their child's stroke diagnosis. Paediatric stroke, although rare, is among the top 10 causes of death in children in the USA, but information about the cause, treatment and long-term impact are difficult to…

  16. The Self-Directed Learning Experience of Mothers Whose Child Has Had a Paediatric Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Kenda S.

    2014-01-01

    This study employed qualitative research methodology to explore the experiences of mothers who self-directed their learning following their child's stroke diagnosis. Paediatric stroke, although rare, is among the top 10 causes of death in children in the USA, but information about the cause, treatment and long-term impact are difficult to…

  17. 78 FR 63410 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Direct Heating Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ...The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to revise its test procedures for direct heating equipment and pool heaters established under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. This rulemaking will fulfill DOE's statutory obligation to review its test procedures for covered products at least once every seven years. For direct heating equipment, the proposed amendments would add provisions......

  18. 14 CFR 39.15 - Does an airworthiness directive apply if the product has been changed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Does an airworthiness directive apply if the product has been changed? 39.15 Section 39.15 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES § 39.15 Does an...

  19. Forecast constraints on inflation from combined CMB and gravitational wave direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Gordon, Christopher; Silk, Joseph; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2010-04-15

    We study how direct detection of the inflationary gravitational wave background constrains inflationary parameters and complements CMB polarization measurements. The error ellipsoids calculated using the Fisher information matrix approach with Planck and the direct detection experiment, Big Bang Observer (BBO), show different directions of parameter degeneracy, and the degeneracy is broken when they are combined. For a slow-roll parametrization, we show that BBO could significantly improve the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio compared with Planck alone. We also look at a quadratic and a natural inflation model. In both cases, if the temperature of reheating is also treated as a free parameter, then the addition of BBO can significantly improve the error bars. In the case of natural inflation, we find that the addition of BBO could even partially improve the error bars of a cosmic variance-limited CMB experiment.

  20. Direct Capture Technologies for Genomics-Guided Discovery of Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Chan, Andrew N; Santa Maria, Kevin C; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Microbes are important producers of natural products, which have played key roles in understanding biology and treating disease. However, the full potential of microbes to produce natural products has yet to be realized; the overwhelming majority of natural product gene clusters encoded in microbial genomes remain "cryptic", and have not been expressed or characterized. In contrast to the fast-growing number of genomic sequences and bioinformatic tools, methods to connect these genes to natural product molecules are still limited, creating a bottleneck in genome-mining efforts to discover novel natural products. Here we review developing technologies that leverage the power of homologous recombination to directly capture natural product gene clusters and express them in model hosts for isolation and structural characterization. Although direct capture is still in its early stages of development, it has been successfully utilized in several different classes of natural products. These early successes will be reviewed, and the methods will be compared and contrasted with existing traditional technologies. Lastly, we will discuss the opportunities for the development of direct capture in other organisms, and possibilities to integrate direct capture with emerging genome-editing techniques to accelerate future study of natural products.

  1. Direct Capture Technologies for Genomics-Guided Discovery of Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew N.; Santa Maria, Kevin C.; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Microbes are important producers of natural products, which have played key roles in understanding biology and treating disease. However, the full potential of microbes to produce natural products has yet to be realized; the overwhelming majority of natural product gene clusters encoded in microbial genomes remain “cryptic”, and have not been expressed or characterized. In contrast to the fast-growing number of genomic sequences and bioinformatic tools, methods to connect these genes to natural product molecules are still limited, creating a bottleneck in genome-mining efforts to discover novel natural products. Here we review developing technologies that leverage the power of homologous recombination to directly capture natural product gene clusters and express them in model hosts for isolation and structural characterization. Although direct capture is still in its early stages of development, it has been successfully utilized in several different classes of natural products. These early successes will be reviewed, and the methods will be compared and contrasted with existing traditional technologies. Lastly, we will discuss the opportunities for the development of direct capture in other organisms, and possibilities to integrate direct capture with emerging genome-editing techniques to accelerate future study of natural products. PMID:26456469

  2. Characterising dark matter searches at colliders and direct detection experiments: Vector mediators

    DOE PAGES

    Buchmueller, Oliver; Dolan, Matthew J.; Malik, Sarah A.; ...

    2015-01-09

    We introduce a Minimal Simplified Dark Matter (MSDM) framework to quantitatively characterise dark matter (DM) searches at the LHC. We study two MSDM models where the DM is a Dirac fermion which interacts with a vector and axial-vector mediator. The models are characterised by four parameters: mDM, Mmed , gDM and gq, the DM and mediator masses, and the mediator couplings to DM and quarks respectively. The MSDM models accurately capture the full event kinematics, and the dependence on all masses and couplings can be systematically studied. The interpretation of mono-jet searches in this framework can be used to establishmore » an equal-footing comparison with direct detection experiments. For theories with a vector mediator, LHC mono-jet searches possess better sensitivity than direct detection searches for light DM masses (≲5 GeV). For axial-vector mediators, LHC and direct detection searches generally probe orthogonal directions in the parameter space. We explore the projected limits of these searches from the ultimate reach of the LHC and multi-ton xenon direct detection experiments, and find that the complementarity of the searches remains. In conclusion, we provide a comparison of limits in the MSDM and effective field theory (EFT) frameworks to highlight the deficiencies of the EFT framework, particularly when exploring the complementarity of mono-jet and direct detection searches.« less

  3. Characterising dark matter searches at colliders and direct detection experiments: Vector mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Buchmueller, Oliver; Dolan, Matthew J.; Malik, Sarah A.; McCabe, Christopher

    2015-01-09

    We introduce a Minimal Simplified Dark Matter (MSDM) framework to quantitatively characterise dark matter (DM) searches at the LHC. We study two MSDM models where the DM is a Dirac fermion which interacts with a vector and axial-vector mediator. The models are characterised by four parameters: mDM, Mmed , gDM and gq, the DM and mediator masses, and the mediator couplings to DM and quarks respectively. The MSDM models accurately capture the full event kinematics, and the dependence on all masses and couplings can be systematically studied. The interpretation of mono-jet searches in this framework can be used to establish an equal-footing comparison with direct detection experiments. For theories with a vector mediator, LHC mono-jet searches possess better sensitivity than direct detection searches for light DM masses (≲5 GeV). For axial-vector mediators, LHC and direct detection searches generally probe orthogonal directions in the parameter space. We explore the projected limits of these searches from the ultimate reach of the LHC and multi-ton xenon direct detection experiments, and find that the complementarity of the searches remains. In conclusion, we provide a comparison of limits in the MSDM and effective field theory (EFT) frameworks to highlight the deficiencies of the EFT framework, particularly when exploring the complementarity of mono-jet and direct detection searches.

  4. First Human Experience with Directly Image-able Iodinated Embolization Microbeads.

    PubMed

    Levy, Elliot B; Krishnasamy, Venkatesh P; Lewis, Andrew L; Willis, Sean; Macfarlane, Chelsea; Anderson, Victoria; van der Bom, Imramsjah Mj; Radaelli, Alessandro; Dreher, Matthew R; Sharma, Karun V; Negussie, Ayele; Mikhail, Andrew S; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H; Wood, Bradford J

    2016-08-01

    To describe first clinical experience with a directly image-able, inherently radio-opaque microspherical embolic agent for transarterial embolization of liver tumors. LC Bead LUMI™ is a new product based upon sulfonate-modified polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel microbeads with covalently bound iodine (~260 mg I/ml). 70-150 μ LC Bead LUMI™ iodinated microbeads were injected selectively via a 2.8 Fr microcatheter to near complete flow stasis into hepatic arteries in three patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, carcinoid, or neuroendocrine tumor. A custom imaging platform tuned for LC LUMI™ microbead conspicuity using a cone beam CT (CBCT)/angiographic C-arm system (Allura Clarity FD20, Philips) was used along with CBCT embolization treatment planning software (EmboGuide, Philips). LC Bead LUMI™ image-able microbeads were easily delivered and monitored during the procedure using fluoroscopy, single-shot radiography (SSD), digital subtraction angiography (DSA), dual-phase enhanced and unenhanced CBCT, and unenhanced conventional CT obtained 48 h after the procedure. Intra-procedural imaging demonstrated tumor at risk for potential under-treatment, defined as paucity of image-able microbeads within a portion of the tumor which was confirmed at 48 h CT imaging. Fusion of pre- and post-embolization CBCT identified vessels without beads that corresponded to enhancing tumor tissue in the same location on follow-up imaging (48 h post). LC Bead LUMI™ image-able microbeads provide real-time feedback and geographic localization of treatment in real time during treatment. The distribution and density of image-able beads within a tumor need further evaluation as an additional endpoint for embolization.

  5. Space product development experiment module utilizing the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Christine; Lundquist, Charles; Wessling, Francis; Smith, James; Naumann, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Furnace facilities for materials processing on the International Space Station (ISS) will include the Space Product Development Experiment Module (SPDEM) which includes a transparent Furnace module and an opaque Furnace Module. The SPDEM is scheduled currently for UF-3 aboard the Materials Science Research Rack(MSRR). Various commercial interests can be satisfied sequentially by scheduled employment of the SPDEM. The CMDS will be the facility manager through whom arrangements can be made for SPDEM access. The ISS should provide long growth periods which are needed to grow large single crystals in microgravity. A typical area of commercial interest is acousto-optic filters (AOTF) based on mercurous halide research which would continue on the ISS, research begun on the STS-77 mission. Another area of commercial interest planned for implementation on ISS is liquid metal sintering of composites to further improve techniques for making better quality materials.

  6. Production of defects in metals by collision cascades: TEM experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, M.A.

    1995-03-01

    This paper reviews experimental TEM data on production of dislocation loops by low energy ion bombardment to low doses, as simulations of similar collision cascades produced by fast neutron irradiation, in various metals and alloys. The dependence of vacancy dislocation loop formation on recoil energy, sample temperature, and specific metal or alloy will be examined. Special emphasis will be placed on the effects of dilute alloy additions. A model for cascade melting will be employed to understand these effects, and will require an examination of the role of electron-phonon coupling in cascade cooling and recrystallization. The formation of interstitial dislocation loops as cascade defects, and the influence of the nearby surfaces in these experiments is briefly discussed.

  7. [The new directive on tobacco products: "(a Battle) ended, (Battle) is just beginning"!].

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, Magdalena; Postolache, Paraschiva

    2014-01-01

    As tobacco products are sold in all the 28 member states of the European Union, they are subject of regulation of the internal common market. Thus, the Directive 2001/37/EC lays down rules at Union level concerning the manufacture, presentation and sale of tobacco products. In order to reflect scientific, market and international developments, substantial changes have to be made and the Directive was replaced by a new Directive. The process has begun in 2009 and was finished in December 2013, with a political agreement regarding the new provisions. The final vote in the European Parliament (expected for February 2014) will mark the end of a long and difficult legislative process. The article presents the main changes of the regulation of tobacco products from the point of view of health professionals, closer to their expectations and understandings. The complete text in Romanian and English language of the new directive will be available on: www.stopfumat.eu.

  8. Production of mineral aggregates in quartz tumbling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørnberg, Per; Finster, Kai; Pall Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur; Knak Jensen, Svend; Merrison, Jonathan Peter

    2013-04-01

    Introduction Tumbling experiments with quartz sand with the purpose of tracing the effect of broken bonds in mineral surfaces resulted in an unexpected production of aggregates. These aggregates are a few microns in diameter, spherical and resembling tiny white "snowballs." Particle comminution by aeolian and other natural weathering processes are known in soil science and is often seen as an increase of fine particles towards the top of soil profiles (Nørnberg, P. 1987, 1988, 2002, J.S. Wright 2007). When mineral grains collide in aeolian processes they break up along weakness zones in the crystal lattice. This mechanism causes broken bonds between atoms in the crystal lattice and results in reactive groups in the mineral surface. This mechanism provides the background for experiments to investigate the oxidation processes of magnetite on the planet Mars. The primary magnetic iron oxide phase on Mars is to day known to be magnetite and the colour of the dust on Mars is most likely due to hematite. To investigate if the oxidation process could take place without going over dissolution and precipitation in water, experiments with tumbling of quartz grains in sealed glass containers along with magnetite were started. The idea was that activated bonds at the surface of quartz could oxidize magnetite and convert it to hematite over time. This proved to be the case (Merrison, J.P. et al. 2010). However, in these experiments we observed the formation of the white aggregates which has been the subject of the study that we present here. Results of tumbling experiments Commercially available quarts (Merck) was sieved to obtain the fraction between 125 and 1000 µm. This fraction was tumbled in glass containers for months and resulted in production of a significant amount of fine grained material (Merrison, J.P et al. 2010). A part of this fine fraction consists of the "snowball"-like aggregates which is a fragile element with relatively high specific surface. The physical

  9. The effect of direct electron-positron pair production on relativistic feedback rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodopiyanov, I. B.; Dwyer, J. R.; Cramer, E. S.; Lucia, R. J.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Runaway electron avalanches developing in thunderclouds in high electric field become self-sustaining due to relativistic feedback via the production of backward propagating positrons and backscattered X-rays. To date, only positrons created from pair production by gamma rays interacting with the air have been considered. In contrast, direct electron-positron pair production, also known as "trident process," occurs from the interaction of energetic runaway electrons with atomic nuclei, and so it does not require the generation of a gamma ray mediator. The positrons produced in this process contribute to relativistic feedback and become especially important when the feedback factor value approaches unity. Then the steady state flux of runaway electrons increases significantly. In certain cases, when the strong electrostatic field forms in a narrow area, the direct positrons become one of processes dominating relativistic feedback. Calculations of the direct positron production contribution to relativistic feedback are presented for different electric field configurations.

  10. Internal medicine residents' perceived ability to direct patient care: impact of gender and experience.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Christie; Goetz, Sarah; Ward, Earlise; Carnes, Molly

    2008-12-01

    Physicians are expected to effect patient care by giving orders to members of a healthcare team. Because women are socialized to be less directive than men, the assertive behavior required of new physicians may be experienced differently by male and female residents. We sought to explore the effects of gender and year of training on residents' experiences and perceived ability to direct patient care. This was a mixed-methods, cross-sectional, descriptive study employing a quantitative written survey and qualitative interviews among internal medicine residents at an academic health center. Measurements included questionnaires and interviews about stress, assertiveness, and personal factors that influence their effectiveness in directing patient care. Analyses examined differences by gender and year of training. One hundred residents were invited to participate; 65 returned questionnaires, and 16 of these residents were interviewed. Compared with male residents, female residents selected less assertive behaviors for clinical scenarios (p = 0.047) and were more likely to perceive gender as inhibiting their ability to influence patient care (p < 0.01). Stress associated with being assertive varied more with experience than gender. Interviews corroborated these findings and supported the complexity of gender norms for behavior for female residents in a directive leadership position. When compared with male peers, female residents reported more gender issues in residency and chose less assertive behaviors in clinical scenarios. Experience mitigated some gender differences. Our findings suggest that discussion of the existing research on prescriptive gender norms for behavior and leadership may be warranted in resident orientation.

  11. Exercise Experiences and Changes in Affective Attitude: Direct and Indirect Effects of In Situ Measurements of Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Sudeck, Gorden; Schmid, Julia; Conzelmann, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between exercise experiences (perceptions of competence, perceived exertion, acute affective responses to exercise) and affective attitudes toward exercise. This relationship was analyzed in a non-laboratory setting during a 13-weeks exercise program. Materials and Methods: 56 women and 49 men (aged 35–65 years; Mage = 50.0 years; SD = 8.2 years) took part in the longitudinal study. Affective responses to exercise (affective valence, positive activation, calmness) as well as perceptions of competence and perceived exertion were measured at the beginning, during, and end of three exercise sessions within the 13-weeks exercise program. Affective attitude toward exercise were measured before and at the end of the exercise program. A two-level path analysis was conducted. The direct and indirect effects of exercise experiences on changes in affective attitude were analyzed on the between-person level: firstly, it was tested whether perceptions of competence and perceived exertion directly relate to changes in affective attitude. Secondly, it was assessed whether perceptions of competence and perceived exertion indirectly relate to changes in affective attitudes—imparted via the affective response during exercise. Results and Conclusion: At the between-person level, a direct effect on changes in affective attitude was found for perceptions of competence (β = 0.24, p < 0.05). The model revealed one significant indirect pathway between perceived exertion and changes in affective attitude via positive activation: on average, the less strenuous people perceive physical exercise to be, the more awake they will feel during exercise (β = -0.57, p < 0.05). Those people with higher average levels of positive activation during exercise exhibit more improvements in affective attitudes toward exercise from the beginning to the end of the 13-weeks exercise program (β = 0.24, p < 0.05). Main study results

  12. VIIRS Aerosol Products During the SEAC4RS Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remer, L. A.; Munchak, L. A.; Huang, J.; Martins, J. V.; Espinosa, R.; Orozco, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) field experiment that took place during August and September 2013 offered an in depth portrait of the aerosol system over much of the continental United States. Heavily instrumented aircraft, including the NASA DC-8 sampled a wide variety of aerosol types including transported Saharan dust, both fresh and aged smoke from western wildfires, urban pollution plumes and also biogenic aerosol produced by the "green volcano" in the vegetated Ozarks. Complementing these aircraft measurements was an enhanced array of AERONET stations sprinkled across the country and also concentrated in a mesoscale array near the home base of Houston Texas. This rich collection of suborbital aerosol information permits a more comprehensive evaluation of the VIIRS aerosol product that includes validation of the products across the mesoscale and choices of case studies in which we can delve deeper into the VIIRS retrieval to test algorithm assumptions. We will compare VIIRS retrievals during SEAC4RS with MODIS retrievals, with AERONET observations and retrievals, and with measurements and retrievals from the Polar Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph) that flew aboard the NASA DC-8.

  13. Light flavour hadron production in the ALICE experiment at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalà, Angela

    2016-05-01

    Unique among the LHC experiments, ALICE has excellent particle identification capabilities for the measurement of light-flavour hadrons. A large number of hadron species from pions to multi-strange baryons and light nuclei have been measured over a large transverse momentum region. The measurement of the production of these particles is a valuable tool to study the properties of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions. In particular they give information on the collective phenomena of the fireball, on the parton energy loss in the hot QCD medium and on the hadronization mechanisms such as recombination and statistical hadronization. The measurements in pp and in p-nucleus collisions provide the necessary baseline for heavy-ion data and help to investigate the effects of the ordinary nuclear matter. In this paper some of the main ALICE results on identified light-flavour hadron production in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV and p-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV will be presented.

  14. Two-plasmon decay mitigation in direct-drive inertial-confinement-fusion experiments using multilayer targets

    DOE PAGES

    Follett, R. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; ...

    2016-04-15

    Multilayer direct-drive inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) targets are shown to significantly reduce two-plasmon-decay (TPD) driven hot-electron production while maintaining high hydrodynamic efficiency. Implosion experiments on the OMEGA Laser used targets with silicon layered between an inner beryllium and outer silicon-doped plastic ablator. A factor of five reduction in hot-electron generation (> 50 keV) was observed in the multilayer targets relative to pure CH targets. Three-dimensional simulations of the TPD driven hot-electron production using a laser-plasma interaction code (LPSE) that includes nonlinear and kinetic effects show excellent agreement with the measurements. As a result, the simulations suggest that the reduction in hot-electron productionmore » observed in the multilayer targets is primarily due to increased electron-ion collisional damping.« less

  15. Direct impacts of biochar on N2O production during denitrification by a soil microbial community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Akanksha; Harter, Johannes; Hagemann, Nikolas; Kappler, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Biochar, i.e. biomass heated under O2 limitation to 350-1000°C (pyrolysis), is suggested as a beneficial soil amendment to mitigate climate change and to maintain and restore the fertility of agro-ecosystems. Its stability enables long-term carbon sequestration and biochar effectively reduces soil-borne N2O emissions. Biochar's ability to reduce N2O emissions is well recognized through field and laboratory experiments as well as meta-analyses. However, the underlying mechanisms remain widely debated. Microbial nitrogen transformations, especially denitrification, the stepwise reduction of nitrate/nitrite via NO and N2O to N2, are considered to be a major source of N2O emissions. Soil microcosm experiments showed lower N2O emissions in the presence of biochar often correlate with a higher abundance and/or activity of N2O reducing bacteria in the presence of biochar. However, it is still unknown whether these shifts in the microbial community and/or activity is cause or effect of reduced N2O production. Biochar has the potential to change the physico-chemical environment towards conditions that favor complete denitrification, i.e. decrease the N2O/(N2O+N2) product ratio. Specifically, biochar can increase soil pH, reduce the availability of nitrate and increase the entrapment of gases, including N2O. These effects are known to decrease the N2O/(N2O+N2) ratio. In addition to the observed effects in the physio-chemical environment, we hypothesized that biochar has a direct impact on the soil microbial community. For instance, it has been shown to provide a suitable habitat to microorganisms, or facilitate electron transfer between microbe and substrates by acting as an electron shuttle or as a temporary acceptor/donor of electrons. To test this hypothesis, our experiment consisted of a microbial community extracted from soil and cultivated under anoxic conditions. It was introduced as an inoculum into three different treatments: biochar, quartz (control with a solid

  16. Testing keV sterile neutrino dark matter in future direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Miguel D.; Rodejohann, Werner

    2016-11-01

    We determine constraints on sterile neutrino warm dark matter through direct detection experiments, taking XENON100, XENON1T, and DARWIN as examples. If keV-scale sterile neutrinos scatter inelastically with bound electrons of the target material, an electron recoil signal is generated. This can be used to set limits on the sterile neutrino mass and its mixing with the active sector. While not competitive with astrophysical constraints from x-ray data, the constraints are the first direct laboratory bounds on sterile neutrino warm dark matter and will be in some parts of parameter space the strongest limits on keV-scale neutrinos.

  17. Accelerator experiments on the contribution of secondary particles to the production of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P.

    1985-01-01

    Through the interaction of galactic cosmic particle radiation (GCR) a wide variety of cosmogenic nuclides is produced in meteorites. They provide historical information about the cosmic radiation and the bombarded meteorites. An important way to understand the production mechanisms of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites is to gather information about the depth and size dependence of the build-up of Galactic Rays Cosmic-secondary particles within meteorites of different sizes and chemical compositions. Simulation experiments with meteorite models offer an alternative to direct observation providing a data basis to describe the development and action of the secondary cascade induced by the GCR in meteorites.

  18. Search for direct and indirect unitarity violation in neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shu

    2014-08-01

    If three standard neutrinos mix with other degree of freedoms like sterile neutrinos, no matter how heavy the sterile neutrino masses are, it could result in the unitarity violation in the MNSP matrix. Nevertheless, the unitarity violation induced by the existence of light or heavy sterile neutrinos can have very different effects on neutrino oscillations, we call the former case direct unitarity violation and the later case the indirect unitarity violation. We will explain in this paper the difference of these two kinds of unitarity violations, then focus on the possibilities of searching the unitarity violation in neutrino oscillation experiments, of which the precision reactor experiments with multiple baselines are discussed in detail.

  19. Direct VCSEL launch into large-core multimode fiber: enhancement of the bandwidth x distance product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBaun, Barbara A.; Pepeljugoski, Petar K.; Trewhella, Jeannine M.

    1997-04-01

    Traditionally, large core (greater than 100 micron) step index multimode optical fiber has occupied a reactively small niche of applications in data communications. While the large diameter of this type of fiber makes it easy to align to optoelectronic devices, its bandwidth*distance (BW*D) product is low due to modal dispersion between the large number of modes supported by a fully filled fiber. Recently, interest has been renewed in using an underfilled launch to excite 62.5 micron core graded index multimode fiber as a way to improve its bandwidth performance. With the proper launch conditions, this same effect has been measured in large core fiber. A vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) is used to provide a low numerical aperture launch into a large core fiber, which has a relatively large numerical aperture. The laser thus underfills the modes of the fiber, and a bandwidth enhancement for the fiber is obtained. Results of experiments performed on step and graded index large core multimode fibers using a direct VCSEL launch are presented. In addition, these relaxed alignment tolerance fibers allow the utilization of very low cost cabling and connectorization procedures for parallel optical fiber cables. Data, including skew, bandwidth, and insertion loss, are presented on these cables.

  20. Biodiesel production from Spirulina microalgae feedstock using direct transesterification near supercritical methanol condition.

    PubMed

    Mohamadzadeh Shirazi, Hamed; Karimi-Sabet, Javad; Ghotbi, Cyrus

    2017-09-01

    Microalgae as a candidate for production of biodiesel, possesses a hard cell wall that prevents intracellular lipids leaving out from the cells. Direct or in situ supercritical transesterification has the potential for destruction of microalgae hard cell wall and conversion of extracted lipids to biodiesel that consequently reduces the total energy consumption. Response surface methodology combined with central composite design was applied to investigate process parameters including: Temperature, Time, Methanol-to-dry algae, Hexane-to-dry algae, and Moisture content. Thirty-two experiments were designed and performed in a batch reactor, and biodiesel efficiency between 0.44% and 99.32% was obtained. According to fatty acid methyl ester yields, a quadratic experimental model was adjusted and the significance of parameters was evaluated using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Effects of single and interaction parameters were also interpreted. In addition, the effect of supercritical process on the ultrastructure of microalgae cell wall using scanning electron spectrometry (SEM) was surveyed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnesium stearine production via direct reaction of palm stearine and magnesium hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratiwi, M.; Ylitervo, P.; Pettersson, A.; Prakoso, T.; Soerawidjaja, T. H.

    2017-06-01

    The fossil oil production could not compensate with the increase of its consumption, because of this reason the renewable alternative energy source is needed to meet this requirement of this fuel. One of the methods to produce hydrocarbon is by decarboxylation of fatty acids. Vegetable oil and fats are the greatest source of fatty acids, so these can be used as raw material for biohydrocarbon production. From other researchers on their past researchs, by heating base soap from divalent metal, those metal salts will decarboxylate and produce hydrocarbon. This study investigate the process and characterization of magnesium soaps from palm stearine by Blachford method. The metal soaps are synthesized by direct reaction of palm stearine and magnesium hydroxide to produce magnesium stearine and magnesium stearine base soaps at 140-180°C and 6-10 bar for 3-6 hours. The operation process which succeed to gain metal soaps is 180°C, 10 bar, for 3-6 hours. These metal soaps are then compared with commercial magnesium stearate. Based on Thermogravimetry Analysis (TGA) results, the decomposition temperature of all the metal soaps were 250°C. Scanning Electron Microscope with Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) analysis have shown the traces of sodium sulphate for magnesium stearate commercial and magnesium hydroxide for both type of magnesium stearine soaps. The analysis results from Microwave Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (MP-AES) have shown that the magnesium content of magnesium stearine approximate with magnesium stearate commercial and lower compare with magnesium stearine base soaps. These experiments suggest that the presented saponification process method could produced metal soaps comparable with the commercial metal soaps.

  2. Comparison of flow and transport experiments on 3D printed 'rocks' with direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, F. E.; Geiger, S.; Mackay, E.; Singleton, M.; McGravie, T.; Anouilh, T.; Jobe, D.; Zhang, S.; Agar, S. M.; Ishutov, S.; Hasiuk, F.; Chalaturnyk, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    3D printing technology has the potential to revolutionise modelling of fluid flow and mass transport in porous media. Using 3D printing to replicate pore geometries from real rocks quickly and cheaply, and being able to assign specific properties to the samples, would enable us to repeat experiments where things such as permeability, porosity, reactivity, or wettability are known a priori. Destructive tests, such as reactive transport experiments, could then be performed using the same, realistic, initial geometry, in a repeatable fashion; in addition, specific properties of the porous media (e.g. the reactivity of individual grains) could be altered in a controlled way. Similarly, two-phase flow experiments could be carried out where relevant properties (e.g. individual grain wettability) are modified between experiments. Results from such experiments would shed new light on key physio-chemical processes occurring at the pore-scale during multi-phase reactive flow and would allow us to validate the suite of emerging direct numerical simulation techniques (e.g. Lattice Boltzman, Volume of Fluid) currently used to model pore-scale flow and transport. We have developed a novel experimental setup to investigate single-phase flow and transport through translucent 3D printed and Perspex samples and to visualise the experiments for comparison with numerical simulations. Dyed fluid is injected at one end of the sample and the behaviour of the system is recorded using a digital camera situated directly above it. Image processing techniques are employed to quantify dye concentration and location through time. We use the finite volume method to simulate the flow experiments in OpenFOAM, using the same input geometry that was used to print the sample. Comparison of experimental results with simulations enables us to identify similarities and differences between flow and transport observed in the 3D printed samples and behaviour expected from the numerical simulations.

  3. The Impact of Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences on Students' Readiness for Self-directed Learning

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Stuart T.; Plaza, Cecilia M.; Sturpe, Deborah A.; Williams, Greg; Rodriguez de Bittner, Magaly A.; Roffman, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) on doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students' readiness for self-directed learning. Methods The Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale (SDLRS) was administered to students prior to and after completing their APPEs. SDLRS is a validated instrument that determines the relative degree to which students have the attitudes and motivation to engage in self-directed learning. Results Seventy-seven (64%) students completed the SDLRS prior to starting their APPEs and 80 (67%) students completed the instrument after completing their APPEs. Forty-six (38%) students completed both. Prior to starting their APPEs, 74% of students scored greater than 150 on the SDLRS, indicating a high level of readiness for self-directed learning. No significant difference was found between the mean scores of students who took the SDLRS both prior to (159 ± 20) and after completing their APPEs (159 ± 24; p > 0.05). Conclusion Students at our institution appear to be ready for self-directed learning but APPEs had a minimal impact on their readiness for self-directed learning. PMID:19657498

  4. Poker Face of Inelastic Dark Matter: Prospects at Upcoming Direct Detection Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Daniele S.M.; Lisanti, Mariangela; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    The XENON100 and CRESST experiments will directly test the inelastic dark matter explanation for DAMA's 8.9{sigma} anomaly. This article discusses how predictions for direct detection experiments depend on uncertainties in quenching factor measurements, the dark matter interaction with the Standard Model and the halo velocity distribution. When these uncertainties are accounted for, an order of magnitude variation is found in the number of expected events at CRESST and XENON100. The process of testing the DAMA anomaly highlights many of the challenges inherent to direct detection experiments. In addition to determining the properties of the unknown dark matter particle, direct detection experiments must also consider the unknown flux of the incident dark matter, as well as uncertainties in converting a signal from one target nucleus to another. The predictions for both the CRESST 2009 run and XENON100 2010 run show an order of magnitude uncertainty. The nuclear form factor for {sup 184}W, when combined with additional theoretical and experimental uncertainties, will likely prevent CRESST from refuting the iDM hypothesis with an exposure of {Omicron}(100 kg-d) in a model-independent manner. XENON100, on the other hand, will be able to make a definitive statement about a spin-independent, inelastically scattering dark matter candidate. Still, the CRESST 2009 data can potentially confirm iDM for a large range of parameter space. In case of a positive signal, the combined data from CRESST and XENON100 will start probing the properties of the Milky Way DM profile and the interaction of the SM with the dark matter.

  5. Directed Design of Experiments (DOE) for Determining Probability of Detection (POD) Capability of NDE Systems (DOEPOD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Ed

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews some of the issues that people who specialize in Non destructive evaluation (NDE) have with determining the statistics of the probability of detection. There is discussion of the use of the binominal distribution, and the probability of hit. The presentation then reviews the concepts of Directed Design of Experiments for Validating Probability of Detection of Inspection Systems (DOEPOD). Several cases are reviewed, and discussed. The concept of false calls is also reviewed.

  6. Directional resolution of dish antenna experiments to search for WISPy dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeckel, Joerg; Knirck, Stefan E-mail: knirck@stud.uni-heidelberg.de

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter consisting of very light and very weakly interacting particles such as axions, axion-like particles and hidden photons could be detected using reflective surfaces. On such reflectors some of the dark matter particles are converted into photons and, given a suitable geometry, concentrated on the detector. This technique offers sensitivity to the direction of the velocity of the dark matter particles. In this note we investigate how far spherical mirrors can concentrate the generated photons and what this implies for the resolution in directional detection as well as the sensitivity of discovery experiments not aiming for directional resolution. Finally we discuss an improved setup using a combination of a reflecting plane with focussing optics.

  7. Directional resolution of dish antenna experiments to search for WISPy dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeckel, Joerg; Knirck, Stefan

    2016-01-04

    Dark matter consisting of very light and very weakly interacting particles such as axions, axion-like particles and hidden photons could be detected using reflective surfaces. On such reflectors some of the dark matter particles are converted into photons and, given a suitable geometry, concentrated on the detector. This technique offers sensitivity to the direction of the velocity of the dark matter particles. In this note we investigate how far spherical mirrors can concentrate the generated photons and what this implies for the resolution in directional detection as well as the sensitivity of discovery experiments not aiming for directional resolution. Finally we discuss an improved setup using a combination of a reflecting plane with focussing optics.

  8. Bio-diesel production directly from the microalgae biomass of Nannochloropsis by microwave and ultrasound radiation.

    PubMed

    Koberg, Miri; Cohen, Moshe; Ben-Amotz, Ami; Gedanken, Aharon

    2011-03-01

    This work offers an optimized method for the direct conversion of harvested Nannochloropsis algae into bio-diesel using two novel techniques. The first is a unique bio-technology-based environmental system utilizing flue gas from coal burning power stations for microalgae cultivation. This method reduces considerably the cost of algae production. The second technique is the direct transesterification (a one-stage method) of the Nannochloropsis biomass to bio-diesel production using microwave and ultrasound radiation with the aid of a SrO catalyst. These two techniques were tested and compared to identify the most effective bio-diesel production method. Based on our results, it is concluded that the microwave oven method appears to be the most simple and efficient method for the one-stage direct transesterification of the as-harvested Nannochloropsis algae. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Physicians' experiences with demented patients with advance euthanasia directives in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Rurup, Mette L; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D; van der Heide, Agnes; van der Wal, Gerrit; van der Maas, Paul J

    2005-07-01

    To estimate the incidence of (compliance with) advance euthanasia directives of patients suffering from dementia in the Netherlands and to gain knowledge about the experiences of physicians. Retrospective interview study. Physicians in the Netherlands. Four hundred ten physicians. Physicians were interviewed about their demented patients who had an advance euthanasia directive. Nursing home physicians were interviewed more extensively. Approximately 2,200 demented patients with an advance euthanasia directive die annually after being treated by a physician who knows about this directive. In 76% of such cases, compliance with the directive was discussed, but euthanasia was seldom performed. In two-thirds of the cases of demented nursing home patients with an advance euthanasia directive, the physician was able to identify during the course of the disease a situation for which the patient had intended the directive. One-quarter of the nursing home physicians thought that their most recent patient suffered unbearably to a (very) high degree, and half of them thought that the patient suffered hopelessly to a (very) high degree. In three-quarters of the cases, the relatives did not want the nursing home physician to comply with the directive, but they did want to respect the patient's wishes by forgoing life-prolonging treatment, which occurred in approximately 90% of cases. Most nursing home physicians think that the suffering of patients with dementia can be unbearable and hopeless as a consequence of dementia, but most physicians do not consider dementia to be grounds for euthanasia, unless perhaps the patient has an additional illness.

  10. Review of tokamak experiments on direct electron heating and current drive with fast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.

    1993-12-01

    Results from tokamak experiments on direct electron interaction with the compressional Alfven wave ({open_quote}fast wave{close_quote}) are reviewed. Experiments aimed at electron heating as well as those in which fast wave electron current drive was investigated are discussed. A distinction is drawn between experiments employing the lower hybrid range of frequencies, where both the lower hybrid wave ({open_quote}slow wave{close_quote}) and the fast wave can propagate in much of the plasma, and those experiments using the fast wave in the range of moderate to high ion cyclotron harmonics, where only the fast wave can penetrate to the plasma core. Most of the early tokamak experiments were in the lower hybrid frequency regime, and the observed electron interaction appeared to be very similar to that obtained with the slow wave at the same frequency. In particular, electron interaction with the fast wave was observed only below a density limit nearly the same as the well known slow wave density limit. In the more recent lower frequency fast wave experiments, electron interaction (heating and current drive) is observed at the center of the discharge, where slow waves are not present.

  11. Quantifying (dis)agreement between direct detection experiments in a halo-independent way

    SciTech Connect

    Feldstein, Brian; Kahlhoefer, Felix E-mail: felix.kahlhoefer@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2014-12-01

    We propose an improved method to study recent and near-future dark matter direct detection experiments with small numbers of observed events. Our method determines in a quantitative and halo-independent way whether the experiments point towards a consistent dark matter signal and identifies the best-fit dark matter parameters. To achieve true halo independence, we apply a recently developed method based on finding the velocity distribution that best describes a given set of data. For a quantitative global analysis we construct a likelihood function suitable for small numbers of events, which allows us to determine the best-fit particle physics properties of dark matter considering all experiments simultaneously. Based on this likelihood function we propose a new test statistic that quantifies how well the proposed model fits the data and how large the tension between different direct detection experiments is. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in order to determine the probability distribution function of this test statistic and to calculate the p-value for both the dark matter hypothesis and the background-only hypothesis.

  12. Direct dark matter search with the CRESST-III experiment - status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willers, M.; Angloher, G.; Bento, A.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Defay, X.; Erb, A.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Ferreiro Iachellini, N.; Gütlein, A.; Gorla, P.; Hauff, D.; Jochum, J.; Kiefer, M.; Kluck, H.; Kraus, H.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Loebell, J.; Mancuso, M.; Münster, A.; Pagliarone, C.; Petricca, F.; Potzel, W.; Pröbst, F.; Puig, R.; Reindl, F.; Schäffner, K.; Schieck, J.; Schönert, S.; Seidel, W.; Stahlberg, M.; Stodolsky, L.; Strandhagen, C.; Strauss, R.; Tanzke, A.; Trinh Thi, H. H.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Uffinger, M.; Ulrich, A.; Usherov, I.; Wawoczny, S.; Wüstrich, M.; Zöller, A.

    2017-09-01

    The CRESST-III experiment, located in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS, Italy), aims at the direct detection of dark matter (DM) particles. Scintillating CaWO4 crystals operated as cryogenic detectors are used as target material for DM-nucleus scattering. The simultaneous measurement of the phonon signal from the CaWO4 crystal and of the emitted scintillation light in a separate cryogenic light detector is used to discriminate backgrounds from a possible dark matter signal. The experiment aims to significantly improve the sensitivity for low-mass (≲ 5-10 GeV/c2) DM particles by using optimized detector modules with a nuclear recoil-energy threshold ≲ 100 eV. The current status of the experiment as well as projections of the sensitivity for spin-independent DM-nucleon scattering will be presented.

  13. Rapid determination of molar mass in modified Archibald experiments using direct fitting of the Lamm equation.

    PubMed

    Schuck, P; Millar, D B

    1998-05-15

    A new method is described that allows measurement of the molar mass of the solute within 15 to 30 min after start of a conventional long-column sedimentation equilibrium experiment. A series of scans of the concentration distribution in close vicinity of the meniscus, taken in rapid succession after the start of the centrifuge run, is analyzed by direct fitting using the Lamm equation and the Svedberg equation. In case of a single solute, this analysis of the initial depletion at the meniscus reveals its buoyant molar mass and sedimentation coefficient with an accuracy of approximately 10% and provides gross information about sample heterogeneity. This method can be used to study macromolecules that do not possess the prolonged stability needed in conventional sedimentation equilibrium experiments and it can increase the efficiency of sedimentation equilibrium experiments of previously uncharacterized samples.

  14. Use of gas turbine exhaust for the direct drying of food products: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The objective of this program was to evaluate the merits of using natural gas-fired gas turbine exhaust to directly dry food products. A survey of drying practices utilized in the food industry and a detailed review of worldwide regulatory drying practices were completed. An investigation of the economic advantages associated with direct drying was also considered. Four drying scenarios were used as part of the analysis: Dilution - hot turbine exhaust gases were diluted with ambient air to achieve temperatures suitable for food product drying; Indirect Heat Exchanger - gas turbine exhaust was directed through an intermediate heat exchanger to avoid flue-gas contamination of the ambient air; Tri-Generation - exhaust gases from the gas turbine were first directed to a heat recovery boiler and then through the drying system to dry the food product; and Conventional Cogeneration - the most conventional simple cycle gas turbine cogeneration (this scenario served as the baseline for all evaluations). Although the economics associated with direct drying appear attractive, the principal concern of any potential use would be the extraordinarily high NO/sub x/ levels and the potential nitrate and nitrosamine (potential carcinogens and carcinogenic precursors) contamination in food products. 21 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

  15. The direct oxidative diene cyclization and related reactions in natural product synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary The direct oxidative cyclization of 1,5-dienes is a valuable synthetic method for the (dia)stereoselective preparation of substituted tetrahydrofurans. Closely related reactions start from 5,6-dihydroxy or 5-hydroxyalkenes to generate similar products in a mechanistically analogous manner. After a brief overview on the history of this group of transformations and a survey on mechanistic and stereochemical aspects, this review article provides a summary on applications in natural product synthesis. Moreover, current limitations and future directions in this area of chemistry are discussed. PMID:27829917

  16. Enantioselective intramolecular aldehyde α-alkylation with simple olefins: direct access to homo-ene products.

    PubMed

    Comito, Robert J; Finelli, Fernanda G; MacMillan, David W C

    2013-06-26

    A highly selective method for the synthesis of asymmetrically substituted carbocycles and heterocycles from unactivated aldehyde-olefin precursors has been achieved via enantioselective SOMO-catalysis. Addition of a catalytically generated enamine radical cation across a pendent olefin serves to establish a general asymmetric strategy toward the production of a wide range of formyl-substituted rings with alkene transposition. Conceptually, this novel mechanism allows direct access to "homo-ene"-type products.

  17. Internal Medicine Residents' Perceived Ability to Direct Patient Care: Impact of Gender and Experience

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Christie; Goetz, Sarah; Ward, Earlise

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Physicians are expected to effect patient care by giving orders to members of a healthcare team. Because women are socialized to be less directive than men, the assertive behavior required of new physicians may be experienced differently by male and female residents. We sought to explore the effects of gender and year of training on residents' experiences and perceived ability to direct patient care. Methods This was a mixed-methods, cross-sectional, descriptive study employing a quantitative written survey and qualitative interviews among internal medicine residents at an academic health center. Measurements included questionnaires and interviews about stress, assertiveness, and personal factors that influence their effectiveness in directing patient care. Analyses examined differences by gender and year of training. Results One hundred residents were invited to participate; 65 returned questionnaires, and 16 of these residents were interviewed. Compared with male residents, female residents selected less assertive behaviors for clinical scenarios (p = 0.047) and were more likely to perceive gender as inhibiting their ability to influence patient care (p < 0.01). Stress associated with being assertive varied more with experience than gender. Interviews corroborated these findings and supported the complexity of gender norms for behavior for female residents in a directive leadership position. Conclusions When compared with male peers, female residents reported more gender issues in residency and chose less assertive behaviors in clinical scenarios. Experience mitigated some gender differences. Our findings suggest that discussion of the existing research on prescriptive gender norms for behavior and leadership may be warranted in resident orientation. PMID:19049356

  18. What is the probability that direct detection experiments have observed dark matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Bozorgnia, Nassim; Schwetz, Thomas E-mail: schwetz@fysik.su.se

    2014-12-01

    In Dark Matter direct detection we are facing the situation of some experiments reporting positive signals which are in conflict with limits from other experiments. Such conclusions are subject to large uncertainties introduced by the poorly known local Dark Matter distribution. We present a method to calculate an upper bound on the joint probability of obtaining the outcome of two potentially conflicting experiments under the assumption that the Dark Matter hypothesis is correct, but completely independent of assumptions about the Dark Matter distribution. In this way we can quantify the compatibility of two experiments in an astrophysics independent way. We illustrate our method by testing the compatibility of the hints reported by DAMA and CDMS-Si with the limits from the LUX and SuperCDMS experiments. The method does not require Monte Carlo simulations but is mostly based on using Poisson statistics. In order to deal with signals of few events we introduce the so-called ''signal length'' to take into account energy information. The signal length method provides a simple way to calculate the probability to obtain a given experimental outcome under a specified Dark Matter and background hypothesis.

  19. Ramp-wave compression experiment with direct laser illumination on Shen Guang III prototype Laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Xu, Tao; Optical Team Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Ramp-wave compression (RWC) experiment to balance the high compression pressure generation in aluminum and x-ray blanking effect in transparent window was demonstrated on Shen Guang-III prototype laser facility. A new target concept was proposed to develop a laser-driven shocks-RWC technique for studying material behavior under dynamic, high pressure conditions. As the ``little shocks'' in our experiment cannot be avoided, the effort to diminish the shock under a special level has been demonstrated with Al/Au/Al/LiF target. The highest pressure is about 500GPa after using the multilayer target design Al/Au/Al/LiF and about 1013W/cm2 laser pulse incident on the planer Al target, instantaneously affecting ablation layer located 500 μm away. As the x-ray generated by Al layer had been prevented by the Au layer, the width abrupt onset of strong absorption of an optical probe beam (λ = 532 nm) in LiF window may be the limitation for this kind if RWC experiment during the experiment time scale for 30 μm thick step. With the design laser shape and target structure of Al/Au/Al/LiF, 500GPa may be the highest pressure after balance the preheat effect and ablation efficiency for laser direct-drive experiment.

  20. Efficacy of multistrain direct-fed microbial and phytogenetic products in reducing necrotic enteritis in commercial broilers.

    PubMed

    McReynolds, J; Waneck, C; Byrd, J; Genovese, K; Duke, S; Nisbet, D

    2009-10-01

    Our laboratory is evaluating the efficacy of direct-fed microbials (DFM) and phytogenic products to control Clostridium perfringens, a gram-positive organism associated with decreased performance and morbidity and mortality associated with necrotic enteritis, as well as some recent human food safety issues. Three experiments were conducted to evaluate a DFM (PoultryStar) and a phytogenic product (PEP125), which were administered to birds from day of hatch until termination (d 25) via the drinking water or through supplementation to a wheat-corn diet, respectively. Each experiment contained a nonchallenged negative control and a positive control wherein birds were immunocompromised with a 10x dosage of infectious bursal disease vaccine at 14 d of age and subsequently gavaged with C. perfringens (10(7) cfu/mL) daily for 3 consecutive days starting on d 17. Intestinal lesions, mortality, and log10 values of C. perfringens in the probiotic and phytogenic treatment groups were found to be lower (P<0.05) than those observed in the positive controls. These experiments suggest that the DFM and the phytogenic product could be used as potential alternatives to help control C. perfringens and necrotic enteritis.

  1. The repertoire of resistance: Non-compliance with directives in Milgram's 'obedience' experiments.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Matthew M

    2015-09-01

    This paper is the first extensive conversation-analytic study of resistance to directives in one of the most controversial series of experiments in social psychology, Stanley Milgram's 1961-1962 study of 'obedience to authority'. As such, it builds bridges between interactionist and experimental areas of social psychology that do not often communicate with one another. Using as data detailed transcripts of 117 of the original sessions representing five experimental conditions, I show how research participants' resistance to experimental progressivity takes shape against a background of directive/response and complaint/remedy conversational sequences--sequence types that project opposing and competing courses of action. In local contexts of competing sequential relevancies, participants mobilize six forms of resistance to the confederate experimenter's directives to continue. These range along a continuum of explicitness, from relatively subtle resistance that momentarily postpones continuation to techniques for explicitly trying to stop the experiment. Although both 'obedient'- and 'defiant'-outcome participants use all six of the forms, evidence is provided suggesting precisely how members of the two groups differ in manner and frequency of resistance.

  2. Warming experiments elucidate the drivers of observed directional changes in tundra vegetation

    PubMed Central

    Hollister, Robert D; May, Jeremy L; Kremers, Kelseyann S; Tweedie, Craig E; Oberbauer, Steven F; Liebig, Jennifer A; Botting, Timothy F; Barrett, Robert T; Gregory, Jessica L

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have clearly linked long-term monitoring with in situ experiments to clarify potential drivers of observed change at a given site. This is especially necessary when findings from a site are applied to a much broader geographic area. Here, we document vegetation change at Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska, occurring naturally and due to experimental warming over nearly two decades. An examination of plant cover, canopy height, and community indices showed more significant differences between years than due to experimental warming. However, changes with warming were more consistent than changes between years and were cumulative in many cases. Most cases of directional change observed in the control plots over time corresponded with a directional change in response to experimental warming. These included increases in canopy height and decreases in lichen cover. Experimental warming resulted in additional increases in evergreen shrub cover and decreases in diversity and bryophyte cover. This study suggests that the directional changes occurring at the sites are primarily due to warming and indicates that further changes are likely in the next two decades if the regional warming trend continues. These findings provide an example of the utility of coupling in situ experiments with long-term monitoring to accurately document vegetation change in response to global change and to identify the underlying mechanisms driving observed changes. PMID:26140204

  3. Wh interrogative production in agrammatic aphasia: an experimental analysis of auditory-visual stimulation and direct-production treatment.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C K; McReynolds, L V

    1986-06-01

    The effects of auditory-visual stimulation treatment derived from principles associated with a stimulation approach for aphasia treatment and direct-production treatment derived from a behavioral or learning approach were examined in 4 neurologically stable agrammatic aphasic subjects. Subjects were trained to produce selected exemplars of wh interrogative morphemes in complete sentence contexts, while the acquisition, response generalization (both within and across interrogative forms), stimulus generalization (to language samples), and maintenance effects of the two treatments were assessed. An alternating treatments design (ATD) in combination with a multiple-baseline design across behaviors and a multiple-baseline design across subjects was employed. Interrogative constructions were counterbalanced across subjects and treatments, and probes were administered daily to assess treatment effects. Results indicated that direct-production treatment was consistently more effective than auditory-visual stimulation treatment in facilitating acquisition of target responses for all subjects. Response generalization within interrogative forms paralleled acquisition regardless of treatment approach. Stimulus generalization to the elicited language-sample condition was not evident, however, trained responses were maintained subsequent to treatment. These data provided support for using direct-production treatment for interrogative intervention with agrammatic aphasic patients and indicated that training a selected number of exemplars of target interrogatives results in generalization of that question form to novel language responses. However, the lack of generalization across interrogatives indicated that wh interrogatives do not constitute a response class and, thus, pointed out a need for programming generalization to untrained members of that linguistic class and to spontaneous language.

  4. Applying fuel cell experience to sustainable power products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Joseph M.; O'Day, Michael J.

    Fuel cell power plants have demonstrated high efficiency, environmental friendliness, excellent transient response, and superior reliability and durability in spacecraft and stationary applications. Broader application of fuel cell technology promises significant contribution to sustainable global economic growth, but requires improvement to size, cost, fuel flexibility and operating flexibility. International Fuel Cells (IFC) is applying lessons learned from delivery of more than 425 fuel cell power plants and 3 million h of operation to the development of product technology which captures that promise. Key findings at the fuel cell power plant level include: (1) ancillary components account for more than 40% of the weight and nearly all unscheduled outages of hydrocarbon-fuelled power plants; a higher level of integration and simplification is required to achieve reasonable characteristics, (2) hydrocarbon fuel cell power plant components are highly interactive; the fuel processing approach and power plant operating pressure are major determinants of overall efficiency, and (3) achieving the durability required for heavy duty vehicles and stationary applications requires simultaneous satisfaction of electrochemical, materials and mechanical considerations in the design of the cell stack and other power plant components. Practical designs must minimize application specific equipment. Related lessons for stationary fuel cell power plants include: (1) within fuel specification limits, natural gas varies widely in heating value, minor constituents such as oxygen and nitrogen content and trace compounds such as the odorant; (2) city water quality varies widely; recovery of product water for process use avoids costly, complicated and site-specific water treatment systems, but water treatment is required to eliminate impurities and (3) the embedded protection functions for reliable operation of fuel cell power conditioners meet or exceed those required for connection to

  5. Leptophilic Dark Matter in Direct Detection Experiments and in the Sun

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Joachim; Niro, Viviana; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

    2010-11-01

    Dark matter interacting predominantly with leptons instead of nuclear matter has received a lot of interest recently. In this talk, we investigate the signals expected from such 'leptophilic Dark Matter' in direct detection experiments and in experiments looking for Dark Matter annihilation into neutrinos in the Sun. In a model-independent framework, we calculate the expected interaction rates for different scattering processes, including elastic and inelastic scattering off atomic electron shells, as well as loop-induced scattering off atomic nuclei. In those cases where the last effect dominates, leptophilic Dark Matter cannot be distinguished from conventional WIMPs. On the other hand, if inelastic scattering off the electron shell dominates, the expected event spectrum in direct detection experiments is different and would provide a distinct signal. However, we find that the signals in DAMA and/or CoGeNT cannot be explained by invoking leptophilic DM because the predicted and observed energy spectra do not match, and because of neutrino bounds from the Sun.

  6. Direct cellobiose production from cellulose using sextuple beta-glucosidase gene deletion Neurospora crassa mutants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Direct cellobiose production from cellulose by a genetically modified fungus—Neurospora crassa, was explored in this study. A library of N. crassa sextuple beta-glucosidase (bgl) gene deletion strains was constructed. Various concentrations of cellobiose were detected in the culture broth of the N. ...

  7. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Behaviour and Electrophysiology of Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, Miranka; Rahman, Rasha Abdel; Kuenecke, Janina; Koenig, Thomas; Horn, Helge; Sommer, Werner; Dierks, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Excitatory anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (A-tDCS) over the left dorsal prefrontal cortex (DPFC) has been shown to improve language production. The present study examined neurophysiological underpinnings of this effect. In a single-blinded within-subject design, we traced effects of A-tDCS compared to sham stimulation over the left…

  8. Direct photon production in NCG QCD at the tevatron and LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Bekli, M. R.; Mebarki, N.; Chadou, I.

    2012-06-27

    The minimal NCSM contribution of a direct photon production at the Tevatron and LHC is obtained and the phenomenological implications are discussed. Some behaviors are discussed. It is shown that the effect of the space-time noncommutativity becomes important at very high energies leading to a violation of unitarity.

  9. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Behaviour and Electrophysiology of Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, Miranka; Rahman, Rasha Abdel; Kuenecke, Janina; Koenig, Thomas; Horn, Helge; Sommer, Werner; Dierks, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Excitatory anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (A-tDCS) over the left dorsal prefrontal cortex (DPFC) has been shown to improve language production. The present study examined neurophysiological underpinnings of this effect. In a single-blinded within-subject design, we traced effects of A-tDCS compared to sham stimulation over the left…

  10. 75 FR 44887 - Foreign Direct Products of U.S. Technology

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ... the Export Administration Regulations (EAR). Under the EAR's ``direct product rule,'' foreign- made items that are located outside of the United States; subject to national security controls under the EAR... terrorist supporting country, are subject to the EAR and require an export license or license...

  11. Direct Forming of All-Polypropylene Composites Products from Fabrics made of Co-Extruded Tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, B.; Cabrera, N. O.; Barkoula, N. M.; Peijs, T.

    2009-04-01

    Many technologies presented in literature for the forming of self-reinforced or all-polymer composites are based on manufacturing processes involving thermoforming of pre-consolidated sheets. This paper describes novel direct forming routes to manufacture simple geometries of self-reinforced, all-polypropylene (all-PP) composites, by moulding fabrics of woven co-extruded polypropylene tapes directly into composite products, without the need for pre-consolidated sheet. High strength co-extruded PP tapes have potential processing advantages over mono-extruded fibres or tapes as they allow for a larger temperature processing window for consolidation. This enlarged temperature processing window makes direct forming routes feasible, without the need for an intermediate pre-consolidated sheet product. Thermoforming studies show that direct forming is an interesting alternative to stamping of pre-consolidated sheets, as it eliminates an expensive belt-pressing step which is normally needed for the manufacturing of semi-finished sheets products. Moreover, results from forming studies shows that only half the energy was required to directly form a simple dome geometry from a stack of fabrics compared to stamping the same shape from a pre-consolidated sheet.

  12. Direct ethanol production from starch using a natural isolate, Scheffersomyces shehatae: Toward consolidated bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, Ayumi; Kikukawa, Minako; Yamaguchi, Shino; Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Shima, Jun

    2015-04-22

    Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), which integrates enzyme production, saccharification and fermentation into a one-step process, is a promising strategy for cost-effective ethanol production from starchy biomass. To gain insights into starch-based ethanol production using CBP, an extensive screening was undertaken to identify naturally occurring yeasts that produce ethanol without the addition of any amylases. Three yeast strains were capable of producing a significant amount of ethanol. Quantitative assays revealed that Scheffersomyces shehatae JCM 18690 was the strain showing the highest ethanol production ability. This strain was able to utilize starch directly, and the ethanol concentration reached 9.21 g/L. We attribute the ethanol-producing ability of this strain to the high levels of glucoamylase activity, fermentation potential and ethanol stress tolerance. This study strongly suggests the possibility of starch-based ethanol production by consolidated bioprocessing using natural yeasts such as S. shehatae JCM 18690.

  13. Japanese regulation of biosimilar products: past experience and current challenges.

    PubMed

    Arato, Teruyo

    2016-07-01

    Seven biosimilar products have been approved in Japan since the March 2009 publication of the 'Guideline for quality, safety and efficacy assurance of biosimilar products' by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW). Four years previously, the 'Guideline on similar biological medicinal products' was issued in the European Union (EU), and 13 products as of February 2016 have been approved as biosimilar. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first biosimilar product in the US in March 2015 and final Guidance was issued at the end of April 2015. Over the past decade, the challenges regarding the development of biosimilar products have been discussed extensively. In this article, the data packages of biosimilar products in Japan are compared with those overseas in order to clarify the concepts used by the Japanese regulatory authority, i.e., the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA). The challenges in the development of biosimilar products in Japan are also addressed.

  14. Planar Laser-Plasma Interaction Experiments at Direct-Drive Ignition-Relevant Scale Lengths at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Solodov, A. A.; Seka, W.; Myatt, J. F.; Regan, S. P.; Hohenberger, M.; Epstein, R.; Froula, D. H.; Radha, P. B.; Michel, P. A.; Moody, J. D.; Masse, L.; Goyon, C.; Turnbull, D. P.; Barrios, M. A.; Bates, J. W.; Schmitt, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    The first experiments at the National Ignition Facility to probe laser-plasma interactions and the hot electron production at scale lengths relevant to direct-drive ignition are reported. The irradiation on one side of planar CH foils generated a plasma at the quarter-critical surface with predicted density scale lengths of Ln 600 μm, measured electron temperatures of Te 3.5 to 4.0 keV, and overlapped laser intensities of I 6 to 15 ×1014W/cm2. Optical emission from stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and at ω/2 are correlated with the time-dependent hard x-ray signal. The fraction of laser energy converted to hot electrons increased from 0.5 % to 2.3 % as the laser intensity increased from 6 to 15 ×1014W/cm2, while the hot electron temperature was nearly constant around 40 to 50 keV. Only a sharp red-shifted feature is observed around ω/2, and both refracted and sidescattered SRS are detected, suggesting that multibeam SRS contributes to, and may even dominate, hot-electron production. These results imply a diminished presence of two-plasmon decay relative to SRS at these conditions, which has implications for hot-electron preheat mitigation strategies for direct-drive ignition. This work is supported by the DOE NNSA under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  15. Precision directional drilling of hot-dry-rock geothermal production well EE-3

    SciTech Connect

    Carden, R.S.; Rowley, J.C.; Helmick, C.

    1982-01-01

    The deviated directional drilling of the hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal production well EE-3 (Energy Extraction No. 3) was successfully completed on August 1981. The injection well, EE-2, previously had been drilled with its lower part at an inclination of 35/sup 0/ to the vertical. It reached an on-line depth of 15,292 feet and its bottom-hole temperature was 608/sup 0/F (320/sup 0/C). The production well EE-3 was required to be drilled 1200 feet (370 m) above and parallel to the injection well. This necessitated high precision, controlled-trajectory directional drilling operations. The directional drilling of EE-3 was accomplished within the required tolerances at a depth of 13,933 feet and a bottom-hole temperature of 580/sup 0/F (280/sup 0/C).

  16. Direct photon production from hadronic sources in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Kiselev, S. M.; Sharkov, G. B.

    2008-09-15

    The low p{sub T} direct photon production from a variety of the hadronic sources is studied within the microscopic hadron-string dynamics transport approach for p+C, p+Pb, and Pb+Pb collisions at 160A GeV. The direct photon emission from elementary hadronic scatterings as well as meson-meson bremsstrahlung are incorporated. The influence of in-medium effects such as a collisional broadening of the vector-meson spectral functions on the photon emission rate is found to be hardly observable in the final spectra that are dominated by bremsstrahlung-type processes. The uncertainties in the subtraction of the 'background' from the photon decay of hadronic resonances inside the hot and dense fireball is investigated, additionally. Our findings are relevant for the interpretation and extraction of experimental data on direct photon production at low p{sub T}.

  17. Simulation of the direct production of 99mTc at a small cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, M.; Kakavand, T.

    2014-06-01

    Usually 99mTc is produced indirectly through generator 99Mo/99mTc. In the present study, the direct production of this radioisotope by charged particle irradiation was investigated using Monte Carlo method. After scouting of the reactions that produce 99mTc, excitation functions of these reactions were predicted by optical model components in the TALYS-1.6 code. Suitable energy range of projectile for this production was selected by spotting of maximum cross section and minimum impurity due to other emission channels. Then target geometry was designed based on stopping power calculation by the SRIM code. Thick target yield of 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc, 98Mo(p,γ)99mTc and natMo(p,x)99mTc reactions was predicted by the result of excitation function and stopping power calculations. Finally, 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction was selected as a primary reaction for the direct production of 99mTc and its process was simulated by employing the MCNPX code to calculate the energy distribution of proton in the 100Mo target body and estimation of residual nuclei during irradiation. Good agreement was obtained between the experimental, the theoretical, and the simulation-based (analytical and directly) production yields. This study demonstrated that Monte Carlo provides a method for the design and optimization of targets for the radionuclide production purposes.

  18. Experiments on water/melt explosions, nature of products, and models of dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, M. F.; Wohletz, K. H.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in a steel pressure device using controlled amounts of water and thermite melt to examine the mechanical energy released on explosive mixing following the initial contact of the two materials. An experimental design was used to allow the direct calculation of the mechanical energy by the dynamic lift of the device as recorded both optically and physically. A large number of experiments were run to accurately determine the optimum mixture of water and melt for the conversion of thermal to mechanical energy. The maximum efficiency observed was about 12% at a water/thermite mass ratio of 0.50. These experiments are the basis for the development of models of hydroexplosions and melt fragmentation. Particles collected from the experimental products are similar in size and shape to pyroclasts produced by much larger hydrovolcanic explosions. Melt rupture at optimum ratios produces very fine particles whereas rupture at high or low water/melt ratios produces large melt fragments. Grain surface textures in the experimental products are also related to the water/melt ratio and the mechanism of explosive mixing. It is thus possible to have qualitative information about the nature of the explosion from the sizes and shapes of the fragments produced.

  19. Experiments on water/melt explosions, nature of products, and models of dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, M. F.; Wohletz, K. H.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in a steel pressure device using controlled amounts of water and thermite melt to examine the mechanical energy released on explosive mixing following the initial contact of the two materials. An experimental design was used to allow the direct calculation of the mechanical energy by the dynamic lift of the device as recorded both optically and physically. A large number of experiments were run to accurately determine the optimum mixture of water and melt for the conversion of thermal to mechanical energy. The maximum efficiency observed was about 12% at a water/thermite mass ratio of 0.50. These experiments are the basis for the development of models of hydroexplosions and melt fragmentation. Particles collected from the experimental products are similar in size and shape to pyroclasts produced by much larger hydrovolcanic explosions. Melt rupture at optimum ratios produces very fine particles whereas rupture at high or low water/melt ratios produces large melt fragments. Grain surface textures in the experimental products are also related to the water/melt ratio and the mechanism of explosive mixing. It is thus possible to have qualitative information about the nature of the explosion from the sizes and shapes of the fragments produced.

  20. Astrophysical uncertainties on the local dark matter distribution and direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Anne M.

    2017-08-01

    The differential event rate in weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) direct detection experiments depends on the local dark matter density and velocity distribution. Accurate modelling of the local dark matter distribution is therefore required to obtain reliable constraints on the WIMP particle physics properties. Data analyses typically use a simple standard halo model which might not be a good approximation to the real Milky Way (MW) halo. We review observational determinations of the local dark matter density, circular speed and escape speed and also studies of the local dark matter distribution in simulated MW-like galaxies. We discuss the effects of the uncertainties in these quantities on the energy spectrum and its time and direction dependence. Finally, we conclude with an overview of various methods for handling these astrophysical uncertainties.

  1. Development of a super-resolution optical microscope for directional dark matter search experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Asada, T.; Consiglio, L.; D`Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Furuya, S.; Hakamata, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Katsuragawa, T.; Kuwabara, K.; Machii, S.; Naka, T.; Pupilli, F.; Sirignano, C.; Tawara, Y.; Tioukov, V.; Umemoto, A.; Yoshimoto, M.

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear emulsion is a perfect choice for a detector for directional DM search because of its high density and excellent position accuracy. The minimal detectable track length of a recoil nucleus in emulsion is required to be at least 100 nm, making the resolution of conventional optical microscopes insufficient to resolve them. Here we report about the R&D on a super-resolution optical microscope to be used in future directional DM search experiments with nuclear emulsion as a detector media. The microscope will be fully automatic, will use novel image acquisition and analysis techniques, will achieve the spatial resolution of the order of few tens of nm and will be capable of reconstructing recoil tracks with the length of at least 100 nm with high angular resolution.

  2. Directed Design of Experiments for Validating Probability of Detection Capability of NDE Systems (DOEPOD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    2008-01-01

    The capability of an inspection system is established by applications of various methodologies to determine the probability of detection (POD). One accepted metric of an adequate inspection system is that there is 95% confidence that the POD is greater than 90% (90/95 POD). Directed design of experiments for probability of detection (DOEPOD) has been developed to provide an efficient and accurate methodology that yields observed POD and confidence bounds for both Hit- Miss or signal amplitude testing. Specifically, DOEPOD demands utilization of observance of occurrences. Directed DOEPOD does not assume prescribed POD logarithmic or similar functions with assumed adequacy over a wide range of flaw sizes and inspection system technologies, so that multi-parameter curve fitting or model optimization approaches to generate a POD curve are not required.

  3. Nutrition and health claims in products directed at children via television in Spain in 2012.

    PubMed

    Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Bosqued-Estefanía, María José; Damián, Javier; López-Jurado, Lázaro; Moya-Geromini, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    To describe the use of nutrition and health claims in products directed at children via television in Spain and to analyse their nutrient profile. A cross-sectional study of television food advertisements over 7 days in five Spanish television channels popular among children. The products were classified as core, non-core or miscellaneous, and as either healthy or less healthy, according to the United Kingdom Nutrient Profile Model. We registered all claims contained on the product (packaging and labelling) and its advertisement. We calculated the frequency distributions of health and nutrition claims. During the 420hours of broadcasting, 169 food products were identified, 28.5% in the dairy group and 60.9% in the non-core category. A total of 53.3% of products contained nutrition claims and 26.6% contained health claims; 62.2% of the products with claims were less healthy. Low-fat dairy products were the food category containing the highest percentage of health and nutrition claims. Over half of all food products marketed to children via television in Spain made some type of nutrition or health claim. Most of these products were less healthy, which could mislead Spanish consumers. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Slow or swift, your patients' experience won't drift: absence of correlation between physician productivity and the patient experience.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Kasia; McRae, Andrew; Wang, Dongmei; Higgins, Benjamin; Innes, Grant; Cook, Timothy; Lang, Eddy

    2017-09-01

    Absract OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the relationship between Emergency Physician (EP) productivity and patient satisfaction with Emergency Department (ED) care. This retrospective observational study linked administrative and patient experience databases to measure correlations between the patient experience and EP productivity. The study was performed across three Calgary EDs (from June 2010 to July 2013). Patients>16 years old with completed Health Quality Council of Alberta (HQCA) ED Patient Experience Surveys were included. EP productivity was measured at the individual physician level and defined as the average number of patients seen per hour. The association between physician productivity and patient experience scores from six composite domains of the HQCA ED Patient Experience Survey were examined using Pearson correlation coefficients, linear regression modelling, and a path analysis. We correlated 3,794 patient experience surveys with productivity data for 130 EPs. Very weak non-significant negative correlations existed between productivity and survey composites: "Staff Care and Communication" (r=-0.057, p=0.521), "Discharge Communication" (r=-0.144, p=0.102), and "Respect" (r=-0.027, p=0.760). Very weak, non-significant positive correlations existed between productivity and the composite domains: "Medication Communication" (r=0.003, p=0.974) and "Pain management" (r=0.020, p=0.824). A univariate general linear model yielded no statistically significant correlations between EP productivity and patient experience, and the path analysis failed to show a relationship between the variables. We found no correlation between EP productivity and the patient experience.

  5. The ArDM, a ton-scale liquid argon experiment for direct dark matter detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otyugova, P.; Ar DM Collaboration

    2008-07-01

    The ArDM project aims at developing and operating large noble liquid detectors to search for direct evidence of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP) as Dark Matter in the Universe. The initial goal is to design, assemble and operate an approximately 1 ton liquid argon prototype based on the double-phase detection principle to demonstrate the feasibility of a ton-scale experiment with the required performance to efficiently detect and sufficiently discriminate backgrounds for a successful WIMP detection. The detector will independently measure the primary scintillation light and the ionization charge. This paper will mainly describe the concept, R&D results and status of the charge read out system.

  6. Polar-direct-drive experiments with contoured-shell targets on OMEGA

    DOE PAGES

    Marshall, F. J.; Radha, P. B.; Bonino, M. J.; ...

    2016-01-28

    Polar-driven direct-drive experiments recently performed on the OMEGA Laser System have demonstrated the efficacy of using a target with a contoured shell with varying thickness to improve the symmetry and fusion performance of the implosion. The polar-driven contoured-shell implosions have substantially reduced low mode perturbations compared to polar-driven spherical-shell implosions as diagnosed by x-ray radiographs up to shell stagnation. As a result, fusion yields were increased by more than a factor of ~2 without increasing the energy of the laser by the use of contoured shells.

  7. Self-similar magnetohydrodynamic model for direct current discharge fireball experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, K. H.; Navia, C. E.; Robba, M. B.; Carneiro, L. T.; Emelin, S. E.

    2006-11-15

    Ball lightning models and corresponding laboratory efforts in generating fireballs are briefly summarized to give an overview of the current status. In particular, emphasis is given to direct current discharge experiments at atmospheric pressure such as capillary discharge with a plasma plume in front of the anode opening [Emelin et al., Tech. Phys. Letters 23, 758 (1997)] and water resistor discharge with fluttering fireball overhead [Egorov and Stepanov, Tech. Phys. 47, 1584 (2002)]. These fireballs are interpreted as laboratory demonstrations of the self-similar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of ball lightning [Tsui, Phys. Plasmas 13, 072102 (2006)].

  8. Self-similar magnetohydrodynamic model for direct current discharge fireball experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, K. H.; Navia, C. E.; Robba, M. B.; Carneiro, L. T.; Emelin, S. E.

    2006-11-01

    Ball lightning models and corresponding laboratory efforts in generating fireballs are briefly summarized to give an overview of the current status. In particular, emphasis is given to direct current discharge experiments at atmospheric pressure such as capillary discharge with a plasma plume in front of the anode opening [Emelin et al., Tech. Phys. Letters 23, 758 (1997)] and water resistor discharge with fluttering fireball overhead [Egorov and Stepanov, Tech. Phys. 47, 1584 (2002)]. These fireballs are interpreted as laboratory demonstrations of the self-similar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of ball lightning [Tsui, Phys. Plasmas 13, 072102 (2006)].

  9. Simulation and assessment of ion kinetic effects in a direct-drive capsule implosion experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, A.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Schmitt, M. J.; Herrmann, H. W.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-10-01

    The first simulations employing a kinetic treatment of both fuel and shell ions to model inertial confinement fusion experiments are presented, including results showing the importance of kinetic physics processes in altering fusion burn. A pair of direct drive capsule implosions performed at the OMEGA facility with two different gas fills of deuterium, tritium, and helium-3 are analyzed. During implosion shock convergence, highly non-Maxwellian ion velocity distributions and separations in the density and temperature amongst the ion species are observed. Diffusion of fuel into the capsule shell is identified as a principal process that degrades fusion burn performance.

  10. Simulation and assessment of ion kinetic effects in a direct-drive capsule implosion experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Ari Yitzchak; Kwan, Thomas J. T.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Herrmann, Hans W.; Batha, Steven H.

    2016-10-24

    The first simulations employing a kinetic treatment of both fuel and shell ions to model inertial confinement fusion experiments are presented, including results showing the importance of kinetic physics processes in altering fusion burn. A pair of direct drive capsule implosions performed at the OMEGA facility with two different gas fills of deuterium, tritium, and helium-3 are analyzed. During implosion shock convergence, highly non-Maxwellian ion velocity distributions and separations in the density and temperature amongst the ion species are observed. Finally, diffusion of fuel into the capsule shell is identified as a principal process that degrades fusion burn performance.

  11. Polar-direct-drive experiments with contoured-shell targets on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, F. J.; Radha, P. B.; Bonino, M. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Stoeckl, C.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A.; Giraldez, E.

    2016-01-15

    Polar-driven direct-drive experiments recently performed on the OMEGA Laser System have demonstrated the efficacy of using a target with a contoured shell with varying thickness to improve the symmetry and fusion performance of the implosion. The polar-driven contoured-shell implosions have substantially reduced low mode perturbations compared to polar-driven spherical-shell implosions as diagnosed by x-ray radiographs up to shell stagnation. Fusion yields were increased by more than a factor of ∼2 without increasing the energy of the laser by the use of contoured shells.

  12. Low pressure gas study for a direction-sensitive dark matter search experiment with MPGD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Miuchi, K.; Iwaki, S.; Kubo, H.; Mizumoto, T.; Nishimura, H.; Parker, J. D.; Sawano, T.; Takada, A.; Tanimori, T.; Sekiya, H.; Takeda, A.

    2012-02-01

    The NEWAGE project (NEw generation WIMP search with an Advanced Gaseous tracking device Experiment) is a direction-sensitive dark matter search experiment, searching for WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particle) via nuclear recoil. The NEWAGE detector, a micro time-projection-chamber with a 400μm pitch read out, detects three-dimensional nuclear tracks. A low-pressure gas study (76 torr) was performed in order to lower the energy threshold, one of the most effective improvements for the next underground measurement. We measured the gas gain, the angular resolution and the detection efficiency. We have consequently lowered the energy threshold from 100 keV to 50 keV by decreasing the gas pressure.

  13. Three-dimensional Dendritic Needle Network model with application to Al-Cu directional solidification experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Tourret, D.; Karma, A.; Clarke, A. J.; ...

    2015-06-11

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) extension of a previously proposed multi-scale Dendritic Needle Network (DNN) approach for the growth of complex dendritic microstructures. Using a new formulation of the DNN dynamics equations for dendritic paraboloid-branches of a given thickness, one can directly extend the DNN approach to 3D modeling. We validate this new formulation against known scaling laws and analytical solutions that describe the early transient and steady-state growth regimes, respectively. Finally, we compare the predictions of the model to in situ X-ray imaging of Al-Cu alloy solidification experiments. The comparison shows a very good quantitative agreement between 3D simulationsmore » and thin sample experiments. It also highlights the importance of full 3D modeling to accurately predict the primary dendrite arm spacing that is significantly over-estimated by 2D simulations.« less

  14. Effect of gravitational focusing on annual modulation in dark-matter direct-detection experiments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Samuel K; Lisanti, Mariangela; Peter, Annika H G; Safdi, Benjamin R

    2014-01-10

    The scattering rate in dark-matter direct-detection experiments should modulate annually due to Earth's orbit around the Sun. The rate is typically thought to be extremized around June 1, when the relative velocity of Earth with respect to the dark-matter wind is maximal. We point out that gravitational focusing can alter this modulation phase. Unbound dark-matter particles are focused by the Sun's gravitational potential, affecting their phase-space density in the lab frame. Gravitational focusing can result in a significant overall shift in the annual-modulation phase, which is most relevant for dark matter with low scattering speeds. The induced phase shift for light O(10)  GeV dark matter may also be significant, depending on the threshold energy of the experiment.

  15. Final Progress Report: Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO2.

    SciTech Connect

    James P. Barry; Peter G. Brewer

    2004-05-25

    OAK-B135 This report summarizes activities and results of investigations of the potential environmental consequences of direct injection of carbon dioxide into the deep-sea as a carbon sequestration method. Results of field experiments using small scale in situ releases of liquid CO2 are described in detail. The major conclusions of these experiments are that mortality rates of deep sea biota will vary depending on the concentrations of CO2 in deep ocean waters that result from a carbon sequestration project. Large changes in seawater acidity and carbon dioxide content near CO2 release sites will likely cause significant harm to deep-sea marine life. Smaller changes in seawater chemistry at greater distances from release sites will be less harmful, but may result in significant ecosystem changes.

  16. Simulation and Experiment on Direct Continuous Casting Process of Lead Frame Copper Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guojie, Huang; Shuisheng, Xie; Lei, Cheng

    2010-06-01

    Direct Continuous Casting (D.C.C) is an important method in casting lead frame copper alloy. In this paper, numerical simulation is adopted to investigate the casting process in order to optimize the D.C.C technical parameters, such as the casting temperature, casting speed and cooling intensity. According to the numerical results, the reasonable parameters are that the casting temperature is between 1413 K˜1413 K, the casting speed is between 8 m/h˜10 m/h and the speed of cooling water is between 4.2 m/s˜4.6 m/s. And the depth of liquid-solid boundary is measured in different casting temperature and casting speed by experiments. The results show the actual measurements have a little deviation with the numerical simulation. The results of numerical simulation provide the significant reference to the actual experiments.

  17. Three-dimensional Dendritic Needle Network model with application to Al-Cu directional solidification experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tourret, D.; Karma, A.; Clarke, A. J.; Gibbs, P. J.; Imhoff, S. D.

    2015-06-11

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) extension of a previously proposed multi-scale Dendritic Needle Network (DNN) approach for the growth of complex dendritic microstructures. Using a new formulation of the DNN dynamics equations for dendritic paraboloid-branches of a given thickness, one can directly extend the DNN approach to 3D modeling. We validate this new formulation against known scaling laws and analytical solutions that describe the early transient and steady-state growth regimes, respectively. Finally, we compare the predictions of the model to in situ X-ray imaging of Al-Cu alloy solidification experiments. The comparison shows a very good quantitative agreement between 3D simulations and thin sample experiments. It also highlights the importance of full 3D modeling to accurately predict the primary dendrite arm spacing that is significantly over-estimated by 2D simulations.

  18. Acceleration of heavy and light particles in turbulence: Comparison between experiments and direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, R.; Calzavarini, E.; Verhille, G.; Lohse, D.; Mordant, N.; Pinton, J.-F.; Toschi, F.

    2008-08-01

    We compare experimental data and numerical simulations for the dynamics of inertial particles with finite density in turbulence. In the experiment, bubbles and solid particles are optically tracked in a turbulent flow of water using an Extended Laser Doppler Velocimetry technique. The probability density functions (PDF) of particle accelerations and their auto-correlation in time are computed. Numerical results are obtained from a direct numerical simulation in which a suspension of passive pointwise particles is tracked, with the same finite density and the same response time as in the experiment. We observe a good agreement for both the variance of acceleration and the autocorrelation time scale of the dynamics; small discrepancies on the shape of the acceleration PDF are observed. We discuss the effects induced by the finite size of the particles, not taken into account in the present numerical simulations.

  19. Effect of Gravitational Focusing on Annual Modulation in Dark-Matter Direct-Detection Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Samuel K.; Lisanti, Mariangela; Peter, Annika H. G.; Safdi, Benjamin R.

    2014-01-01

    The scattering rate in dark-matter direct-detection experiments should modulate annually due to Earth's orbit around the Sun. The rate is typically thought to be extremized around June 1, when the relative velocity of Earth with respect to the dark-matter wind is maximal. We point out that gravitational focusing can alter this modulation phase. Unbound dark-matter particles are focused by the Sun's gravitational potential, affecting their phase-space density in the lab frame. Gravitational focusing can result in a significant overall shift in the annual-modulation phase, which is most relevant for dark matter with low scattering speeds. The induced phase shift for light O(10) GeV dark matter may also be significant, depending on the threshold energy of the experiment.

  20. Experiments and analysis on the molten-salt direct-contact absorption receiver concept

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, M S; Wang, K Y

    1986-11-01

    This paper presents results of recent experiments on the Direct Absorption Receiver (DAR) concept using molten salt as the working fluid. The DAR concept may result in a solar central receiver that costs 50% less than the current tube receiver and has significantly lower operational and maintenance costs. These experiments were aimed at determining whether the DAR concept is technically feasible and were carried out at the Advanced Components Test Facility, Atlanta, GA. Results are based on several days of operating with solar flux ranging up to 50 W/cm/sup 2/ and also on a numerical model that is capable of predicting the thermal performance of the DAR salt film. Issues relating to thermal efficiency, absorber-to-salt heat transfer, and salt film stability are addressed.

  1. Helping direct and indirect victims of national terror: experiences of Israeli social workers.

    PubMed

    Shamai, Michal; Ron, Pnina

    2009-01-01

    In this study we explored the subjective experience and the meaning attached to it by Israeli social workers who provide help to direct and indirect victims of national terror attacks. A qualitative methodology, based on grounded theory tradition, was used to conduct and analyze interviews with 29 social workers from three types of agencies (municipal social services, general hospitals, and the National Insurance Institute) from various parts of the country. Based on the data, three main themes were constructed: (a) professional and personal functioning during intervention, (b) the immediate and long-term impact of intervening with terror attacks, and (c) the meaning attached to the social worker's role in intervening with victims. Overall, the findings show that the social workers experienced symptoms similar to those of secondary traumatic stress disorder (STSD) for a few days only, but in the long-term, they perceived their experience of helping victims of terror attacks as leading to personal and professional growth.

  2. SBS in Long-Scale-Length Plasmas for Direct-Drive ICF: Comparing Experiments with Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seka, W.; Myatt, J.; Maximov, A. V.; Short, R. W.; Craxton, R. S.; Regan, S. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.

    2002-11-01

    Single- and multiple-beam SBS experiments will be compared to detailed simulations for plasmas representing direct-drive NIF conditions. The SBS spectra exhibit red- and blue-shifted features. The blue-shifted component is clearly identified with SBS in a flat velocity gradient that rapidly moves to higher expansion velocities. This feature can be reduced or suppressed by beam-smoothing techniques in both the experiments and simulations. The red-shifted spectrum originates near the critical density; it arises from EM seeding and is not reduced by beam smoothing. The agreement between experimental data and simulations now allows for more-confident extrapolation to other plasma conditions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  3. [Direct proteome profiling of human blood serum in the experiment with 5-day dry immersion].

    PubMed

    Pastushkova, L Kh; Pakharukova, N A; Trifonova, O P; Dobrokhotov, I V; Valeeva, O A; Larina, I M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the investigation was to determine changes in blood plasma proteome in healthy human subjects (n = 14, 19 to 26 y.o.) in an experiment with dry immersion (DI). Plasma samples were drawn 7 and 2 days before the exposure, on DI days 2, 3 and 5, and on days 1, 3, 7 and 15 after the experiment. Previous to direct MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometric profiling, serum samples were pre-fractionated and enriched with magnetic particles MB WCX (WCX--a weak cation exchanger) on ClinProt (Bruker Daltonics). In each spectrum, 175 MS-peaks were detected on average within the mass range from 1000 to 17,000 Da with the signal/noise ratio = 5. Student's criterion (p < 0.05) was used to define reliable differences between DI and baseline samples from 48 peaks (27.4 % of all the proteome profile peaks). On DI days 2 and 3, growth of peak areas was observed in fragments of complement system proteins C3 and C4, high-molecular kininogen and fibrinogen that can be attributed to organism adaptation to conditions of the experiment. Significant increases of the peak area of apolipoprotein CI (reduced form with segregated threonine and proline) and C4 enzymes of the complement system, and fibrinogen on the first day after the experiment can be related to changes in motor activities of the subjects.

  4. Patients’ Experience of Tuberculosis Treatment Using Directly Observed Treatment, Short-Course (DOTS): A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Behzadifar, Masoud; Mirzaei, Masoud; Behzadifar, Meysam; Keshavarzi, Abouzar; Behzadifar, Maryam; Saran, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite effective diagnosis and treatment, prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) is still growing. The directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS) strategy to treat TB was introduced by the World Health Organization more than a decade ago. Little is known about patients’ experience of TB treatment, according to DOTS, in Iran. Objectives: This study aimed to understand the patients’ experience of tuberculosis treatment according to DOTS in Iran. Patients and Methods: This study is a qualitative study, using content analysis to examine patients’ experience of TB treatment and to understand their compliance during DOTS. In this study, a semi-structured interview with open questions was answered by 40 patients, who had a diagnosis of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and improved during the course of their treatment. The method of sampling was purposive sample and the interview process lasted until data saturation. Results: Data analysis resulted in the extraction of six themes, which reflect the experiences of the study participants. The themes are: 1) individual factors; 2) change of the attitudes and beliefs of patients on TB treatment; 3) support terms of patients with tuberculosis; 4) the role of health care professionals; 5) social factors and 6) the financial burden. Conclusions: Successful completion of TB treatment requires an effective partnership between the patient and health care professionals, and a harmony between the cultural context, attitude of the patient, family support and health literacy. Future health policies should address these issues to improve patients’ adherence to DOTS. PMID:26023334

  5. Recording of direct health traits in Austria--experience report with emphasis on aspects of availability for breeding purposes.

    PubMed

    Egger-Danner, C; Fuerst-Waltl, B; Obritzhauser, W; Fuerst, C; Schwarzenbacher, H; Grassauer, B; Mayerhofer, M; Koeck, A

    2012-05-01

    A project to establish an Austria-wide health-monitoring system for cattle was launched in 2006. Veterinary diagnostic data subject to documentation by law [Law on the Control of Veterinary Medicinal Products (Tierarzneimittelkontrollgesetz)] are standardized, validated, and recorded in a central database. This Austria-wide project is a collaboration among agricultural and veterinary organizations as well as universities, and is also supported by the Austrian government. In addition to providing information for herd management and preventive measures, further objectives of the project include estimating breeding values for health traits and monitoring the overall health status of Austria's cattle. To ensure a high level of participation from farmers and veterinarians, data security issues are extremely important. Valid data are the prerequisite for the efficient use of health records. The challenge hereby is to distinguish between farms with low frequencies of diseases and incomplete documentation and recording. Measures were undertaken to establish a routine monitoring system for direct health traits. A routine genetic evaluation for direct health traits as part of the joint breeding value estimation program between Germany and Austria was introduced for Fleckvieh in December 2010, based on diagnostic data from 5,428 farms with 147,764 Fleckvieh cows. In 2010 to 2011, the reporting of direct health traits as a compulsory part of performance recording and the breeding program was introduced as well. The overall challenge is the availability of sufficient valid direct health data for reliable breeding values. Practical experience gained in Austria in setting up a health registration system, focusing mainly on the availability of direct health data for breeding purposes with its successes and difficulties, is described. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Advancing user experience research to facilitate and enable patient-centered research: current state and future directions.

    PubMed

    Payne, Philip R O

    2013-01-01

    Human-computer interaction and related areas of user experience (UX) research, such as human factors, workflow evaluation, and data visualization, are thus essential to presenting data in ways that can further the analysis of complex data sets such as those used in patient-centered research. However, a review of available data on the state of UX research as it relates to patient-centered research demonstrates a significant underinvestment and consequently a large gap in knowledge generation. In response, this report explores trends in funding and research productivity focused on UX and patient-centered research and then presents a set of recommendations to advance innovation at this important intersection point. Ultimately, the aim is to catalyze a community-wide dialogue concerning future directions for research and innovation in UX as it applies to patient-centered research.

  7. Advancing User Experience Research to Facilitate and Enable Patient-Centered Research: Current State and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Philip R.O.

    2013-01-01

    Human-computer interaction and related areas of user experience (UX) research, such as human factors, workflow evaluation, and data visualization, are thus essential to presenting data in ways that can further the analysis of complex data sets such as those used in patient-centered research. However, a review of available data on the state of UX research as it relates to patient-centered research demonstrates a significant underinvestment and consequently a large gap in knowledge generation. In response, this report explores trends in funding and research productivity focused on UX and patient-centered research and then presents a set of recommendations to advance innovation at this important intersection point. Ultimately, the aim is to catalyze a community-wide dialogue concerning future directions for research and innovation in UX as it applies to patient-centered research. PMID:25848566

  8. Criegee Intermediates: What Direct Production and Detection Can Teach Us About Reactions of Carbonyl Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taatjes, Craig A.

    2017-05-01

    The carbonyl oxide intermediates in the ozonolysis of alkenes, often known as Criegee intermediates, are potentially important reactants in Earth's atmosphere. For decades, careful analysis of ozonolysis systems was employed to derive an understanding of the formation and reactions of these species. Recently it has proved possible to synthesize at least some of these intermediates separately from ozonolysis, and hence to measure their reaction kinetics directly. Direct measurements have allowed new or more detailed understanding of each type of gas-phase reaction that carbonyl oxides undergo, often acting as a complement to highly detailed ozonolysis experiments. Moreover, the use of direct characterization methods to validate increasingly accurate theoretical investigations can enhance their impact well beyond the set of specific reactions that have been measured. Reactions that initiate particles or fuel their growth could be a new frontier for direct measurements of Criegee intermediate chemistry.

  9. Experiences of a grid connected solar array energy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagymássy, Zoltán; Vántus, András

    2015-04-01

    Solar energy possibilities of Hungary are higher than in Central Europe generally. The Institute for Land Utilisation, Technology and Regional Development of the University of Debrecen installed a photovoltaic (PV) system. The PV system is structured into 3 subsystems (fields). The first subsystem has 24 pieces of Kyocera KC 120 W type modules, the second subsystem has 72 pieces of Siemens ST 40W, and the remaining has 72 pieces of Dunasolar DS 40W In order to be operable independently of each other three inverter modules (SB 2500) had been installed. The recorder can be connected directly to a desktop PC. Operating and meteorological dates are recorded by MS Excel every 15 minutes. The power plant is connected to a weather station, which contents a PT 100 type temperature and humidity combined measuring instrument, a CM 11 pyranometer, and a wind speed measuring instrument. The produced DC, and AC power, together with the produced energy are as well, and the efficiency can be determined for each used PV technology. The measured operating and meteorological dates are collected by Sunny Boy Control, produced by the SMA. The energy productions of the subsystems are measured continually and the subsystems are measured separately. As an expected, the produced energy of polycrystalline -Si PV module and monocrystalline -Si PV was higher than amorphous-Si PV module. It is well known that energy analysis is more suitable for energy balance when we design a system. The air temperature and the temperature of the panels and the global irradiation conditions were measured. In summertime the panel temperature reaches 60-80 degrees in a sunny day. The panel temperatures are in a spring sunny day approximately 30-40 degrees. It can be concluded that the global irradiation is a major impact feature to influence the amount of energy produced. The efficiency depends on several parameters (spectral distribution of the incoming light, temperature values, etc.). The energy efficiency

  10. Direct biodiesel production from wet microalgae biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa through in situ transesterification.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hechun; Zhang, Zhiling; Wu, Xuwen; Miao, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    A one-step process was applied to directly converting wet oil-bearing microalgae biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa containing about 90% of water into biodiesel. In order to investigate the effects of water content on biodiesel production, distilled water was added to dried microalgae biomass to form wet biomass used to produce biodiesel. The results showed that at lower temperature of 90°C, water had a negative effect on biodiesel production. The biodiesel yield decreased from 91.4% to 10.3% as water content increased from 0% to 90%. Higher temperature could compensate the negative effect. When temperature reached 150°C, there was no negative effect, and biodiesel yield was over 100%. Based on the above research, wet microalgae biomass was directly applied to biodiesel production, and the optimal conditions were investigated. Under the optimal conditions of 100 mg dry weight equivalent wet microalgae biomass, 4 mL methanol, 8 mL n-hexane, 0.5 M H2SO4, 120°C, and 180 min reaction time, the biodiesel yield reached as high as 92.5% and the FAME content was 93.2%. The results suggested that biodiesel could be effectively produced directly from wet microalgae biomass and this effort may offer the benefits of energy requirements for biodiesel production.

  11. Direct Biodiesel Production from Wet Microalgae Biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa through In Situ Transesterification

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hechun; Zhang, Zhiling; Wu, Xuwen; Miao, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    A one-step process was applied to directly converting wet oil-bearing microalgae biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa containing about 90% of water into biodiesel. In order to investigate the effects of water content on biodiesel production, distilled water was added to dried microalgae biomass to form wet biomass used to produce biodiesel. The results showed that at lower temperature of 90°C, water had a negative effect on biodiesel production. The biodiesel yield decreased from 91.4% to 10.3% as water content increased from 0% to 90%. Higher temperature could compensate the negative effect. When temperature reached 150°C, there was no negative effect, and biodiesel yield was over 100%. Based on the above research, wet microalgae biomass was directly applied to biodiesel production, and the optimal conditions were investigated. Under the optimal conditions of 100 mg dry weight equivalent wet microalgae biomass, 4 mL methanol, 8 mL n-hexane, 0.5 M H2SO4, 120°C, and 180 min reaction time, the biodiesel yield reached as high as 92.5% and the FAME content was 93.2%. The results suggested that biodiesel could be effectively produced directly from wet microalgae biomass and this effort may offer the benefits of energy requirements for biodiesel production. PMID:24195081

  12. The opinions and experiences of family physicians regarding direct-to-consumer advertising.

    PubMed

    Lipsky, M S; Taylor, C A

    1997-12-01

    The use of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) by pharmaceutical companies is increasing. Our study examines the opinions and experiences of family physicians concerning DTCA. A survey instrument designed to elicit the opinions, experiences, and perceptions of family physicians about DTCA was sent to a 2% (N = 880) systematic sampling of active physician members of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze responses with t tests and chi 2 tests for independence used to examine subgroup response differences. Four hundred fifty-four (52%) physicians responded to the survey. Most physicians (95%) had encountered DTCA personally, and had been approached by an average of 7 patients over the previous 6 months with requests for specific prescription drugs. Prescription antihistamines and antihypertensive drugs were the most commonly requested. Overall, 80% of the physician respondents believed that print DTCA was not a good idea, while 84% expressed negative feelings about television and radio advertising. Both groups cited "misleading biased view" and "increased costs" as the most common disadvantages. Some reported benefits included "better informed patients" and "promoting physician-patient communication." Overall, the study group physicians had negative feelings about DTCA in both print and electronic media. Studies directly examining patient perspectives, as well as cost benefits, are necessary to test the validity of the physicians' perceptions about DTCA.

  13. Inverse Method for Identification of Material Parameters Directly from Milling Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Maurel, A.; Michel, G.; Thibaud, S.; Fontaine, M.; Gelin, J. C.

    2007-04-07

    An identification procedure for the determination of material parameters that are used for the FEM simulation of High Speed Machining processes is proposed. This procedure is based on the coupling of a numerical identification procedure and FEM simulations of milling operations. The experimental data result directly from measurements performed during milling experiments. A special device has been instrumented and calibrated to perform force and torque measures, directly during machining experiments in using a piezoelectric dynamometer and a high frequency charge amplifier. The forces and torques are stored and low pass filtered if necessary, and these data provide the main basis for the identification procedure which is based on coupling 3D FEM simulations of milling and optimization/identification algorithms. The identification approach is mainly based on the Surfaces Response Method in the material parameters space, coupled to a sensitivity analysis. A Moving Least Square Approximation method is used to accelerate the identification process. The material behaviour is described from Johnson-Cook law. A fracture model is also added to consider chip formation and separation. The FEM simulations of milling are performed using explicit ALE based FEM code. The inverse method of identification is here applied on a 304L stainless steel and the first results are presented.

  14. Milling Process FEM Simulation for Identification of Material Parameters Directly from Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Maurel, A.; Fontaine, M.; Thibaud, S.; Michel, G.; Gelin, J. C.

    2007-05-17

    An identification procedure for the determination of material parameters that are used for the FEM simulation of milling processes is proposed. This procedure is based on the coupling of a numerical identification procedure and FEM simulations of milling operations. The experimental data result directly from measurements performed during milling experiments. A special device has been instrumented and calibrated to perform force and torque measurements, directly during machining experiments in using a piezoelectric dynamometer and a high frequency charge amplifier. The forces and torques are stored and low pass filtered if necessary, and these data provide the main basis for the identification procedure which is based on coupling 3D FEM simulations of milling and optimization/identification algorithms. The identification approach is mainly based on the Surfaces Response Method in the material parameters space, coupled to a sensitivity analysis. A Moving Least Square Approximation method is used to accelerate the identification process. The material behaviour is described from Johnson-Cook law. A fracture model is also added to consider chip formation and separation. The FEM simulations of milling are performed using explicit ALE based FEM code. The inverse identification method is here applied on a 304L stainless steel and the first results are presented.

  15. Milling Process FEM Simulation for Identification of Material Parameters Directly from Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurel, A.; Fontaine, M.; Thibaud, S.; Michel, G.; Gelin, J. C.

    2007-05-01

    An identification procedure for the determination of material parameters that are used for the FEM simulation of milling processes is proposed. This procedure is based on the coupling of a numerical identification procedure and FEM simulations of milling operations. The experimental data result directly from measurements performed during milling experiments. A special device has been instrumented and calibrated to perform force and torque measurements, directly during machining experiments in using a piezoelectric dynamometer and a high frequency charge amplifier. The forces and torques are stored and low pass filtered if necessary, and these data provide the main basis for the identification procedure which is based on coupling 3D FEM simulations of milling and optimization/identification algorithms. The identification approach is mainly based on the Surfaces Response Method in the material parameters space, coupled to a sensitivity analysis. A Moving Least Square Approximation method is used to accelerate the identification process. The material behaviour is described from Johnson-Cook law. A fracture model is also added to consider chip formation and separation. The FEM simulations of milling are performed using explicit ALE based FEM code. The inverse identification method is here applied on a 304L stainless steel and the first results are presented.

  16. Inverse Method for Identification of Material Parameters Directly from Milling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurel, A.; Michel, G.; Thibaud, S.; Fontaine, M.; Gelin, J. C.

    2007-04-01

    An identification procedure for the determination of material parameters that are used for the FEM simulation of High Speed Machining processes is proposed. This procedure is based on the coupling of a numerical identification procedure and FEM simulations of milling operations. The experimental data result directly from measurements performed during milling experiments. A special device has been instrumented and calibrated to perform force and torque measures, directly during machining experiments in using a piezoelectric dynamometer and a high frequency charge amplifier. The forces and torques are stored and low pass filtered if necessary, and these data provide the main basis for the identification procedure which is based on coupling 3D FEM simulations of milling and optimization/identification algorithms. The identification approach is mainly based on the Surfaces Response Method in the material parameters space, coupled to a sensitivity analysis. A Moving Least Square Approximation method is used to accelerate the identification process. The material behaviour is described from Johnson-Cook law. A fracture model is also added to consider chip formation and separation. The FEM simulations of milling are performed using explicit ALE based FEM code. The inverse method of identification is here applied on a 304L stainless steel and the first results are presented.

  17. Promoting direct patient care services at community pharmacies through advanced pharmacy practice experiences.

    PubMed

    Kassam, Rosemin; Kwong, Mona; Collins, John B

    2013-12-01

    To determine the relative benefits of three different models of advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in successfully integrating the delivery of direct patient care into students' final year community pharmacy clerkships. All fourth-year pharmacy students at the University of British Columbia were divided into one of three study arms for their community APPE: a 2 × 4-week rotation in a traditional format, a 1 × 8-week rotation where their preceptors had experienced a 2-day education course and a 1 × 8-week rotation with both preceptor education plus a 5-day pre-APPE in-store orientation and peer debriefing. All 123 students conducted patient consultations and documented their care. Students in the pre-APPE + preceptor education arm provided nearly double the number of direct patient consultations than did students in the preceptor-education-only arm or the traditional 2 × 4-week arm. Numbers of drug-related problems identified and interventions performed per patient consult did not differ across study arms. Pre-APPE orientation activities provided an enhanced learning environment, promoted greater student engagement, provided care to more patients, increased preceptor preparedness and enhanced in-store patient-centred care practice. Certain of these learning activities can also form part of third- and fourth-year introductory pharmacy practice experiences to prepare students for their final-year APPE. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  18. Progress in indirect and direct-drive planar experiments on hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front

    SciTech Connect

    Casner, A. Masse, L.; Huser, G.; Galmiche, D.; Liberatore, S.; Riazuelo, G.; Delorme, B.; Martinez, D.; Remington, B.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Igumenshchev, I.; Michel, D. T.; Froula, D.; Seka, W.; Goncharov, V. N.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Breil, J.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Fujioka, S.; and others

    2014-12-15

    Understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and the fuel mix are the key elements for achieving ignition in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Cryogenic indirect-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility have evidenced that the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) is a driver of the hot spot mix. This motivates the switch to a more flexible higher adiabat implosion design [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056313 (2014)]. The shell instability is also the main candidate for performance degradation in low-adiabat direct drive cryogenic implosions [Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014)]. This paper reviews recent results acquired in planar experiments performed on the OMEGA laser facility and devoted to the modeling and mitigation of hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front. In application to the indirect-drive scheme, we describe results obtained with a specific ablator composition such as the laminated ablator or a graded-dopant emulator. In application to the direct drive scheme, we discuss experiments devoted to the study of laser imprinted perturbations with special phase plates. The simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov phase reversal during the shock transit phase are challenging, and of crucial interest because this phase sets the seed of the RTI growth. Recent works were dedicated to increasing the accuracy of measurements of the phase inversion. We conclude by presenting a novel imprint mitigation mechanism based on the use of underdense foams. The foams induce laser smoothing by parametric instabilities thus reducing the laser imprint on the CH foil.

  19. Tensor methodology and computational geometry in direct computational experiments in fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarev, Alexander; Khramushin, Vasily; Shichkina, Julia

    2017-07-01

    The paper considers a generalized functional and algorithmic construction of direct computational experiments in fluid dynamics. Notation of tensor mathematics is naturally embedded in the finite - element operation in the construction of numerical schemes. Large fluid particle, which have a finite size, its own weight, internal displacement and deformation is considered as an elementary computing object. Tensor representation of computational objects becomes strait linear and uniquely approximation of elementary volumes and fluid particles inside them. The proposed approach allows the use of explicit numerical scheme, which is an important condition for increasing the efficiency of the algorithms developed by numerical procedures with natural parallelism. It is shown that advantages of the proposed approach are achieved among them by considering representation of large particles of a continuous medium motion in dual coordinate systems and computing operations in the projections of these two coordinate systems with direct and inverse transformations. So new method for mathematical representation and synthesis of computational experiment based on large particle method is proposed.

  20. A Computational Model of Innate Directional Selectivity Refined by Visual Experience

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Samantha V.; Harris, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian visual system has been extensively studied since Hubel and Wiesel’s work on cortical feature maps in the 1960s. Feature maps representing the cortical neurons’ ocular dominance, orientation and direction preferences have been well explored experimentally and computationally. The predominant view has been that direction selectivity (DS) in particular, is a feature entirely dependent upon visual experience and as such does not exist prior to eye opening (EO). However, recent experimental work has shown that there is in fact a DS bias already present at EO. In the current work we use a computational model to reproduce the main results of this experimental work and show that the DS bias present at EO could arise purely from the cortical architecture without any explicit coding for DS and prior to any self-organising process facilitated by spontaneous activity or training. We explore how this latent DS (and its corresponding cortical map) is refined by training and that the time-course of development exhibits similar features to those seen in the experimental study. In particular we show that the specific cortical connectivity or ‘proto-architecture’ is required for DS to mature rapidly and correctly with visual experience. PMID:26228922

  1. Direct-to-Consumer Marketing of Cigar Products in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Ollie; Teplitskaya, Lyubov; Cantrell, Jennifer; Hair, Elizabeth C; Vallone, Donna

    2016-05-01

    Although cigar use and sales have increased in the United States over the past decade, little is known about how these products are promoted. Direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising is a common method used to promote tobacco products and may be a potential channel through which cigars are advertised. Comperemedia (Mintel) was used to acquire opt-in direct mail and email advertising for the top 10 cigar brands in the United States between January 2013 and July 2014. The advertisement and corresponding data on brand, advertising spend, and mail volume were downloaded and summarized. Promotions such as coupons, giveaways, and sweepstakes were also examined. A total of 92 unique advertisements met the search criteria and included two brands: Black & Mild (n = 77) and Swisher Sweets (n = 15). Expenditures on direct mail advertising during this period totaled $12 809 630. Black & Mild encompassed 80% of total direct mail volume and 78% of direct mail advertising expenditures. Almost all advertisements contained at least one promotion (88%) and included a URL to the product website (85%). The results suggest that Black & Mild and Swisher Sweets are the primary cigar brands using DTC advertising. Promotional offers were nearly ubiquitous among the advertisements, which may appeal to price-sensitive populations. Future studies should continue to examine cigar advertising via direct mail and email, in addition to other channels, such as the point-of-sale. Although cigar use and sales have increased in the United States over the past decade, there is limited data on cigar advertising. This article provides a snapshot of expenditures, volume, and promotional content of DTC cigar advertising in the United States between January 2013 and July 2014. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Learning by Experience, Work and Productivity: Theory and Empirical Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankhurst, K. V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the nature and significance of learning by experience during work, both paid and unpaid. Data about the relationship between costs, especially labour costs, and output have come to be interpreted as evidence of learning by experience, but these grouped data are unable to explain the nature and process of individual experience…

  3. Learning by Experience, Work and Productivity: Theory and Empirical Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankhurst, K. V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the nature and significance of learning by experience during work, both paid and unpaid. Data about the relationship between costs, especially labour costs, and output have come to be interpreted as evidence of learning by experience, but these grouped data are unable to explain the nature and process of individual experience…

  4. Quantitative Field Testing Heterodera glycines from Metagenomic DNA Samples Isolated Directly from Soil under Agronomic Production

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Lawrence, Gary W.; Lu, Shien; Balbalian, Clarissa; Klink, Vincent P.

    2014-01-01

    A quantitative PCR procedure targeting the Heterodera glycines ortholog of the Caenorhabditis elegans uncoordinated-78 gene was developed. The procedure estimated the quantity of H. glycines from metagenomic DNA samples isolated directly from field soil under agronomic production. The estimation of H. glycines quantity was determined in soil samples having other soil dwelling plant parasitic nematodes including Hoplolaimus, predatory nematodes including Mononchus, free-living nematodes and biomass. The methodology provides a framework for molecular diagnostics of nematodes from metagenomic DNA isolated directly from field soil. PMID:24587100

  5. Directed evolution of carotenoid synthases for the production of unnatural carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Furubayashi, Maiko; Umeno, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Directed evolution is a well-established strategy to confer novel catalytic functions to the enzymes. Thanks to the relative ease of establishing color screening, carotenogenic enzymes can be rapidly evolved in the laboratory for novel functions. The combinatorial usages of the evolvants result in the creation of diverse set of novel, sometimes unnatural carotenoids. This chapter describes the directed evolution of diapophytoene (C(30) carotenoid) synthase CrtM to function in the foreign C(40) pathway, and the use of the CrtM variants thus obtained for the production of novel backbone structures.

  6. Measurement of direct-photon production at the Fermilab Tevatron fixed target energies

    SciTech Connect

    Apanasevich, L.; Bacigalupi, J.; Pellett, D.; Tripathi, S.M.; Baker, W.; Johnstone, C.; Lukens, P.; Skow, D.; Begel, M.; Barbaro, L. de; DeSoi, W.; Dunlea, J.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferbel, T.; Ftacnik, J.; Ginther, G.; Lobkowicz, F.; Mansour, J.; Osborne, G.; Prebys, E.

    2004-11-01

    Measurements of the production of high transverse momentum direct photons by a 515 GeV/c {pi}{sup -} beam and 530 and 800 GeV/c proton beams in interactions with beryllium and hydrogen targets are presented. The data span the kinematic ranges of 3.5direct-photon cross sections are compared with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations and expectations based on a phenomenological parton-k{sub T} model.

  7. Quantitative field testing Heterodera glycines from metagenomic DNA samples isolated directly from soil under agronomic production.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Lawrence, Gary W; Lu, Shien; Balbalian, Clarissa; Klink, Vincent P

    2014-01-01

    A quantitative PCR procedure targeting the Heterodera glycines ortholog of the Caenorhabditis elegans uncoordinated-78 gene was developed. The procedure estimated the quantity of H. glycines from metagenomic DNA samples isolated directly from field soil under agronomic production. The estimation of H. glycines quantity was determined in soil samples having other soil dwelling plant parasitic nematodes including Hoplolaimus, predatory nematodes including Mononchus, free-living nematodes and biomass. The methodology provides a framework for molecular diagnostics of nematodes from metagenomic DNA isolated directly from field soil.

  8. Process kinetics and bioreactor design for the direct bioconversion of cellulose into microbial products

    SciTech Connect

    Asenjo, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    To achieve a direct bioconversion of cellulose, a bioreactor that can be operated with a high concentration of microbial biomass and where cellulose can be fed and product withdrawn continuously should be designed. The development of realistic mathematical models to simulate a simultaneous bioconversion makes the task of analyzing the different interactions between the saccharification and fermentation, as well as optimizing the system, more efficient. This paper shows the use of a general kinetic model of the direct simultaneous bioconversion process in describing the kinetics of aerobic and anaerobic systems. It also discusses the design of specialized bioreactors to carry out such a conversion. 22 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  9. Production of a Biopolymer at Reactor Scale: A Laboratory Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genc, Rukan; Rodriguez-Couto, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Undergraduate students of biotechnology became familiar with several aspects of bioreactor operation via the production of xanthan gum, an industrially relevant biopolymer, by "Xanthomonas campestris" bacteria. The xanthan gum was extracted from the fermentation broth and the yield coefficient and productivity were calculated. (Contains 2 figures.)

  10. Production of a Biopolymer at Reactor Scale: A Laboratory Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genc, Rukan; Rodriguez-Couto, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Undergraduate students of biotechnology became familiar with several aspects of bioreactor operation via the production of xanthan gum, an industrially relevant biopolymer, by "Xanthomonas campestris" bacteria. The xanthan gum was extracted from the fermentation broth and the yield coefficient and productivity were calculated. (Contains 2 figures.)

  11. Experiences with High-Level Programming Directives for Porting Applications to GPUs

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Oscar R; Ding, Wei; Chapman, Barbara; Kartsaklis, Christos; Sankaran, Ramanan; Graham, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    HPC systems now exploit GPUs within their compute nodes to accelerate program performance. As a result, high-end application development has become extremely complex at the node level. In addition to restructuring the node code to exploit the cores and specialized devices, the programmer may need to choose a programming model such as OpenMP or CPU threads in conjunction with an accelerator programming model to share and manage the difference node resources. This comes at a time when programmer productivity and the ability to produce portable code has been recognized as a major concern. In order to offset the high development cost of creating CUDA or OpenCL kernels, directives have been proposed for programming accelerator devices, but their implications are not well known. In this paper, we evaluate the state of the art accelerator directives to program several applications kernels, explore transformations to achieve good performance, and examine the expressiveness and performance penalty of using high-level directives versus CUDA. We also compare our results to OpenMP implementations to understand the benefits of running the kernels in the accelerator versus CPU cores.

  12. ISAAC: A REXUS Student Experiment to Demonstrate an Ejection System with Predefined Direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmer, G.; Berquand, A.; Company-Vallet, E.; Granberg, V.; Grigore, V.; Ivchenko, N.; Kevorkov, R.; Lundkvist, E.; Olentsenko, G.; Pacheco-Labrador, J.; Tibert, G.; Yuan, Y.

    2015-09-01

    ISAAC Infrared Spectroscopy to Analyse the middle Atmosphere Composition — was a student experiment launched from SSC's Esrange Space Centre, Sweden, on 29th May 2014, on board the sounding rocket REXUS 15 in the frame of the REXUS/BEXUS programme. The main focus of the experiment was to implement an ejection system for two large Free Falling Units (FFUs) (240 mm x 80 mm) to be ejected from a spinning rocket into a predefined direction. The system design relied on a spring-based ejection system. Sun and angular rate sensors were used to control and time the ejection. The flight data includes telemetry from the Rocket Mounted Unit (RMU), received and saved during flight, as well as video footage from the GoPro camera mounted inside the RMU and recovered after the flight. The FFUs' direction, speed and spin frequency as well as the rocket spin frequency were determined by analyzing the video footage. The FFU-Rocket-Sun angles were 64.3° and 104.3°, within the required margins of 90°+45°. The FFU speeds were 3.98 mIs and 3.74 mIs, lower than the expected 5± 1 mIs. The FFUs' spin frequencies were 1 .38 Hz and 1 .60 Hz, approximately half the rocket's spin frequency. The rocket spin rate slightly changed from 3. 163 Hz before the ejection to 3.1 17 Hz after the ejection of the two FFUs. The angular rate, sun sensor data and temperature on the inside of the rocket module skin were also recorded. The experiment design and results of the data analysis are presented in this paper.

  13. Near Real Time VIIRS EDR Products Via Direct Broadcast Using the Community Satellite Processing Package (CSPP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cureton, G. P.; Mindock, S.; Martin, G.; Garcia, R.; Strabala, K.; Davies, J.; Bearson, N.; Gumley, L.; Huang, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) has a long history of supporting the Direct Broadcast (DB) community for various sensors, recently with the International MODIS/AIRS Processing Package (IMAPP) for the NASA EOS polar orbiters Terra and Aqua. CIMSS has continued this effort into the NPP/JPSS (previously NPOESS) era with the development of the Community Satellite Processing Package (CSPP), supporting the VIIRS, CrIS and ATMS sensors on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) spacecraft. Within CSPP, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Environmental Data Record (EDR) products are based on the NOAA Operational products as implemented by Raytheon in the Algorithm Development Library (ADL), packaged for use in a Direct Broadcast environment. Examples of near real time usage of various VIIRS EDR products are given, with a focus on products obtained using CSPP (which include the Cloud Mask, Active Fires, Aerosol Optical Thickness, Sea Surface Temperature, Surface Reflectance, Vegetation Index, Surface Type and Land Surface Temperature products).

  14. Using directed evolution to improve hydrogen production in chimeric hydrogenases from Clostridia species.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Scott M; Plummer, Mark A; Merkel, Patricia A; Hagen, Moira; Biddle, Jennifer F; Waidner, Lisa A

    2016-11-01

    Hydrogenases are enzymes that play a key role in controlling excess reducing equivalents in both photosynthetic and anaerobic organisms. This enzyme is viewed as potentially important for the industrial generation of hydrogen gas; however, insufficient hydrogen production has impeded its use in a commercial process. Here, we explore the potential to circumvent this problem by directly evolving the Fe-Fe hydrogenase genes from two species of Clostridia bacteria. In addition, a computational model based on these mutant sequences was developed and used as a predictive aid for the isolation of enzymes with even greater efficiency in hydrogen production. Two of the improved mutants have a logarithmic increase in hydrogen production in our in vitro assay. Furthermore, the model predicts hydrogenase sequences with hydrogen productions as high as 540-fold over the positive control. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential of directed evolution to improve the native bacterial hydrogenases as a first step for improvement of hydrogenase activity, further in silico prediction, and finally, construction and demonstration of an improved algal hydrogenase in an in vivo assay of C. reinhardtii hydrogen production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Question of Scope? Direct Comparison of Clear and In-Focus Speech Productions.

    PubMed

    Redford, Melissa A; Stine, Jessica N; Vatikiotis-Bateson, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Parallels in the production of clear speech and words under prosodic focus suggest that both may be realized in the same way: as hyper-articulated speech. To directly investigate this possibility, school-aged children and college-aged adults produced target words in a default conversational style, a clear speech style, and with prosodic focus. The results were that children and adults both produced target vowels more distinctly and with greater mouth opening in the clear speech and prosodic focus conditions than in the default condition. Whereas the temporal scope of production changes varied as a function of condition in adults' speech, there was no evidence of this in children's speech.

  16. Observation of Electroweak Single Top-Quark Production with the CDF II Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lueck, Jan

    2009-07-24

    The standard model of elementary particle physics (SM) predicts, besides the top-quark pair production via the strong interaction, also the electroweak production of single top-quarks [19]. Up to now, the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton-collider is the only place to produce and study top quarks emerging from hadron-hadron-collisions. Top quarks were directly observed in 1995 during the Tevatron Run I at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.8 TeV simultaneously by the CDF and D0 Collaborations via the strong production of top-quark pairs. Run II of the Tevatron data taking period started 2001 at √s = 1.96 TeV after a five year upgrade of the Tevatron accelerator complex and of both experiments. One main component of its physics program is the determination of the properties of the top quark including its electroweak production. Even though Run II is still ongoing, the study of the top quark is already a successful endeavor, confirmed by dozens of publications from both Tevatron experiments. A comprehensive review of top-quark physics can be found in reference. The reasons for searching for single top-quark production are compelling. As the electroweak top-quark production proceeds via a Wtb vertex, it provides the unique opportunity of the direct measurement of the CKM matrix element |Vtb|, which is expected to be |Vtb| ~ 1 in the SM. Significant deviations from unity could be an indication of a fourth quark generation, a production mode via flavor-changing neutral currents, and other new phenomena, respectively. There are two dominating electroweak top-quark production modes at the Fermilab Tevatron: the t-channel exchange of a virtual W boson striking a b quark and the s-channel production of a timelike W boson via the fusion of two quarks. In proton-antiproton-collisions the third electroweak production mode, the associated Wt production of an on-shell W boson in conjunction with a top quark has a comparatively negligible small

  17. Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Surry Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, T.K.; Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M.; Nichols, R.T.

    1994-06-01

    The Containment Technology Test Facility (CTTF) and the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories are used to perform scaled experiments that simulate High Pressure Melt Ejection accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effects of direct containment heating (DCH) phenomena on the containment load. High-temperature, chemically reactive melt (thermite) is ejected by high-pressure steam into a scale model of a reactor cavity. Debris is entrained by the steam blowdown into a containment model where specific phenomena, such as the effect of subcompartment structures, prototypic air/steam/hydrogen atmospheres, and hydrogen generation and combustion, can be studied. Four Integral Effects Tests (IETs) have been performed with scale models of the Surry NPP to investigate DCH phenomena. The 1/61{sup th} scale Integral Effects Tests (IET-9, IET-10, and IET-11) were conducted in CTRF, which is a 1/6{sup th} scale model of the Surry reactor containment building (RCB). The 1/10{sup th} scale IET test (IET-12) was performed in the Surtsey vessel, which had been configured as a 1/10{sup th} scale Surry RCB. Scale models were constructed in each of the facilities of the Surry structures, including the reactor pressure vessel, reactor support skirt, control rod drive missile shield, biological shield wall, cavity, instrument tunnel, residual heat removal platform and heat exchangers, seal table room and seal table, operating deck, and crane wall. This report describes these experiments and gives the results.

  18. Scientific reach of multiton-scale dark matter direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newstead, Jayden L.; Jacques, Thomas D.; Krauss, Lawrence M.; Dent, James B.; Ferrer, Francesc

    2013-10-01

    The next generation of large-scale weakly interacting massive particle direct detection experiments have the potential to go beyond the discovery phase and reveal detailed information about both the particle physics and astrophysics of dark matter. We report here on early results arising from the development of a detailed numerical code modeling the proposed DARWIN detector, involving both liquid argon and xenon targets. We incorporate realistic detector physics, particle physics, and astrophysical uncertainties and demonstrate to what extent two targets with similar sensitivities can remove various degeneracies and allow a determination of dark matter cross sections and masses while also probing rough aspects of the dark matter phase-space distribution. We find that, even assuming dominance of spin-independent scattering, multiton-scale experiments still have degeneracies that depend sensitively on the dark matter mass, and on the possibility of isospin violation and inelasticity in interactions. We find that these experiments are best able to discriminate dark matter properties for dark matter masses less than around 200 GeV. In addition, and somewhat surprisingly, the use of two targets gives only a small improvement (aside from the advantage of different systematics associated with any claimed signal) in the ability to pin down dark matter parameters when compared with one target of larger exposure.

  19. [Direct support of the STOW effort and SAFAGANZA experiments]. Final report, February--14 March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kollmorgen, L.S.

    1994-03-24

    The Synthetic Theater of War program, under the leadership of the Advanced Distributed Simulation Office, was redesignated a probationary Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration by the Office of the Secretary of Defense. This new designation makes the STOW program, and the enabling technology developments, one of only six major technology thrusts being supported by the Defense Research and Development organization. Support to this technology area, has been, and will continue to be a major thrust for this contract and the follow-on contract. Over the extended period of this contract we have supported a major experimental series, the Counter Target Acquistion System (CTAS), and initiated support and development effort for STOW-97 and participated in ongoing series of experiments known as the SAFAGANZA. These efforts have seen the development of significant experiment support and analysis tools, i.e. the integration of headeye tracking to manned tactical simulation and the Simulyzer analysis system. Recently, we have initiated the development of a customized data base analysis tool to enable analysis supporting selection of communications bandwidth reduction designs and concepts. This is in direct support of the STOW effort and intrinsic to the SAFAGANZA experiments.

  20. Tests of WIMP Dark Matter Candidates with Direct Dark Matter Detection Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, Andreea Irina

    We reexamine the current direct dark matter (DM) detection data for several types of DM candidates, both assuming the Standard Halo Model (SHM) and in a halo-independent manner. We consider the potential signals for light WIMPs that have appeared in three direct detection searches: DAMA, CDMS-II-Si, and CoGeNT, and we analyze their compatibility with the null results of other direct detection experiments. We first consider light WIMPs with exothermic scattering with nuclei (exoDM). Exothermic interactions favor light targets, thus reducing the importance of upper limits derived from Xe targets, the most restrictive of which is at present the LUX limit. In our SHM analysis the CDMS-II-Si and CoGeNT regions become allowed by these bounds, however the SuperCDMS limit rejects both regions for exoDM with isospin-conserving couplings. An isospin-violating coupling of the exoDM, in particular one with a neutron to proton coupling ratio of -0.8 (which we call "Ge-phobic"), maximally reduces the DM coupling to Ge and allows the CDMS-II-Si region to become compatible with all upper bounds. This is also clearly shown in our halo-independent analysis. Next, we extend and correct a recently proposed maximum-likelihood halo-independent method to analyze unbinned direct DM detection data. Instead of the recoil energy as an independent variable, we use the minimum speed a DM particle must have to impart a given recoil energy to a nucleus. This has the advantage of allowing us to apply the method to any type of target composition and interaction, e.g. with general momentum and velocity dependence, and with elastic or inelastic scattering. We prove the method and provide a rigorous statistical interpretation of the results. As first applications, we find that for dark matter particles with elastic spin-independent interactions and neutron to proton coupling ratio ƒn/ƒp = --0.7 ("Xe-phobic", which reduces maximally the coupling to Xe), the WIMP interpretation of the signal observed

  1. Cyanobacterial production of 1,3-propanediol directly from carbon dioxide using a synthetic metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Yasutaka; Maki, Yuki; Tatsuke, Tsuneyuki; Hanai, Taizo

    2016-03-01

    Production of chemicals directly from carbon dioxide using light energy is an attractive option for a sustainable future. The 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) production directly from carbon dioxide was achieved by engineered Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 with a synthetic metabolic pathway. Glycerol dehydratase catalyzing the conversion of glycerol to 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde in a coenzyme B12-dependent manner worked in S. elongatus PCC 7942 without addition of vitamin B12, suggesting that the intrinsic pseudovitamin B12 served as a substitute of coenzyme B12. The highest titers of 1,3-PDO (3.79±0.23 mM; 288±17.7 mg/L) and glycerol (12.62±1.55 mM; 1.16±0.14 g/L), precursor of 1,3-PDO, were reached after 14 days of culture under optimized conditions in this study.

  2. Experience as Knowledge in a New Product Development Team: Implications for Knowledge Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to better understand how New Product Development (NPD) team members apply their experiences to meet the task needs of their project. Although "experience" is highly valued in team members, little research has looked specifically at experiences as a type of knowledge, and how this knowledge is used in work settings. This research evaluated nearly 200 instances where team members referenced past experiences during team meetings. During these experience exchanges, team members structured the sharing of their experiences to include three common elements: the source of the experience, the nature of the experience, and the degree of relevance to the current work of the team. The experiences fell into four categories: people (relationships), process, product, and politics. This paper describes how team members structured, applied, and integrated their individual experiences and presents the resulting implications for knowledge management systems that wish to exploit experience knowledge.

  3. Experience as Knowledge in a New Product Development Team: Implications for Knowledge Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to better understand how New Product Development (NPD) team members apply their experiences to meet the task needs of their project. Although "experience" is highly valued in team members, little research has looked specifically at experiences as a type of knowledge, and how this knowledge is used in work settings. This research evaluated nearly 200 instances where team members referenced past experiences during team meetings. During these experience exchanges, team members structured the sharing of their experiences to include three common elements: the source of the experience, the nature of the experience, and the degree of relevance to the current work of the team. The experiences fell into four categories: people (relationships), process, product, and politics. This paper describes how team members structured, applied, and integrated their individual experiences and presents the resulting implications for knowledge management systems that wish to exploit experience knowledge.

  4. Asymmetric responses of primary productivity to precipitation extremes: a synthesis of grassland precipitation manipulation experiments.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Kevin R; Shi, Zheng; Gherardi, Laureano A; Lemoine, Nathan P; Koerner, Sally E; Hoover, David L; Bork, Edward; Byrne, Kerry M; Cahill, James; Collins, Scott L; Evans, Sarah; Katarina Gilgen, Anna; Holub, Petr; Jiang, Lifen; Knapp, Alan K; LeCain, Daniel; Liang, Junyi; Garcia-Palacios, Pablo; Peñuelas, Josep; Pockman, William T; Smith, Melinda D; Sun, Shanghua; White, Shannon R; Yahdjian, Laura; Zhu, Kai; Luo, Yiqi

    2017-04-02

    Climatic changes are altering Earth's hydrological cycle, resulting in altered precipitation amounts, increased inter-annual variability of precipitation, and more frequent extreme precipitation events. These trends will likely continue into the future, having substantial impacts on net primary productivity (NPP) and associated ecosystem services such as food production and carbon sequestration. Frequently, experimental manipulations of precipitation have linked altered precipitation regimes to changes in NPP. Yet, findings have been diverse and substantial uncertainty still surrounds generalities describing patterns of ecosystem sensitivity to altered precipitation. Additionally, we do not know whether previously observed correlations between NPP and precipitation remain accurate when precipitation changes become extreme. We synthesized results from 83 case studies of experimental precipitation manipulations in grasslands worldwide. We used meta-analytical techniques to search for generalities and asymmetries of aboveground NPP (ANPP) and belowground NPP (BNPP) responses to both the direction and magnitude of precipitation change. Sensitivity (i.e., productivity response standardized by the amount of precipitation change) of BNPP was similar under precipitation additions and reductions, but ANPP was more sensitive to precipitation additions than reductions; this was especially evident in drier ecosystems. Additionally, overall relationships between the magnitude of productivity responses versus the magnitude of precipitation change were saturating in form. The saturating form of this relationship was likely driven by ANPP responses to very extreme precipitation increases, although there were limited studies imposing extreme precipitation change and there was considerable variation among experiments. This highlights the importance of incorporating gradients of manipulations, ranging from extreme drought to extreme precipitation increases into future climate change

  5. Nuclear effects in high-p{sub T} production of direct photons and neutral mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Apanasevich, L.; Bacigalupi, J.; Pellett, D.; Tripathi, S.M.; Baker, W.; Johnstone, C.; Lukens, P.; Skow, D.; Begel, M.; Barbaro, L. de; DeSoi, W.; Dunlea, J.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferbel, T.; Ftacnik, J.; Ginther, G.; Lobkowicz, F.; Mansour, J.; Osborne, G.; Prebys, E.

    2005-08-01

    We present results on the production of direct photons, {pi}{sup 0}, and {eta} mesons on nuclear targets at large transverse momenta (p{sub T}). The data are from 530 and 800 GeV/c proton beams and 515 GeV/c {pi}{sup -} beams incident upon copper and beryllium targets that span the kinematic range of 1.0

  6. Construction of a directional T vector for cloning PCR products and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiu-Yi; Liang, Zhi-Cheng; Zhang, Zhi; Zhou, Jiao-Jiao; Liu, Shi-Yu; Tian, Sheng-Li

    2015-05-01

    In order to clone PCR products and express them effectively in Escherichia coli, a directional cloning system was constructed by generating a T vector based on pQE-30Xa. The vector was prepared by inserting an XcmI cassette containing an endonuclease XcmI site, a kanamycin selective marker, a multiple-cloning-site (MCS) region and an opposite endonuclease XcmI site into the vector pQE-30Xa. The T vector pQE-T with single overhanging dT residues at both 3' ends was obtained by digesting with the restriction enzyme XcmI. For directional cloning, a BamHI site was introduced to the ends of the PCR products. A BamHI site was also located on the multiple cloning site of pQE-T. The PCR products were ligated with pQE-T. The directionally inserted recombinants were distinguished by using BamHI to digest the recombinants because there are two BamHI sites located on the both sides of PCR fragment. In order to identify the T-vector functions, the 14-3-3-ZsGreen and hRBP genes were amplified and a BamHI site was added to the ends of the genes to confirm this vector by ligation with pQE-T. Results showed that the 14-3-3-ZsGreen and hRBP were cloned to the vector pQE-T directly and corresponding proteins were successfully produced. It was here demonstrated that this directional vector is capable of gene cloning and is used to manipulate gene expression very easily. The methodology proposed here involves easy incorporation of the construct into other vectors in various hosts.

  7. Increased Ethylene Production during Clinostat Experiments May Cause Leaf Epinasty.

    PubMed

    Leather, G R; Forrence, L E

    1972-02-01

    Ethylene production from tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum L. cv. Rutgers) plants based on a clinostat doubled during the first 2 hours of rotation. Carbon dioxide blocked the appearance of leaf epinasty normally associated with plants rotated on a clinostat. These results support the idea that epinasty of clinostated plants was due to increased ethylene production and not to the cancellation of the gravitational pull on auxin transport in the petiole.

  8. Increased Ethylene Production during Clinostat Experiments May Cause Leaf Epinasty

    PubMed Central

    Leather, G. R.; Forrence, L. E.; Abeles, F. B.

    1972-01-01

    Ethylene production from tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum L. cv. Rutgers) plants based on a clinostat doubled during the first 2 hours of rotation. Carbon dioxide blocked the appearance of leaf epinasty normally associated with plants rotated on a clinostat. These results support the idea that epinasty of clinostated plants was due to increased ethylene production and not to the cancellation of the gravitational pull on auxin transport in the petiole. Images PMID:16657920

  9. Directed evolution of a cellodextrin transporter for improved biofuel production under anaerobic conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jiazhang; Li, Yanglin; HamediRad, Mohammad; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-08-01

    Introduction of a cellobiose utilization pathway consisting of a cellodextrin transporter and a β-glucosidase into Saccharomyces cerevisiae enables co-fermentation of cellobiose and xylose. Cellodextrin transporter 1 (CDT1) from Neurospora crassa has been established as an effective transporter for the engineered cellobiose utilization pathways. However, cellodextrin transporter 2 (CDT2) from the same species is a facilitator and has the potential to be more efficient than CDT1 under anaerobic conditions due to its energetic benefits. Currently, CDT2 has a very low activity and is considered rate-limiting in cellobiose fermentation. Here, we report the directed evolution of CDT2 with an increased cellobiose uptake activity, which results in improved cellobiose fermentation under anaerobic conditions. After three rounds of directed evolution, the cellobiose uptake activity of CDT2 was increased by 2.2-fold, which resulted from both increased specific activity and transporter expression level. Using high cell density fermentation under anaerobic conditions, the evolved mutant conferred 4.0- and 4.4-fold increase in the cellobiose consumption rate and ethanol productivity, respectively. In addition, although the cellobiose uptake activity was still lower than that of CDT1, the engineered CDT2 showed significantly improved cellobiose consumption and ethanol production under anaerobic conditions, representing the energetic benefits of a sugar facilitator for anaerobic cellobiose fermentation. This study demonstrated that anaerobic biofuel production could be significantly improved via directed evolution of a sugar transporter protein in yeast.

  10. Direct control of hepatic glucose production by interleukin-13 in mice.

    PubMed

    Stanya, Kristopher J; Jacobi, David; Liu, Sihao; Bhargava, Prerna; Dai, Lingling; Gangl, Matthew R; Inouye, Karen; Barlow, Jillian L; Ji, Yewei; Mizgerd, Joseph P; Qi, Ling; Shi, Hang; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Lee, Chih-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a result of impaired insulin action on glucose production and disposal, and a major target of antidiabetic therapies. The study of insulin-independent regulatory mechanisms of glucose metabolism may identify new strategies to lower blood sugar levels. Here we demonstrate an unexpected metabolic function for IL-13 in the control of hepatic glucose production. IL-13 is a Th2 cytokine known to mediate macrophage alternative activation. Genetic ablation of Il-13 in mice (Il-13-/-) resulted in hyperglycemia, which progressed to hepatic insulin resistance and systemic metabolic dysfunction. In Il-13-/- mice, upregulation of enzymes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis was a primary event leading to dysregulated glucose metabolism. IL-13 inhibited transcription of gluconeogenic genes by acting directly on hepatocytes through Stat3, a noncanonical downstream effector. Consequently, the ability of IL-13 to suppress glucose production was abolished in liver cells lacking Stat3 or IL-13 receptor α1 (Il-13rα1), which suggests that the IL-13Rα1/Stat3 axis directs IL-13 signaling toward metabolic responses. These findings extend the implication of a Th1/Th2 paradigm in metabolic homeostasis beyond inflammation to direct control of glucose metabolism and suggest that the IL-13/Stat3 pathway may serve as a therapeutic target for glycemic control in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

  11. Can we predict the direction of marine primary production change under global warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taucher, J.; Oschlies, A.

    2011-01-01

    A global Earth System model is employed to investigate the role of direct temperature effects in the response of marine ecosystems to climate change. While model configurations with and without consideration of explicit temperature effects can reproduce observed current biogeochemical tracer distributions and estimated carbon export about equally well, carbon flow through the model ecosystem reveals strong temperature sensitivities. Depending on whether biological processes are assumed temperature sensitive or not, simulated marine net primary production (NPP) increases or decreases under projected climate change driven by a business-as-usual CO2 emission scenario for the 21st century. This suggests that indirect temperature effects such as changes in the supply of nutrients and light are not the only relevant factors to be considered when modeling the response of marine ecosystems to climate change. A better understanding of direct temperature effects on marine ecosystems is required before even the direction of change in NPP can be reliably predicted.

  12. The direct strip casting concept: A low-cost, high-productivity solution for flat products of all steel grades

    SciTech Connect

    Reichelt, W.; Urlau, U.; Burstroem, E.; Nystroem, R.

    1996-12-31

    The Direct Strip Casting concept is characterized by a high degree of flexibility as regards the types of steel to be cast, at the same time guaranteeing a high production rate and low investment costs. It has been planned to cast strips of all steel grades with a thickness of approx. 10 mm. These strips will not be directly transferred to a cold rolling mill but will undergo two or three hot passes before being wound into a coil. A comparison of the economic feasibility of the DSC process with other near net shape casting processes shows that this process is suitable for small as well as large production rates (up to million tpy/strand) because of the low investment and operating costs. Casting and rolling tests performed in a pilot casting machine and in a casting machine for laboratory purposes show potentially that: the crucial element of the DSC process, the belt caster, is sufficiently stable to attain the required final strip geometry already at the time of casting; the hot shaping envisaged in the DSC concept is sufficient to remove a lack of symmetry that may arise during casting; and the rolling passes envisaged in the DSC concept are necessary and yet at the same time adequate for achieving material properties, for example, sufficiently high r-values for deep drawing grades.

  13. Production of FAME biodiesel in E. coli by direct methylation with an insect enzyme

    DOE PAGES

    Sherkhanov, Saken; Korman, Tyler P.; Clarke, Steven G.; ...

    2016-04-07

    Here, most biodiesel currently in use consists of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) produced by transesterification of plant oils with methanol. To reduce competition with food supplies, it would be desirable to directly produce biodiesel in microorganisms. To date, the most effective pathway for the production of biodiesel in bacteria yields fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) at up to ~1.5 g/L. A much simpler route to biodiesel produces FAMEs by direct S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) dependent methylation of free fatty acids, but FAME production by this route has been limited to only ~16 mg/L. Here we employ an alternative, broad spectrum methyltransferase,more » Drosophila melanogaster Juvenile Hormone Acid O-Methyltransferase (DmJHAMT). By introducing DmJHAMT in E. coli engineered to produce medium chain fatty acids and overproduce SAM, we obtain medium chain FAMEs at titers of 0.56 g/L, a 35-fold increase over titers previously achieved. Although considerable improvements will be needed for viable bacterial production of FAMEs and FAEEs for biofuels, it may be easier to optimize and transport the FAME production pathway to other microorganisms because it involves fewer enzymes.« less

  14. Production of FAME biodiesel in E. coli by direct methylation with an insect enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sherkhanov, Saken; Korman, Tyler P; Clarke, Steven G; Bowie, James U

    2016-04-07

    Most biodiesel currently in use consists of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) produced by transesterification of plant oils with methanol. To reduce competition with food supplies, it would be desirable to directly produce biodiesel in microorganisms. To date, the most effective pathway for the production of biodiesel in bacteria yields fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) at up to ~1.5 g/L. A much simpler route to biodiesel produces FAMEs by direct S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) dependent methylation of free fatty acids, but FAME production by this route has been limited to only ~16 mg/L. Here we employ an alternative, broad spectrum methyltransferase, Drosophila melanogaster Juvenile Hormone Acid O-Methyltransferase (DmJHAMT). By introducing DmJHAMT in E. coli engineered to produce medium chain fatty acids and overproduce SAM, we obtain medium chain FAMEs at titers of 0.56 g/L, a 35-fold increase over titers previously achieved. Although considerable improvements will be needed for viable bacterial production of FAMEs and FAEEs for biofuels, it may be easier to optimize and transport the FAME production pathway to other microorganisms because it involves fewer enzymes.

  15. Production of FAME biodiesel in E. coli by direct methylation with an insect enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Sherkhanov, Saken; Korman, Tyler P.; Clarke, Steven G; Bowie, James U.

    2016-01-01

    Most biodiesel currently in use consists of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) produced by transesterification of plant oils with methanol. To reduce competition with food supplies, it would be desirable to directly produce biodiesel in microorganisms. To date, the most effective pathway for the production of biodiesel in bacteria yields fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) at up to ~1.5 g/L. A much simpler route to biodiesel produces FAMEs by direct S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) dependent methylation of free fatty acids, but FAME production by this route has been limited to only ~16 mg/L. Here we employ an alternative, broad spectrum methyltransferase, Drosophila melanogaster Juvenile Hormone Acid O-Methyltransferase (DmJHAMT). By introducing DmJHAMT in E. coli engineered to produce medium chain fatty acids and overproduce SAM, we obtain medium chain FAMEs at titers of 0.56 g/L, a 35-fold increase over titers previously achieved. Although considerable improvements will be needed for viable bacterial production of FAMEs and FAEEs for biofuels, it may be easier to optimize and transport the FAME production pathway to other microorganisms because it involves fewer enzymes. PMID:27053100

  16. Study of polymer diffusion across the interface in latex films through direct energy transfer experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan Sheng; Feng, Jianrong; Winnik, Mitchell A.

    1994-11-01

    Efforts have been made to improve the method of using direct nonradiative energy transfer to follow the interdiffusion of polymer molecules across an interface. Two data analysis techniques are developed. The first one presents the extent of interdiffusion in terms of an acceptor concentration distribution; the second one recovers the diffusion coefficient and the concentration profile based on a Fickian diffusion model. The first method is model independent while the second method can be readily extended for other diffusion models. Polydisperse systems are characterized by a distribution of molecular mobilities. The energy transfer experiment provides a mean diffusion coefficient averaged over the sample history. For such systems, the concept of ``instantaneous'' effective diffusion coefficient and a method to derive it are discussed. These techniques are examined using computer simulations and tested in the study of molecular diffusion process of a poly(butyl methacrylate) latex system.

  17. Directed Design of Experiments for Validating Probability of Detection Capability of a Testing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of validating a probability of detection (POD) testing system using directed design of experiments (DOE) includes recording an input data set of observed hit and miss or analog data for sample components as a function of size of a flaw in the components. The method also includes processing the input data set to generate an output data set having an optimal class width, assigning a case number to the output data set, and generating validation instructions based on the assigned case number. An apparatus includes a host machine for receiving the input data set from the testing system and an algorithm for executing DOE to validate the test system. The algorithm applies DOE to the input data set to determine a data set having an optimal class width, assigns a case number to that data set, and generates validation instructions based on the case number.

  18. Appreciating history: the Australian experience of direct-entry mental health nursing education in universities.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda

    2009-02-01

    More than two decades since the introduction of comprehensive nursing education in Australia, the controversy regarding the type of undergraduate education that would best serve the needs of the mental health nursing profession continues. The ensuing debate tends to be based on a comparison between the current model of comprehensive education in the universities and the specialist mental health nursing programs that previously operated within the hospital system. The previous existence of a tertiary-based direct-entry mental health nursing program in Victoria is generally not recognized. The paper provides a brief overview of mental health nursing education from a historical perspective emphasizing the period following the commencement of the transfer of the nursing education. Articulating the Victorian experience of specialist undergraduate mental health nursing education within universities is essential as discussions about the most appropriate educational preparation for mental health nursing continues.

  19. Characterization of the general purpose research furnace for low-G directional solidification experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, R. K.; Fripp, A. L.; Debnam, W. J.; Clark, I. O.; Zweiner, J. W.; Carlson, F. M.

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary tests have shown that it is possible to control the temperature settings in NASA's General Purpose Research Furnace in such a manner as to obtain a constant rate of movement of a high temperature isotherm down the length of the furnace. These tests also showed that a temperature gradient on the order of 40 deg cm could be obtained in the furnace while moving the particular isotherm of interest, i.e., 900 C. This provides the possibility of performing directional solidification experiments in the furnace on a MEA flight in the low gravity environment provided by the Shuttle. A functional dependency of growth rate on perturbations during the the growth has been derived and shows the importance of avoiding non-steady growth rates and changing temperature gradients.

  20. Strain localization in direct shear experiments on Solnhofen limestone at high temperature Effects of transpression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llana-Fúnez, Sergio; Rutter, Ernest H.

    2008-11-01

    Some features of natural shear zones formed under non-coaxial strain geometries, including some effects of transpression, can be simulated in the laboratory by using the direct shear experimental configuration. Slices of ˜1 mm thick Solnhofen limestone were deformed in direct shear between two stronger forcing blocks of cores of Tennessee sandstone pre-cut at 45° to the cylinder axis. Experiments were run dry at 600 °C, 200 MPa confining pressure and bulk shear strain rates of ˜5 × 10 -3 s -1, at which conditions Solnhofen limestone deformed by dislocation creep with a stress exponent of 4.7. When loaded, strain concentrates in the limestone band, producing non-coaxial deformation as one pre-cut block slides past the other. The orientation and intensity of the shape fabric developed in calcite grains indicate that strain is heterogeneous across the specimen, with the formation of two high-strain shear bands close to the limestone-sandstone interface, separated by a central zone of low strain. Crystallographic preferred orientation patterns in the calcite grains measured by electron backscatter diffraction are consistent with a switch in deformation geometry from flattening-dominated in the middle of the specimen towards shear-dominated in the high-strain bands. From tests on thin slices of the same material compressed axisymmetrically (without shearing) normal to the layer, heterogeneous thinning of the slice develops, from a maximum in the centre of the slice to zero at the edges. The formation of the paired shear zones observed in the sheared experiments is interpreted in terms of superposed strain fields, with shearing in the centre of the slice being inhibited by the strain hardening that accompanies the higher flattening strain in the centre of the specimen.

  1. HARP and NA61 (SHINE) hadron production experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Boris A.

    2009-11-25

    The hadroproduction experiments HARP and NA61 (SHINE) as well as their implications for neutrino physics are discussed. Recent HARP measurements have already been used for precise predictions of neutrino beams in K2K and MiniBooNE/SciBooNE experiments and are also being used to improve the atmospheric neutrino flux predictions and to help in the optimization of neutrino factory and super-beam designs. First preliminary data from NA61 are of significant importance for a precise prediction of a new neutrino beam at J-PARC to be used for the first stage of the T2K experiment. Both HARP and NA61 provide a large amount of input for validation and tuning of hadroproduction models in Monte-Carlo generators.

  2. Recent developments in virtual experience design and production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Scott S.

    1995-03-01

    Today, the media of VR and Telepresence are in their infancy and the emphasis is still on technology and engineering. But, it is not the hardware people might use that will determine whether VR becomes a powerful medium--instead, it will be the experiences that they are able to have that will drive its acceptance and impact. A critical challenge in the elaboration of these telepresence capabilities will be the development of environments that are as unpredictable and rich in interconnected processes as an actual location or experience. This paper will describe the recent development of several Virtual Experiences including: `Menagerie', an immersive Virtual Environment inhabited by virtual characters designed to respond to and interact with its users; and `The Virtual Brewery', an immersive public VR installation that provides multiple levels of interaction in an artistic interpretation of the brewing process.

  3. Solitons Experience for Black Hole Production in Ultrarelativistic Particle Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref'eva, I. Ya.

    2013-06-01

    We discuss the analogy between soliton scattering in quantum field theory and black hole/wormholes (BH/WH) production in ultrarelativistic particle collisions in gravity. It is a common wisdom of the current paradigm suggests that BH/WH formation in particles collisions will happen when a center-mass energy of colliding particles is sufficiently above the Planck scale (the transplanckian region) and the BH/WH production can be estimated by the classical geometrical cross section. We compare the background of this paradigm with the functional integral method to scattering amplitudes and, in particular, we stress the analogy of the BH production in collision of ultrarelativistic particle and appearance of breathers poles in the scattering amplitudes in the Sin-Gordon model.

  4. Solitons Experience for Black Hole Production in Ultrarelativistic Particle Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ya. Aref'eva, I.

    2012-11-01

    We discuss the analogy between soliton scattering in quantum field theory and black hole/wormholes (BH/WH) production in ultrarelativistic particle collisions in gravity. It is a common wisdom of the current paradigm suggests that BH/WH formation in particles collisions will happen when a center-mass energy of colliding particles is sufficiently above the Planck scale (the transplanckian region) and the BH/WH production can be estimated by the classical geometrical cross section. We compare the background of this paradigm with the functional integral method to scattering amplitudes and, in particular, we stress the analogy of the BH production in collision of ultrarelativistic particle and appearance of breathers poles in the scattering amplitudes in the Sin-Gordon model.

  5. A search for the production of direct leptons in nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, P.N.

    1990-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics: subthreshold production experiment; testing and selection of PCOS amplifiers; transverse energy detector; development of a sensitive new amplifiers; single-lepton experiment. (LSP)

  6. Effective field theory treatment of the neutrino background in direct dark matter detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, James B.; Dutta, Bhaskar; Newstead, Jayden L.; Strigari, Louis E.

    2016-04-01

    Distinguishing a dark matter interaction from an astrophysical neutrino-induced interaction will be major challenge for future direct dark matter searches. In this paper, we consider this issue within nonrelativistic effective field theory (EFT), which provides a well-motivated theoretical framework for determining nuclear responses to dark matter scattering events. We analyze the nuclear energy recoil spectra from the different dark matter-nucleon EFT operators, and compare them to the nuclear recoil energy spectra that are predicted to be induced by astrophysical neutrino sources. We determine that for 11 of the 14 possible operators, the dark matter-induced recoil spectra can be cleanly distinguished from the corresponding neutrino-induced recoil spectra with moderate-size detector technologies that are now being pursued, e.g., these operators would require 0.5 tonne years to be distinguished from the neutrino background for low mass dark matter. Our results imply that in most models detectors with good energy resolution will be able to distinguish a dark matter signal from a neutrino signal, without the need for much larger detectors that must rely on additional information from timing or direction. In addition we calculate up-to-date exclusion limits in the EFT model space using data from the LUX experiment.

  7. Electrostatic frequency shifts in amide I vibrational spectra: Direct parameterization against experiment

    PubMed Central

    Reppert, Mike; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    The interpretation of protein amide I infrared spectra has been greatly assisted by the observation that the vibrational frequency of a peptide unit reports on its local electrostatic environment. However, the interpretation of spectra remains largely qualitative due to a lack of direct quantitative connections between computational models and experimental data. Here, we present an empirical parameterization of an electrostatic amide I frequency map derived from the infrared absorption spectra of 28 dipeptides. The observed frequency shifts are analyzed in terms of the local electrostatic potential, field, and field gradient, evaluated at sites near the amide bond in molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the frequency shifts observed in experiment correlate very well with the electric field in the direction of the C=O bond evaluated at the position of the amide oxygen atom. A linear best-fit mapping between observed frequencies and electric field yield sample standard deviations of 2.8 and 3.7 cm−1 for the CHARMM27 and OPLS-AA force fields, respectively, and maximum deviations (within our data set) of 9 cm−1. These results are discussed in the broader context of amide I vibrational models and the effort to produce quantitative agreement between simulated and experimental absorption spectra. PMID:23574217

  8. SPAR X Technical Report for Experiment 76-22 Directional Solidification of Magnetic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bethin, J.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of gravity on Bridgman-Stockbarger directional solidification of off-eutectic Bi/MnBi were studied in reduced gravity aboard the SPAR X flight and compared to normal-gravity investigations and previous eutectic Bi/MnBi SPAR flight experiments. The directional solidification of off-eutectic Bi/MnBi results in either a dendritic structure connected with local cooperative growth or a coupled low volume fraction faceted/non faceted aligned rod eutectic whose Mn macrosegregation, MnBi rod size, interrod spacing, and thermal and magnetic properties are sensitive functions of the solidification processing conditions. Two hypoeutectic and two hypereutectic samples were solidified during 605 sec of furnace travel, with an initial 265 sec low-gravity interval. Comparison Earth-gravity samples were solidified in the same furance assembly under identical processing conditions. Macrosegregation in the low-g samples was consistent with a metastable increase in Mn solubility in the Bi matrix, in partial agreement with previous Bi/MnBi SPAR findings of MnBi volume reduction.

  9. eCodonOpt: a systematic computational framework for optimizing codon usage in directed evolution experiments

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Gregory L.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2002-01-01

    We present a systematic computational framework, eCodonOpt, for designing parental DNA sequences for directed evolution experiments through codon usage optimization. Given a set of homologous parental proteins to be recombined at the DNA level, the optimal DNA sequences encoding these proteins are sought for a given diversity objective. We find that the free energy of annealing between the recombining DNA sequences is a much better descriptor of the extent of crossover formation than sequence identity. Three different diversity targets are investigated for the DNA shuffling protocol to showcase the utility of the eCodonOpt framework: (i) maximizing the average number of crossovers per recombined sequence; (ii) minimizing bias in family DNA shuffling so that each of the parental sequence pair contributes a similar number of crossovers to the library; and (iii) maximizing the relative frequency of crossovers in specific structural regions. Each one of these design challenges is formulated as a constrained optimization problem that utilizes 0–1 binary variables as on/off switches to model the selection of different codon choices for each residue position. Computational results suggest that many-fold improvements in the crossover frequency, location and specificity are possible, providing valuable insights for the engineering of directed evolution protocols. PMID:12034828

  10. Preliminary results from direct-drive cryogenic target implosion experiments on SGIII prototype laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-dong, Pu; Tian-Xuan, Huang; Ping, Li; Hai-le, Lei; Jun, Li; Shao-En, Jiang; Huang, Li; Zhi-Wen, Yang; Jian, Teng; Bo, Wu; Kai, Wang; Wei, Lin; Ming, Su; Xia-Yu, Zhan; Li, Chen; Xiao-Shi, Peng; Tang-Qi,; Zi-Feng, Song; Jia-Bin, Chen; Ming, Chen; and others

    2014-01-15

    Since ignition target design with layered deuterium and triterium ice had been proposed several decades ago, much effort was devoted to fabricate and implode cryogenic targets. Until recently, direct-drive cryogenic target implosion experiment was carried out on SGIII prototype laser facility. The target consisted of a plastic capsule supported by fill tube. Cryogenic helium gas was used to cool the capsule to a few degrees below the deuterium triple point. The resulting deuterium ice layer was characterized by optical shadowgraph and smoothed by applied temperature gradient. Eight laser beams with total energy of 7 kJ were used to directly drive the implosion. On the path of laser light to the capsule, there were 500 nm sealing film and helium gas of mm length. X-ray pinhole images were analyzed to confirm that the sealing film, and helium gas had little effect on aiming accuracy but caused some loss of laser energy especially when condensation on the sealing film was observed.

  11. Endobronchial Ultrasound-directed Transbronchial Needle Aspiration in Diagnosis of Mediastinal Lesions: Initial Egyptian Experience.

    PubMed

    Safwat, Tarek; Khattab, Adel; Haddad, Salwa El; Mostafa, Yasser; Korraa, Emad; Madkour, Ashraf; Fattah, Wael Abd El

    2009-01-01

    Mediastinal lesions represent a diagnostic challenge and often require invasive approaches. We evaluated the role of radial probe endobronchial ultrasound-directed transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) in the evaluation of mediastinal lesions. Between March 2005 to February 2006, 30 consecutive patients with enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes from unknown etiologies or suspicious for metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma and mediastinal masses underwent EBUS-TBNA and were clinically followed up. EBUS-TBNA was applied under topical anesthesia, midazolam sedation with a mean dose of 4.6+1.7 mg and prolonged the examination by 14.7 minutes on average. EBUS-directed TBNA was performed in 17 lymph nodes and 13 mediastinal masses, achieving specific diagnosis in 82.3% (14/17) and 84.6% (11/13) of examined lesions, respectively, with an overall yield of 83%. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of EBUS-TBNA in distinguishing benign from malignant mediastinal lesions were 89.4%, 100%, and 93.3%, respectively. EBUS was well tolerated by most of the patients with no TBNA-related complications. In conclusion, EBUS-TBNA of mediastinal lesions is a minimally invasive safe diagnostic technique with high yield, even in the hands of those with initial experience. This initial study is convincing and stimulating for widespread application of EBUS-TBNA in Egyptian bronchoscopy practice.

  12. Design of experiments approach to engineer cell-secreted matrices for directing osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Decaris, Martin L; Leach, J Kent

    2011-04-01

    The presentation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins provides an opportunity to instruct the phenotype and behavior of responsive cells. Decellularized cell-secreted matrix coatings (DM) represent a biomimetic culture surface that retains the complexity of the natural ECM. Microenvironmental culture conditions alter the composition of these matrices and ultimately the ability of DMs to direct cell fate. We employed a design of experiments (DOE) multivariable analysis approach to determine the effects and interactions of four variables (culture duration, cell seeding density, oxygen tension, and media supplementation) on the capacity of DMs to direct the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). DOE analysis revealed that matrices created with extended culture duration, ascorbate-2-phosphate supplementation, and in ambient oxygen tension exhibited significant correlations with enhanced hMSC differentiation. We validated the DOE model results using DMs predicted to have superior (DM1) or lesser (DM2) osteogenic potential for naïve hMSCs. Compared to cells on DM2, hMSCs cultured on DM1 expressed 2-fold higher osterix levels and deposited 3-fold more calcium over 3 weeks. Cells on DM1 coatings also exhibited greater proliferation and viability compared to DM2-coated substrates. This study demonstrates that DOE-based analysis is a powerful tool for optimizing engineered systems by identifying significant variables that have the greatest contribution to the target output.

  13. Electrostatic frequency shifts in amide I vibrational spectra: Direct parameterization against experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, Mike; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2013-04-01

    The interpretation of protein amide I infrared spectra has been greatly assisted by the observation that the vibrational frequency of a peptide unit reports on its local electrostatic environment. However, the interpretation of spectra remains largely qualitative due to a lack of direct quantitative connections between computational models and experimental data. Here, we present an empirical parameterization of an electrostatic amide I frequency map derived from the infrared absorption spectra of 28 dipeptides. The observed frequency shifts are analyzed in terms of the local electrostatic potential, field, and field gradient, evaluated at sites near the amide bond in molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the frequency shifts observed in experiment correlate very well with the electric field in the direction of the C=O bond evaluated at the position of the amide oxygen atom. A linear best-fit mapping between observed frequencies and electric field yield sample standard deviations of 2.8 and 3.7 cm-1 for the CHARMM27 and OPLS-AA force fields, respectively, and maximum deviations (within our data set) of 9 cm-1. These results are discussed in the broader context of amide I vibrational models and the effort to produce quantitative agreement between simulated and experimental absorption spectra.

  14. Prediction and measurement of direct-normal solar irradiance: A closure experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Halthore, R.N.; Schwartz, S.E.; Michalsky, J.J.; Anderson, G.P.; Ferrare, R.A.; Ten Brink, H.M.

    1997-03-01

    Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the total energy in the solar spectrum incident on a plane perpendicular to the Sun`s direction on a unit area at the earth`s surface in unit time, depends only on the atmospheric extinction of sunlight without regard to the details of extinction--whether absorption or scattering. Here the authors describe a set of closure experiments performed in north-central Oklahoma, wherein measured atmospheric composition is input to a radiative transfer model, MODTRAN-3, to predict DNSI, which is then compared to measured values. Thirty six independent comparisons are presented; the agreement between predicted and measured values falls within the combined uncertainties in the prediction (2%) and measurement (0.2%) albeit with a slight bias ({approximately} 1% overprediction) that is independent of the solar zenith angle. Thus these results establish the adequacy of current knowledge of the solar spectrum and atmospheric extinction as embodied in MODTRAN-3 for use in climate models. An important consequence is the overwhelming likelihood that the atmospheric clear-sky absorption is accurately described to within comparable uncertainties.

  15. Corrugated Waveguide and Directional Coupler for CW 250-GHz Gyrotron DNP Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Woskov, Paul P.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Hornstein, Melissa K.; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    A 250-GHz corrugated transmission line with a directional coupler for forward and backward power monitoring has been constructed and tested for use with a 25-W continuous-wave gyrotron for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. The main corrugated line (22-mm internal diameter, 2.4-m long) connects the gyrotron output to the DNP probe input. The directional coupler, inserted approximately midway, is a four-port crossed waveguide beamsplitter design. Two beamsplitters, a quartz plate and ten-wire array, were tested with output coupling of 2.5% (−16 dB) at 250.6 GHz and 1.6% (−18 dB), respectively. A pair of mirrors in the DNP probe transferred the gyrotron beam from the 22-mm waveguide to an 8-mm helically corrugated waveguide for transmission through the final 0.58-m distance inside the NMR magnet to the sample. The transmission-line components were all cold tested with a 248 ± 4-GHz radiometer. A total insertion loss of 0.8 dB was achieved for HE11 -mode propagation from the gyrotron to the sample with only 1% insertion loss for the 22-mm-diameter waveguide. A clean Gaussian gyrotron beam at the waveguide output and reliable forward power monitoring were achieved for many hours of continuous operation. PMID:17901907

  16. Two-wave photon Doppler velocimetry measurements in direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Lewis J.; Jardine, Andrew P.

    2015-09-01

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently advantages are gained at a significant cost: the fact that input bar data is unavailable removes all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. Recently photon Doppler velocimetry methods have been developed, which can replace strain gauges on Hopkinson bars. In this paper we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system, with the same level of convenience. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and improving the accuracy and convenience of Doppler velocimetry on Hopkinson bars. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains.

  17. Experience with novel technologies for direct measurement of atmospheric NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueglin, Christoph; Hundt, Morten; Mueller, Michael; Schwarzenbach, Beat; Tuzson, Bela; Emmenegger, Lukas

    2017-04-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an air pollutant that has a large impact on human health and ecosystems, and it plays a key role in the formation of ozone and secondary particulate matter. Consequently, legal limit values for NO2 are set in the EU and elsewhere, and atmospheric observation networks typically include NO2 in their measurement programmes. Atmospheric NO2 is principally measured by chemiluminescence detection, an indirect measurement technique that requires conversion of NO2 into nitrogen monoxide (NO) and finally calculation of NO2 from the difference between total nitrogen oxides (NOx) and NO. Consequently, NO2 measurements with the chemiluminescence method have a relatively high measurement uncertainty and can be biased depending on the selectivity of the applied NO2 conversion method. In the past years, technologies for direct and selective measurement of NO2 have become available, e.g. cavity attenuated phase shift spectroscopy (CAPS), cavity enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy and quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometry (QCLAS). These technologies offer clear advantages over the indirect chemiluminescence method. We tested the above mentioned direct measurement techniques for NO2 over extended time periods at atmospheric measurement stations and report on our experience including comparisons with co-located chemiluminescence instruments equipped with molybdenum as well as photolytic NO2 converters. A still open issue related to the direct measurement of NO2 is instrument calibration. Accurate and traceable reference standards and NO2 calibration gases are needed. We present results from the application of different calibration strategies based on the use of static NO2 calibration gases as well as dynamic NO2 calibration gases produced by permeation and by gas-phase titration (GPT).

  18. Feasibility Activities Completed for the Direct Data Distribution (D(sup )3) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wald, Lawrence W.

    2000-01-01

    The Direct Data Distribution (D(sup 3)) project being designed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field will demonstrate a high-performance communications system that transmits information at up to 1.2 gigabits per second (Gbps) from an advanced technology payload carried by the space shuttles in low Earth orbit to small (0.9-m) autonomously tracking terminals on the Earth. The flight communications package features a solid-state, phased-array antenna operating in the commercial K-band frequency that electronically steers two independently controlled downlink beams toward low-cost tracking ground terminals. The array enables agile, vibration-free beam steering at reduced size and weight with increased reliability over traditional mechanically steered reflectors. The flight experiment will also demonstrate efficient digital modulation technology that allows transmission of substantially increased amounts of latency-tolerant data (up to 72 Gb of data per minute of contact time) with very high quality (10(exp -11) bit error rate). D(sup 3) enables transmission from low-Earth-orbit science spacecraft, the shuttles, or the International Space Station directly to NASA field centers and principle investigator sites, or directly into the commercial terrestrial telecommunications network for remote distribution and archive. The ground terminal features a cryocooled receiver for ultralow noise and a reduced antenna aperture as well as open-loop tracking for unattended operations. The D(sup 3) technology validation and service demonstration will help to facilitate NASA's transition from using Government-owned communications assets to using commercially provided services.

  19. Mini-FLOTAC, an Innovative Direct Diagnostic Technique for Intestinal Parasitic Infections: Experience from the Field

    PubMed Central

    Barda, Beatrice Divina; Rinaldi, Laura; Ianniello, Davide; Zepherine, Henry; Salvo, Fulvio; Sadutshang, Tsetan; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Clementi, Massimo; Albonico, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Background Soil-transmitted helminths and intestinal protozoa infection are widespread in developing countries, yet an accurate diagnosis is rarely performed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the recently developed mini–FLOTAC method and to compare with currently more widely used techniques for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections in different settings. Methodology/Principal Findings The study was carried out in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh, India, and in Bukumbi, Tanzania. A total of 180 pupils from two primary schools had their stool analyzed (n = 80 in Dharamsala and n = 100 in Bukumbi) for intestinal parasitic infections with three diagnostic methods: direct fecal smear, formol-ether concentration method (FECM) and mini-FLOTAC. Overall, 72% of the pupils were positive for any intestinal parasitic infection, 24% carried dual infections and 11% three infections or more. The most frequently encountered intestinal parasites were Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Giardia intestinalis, hookworm, (and Schistosoma mansoni, in Tanzania). Statistically significant differences were found in the detection of parasitic infections among the three methods: mini-FLOTAC was the most sensitive method for helminth infections (90% mini-FLOTAC, 60% FECM, and 30% direct fecal smear), whereas FECM was most sensitive for intestinal protozoa infections (88% FECM, 70% direct fecal smear, and 68% mini-FLOTAC). Conclusion/Significance We present the first experiences with the mini-FLOTAC for the diagnosis of intestinal helminths and protozoa. Our results suggest that it is a valid, sensitive and potentially low-cost alternative technique that could be used in resource-limited settings — particularly for helminth diagnosis. PMID:23936577

  20. Molecular diffusion and latex film formation: An analysis of direct nonradiative energy transfer experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongcai; Zhao, Cheng-Le; Winnik, Mitchell A.

    1991-08-01

    The diffusion of polymer molecules across an interface is an important topic in polymer physics. Measuring this diffusion process requires a labeling experiment so that the mixing of otherwise identical molecules can be followed. Here we examine the use of nonradiative energy transfer to follow the interdiffusion of polymer molecules during the annealing of latex films. Those films are prepared from a mixture of phenanthrene (Phe, the donor)- and anthracene(An, the acceptor)-labeled poly(butyl methacrylate) (PBMA) latex particles. We examine in some detail the kinetics of direct energy transfer (DET) at an interface and the evolution of the DET kinetics as the components mix. Time resolved and steady state measurement approaches are compared, and the former is employed to examine molecular diffusion in a series PBMA latex films. Various diffusion models are considered. Diffusion coefficients are calculated by treating the data in terms of a Fickian spherical diffusion model. A film from one set of samples is similar in molecular weight to that studied by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) [K. Hahn, G. Ley, H. Schuller, and R. Oberthur, Colloid Polym. Sci. 264, 1029 (1986)]. Diffusion coefficients calculated from both sets of experiments using similar Fickian diffusion models are very similar in magnitude.

  1. Directed Design of Experiments for Validating Probability of Detection Capability of NDE Systems (DOEPOD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    Directed Design of Experiments for Validating Probability of Detection Capability of NDE Systems (DOEPOD) Manual v.1.2 The capability of an inspection system is established by applications of various methodologies to determine the probability of detection (POD). One accepted metric of an adequate inspection system is that there is 95% confidence that the POD is greater than 90% (90/95 POD). Design of experiments for validating probability of detection capability of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) systems (DOEPOD) is a methodology that is implemented via software to serve as a diagnostic tool providing detailed analysis of POD test data, guidance on establishing data distribution requirements, and resolving test issues. DOEPOD demands utilization of observance of occurrences. The DOEPOD capability has been developed to provide an efficient and accurate methodology that yields observed POD and confidence bounds for both Hit-Miss or signal amplitude testing. DOEPOD does not assume prescribed POD logarithmic or similar functions with assumed adequacy over a wide range of flaw sizes and inspection system technologies, so that multi-parameter curve fitting or model optimization approaches to generate a POD curve are not required. DOEPOD applications for supporting inspector qualifications is included.

  2. Utilizing a TDRS satellite for direct broadcast satellite-radio propagation experiments and demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollansworth, James E.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA/VOA Direct Broadcast Satellite - Radio (DBS-R) Program will be using a NASA Tracking Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) at 62 deg West longitude to conduct live satellite S-band propagation experiments and demonstrations of satellite sound broadcasting over the next two years (1993-1994). The NASA/VOA DBS-R program has applied intensive effort to garner domestic and international support for the DBS-R concept. An S-band DBS-R allocation was achieved for Region 2 at WARC-92 held in Spain. With this allocation, the DBS-R program now needs to conduct S-band propagation experiments and systems demonstrations that will assist in the development of planning approaches for the use of Broadcast Satellite Service (Sound) frequency bands prior to the planning conference called for by WARC-92. These activities will also support receiver concept development applied to qualities ranging from AM to Monophonic FM, Stereophonic FM, Monophonic CD, and Stereophonic CD quality.

  3. Utilizing a TDRS satellite for direct broadcast satellite-radio propagation experiments and demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollansworth, James E.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA/VOA Direct Broadcast Satellite-Radio (DBS-R) Program will be using a NASA Tracking Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) satellite at 62 deg. West longitude to conduct live satellite S-band propagation experiments and demonstrations of satellite sound broadcasting over the next two years (1993-1994). The NASA/VOA DBS-R program has applied intensive effort to garner domestic and international support for the DBS-R concept. An S-band DBS-R allocation was achieved for Region 2 at WARC-92 held in Spain. With this allocation, the DBS-R program now needs to conduct S-band propagation experiments and systems demonstrations that will assist in the development of planning approaches for the use of Broadcast Satellite Service (Sound) frequency bands prior to the planning conference called for by WARC-92. These activities will also support receiver concept development applied to qualities ranging from AM to Monophonic FM, Stereophonic FM, Monophonic CD, and Stereophonic CD quality.

  4. Utilizing a TDRS satellite for direct broadcast satellite-radio propagation experiments and demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollansworth, James E.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA/VOA Direct Broadcast Satellite - Radio (DBS-R) Program will be using a NASA Tracking Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) satellite at 62 deg West longitude to conduct live satellite S-band propagation experiments and demonstrations of satellite sound broadcasting over the next two years (1993-1994). The NASA/VOA DBS-R program has applied intensive effort to garner domestic and international support for the DBS-R concept. An S-band DBS-R allocation was achieved for Region 2 at WARC-92 held in Spain. With this allocation, the DBS-R program now needs to conduct S-band propagation experiments and systems demonstrations that will assist in the development of planning approaches for the use of Broadcast Satellite Service (Sound) frequency bands prior to the planning conference called for by WARC-92. These activities will also support receiver concept development applied to qualities ranging from AM to Monophonic FM, Stereophonic FM, Monophonic CD, and Stereophonic CD quality.

  5. Experiences of disability consumer-directed care users in Australia: results from a longitudinal qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ottmann, Goetz; Laragy, Carmel; Haddon, Michelle

    2009-09-01

    The rapidly growing body of literature suggests that Consumer-directed Care (CDC) has the potential to empower consumers and improve the flexibility and quality of care. However, reports highlighting quality and risk concerns associated with CDC focusing on a longer time frame have been few. This paper presents the findings from a qualitative longitudinal evaluation of an Australian CDC programme. Focusing on the period between 2003 and 2008, it reports on the experiences of 12 families caring for a dependent family member. It is based on two external evaluations completed 6 and 36 months after enrollment, and one internal evaluation completed 48 months after enrollment. The findings were triangulated with internal memos, reports and minutes of meetings, as well as with the theoretical literature. The study demonstrates that CDC harbours considerable benefits for people with disabilities and their carers. However, the study also suggests that, over time, carers may experience an increased sense of isolation and lack of support as a result of their involvement in the CDC programme. The paper argues that the development of safeguards addressing these weaknesses is crucial for the sustainability of CDC programmes in contexts where risk cannot be simply transferred onto consumers.

  6. Microwave experiments simulating quantum search and directed transport in artificial graphene.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Julian; Bellec, Matthieu; Mortessagne, Fabrice; Kuhl, Ulrich; Barkhofen, Sonja; Gehler, Stefan; Stöckmann, Hans-Jürgen; Foulger, Iain; Gnutzmann, Sven; Tanner, Gregor

    2015-03-20

    A series of quantum search algorithms have been proposed recently providing an algebraic speedup compared to classical search algorithms from N to √N, where N is the number of items in the search space. In particular, devising searches on regular lattices has become popular in extending Grover's original algorithm to spatial searching. Working in a tight-binding setup, it could be demonstrated, theoretically, that a search is possible in the physically relevant dimensions 2 and 3 if the lattice spectrum possesses Dirac points. We present here a proof of principle experiment implementing wave search algorithms and directed wave transport in a graphene lattice arrangement. The idea is based on bringing localized search states into resonance with an extended lattice state in an energy region of low spectral density-namely, at or near the Dirac point. The experiment is implemented using classical waves in a microwave setup containing weakly coupled dielectric resonators placed in a honeycomb arrangement, i.e., artificial graphene. Furthermore, we investigate the scaling behavior experimentally using linear chains.

  7. Surveillance or support: The experience of direct observation during tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Bojorquez, Ietza; Salazar, Irais; Garfein, Richard S; Cerecer, Paris; Rodwell, Timothy C

    2016-10-16

    Directly observed therapy (DOT) is a cornerstone of tuberculosis (TB) control. DOT has been criticised as paternalistic, but it has also been argued that the interaction with healthcare workers (HWs) can be a source of support for patients. We explored the experience of patients in antituberculosis treatment, with the aim of understanding the balance between surveillance and support from the recipient's point of view. We interviewed 27 patients in Tijuana, Mexico, employing narrative analysis to understand how participants made sense of their illness and their experience of DOT. We found a core narrative of biographic disruption and self-reconstruction, in which HWs helped participants to attribute a less negative meaning to TB. Interviewees accepted DOT's as necessary for other people to avoid treatment abandonment, but felt that in their case it was unnecessary. Only a few felt that DOT represented mistrust on the part of the HWs. We conclude that DOT can be a source of support when it is enacted in a patient-centred way. We discuss whether participants' lack of criticism of DOT is a case of adaptive preference, in the context of a power differential between patient and health system.

  8. The Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX): Its structure, connection to other international initiatives and future directions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagener, T.; Hogue, T.; Schaake, J.; Duan, Q.; Gupta, H.; Andreassian, V.; Hall, A.; Leavesley, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) is an international project aimed at developing enhanced techniques for the a priori estimation of parameters in hydrological models and in land surface parameterization schemes connected to atmospheric models. The MOPEX science strategy involves: database creation, a priori parameter estimation methodology development, parameter refinement or calibration, and the demonstration of parameter transferability. A comprehensive MOPEX database has been developed that contains historical hydrometeorological data and land surface characteristics data for many hydrological basins in the United States (US) and in other countries. This database is being continuously expanded to include basins from various hydroclimatic regimes throughout the world. MOPEX research has largely been driven by a series of international workshops that have brought interested hydrologists and land surface modellers together to exchange knowledge and experience in developing and applying parameter estimation techniques. With its focus on parameter estimation, MOPEX plays an important role in the international context of other initiatives such as GEWEX, HEPEX, PUB and PILPS. This paper outlines the MOPEX initiative, discusses its role in the scientific community, and briefly states future directions.

  9. Sputtering and redeposition of ion irradiated Au nanoparticle arrays: direct comparison of simulations to experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland-Moritz, Henry; Ilinov, Andrey; Djurabekova, Flyura; Nordlund, Kai; Ronning, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Ion beam processing of surfaces is well known to lead to sputtering, which conventionally is associated only with erosion of atoms from the material. We show here, by combination of experiments and a newly developed Monte Carlo algorithm, that in the case of nanoparticles in a regular two-dimensional array on surfaces, the redeposition of sputtered atoms may play a significant role on the system development. The simulations are directly compared to in situ experiments obtained using a dual focused Ga+ ion beam system and high resolution scanning electron microscopy, and explain the size evolution by a combination of sputtering and redeposition of sputtered material on neighboring particles. The effect is found to be dependent on the size of the nanoparticles: if the nanoparticle size is comparable to the ion range, the reposition is negligible. For larger nanoparticles the redeposition becomes significant and is able to compensate up to 20% of the sputtered material, effectively reducing the process of sputtering. The redeposition may even lead to significant growth: this was seen for the nanoparticles with the sizes much smaller than the ion range. Furthermore, the algorithm shows that significant redeposition is possible when the large size neighboring nanoparticles are present.

  10. Self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Nilson, P. M.; Goncharov, V. N.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-06-13

    Electric and self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments on the OMEGA Laser Facility were investigated employing radiography with ~10- to 60-MeV protons. The experiment used plastic-shell targets with imposed surface defects (glue spots, wires, and mount stalks), which enhance self-generated fields. The fields were measured during the 1-ns laser drive with an on-target intensity ~1015 W/cm2. Proton radiographs show multiple ring-like structures produced by electric fields ~107 V/cm and fine structures from surface defects, indicating self-generated fields up to ~3 MG. These electric and magnetic fields show good agreement with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations when the latter include the ∇Te × ∇ne source, Nernst convection, and anisotropic resistivity. The simulations predict that self-generated fields affect heat fluxes in the conduction zone and, through this, affect the growth of local perturbations.

  11. Self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Nilson, P. M.; Goncharov, V. N.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-06-15

    Electric and self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments on the OMEGA Laser Facility were investigated employing radiography with ∼10- to 60-MeV protons. The experiment used plastic-shell targets with imposed surface defects (glue spots, wires, and mount stalks), which enhance self-generated fields. The fields were measured during the 1-ns laser drive with an on-target intensity ∼10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Proton radiographs show multiple ring-like structures produced by electric fields ∼10{sup 7} V/cm and fine structures from surface defects, indicating self-generated fields up to ∼3 MG. These electric and magnetic fields show good agreement with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations when the latter include the ∇T{sub e} × ∇n{sub e} source, Nernst convection, and anisotropic resistivity. The simulations predict that self-generated fields affect heat fluxes in the conduction zone and, through this, affect the growth of local perturbations.

  12. Investigating the Mechanisms behind Phonotactic Learning from Recent Production Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warker, Jill Anna

    2009-01-01

    Recent research has shown that adults can implicitly learn artificial phonotactics constraints from experience producing syllables that contain those constraints, and that this learning is reflected in their speech errors. However, second-order constraints in which the placement of a consonant depends on another characteristic of the syllable…

  13. Investigating the Mechanisms behind Phonotactic Learning from Recent Production Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warker, Jill Anna

    2009-01-01

    Recent research has shown that adults can implicitly learn artificial phonotactics constraints from experience producing syllables that contain those constraints, and that this learning is reflected in their speech errors. However, second-order constraints in which the placement of a consonant depends on another characteristic of the syllable…

  14. Acute Alcohol Consumption Directly Increases HIV Transmission Risk: A Randomized Controlled Experiment.

    PubMed

    Shuper, Paul A; Joharchi, Narges; Monti, Peter M; Loutfy, Mona; Rehm, Jürgen

    2017-09-18

    Alcohol consumption has frequently been purported as a driver of condomless sex and HIV transmission, but to date, experimental evidence for the causal risk-taking impact of alcohol among HIV-positive populations is lacking. The present experiment sought to determine whether acute alcohol consumption has a direct causal impact on condomless sex intentions among HIV-positive men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM), and to assess whether alcohol's impact differs between MSM who are HIV-positive versus HIV-negative. In a randomized controlled alcohol administration experiment, HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM were brought into a specialized barroom laboratory and randomly assigned to beverage consumption condition: alcohol (target BAC=.080%), placebo alcohol (target BAC=.000%), or water (control). Participants then underwent a video-based sexual arousal manipulation (sexually aroused/non-aroused) and indicated their intentions to engage in condom-protected and condomless sexual acts in a standardized paradigm. The primary outcome entailed intentions to engage in condomless receptive and condomless insertive anal sex. A total of 282 MSM (141 HIV-positive; 141 HIV-negative) completed experimental procedures. MSM who received alcohol reported significantly stronger intentions to engage in condomless sex than those who received placebo alcohol or water (F(1,274)=9.43, p=0.002). The impact of alcohol did not differ between HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM (F(1,274)=1.86, p=0.174). The present investigation entailed the first risk-focused alcohol administration experiment to involve an HIV-positive sample, and results demonstrated that consuming alcohol had an independent, causal impact on intentions to engage in sexual behaviors that can result in HIV transmission. Findings strongly suggest that alcohol-focused initiatives should be incorporated into HIV prevention efforts.

  15. Design and Construction of Experiment for Direct Electron Irradiation of Uranyl Sulfate Solution: Bubble Formation and Thermal Hydraulics Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chemerisov, Sergey; Gromov, Roman; Makarashvili, Vakho; Heltemes, Thad; Sun, Zaijing; Wardle, Kent E.; Bailey, James; Quigley, Kevin; Stepinski, Dominique; Vandegrift, George

    2014-10-01

    Argonne is assisting SHINE Medical Technologies in developing SHINE, a system for producing fission-product 99Mo using a D/T-accelerator to produce fission in a non-critical target solution of aqueous uranyl sulfate. We have developed an experimental setup for studying thermal-hydraulics and bubble formation in the uranyl sulfate solution to simulate conditions expected in the SHINE target solution during irradiation. A direct electron beam from the linac accelerator will be used to irradiate a 20 L solution (sector of the solution vessel). Because the solution will undergo radiolytic decomposition, we will be able to study bubble formation and dynamics and effects of convection and temperature on bubble behavior. These experiments will serve as a verification/ validation tool for the thermal-hydraulic model. Utilization of the direct electron beam for irradiation allows homogeneous heating of a large solution volume and simplifies observation of the bubble dynamics simultaneously with thermal-hydraulic data collection, which will complement data collected during operation of the miniSHINE experiment. Irradiation will be conducted using a 30-40 MeV electron beam from the high-power linac accelerator. The total electron-beam power will be 20 kW, which will yield a power density on the order of 1 kW/L. The solution volume will be cooled on the front and back surfaces and central tube to mimic the geometry of the proposed SHINE solution vessel. Also, multiple thermocouples will be inserted into the solution vessel to map thermal profiles. The experimental design is now complete, and installation and testing are in progress.

  16. Dielectron Production in Heavy Ions Collisions: the HADES Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Garzon; H. Alvarez-Pol; I. Duran; C. Fernandez; B. Fuentes; R. Lorenzo; M. Sanchez; A. Vazquez-Cardesin

    1999-12-31

    HADES (High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer) is being built at UNILAC-SIS in Darmstadt with the main purpose of studying the production of dilepton pairs in nucleus-nucleus collisions at energies of 1AGeV. The spectrometer is briefly described, and the responsibilities of the group from the University of Santiago de Compostela are discussed.

  17. Experience and Grammatical Agreement: Statistical Learning Shapes Number Agreement Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskell, Todd R.; Thornton, Robert; MacDonald, Maryellen C.

    2010-01-01

    A robust result in research on the production of grammatical agreement is that speakers are more likely to produce an erroneous verb with phrases such as "the key to the cabinets", with a singular noun followed by a plural one, than with phrases such as "the keys to the cabinet", where a plural noun is followed by a singular. These asymmetries are…

  18. Experience of production of hollow tubular ingots by electroslag melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dub, V. S.; Levkov, L. Ya.; Shurygin, D. A.; Kriger, Yu. N.; Orlov, S. V.; Markov, S. I.; Nakhabina, M. S.

    2015-06-01

    The manufacture of hollow ingots by electroslag melting is a promising trend in producing high-quality important products for and thermal and nuclear power engineering, petrochemistry, machine building, and some other industries. The prerequisites of development and challenging problems in this field are considered. The results obtained by Russian enterprises are presented.

  19. Experience and Grammatical Agreement: Statistical Learning Shapes Number Agreement Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskell, Todd R.; Thornton, Robert; MacDonald, Maryellen C.

    2010-01-01

    A robust result in research on the production of grammatical agreement is that speakers are more likely to produce an erroneous verb with phrases such as "the key to the cabinets", with a singular noun followed by a plural one, than with phrases such as "the keys to the cabinet", where a plural noun is followed by a singular. These asymmetries are…

  20. Measurements of strangeness production in the STAR experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.K.

    1995-07-15

    Simulations of the ability of the STAR (Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC) detector to measure strangeness production in central Au+Au collisions at RHIC are presented. Emphasis is placed on the reconstruction of short lived particles using a high resolution inner tracker. The prospects for performing neutral kaon interferometry are discussed. Simulation results for measurements of strange and multi-strange baryons are presented.

  1. Resource Based Learning: An Experience in Planning and Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAleese, Ray; Scobbie, John

    A 2-year project at the University of Aberdeen focused on the production of learning materials and the planning of audiovisual based instruction. Background information on the project examines its origins, the nature of course teams, and the evaluation of the five text-tape programs produced. The report specifies three project aims: (1) to produce…

  2. International hospital productivity comparison: experiences from the Nordic countries.

    PubMed

    Medin, Emma; Häkkinen, Unto; Linna, Miika; Anthun, Kjartan S; Kittelsen, Sverre A C; Rehnberg, Clas

    2013-09-01

    This article focuses on describing the methodological challenges intrinsic in international comparative studies of hospital productivity and how these challenges have been addressed within the context of hospital comparisons in the Nordic countries. The hospital sectors in the Nordic countries are suitable for international comparison as they exhibit similar structures in the organisation for hospital care, hold administrative data of good quality at the hospital level, apply a similar secondary patient classification system, and use similar definitions of operating costs. The results of a number of studies have suggested marked differences in hospital cost efficiency and hospital productivity across the Nordic countries and the Finnish hospitals have the highest estimates in all the analyses. Explanatory factors that were tested and seemed to be of limited importance included institutional, structural and technical. A factor that is yet to be included in the Nordic hospital productivity comparison is the quality of care. Patient-level data available from linkable national registers in each country enable the development of quality indicators and will be included in the forthcoming hospital productivity studies within the context of the EuroHOPE (European health care outcomes, performance and efficiency) project. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. BUNDLE - A Novel Furnace for Performing Controlled Directional Solidification Experiments in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrasquillo, Edgar J.; Griffin, Mark R.; Hammond, Monica S.; Johnson, Martin L.; Grugel, R. N.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a novel directional solidification furnace prototype for processing metals and alloys experiments in a microgravity environment. The BUNDLE (Bridgman Unidirectional Dendrite in Liquid Experiment) furnace is intended to accommodate the science requirements of Flight Definition Principle Investigators studying cellular/dendritic growth in aluminum and lead alloys at processing temperatures up to 1200 C. The furnace implements a number of innovative features to achieve high thermal gradients and quench rates in a low-power, light-weight design. These include a pyrolytic boron nitride/graphite composite heating element surrounded by layers of self-supporting refractory metal shielding, and a graphite fiber enhanced cold zone allowing high levels of heat extraction from the sample crucible. Novel to the BUNDLE design is an in-situ helium gas quench capability that ensures rapid freezing of the solidifying region (mushy zone) of the metal sample within the furnace without sample disturbance prior to quenching; this is a stringent requirement for subsequent analysis and understanding of microstructural development. The experiment hardware concept features multiple furnaces that may be "bundled" together so many samples, currently up to eight, can be processed at one time. The design of BUNDLE is flexible enough to be implemented on the Shuttle and Space Station in a number of locations (SpaceHab, Express Rack, MPESS, ISPR, etc). BUNDLE prototype furnaces have directionally solidified and quenched 1cm diameter lead - 5.8 weight percent antimony and aluminum - 4 weight percent copper alloys. Quenching of the mushy zone, as recorded by in-situ thermocouples, occurred on the order of 0.5 seconds or less, a rate within the PI's requirements. Subsequent metallographic examination revealed the solidified microstructure to be, as expected, unidirectional. Both the dendrite tips and the eutectic reaction were planar in nature

  4. BUNDLE: A Novel Furnace for Performing Controlled Directional Solidification Experiments in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrasquillo, Edgar J.; Griffin, Mark R.; Hammond, Monica S.; Johnson, Martin L.; Grugel, R. N.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a novel directional solidification furnace prototype for processing metals and alloys experiments in a microgravity environment. The BUNDLE (Bridgman Unidirectional Dendrite in Liquid Experiment) furnace is intended to accommodate the science requirements of Flight Definition Principle Investigators studying cellular/dendritic growth in aluminum and lead alloys at processing temperatures up to 1200 C. The furnace implements a number of innovative features to achieve high thermal gradients and quench rates in a low-power, light-weight design. These include a pyrolytic boron nitride/graphite composite heating element surrounded by layers of self-supporting refractory metal shielding, and a graphite fiber enhanced cold zone allowing high levels of heat extraction from the sample crucible. Novel to the BUNDLE design is an in-situ helium gas quench capability that ensures rapid freezing of the solidifying region (mushy zone) of the metal sample within the furnace without sample disturbance prior to quenching; this is a stringent requirement for subsequent analysis and understanding of microstructural development. The experiment hardware concept features multiple furnaces that may be "bundled" together so many samples, currently up to eight, can be processed at one time. The design of BUNDLE is flexible enough to be implemented on the Shuttle and Space Station in a number of locations (SpaceHab, Express Rack, MPESS, ISPR, etc). BUNDLE prototype furnaces have directionally solidified and quenched 1cm diameter lead - 5.8 weight percent antimony and aluminum - 4 weight percent copper alloys. Quenching of the mushy zone, as recorded by in-situ thermocouples, occurred on the order of 0.5 seconds or less, a rate within the PI's requirements. Subsequent metallographic examination revealed the solidified microstructure to be, as expected, unidirectional. Both the dendrite tips and the eutectic reaction were planar in nature

  5. BUNDLE: A Novel Furnace for Performing Controlled Directional Solidification Experiments in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrasquillo, Edgar J.; Griffin, Mark R.; Hammond, Monica S.; Johnson, Martin L.; Grugel, R. N.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a novel directional solidification furnace prototype for processing metals and alloys experiments in a microgravity environment. The BUNDLE (Bridgman Unidirectional Dendrite in Liquid Experiment) furnace is intended to accommodate the science requirements of Flight Definition Principle Investigators studying cellular/dendritic growth in aluminum and lead alloys at processing temperatures up to 1200 C. The furnace implements a number of innovative features to achieve high thermal gradients and quench rates in a low-power, light-weight design. These include a pyrolytic boron nitride/graphite composite heating element surrounded by layers of self-supporting refractory metal shielding, and a graphite fiber enhanced cold zone allowing high levels of heat extraction from the sample crucible. Novel to the BUNDLE design is an in-situ helium gas quench capability that ensures rapid freezing of the solidifying region (mushy zone) of the metal sample within the furnace without sample disturbance prior to quenching; this is a stringent requirement for subsequent analysis and understanding of microstructural development. The experiment hardware concept features multiple furnaces that may be "bundled" together so many samples, currently up to eight, can be processed at one time. The design of BUNDLE is flexible enough to be implemented on the Shuttle and Space Station in a number of locations (SpaceHab, Express Rack, MPESS, ISPR, etc). BUNDLE prototype furnaces have directionally solidified and quenched 1cm diameter lead - 5.8 weight percent antimony and aluminum - 4 weight percent copper alloys. Quenching of the mushy zone, as recorded by in-situ thermocouples, occurred on the order of 0.5 seconds or less, a rate within the PI's requirements. Subsequent metallographic examination revealed the solidified microstructure to be, as expected, unidirectional. Both the dendrite tips and the eutectic reaction were planar in nature

  6. BUNDLE - A Novel Furnace for Performing Controlled Directional Solidification Experiments in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrasquillo, Edgar J.; Griffin, Mark R.; Hammond, Monica S.; Johnson, Martin L.; Grugel, R. N.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a novel directional solidification furnace prototype for processing metals and alloys experiments in a microgravity environment. The BUNDLE (Bridgman Unidirectional Dendrite in Liquid Experiment) furnace is intended to accommodate the science requirements of Flight Definition Principle Investigators studying cellular/dendritic growth in aluminum and lead alloys at processing temperatures up to 1200 C. The furnace implements a number of innovative features to achieve high thermal gradients and quench rates in a low-power, light-weight design. These include a pyrolytic boron nitride/graphite composite heating element surrounded by layers of self-supporting refractory metal shielding, and a graphite fiber enhanced cold zone allowing high levels of heat extraction from the sample crucible. Novel to the BUNDLE design is an in-situ helium gas quench capability that ensures rapid freezing of the solidifying region (mushy zone) of the metal sample within the furnace without sample disturbance prior to quenching; this is a stringent requirement for subsequent analysis and understanding of microstructural development. The experiment hardware concept features multiple furnaces that may be "bundled" together so many samples, currently up to eight, can be processed at one time. The design of BUNDLE is flexible enough to be implemented on the Shuttle and Space Station in a number of locations (SpaceHab, Express Rack, MPESS, ISPR, etc). BUNDLE prototype furnaces have directionally solidified and quenched 1cm diameter lead - 5.8 weight percent antimony and aluminum - 4 weight percent copper alloys. Quenching of the mushy zone, as recorded by in-situ thermocouples, occurred on the order of 0.5 seconds or less, a rate within the PI's requirements. Subsequent metallographic examination revealed the solidified microstructure to be, as expected, unidirectional. Both the dendrite tips and the eutectic reaction were planar in nature

  7. Evaluating the Productive Ward at an acute NHS trust: experiences and implications of releasing time to care.

    PubMed

    Wright, Stella; McSherry, Wilfred

    2014-07-01

    To demonstrate how a national programme aimed to increase the amount of direct time nurses spend with patients', impacts on both staff and patient experience. The Productive Ward is an improvement programme developed by the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement (2007, http://www.institute.nhs.uk/quality_and_value/productivity_series/productive_ward.html) which aims to enable nurses to work more efficiently by reviewing process and practice, thus releasing more time to spend on direct patient care. However, there is little empirical published research around the programme, particularly concerning impact, sustainability and the patient perspective. This manuscript presents the findings from qualitative interviews involving both staff and patients. Semi-structured one-to-one interviews were conducted with patients (n = 8) and staff (n = 5) on five case study wards. Seven focus groups were held according to staff grade (n = 29). Despite initial scepticism, most staff embraced the opportunity and demonstrated genuine enthusiasm and energy for the programme. Patients were generally complimentary about their experience as an inpatient, reporting that staff made them feel safe, comfortable and cared for. Findings showed that the aims of the programme were partially met. The implementation of Productive Ward was associated with significant changes to the ward environment and improvements for staff. The programme equipped staff with skills and knowledge which acted as a primer for subsequent interventions. However, there was a lack of evidence to demonstrate that Productive Ward released time for direct patient care in all areas that implemented the programme. Developing robust performance indicators including a system to capture reinvestment of direct care time would enable frontline staff to demonstrate impact of the programme. Additionally, staff will need to ensure that reorganisation and instability across the NHS do not affect sustainability and viability of the

  8. Directed evolution toward improved production of L-ribose from ribitol.

    PubMed

    Christ, Trevor N; Deweese, Kara A; Woodyer, Ryan D

    2010-05-01

    Improvement of the one-step production of L-ribose from ribitol using a recombinant Escherichia coli is described. The gene encoding the enzyme mannitol-1-dehydrogenase (MDH) from Apium graveolens has previously been codon-optimized, cloned into the constitutive pZuc10 vector, and expressed in E. coli. This MDH catalyzes the NAD-dependent conversion of mannitol to D-mannose and has the ability to convert several polyols to their L-sugar counterparts, including ribitol to L-ribose. Here, three rounds of directed evolution using libraries generated through error-prone PCR and screened using a dinitrosalicylate reagent were prepared. Mutants were selected for improved conversion of L-ribose, and the best mutant was isolated by combining two round 2 mutations. Libraries were also selected for thermal stability and screened at increasingly higher temperatures with each round of mutagenesis. An overall 19.2-fold improvement was observed with a final conversion of 46.6 +/- 1.7% and a productivity of 3.88 +/- 0.14 gL(-1)d(-1) in 50 mL shaken flasks at 34 degrees C. Further characterization of the mutants suggests that increased enzyme thermal stability and expression are responsible for the increase in L-ribose production. The mutant E. coli production strain isolated represents an improved system for large-scale production of L-ribose.

  9. Direct detection of enzyme-catalyzed products by FET sensor with ferrocene-modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Ishige, Yu; Takeda, Sizu; Kamahori, Masao

    2010-12-15

    An FET-based biosensor with a ferrocene-modified gold electrode detects the enzyme-produced electrons by using mediators that transfer the electrons from the enzyme to the sensor. Since an extended-gate FET sensor with a light-shielding mask can be operated without a light-shielding box, a small portable instrument will soon be realised. However, when the FET sensor detected enzyme-catalyzed products with the mediators under light conditions, measurements fluctuated due to photo-reduction of the mediators, resulting in decreased sensitivity. To improve sensitivity by reducing the fluctuation, we developed a procedure for directly detecting enzyme-catalyzed products without using the mediators. The key technique used in this procedure was a measurement technique using our developed potential-keeping method, in which the modified electrode of the FET sensor was oxidised by ferricyanide solution to make its surface the same high potential every time, and this high potential was kept until measurement because of the high input impedance of the FET structure. After this method was applied, the interfacial potential of the gold electrode decreased depending on the amount of enzyme-catalyzed products due to the ferrocene molecules immobilised on the gold electrode directly reacting with the products. The results obtained in light conditions indicated that model compounds of the products were detected from 10 μM to 10 mM with the Nernstian response of 59.2 mV/decade. Also, this method was applied to pesticide detection by using the enzyme inhibition by pesticide, and 5 ppb of diazinon was successfully detected by using only a sensor chip. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Revocation of status of specific products; Group A streptococcus. Direct final rule.

    PubMed

    2005-12-02

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is removing the regulation applicable to the status of specific products; Group A streptococcus. FDA is removing the regulation because the existing requirement for Group A streptococcus organisms and derivatives is both obsolete and a perceived impediment to the development of Group A streptococcus vaccines. The regulation was written to apply to a group of products that are no longer on the market. We are taking this action as part of our continuing effort to reduce the burden of unnecessary regulations on industry and to revise outdated regulations without diminishing public health protection. We are issuing the removal directly as a final rule because it is noncontroversial, and there is little likelihood that we will receive any significant adverse comments. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, we are publishing a companion proposed rule under our usual procedures for notice and comment in the event that we receive any significant adverse comments on the direct final rule. If we receive any significant adverse comments that warrant terminating the direct final rule, we will consider such comments on the proposed rule in developing the final rule.

  11. Directional and Spectral Irradiance in Ocean Models: Effects on Simulated Global Phytoplankton, Nutrients, and Primary Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Rousseaux, Cecile S.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of including directional and spectral light in simulations of ocean radiative transfer was investigated using a coupled biogeochemical-circulation-radiative model of the global oceans. The effort focused on phytoplankton abundances, nutrient concentrations and vertically-integrated net primary production. The importance was approached by sequentially removing directional (i.e., direct vs. diffuse) and spectral irradiance and comparing results of the above variables to a fully directionally and spectrally-resolved model. In each case the total irradiance was kept constant; it was only the pathways and spectral nature that were changed. Assuming all irradiance was diffuse had negligible effect on global ocean primary production. Global nitrate and total chlorophyll concentrations declined by about 20% each. The largest changes occurred in the tropics and sub-tropics rather than the high latitudes, where most of the irradiance is already diffuse. Disregarding spectral irradiance had effects that depended upon the choice of attenuation wavelength. The wavelength closest to the spectrally-resolved model, 500 nm, produced lower nitrate (19%) and chlorophyll (8%) and higher primary production (2%) than the spectral model. Phytoplankton relative abundances were very sensitive to the choice of non-spectral wavelength transmittance. The combined effects of neglecting both directional and spectral irradiance exacerbated the differences, despite using attenuation at 500 nm. Global nitrate decreased 33% and chlorophyll decreased 24%. Changes in phytoplankton community structure were considerable, representing a change from chlorophytes to cyanobacteria and coccolithophores. This suggested a shift in community function, from light-limitation to nutrient limitation: lower demands for nutrients from cyanobacteria and coccolithophores favored them over the more nutrient-demanding chlorophytes. Although diatoms have the highest nutrient demands in the model, their

  12. Open-source products for a lighting experiment device.

    PubMed

    Gildea, Kevin M; Milburn, Nelda

    2014-12-01

    The capabilities of open-source software and microcontrollers were used to construct a device for controlled lighting experiments. The device was designed to ascertain whether individuals with certain color vision deficiencies were able to discriminate between the red and white lights in fielded systems on the basis of luminous intensity. The device provided the ability to control the timing and duration of light-emitting diode (LED) and incandescent light stimulus presentations, to present the experimental sequence and verbal instructions automatically, to adjust LED and incandescent luminous intensity, and to display LED and incandescent lights with various spectral emissions. The lighting device could easily be adapted for experiments involving flashing or timed presentations of colored lights, or the components could be expanded to study areas such as threshold light perception and visual alerting systems.

  13. Directed natural product biosynthesis gene cluster capture and expression in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxin; Li, Zhongrui; Yamanaka, Kazuya; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Weipeng; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto; Moore, Bradley S.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-03-01

    Bacilli are ubiquitous low G+C environmental Gram-positive bacteria that produce a wide assortment of specialized small molecules. Although their natural product biosynthetic potential is high, robust molecular tools to support the heterologous expression of large biosynthetic gene clusters in Bacillus hosts are rare. Herein we adapt transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast to design a single genomic capture and expression vector for antibiotic production in Bacillus subtilis. After validating this direct cloning ``plug-and-play'' approach with surfactin, we genetically interrogated amicoumacin biosynthetic gene cluster from the marine isolate Bacillus subtilis 1779. Its heterologous expression allowed us to explore an unusual maturation process involving the N-acyl-asparagine pro-drug intermediates preamicoumacins, which are hydrolyzed by the asparagine-specific peptidase into the active component amicoumacin A. This work represents the first direct cloning based heterologous expression of natural products in the model organism B. subtilis and paves the way to the development of future genome mining efforts in this genus.

  14. High-Purity Composite Briquette for Direct UMG-Si Production in Arc Furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perruchoud, Raymond; Fischer, Jean-Claude

    2013-12-01

    In metallurgical grade Si (MG-Si), the coal (B) and charcoal (P) contents are on average above 30 ppm as the carbon reduction materials used in the arc furnace are either rich in B or in P. A decrease of both impurities by a factor of 3 using purer raw materials would allow for the direct production of the upgraded metallurgical grade (UMG).This would significantly improve the efficiency of the resulting photovoltaic (PV) cells made with the refined solar grade silicon (SoG-Si) or massively decrease the costs of Si purification by shortening the number of steps needed for reaching B and P contents below 1 ppm requested for the SoG-Si used for the PV cells. A composite C/SiO2 briquette fulfilling the purity targets for the direct production of UMG-Si in the arc furnace was developed. The composite contains several carbon materials with different levels of reactivities and quartz sand. The raw materials aspects, the paste and briquette preparation, as well as the final carbonization step are discussed. The finished briquettes are free of volatiles and are mechanically and thermally very stable, thus, ensuring stable arc furnace charges with minimum losses of dust and SiO gas. Semi-industrial trials including the downstream purification steps for the production of SoG-Si by a metallurgical low-cost route are contemplated.

  15. Direct Measurements of the Local Ozone Production Rate in the Pollution Outflow from a Megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crilley, L.; Kramer, L. J.; Woodward-Massey, R.; Cryer, D. R.; Whalley, L. K.; Heard, D. E.; Reeves, C.; Forster, G.; Oram, D.; Bandy, B.; Reed, C.; Lee, J. D.; Bloss, W.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is major secondary air pollutant that is formed in the atmosphere through the complex oxidation of volatile organic carbon compounds (VOCs) in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sunlight. In order to effectively implement control measures to reduce O3 levels, it is necessary to understand the chemical processes that in part govern O3 concentration, and to disaggregate local chemical O3 production from transport. To address this issue, a major field campaign was organised at the Weybourne Atmospheric Observatory (WAO), a coastal site in the UK that is regularly within the pollution outflow from London and Western Europe. As part of this campaign, a novel approach to directly measure in situ the rate of local O3 production was employed along with a range of instrumentation to measure concentrations of different radical species as well as with detailed VOC and NOx speciation. We will present preliminary findings from a major O3 pollution event (~120 ppb) that occurred during the campaign as a case study for investigating the contributing factors influencing O3 formation at a NOx limited site. Direct measurements of local chemical O3 production rates are compared with those inferred from a range of indirect approaches.

  16. Engineering cyanobacteria for photosynthetic production of 3-hydroxybutyrate directly from CO2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Pugh, Shawn; Nielsen, David R; Zhang, Weiwen; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2013-03-01

    (S)- and (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) are precursors to synthesize the biodegradable plastics polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) and many fine chemicals. To date, however, their production has been restricted to petroleum-based chemical industry and sugar-based microbial fermentation, limiting its sustainability and economical feasibility. With the ability to fix CO2 photosynthetically, cyanobacteria have attracted increasing interest as a biosynthesis platform to produce fuels and chemicals from alternative renewable resources. To this end, synthesis metabolic pathways have been constructed and optimized in cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 to photosynthetically produce (S)- and (R)-3HB directly from CO2. Both types of 3HB molecules were produced and readily secreted from Synechocystis cells without over-expression of transporters. Additional inactivation of the competing pathway by deleting slr1829 and slr1830 (encoding PHB polymerase) from the Synechocystis genome further promoted the 3HB production. Up to 533.4mg/L 3HB has been produced after photosynthetic cultivation of the engineered cyanobacterium Synechocystis TABd for 21 days. Further analysis indicated that the phosphate consumption during the photoautrophic growth and the concomitant elevated acetyl-CoA pool acted as a key driving force for 3HB biosynthesis in Synechocystis. For the first time, the study has demonstrated the feasibility of photosynthetic production of (S)- and (R)-3HB directly from sunlight and CO2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Experiments With Recirculating Target for F-18 Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, M. Y.

    2003-08-01

    Approximately 10 ml of O-18 water was loaded in an apparatus containing a 5 ml storage vessel, pump, silver target attached to a cyclotron, filter, backpressure regulator, conductivity meter, several valves and ion exchange cartridges. The water was continuously pumped through the target during proton bombardment at a rate 5 ml/min. Continuous irradiation with beam current ranging from 10 to 50 uA was conducted while pressure, temperature and conductivity were continuously monitored. The results indicate that recirculating of the target water can increase production of F-18 in relation to consumed O-18 water material. It can also increase productivity by eliminating idle periods for re-filling the target. A backpressure regulator can precisely control target pressure. This method also allows for continuous monitoring of the target material temperature, pressure, conductivity and accumulated radioactivity. Results of these observations provide important information about target performance and physical processes taking place inside the target.

  18. China experiments with solar-thermal power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Margaret

    2009-04-01

    Construction is due to start later this month on an experimental solar-thermal power plant in the shadow of China's Great Wall that will bring clean energy to 30 000 households by 2010. Built on the outskirts of Beijing at a cost of £10m, the 1.5MW Dahan plant will cover an area the size of 10 football pitches, and will serve as a platform for experiments on different solar-power technologies.

  19. Gender as a Context for Interpreting the Self-Directed Learning Experiences of Prostate and Breast Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rager, Kathleen B.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports the findings from a secondary analysis of the data from two qualitative studies conducted by the researcher regarding the self-directed learning experiences of prostate and breast cancer patients. Of interest were possible differences in the descriptions of the participants' experiences that appear to relate to gender.…

  20. Gender as a Context for Interpreting the Self-Directed Learning Experiences of Prostate and Breast Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rager, Kathleen B.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports the findings from a secondary analysis of the data from two qualitative studies conducted by the researcher regarding the self-directed learning experiences of prostate and breast cancer patients. Of interest were possible differences in the descriptions of the participants' experiences that appear to relate to gender.…

  1. Direct and selective production of propene from bio-ethanol on Sc-loaded IN2O3 catalysts.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masakazu; Mizuno, Shouta; Tanaka, Masashi

    2013-05-27

    Propene, one of key building blocks for manufacturing plastics and chemicals, could be directly and stably produced from ethanol in good yields. The conversion degree of ethanol to propene reached approximately 60 mol% by using a 3 atom% scandium-loaded indium oxide catalyst at 823 K in the presence of water and hydrogen. The introduction of Sc prevented the reduction of In2O3 to In metal during the reaction, and that of water decreased the coke formation. Both additions resulted in longer lifetimes of the catalysts. The hydrogen addition increased the conversion of acetone to propene. The reaction pathways are also suggested on the basis of the product distributions and the pulse experiments, ethanol→acetaldehyde→acetone→propene, which is quite different from the shape-selective catalysis on zeolites and the dimerization-metathesis of ethene on nickel ion-loaded silica catalysts.

  2. Experiments on the dynamics and sedimentary products of glacier slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, Neal R.; Zoet, Lucas K.

    2015-09-01

    Experimental work in glacial geomorphology is focused almost entirely on processes in the thin shear zone at the beds of sliding glaciers, where ice at its pressure-melting temperature moves over either rigid rock or deformable till. Experiments with rotary shear devices illuminate constitutive behavior there, central to the dynamics of fast-moving glaciers, and provide a foundation for interpreting the sedimentary record of glacier slip and associated sediment transport. Results from experiments designed to study ice sliding over a rigid wavy bed, shear deformation of till, and plowing of clasts across the surface of a till bed point to a common conclusion: drag at the bed can decrease with increasing slip velocity, thereby concentrating driving stress elsewhere and promoting rapid glacier flow. This rate-weakening behavior at glacier beds is in contrast to the viscous slip resistance assumed in ice-sheet models and most efforts to determine distributions of basal drag from glacier surface velocities. Ring-shear experiments in which various basal tills and more idealized materials are sheared to high strains provide quantitative insight into grain size evolution, mixing at contacts between basal tills, microstructure development, particle-fabric development, and development of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility. Preferred orientations of principal magnetic susceptibilities provide the most dependable and complete description of till shear patterns. When applied to basal tills of the geologic record, magnetic till fabrics measured along thick till sections and calibrated experimentally indicate that deformation of the bed by two lobes of the Laurentide ice sheet was shallow (< 1 m), patchy, and occurred as till progressively accreted. Rates of sediment transport by bed shear were thus significantly less than estimates based on models that invoke deep, pervasive shear of the bed. The lack of an experimental tradition in glacial geomorphology leaves many research

  3. Experience with OMCVD production of GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Y. C. M.; Iles, P. A.; Ho, P.; Ling, K. S.

    1985-01-01

    The projected promise of the OMCVD approach, i.e., to make high efficiency GaAs space cells, has been demonstrated. The properties and control of the deposited GaAs and AlGaAs layers and the uniformity of the post layer processing have been most satisfactory. In particular the control of the critical thin layers (p-GaAs, p-AlGaAs) has been impressive. Experience has also been gained in routine areas, connected with continuous operation at high capacity. There are still a few areas for improvement, to further increase capacity, and to anticipate and prevent mechanical equipment problems.

  4. Impact of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) on the operative experience of surgery residents.

    PubMed

    Hopmans, Cornelis J; den Hoed, Pieter T; van der Laan, Lijckle; van der Harst, Erwin; van der Elst, Maarten; Mannaerts, Guido H H; Dawson, Imro; Timman, Reinier; Wijnhoven, Bas P L; IJzermans, Jan N M

    2015-04-01

    In Europe and the United States, work hour restrictions are considered to be particularly burdensome for residents in surgery specialties. The aim of this study was to examine whether reduction of the work week to 48 hours resulting from the implementation of the European Working Time Directive has affected the operative experience of surgery residents. This study was conducted in a general surgery training region in the Netherlands, consisting of 1 university hospital and 6 district training hospitals. Operating records summarizing the surgical procedures performed as "primary surgeon" in the operating theater for different grades of surgeons were retrospectively analyzed for the period 2005-2012 by the use of linear regression models. Operative procedures performed by residents were considered the main outcome measure. In total, 235,357 operative procedures were performed, including 47,458 (20.2%) in the university hospital and 187,899 (79.8%) in the district training hospitals (n = 5). For residents in the university hospital, the mean number of operative procedures performed per 1.0 full-time equivalent increased from 128 operations in 2005 to 204 operations in 2012 (P = .001), whereas for residents in district training hospitals, no substantial differences were found over time. The mean (±SD) operative caseload of 64 residents who completed the 6-year training program between 2005 and 2012 was 1,391 ± 226 (range, 768-1856). A comparison of the operative caseload according to year of board-certification showed no difference. Implementation of the European Working Time Directive has not affected adversely the number of surgical procedures performed by residents within a general surgical training region in the Netherlands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Early experience with digital advance care planning and directives, a novel consumer-driven program

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiyong; Spivey, Christy; Boardman, Bonnie; Courtney, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Barriers to traditional advance care planning (ACP) and advance directive (AD) creation have limited the promise of ACP/AD for individuals and families, the healthcare team, and society. Our objectives were to determine the results of a digital ACP/AD through which consumers create, store, locate, and retrieve their ACP/AD at no charge and with minimal physician involvement, and the ACP/AD can be integrated into the electronic health record. The authors chose 900 users of MyDirectives, a digital ACP/AD tool, to achieve proportional representation of all 50 states by population size and then reviewed their responses. The 900 participants had an average age of 50.8 years (SD = 16.6); 84% of the men and 91% of the women were in self-reported good health when signing their ADs. Among the respondents, 94% wanted their physicians to consult a supportive and palliative care team if they were seriously ill; nearly 85% preferred cessation of life-sustaining treatments during their final days; 76% preferred to spend their final days at home or in a hospice; and 70% would accept attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation in limited circumstances. Most respondents wanted an autopsy under certain conditions, and 62% wished to donate their organs. In conclusion, analysis of early experience with this ACP/AD platform demonstrates that individuals of different ages and conditions can engage in an interrogatory process about values, develop ADs that are more nuanced than traditional paper-based ADs in reflecting those values, and easily make changes to their ADs. Online ADs have the potential to remove barriers to ACP/AD and thus further improve patient-centered end-of-life care. PMID:27365867

  6. Production of defects in metals by collision cascades: TEM experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews experimental TEM data on production of dislocation loops by low energy ion bombardment to low doses, as simulations of similar collision cascades produced by fast neutrons, in various metals and alloys. Dependence of vacancy dislocation loop formation on recoil energy, temperature and metal/alloy is examined. Emphasis is placed on effects on dilute alloy additions. A model for cascade melting is used to understand these effects; this will require an examination of the role of electron-phonon coupling in cascade cooling and recrystallization. Formation of interstitial dislocation loops as cascade defects and the effect of nearby surfaces are briefly discussed.

  7. Direct observation of unimolecular decay of CH3CH2CHOO Criegee intermediates to OH radical products.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi; Liu, Fang; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Lester, Marsha I

    2016-07-28

    The unimolecular decay of carbonyl oxide intermediates, known as Criegee intermediates, produced in alkene ozonolysis is a significant source of OH radicals in the troposphere. Here, the rate of appearance of OH radical products is examined directly in the time-domain for a prototypical alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediate, CH3CH2CHOO, following vibrational activation under collision-free conditions. Complementary statistical Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations of the microcanonical unimolecular decay rate for CH3CH2CHOO are also carried out at energies in the vicinity of the barrier for 1,4 hydrogen atom transfer that leads to OH products. Tunneling through the barrier, derived from high level electronic structure calculations, contributes significantly to the decay rate. Infrared transitions of CH3CH2CHOO are identified in the CH stretch overtone region, which are detected by ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence of the resultant OH products. The features observed are attributed to CH vibrational excitations and conformational forms utilizing insights from theory. Both experiment and theory yield unimolecular decay rates for CH3CH2CHOO of ca. 10(7) s(-1), which are slower than those obtained for syn-CH3CHOO or (CH3)2COO reported previously [Fang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 061102 (2016)] at similar energies. Master equation modeling is also utilized to predict the thermal decay rate of CH3CH2CHOO under atmospheric conditions, giving a rate of 279 s(-1) at 298 K.

  8. Direct observation of unimolecular decay of CH3CH2CHOO Criegee intermediates to OH radical products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yi; Liu, Fang; Klippenstein, Stephen J.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2016-07-01

    The unimolecular decay of carbonyl oxide intermediates, known as Criegee intermediates, produced in alkene ozonolysis is a significant source of OH radicals in the troposphere. Here, the rate of appearance of OH radical products is examined directly in the time-domain for a prototypical alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediate, CH3CH2CHOO, following vibrational activation under collision-free conditions. Complementary statistical Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations of the microcanonical unimolecular decay rate for CH3CH2CHOO are also carried out at energies in the vicinity of the barrier for 1,4 hydrogen atom transfer that leads to OH products. Tunneling through the barrier, derived from high level electronic structure calculations, contributes significantly to the decay rate. Infrared transitions of CH3CH2CHOO are identified in the CH stretch overtone region, which are detected by ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence of the resultant OH products. The features observed are attributed to CH vibrational excitations and conformational forms utilizing insights from theory. Both experiment and theory yield unimolecular decay rates for CH3CH2CHOO of ca. 107 s-1, which are slower than those obtained for syn-CH3CHOO or (CH3)2COO reported previously [Fang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 061102 (2016)] at similar energies. Master equation modeling is also utilized to predict the thermal decay rate of CH3CH2CHOO under atmospheric conditions, giving a rate of 279 s-1 at 298 K.

  9. A comparison of microwave versus direct solar heating for lunar brick production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yankee, S. J.; Strenski, D. G.; Pletka, B. J.; Patil, D. S.; Mutsuddy, B. C.

    1990-01-01

    Two processing techniques considered suitable for producing bricks from lunar regolith are examined: direct solar heating and microwave heating. An analysis was performed to compare the two processes in terms of the amount of power and time required to fabricate bricks of various sizes. Microwave heating was shown to be significantly faster than solar heating for rapid production of realistic-size bricks. However, the relative simplicity of the solar collector(s) used for the solar furnace compared to the equipment necessary for microwave generation may present an economic tradeoff.

  10. Earth Science System of the Future: Observing, Processing, and Delivering Data Products Directly to Users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, David; Komar, George (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Advancement of our predictive capabilities will require new scientific knowledge, improvement of our modeling capabilities, and new observation strategies to generate the complex data sets needed by coupled modeling networks. New observation strategies must support remote sensing from a variety of vantage points and will include "sensorwebs" of small satellites in low Earth orbit, large aperture sensors in Geostationary orbits, and sentinel satellites at L1 and L2 to provide day/night views of the entire globe. Onboard data processing and high speed computing and communications will enable near real-time tailoring and delivery of information products (i.e., predictions) directly to users.

  11. Standard Preparations, Limits of Potency, and Dating Period Limitations for Biological Products. Direct final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-05-04

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency or we) is amending the general biological products standards relating to dating periods and also removing certain standards relating to standard preparations and limits of potency. FDA is taking this action to update outdated requirements, and accommodate new and evolving technology and testing capabilities, without diminishing public health protections. This action is part of FDA's retrospective review of its regulations in response to an Executive order. FDA is issuing these amendments directly as a final rule because the Agency believes they are noncontroversial and FDA anticipates no significant adverse comments.

  12. Direct Monte Carlo simulation of the chemical equilibrium composition of detonation products

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, M.S.

    1993-06-01

    A new Monte Carlo simulation method has been developed by the author which gives the equilibrium chemical composition of a molecular fluid directly. The usual NPT ensemble (isothermal-isobaric) is implemented with N being the number of atoms instead of molecules. Changes in chemical composition are treated as correlated spatial moves of atoms. Given the interaction potentials between molecular products, ``exact`` EOS points including the equilibrium chemical composition can be determined from the simulations. This method is applied to detonation products at conditions in the region near the Chapman- Jouget state. For the example of NO, it is shown that the CJ detonation velocity can be determined to a few meters per second. A rather small change in cross potentials is shown to shift the chemical equilibrium and the CJ conditions significantly.

  13. The direct production of a neutralino with the lightest chargino in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, Mehmet

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the direct production of a neutralino with the lightest chargino in a proton-proton collision at the Large Hadron Collider is analyzed in the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), focusing on the Higgsino and gaugino component of the neutralinos and charginos. The dependence of total cross section on the chargino mass is presented for the center of mass energies of 8, 14 and 20 TeV. The results show that the total cross section is clearly dependent on the Higgsino/gaugino decomposition of the charginos and neutralinos. In the most promising scenarios, the total cross section of neutralino-chargino production can reach a few thousand of fb.

  14. Direct contribution of the seagrass Thalassia testudinum to lime mud production

    PubMed Central

    Enríquez, Susana; Schubert, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Seagrass beds contribute to oceanic carbonate lime mud production by providing a habitat for a wide variety of calcifying organisms and acting as efficient sediment traps. Here we provide evidence for the direct implication of Thalassia testudinum in the precipitation of aragonite needles. The crystals are located internally in the cell walls, and as external deposits on the blade, and are similar in size and shape to the aragonite needles reported for modern tropical carbonate factories. Seagrass calcification is a biological, light-enhanced process controlled by the leaf, and estimates of seagrass annual carbonate production in a Caribbean reef lagoon are as significant as values reported for Halimeda incrassata. Thus, we conclude that seagrass calcification is another biological source for the aragonite lime mud deposits found in tropical banks, and that tropical seagrass habitats may play a more important role in the oceanic carbon cycle than previously considered. PMID:24848374

  15. Cobalt carbide nanoprisms for direct production of lower olefins from syngas.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Liangshu; Yu, Fei; An, Yunlei; Zhao, Yonghui; Sun, Yuhan; Li, Zhengjia; Lin, Tiejun; Lin, Yanjun; Qi, Xingzhen; Dai, Yuanyuan; Gu, Lin; Hu, Jinsong; Jin, Shifeng; Shen, Qun; Wang, Hui

    2016-10-06

    Lower olefins-generally referring to ethylene, propylene and butylene-are basic carbon-based building blocks that are widely used in the chemical industry, and are traditionally produced through thermal or catalytic cracking of a range of hydrocarbon feedstocks, such as naphtha, gas oil, condensates and light alkanes. With the rapid depletion of the limited petroleum reserves that serve as the source of these hydrocarbons, there is an urgent need for processes that can produce lower olefins from alternative feedstocks. The 'Fischer-Tropsch to olefins' (FTO) process has long offered a way of producing lower olefins directly from syngas-a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide that is readily derived from coal, biomass and natural gas. But the hydrocarbons obtained with the FTO process typically follow the so-called Anderson-Schulz-Flory distribution, which is characterized by a maximum C2-C4 hydrocarbon fraction of about 56.7 per cent and an undesired methane fraction of about 29.2 per cent (refs 1, 10, 11, 12). Here we show that, under mild reaction conditions, cobalt carbide quadrangular nanoprisms catalyse the FTO conversion of syngas with high selectivity for the production of lower olefins (constituting around 60.8 per cent of the carbon products), while generating little methane (about 5.0 per cent), with the ratio of desired unsaturated hydrocarbons to less valuable saturated hydrocarbons amongst the C2-C4 products being as high as 30. Detailed catalyst characterization during the initial reaction stage and theoretical calculations indicate that preferentially exposed {101} and {020} facets play a pivotal role during syngas conversion, in that they favour olefin production and inhibit methane formation, and thereby render cobalt carbide nanoprisms a promising new catalyst system for directly converting syngas into lower olefins.

  16. Cobalt carbide nanoprisms for direct production of lower olefins from syngas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Liangshu; Yu, Fei; An, Yunlei; Zhao, Yonghui; Sun, Yuhan; Li, Zhengjia; Lin, Tiejun; Lin, Yanjun; Qi, Xingzhen; Dai, Yuanyuan; Gu, Lin; Hu, Jinsong; Jin, Shifeng; Shen, Qun; Wang, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Lower olefins—generally referring to ethylene, propylene and butylene—are basic carbon-based building blocks that are widely used in the chemical industry, and are traditionally produced through thermal or catalytic cracking of a range of hydrocarbon feedstocks, such as naphtha, gas oil, condensates and light alkanes. With the rapid depletion of the limited petroleum reserves that serve as the source of these hydrocarbons, there is an urgent need for processes that can produce lower olefins from alternative feedstocks. The ‘Fischer-Tropsch to olefins’ (FTO) process has long offered a way of producing lower olefins directly from syngas—a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide that is readily derived from coal, biomass and natural gas. But the hydrocarbons obtained with the FTO process typically follow the so-called Anderson-Schulz-Flory distribution, which is characterized by a maximum C2-C4 hydrocarbon fraction of about 56.7 per cent and an undesired methane fraction of about 29.2 per cent (refs 1, 10, 11, 12). Here we show that, under mild reaction conditions, cobalt carbide quadrangular nanoprisms catalyse the FTO conversion of syngas with high selectivity for the production of lower olefins (constituting around 60.8 per cent of the carbon products), while generating little methane (about 5.0 per cent), with the ratio of desired unsaturated hydrocarbons to less valuable saturated hydrocarbons amongst the C2-C4 products being as high as 30. Detailed catalyst characterization during the initial reaction stage and theoretical calculations indicate that preferentially exposed {101} and {020} facets play a pivotal role during syngas conversion, in that they favour olefin production and inhibit methane formation, and thereby render cobalt carbide nanoprisms a promising new catalyst system for directly converting syngas into lower olefins.

  17. Inflammatory markers and adipokines alter adipocyte-derived ASP production through direct and indirect immune interaction.

    PubMed

    Lu, H; Gauvreau, D; Tom, F-Q; Lapointe, M; Luo, X P; Cianflone, K

    2013-04-01

    Obesity and related metabolic diseases are associated with chronic low-grade inflammation, characterized by increased pro-inflammatory proteins. Several studies have demonstrated increases in acylation stimulating protein (ASP) and its precursor protein C3 in obesity, diabetes and dyslipidemia. To evaluate the effects of acute inflammatory factors and adipokines on ASP production and potential mechanisms of action, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated for 24 h with adipokines, cytokines, macrophage-conditioned media and direct co-culture with J774 macrophages. ASP and C3 in the media were evaluated in relation to changes in adipocyte lipid metabolism (cellular triglyceride stores). Leptin, adiponectin, IL-10, LPS and TNF-α increased ASP production (151%, 153%, 190%, 318%, 134%, P<0.05, respectively,). C5a and RANTES (Regulated and normal T cell expressed and secreted) decreased ASP production ( - 34%, - 47%, P<0.05), which was also associated with a decrease in the precursor protein C3 ( - 39% to - 51%, P<0.01), while keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC; murine IL-8 ortholog) had no effect on ASP and C3 secretion. By contrast, apelin, omentin and visfatin also decreased ASP ( - 27%, - 49%, - 22%, P<0.05), but without changes in precursor protein C3 secretion. Macrophage-conditioned media alone had little effect on C3 or ASP, while co-culture of adipocytes with macrophages markedly increased ASP and C3 production (272%, 167%, P<0.05). These in vitro results suggest various metabolic hormones and inflammatory factors can affect ASP production through increased precursor C3 production and/or by changing the rate of C3 conversion to ASP. As an adipokine, ASP could constitute a new link between adipocytes and macrophages.

  18. On direct passive microwave remote sensing of sea spray aerosol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelyev, I. B.; Anguelova, M. D.; Frick, G. M.; Dowgiallo, D. J.; Hwang, P. A.; Caffrey, P. F.; Bobak, J. P.

    2014-11-01

    This study addresses and attempts to mitigate persistent uncertainty and scatter among existing approaches for determining the rate of sea spray aerosol production by breaking waves in the open ocean. The new approach proposed here utilizes passive microwave emissions from the ocean surface, which are known to be sensitive to surface roughness and foam. Direct, simultaneous, and collocated measurements of the aerosol production and microwave emissions were collected aboard the FLoating Instrument Platform (FLIP) in deep water ~ 150 km off the coast of California over a period of ~ 4 days. Vertical profiles of coarse-mode aerosol (0.25-23.5 μm) concentrations were measured with a forward-scattering spectrometer and converted to surface flux using dry deposition and vertical gradient methods. Back-trajectory analysis of eastern North Pacific meteorology verified the clean marine origin of the sampled air mass over at least 5 days prior to measurements. Vertical and horizontal polarization surface brightness temperature were measured with a microwave radiometer at 10.7 GHz frequency. Data analysis revealed a strong sensitivity of the brightness temperature polarization difference to the rate of aerosol production. An existing model of microwave emission from the ocean surface was used to determine the empirical relationship and to attribute its underlying physical basis to microwave emissions from surface roughness and foam within active and passive phases of breaking waves. A possibility of and initial steps towards satellite retrievals of the sea spray aerosol production are briefly discussed in concluding remarks.

  19. On direct passive microwave remote sensing of sea spray aerosol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelyev, I. B.; Anguelova, M. D.; Frick, G. M.; Dowgiallo, D. J.; Hwang, P. A.; Caffrey, P. F.; Bobak, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    This study addresses and attempts to mitigate persistent uncertainty and scatter among existing approaches for determining the rate of sea spray aerosol production by breaking waves in the open ocean. The new approach proposed here utilizes passive microwave emissions from the ocean surface, which are known to be sensitive to surface roughness and foam. Direct, simultaneous, and collocated measurements of the aerosol production and microwave emissions were collected on-board FLoating Instrument Platform (FLIP) in deep water ∼150 km off the coast of California over a period of ∼4 days. Vertical profiles of coarse-mode aerosol (0.25-23.5 μm) concentrations were measured with a forward scattering spectrometer and converted to surface flux using dry deposition and vertical gradient methods. Back trajectory analysis of Northeast Pacific meteorology verified the clean marine origin of the sampled air mass over at least 5 days prior to measurements. Vertical and horizontal polarization surface brightness temperatures were measured with a microwave radiometer at 10.7 GHz frequency. Data analysis revealed a strong sensitivity of the brightness temperature polarization difference to the rate of aerosol production. An existing model of microwave emission from the ocean surface was used to determine the empirical relationship and to attribute its underlying physical basis to microwave emissions from surface roughness and foam within active and passive phases of breaking waves. A possibility of and initial steps towards satellite retrievals of the sea spray aerosol production are briefly discussed in concluding remarks.

  20. 13C-direct detected NMR experiments for the sequential J-based resonance assignment of RNA oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Christian; Kovacs, Helena; Buck, Janina; Wacker, Anna; Fürtig, Boris; Bermel, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    We present here a set of 13C-direct detected NMR experiments to facilitate the resonance assignment of RNA oligonucleotides. Three experiments have been developed: (1) the (H)CC-TOCSY-experiment utilizing a virtual decoupling scheme to assign the intraresidual ribose 13C-spins, (2) the (H)CPC-experiment that correlates each phosphorus with the C4′ nuclei of adjacent nucleotides via J(C,P) couplings and (3) the (H)CPC-CCH-TOCSY-experiment that correlates the phosphorus nuclei with the respective C1′,H1′ ribose signals. The experiments were applied to two RNA hairpin structures. The current set of 13C-direct detected experiments allows direct and unambiguous assignment of the majority of the hetero nuclei and the identification of the individual ribose moieties following their sequential assignment. Thus, 13C-direct detected NMR methods constitute useful complements to the conventional 1H-detected approach for the resonance assignment of oligonucleotides that is often hindered by the limited chemical shift dispersion. The developed methods can also be applied to large deuterated RNAs. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10858-010-9429-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20544375

  1. 21 CFR 1240.61 - Mandatory pasteurization for all milk and milk products in final package form intended for direct...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pasteurization for all milk and milk products in final package form intended for direct human consumption. (a) No... for sale or other distribution after shipment in interstate commerce any milk or milk product in final... ingredients (milk or milk products) that have all been pasteurized, except where alternative procedures...

  2. Flow excursion experiments with a production reactor assembly mockup

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, G.C.; Blake, J.E. ); Nash, C.A. )

    1990-01-01

    A series of power ramp and loss-of-coolant accidents were simulated with an electrically heated mockup of a Savannah River Site production reactor assembly. The one-to-one scale mockup had full multichannel annular geometry in its heated section in addition to prototypical inlet and outlet endfitting hardware. Power levels causing void generation and flow instability in the water coolant flowing through the mockup were found under different transient and quasi-steady state test conditions. A reasonably sharp boundary between initial operating powers leading to or not leading to flow instability were found: that being 0.2 MW or less on power levels of 4 to 6.3 MW. Void generation occurred before, but close to, the point of flow instability. The data were taken in support of the Savannah River reactor limits program and will be used in continuing code benchmarking efforts. 6 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Measurement of diffractive dijet production at the H1 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Raičević, Nataša

    2016-03-25

    The new results on measurement of dijet production in diffractive deep inelastic ep scattering, ep → eXY, obtained with the H1 detector are presented. The system X contains at least two jets. Measurements are performed using two approaches. One approach is based on detection of the diffractive processes with Y being a proton or its low mass excitation. Diffractive events are selected by demanding a large empty rapidity gap interval separating the final state hadronic systems X and Y. In another approach, the leading final state proton from the process ep → eXp is detected in the H1 Very Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurements are compared with predictions from NLO QCD calculations based on diffractive parton densities.

  4. Productive efficiency of rural health clinics: the Midwest experience.

    PubMed

    Sinay, T

    2001-01-01

    This article identifies the characteristics of efficient and inefficient rural clinics in the Midwest, using 1994 Medicare cost reports. Rural health clinics are compared on the basis of productive efficiency by estimating a nonparametric frontier. Six inputs and five output categories were employed to estimate an efficient frontier. The results show that an efficient clinic, on average, employs approximately 1.5 more physicians than an inefficient clinic and incurs capital expenses more than twice those of the inefficient clinic. Future rural clinics are expected to be larger, employing more capital and labor to take advantage of scale economies. However, given the steady (or decreasing) population of rural communities, the expansion of relatively small rural clinics could involve forming rural health care systems and/or networks in close proximity to create synergies from scale economies, staff recruitment, easier access to capital, shared information systems, improved mobility of physicians among several clinics and savings from management costs.

  5. New directions for critical internet health studies: representing cancer experience on the web.

    PubMed

    Seale, Clive

    2005-05-01

    Studies of health representations on the internet have been preoccupied with the assessment of their (medically-defined) accuracy and quality. This contrasts with studies of health representations in 'old' media, where critical sociological analyses are common. Medical sociologists have been concerned to establish the potential of web information in transforming professional-client relations. A case study of breast and prostate cancer web sites provides evidence of the increasing convergence of the 'new' medium of the internet and old media such as newspapers and television. Large institutions are now consolidating their presence on the web so that users experience increasingly similar messages across media platforms. Search engines and links to the web from old media sources direct people to heavily resourced, mainstream health sites where, in the case of cancer, representations of gender are strikingly similar to those found in studies of old media sources. The media convergence thesis contrasts with earlier celebrations of the internet as a new medium that would promote a diversity of perspectives on health. Using existing methods for analysing media texts and developing new methods where appropriate, sociologists and media analysts interested in health need to develop more critical perspectives on this important new medium.

  6. Two Years of Industrial Experience in the Use of a Small, Direct Field Acoustic Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saggini, Nicola; Di Pietro, Vincenzo; Poulain, Nicolas; Herzog, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    Within Thales Alenia Space - Italy small satellite Assembly Integration and Test (AIT) plant, the need to develop a suitable facility for spacecraft acoustic noise test has arisen, with additional constraints posed by the necessity of a low impact on the existing building layout, low cost of procurement and operations, while maintaining a high reliability of the system for a theoretical maximum throughput of one test per week over an extended period of time, e.g. six months. The needs have been answered by developing a small (~40 m3 test volume), direct field (DF A T) acoustic test chamber, christened “Alpha Cabin”, where noise generation is achieved by means of commercial audio drivers equipped with custom enclosures. The paper starts with a brief presentation of the main characteristics of the system, but then concentrates on the lessons learnt and return of experience from the tests conducted in more than two years of continuous use. Starting from test article structural responses and their comparison with reverberant chambers, properties of the acoustic field and their implications on the former are analyzed.

  7. Performance measurements on NIF beamlines for future experiments to support polar direct drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, J. K.; Kruschwitz, B.; Yang, S. T.; Bowers, M.; Browning, D.; Budge, T.; Canning, D.; Chou, J.; Consentino, A.; Di Nicola, J. M.; Dixit, S.; Dorrer, C.; Erbert, G.; Hackel, R.; Heebner, J.; Hill, E.; Johnston, M.; Kelly, J.; Kwiatkowski, J.; Shaw, M.; Smith, L.; Wegner, P.; Zuegel, J.

    2016-05-01

    We are studying the implementation of polar direct drive (PDD) ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser system. Part of this preparation involves testing the performance of the NIF laser system over a broader span of center wavelengths, 3.6 nm, where the laser currently operates and that gain models describe. The temporal shape for the PDD pulses consists of a drive pulse preceded by three lower power “picket pulses”. These picket pulses require a multi-FM sinusoidal phase modulation format with a bandwidth of ∼ 200 GHz and a more dispersive grating in the preamplifier module (PAM) for smoothing-by-spectral-dispersion (SSD). In this paper we discuss recent measurements of gain on the NIF laser system over this broader wavelength range. We measured FM-to-AM conversion over the 3.6 nm wavelength range. The possibility of pinhole closure due to the larger bandwidth and dispersion associated with multi-FM SSD was studied at LLE on the OMEGA EP laser.

  8. Stereotactic breast biopsy with an 8-gauge, directional, vacuum-assisted probe: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Lifrange, Eric; Dondelinger, Robert F; Quatresooz, Pascale; Vandevorst, Geraldine; Colin, Claude

    2002-09-01

    This study was prospectively conducted to assess the feasibility, safety and accuracy of an 8-G directional vacuum-assisted biopsy (DVAB) probe in the diagnostic management of nonpalpable breast lesions (NPBL). Of 170 planned procedures which were indicated for investigation of BI-RADS category-3 to category-5 lesions, 153 were performed in 138 consecutive patients. The probe was targeted by the stereotactic unit of a prone table (United States Surgical Corporation, Norwalk, Conn.; and Lorad, Danbury, Conn.). Four to 18 (mean 8) core specimens were obtained for each lesion. In case of complete removal of the lesion, a localizing clip was deployed at the biopsy site. Adequate material for histopathologic examination was obtained in all cases (100%). Four of 138 (3%) patients experienced mild hematomas. We observed 15 of 39 failures (38%) to place the localizing clips. Thirteen of 153 (8%) procedures were inconclusive and required reintervention. Following DVAB, 42 of 138 (30%) patients underwent surgery. Subject to incomplete follow-up of the entire cohort, we observed no false-positive and one false-negative diagnosis. These preliminary results suggest that DVAB using an 8-G probe are feasible, safe and accurate. In our experience, clip placement was problematic. It is probable that increasing the dimensions of DVAB will only be relevant in a limited number of clinical situations, primarily the desire to obtain complete radiologic resections of the target abnormality.

  9. PRODUCTION OF HIGHER STRENGTH THIN WALLED GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER SHELLS FOR CRYOGENIC EXPERIMENTS AT OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    NIKROO,A; CZECHOWICZ,DG; CASTILLO,ER; PONTELANDOLFO,JM

    2002-04-01

    OAK A271 PRODUCTION OF HIGHER STRENGTH THIN WALLED GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER SHELLS FOR CRYOGENIC EXPERIMENTS AT OMEGA. Thin walled polymer shells are needed for OMEGA cryogenic laser experiments. These capsules need to be about 900 {micro}m in diameter and as thin as possible (approx 1-2 {micro}m), while having enough strength to be filled with DT as fast as possible to about 1000 atm. The authors have found that by optimizing the coating parameters in the glow discharge polymer (GDP) deposition system, traditionally used for making ICF targets, they can routinely make robust, {approx} 1.5 {micro}m thick, 900 {micro}m diameter GDP shells with buckle strengths of over 0.3 atm. This is twice the strength of shells made prior to the optimization and is comparable to values quoted for polyimide shells. In addition, these shells were found to be approximately three times more permeable and over 20% denser than previously made GDP shells. The combination of higher strength and permeability is ideal for direct drive cryogenic targets at OMEGA. Shells as thin as 0.5 {micro}m have been made. In this paper, the authors discuss the shell fabrication process, effects of modifying various GDP deposition parameters on shell properties and chemical composition.

  10. Filtrates & Residues: An Experiment on the Molar Solubility and Solubility Product of Barium Nitrate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wruck, Betty; Reinstein, Jesse

    1989-01-01

    Provides a two hour experiment using direct gravimetric methods to determine solubility constants. Provides methodology and sample results. Discusses the effect of the common ion on the solubility constant. (MVL)

  11. Filtrates & Residues: An Experiment on the Molar Solubility and Solubility Product of Barium Nitrate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wruck, Betty; Reinstein, Jesse

    1989-01-01

    Provides a two hour experiment using direct gravimetric methods to determine solubility constants. Provides methodology and sample results. Discusses the effect of the common ion on the solubility constant. (MVL)

  12. Direct enzymatic production of oligosaccharide mixtures from sugar beet pulp: experimental evaluation and mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Martina; Gullón, Beatriz; Yáñez, Remedios; Alonso, José Luis; Parajó, Juan Carlos

    2009-06-24

    The potential of sugar beet pulp as raw material for neutral and acidic oligosaccharide production by direct enzymatic treatment was evaluated. The effect of the polygalacturonase to solid ratio (PGaseSR), cellulase activity to polygalacturonase activity ratio (CPGaseR), and reaction time (t) on several dependent variables (selected to quantify the mass of recovered liquors, the conversion of each polysaccharide into monosaccharides, and the conversion of each polysaccharide into oligomers) was studied. Mathematical models suitable for reproducing and predicting the experimental results were also developed. Operational conditions leading to a maximum oligomer production were calculated from models being PGaseSR = 10 U/g, CPGaseR = 0.725 filter paper units/U, and t = 12.82 h. Under these conditions, the models predicted that 906 kg of liquors containing 26.7 kg of oligosaccharides can be obtained from 100 kg of SBP, the distribution being as follows: 5.9 kg of glucooligosaccharides, 2.4 kg of galactooligosaccharides, 9.7 kg of arabinooligosaccharides, and 8.7 kg of oligogalacturonides. Therefore, this study demonstrated that pectic oligomers (for which prebiotic properties have been reported) can be obtained from SBP at high yield by direct enzymatic hydrolysis using mixtures of cellulases and pectinases.

  13. Directed Protein Packaging within Outer Membrane Vesicles from Escherichia coli: Design, Production and Purification.

    PubMed

    Alves, Nathan J; Turner, Kendrick B; Walper, Scott A

    2016-11-16

    An increasing interest in applying synthetic biology techniques to program outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are leading to some very interesting and unique applications for OMV where traditional nanoparticles are proving too difficult to synthesize. To date, all Gram-negative bacteria have been shown to produce OMV demonstrating packaging of a variety of cargo that includes small molecules, peptides, proteins and genetic material. Based on their diverse cargo, OMV are implicated in many biological processes ranging from cell-cell communication to gene transfer and delivery of virulence factors depending upon which bacteria are producing the OMV. Only recently have bacterial OMV become accessible for use across a wide range of applications through the development of techniques to control and direct packaging of recombinant proteins into OMV. This protocol describes a method for the production, purification, and use of enzyme packaged OMV providing for improved overall production of recombinant enzyme, increased vesiculation, and enhanced enzyme stability. Successful utilization of this protocol will result in the creation of a bacterial strain that simultaneously produces a recombinant protein and directs it for OMV encapsulation through creating a synthetic linkage between the recombinant protein and an outer membrane anchor protein. This protocol also details methods for isolating OMV from bacterial cultures as well as proper handling techniques and things to consider when adapting this protocol for use for other unique applications such as: pharmaceutical drug delivery, medical diagnostics, and environmental remediation.

  14. Microbial production of 4-hydroxybenzylidene acetone, the direct precursor of raspberry ketone.

    PubMed

    Feron, G; Mauvais, G; Martin, F; Sémon, E; Blin-Perrin, C

    2007-07-01

    To investigate the enzymatic aldol reaction between acetone as a donor and 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde as a receptor to generate 4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-but-3-ene-2-one or 4-hydroxybenzylidene acetone, the direct precursor of 4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-butan-2-one or raspberry ketone, using different species of filamentous fungi and bacteria. Different classes of micro-organisms were tested in a medium containing mainly acetone and 4-hydoxybenzaldehyde. Of the micro-organisms tested, only bacteria were able to synthesize significant amounts of 4-hydroxybenzylidene acetone, ranging from 15 to 160 mg l(-1) after 21 h of bioconversion, as a function of the bacteria tested. The biological production of 4-hydroxybenzylidene acetone has been described with bacteria possessing 2-deoxyribose-5-phosphate aldolase (DERA, EC 4.1.2.4). This result suggests that DERA is involved in the catalytic aldolization of precursors for the production of 4-hydroxybenzylidene acetone. Raspberry ketone or frambinone represents a total market value of between euro6 million and euro10 million. The possibility of producing its direct precursor through a simple process using bacteria is of considerable interest to the flavour market and the food industry as a whole. This paper broadens the spectrum for the use of aldolase to achieve the biological synthesis of compounds of interest.

  15. High-energy resummation of direct photon production at hadronic colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diana, Giovanni; Rojo, Juan; Ball, Richard D.

    2010-10-01

    Direct photon production is an important process at hadron colliders, being relevant both for precision measurement of the gluon density, and as background to Higgs and other new physics searches. Here we explore the implications of recently derived results for high-energy resummation of direct photon production for the interpretation of measurements at the Tevatron and the LHC. The effects of resummation are compared to various sources of theoretical uncertainties like PDFs and scale variations. We show how the high-energy resummation procedure stabilizes the logarithmic enhancement of the cross section at high energy which is present at any fixed order in the perturbative expansion starting at NNLO. The effects of high-energy resummation are found to be negligible at Tevatron, while they enhance the cross section by a few percent for pT≲10 GeV at the LHC. Our results imply that the discrepancy at small pT between fixed order NLO and Tevatron data cannot be explained by unresummed high-energy contributions.

  16. Estimates of rates and errors for measurements of direct-{gamma} and direct-{gamma} + jet production by polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Beddo, M.E.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.G.

    1992-08-14

    Studies of inclusive direct-{gamma} production by pp interactions at RHIC energies were performed. Rates and the associated uncertainties on spin-spin observables for this process were computed for the planned PHENIX and STAR detectors at energies between {radical}s = 50 and 500 GeV. Also, rates were computed for direct-{gamma} + jet production for the STAR detector. The goal was to study the gluon spin distribution functions with such measurements. Recommendations concerning the electromagnetic calorimeter design and the need for an endcap calorimeter for STAR are made.

  17. Direct glucose production from lignocellulose using Clostridium thermocellum cultures supplemented with a thermostable β-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Prawitwong, Panida; Waeonukul, Rattiya; Tachaapaikoon, Chakrit; Pason, Patthra; Ratanakhanokchai, Khanok; Deng, Lan; Sermsathanaswadi, Junjarus; Septiningrum, Krisna; Mori, Yutaka; Kosugi, Akihiko

    2013-12-21

    Cellulases continue to be one of the major costs associated with the lignocellulose hydrolysis process. Clostridium thermocellum is an anaerobic, thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium that produces cellulosomes capable of efficiently degrading plant cell walls. The end-product cellobiose, however, inhibits degradation. To maximize the cellulolytic ability of C. thermocellum, it is important to eliminate this end-product inhibition. This work describes a system for biological saccharification that leads to glucose production following hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass. C. thermocellum cultures supplemented with thermostable beta-glucosidases make up this system. This approach does not require any supplementation with cellulases and hemicellulases. When C. thermocellum strain S14 was cultured with a Thermoanaerobacter brockii beta-glucosidase (CglT with activity 30 U/g cellulose) in medium containing 100 g/L cellulose (617 mM initial glucose equivalents), we observed not only high degradation of cellulose, but also accumulation of 426 mM glucose in the culture broth. In contrast, cultures without CglT, or with less thermostable beta-glucosidases, did not efficiently hydrolyze cellulose and accumulated high levels of glucose. Glucose production required a cellulose load of over 10 g/L. When alkali-pretreated rice straw containing 100 g/L glucan was used as the lignocellulosic biomass, approximately 72% of the glucan was saccharified, and glucose accumulated to 446 mM in the culture broth. The hydrolysate slurry containing glucose was directly fermented to 694 mM ethanol by addition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, giving an 85% theoretical yield without any inhibition. Our process is the first instance of biological saccharification with exclusive production and accumulation of glucose from lignocellulosic biomass. The key to its success was the use of C. thermocellum supplemented with a thermostable beta-glucosidase and cultured under a high cellulose load. We

  18. Mechanisms of direct radiation damage to DNA: the effect of base sequence on base end products.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kiran K K; Swarts, Steven G; Bernhard, William A

    2011-04-28

    It has been generally assumed that product formation in DNA damaged by ionizing radiation is relatively independent of base sequence, i.e., that the yield of a given product depends primarily on the chemical properties of each DNA constituent and not on its base sequence context. We examined this assumption by comparing direct-type end products produced in films of d(CTCTCGAGAG)(2) with those produced in films of d(GCACGCGTGC)(2). Here we report the product yields in d(CTCTCGAGAG)(2) hydrated to Γ = 2.5 and 15, where Γ is the hydration level given in moles of H(2)O/mole of nucleotide. Of the 17 products monitored by GC/MS, seven exhibited statistically significant yields: 8-oxoGua, 8-oxoAde, 5-OHMeUra, 5,6-diHUra, 5,6-diHThy, 5-OHCyt, and 5-OHUra. These yields at Γ = 2.5 are compared with the yields from our previously reported study of d(GCACGCGTGC)(2) (after projecting the yields to a CG/AT ratio of 1). The ratio of projected yields, d(CTCTCGAGAG)(2) divided by d(GCACGCGTGC)(2), are 1.3 ± 0.9, 1.8 ± 0.3, 1.6 ± 0.6, 11.4 ± 4.7, 0.2 ± 0.1, >28, and 0.8 ± 1.1, respectively. Considering just d(CTCTCGAGAG)(2), the ratios of yields at Γ = 2.5 divided by yields at Γ = 15 are 0.7 ± 0.2, 0.5 ± 0.1, 2.3 ± 4.0, 3.4 ± 1.2, 3.5 ± 3.3, 1.2 ± 0.2, and 0.4 ± 0.2, respectively. The effects of sequence and hydration on base product yields are explained by a working model emphasizing the difference between two distinctly different types of reaction: (i) radical reactions that progress to nonradical intermediates and product prior to dissolution and (ii) reactions that stem from radicals trapped in the solid state at room temperature that go on to yield nonradical product after sample dissolution. Based on these findings, insights into rates of hole and excess electron-transfer relative to rates of proton transfer are discussed.

  19. Search for Electroweak Single-Top Quark Production with the CDF II Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, Matthias; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2006-08-01

    The CDF II experiment and the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider are parts of the Fermi National Laboratories (Fermilab). The Fermilab is located in the vicinity of Chicago, USA. Today, the Tevatron is the only collider which is able to produce the heaviest known elementary particle, the top quark. The top quark was discovered at the Tevatron by the CDF and the D0 collaborations in 1995 [1]. So far, all the top quarks found are produced via the strong interaction as top-antitop pairs. The Standard Model of elementary particle physics also predicts single-top quark production via the electroweak interaction. This production mode has not yet been observed. The CDF and the D0 collaborations have set upper limits on the cross section for that process in Run I [2, 3] and improved those results in Run II [4, 5]. Single-top quark production is one of the major interests in Run II of the Tevatron as it offers several ways to test the Standard Model and to search for potential physics beyond the Standard Model. The measurement of the cross section of singly produced top quarks via the electroweak interaction offers the possibility to determine the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element V{sub tb} directly. The CKM matrix defines the transformation from the eigenstates of the electroweak interactions to the mass eigenstates of the quarks. V{sub tb} gives the strength of the coupling at the Wtb vertex. The single-top quark is produced at this vertex and therefore the cross section of the single-top quark production is directly proportional to |V{sub tb}|{sup 2}. In the Standard Model, three generations of quarks and the unitarity of the CKM matrix are predicted. This leads to V{sub tb} {approx} 1. Up to now, there is no possibility to measure V{sub tb} without using the assumption that there are a certain number of quark generations. Since the measurement of the cross section of single-top quark production is independent of this assumption it could verify another

  20. Linking phytoplankton and bacterioplankton community dynamics to iron-binding ligand production in a microcosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogle, S. L.; Bundy, R.; Barbeau, K.

    2016-02-01

    Several significant lines of evidence implicate heterotrophic bacterioplankton as agents of iron cycling and sources of iron-binding ligands in seawater, but direct and mechanistic linkages have mostly remained elusive. Currently, it is unknown how microbial community composition varies during the course of biogenic particle remineralization and how shifts in community structure are related to sources and sinks of Fe-binding ligands. In order to simulate the rise, decline, and ultimate remineralization of a phytoplankton bloom, we followed the production of different classes of Fe-binding ligands as measured by electrochemical techniques, Fe concentrations, and macronutrient concentrations in a series of iron-amended whole seawater incubations over a period of six days during a California Current Ecosystem Long Term Ecological Research (CCE-LTER) process cruise. At the termination of the experiment phytoplankton communities were similar across iron treatments, but high iron conditions generated greater phytoplankton biomass and increased nutrient drawdown suggesting that phytoplankton communities were in different phases of bloom development. Strikingly, L1 ligands akin to siderophores in binding strength were only observed in high iron treatments implicating phytoplankton bloom phase as an important control. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene surveys, we observed that the abundance of transiently dominant copiotroph bacteria were strongly correlated with L1 concentrations. However, incubations with similar L1 concentrations and binding strengths produced distinct copiotroph community profiles dominated by a few strains. We suggest that phytoplankton bloom maturity influences algal-associated heterotrophic community succession, and that L1 production is either directly or indirectly tied to the appearance and eventual dominance of rarely abundant copiotroph bacterial strains.

  1. Recent Developments in Fabrication of Direct Drive Cylinder Targets for Hydrodynamics Experiments at the OMEGA Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nobile, A.; Balkey, M.M.; Bartos, J.J.; Batha, S.H.; Day, R.D.; Elliott, J.E.; Elliott, N.E.; Gomez, V.M.; Hatch, D.J.; Lanier, N.E.; Fincke, J.R.; Manzanares, R.; Pierce, T.H.; Sandoval, D.L.; Schmidt, D.W.; Steckle, W.P.

    2004-03-15

    Experimental campaigns are being conducted at the 60 beam OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics to acquire data to validate hydrodynamic models in the high energy-density regime. This paper describes targets that have been developed and constructed for these experimental campaigns. Targets are 860 {mu}m inner diameter by 2.2 mm length cylinders with 70 {mu}m thick polymer ablator. On the ablator inner surface and located halfway along the axis of the cylinder is a 500 {mu}m wide Al marker band. Band thicknesses in the range 8-16 microns are used. CH foam with densities in the range 30-90 mg/cc fills the inside of the cylinder. While these targets have been fabricated for years, several new improvements and features have recently been developed. Improvements include the use of epoxy instead of polystyrene for the ablator, and the use of electrodeposited Al for the marker band. A critical feature of the target is the surface feature that is placed on the marker band. Experiments are aimed at understanding the hydrodynamic behavior of imploding cylinders as a function of this surface feature. Recent development work has focused on production of engineered surface features on the target marker band. Using a fast tool servo on a diamond turning lathe, a wide range of specified surface features have been produced. This paper will address improvements to the cylinder targets as well as current development efforts.

  2. Enhanced Butanol Production Obtained by Reinforcing the Direct Butanol-Forming Route in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Joungmin; Park, Jin Hwan; Im, Jung Ae; Eom, Moon-Ho; Lee, Julia; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Song, Hyohak; Cho, Jung-Hee; Seung, Do Young; Lee, Sang Yup

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Butanol is an important industrial solvent and advanced biofuel that can be produced by biphasic fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum. It has been known that acetate and butyrate first formed during the acidogenic phase are reassimilated to form acetone-butanol-ethanol (cold channel). Butanol can also be formed directly from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) through butyryl-CoA (hot channel). However, little is known about the relative contributions of the two butanol-forming pathways. Here we report that the direct butanol-forming pathway is a better channel to optimize for butanol production through metabolic flux and mass balance analyses. Butanol production through the hot channel was maximized by simultaneous disruption of the pta and buk genes, encoding phosphotransacetylase and butyrate kinase, while the adhE1D485G gene, encoding a mutated aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase, was overexpressed. The ratio of butanol produced through the hot channel to that produced through the cold channel increased from 2.0 in the wild type to 18.8 in the engineered BEKW(pPthlAAD**) strain. By reinforcing the direct butanol-forming flux in C. acetobutylicum, 18.9 g/liter of butanol was produced, with a yield of 0.71 mol butanol/mol glucose by batch fermentation, levels which are 160% and 245% higher than those obtained with the wild type. By fed-batch culture of this engineered strain with in situ recovery, 585.3 g of butanol was produced from 1,861.9 g of glucose, with the yield of 0.76 mol butanol/mol glucose and productivity of 1.32 g/liter/h. Studies of two butanol-forming routes and their effects on butanol production in C. acetobutylicum described here will serve as a basis for further metabolic engineering of clostridia aimed toward developing a superior butanol producer. PMID:23093384

  3. Enhanced butanol production obtained by reinforcing the direct butanol-forming route in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Joungmin; Park, Jin Hwan; Im, Jung Ae; Eom, Moon-Ho; Lee, Julia; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Song, Hyohak; Cho, Jung-Hee; Seung, Do Young; Lee, Sang Yup

    2012-10-23

    Butanol is an important industrial solvent and advanced biofuel that can be produced by biphasic fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum. It has been known that acetate and butyrate first formed during the acidogenic phase are reassimilated to form acetone-butanol-ethanol (cold channel). Butanol can also be formed directly from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) through butyryl-CoA (hot channel). However, little is known about the relative contributions of the two butanol-forming pathways. Here we report that the direct butanol-forming pathway is a better channel to optimize for butanol production through metabolic flux and mass balance analyses. Butanol production through the hot channel was maximized by simultaneous disruption of the pta and buk genes, encoding phosphotransacetylase and butyrate kinase, while the adhE1(D485G) gene, encoding a mutated aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase, was overexpressed. The ratio of butanol produced through the hot channel to that produced through the cold channel increased from 2.0 in the wild type to 18.8 in the engineered BEKW(pPthlAAD(**)) strain. By reinforcing the direct butanol-forming flux in C. acetobutylicum, 18.9 g/liter of butanol was produced, with a yield of 0.71 mol butanol/mol glucose by batch fermentation, levels which are 160% and 245% higher than those obtained with the wild type. By fed-batch culture of this engineered strain with in situ recovery, 585.3 g of butanol was produced from 1,861.9 g of glucose, with the yield of 0.76 mol butanol/mol glucose and productivity of 1.32 g/liter/h. Studies of two butanol-forming routes and their effects on butanol production in C. acetobutylicum described here will serve as a basis for further metabolic engineering of clostridia aimed toward developing a superior butanol producer. IMPORTANCE Renewable biofuel is one of the answers to solving the energy crisis and climate change problems. Butanol produced naturally by clostridia has superior liquid fuel characteristics and thus has

  4. Experiments to investigate lift production mechanisms on pitching flat plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, P. R. R. J.; Babinsky, H.

    2017-01-01

    Pitching flat plates are a useful simplification of flapping wings, and their study can provide useful insights into unsteady force generation. Non-circulatory and circulatory lift producing mechanisms for low Reynolds number pitching flat plates are investigated. A series of experiments are designed to measure forces and study the unsteady flowfield development. Two pitch axis positions are investigated, namely a leading edge and a mid-chord pitch axis. A novel PIV approach using twin laser lightsheets is shown to be effective at acquiring full field of view velocity data when an opaque wing model is used. Leading-edge vortex (LEV) circulations are extracted from velocity field data, using a Lamb-Oseen vortex fitting algorithm. LEV and trailing-edge vortex positions are also extracted. It is shown that the circulation of the LEV, as determined from PIV data, approximately matches the general trend of an unmodified Wagner function for a leading edge pitch axis and a modified Wagner function for a mid-chord pitch axis. Comparison of experimentally measured lift correlates well with the prediction of a reduced-order model for a LE pitch axis.

  5. Deficiencies in product labelling instructions and quality control directions for 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Buroni, Federica E; Lodola, Lorenzo; Persico, Marco G; Aprile, Carlo

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to identify deficiencies in product labelling instructions for reconstitution and in the quality control directions detailed in the technical leaflets (TLs) or summary product characteristic (SPC) sheets of commonly used technetium labelling cold kits. The reconstitution and quality control directions in 25 TLs/SPCs were evaluated to identify deficiencies, incompleteness, restrictions, errors, impracticability, and vagueness. In addition, their congruence with the statements given in the relative European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur. VII ed.) monography and diagnostic reference levels of Directive 97/43/EURATOM was evaluated. Deficiencies in information were scored and classified into five categories: 1, absent or incomplete; 2, restrictive; 3, inconsistent or wrong; 4, impractical; and 5, vague. In the 25 documents analyzed a total of 141 deficiencies were found (corresponding to 40.2% of the total scores assigned), and more frequently they pertained to quality control procedures (70.9%), followed by those related to quantitative composition (14.9%), preparation (8.5%), and particle size (5.7%). Nearly 80% of these deficiencies were classified as type 1 - that is, absent or incomplete information. The indications in TLs and SPCs should provide useful information for maintaining the quality and purity of the radiopharmaceutical preparation and ensure the safety level and effectiveness required by law. However, the instructions are often suboptimal or even erroneous, and consequently there are countless failures or difficulties, which represent an impediment to good laboratory practice. We believe that a 'smart' review of radiopharmaceutical documentation would be beneficial in order to align these indications to the real needs of the operators involved in routine in-house nuclear medicine practice.

  6. Experiences in flip chip production of radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savolainen-Pulli, Satu; Salonen, Jaakko; Salmi, Jorma; Vähänen, Sami

    2006-09-01

    Modern imaging devices often require heterogeneous integration of different materials and technologies. Because of yield considerations, material availability, and various technological limitations, an extremely fine pitch is necessary to realize high-resolution images. Thus, there is a need for a hybridization technology that is able to join together readout amplifiers and pixel detectors at a very fine pitch. This paper describes radiation detector flip chip production at VTT. Our flip chip technology utilizes 25-μm diameter tin-lead solder bumps at a 50-μm pitch and is based on flux-free bonding. When preprocessed wafers are used, as is the case here, the total yield is defined only partly by the flip chip process. Wafer preprocessing done by a third-party silicon foundry and the flip chip process create different process defects. Wafer-level yield maps (based on probing) provided by the customer are used to select good readout chips for assembly. Wafer probing is often done outside of a real clean room environment, resulting in particle contamination and/or scratches on the wafers. Factors affecting the total yield of flip chip bonded detectors are discussed, and some yield numbers of the process are given. Ways to improve yield are considered, and finally guidelines for process planning and device design with respect to yield optimization are given.

  7. Excretory-secretory product of newly excysted metacercariae of Paragonimus westermani directly induces eosinophil apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Eosinophils are important effector cells in host defense against parasites. Excretory-secretory product (ESP) produced by helminthic worms plays important roles in the uptake of nutrients, migration in the host tissue, and in immune modulation. However, little is known about the ability of the ESP to directly trigger eosinophil apoptosis. This study investigated whether the ESP of newly excysted metacercariae of Paragonimus westermani could induce apoptosis in human eosinophils. Apoptosis was assayed by staining the cells with FITC-annexin V, and the cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. It was found that the ESP of newly excysted metacercariae of P. westermani induced a direct time- and concentration-dependent increase in the rate of constitutive apoptosis in mature human eosinophils. Eosinophil apoptosis was first apparent 3 hr after treatment with the ESP and continued to increase after 6 hr of incubation with respect to the cells cultured in the absence of the ESP. While only 2.8% of the eosinophils incubated in the medium for 3 hr were apoptotic, 7.6%, 10.9% and 22.6% of the eosinophils treated with 10, 30 and 100 µg/ml ESP were apoptotic, respectively. This result suggests that the ESP of newly excysted metacercariae of P. westermani directly induce eosinophil apoptosis, which may be important for the survival of the parasites and the reduction of eosinophilic inflammation in vivo. PMID:10743354

  8. Insulin’s direct hepatic effect explains the inhibition of glucose production caused by insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Edgerton, Dale S.; Kraft, Guillaume; Smith, Marta; Farmer, Ben; Williams, Phillip E.; Coate, Katie C.; Printz, Richard L.; O’Brien, Richard M.; Cherrington, Alan D.

    2017-01-01

    Insulin can inhibit hepatic glucose production (HGP) by acting directly on the liver as well as indirectly through effects on adipose tissue, pancreas, and brain. While insulin’s indirect effects are indisputable, their physiologic role in the suppression of HGP seen in response to increased insulin secretion is not clear. Likewise, the mechanisms by which insulin suppresses lipolysis and pancreatic α cell secretion under physiologic circumstances are also debated. In this study, insulin was infused into the hepatic portal vein to mimic increased insulin secretion, and insulin’s indirect liver effects were blocked either individually or collectively. During physiologic hyperinsulinemia, plasma free fatty acid (FFA) and glucagon levels were clamped at basal values and brain insulin action was blocked, but insulin’s direct effects on the liver were left intact. Insulin was equally effective at suppressing HGP when its indirect effects were absent as when they were present. In addition, the inhibition of lipolysis, as well as glucagon and insulin secretion, did not require CNS insulin action or decreased plasma FFA. This indicates that the rapid suppression of HGP is attributable to insulin’s direct effect on the liver and that its indirect effects are redundant in the context of a physiologic increase in insulin secretion. PMID:28352665

  9. Construction of bioengineered yeast platform for direct bioethanol production from alginate and mannitol.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Toshiyuki; Sasaki, Yusuke; Motone, Keisuke; Shibata, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Reiji; Miyake, Hideo; Mori, Tetsushi; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-07-24

    Brown macroalgae are a sustainable and promising source for bioethanol production because they are abundant in ocean ecosystems and contain negligible quantities of lignin. Brown macroalgae contain cellulose, hemicellulose, mannitol, laminarin, and alginate as major carbohydrates. Among these carbohydrates, brown macroalgae are characterized by high levels of alginate and mannitol. The direct bioconversion of alginate and mannitol into ethanol requires extensive bioengineering of assimilation processes in the standard industrial microbe Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we constructed an alginate-assimilating S. cerevisiae recombinant strain by genome integration and overexpression of the genes encoding endo- and exo-type alginate lyases, DEH (4-deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid) transporter, and components of the DEH metabolic pathway. Furthermore, the mannitol-metabolizing capacity of S. cerevisiae was enhanced by prolonged culture in a medium containing mannitol as the sole carbon source. When the constructed strain AM1 was anaerobically cultivated in a fermentation medium containing 6% (w/v) total sugars (approximately 1:2 ratio of alginate/mannitol), it directly produced ethanol from alginate and mannitol, giving 8.8 g/L ethanol and yields of up to 32% of the maximum theoretical yield from consumed sugars. These results indicate that all major carbohydrates of brown macroalgae can be directly converted into bioethanol by S. cerevisiae. This strain and system could provide a platform for the complete utilization of brown macroalgae.

  10. [Regulating factors of intention and experience with co-production related to local government administration].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoya

    2008-12-01

    This study examined the regulating factors of intention and experience with co-production related to local government administration. The result of a survey for 211 adults showed that their intention to participate in co-production was determined by "contact/information disclosure expectations" for local government employees, dissatisfaction with local government, communication with the neighborhood, and the number of organizational affiliations in the community. Of these factors, the number of organizational affiliations also determined experiences with co-production. Co-production was promoted by increased affiliative expectations for local government employees and ties in the community for action.

  11. Direct irradiation of long-lived fission products in an ATW system

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, T.F.; Henderson, D.; Sailor, W.C.

    1995-10-01

    The feasibility of directly irradiating five long-lived fission products (LLFPs: {sup 79}Se, {sup 93}Zr, {sup 107}Pd, {sup 126}Sn, and {sup 135}Cs, each with a half-life greater than 10,000 years), by incorporating them into the target of an Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) system is discussed. The important parameters used to judge the feasibility of a direct irradiation system were the target`s neutron spallation yield (given in neutrons produced per incident proton), and the removal rate of the LLFP, with the baseline incineration rate set at two light water reactors (LWRs) worth of the LLFP waste per year. A target was constructed which consisted of a LLFP cylindrical {open_quotes}plug{close_quotes} inserted into the top (where the proton beam strikes) of a 30 cm radius, 100 cm length lead target. {sup 126}Sn and {sup 79}Se were each found to have high enough removal rates to support two LWR`s production of the LLFP per year of ATW operation. For the baseline plug geometry (5 cm radius, 30 cm length) containing {sup 126}Sn, 3.5 LWRs could be supported per year (at 75% beam availability). Furthermore, the addition of a {sup 126}Sn plus had a slightly positive effect on the target`s neutron yield. The neutron production was 36.83 {plus_minus}.0039 neutrons per proton with a pure lead target having a yield of 36.29 {plus_minus}.0038. It was also found that a plug composed of a tin-selenide compound (SnSe) had high enough removal rates to burn two or more reactor years of both LLFPs simultaneously.

  12. Rapid acquisition of 1H and 19F NMR experiments for direct and competition ligand-based screening.

    PubMed

    Dalvit, Claudio; Gossert, Alvar D; Coutant, Jérôme; Piotto, Martial

    2011-04-01

    Direct and competition ligand-based NMR experiments are often used in the screening of chemical fragment libraries against a protein target due to the high relative sensitivity of NMR for protein-binding events. A plethora of NMR methods has been proposed for this purpose. Two of these techniques are the (19)F T(2) filter and the (1)H selective T(2) filter experiments. Modifications of the pulse sequences of these experiments have resulted in a ∼2-fold reduction in the experiment time thus allowing an increase in the screening throughput and making NMR an attractive technique for screening large compound collections. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Direct anodic hydrochloric acid and cathodic caustic production during water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hui-Wen; Cejudo-Marín, Rocío; Jeremiasse, Adriaan W.; Rabaey, Korneel; Yuan, Zhiguo; Pikaar, Ilje

    2016-02-01

    Hydrochloric acid (HCl) and caustic (NaOH) are among the most widely used chemicals by the water industry. Direct anodic electrochemical HCl production by water electrolysis has not been successful as current commercially available electrodes are prone to chlorine formation. This study presents an innovative technology simultaneously generating HCl and NaOH from NaCl using a Mn0.84Mo0.16O2.23 oxygen evolution electrode during water electrolysis. The results showed that protons could be anodically generated at a high Coulombic efficiency (i.e. ≥ 95%) with chlorine formation accounting for 3 ~ 5% of the charge supplied. HCl was anodically produced at moderate strengths at a CE of 65 ± 4% together with a CE of 89 ± 1% for cathodic caustic production. The reduction in CE for HCl generation was caused by proton cross-over from the anode to the middle compartment. Overall, this study showed the potential of simultaneous HCl and NaOH generation from NaCl and represents a major step forward for the water industry towards on-site production of HCl and NaOH. In this study, artificial brine was used as a source of sodium and chloride ions. In theory, artificial brine could be replaced by saline waste streams such as Reverse Osmosis Concentrate (ROC), turning ROC into a valuable resource.

  14. Effects of an applied voltage on direct interspecies electron transfer via conductive materials for methane production.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Yeol; Park, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Hee-Deung

    2017-10-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) between exoelectrogenic bacteria and methanogenic archaea via conductive materials is reported as an efficient method to produce methane in anaerobic organic waste digestion. A voltage can be applied to the conductive materials to accelerate the DIET between two groups of microorganisms to produce methane. To evaluate this hypothesis, two sets of anaerobic serum bottles with and without applied voltage were used with a pair of graphite rods as conductive materials to facilitate DIET. Initially, the methane production rate was similar between the two sets of serum bottles, and later the serum bottles with an applied voltage of 0.39V showed a 168% higher methane production rate than serum bottles without an applied voltage. In cyclic voltammograms, the characteristic redox peaks for hydrogen and acetate oxidation were identified in the serum bottles with an applied voltage. In the microbial community analyses, hydrogenotrophic methanogens (e.g. Methanobacterium) were observed to be abundant in serum bottles with an applied voltage, while methanogens utilizing carbon dioxide (e.g., Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina) were dominant in serum bottles without an applied voltage. Taken together, the applied voltage on conductive materials might not be effective to promote DIET in methane production. Instead, it appeared to generate a condition for hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rapid Leptospira identification by direct sequencing of the diagnostic PCR products in New Caledonia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most of the current knowledge of leptospirosis epidemiology originates from serological results obtained with the reference Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT). However, inconsistencies and weaknesses of this diagnostic technique are evident. A growing use of PCR has improved the early diagnosis of leptospirosis but a drawback is that it cannot provide information on the infecting Leptospira strain which provides important epidemiologic data. Our work is aimed at evaluating if the sequence polymorphism of diagnostic PCR products could be used to identify the infecting Leptospira strains in the New Caledonian environment. Results Both the lfb1 and secY diagnostic PCR products displayed a sequence polymorphism that could prove useful in presumptively identifying the infecting leptospire. Using both this polymorphism and MLST results with New Caledonian isolates and clinical samples, we confirmed the epidemiological relevance of the sequence-based identification of Leptospira strains. Additionally, we identified one cluster of L. interrogans that contained no reference strain and one cluster of L. borgpetersenii found only in the introduced Rusa deer Cervus timorensis russa that is its probable reservoir. Conclusions The sequence polymorphism of diagnostic PCR products proved useful in presumptively identifying the infecting Leptospira strains. This could contribute to a better understanding of leptospirosis epidemiology by providing epidemiological information that cannot be directly attained from the use of PCR as an early diagnostic test for leptospirosis. PMID:21176235

  16. Old wine in new bottles: Tobacco industry's submission to European Commission tobacco product directive public consultation

    PubMed Central

    Hiilamo, Heikki; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2015-01-01

    Between September and December 2010 the European Commission Health & Consumer Protection Directorate-General (DGSANCO) held a public consultation on a possible revision of the European Union Tobacco Products Directive (2001/37/EC). We used content analysis of the tobacco industry's and related parties' 300 submissions to the public consultation to determine if tobacco industry and its allies in Europe are prepared to reduce harm of the tobacco products as their public statements assert. The industry submission resorted to traditional tobacco industry arguments where illicit trade and freedom of choice were emphasized and misrepresented the conclusions of a DGSANCO-commissioned scientific report on smokeless tobacco products. Retailers and wholesalers referred to employment and economic growth more often than respondents from other categories. The pattern of responses in the submission differed dramatically from independent public opinion polls of EU citizens' support for tobacco control policies. None of the major tobacco manufacturers or their lobbying organizations supported any of the DGSANCO's proposed evidence based interventions (pictorial health warnings, plain packaging or point-of-sale display bans) to reduce harms caused by cigarette smoking. PMID:25467283

  17. A direct human influence on atmospheric CO2 seasonality from increased cropland productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, J. M.; Frolking, S. E.; Kort, E. A.; Ray, D. K.; Kucharik, C. J.; Ramankutty, N.; Friedl, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Ground- and aircraft-based measurements show that the seasonal amplitude of Northern Hemisphere atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations has increased by as much as 50% over the last 50 years. This increase has been linked to changes in Temperate, Boreal and Arctic ecosystem properties and processes such as enhanced photosynthesis, increased heterotrophic respiration, and expansion of woody vegetation. However, the precise causal mechanisms behind observed changes in atmospheric CO2 seasonality remain unclear. Here we show that increases in agricultural productivity, which have been largely overlooked in previous investigations, explain as much as 25% of observed changes in atmospheric CO2 seasonality, and perhaps more. Specifically, Northern Hemisphere extratropical maize, wheat, rice, and soybean production grew by 240% between 1961-2008, thereby increasing the amount of net carbon uptake by croplands during the Northern Hemisphere growing season by 0.33 Pg. Maize alone accounts for two-thirds of this change, owing mostly to agricultural intensification within concentrated production zones in the Midwestern United States and Northern China. Since a substantial portion of seasonality enhancement results from a process that is roughly neutral in terms of its impact on the terrestrial carbon sink, our results show that care must be taken when making inferences regarding the linkages between CO2 seasonality and terrestrial carbon sink dynamics. More generally, these results demonstrate how intensive management of agricultural ecosystems over the last five decades have imparted a substantial and direct fingerprint of anthropogenic activities on seasonal patterns of Northern Hemisphere atmospheric CO2.

  18. Old wine in new bottles: tobacco industry's submission to European Commission tobacco product directive public consultation.

    PubMed

    Hiilamo, Heikki; Glantz, Stanton A

    2015-01-01

    Between September and December 2010 the European Commission Health & Consumer Protection Directorate-General (DGSANCO) held a public consultation on a possible revision of the European Union Tobacco Products Directive (2001/37/EC). We used content analysis of the tobacco industry's and related parties' 300 submissions to the public consultation to determine if tobacco industry and its allies in Europe are prepared to reduce harm of the tobacco products as their public statements assert. The industry submission resorted to traditional tobacco industry arguments where illicit trade and freedom of choice were emphasized and misrepresented the conclusions of a DGSANCO-commissioned scientific report on smokeless tobacco products. Retailers and wholesalers referred to employment and economic growth more often than respondents from other categories. The pattern of responses in the submission differed dramatically from independent public opinion polls of EU citizens' support for tobacco control policies. None of the major tobacco manufacturers or their lobbying organizations supported any of the DGSANCO's proposed evidence based interventions (pictorial health warnings, plain packaging or point-of-sale display bans) to reduce harms caused by cigarette smoking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolic Investigation in Gluconacetobacter xylinus and Its Bacterial Cellulose Production under a Direct Current Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Liu, Miao; Zhong, Cheng; Zhang, Yu Ming; Xu, Ze Ming; Qiao, Chang Sheng; Jia, Shi Ru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of a direct current (DC) electric field on the growth and metabolism of Gluconacetobacter xylinus were investigated in static culture. When a DC electric field at 10 mA was applied using platinum electrodes to the culture broth, bacterial cellulose (BC) production was promoted in 12 h but was inhibited in the last 12 h as compared to the control (without DC electric field). At the cathode, the presence of the hydrogen generated a strong reductive environment that is beneficial to cell growth. As compared to the control, the activities of glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle, as well as BC productivity were observed to be slightly higher in the first 12 h. However, due to the absence of sufficient oxygen, lactic acid was accumulated from pyruvic acid at 18 h, which was not in favor of BC production. At the anode, DC inhibited cell growth in 6 h when compared to the control. The metabolic activity in G. xylinus was inhibited through the suppression of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis. At 18-24 h, cell density was observed to decrease, which might be due to the electrolysis of water that significantly dropped the pH of cultural broth far beyond the optimal range. Meanwhile, metabolites for self-protection were accumulated, for instance proline, glutamic acid, gluconic acid, and fatty acids. Notably, the accumulation of gluconic acid and lactic acid made it a really tough acid stress to cells at the anode and finally led to depression of cell growth.

  20. Direct anodic hydrochloric acid and cathodic caustic production during water electrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui-Wen; Cejudo-Marín, Rocío; Jeremiasse, Adriaan W.; Rabaey, Korneel; Yuan, Zhiguo; Pikaar, Ilje

    2016-01-01

    Hydrochloric acid (HCl) and caustic (NaOH) are among the most widely used chemicals by the water industry. Direct anodic electrochemical HCl production by water electrolysis has not been successful as current commercially available electrodes are prone to chlorine formation. This study presents an innovative technology simultaneously generating HCl and NaOH from NaCl using a Mn0.84Mo0.16O2.23 oxygen evolution electrode during water electrolysis. The results showed that protons could be anodically generated at a high Coulombic efficiency (i.e. ≥ 95%) with chlorine formation accounting for 3 ~ 5% of the charge supplied. HCl was anodically produced at moderate strengths at a CE of 65 ± 4% together with a CE of 89 ± 1% for cathodic caustic production. The reduction in CE for HCl generation was caused by proton cross-over from the anode to the middle compartment. Overall, this study showed the potential of simultaneous HCl and NaOH generation from NaCl and represents a major step forward for the water industry towards on-site production of HCl and NaOH. In this study, artificial brine was used as a source of sodium and chloride ions. In theory, artificial brine could be replaced by saline waste streams such as Reverse Osmosis Concentrate (ROC), turning ROC into a valuable resource. PMID:26848031