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Sample records for direct soft photon

  1. Direct and inverted nematic dispersions for soft matter photonics.

    PubMed

    Muševič, I; Skarabot, M; Humar, M

    2011-07-20

    General properties and recent developments in the field of nematic colloids and emulsions are discussed. The origin and nature of pair colloidal interactions in the nematic colloids are explained and an overview of the stable colloidal 2D crystalline structures and superstructures discovered so far is given. The nature and role of topological defects in the nematic colloids is discussed, with an emphasis on recently discovered entangled colloidal structures. Applications of inverted nematic emulsions and binding force mechanisms in nematic colloids for soft matter photonic devices are discussed.

  2. Study of the dependence of direct soft photon production on the jet characteristics in hadronic Z 0 decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.; DELPHI Collaboration

    2010-06-01

    An analysis of the direct soft photon production rate as a function of the parent jet characteristics is presented, based on hadronic events collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP1. The dependences of the photon rates on the jet kinematic characteristics (momentum, mass, etc.) and on the jet charged, neutral and total hadron multiplicities are reported. Up to a scale factor of about four, which characterizes the overall value of the soft photon excess, a similarity of the observed soft photon behavior to that of the inner hadronic bremsstrahlung predictions is found for the momentum, mass, and jet charged multiplicity dependences. However for the dependence of the soft photon rate on the jet neutral and total hadron multiplicities a prominent difference is found for the observed soft photon signal as compared to the expected bremsstrahlung from final state hadrons. The observed linear increase of the soft photon production rate with the jet total hadron multiplicity and its strong dependence on the jet neutral multiplicity suggest that the rate is proportional to the number of quark pairs produced in the fragmentation process, with the neutral pairs being more effectively radiating than the charged ones.

  3. From soft photon study at Nuclotron and U-70 to NICA. Soft photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardashev, E.; Avdeichikov, V.; Balandin, V.; Bogdanova, G.; Dunin, V.; Gavrishchuk, O.; Golovkin, V.; Golovnya, S.; Gorokhov, S.; Isupov, A.; Kazakov, A.; Kholodenko, A.; Kiryakov, A.; Kokoulina, E.; Kutov, A.; Kuzmin, N.; Lobanov, I.; Nikitin, V.; Petukhov, Yu.; Pokatashkin, G.; Polkovnikov, M.; Popov, V.; Reznikov, S.; Rogov, V.; Ronzhin, V.; Rufanov, I. A.; Ryadovikov, V.; Tsyupa, Yu.; Volkov, V.; Vorobiev, A.; Zhidkov, N.; Zolin, L.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of direct photon production in hadronic collisions essentially expand our insights in multiparticle production mechanisms. These photons are useful probes to investigate nuclear matter at all stages of the interaction. Soft photons play a particular role in these studies. Until now we have no explanation for the experimentally observed excess of soft photons. These photons have low transverse momenta pT < 0.1 GeV/ c, \\vert x\\vert < 0.01 . In this domain their yield exceeds the theoretical estimates by 5-8 times. The registration of soft photons at Nuclotron (LHEP, JINR) has been carried out by the electromagnetic calorimeter built by the SVD-2 Collaboration. Soft photon electromagnetic calorimeter was tested at U-70, IHEP (Protvino). For the first time the soft photon yield at interactions of 3.5 A GeV/ c per nucleon deuterium and lithium beams has been measured. The obtained energy spectra confirm the increased yield of soft photons with their energy less than 50MeV (in the laboratory system) in comparison with theoretical predictions and agree with previous experiments at high-energy interactions. It is planned to continue soft photon study at the future accelerator complex NICA with heavy-ion beams.

  4. Tevatron direct photon results.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlmann, S.

    1999-09-21

    Tevatron direct photon results since DIS98 are reviewed. Two new CDF measurements are discussed, the Run Ib inclusive photon cross section and the photon + Muon cross section. Comparisons with the latest NLO QCD calculations are presented.

  5. Direct Photons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor,D.

    2008-07-29

    Direct photons are ideal tools to investigate kinematical and thermodynamical conditions of heavy ion collisions since they are emitted from all stages of the collision and once produced they leave the interaction region without further modification by the medium. The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured direct photon production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV over a wide transverse momentum (p{sub T}) range. The p+p measurements allow a fundamental test of QCD, and serve as a baseline when we try to disentangle more complex mechanisms producing high p{sub T} direct photons in Au+Au. As for thermal photons in Au+Au we overcome the difficulties due to the large background from hadronic decays by measuring 'almost real' virtual photons which appear as low invariant mass e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs: a significant excess of direct photons is measured above the above next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. Additional insights on the origin of direct photons can be gained with the study of the azimuthal anisotropy which benefits from the increased statistics and reaction plane resolution achieved in RHIC Year-7 data.

  6. Electrically Responsive Soft Photonic BCP Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noro, Atsushi; Ohno, Maho; Matsushita, Yushu

    We report electro-responsive soft photonic films composed of lamellar-forming block copolymer/nonvolatile protic solvent/metal salt. Thin films of polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (SP, Mn =153k, φS =0.57, PDI =1.18) were prepared by spin-coating of the solutions on ITO glass substrates, then mixture of glycol-based solvent and lithium bis(trifluoro methanesulfonyl)imidide (LiTFSI) was added to the thin films, producing soft photonic films. If needed, the spin-coated SP thin films were ionized by iodomethane before addition of the mixture of glycol-based solvent and LiTFSI. TEM observations and U-SAXS measurements revealed that these photonic films kept lamellar structures after addition of the solvent, that is, the P phase was swollen selectively with the solvent. Systematic electro-responsiveness of photonic properties of the films was also confirmed by applying voltages to the films.

  7. Direct Photon Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tingjun

    2013-01-01

    Direct (prompt) photon production is a field of very high interest in hadron colliders. It provides probes to search for new phenomena and to test QCD predictions. In this article, two recent cross-section results for direct photon production using the full CDF Run II data set are presented: diphoton production and photon production in association with a heavy quark.

  8. New electromagnetic memories and soft photon theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Pujian; Ouyang, Hao; Wu, Jun-Bao; Wu, Xiaoning

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we present a new type of electromagnetic memory. It is a "magnetic" type, or B mode, radiation memory effect. Rather than a residual velocity, we find a position displacement of a charged particle induced by the B mode radiation with memory. We find two types of electromagnetic displacement (ordinary and null). We also show that the null electromagnetic memory formulas are nothing but a Fourier transformation of soft photon theorems.

  9. Soft Photon Effects on Vacuum Power Flow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    Voltage as Function of Insulator Angle ............... 14 6. Vacuum Flashover Component Configuration ....................... 20 7. Radiation Temperature ...application. First, when an insulator is used in a vacuum , its ability to stand off voltage is severely limited on and near its surface . Bulk breakdown...investigate the following two problem areas inherent in vacuum nower flow under soft photon fluence: 1. Insulator Flashover : When a voltage is applied

  10. Subleading soft photons and large gauge transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campiglia, Miguel; Laddha, Alok

    2016-11-01

    Lysov, Pasterski and Strominger have shown how Low's subleading soft photon theorem can be understood as Ward identities of new symmetries of massless QED. In this paper we offer a different perspective and show that there exists a class of large U(1) gauge transformations such that (i) the associated (electric and magnetic) charges can be computed from first principles, (ii) their Ward identities are equivalent to Low's theorem. Our framework paves the way to analyze the sub-subleading theorem in gravity in terms of Ward identities associated to large diffeomorphisms.

  11. Soft photon effects on vacuum power flow. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, O.J.; Blaher, R.J.

    1981-12-01

    Understanding the physical processes of high power electrical energy is of major importance for the advancement of state-of-art directed energy, simulation and confined fusion programs. Generation of high voltage, short duration pulses may result in high energy density plasma which produces quantities of VUV and soft X-ray photons in the range of 0.15-10 ev. Power transport down vacuum lines presents two problems which must be dealt with in every application-insulator flashover and electrode gap closure. The pulsed flashover and ablative closure mechanisms under soft VUV photon fluence are described. Two tests were conducted. First, an insulator surface was subjected to VUV photons (0.5 ev) using apertures of 0.0156 to 0.5 inches in diameter with and without a quartz window. The apertures had no effect in inhibiting a flashover; however, the quartz window prevented the occurrance of insulator flashover. Second the gap closure rate of copper electrodes under the photon fluence of 6 x 10'9 watts per square meter was measured. A gap closure rate of 0.35 cm/microsecond was determined for the copper electrodes.

  12. Photon upconversion with directed emission

    PubMed Central

    Börjesson, K.; Rudquist, P.; Gray, V.; Moth-Poulsen, K.

    2016-01-01

    Photon upconversion has the potential to increase the efficiency of single bandgap solar cells beyond the Shockley Queisser limit. Efficient light management is an important point in this context. Here we demonstrate that the direction of upconverted emission can be controlled in a reversible way, by embedding anthracene derivatives together with palladium porphyrin in a liquid crystalline matrix. The system is employed in a triplet-triplet annihilation photon upconversion scheme demonstrating controlled switching of directional anti Stokes emission. Using this approach an emission ratio of 0.37 between the axial and longitudinal emission directions and a directivity of 1.52 is achieved, reasonably close to the theoretical maximal value of 2 obtained from a perfectly oriented sample. The system can be switched for multiple cycles without any visible degradation and the speed of switching is only limited by the intrinsic rate of alignment of the liquid crystalline matrix. PMID:27573539

  13. Photon upconversion with directed emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börjesson, K.; Rudquist, P.; Gray, V.; Moth-Poulsen, K.

    2016-08-01

    Photon upconversion has the potential to increase the efficiency of single bandgap solar cells beyond the Shockley Queisser limit. Efficient light management is an important point in this context. Here we demonstrate that the direction of upconverted emission can be controlled in a reversible way, by embedding anthracene derivatives together with palladium porphyrin in a liquid crystalline matrix. The system is employed in a triplet-triplet annihilation photon upconversion scheme demonstrating controlled switching of directional anti Stokes emission. Using this approach an emission ratio of 0.37 between the axial and longitudinal emission directions and a directivity of 1.52 is achieved, reasonably close to the theoretical maximal value of 2 obtained from a perfectly oriented sample. The system can be switched for multiple cycles without any visible degradation and the speed of switching is only limited by the intrinsic rate of alignment of the liquid crystalline matrix.

  14. Direct imaging of photonic nanojets.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Patrick; Wenger, Jérôme; Devilez, Alexis; Pianta, Martina; Stout, Brian; Bonod, Nicolas; Popov, Evgueni; Rigneault, Hervé

    2008-05-12

    We report the direct experimental observation of photonic nanojets created by single latex microspheres illuminated by a plane wave at a wavelength of 520 nm. Measurements are performed with a fast scanning confocal microscope in detection mode, where the detection pinhole defines a diffraction-limited observation volume that is scanned in three dimensions over the microsphere vicinity. From the collected stack of images, we reconstruct the full 3 dimensional photonic nanojet beam. Observations are conducted for polystyrene spheres of 1, 3 and 5 microm diameter deposited on a glass substrate, the upper medium being air or water. Experimental results are compared to calculations performed using the Mie theory. We measure nanojet sizes as small as 270 nm FWHM for a 3 microm sphere at a wavelength lambda of 520 nm. The beam keeps a subwavelength FWHM over a propagation distance of more than 3 lambda, displaying all the specificities of a photonic nanojet.

  15. Consistency of data on soft photon production in hadronic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lichard, P. )

    1994-12-01

    The glob model of Lichard and Van Hove and the modified soft annihilation model (MSAM) of Lichard and Thompson are used as a phenomenological tool for relating results from various experiments on soft photon production in high energy collisions. The total phenomenological expectation is composed of contributions from classical bremsstrahlung, the soft annihilation model, and the glob model. The empirical excess above the background from hadronic decays at very small longitudinal momenta of photons is well reproduced, as well as that for transverse momenta [ital p][sub [ital T

  16. Status of soft photons in experiment E855

    SciTech Connect

    Woody, C.; Lissauer, D. ); Gomez del Campo, J.; Ray, A.; Shapira, D.; Tincknell, M. ); Clark, R. ); Erd, C.; Schukraft, J.; Willis, W. )

    1990-01-01

    Experiment E855 was carried out at the AGS at Brookhaven National Laboratory to study soft photon production near center of mass rapidity Y{sub cm} {approximately} 0 in proton-nucleus collisions at 10 at 18 GeV/c. This was the first dedicated experiment to study this phenomenon at these lower energies. It is important to note that the related process of low mass dilepton pair production has been studied extensively at these energies and an excess signal of dileptons above known hadronic backgrounds has been firmly established. E855 was designed to measure photon production from P{sub t} {approximately} 5 MeV/c up to several GeV/c. A search will be made for an excess of soft photons in the P{sub t} region below the Jacobian peak from {pi}{sup 0} decays, above that which is expected from hadronic bremsstrahlung. Any observed signal will be correlated with the total charged multiplicity in the event in order to determine its production mechanism. This correlation can be used to distinguish purely hadronic sources of soft photons, such as mesons decays and bremsstrahlung, which vary linearly with the charged multiplicity, and a thermal source of soft photons which would exhibit a quadratic dependence on the charged multiplicity. In addition, E855 will measure low energy photons from nuclear decays which can be a background for measuring soft photons near Y{sub cm} {approximately} 0. These photons are also interesting from a nuclear physics point of view, since the spectrum of photons from nuclei excited by incident high energy protons gives a measure of the temperature of the excited nucleus and the amount of excitation energy which can be transferred to a nucleus in a high energy proton collision.

  17. Remarks on asymptotic symmetries and the subleading soft photon theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, Eduardo; Mao, Pujian

    2017-01-01

    A deep connection has been recently established between soft theorems and symmetries at null infinity in gravity and gauge theories, recasting the former as Ward identities of the latter. In particular, different orders (in the frequency of the soft particle) in the soft theorems are believed to be controlled by different asymptotic symmetries. In this paper we argue that this need not be the case by focusing on the soft photon theorem. We argue that the subleading soft factor follows from the same symmetry responsible for the leading one, namely certain residual (large) gauge transformations of the gauge theory. In particular, expanding the associated charge in inverse powers of the radial coordinate, the (sub)leading charge yields the (sub)leading soft factor.

  18. Semicrystalline woodpile photonic crystals without complicated alignment via soft lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Kuang, Ping; Leung, Wai; Kim, Yong-Sung; Park, Joong-Mok; Kang, Henry; Constant, Kristen; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2010-05-13

    We report the fabrication and characterization of woodpile photonic crystals with up to 12 layers through titania nanoparticle infiltration of a polymer template made by soft lithography. Because the complicated alignment in the conventional layer-by-layer fabrication associated with diamondlike symmetry is replaced by a simple 90{sup o} alignment, the fabricated photonic crystal has semicrystalline phase. However, the crystal performs similarly to a perfectly aligned crystal for the light propagation integrated from the surface normal to 30{sup o} at the main photonic band gap.

  19. The soft photon theorem for bremsstrahlung

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, L.

    1990-01-01

    We review this theorem and discuss the possible importance of the second term in the expansion of the cross section in powers of the photon momentum, especially for radiation from particle coming from the decay of resonances. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Adaptable and dynamic soft colloidal photonics (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Go, Dennis

    2015-10-01

    Existent photonic systems are highly integrated with the active component being completely isolated from the environment as a result of their complex format. There are almost no example for periodic photonic materials, which can interact with their environment by being sensitive to external stimuli while providing the corresponding photonic response. Due to this lack of interaction with the outside world, smart optical components, which are self-healing or adaptable, are almost impossible to achieve. I am going to present an aqueous colloidal system, consisting of core-shell particles with a solid core and a soft shell, bearing both negatively and positively charged groups. The described soft colloids exhibit like charges over a broad range of pH, where they repel each other resulting in a pefect and defect-free photonic crystal. In the absence of a net charge the colloids acquire the arrangement of an amorphous photonic glass. We showcase the applicability of our colloidal system for photonic applications by temporal programming of the photonic system and dynamic switching between ordered and amorphous particle arrangements. We can decrease the pH slowly allowing the particles to transit from negative through neutral to positive, and have them arrange accordingly from crystalline to amorphous and back to crystalline. Thus, we achieve a pre-programmable and autonomous dynamic modulation of the crystallinity of the colloidal arrays and their photonic response. References [1] Go, D., Kodger, T. E., Sprakel, J., and Kuehne, A. J.C. Soft matter. 2014, 10(40), 8060-8065.

  1. Soft glass photonic crystal fibres and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczyński, Ryszard; Klimczak, Mariusz; Pysz, Dariusz; Stepniewski, Grzegorz; Siwicki, Bartłomiej; Cimek, Jarosław; Kujawa, Ireneusz; Piechal, Bernard; Stepień, Ryszard

    2015-05-01

    Most of the research work related to photonic crystal fibres has to date been focused on silica based fibres. Only in the recent years has there been a fraction of research devoted to fibres based on soft glasses, since some of them offer interesting properties as significantly higher nonlinearity than silica glass and wide transparency in the infrared range. On the other hand, attenuation in those glasses is usually one or more orders of magnitude higher that in silica glass, which limits their application area due to limited length of the fibres, which can be practically used. We report on the development of single-mode photonic crystal fibres made of highly nonlinear lead-bismuth-gallate glass with a zero dispersion wavelength at 1460 nm and flat anomalous dispersion. A two-octave spanning supercontinuum in the range 700-3000 nm was generated in 2 cm of the fibre. In contrast to the silica glass, various oxide based soft glasses with large refractive index difference can jointly undergo multiple thermal processing steps without degradation. The use of two soft glasses gives additional degrees of freedom in the design of photonic crystal fibres. As a result, highly nonlinear fibres with unique dispersion characteristics can be obtained. Soft glass allow also development of fibres with complex subwavelength refractive index distribution inside core of the fibre. A highly birefringent fibre with anisotropic core composed of subwavelength glass layers ordered in a rectangular structure was developed and is demonstrated

  2. Clover: Compiler directed lightweight soft error resilience

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Qingrui; Lee, Dongyoon; Jung, Changhee; ...

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents Clover, a compiler directed soft error detection and recovery scheme for lightweight soft error resilience. The compiler carefully generates soft error tolerant code based on idem-potent processing without explicit checkpoint. During program execution, Clover relies on a small number of acoustic wave detectors deployed in the processor to identify soft errors by sensing the wave made by a particle strike. To cope with DUE (detected unrecoverable errors) caused by the sensing latency of error detection, Clover leverages a novel selective instruction duplication technique called tail-DMR (dual modular redundancy). Once a soft error is detected by either themore » sensor or the tail-DMR, Clover takes care of the error as in the case of exception handling. To recover from the error, Clover simply redirects program control to the beginning of the code region where the error is detected. Lastly, the experiment results demonstrate that the average runtime overhead is only 26%, which is a 75% reduction compared to that of the state-of-the-art soft error resilience technique.« less

  3. Clover: Compiler directed lightweight soft error resilience

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qingrui; Lee, Dongyoon; Jung, Changhee; Tiwari, Devesh

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents Clover, a compiler directed soft error detection and recovery scheme for lightweight soft error resilience. The compiler carefully generates soft error tolerant code based on idem-potent processing without explicit checkpoint. During program execution, Clover relies on a small number of acoustic wave detectors deployed in the processor to identify soft errors by sensing the wave made by a particle strike. To cope with DUE (detected unrecoverable errors) caused by the sensing latency of error detection, Clover leverages a novel selective instruction duplication technique called tail-DMR (dual modular redundancy). Once a soft error is detected by either the sensor or the tail-DMR, Clover takes care of the error as in the case of exception handling. To recover from the error, Clover simply redirects program control to the beginning of the code region where the error is detected. Lastly, the experiment results demonstrate that the average runtime overhead is only 26%, which is a 75% reduction compared to that of the state-of-the-art soft error resilience technique.

  4. Extruded soft glass photonic crystal fiber for ultrabroad supercontinuum generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanth Kumar, V. V. Ravi; George, A. K.; Reeves, W. H.; Knight, J. C.; Russell, P. St. J.; Omenetto, F. G.; Taylor, A. J.

    2002-12-01

    We report the fabrication and properties of soft glass photonic crystal fibers (PCF’s) for supercontinuum generation. The fibers have zero or anomalous group velocity dispersion at wavelengths around 1550 nm, and approximately an order of magnitude higher nonlinearity than attainable in comparable silica fibers. We demonstrate the generation of an ultrabroad supercontinuum spanning at least 350 nm to 2200 nm using a 1550 nm ultrafast pump source.

  5. Soft-commutated direct current motor

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    1999-01-01

    A method and circuit is disclosed for soft-commutation of a direct current (DC) motor. An attenuation circuit is connected through auxiliary brushes A, A', B and B' to the commutator (16) to drain circuit from successive armature coils (15) before the main brushes (27, 28) disconnects from each of the coils (15). This prevents the spark generation that normally occurs in conventional DC motors. The attenuation circuit may also be connected before energization of the coil (15) for a soft turning on operation.

  6. Soft-commutated direct current motor

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, J.S.

    1999-07-27

    A method and circuit is disclosed for soft-commutation of a direct current (DC) motor. An attenuation circuit is connected through auxiliary brushes A, A[prime], B and B[prime] to the commutator (16) to drain circuit from successive armature coils (15) before the main brushes (27, 28) disconnects from each of the coils (15). This prevents the spark generation that normally occurs in conventional DC motors. The attenuation circuit may also be connected before energization of the coil (15) for a soft turning on operation. 13 figs.

  7. Soft tissue imaging with photon counting spectroscopic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this work was experimental investigation of photon counting spectroscopic CT (PCS-CT) imaging of anatomical soft tissue with clinically relevant size. The imaging experiments were performed using a spectroscopic CT system based on CdZnTe photon counting detector with two rows of pixels, 256 pixels in each row, 1  ×  1 mm2 pixel size, and 25.6 cm detector length. The detector could split the x-ray energy spectrum to 5 regions (energy bins), and acquire 5 multi-energy (spectroscopic) CT images in a single CT scan. A sample of round shaped anatomical soft tissue of 14 cm diameter including lean and fat was used for imaging. To avoid the negative effect of anatomical noise on quantitative analysis, a spectroscopic CT phantom with tissue equivalent solid materials was used. The images were acquired at 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages, and spectroscopic image series were acquired with 3 and 5 energy bins. Spectroscopic CT numbers were introduced and used to evaluate an energy selective image series. The anatomical soft tissue with 14 cm diameter was visualized with good quality and without substantial artifacts by the photon counting spectroscopic CT system. The effects of the energy bin crosstalk on spectroscopic CT numbers were quantified and analyzed. The single and double slice PCS-CT images were acquired and compared. Several new findings were observed, including the effect of soft tissue non-uniformity on image artifacts, unique status of highest energy bin, and material dependent visualization in spectroscopic image series. Fat-lean decomposition was performed using dual energy subtraction and threshold segmentation methods, and compared. Using K-edge filtered x-rays improved fat-lean decomposition as compared to conventional x-rays. Several new and important aspects of the PCS-CT were investigated. These include imaging soft tissue with clinically relevant size, single- and double-slice PCS-CT imaging, using spectroscopic CT

  8. Soft tissue imaging with photon counting spectroscopic CT.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2015-03-21

    The purpose of this work was experimental investigation of photon counting spectroscopic CT (PCS-CT) imaging of anatomical soft tissue with clinically relevant size. The imaging experiments were performed using a spectroscopic CT system based on CdZnTe photon counting detector with two rows of pixels, 256 pixels in each row, 1  ×  1 mm(2) pixel size, and 25.6 cm detector length. The detector could split the x-ray energy spectrum to 5 regions (energy bins), and acquire 5 multi-energy (spectroscopic) CT images in a single CT scan. A sample of round shaped anatomical soft tissue of 14 cm diameter including lean and fat was used for imaging. To avoid the negative effect of anatomical noise on quantitative analysis, a spectroscopic CT phantom with tissue equivalent solid materials was used. The images were acquired at 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages, and spectroscopic image series were acquired with 3 and 5 energy bins. Spectroscopic CT numbers were introduced and used to evaluate an energy selective image series. The anatomical soft tissue with 14 cm diameter was visualized with good quality and without substantial artifacts by the photon counting spectroscopic CT system. The effects of the energy bin crosstalk on spectroscopic CT numbers were quantified and analyzed. The single and double slice PCS-CT images were acquired and compared. Several new findings were observed, including the effect of soft tissue non-uniformity on image artifacts, unique status of highest energy bin, and material dependent visualization in spectroscopic image series. Fat-lean decomposition was performed using dual energy subtraction and threshold segmentation methods, and compared. Using K-edge filtered x-rays improved fat-lean decomposition as compared to conventional x-rays. Several new and important aspects of the PCS-CT were investigated. These include imaging soft tissue with clinically relevant size, single- and double-slice PCS-CT imaging, using spectroscopic CT

  9. Optomechanics of two- and three-dimensional soft photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Dwarak

    Soft photonic crystals are a class of periodic dielectric structures that undergo highly nonlinear deformation due to strain or other external stimulus such as temperature, pH etc. This can in turn dramatically affect optical properties such as light transmittance. Moreover certain classes of lithographically fabricated structures undergo some structural distortion due to the effects of processing, eventually affecting the optical properties of the final photonic crystal. In this work, we study the deformation mechanics of soft photonic crystal structures using realistic physics-based models and leverage that understanding to explain the optomechanics of actual 2-D and 3-D soft photonic crystals undergoing similar symmetry breaking nonlinear deformations. We first study the optomechanics of two classes of 3-D soft photonic crystals: (1) hydrogel and (2) elastomer based material systems. The hydrogel based inverse face-centered-cubic structure undergoes swelling with change in pH of the surrounding fluid. The inverse structure is a network of bulky domains with thin ligament-like connections, and it undergoes a pattern transformation from FCC to L11 as a result of swelling. A continuum scale poroelasticity based coupled fluid-diffusion FEM model is developed to accurately predict this mechanical behavior. Light transmittance simulation results qualitatively explain the experimentally observed trends in the optical behavior with pH change. The elastomer based, lithographically fabricated material experiences shrinkage induced distortion upon processing. This behavior is modeled using FEM with the material represented by a neo-Hookean constitutive law. The light transmittance calculations for normal incidence are carried out using the transfer matrix method and a good comparison is obtained for the positions of first and second order reflectance peaks. A unit cell based approach is taken to compute the photonic bandstructure to estimate light propagation through the

  10. PHENIX Low Momentum Direct Photon Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wenqing; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The PHENIX experiment operates with one of the major detectors at the RHIC collider. One of the major goals of PHENIX is to identify and study Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Direct photons turn out to be an excellent probe due to their small interaction cross section with the collision produced medium hence carrying information of its properties from the space-time production points. In the PHENIX direct photon measurement, a large excess of low-pT photons in Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV is discovered compared to reference p+p collisions, which has been interpreted as thermal radiation from the QGP and hadron-gas (HG) medium. At the same time the excess photons have a large azimuthal anisotropy, expressed as Fourier coefficients v2 and v3. Measurements at a lower collision energy may provide new insight on the origin of the low-pT direct photons. In the experiment the current effort is to reduce the experimental uncertainties in Au+Au and p+p collisions via the photons' external conversion to di-electron pairs, and measure the direct photon yield in Cu+Au and p+Au collisions at 200 GeV as well as the yield in Au+Au collisions at lower 39 GeV and 62.4 GeV. We will present the improvements and the status of the ongoing analyses.

  11. Soft x-ray undulator for the Siam Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rugmai, S.; Dasri, T.; Prawanta, S.; Siriwattanapaitoon, S.; Kwankasem, A.; Sooksrimuang, V.; Chachai, W.; Suradet, N.; Juthong, N.; Tancharakorn, S.

    2007-01-19

    An undulator for production of intense soft x-rays has been designed for the Siam Photon Source. The construction of the undulator has been completed. It is now being characterized and prepared for installation. The device, named U60, is a pure permanent magnet planar undulator, consisting of 41 magnetic periods, with 60 mm period length. Utilization of the undulator radiation in the photon energy range of 30 - 900 eV is expected. The design studies of the magnetic structure, including investigation of perturbations arising from the magnetic field of the device, their effects on the SPS storage ring and compensation schemes are described. A magnetic measurement system has been constructed for magnetic characterization of the device. Partial results of magnetic measurements are presented.

  12. Direct Photon Production in a Nuclear Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaofeng

    The photon is a very good probe of short distance physics in strong interactions. It can be produced directly at short-distance or through fragmentation processes. Through one-loop order in perturbation theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), this thesis provides complete analytic expressions for both the inclusive and the isolated prompt photon production cross sections in hadronic final states of e^+e ^- annihilations. It is the first time that the full angular dependence of the cross sections is derived. Extraction of photon fragmentation functions from e^+e ^- annihilations is addressed. Using e ^+e^--->gamma+X as an example, this work demonstrates for the first time that conventional perturbative QCD factorization breaks down for isolated photon production in e^+e ^- annihilations in a specific region of phase space. The impact of this breakdown for computations of prompt photon production in hadron-hadron reactions is also discussed. In hadron-nucleus collisions, high energy photons can be produced through a single hard scattering as well as through multiple scattering. The contribution from the multiple scattering can be presented in terms of multi-parton correlation functions. Using information on the multi-parton correlation functions extracted from photon-nucleus experiments, for the first time, the nuclear dependence of direct photon production in hadron-nucleus collisions was predicted without any free parameter, and was tested at Fermi Lab experiment E706.

  13. Evidence for an excess of soft photons in hadronic decays of Z0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Johansson, P. D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A. C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2006-08-01

    Soft photons inside hadronic jets converted in front of the DELPHI main tracker (TPC) in events of qq¯ disintegrations of the Z0 were studied in the kinematic range 0.2direction pT<80 MeV/c. A clear excess of photons in the experimental data as compared to the Monte Carlo predictions is observed. This excess (uncorrected for the photon detection efficiency) is (1.17±0.06±0.27)×10-3 γ/jet in the specified kinematic region, while the expected level of the inner hadronic bremsstrahlung (which is not included in the Monte Carlo) is (0.340±0.001±0.038)×10-3 γ/jet. The ratio of the excess to the predicted bremsstrahlung rate is then (3.4±0.2±0.8), which is similar in strength to the anomalous soft photon signal observed in fixed target experiments with hadronic beams.

  14. Photon-exposure-dependent photon-stimulated desorption for obtaining photolysis cross section of molecules adsorbed on surface by monochromatic soft x-ray photons.

    PubMed

    Chou, L-C; Jang, C-Y; Wu, Y-H; Tsai, W-C; Wang, S-K; Chen, J; Chang, S-C; Liu, C-C; Shai, Y; Wen, C-R

    2008-12-07

    Photon-exposure-dependent positive- and negative-ion photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) was proposed to study the photoreactions and obtain the photolysis cross sections of molecules adsorbed on a single-crystal surface by monochromatic soft x-ray photons with energy near the core level of adsorbate. The changes in the F(+) and F(-) PSD ion yields were measured from CF(3)Cl molecules adsorbed on Si(111)-7x7 at 30 K (CF(3)Cl dose=0.3x10(15) molecules/cm(2), approximately 0.75 monolayer) during irradiation of monochromatic soft x-ray photons near the F(1s) edge. The PSD ion yield data show the following characteristics: (a) The dissociation of adsorbed CF(3)Cl molecules is due to a combination of direct photodissociation via excitation of F(1s) core level and substrate-mediated dissociation [dissociative attachment and dipolar dissociation induced by the photoelectrons emitting from the silicon substrate]. (b) the F(+) ion desorption is associated with the bond breaking of the surface CF(3)Cl, CF(2)Cl, CFCl, and SiF species. (c) the F(-) yield is mainly due to DA and DD of the adsorbed CF(3)Cl molecules. (d) The surface SiF is formed by reaction of the surface Si atom with the neutral fluorine atom, F(+), or F(-) ion produced by scission of C-F bond of CF(3)Cl, CF(2)Cl, or CFCl species. A kinetic model was proposed for the explanation of the photolysis of this submonolayer CF(3)Cl-covered surface. Based on this model and the variation rates of the F(+)F(-) signals during fixed-energy monochromatic photon bombardment at 690.2 and 692.6 eV [near the F(1s) edge], the photolysis cross section was deduced as a function of energy.

  15. Photon-exposure-dependent photon-stimulated desorption for obtaining photolysis cross section of molecules adsorbed on surface by monochromatic soft x-ray photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, L.-C.; Jang, C.-Y.; Wu, Y.-H.; Tsai, W.-C.; Wang, S.-K.; Chen, J.; Chang, S.-C.; Liu, C.-C.; Shai, Y.; Wen, C.-R.

    2008-12-01

    Photon-exposure-dependent positive- and negative-ion photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) was proposed to study the photoreactions and obtain the photolysis cross sections of molecules adsorbed on a single-crystal surface by monochromatic soft x-ray photons with energy near the core level of adsorbate. The changes in the F+ and F- PSD ion yields were measured from CF3Cl molecules adsorbed on Si(111)-7×7 at 30K (CF3Cl dose=0.3×1015molecules/cm2, ˜0.75 monolayer) during irradiation of monochromatic soft x-ray photons near the F(1s ) edge. The PSD ion yield data show the following characteristics: (a) The dissociation of adsorbed CF3Cl molecules is due to a combination of direct photodissociation via excitation of F(1s ) core level and substrate-mediated dissociation [dissociative attachment and dipolar dissociation induced by the photoelectrons emitting from the silicon substrate]. (b) the F+ ion desorption is associated with the bond breaking of the surface CF3Cl, CF2Cl, CFCl, and SiF species. (c) the F - yield is mainly due to DA and DD of the adsorbed CF3Cl molecules. (d) The surface SiF is formed by reaction of the surface Si atom with the neutral fluorine atom, F +, or F- ion produced by scission of C-F bond of CF3Cl, CF2Cl, or CFCl species. A kinetic model was proposed for the explanation of the photolysis of this submonolayer CF3Cl-covered surface. Based on this model and the variation rates of the F +/F- signals during fixed-energy monochromatic photon bombardment at 690.2 and 692.6eV [near the F(1s ) edge], the photolysis cross section was deduced as a function of energy.

  16. Direct Piezoelectricity of Soft Composite Electrospun Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Michael; Morvan, Jason; Diorio, Nick; Buyuktanir, Ebru; Harden, John; West, John; Jakli, Antal

    2013-03-01

    Recently soft fiber mats electrospun from solutions of Barium Titanate (BT) ferroelectric ceramics particles and poly lactic acid (PLA) were found to have large (d33 1nm/V) converse piezoelectric signals offering a myriad of applications ranging from active implants to smart textiles. Here we report direct piezoelectric measurements (electric signals due to mechanical stress) of the BT/PLA composite fiber mats at various BT concentrations. A testing apparatus was designed and constructed solely for these measurements involving AC stresses provided by a speaker in 10Hz-10kHz frequency range. The piezoelectric constant d33 ~1nC/N was found to be in agreement with the prior converse piezoelectric measurements. The largest signals were obtained with 6% BT/PLA composites, probably because the BT particles at higher concentrations could not be dispersed homogeneously. Importantly the direct piezoelectric signal is large enough to power a small LCD by simply pressing a 0.2mm thick 2 cm2 area mat by a finger. We expect to use these mats in active Braille cells and in liquid crystal writing tablets.

  17. Twisted Soft Photon Hair Implants on Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, Fabrizio; Laurentis, Mariafelicia; Licata, Ignazio; Thidé, Bo

    2017-08-01

    The Hawking-Perry-Strominger (HPS) work [1] states a new controversial idea about the black hole (BH) information paradox [2-5] where BHs maximally entropize and encode information in their event horizon area [6,7], with no "hair" were thought to reveal information outside but angular momentum, mass and electric charge only [8,9] in a unique quantum gravity (QG) vacuum state. This new idea invokes new conservation laws involving gravitation and electromagnetism [10,11], to generate different QG vacua and preserve more information in hair implants. In the context of black holes and the HPS proposal we find that BH photon hair implants can be spatially shaped ad hoc and encode structured and densely organized information on the event horizon involving novel aspect in the discussion a particular aspect of EM fields, namely the spatial information of the field associated to its orbital angular momentum. BHs can have "curly", twisted, soft-hair implants with vorticity where structured information is holographically encoded in the event horizon in an organized way.

  18. Electronic Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials with Photon-in/Photon-out Soft-X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jinghua

    2008-09-22

    The applications of resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy on a variety of carbon systems have yielded characteristic fingerprints. With high-resolution monochromatized synchrotron radiation excitation, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering has emerged as a new source of information about electronic structure and excitation dynamics. Photon-in/photon-out soft-X-ray spectroscopy is used to study the electronic properties of fundamental materials, nanostructure, and complex hydrides and will offer potential in-depth understanding of chemisorption and/or physisorption mechanisms of hydrogen adsorption/desorption capacity and kinetics.

  19. Soft photon theorem for high energy amplitudes in Yukawa and scalar theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervais, Hualong

    2017-06-01

    We study the emission of soft photons coupling to high energy fixed angle scattering processes at first order in the electromagnetic coupling but to all loop orders in a class of theories without soft divergences, including massive and massless Yukawa and scalar theories. We adapt a method introduced by del Duca for quantum electrodynamics to show that subleading corrections to the soft photon theorem are sensitive to the structure of nonleading external jets of collinear lines. Our techniques are based on a power counting analysis of loop integrals and an application of jet Ward identities. We also apply Grammer and Yennie's decomposition to isolate separately gauge invariant contributions to the soft photon expansion. These are interpreted as infrared sensitive matrix elements coupling to a field strength tensor.

  20. Experimental Overview of Direct Photon Results in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novitzky, Norbert

    2016-07-01

    Direct photons are color blind probes and thus they provide unique opportunities to study the colored medium created in heavy ion collisions. There are many different sources of direct photons each probing different physics processes as the system evolves. In basic 2 → 2 processes the prompt photons from primary hard scatterings offer the most precise measurements of the outgoing parton energy in the opposite direction. In heavy ion collisions the created medium emits photons as thermal radiation, whose rate and anisotropies provide a unique prospective on the properties and evolution of the system. Recent results on direct photons from the LHC and RHIC experiments are briefly summarized in this paper.

  1. Impact of residual contamination on inclusive and direct photon flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, F.; Loizides, C.; Peitzmann, T.; Sas, M.

    2017-02-01

    Direct photon flow is measured by subtracting the contribution of decay photon flow from the measured inclusive photon flow via the double ratio {R}γ , which defines the excess of direct over decay photons. The inclusive photon sample is affected by a modest contamination arising from different background sources, which can not always be fully corrected for in measurements. However, due to the sensitivity of the direct photon measurement even a residual contamination may significantly bias the extracted direct photon flow. In particular, for measurements using photon conversions, which are very powerful at low transverse momentum, these effects can be substantial. Assuming three different types of correlated background contributions we demonstrate using the Therminator2 event generator that the impact of the contamination on the magnitude of direct photon flow can be on the level of 50%, even if the purity of the inclusive photon sample is about 97%. Future measurements should attempt to account for the contamination by measuring the background contributions and subtracting them from the inclusive photon flow.

  2. Towards hybrid pixel detectors for energy-dispersive or soft X-ray photon science.

    PubMed

    Jungmann-Smith, J H; Bergamaschi, A; Brückner, M; Cartier, S; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Huthwelker, T; Maliakal, D; Mayilyan, D; Medjoubi, K; Mezza, D; Mozzanica, A; Ramilli, M; Ruder, Ch; Schädler, L; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Tinti, G

    2016-03-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications at free-electron lasers and synchrotron light sources. The JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype presented here is specifically geared towards low-noise performance and hence soft X-ray detection. The design, geometry and readout architecture of JUNGFRAU 0.4 correspond to those of other JUNGFRAU pixel detectors, which are charge-integrating detectors with 75 µm × 75 µm pixels. Main characteristics of JUNGFRAU 0.4 are its fixed gain and r.m.s. noise of as low as 27 e(-) electronic noise charge (<100 eV) with no active cooling. The 48 × 48 pixels JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype can be combined with a charge-sharing suppression mask directly placed on the sensor, which keeps photons from hitting the charge-sharing regions of the pixels. The mask consists of a 150 µm tungsten sheet, in which 28 µm-diameter holes are laser-drilled. The mask is aligned with the pixels. The noise and gain characterization, and single-photon detection as low as 1.2 keV are shown. The performance of JUNGFRAU 0.4 without the mask and also in the charge-sharing suppression configuration (with the mask, with a `software mask' or a `cluster finding' algorithm) is tested, compared and evaluated, in particular with respect to the removal of the charge-sharing contribution in the spectra, the detection efficiency and the photon rate capability. Energy-dispersive and imaging experiments with fluorescence X-ray irradiation from an X-ray tube and a synchrotron light source are successfully demonstrated with an r.m.s. energy resolution of 20% (no mask) and 14% (with the mask) at 1.2 keV and of 5% at 13.3 keV. The performance evaluation of the JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype suggests that this detection system could be the starting point for a future detector development effort for either applications in the soft X-ray energy regime or for an energy

  3. Towards hybrid pixel detectors for energy-dispersive or soft X-ray photon science

    PubMed Central

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Huthwelker, T.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Medjoubi, K.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.

    2016-01-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications at free-electron lasers and synchrotron light sources. The JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype presented here is specifically geared towards low-noise performance and hence soft X-ray detection. The design, geometry and readout architecture of JUNGFRAU 0.4 correspond to those of other JUNGFRAU pixel detectors, which are charge-integrating detectors with 75 µm × 75 µm pixels. Main characteristics of JUNGFRAU 0.4 are its fixed gain and r.m.s. noise of as low as 27 e− electronic noise charge (<100 eV) with no active cooling. The 48 × 48 pixels JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype can be combined with a charge-sharing suppression mask directly placed on the sensor, which keeps photons from hitting the charge-sharing regions of the pixels. The mask consists of a 150 µm tungsten sheet, in which 28 µm-diameter holes are laser-drilled. The mask is aligned with the pixels. The noise and gain characterization, and single-photon detection as low as 1.2 keV are shown. The performance of JUNGFRAU 0.4 without the mask and also in the charge-sharing suppression configuration (with the mask, with a ‘software mask’ or a ‘cluster finding’ algorithm) is tested, compared and evaluated, in particular with respect to the removal of the charge-sharing contribution in the spectra, the detection efficiency and the photon rate capability. Energy-dispersive and imaging experiments with fluorescence X-ray irradiation from an X-ray tube and a synchrotron light source are successfully demonstrated with an r.m.s. energy resolution of 20% (no mask) and 14% (with the mask) at 1.2 keV and of 5% at 13.3 keV. The performance evaluation of the JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype suggests that this detection system could be the starting point for a future detector development effort for either applications in the soft X-ray energy regime or for an energy

  4. Soft x-ray spectroscopy undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, K.J.; Xu, Z.; Moore, J.F.; Gluskin, E.

    1997-09-01

    Construction of the high-resolution soft x ray spectroscopy undulator beamline, 2ID-C, at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been completed. The beamline, one of two soft x ray beamlines at the APS, will cover the photon energy range from 500 to 3,000 eV, with a maximum resolving power between 7,000 and 14,000. The optical design is based on a spherical grating monochromator (SGM) giving both high resolution and high flux throughput. Photon flux is calculated to be approximately 10{sup 12}--10{sup 13} photons per second with a beam size of approximately 1 x 1 mm{sup 2} at the sample.

  5. Anomalous soft photon production from the induced currents in Dirac sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loshaj, Frasher; Kharzeev, Dmitri

    2013-10-01

    The propagation of a high energy quark distrurbs the confining vacuum inducing the currents in Dirac sea. Since quarks possess electric charge, these induced vacuum currents act as a source of soft photon radiation. This can lead to the enhancement of the soft photon production above the expectations based on the charged hadron yields and the Low theorem. We illustrate the phenomenon by using the exactly soluble 1 + 1 dimensional massless Abelian gauge model that shares with QCD all of the ingredients involved in this mechanism: confinement, chiral symmetry breaking, axial anomaly, and the periodic θ-vacuum. We show that the propagating quark throughout the process of hadronization induces in the vacuum charged transition currents that lead to a strong resonant enhancement of the soft photon yield; the Low theorem however remains accurate in the limit of very soft momenta. We then construct on the basis of our result a simple phenomenological model and apply it to the soft photon production in the fragmentation of jets produced in Z0 decays. We find a qualitative agreement with the recent result from the DELPHI Collaboration.

  6. Anomalous soft photon production from the induced currents in Dirac sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Loshaj, Frashër

    2014-04-01

    The propagation of a high-energy quark disturbs the confining QCD vacuum inducing the currents in Dirac sea. Since quarks possess electric charge, these induced vacuum quark currents act as a source of soft photon radiation. This can lead to the enhancement of the soft photon production above the expectations based on the charged hadron yields and the Low theorem. We illustrate the phenomenon by using the exactly soluble 1+1 dimensional massless Abelian gauge model that shares with QCD all of the ingredients involved in this mechanism: confinement, chiral symmetry breaking, axial anomaly, and the periodic θ vacuum. We show that the propagating quark throughout the process of hadronization induces in the vacuum charged transition currents that lead to a strong resonant enhancement of the soft photon yield; the Low theorem, however, remains accurate in the limit of very soft momenta. We then construct on the basis of our result a simple phenomenological model and apply it to the soft photon production in the fragmentation of jets produced in Z0 decays. We find a qualitative agreement with the recent result from the DELPHI Collaboration.

  7. Direct megavoltage photon calibration service in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, G.; Oliver, C.; Cole, A.; Lye, J.; Harty, P. D.; Wright, T.; Webb, D. V.; Followill, D. S.

    2014-01-01

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) maintains the Australian primary standard of absorbed dose. Until recently, the standard was used to calibrate ionisation chambers only in 60Co gamma rays. These chambers are then used by radiotherapy clinics to determine linac output, using a correction factor (kQ) to take into account the different spectra of 60Co and the linac. Over the period 2010–2013, ARPANSA adapted the primary standard to work in megavoltage linac beams, and has developed a calibration service at three photon beams (6, 10 and 18 MV) from an Elekta Synergy linac. We describe the details of the new calibration service, the method validation and the use of the new calibration factors with the International Atomic Energy Agency’s TRS-398 dosimetry Code of Practice. The expected changes in absorbed dose measurements in the clinic when shifting from 60Co to the direct calibration are determined. For a Farmer chamber (model 2571), the measured chamber calibration coefficient is expected to be reduced by 0.4, 1.0 and 1.1 % respectively for these three beams when compared to the factor derived from 60Co. These results are in overall agreement with international absorbed dose standards and calculations by Muir and Rogers in 2010 of kQ factors using Monte Carlo techniques. The reasons for and against moving to the new service are discussed in the light of the requirements of clinical dosimetry. PMID:25146559

  8. Direct photon production in high-energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Peitzmann, T.

    2016-01-22

    Direct photons have always been considered a promising probe for the very early phases of high-energy nuclear collisions. Prompt photons reveal information about the initial state and its possible modifications in nuclei. In this context they should be one of the best probes for effects of gluon saturation. Thermal photons emitted from the produced matter in nuclear collisions carry information on the temperature of the very early phase. In particular a simultaneous measurement of yield and elliptic flow of thermal photons can put strong constraints on the early time dynamics of the system. I review the status of results on direct photon measurements at RHIC and LHC and their interpretation. Prompt photons at high p{sub T} are consistent with expectations from NLO pQCD in pp and show no strong nuclear modifications in A–A collisions. Recent analysis at RHIC has shown very intriguing results for lower p{sub T}, with high thermal photon yield and strong elliptic flow of direct photons, which are not fully understood theoretically. Also the ALICE experiment at the LHC has measured a high yield of thermal photons. Furthermore I discuss prospects for future measurements of forward direct photons at the LHC.

  9. Imaging nanoscale magnetic structures with polarized soft x-ray photons

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.

    2010-01-18

    Imaging nanoscale magnetic structures and their fast dynamics is scientifically interesting and technologically of highest relevance. The combination of circularly polarized soft X-ray photons which provide a strong X-ray magnetic circular dichroism effect at characteristic X-ray absorption edges, with a high resolution soft X-ray microscope utilizing Fresnel zone plate optics allows to study in a unique way the stochastical behavior in the magnetization reversal process of thin films and the ultrafast dynamics of magnetic vortices and domain walls in confined ferromagnetic structures. Future sources of fsec short and high intense soft X-ray photon pulses hold the promise of magnetic imaging down to fundamental magnetic length and time scales.

  10. Soft commutated direct current motor [summary of proposed paper

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, John S.

    1998-10-22

    A novel soft commutated direct current (DC) motor is introduced. The current of the commutated coil is intentionally drained before the brush disconnects the coil. This prevents the spark generation that normally occurs in conventional DC motors. A similar principle can be applied for DC generators.

  11. Direct photons in nuclear collisions at fair energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, S. M.

    2009-03-15

    Using the extrapolation of existing data, estimations of prompt-photon production at FAIR energies have been made. At y = y{sub c.m.} the rapidity density of prompt photons with p{sub t} > 1.5 GeV/c per central Au + Au event at 25 A GeV is estimated as {approx}10{sup -4}. With the planned beam intensity 10{sup 9} per second and 1% interaction probability, for 10% of most central events one can expect the prompt-photon rate {approx}10{sup 2} photons per second. Direct photons from the hadron scenario of ion collisions generated by the Hadron-String-Dynamics (HSD) transport approach with implemented meson scatterings {pi}{rho} {yields} {pi}{gamma}, {pi}{pi} {yields} {rho}{gamma} have been analyzed. Photons from short-living resonances (e.g., {omega} {yields} {pi}0{gamma}) decaying during the dense phase of the collision should be considered as direct photons. They contribute significantly in the direct photon spectrum at p{sub t} = 0.5-1 GeV/c. At the FAIR energy 25 A GeV in Au + Au central collisions the HSD generator predicts, as a lower estimate, {gamma}{sub direct}/{gamma} {sub ({pi}{sup 0})} {approx_equal} 0.5% in the region p{sub t} = 0.5-1 GeV/c. At p{sub t} = 1.5-2 GeV/c {gamma}{sub prompt}/ {gamma} {sub ({pi}{sup 0})} {approx_equal} 2%. Thermal direct photons have been evaluated with the Bjorken Hydro-Dynamics (BHD) model. The BHD spectra differ strongly from the HSD predictions. The direct-photon spectrum is very sensitive to the initial temperature parameter T{sub 0} of the model. The 10-MeV increase in the T{sub 0} value leads to {approx}2 times higher photon yield.

  12. Direct fiber-coupled single photon source based on a photonic crystal waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Byeong-Hyeon Lee, Chang-Min; Lim, Hee-Jin; Schlereth, Thomas W.; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2015-08-24

    A single photon source plays a key role in quantum applications such as quantum computers and quantum communications. Epitaxially grown quantum dots are one of the promising platforms to implement a good single photon source. However, it is challenging to realize an efficient single photon source based on semiconductor materials due to their high refractive index. Here we demonstrate a direct fiber coupled single photon source with high collection efficiency by employing a photonic crystal (PhC) waveguide and a tapered micro-fiber. To confirm the single photon nature, the second-order correlation function g{sup (2)}(τ) is measured with a Hanbury Brown-Twiss setup. The measured g{sup (2)}(0) value is 0.15, and we can estimate 24% direct collection efficiency from a quantum dot to the fiber.

  13. Midinfrared optical rogue waves in soft glass photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Buccoliero, Daniel; Steffensen, Henrik; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Monro, Tanya M; Bang, Ole

    2011-09-12

    We investigate numerically the formation of extreme events or rogue waves in soft glass tellurite fibers and demonstrate that optical loss drastically diminishes shot-to-shot fluctuations characteristic of picosecond pumped supercontinuum (SC). When loss is neglected these fluctuations include extreme events such as formation of highly energetic pulses located at the red end of the spectrum and we obtain right-skewed heavy-tailed distributions characteristic of extreme events statistics. On the other hand, when loss is included bandwidth fluctuations follow Gaussian-like statistical distributions. Our results thus implicitly show that rogue waves will not occur in any SC spectrum that is limited by loss, such as commercial silica fiber based SC sources.

  14. Bi-directional evolutionary optimization for photonic band gap structures

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Fei; Huang, Xiaodong; Jia, Baohua

    2015-12-01

    Toward an efficient and easy-implement optimization for photonic band gap structures, this paper extends the bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) method for maximizing photonic band gaps. Photonic crystals are assumed to be periodically composed of two dielectric materials with the different permittivity. Based on the finite element analysis and sensitivity analysis, BESO starts from a simple initial design without any band gap and gradually re-distributes dielectric materials within the unit cell so that the resulting photonic crystal possesses a maximum band gap between two specified adjacent bands. Numerical examples demonstrated the proposed optimization algorithm can successfully obtain the band gaps from the first to the tenth band for both transverse magnetic and electric polarizations. Some optimized photonic crystals exhibit novel patterns markedly different from traditional designs of photonic crystals.

  15. Dirac directional emission in anisotropic zero refractive index photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    He, Xin-Tao; Zhong, Yao-Nan; Zhou, You; Zhong, Zhi-Chao; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2015-08-14

    A certain class of photonic crystals with conical dispersion is known to behave as isotropic zero-refractive-index medium. However, the discrete building blocks in such photonic crystals are limited to construct multidirectional devices, even for high-symmetric photonic crystals. Here, we show multidirectional emission from low-symmetric photonic crystals with semi-Dirac dispersion at the zone center. We demonstrate that such low-symmetric photonic crystal can be considered as an effective anisotropic zero-refractive-index medium, as long as there is only one propagation mode near Dirac frequency. Four kinds of Dirac multidirectional emitters are achieved with the channel numbers of five, seven, eleven, and thirteen, respectively. Spatial power combination for such kind of Dirac directional emitter is also verified even when multiple sources are randomly placed in the anisotropic zero-refractive-index photonic crystal.

  16. Dirac directional emission in anisotropic zero refractive index photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin-Tao; Zhong, Yao-Nan; Zhou, You; Zhong, Zhi-Chao; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2015-01-01

    A certain class of photonic crystals with conical dispersion is known to behave as isotropic zero-refractive-index medium. However, the discrete building blocks in such photonic crystals are limited to construct multidirectional devices, even for high-symmetric photonic crystals. Here, we show multidirectional emission from low-symmetric photonic crystals with semi-Dirac dispersion at the zone center. We demonstrate that such low-symmetric photonic crystal can be considered as an effective anisotropic zero-refractive-index medium, as long as there is only one propagation mode near Dirac frequency. Four kinds of Dirac multidirectional emitters are achieved with the channel numbers of five, seven, eleven, and thirteen, respectively. Spatial power combination for such kind of Dirac directional emitter is also verified even when multiple sources are randomly placed in the anisotropic zero-refractive-index photonic crystal. PMID:26271208

  17. Universal soft matter template: from photonic to metamaterial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeton, Cesare; De Sio, Luciano; Caputo, Roberto; Ferjani, Sameh; Strangi, Giuseppe; Bartolino, Roberto

    2011-10-01

    We report on the realization and characterization of a polymeric template sculptured in photosensitive material, on a chemical inert surface. The structure is devoted to micro/nanoconfinement and stabilization of a wide range of organic and nano-particle components with selfarrangement properties at the nanoscale [1]. High quality morphology of a polymeric, micropatterned, array is obtained by combining a, nano-precision level, optical holographic setup and a multi-step chemico-physical process. The "universal" template represents the basic platform to be filled with different organic materials, which can also include metallic nano-particles. The long range self-organization is induced without making use of any kind of surface chemistry. Due to their capability of exhibiting self organization, light responsive Liquid Crystals (LC) [2] and short pitch Cholesterics LC [3] have been exploited, and experimental studies have been carried out in order to investigate the photo-optical and elecro-optical response of obtained composite structures for the realization of photonic devices. Finally, the possibility of including metallic nano-particles has been also investigated, with the aim of inducing a "metamaterial" behavior of the realized structure.

  18. The soft-photon approximation in infrared-laser-assisted atomic ionization by extreme-ultraviolet attosecond-pulse trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Galán, Álvaro; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    We use the soft-photon approximation, formulated for finite pulses, to investigate the effects of the dressing pulse duration and intensity on simulated attosecond pump-probe experiments employing trains of attosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses in conjunction with an IR probe pulse. We illustrate the validity of the approximation by comparing the modelled photoelectron distributions for the helium atom, in the photon energy region close to the N = 2 threshold, to the results from the direct solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for two active electrons. Even in the presence of autoionizing states, the model accurately reproduces most of the background features of the ab initio photoelectron spectrum in the 1s channel. A splitting of the photoelectron harmonic signal along the polarization axis, in particular, is attributed to the finite duration of the probe pulse. Furthermore, we study the dependence of the sideband integrated signal on the pump-probe time delay for increasing IR field strengths. Starting at IR intensities of the order of ˜ 1 TW cm-2, overtones in the sideband oscillations due to the exchange of three or more IR photons start to appear. We derive an analytical expression in the frequency-comb limit of the soft-photon model for the amplitude of all the sideband frequency components and show that these amplitudes oscillate as a function of the intensity of the IR field. In particular, we predict that the amplitude of the fundamental component with frequency 2ωIR, on which the rabitt optical reconstruction technique is based, changes sign periodically.

  19. Photon-splitting limits to the hardness of emission in strongly magnetized soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    1995-01-01

    Soft gamma repeaters are characterized by recurrent activity consisting of short-duration outbursts of high-energy emission that is typically of temperature less than 40 keV. One recent model of repeaters is that they originate in the environs of neutron stars with superstrong magnetic fields, perhaps greater than 10(exp 14) G. In such fields, the exotic process of magnetic photon splitting gamma yields gamma gamma acts very effectively to reprocess gamma-ray radiation down to hard X-ray energies. In this Letter, the action of photon splitting is considered in some detail, via the solution of photon kinetic equations, determining how it limits the hardness of emission in strongly magnetized repeaters, and thereby obtaining observational constraints to the field in SGR 1806-20.

  20. Photon-splitting limits to the hardness of emission in strongly magnetized soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    1995-01-01

    Soft gamma repeaters are characterized by recurrent activity consisting of short-duration outbursts of high-energy emission that is typically of temperature less than 40 keV. One recent model of repeaters is that they originate in the environs of neutron stars with superstrong magnetic fields, perhaps greater than 10(exp 14) G. In such fields, the exotic process of magnetic photon splitting gamma yields gamma gamma acts very effectively to reprocess gamma-ray radiation down to hard X-ray energies. In this Letter, the action of photon splitting is considered in some detail, via the solution of photon kinetic equations, determining how it limits the hardness of emission in strongly magnetized repeaters, and thereby obtaining observational constraints to the field in SGR 1806-20.

  1. Two-photon directed evolution of green fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Barnett, Lauren M.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Wicks, Geoffrey; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Hughes, Thomas E.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2015-07-01

    Directed evolution has been used extensively to improve the properties of a variety of fluorescent proteins (FPs). Evolutionary strategies, however, have not yet been used to improve the two-photon absorption (2PA) properties of a fluorescent protein, properties that are important for two-photon imaging in living tissues, including the brain. Here we demonstrate a technique for quantitatively screening the two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) efficiency and 2PA cross section of tens of thousands of mutant FPs expressed in E. coli colonies. We use this procedure to move EGFP through three rounds of two-photon directed evolution leading to new variants showing up to a 50% enhancement in peak 2PA cross section and brightness within the near-IR tissue transparency wavelength range.

  2. High-directivity photonic bandgap antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Li, Huancai; Wang, Yuanchao; Jin, Jie

    2004-05-01

    The microstrip patch antenna is a low-profile low cost robust planar structure. A wide practical range of can be obtain with this type of antenna and, due to the ease of manufacture, is inexpensive compared with other types of operation, low gain, and a potential decrease in radiation efficiency due do surface-wave losses. In this paper, a new type of high directivity PBG patch antenna is proposed. It has been demonstrated that take advantages of both the suppression of surface waves and high directivity.

  3. Direct imaging of isofrequency contours in photonic structures

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Emma C.; Igarashi, Yuichi; Zhen, Bo; Kaminer, Ido; Hsu, Chia Wei; Shen, Yichen; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-01-01

    The isofrequency contours of a photonic crystal are important for predicting and understanding exotic optical phenomena that are not apparent from high-symmetry band structure visualizations. We demonstrate a method to directly visualize the isofrequency contours of high-quality photonic crystal slabs that show quantitatively good agreement with numerical results throughout the visible spectrum. Our technique relies on resonance-enhanced photon scattering from generic fabrication disorder and surface roughness, so it can be applied to general photonic and plasmonic crystals or even quasi-crystals. We also present an analytical model of the scattering process, which explains the observation of isofrequency contours in our technique. Furthermore, the isofrequency contours provide information about the characteristics of the disorder and therefore serve as a feedback tool to improve fabrication processes. PMID:28138536

  4. Programmable Phase Transitions in a Photonic Microgel System: Linking Soft Interactions to a Temporal pH Gradient.

    PubMed

    Go, Dennis; Rommel, Dirk; Chen, Lisa; Shi, Feng; Sprakel, Joris; Kuehne, Alexander J C

    2017-02-28

    Soft amphoteric microgel systems exhibit a rich phase behavior. Crystalline phases of these material systems are of interest because they exhibit photonic stop-gaps, giving rise to iridescent color. Such microgel systems are promising for applications in soft, switchable, and programmable photonic filters and devices. We here report a composite microgel system consisting of a hard and fluorescently labeled core and a soft, amphoteric microgel shell. At pH above the isoelectric point (IEP), these colloids easily crystallize into three-dimensional colloidal assemblies. By adding a cyclic lactone to the system, the temporal pH profile can be controlled, and the microgels can be programmed to melt, while they lose charge. When the microgels gain the opposite charge, they recrystallize into assemblies of even higher order. We provide a model system to study the dynamic phase behavior of soft particles and their switchable and programmable photonic effects.

  5. Direct photon production in e+e- annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, E.; Ford, W. T.; Qi, N.; Read, A. L.; Smith, J. G.; Camporesi, T.; de Sangro, R.; Marini, A.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Ronga, F.; Blume, H. T.; Hurst, R. B.; Sleeman, J. C.; Venuti, J. P.; Wald, H. B.; Weinstein, Roy; Band, H. R.; Gettner, M. W.; Goderre, G. P.; Meyer, O. A.; Moromisato, J. H.; Shambroom, W. D.; von Goeler, E.; Ash, W. W.; Chadwick, G. B.; Clearwater, S. H.; Coombes, R. W.; Kaye, H. S.; Lau, K. H.; Leedy, R. E.; Lynch, H. L.; Messner, R. L.; Moss, L. J.; Muller, F.; Nelson, H. N.; Ritson, D. M.; Rosenberg, L. J.; Wiser, D. E.; Zdarko, R. W.; Groom, D. E.; Lee, H. Y.; Delfino, M. C.; Heltsley, B. K.; Johnson, J. R.; Lavine, T. L.; Maruyama, T.; Prepost, R.

    1985-01-01

    Direct photon production in hadronic events from e+e- annihilation has been studied at √s =29 GeV with use of the MAC detector at the PEP storage ring. A charge asymmetry A=(-12.3+/-3.5)% is observed in the final-state jets. The cross section and the charge asymmetry are in good agreement with the predictions of the fractionally charged quark-parton model. Both the charge asymmetry and total yield have been used to determine values of quark charges. Limits have been established for anomalous sources of direct photons.

  6. GaN directional couplers for integrated quantum photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yanfeng; McKnight, Loyd; Watson, Ian M.; Gu, Erdan; Calvez, Stephane; Dawson, Martin D.; Engin, Erman; Cryan, Martin J.; Thompson, Mark G.; O'Brien, Jeremy L.

    2011-10-17

    Large cross-section GaN waveguides are proposed as a suitable architecture to achieve integrated quantum photonic circuits. Directional couplers with this geometry have been designed with aid of the beam propagation method and fabricated using inductively coupled plasma etching. Scanning electron microscopy inspection shows high quality facets for end coupling and a well defined gap between rib pairs in the coupling region. Optical characterization at 800 nm shows single-mode operation and coupling-length-dependent splitting ratios. Two photon interference of degenerate photon pairs has been observed in the directional coupler by measurement of the Hong-Ou-Mandel dip [C. K. Hong, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 2044 (1987)] with 96% visibility.

  7. Fabrication of Silicon Nanobelts and Nanopillars by Soft Lithography for Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Photonic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Baquedano, Estela; Martinez, Ramses V.; Llorens, José M.; Postigo, Pablo A.

    2017-01-01

    Soft lithography allows for the simple and low-cost fabrication of nanopatterns with different shapes and sizes over large areas. However, the resolution and the aspect ratio of the nanostructures fabricated by soft lithography are limited by the depth and the physical properties of the stamp. In this work, silicon nanobelts and nanostructures were achieved by combining soft nanolithography patterning with optimized reactive ion etching (RIE) in silicon. Using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) nanopatterned layers with thicknesses ranging between 14 and 50 nm, we obtained silicon nanobelts in areas of square centimeters with aspect ratios up to ~1.6 and linewidths of 225 nm. The soft lithographic process was assisted by a thin film of SiOx (less than 15 nm) used as a hard mask and RIE. This simple patterning method was also used to fabricate 2D nanostructures (nanopillars) with aspect ratios of ~2.7 and diameters of ~200 nm. We demonstrate that large areas patterned with silicon nanobelts exhibit a high reflectivity peak in the ultraviolet C (UVC) spectral region (280 nm) where some aminoacids and peptides have a strong absorption. We also demonstrated how to tailor the aspect ratio and the wettability of these photonic surfaces (contact angles ranging from 8.1 to 96.2°) by changing the RIE power applied during the fabrication process. PMID:28492474

  8. Fabrication of Silicon Nanobelts and Nanopillars by Soft Lithography for Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Photonic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Baquedano, Estela; Martinez, Ramses V; Llorens, José M; Postigo, Pablo A

    2017-05-11

    Soft lithography allows for the simple and low-cost fabrication of nanopatterns with different shapes and sizes over large areas. However, the resolution and the aspect ratio of the nanostructures fabricated by soft lithography are limited by the depth and the physical properties of the stamp. In this work, silicon nanobelts and nanostructures were achieved by combining soft nanolithography patterning with optimized reactive ion etching (RIE) in silicon. Using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) nanopatterned layers with thicknesses ranging between 14 and 50 nm, we obtained silicon nanobelts in areas of square centimeters with aspect ratios up to ~1.6 and linewidths of 225 nm. The soft lithographic process was assisted by a thin film of SiOx (less than 15 nm) used as a hard mask and RIE. This simple patterning method was also used to fabricate 2D nanostructures (nanopillars) with aspect ratios of ~2.7 and diameters of ~200 nm. We demonstrate that large areas patterned with silicon nanobelts exhibit a high reflectivity peak in the ultraviolet C (UVC) spectral region (280 nm) where some aminoacids and peptides have a strong absorption. We also demonstrated how to tailor the aspect ratio and the wettability of these photonic surfaces (contact angles ranging from 8.1 to 96.2°) by changing the RIE power applied during the fabrication process.

  9. Nanomechanical probing of soft matter through hydrophobic AFM tips fabricated by two-photon polymerization.

    PubMed

    Suriano, Raffaella; Zandrini, Tommaso; De Marco, Carmela; Osellame, Roberto; Turri, Stefano; Bragheri, Francesca

    2016-04-15

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation of soft materials is a powerful tool for probing mechanical properties of biomaterials. Though many results have been reported in this field over the last decade, adhesion forces between the tip and the sample hinder the elastic modulus measurement when hydrophilic soft samples are investigated. Here, two-photon polymerization (2PP) technology was used to fabricate hydrophobic perfluoropolyether-based AFM tips. The hydrophobic 2PP tips allowed us to overcome the limitations of commercial and functionalized tips as well as to successfully measure the elastic modulus of medically relevant soft materials in air. Our results obtained in the characterization of poly(dimethyl siloxane) and polyethylene glycol hydrogels showed lower adhesion forces over a larger measurement range when compared to measurements performed with commercial tips. The elastic moduli measured by means of hydrophobic 2PP AFM tips were also found to be comparable to those obtained using conventional techniques for macroscopic samples. We successfully showed that the hydrophobic AFM tips developed by this highly versatile technology enable the study of mechanical properties of soft matter, benefiting from reduced sample-tip interactions, and a custom-made shape and dimension of the tips.

  10. Nanomechanical probing of soft matter through hydrophobic AFM tips fabricated by two-photon polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Zandrini, Tommaso; De Marco, Carmela; Osellame, Roberto; Turri, Stefano; Bragheri, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation of soft materials is a powerful tool for probing mechanical properties of biomaterials. Though many results have been reported in this field over the last decade, adhesion forces between the tip and the sample hinder the elastic modulus measurement when hydrophilic soft samples are investigated. Here, two-photon polymerization (2PP) technology was used to fabricate hydrophobic perfluoropolyether-based AFM tips. The hydrophobic 2PP tips allowed us to overcome the limitations of commercial and functionalized tips as well as to successfully measure the elastic modulus of medically relevant soft materials in air. Our results obtained in the characterization of poly(dimethyl siloxane) and polyethylene glycol hydrogels showed lower adhesion forces over a larger measurement range when compared to measurements performed with commercial tips. The elastic moduli measured by means of hydrophobic 2PP AFM tips were also found to be comparable to those obtained using conventional techniques for macroscopic samples. We successfully showed that the hydrophobic AFM tips developed by this highly versatile technology enable the study of mechanical properties of soft matter, benefiting from reduced sample-tip interactions, and a custom-made shape and dimension of the tips.

  11. Photochemistry in a soft-glass single-ring hollow-core photonic crystal fibre.

    PubMed

    Cubillas, Ana M; Jiang, Xin; Euser, Tijmen G; Taccardi, Nicola; Etzold, Bastian J M; Wasserscheid, Peter; Russell, Philip St J

    2017-03-13

    A hollow-core photonic crystal fibre (HC-PCF), guided by photonic bandgap effects or anti-resonant reflection, offers strong light confinement and long photochemical interaction lengths in a microscale channel filled with a solvent of refractive index lower than that of glass (usually fused silica). These unique advantages have motivated its recent use as a highly efficient and versatile microreactor for liquid-phase photochemistry and catalysis. In this work, we use a single-ring HC-PCF made from a high-index soft glass, thus enabling photochemical experiments in higher index solvents. The optimized light-matter interaction in the fibre is used to strongly enhance the reaction rate in a proof-of-principle photolysis reaction in toluene.

  12. Commissioning of the soft x-ray undulator beamline at the Siam Photon Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Hideki Chaichuay, Sarunyu; Sudmuang, Porntip; Rattanasuporn, Surachet; Jenpiyapong, Watcharapon; Supruangnet, Ratchadaporn; Chanlek, Narong; Songsiriritthigul, Prayoon

    2016-07-27

    The synchrotron radiation from the first undulator at the Siam Photon Laboratory was characterized with the photon beam position monitors (BPMs) and grating monochromator. The soft x-ray undulator beamline employs a varied line-spacing plane grating monochromator with three interchangeable gratings. Since 2010, the beamline has delivered photons with energy of 40-160 and 220-1040 eV at the resolving power of 10,000 for user services at the two end- stations that utilize the photoemission electron spectroscopy and microscopy techniques. The undulator power-density distributions measured by the 0.05-mm wire-scan BPM were in good agreement with those in simulation. The flux-density distributions were evaluated in the red-shift measurements, which identify the central cone of radiation and its distribution. Since 2014, the operation of the other insertion devices in the storage ring has started, and consequently bought about the increases in the emittance from 41 to 61 nm·rad and the coupling constant from 4 to 11%. The local electron-orbit correction greatly improved the alignment of the electron beam in the undulator section resulting in the improvements of the photon flux and harmonics peaks of the undulator radiation.

  13. Generation of high-photon flux-coherent soft x-ray radiation with few-cycle pulses.

    PubMed

    Demmler, Stefan; Rothhardt, Jan; Hädrich, Steffen; Krebs, Manuel; Hage, Arvid; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    We present a tabletop source of coherent soft x-ray radiation with high-photon flux. Two-cycle pulses delivered by a fiber-laser-pumped optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier operating at 180 kHz repetition rate are upconverted via high harmonic generation in neon to photon energies beyond 200 eV. A maximum photon flux of 1.3·10(8) photons/s is achieved within a 1% bandwidth at 125 eV photon energy. This corresponds to a conversion efficiency of ~10(-9), which can be reached due to a gas jet simultaneously providing a high target density and phase matching. Further scaling potential toward higher photon flux as well as higher photon energies are discussed.

  14. Soft Plumbing: Direct-Writing and Controllable Perfusion of Tubular Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Axel; Omoruwa, Patricia; Chen, Haotian; McAllister, Arianna; Jeronimo, Mark; Malladi, Shashi; Hakimi, Navid; Cao, Li; Ramchandran, Arun

    2016-11-01

    Tubular and ductular structures are abundant in tissues in a wide variety of diameters, wall thicknesses, and compositions. In spite of their relevance to engineered tissues, organs-on-chips and soft robotics, the rapid and consistent preparation of tubular structures remains a challenge. Here, we use a microfabricated printhead to direct-write biopolymeric tubes with dimensional and compositional control. A biopolymer solution is introduced to the center layer of the printhead, and the confining fluids to the top and the bottom layers. The radially flowing biopolymer solution is sandwiched between confining solutions that initiate gelation, initially assuming the shape of a funnel until emerging through a cylindrical confinement as a continuous biopolymer tube. Tubular constructs of sodium alginate and collagen I were obtained with inner diameters (0.6-2.2mm) and wall thicknesses (0.1-0.4mm) in favorable agreement with predictions of analytical models. We obtained homogeneous tubes with smooth and buckled walls and heterotypic constructs that possessed compositions that vary along the tube circumference or radius. Ductular soft materials were reversibly hosted in 3D printed fluidic devices for the perfusion at well-defined transmural pressures to explore the rich variety of dynamical features associated with collapsible tubes that include buckling, complete collapse, and self-oscillation.

  15. Ultra-flattened negative dispersion for residual dispersion compensation using soft glass equiangular spiral photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran Hasan, Md.; Mahmud, R. R.; Morshed, Monir; Rabiul Hasan, Md.

    2016-09-01

    We present a numerical investigation of an equiangular spiral photonic crystal fibre (ES-PCF) in soft glass for negative flattened dispersion and ultra-high birefringence. An accurate numerical approach based on finite element method is used for the simulation of the proposed structure. It is demonstrated that it is possible to obtain average negative dispersion of -526.99 ps/nm/km over 1.05-1.70 μm wavelength range with dispersion variation of 3.7 ps/nm/km. The proposed ES-PCF also offers high birefringence of 0.0226 at the excitation wavelength of 1.55 μm. The results here show that the idea of using the proposed fibre can be potential means of effectively directing for residual dispersion compensation, fibre sensor design, long distance data transmission system and so forth.

  16. Ultrafast bandgap photonics for IR directional countermeasures and low observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailov, Michael K.

    2011-06-01

    Ultrafast Bandgap Photonics is discussed as an alternative technology for laser-based Directional IR Counter Measures (DIRCM). Ultra-fast laser is capable of providing fundamentally different type of countermeasure which is able to counter all generations of heat-seeking missiles. Ultrafast Bandgap Photonic technology is compatible with existing laser based DIRCM pointing systems as it requires much less energy per pulse and peak power than damage inducing systems. A foundation of ultra-fast technology is its ability to remotely alter seeker characteristics. In this paper, we will consider the effects caused by relatively low energy per pulse ultra-fast and, to some extent, fast lasers.

  17. Directed Assembly of Soft Colloids through Rapid Solvent Exchange.

    PubMed

    Nikoubashman, Arash; Lee, Victoria E; Sosa, Chris; Prud'homme, Robert K; Priestley, Rodney D; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2016-01-26

    We studied the directed assembly of soft nanoparticles through rapid micromixing of polymers in solution with a nonsolvent. Both experiments and computer simulations were performed to elucidate the underlying physics and to investigate the role of various process parameters. In particular, we discovered that no external stabilizing agents or charged end groups are required to keep the colloids separated from each other when water is used as the nonsolvent. Furthermore, the size of the nanoparticles can be reliably tuned through the mixing rate and the ratio between polymer solution and nonsolvent. Our results demonstrate that this mechanism is highly promising for the mass fabrication of uniformly sized colloidal particles, using a wide variety of polymeric feed materials.

  18. Ultrabroadband direct detection of nonclassical photon statistics at telecom wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Wakui, Kentaro; Eto, Yujiro; Benichi, Hugo; Izumi, Shuro; Yanagida, Tetsufumi; Ema, Kazuhiro; Numata, Takayuki; Fukuda, Daiji; Takeoka, Masahiro; Sasaki, Masahide

    2014-01-01

    Broadband light sources play essential roles in diverse fields, such as high-capacity optical communications, optical coherence tomography, optical spectroscopy, and spectrograph calibration. Although a nonclassical state from spontaneous parametric down-conversion may serve as a quantum counterpart, its detection and characterization have been a challenging task. Here we demonstrate the direct detection of photon numbers of an ultrabroadband (110 nm FWHM) squeezed state in the telecom band centred at 1535 nm wavelength, using a superconducting transition-edge sensor. The observed photon-number distributions violate Klyshko's criterion for the nonclassicality. From the observed photon-number distribution, we evaluate the second- and third-order correlation functions, and characterize a multimode structure, which implies that several tens of orthonormal modes of squeezing exist in the single optical pulse. Our results and techniques open up a new possibility to generate and characterize frequency-multiplexed nonclassical light sources for quantum info-communications technology. PMID:24694515

  19. Ultrabroadband direct detection of nonclassical photon statistics at telecom wavelength.

    PubMed

    Wakui, Kentaro; Eto, Yujiro; Benichi, Hugo; Izumi, Shuro; Yanagida, Tetsufumi; Ema, Kazuhiro; Numata, Takayuki; Fukuda, Daiji; Takeoka, Masahiro; Sasaki, Masahide

    2014-04-03

    Broadband light sources play essential roles in diverse fields, such as high-capacity optical communications, optical coherence tomography, optical spectroscopy, and spectrograph calibration. Although a nonclassical state from spontaneous parametric down-conversion may serve as a quantum counterpart, its detection and characterization have been a challenging task. Here we demonstrate the direct detection of photon numbers of an ultrabroadband (110 nm FWHM) squeezed state in the telecom band centred at 1535 nm wavelength, using a superconducting transition-edge sensor. The observed photon-number distributions violate Klyshko's criterion for the nonclassicality. From the observed photon-number distribution, we evaluate the second- and third-order correlation functions, and characterize a multimode structure, which implies that several tens of orthonormal modes of squeezing exist in the single optical pulse. Our results and techniques open up a new possibility to generate and characterize frequency-multiplexed nonclassical light sources for quantum info-communications technology.

  20. Nanoscale characterization of local structures and defects in photonic crystals using synchrotron-based transmission soft X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nho, Hyun Woo; Kalegowda, Yogesh; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Yoon, Tae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    For the structural characterization of the polystyrene (PS)-based photonic crystals (PCs), fast and direct imaging capabilities of full field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) were demonstrated at soft X-ray energy. PS-based PCs were prepared on an O2-plasma treated Si3N4 window and their local structures and defects were investigated using this label-free TXM technique with an image acquisition speed of ~10 sec/frame and marginal radiation damage. Micro-domains of face-centered cubic (FCC (111)) and hexagonal close-packed (HCP (0001)) structures were dominantly found in PS-based PCs, while point and line defects, FCC (100), and 12-fold symmetry structures were also identified as minor components. Additionally, in situ observation capability for hydrated samples and 3D tomographic reconstruction of TXM images were also demonstrated. This soft X-ray full field TXM technique with faster image acquisition speed, in situ observation, and 3D tomography capability can be complementally used with the other X-ray microscopic techniques (i.e., scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, STXM) as well as conventional characterization methods (e.g., electron microscopic and optical/fluorescence microscopic techniques) for clearer structure identification of self-assembled PCs and better understanding of the relationship between their structures and resultant optical properties. PMID:27087141

  1. Nanoscale characterization of local structures and defects in photonic crystals using synchrotron-based transmission soft X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nho, Hyun Woo; Kalegowda, Yogesh; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Yoon, Tae Hyun

    2016-04-01

    For the structural characterization of the polystyrene (PS)-based photonic crystals (PCs), fast and direct imaging capabilities of full field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) were demonstrated at soft X-ray energy. PS-based PCs were prepared on an O2-plasma treated Si3N4 window and their local structures and defects were investigated using this label-free TXM technique with an image acquisition speed of ~10 sec/frame and marginal radiation damage. Micro-domains of face-centered cubic (FCC (111)) and hexagonal close-packed (HCP (0001)) structures were dominantly found in PS-based PCs, while point and line defects, FCC (100), and 12-fold symmetry structures were also identified as minor components. Additionally, in situ observation capability for hydrated samples and 3D tomographic reconstruction of TXM images were also demonstrated. This soft X-ray full field TXM technique with faster image acquisition speed, in situ observation, and 3D tomography capability can be complementally used with the other X-ray microscopic techniques (i.e., scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, STXM) as well as conventional characterization methods (e.g., electron microscopic and optical/fluorescence microscopic techniques) for clearer structure identification of self-assembled PCs and better understanding of the relationship between their structures and resultant optical properties.

  2. Direct piezoelectric responses of soft composite fiber mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, M.; Morvan, J.; Diorio, N.; Buyuktanir, E.; Harden, J.; West, J. L.; Jákli, A.

    2013-04-01

    Recently soft fiber mats electrospun from solutions of Barium Titanate (BT) ferroelectric ceramics particles and polylactic acid (PLA) were found to have large (d33 ˜ 1 nm/V) converse piezoelectric signals offering a myriad of applications ranging from active implants to smart textiles. Here, we report direct piezoelectric measurements (electric signals due to mechanical stress) of the BT/PLA composite fiber mats at several BT concentrations. A homemade testing apparatus provided AC stresses in the 50 Hz-1.5 kHz-frequency range. The piezoelectric constant d33 ˜ 0.5 nC/N and the compression modulus Y ˜ 104-105 Pa found are in agreement with the prior converse piezoelectric and compressibility measurements. Importantly, the direct piezoelectric signal is large enough to power a small LCD by simple finger tapping of a 0.15 mm thick 2-cm2 area mat. We propose using these mats in active Braille cells and in liquid crystal writing tablets.

  3. Preparation of metallo-dielectric photonic crystals by multi-photon direct laser writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuebler, Stephen M.; Tal, Amir; Chen, Yun-Sheng

    2008-02-01

    Metallo-dielectric photonic crystals (MDPCs) can exhibit intriguing and potentially useful optical properties, including ultra-wide photonic bandgaps, engineered thermal emission, and negative refractive index. But access to such materials has been limited by the lack of suitable methods for their preparation. We have developed a route to three-dimensional (3D) MDPCs that involves fabricating a polymeric pre-form by multi-photon direct laser writing and then conformally depositing metal onto the pre-form by electroless metallization. We use the approach to prepare silver- and copper-plated "woodpile" PCs having face-centered tetragonal symmetry and unit-cell period of several micrometers. The resulting 3D metallized structures exhibit mid-infrared reflectance that is consistent with theory and experimental observations obtained for MDPCs prepared by other routes. These data indicate that multi-photon direct laser writing coupled with electroless metallization is a viable route to complex 3D MDPCs of many symmetries and basis sets and provides a path for integrating such structures with other micron-scale optical elements.

  4. High-energy resummation in direct photon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diana, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    We present the computation of the direct photon production cross-section in perturbative QCD to all orders in the limit of high partonic center-of-mass energy. We show how the high-energy resummation can be performed consistently in the presence of a collinear singularity in the final state, we compare our results to the fixed order NLO cross-section in the MS¯ scheme, and we provide predictions at NNLO and beyond.

  5. Electrical conductivity of the quark-gluon plasma and soft photon spectrum in heavy-ion collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Yin, Yi

    2014-10-06

    We extract the electrical conductivity σ0 of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and study the effects of magnetic field and chiral anomaly on soft photon azimuthal anisotropy, v₂, based on the thermal photon spectrum at 0.4GeV < p⊥< 0.6GeV at the RHIC energy. As a basis for my analysis, we derive the behavior of retarded photon self-energy of a strongly interacting neutral plasma in hydrodynamic regime in the presence of magnetic field and chiral anomaly. By evolving the resulting soft thermal photon production rate over the realistic hydrodynamic background and comparing the results with the data from the PHENIX Collaboration,more » I found that the electrical conductivity at QGP temperature is in the range: 0.4 < σ₀/(e²T) < 1.1, which is comparable with recent studies on lattice. I also compare the contribution from the magnetic field and chiral anomaly to soft thermal photon v₂ with the data. I argue that at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, the chiral magnetic wave would give negative contribution to photon v₂.« less

  6. Electrical conductivity of the quark-gluon plasma and soft photon spectrum in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yi

    2014-10-06

    We extract the electrical conductivity σ0 of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and study the effects of magnetic field and chiral anomaly on soft photon azimuthal anisotropy, v₂, based on the thermal photon spectrum at 0.4GeV < p⊥< 0.6GeV at the RHIC energy. As a basis for my analysis, we derive the behavior of retarded photon self-energy of a strongly interacting neutral plasma in hydrodynamic regime in the presence of magnetic field and chiral anomaly. By evolving the resulting soft thermal photon production rate over the realistic hydrodynamic background and comparing the results with the data from the PHENIX Collaboration, I found that the electrical conductivity at QGP temperature is in the range: 0.4 < σ₀/(e²T) < 1.1, which is comparable with recent studies on lattice. I also compare the contribution from the magnetic field and chiral anomaly to soft thermal photon v₂ with the data. I argue that at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, the chiral magnetic wave would give negative contribution to photon v₂.

  7. Directly tailoring photon-electron coupling for sensitive photoconductance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiming; Zhou, Wei; Huang, Jingguo; Wu, Jing; Gao, Yanqing; Qu, Yue; Chu, Junhao

    2016-03-11

    The coupling between photons and electrons is at the heart of many fundamental phenomena in nature. Despite tremendous advances in controlling electrons by photons in engineered energy-band systems, control over their coupling is still widely lacking. Here we demonstrate an unprecedented ability to couple photon-electron interactions in real space, in which the incident electromagnetic wave directly tailors energy bands of solid to generate carriers for sensitive photoconductance. By spatially coherent manipulation of metal-wrapped material system through anti-symmetric electric field of the irradiated electromagnetic wave, electrons in the metals are injected and accumulated in the induced potential well (EIW) produced in the solid. Respective positive and negative electric conductances are easily observed in n-type and p-type semiconductors into which electrons flow down from the two metallic sides under light irradiation. The photoconductivity is further confirmed by sweeping the injected electrons out of the semiconductor before recombination applied by sufficiently strong electric fields. Our work opens up new perspectives for tailoring energy bands of solids and is especially relevant to develop high effective photon detection, spin injection, and energy harvesting in optoelectronics and electronics.

  8. Directly tailoring photon-electron coupling for sensitive photoconductance

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhiming; Zhou, Wei; Huang, Jingguo; Wu, Jing; Gao, Yanqing; Qu, Yue; Chu, Junhao

    2016-01-01

    The coupling between photons and electrons is at the heart of many fundamental phenomena in nature. Despite tremendous advances in controlling electrons by photons in engineered energy-band systems, control over their coupling is still widely lacking. Here we demonstrate an unprecedented ability to couple photon-electron interactions in real space, in which the incident electromagnetic wave directly tailors energy bands of solid to generate carriers for sensitive photoconductance. By spatially coherent manipulation of metal-wrapped material system through anti-symmetric electric field of the irradiated electromagnetic wave, electrons in the metals are injected and accumulated in the induced potential well (EIW) produced in the solid. Respective positive and negative electric conductances are easily observed in n-type and p-type semiconductors into which electrons flow down from the two metallic sides under light irradiation. The photoconductivity is further confirmed by sweeping the injected electrons out of the semiconductor before recombination applied by sufficiently strong electric fields. Our work opens up new perspectives for tailoring energy bands of solids and is especially relevant to develop high effective photon detection, spin injection, and energy harvesting in optoelectronics and electronics. PMID:26964883

  9. Directly tailoring photon-electron coupling for sensitive photoconductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiming; Zhou, Wei; Huang, Jingguo; Wu, Jing; Gao, Yanqing; Qu, Yue; Chu, Junhao

    2016-03-01

    The coupling between photons and electrons is at the heart of many fundamental phenomena in nature. Despite tremendous advances in controlling electrons by photons in engineered energy-band systems, control over their coupling is still widely lacking. Here we demonstrate an unprecedented ability to couple photon-electron interactions in real space, in which the incident electromagnetic wave directly tailors energy bands of solid to generate carriers for sensitive photoconductance. By spatially coherent manipulation of metal-wrapped material system through anti-symmetric electric field of the irradiated electromagnetic wave, electrons in the metals are injected and accumulated in the induced potential well (EIW) produced in the solid. Respective positive and negative electric conductances are easily observed in n-type and p-type semiconductors into which electrons flow down from the two metallic sides under light irradiation. The photoconductivity is further confirmed by sweeping the injected electrons out of the semiconductor before recombination applied by sufficiently strong electric fields. Our work opens up new perspectives for tailoring energy bands of solids and is especially relevant to develop high effective photon detection, spin injection, and energy harvesting in optoelectronics and electronics.

  10. Characterization of tunable photonic crystal fiber directional couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun Soo; Park, Kwang No; Lee, Kyung Shik

    2007-06-01

    We present a tunable photonic crystal fiber (PCF) directional coupler fabricated by a side-polishing method. The PCF directional coupler was modeled as a typical single-mode fiber-based directional coupler and analyzed using the improved effective-index method (IEIM). The characteristics of the PCF directional coupler such as the coupling coefficient and the coupling ratio were measured and found to be in good agreement with those predicted by the theoretical model. The PCF directional coupler exhibited an insertion loss of ˜2 dB for a 3 dB coupler and was able to tune the coupling ratio between 0% and 100% by tilting the angle of the top side-polished quartz block against the fixed-bottom quartz block.

  11. Soft-Lithographical Fabrication of Three-dimensional Photonic Crystals in the Optical Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Hwang

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes several projects to realize low-cost and high-quality three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication using non-photolithographic techniques for layer-by-layer photonic crystals. Low-cost, efficient 3D microfabrication is a demanding technique not only for 3D photonic crystals but also for all other scientific areas, since it may create new functionalities beyond the limit of planar structures. However, a novel 3D microfabrication technique for photonic crystals implies the development of a complete set of sub-techniques for basic layer-by-layer stacking, inter-layer alignment, and material conversion. One of the conventional soft lithographic techniques, called microtransfer molding (μTM), was developed by the Whitesides group in 1996. Although μTM technique potentially has a number of advantages to overcome the limit of conventional photolithographic techniques in building up 3D microstructures, it has not been studied intensively after its demonstration. This is mainly because of technical challenges in the nature of layer-by-layer fabrication, such as the demand of very high yield in fabrication. After two years of study on conventional μTM, We have developed an advanced microtransfer molding technique, called two-polymer microtransfer molding (2P-μTM) that shows an extremely high yield in layer-by-layer microfabrication sufficient to produce highly layered microstructures. The use of two different photo-curable prepolymers, a filler and an adhesive, allows for fabrication of layered microstructures without thin films between layers. The capabilities of 2P-μTM are demonstrated by the fabrication of a wide-area 12-layer microstructure with high structural fidelity. Second, we also had to develop an alignment technique. We studied the 1st-order diffracted moire fringes of transparent multilayered structures comprised of irregularly deformed periodic patterns. By a comparison study of the diffracted moire fringe pattern and detailed

  12. Pi Zero and Direct Photon Production at High Transverse Moment

    SciTech Connect

    Zioulas, George

    1990-11-01

    The inclusive pizero and direct photon productions by 300 GeV/c $\\pi^-$ and $\\pi^+$ beams on a lithium target, were measured using the E705 spectrometer at Fermilab. The cross sections were determined by analyzing a fraction (20%) of the data recorded by the experiment during the 1987-1988 running period. The photons were measured by a high resolution electromagnetic calorimeter which consisted of scintillation and lead glass blocks. A fast trigger was designed and implemented to select events with high transverse energy depositions in the calorimeter. The invariant cross sections are presented as a function of the transverse momentum and the Feynman-x in the range between 4 to 7 GeV/c and -0.25 to 0.35 respectively. The results are compared to the measurements made by other experiments and to theoretical predictions within the framework of Quantum ChromoDynamics.

  13. Direct laser writing: biomimetic photonics and superresolution nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Min

    2014-03-01

    Biomimetic photonics is inspired by nature's ability to self-assemble complex nanostructured materials with superior properties to that of conventional materials. Biomimetic engineering of novel nanophotonic devices has led to optical nano-fountains, artificial compound eyes and optical gas sensors. Direct laser writing (DLW) is a powerful tool toward the development of ultimate three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic photonic devices. Here we demonstrate the fabrication (DWL) of a novel class of 3D photonic microstructures inspired by a recent finding in butterfly wing-scales and show that these nano-engineered 3D gyroid structures have the ability to redirect circularly polarized light as a chiral beamsplitter. Because of the increasing demand for realising nanogeometries, the diffraction-limited resolution associated with DLW, should be overcomed to access to the nanoscale. We will report on our recent progress on optical beam nanolithography by using the superresolution photoinduction-inhibited nanolithography (SPIN) technique. The smallest feature size of 9 nm for free-standing lines has been demonstrated.

  14. Neutral meson and direct photon analysis with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, A. M.; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of neutral mesons, particularly π0, s and η’s, plays an important role in the study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), the hot and dense medium created in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Parton energy loss in the QGP, often called jet quenching, can be assessed via measuring the suppression of high-pT π0, s in heavy-ion collisions, when compared to pp collisions using the nuclear modification factor (Raa). Furthermore, neutral mesons are the dominant source of photons in pp and Pb-Pb collisions, and their precise measurement is required to measure direct photons that are produced thermally within the QGP or in hard initial scatterings in the earliest phases of the collision. In both cases, high- quality measurements in pp collisions are required as a reference for Pb-Pb collisions. ALICE measurements of neutral meson spectra cover a large p T range, with the Photon Conversion Method - which requires measurements from the ITS and TPC - covering low to intermediate p T and the PHOS and EMCal electromagnetic calorimeters covering an intermediate to high p T range. In this presentation, measurements of π0, s and η’s obtained from the ALICE experiment, for pp collisions at several collisional center of mass energies ≤ft(\\sqrt{{s}NN}\\right), from 0.9 TeV to 8 TeV and in Pb-Pb collisions at \\sqrt{{s}NN}=2.76 {{TeV}}, will be presented. The reconstruction of neutral mesons using the Photon Conversion Method (PCM) will also be discussed.

  15. Soft Nanoimprint Lithography for Direct Printing of Crystalline Metal Oxide Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Rohit; Beaulieu, Michael; Watkins, James

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a solution-based soft nanoimprint lithography technique to directly print dimensionally-stable crystalline metal oxide nanostructures. A patterned PDMS stamp is used in combination with a UV/thermal cure step to imprint a resist containing high concentrations of crystalline nanoparticles in an inorganic/organic binder phase. The as-imprinted nanostructures are highly crystalline and therefore undergo little shrinkage (less than 5% in some cases) upon thermal annealing. High aspect ratio nanostructures and sub-100 nm features are easily realized. Residual layer free direct imprinting (no etching) was achieved by choosing the resist with the appropriate surface energy to ensure dewetting at stamp-substrate interface. The technique was further extended to stack the nanostructures by deploying a layer-by-layer imprint strategy. The method is scalable and can produce large area device quality nanostructures in a rapid fashion at a low cost. CeO2, ITO and TiO2 nanopatterns are illustrated for their potential use in fuel cell electrodes, solar cell electrodes and photonic devices, respectively.

  16. Direct Measurement of Photon Recoil from a Levitated Nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vijay; Gieseler, Jan; Moritz, Clemens; Dellago, Christoph; Quidant, Romain; Novotny, Lukas

    2016-06-01

    The momentum transfer between a photon and an object defines a fundamental limit for the precision with which the object can be measured. If the object oscillates at a frequency Ω0 , this measurement backaction adds quanta ℏΩ0 to the oscillator's energy at a rate Γrecoil, a process called photon recoil heating, and sets bounds to coherence times in cavity optomechanical systems. Here, we use an optically levitated nanoparticle in ultrahigh vacuum to directly measure Γrecoil. By means of a phase-sensitive feedback scheme, we cool the harmonic motion of the nanoparticle from ambient to microkelvin temperatures and measure its reheating rate under the influence of the radiation field. The recoil heating rate is measured for different particle sizes and for different excitation powers, without the need for cavity optics or cryogenic environments. The measurements are in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions and provide valuable guidance for the realization of quantum ground-state cooling protocols and the measurement of ultrasmall forces.

  17. ON THE DOUBLE NATURED SOLUTIONS OF THE TWO-TEMPERATURE EXTERNAL SOFT PHOTON COMPTONIZED ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Meirelles Filho, Cesar

    2009-08-01

    We have analyzed pair production in the innermost region of a two-temperature external soft photon Comptonized accretion disk. We have shown that, if the viscosity parameter is greater than a critical value {alpha}{sub c}, the solution to the disk equation is double valued: one, advection dominated, and the other, radiation dominated. When {alpha} {<=} {alpha}{sub c}, the accretion rate has to satisfy m-dot{sub 1}{<=}m-dot{<=}m-dot{sub c} in order to have two steady-state solutions. It is shown that these critical parameters m-dot{sub 1}, m-dot{sub c} are functions of r, {alpha}, and {theta}{sub e}, and {alpha}{sub c} is a function of r and {theta}{sub e}. Depending on the combination of the parameters, the advection-dominated solution may not be physically consistent. It is also shown that the electronic temperature is maximum at the onset of the thermal instability, from which results this inner region. These solutions are stable against perturbations in the electron temperature and in the density of pairs.

  18. Dispersion engineering in soft glass photonic crystal fibers infiltrated with liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefaniuk, Tomasz; Le Van, Hieu; Pniewski, Jacek; Cao Long, Van; Ramaniuk, Aleksandr; Grajewski, Karol; Chu Van, Lanh; Karpierz, Mirosław; Trippenbach, Marek; Buczynski, Ryszard

    2015-12-01

    We present a numerical study of the dispersion characteristic modification in a nonlinear photonic crystal fibre (PCF) infiltrated with organic solvents. The PCF is made of PBG08 glass and was developed in the stack-and-draw process. The PBG08 glass has a high refractive index (n < 2.0), high nonlinear refractive index (n2 = 4.3×10-19 m2/W) and good rheological properties that allow for thermal processing of the glass without crystallization. In the numerical study 18 different solvents were used. The dispersion, mode area, and losses characteristics were calculated. The zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW) of the fibre can be shifted towards longer wavelengths by approx. 150 nm by using Nitrobenzene as infiltrating liquid and by a smaller value using other liquids. At the same time the mode area of the fundamental mode increases by approx. 5 to 15% depending on the wavelength considered. The confinement losses increase significantly for six analysed liquids by a few orders of magnitude up to 102 dB/m. Our approach allows to combine high nonlinearities of the soft glass with the possibility to tune zero dispersion wavelength to the desired value.

  19. The Soft X-ray Spectrophotometer SphinX for the CORONAS-Photon Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Miroslaw; Szymon, Gburek; Bakala, Jaroslaw; Kuzin, Sergey; Kotov, Yury; Farnik, Frantisek; Reale, Fabio

    The purpose, construction details and calibration results of the new design, Polish-led solar X-ray spectrophotometer SphinX will be presented. The instrument constitutes a part of the Russian TESIS X-ray and EUV complex aboard the forthcoming CORONAS-Photon solar mission to be launched later in 2008. SphinX uses Si-PIN detectors for high time resolution (down to 0.01 s) measurements of solar spectra in the energy range between 0.5 keV and 15 keV. The spectral resolution allows separating 256 individual energy channels in this range with particular groups of lines clearly distinguishable. Unprecedented accuracy of the instrument calibration at the XACT (Palermo) and BESSY (Berlin) synchrotron will allow for establishing the solar soft X-ray photometric reference system. The cross-comparison between SphinX and the other instruments presently in orbit like XRT on Hinode, RHESSI and GOES X-ray monitor, will allow for a precise determination of the coronal emission measure and temperature during both very low and very high activity periods. Examples of the detectors' ground calibration results as well as the calculated synthetic spectra will be presented. The operation of the instrument while in orbit will be discussed allowing for suggestions from other groups to be still included in mission planning.

  20. Soft capacitive tactile sensing arrays fabricated via direct filament casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Gao, Yang; Fontecchio, Adam; Visell, Yon

    2016-07-01

    Advances in soft electronics are enabling the development of mechanical sensors that can conform to curved surfaces or soft objects, allowing them to interface seamlessly with the human body. In this paper, we report on intrinsically deformable tactile sensing arrays that achieve a unique combination of high spatial resolution, sensitivity, and mechanical stretchability. The devices are fabricated via a casting process that yields arrays of microfluidic channels in low modulus polymer membranes with thickness as small as one millimeter. Using liquid metal alloy as a conductor, we apply matrix-addressed capacitive sensing in order to resolve spatially distributed strain with millimeter precision over areas of several square centimeters. Due to the use of low-modulus polymers, the devices readily achieve stretchability greater than 500%, making them well suited for novel applications in wearable tactile sensing for biomedical applications.

  1. Direct measurement of the formation length of photons.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kristoffer K; Andersen, Søren L; Esberg, Jakob; Knudsen, Helge; Mikkelsen, Rune; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I; Sona, Pietro; Mangiarotti, Alessio; Ketel, Tjeerd J; Ballestrero, Sergio

    2012-02-17

    We report the first observation of a shoulder in the radiation spectrum from GeV electrons in a structured target consisting of two thin and closely spaced foils. The position of the shoulder depends on the target spacing and is directly connected to the finite formation length of a low-energy photon emitted by an ultrarelativistic electron. With the present setup it is possible to control the separation of the foils on a μm scale and hence measure interference effects caused by the macroscopic dimensions of the formation length. Several theoretical groups have predicted this effect using different methods. Our observations have a preference for the modified theory by Blankenbecler but disagree with the results of Baier and Katkov.

  2. Hysteresis Loss Analysis of Soft Magnetic Materials Under Direct Current Bias Conditions (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    correlated higher losses is not well understood. A domain imaging study under applied fields that uses the conditions reported in this study may...AFRL-RQ-WP-TP-2015-0133 Hysteresis Loss Analysis of Soft Magnetic Materials Under Direct Current Bias Conditions (Preprint) Zafer Turgut...Technical Paper 1 October 2013 to 1 September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hysteresis Loss Analysis of Soft Magnetic Materials Under Direct Current Bias

  3. Enhanced light extraction of scintillator using large-area photonic crystal structures fabricated by soft-X-ray interference lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zhichao; Wu, Shuang; Liu, Bo Cheng, Chuanwei; Gu, Mu; Chen, Hong; Xue, Chaofan; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Liansheng; Wu, Yanqing; Tai, Renzhong

    2015-06-15

    Soft-X-ray interference lithography is utilized in combination with atomic layer deposition to prepare photonic crystal structures on the surface of Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BGO) scintillator in order to extract the light otherwise trapped in the internal of scintillator due to total internal reflection. An enhancement with wavelength- and emergence angle-integration by 95.1% has been achieved. This method is advantageous to fabricate photonic crystal structures with large-area and high-index-contrast which enable a high-efficient coupling of evanescent field and the photonic crystal structures. Generally, the method demonstrated in this work is also suitable for many other light emitting devices where a large-area is required in the practical applications.

  4. Direct generation of photon triplets using cascaded photon-pair sources.

    PubMed

    Hübel, Hannes; Hamel, Deny R; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Ramelow, Sven; Resch, Kevin J; Jennewein, Thomas

    2010-07-29

    Non-classical states of light, such as entangled photon pairs and number states, are essential for fundamental tests of quantum mechanics and optical quantum technologies. The most widespread technique for creating these quantum resources is spontaneous parametric down-conversion of laser light into photon pairs. Conservation of energy and momentum in this process, known as phase-matching, gives rise to strong correlations that are used to produce two-photon entanglement in various degrees of freedom. It has been a longstanding goal in quantum optics to realize a source that can produce analogous correlations in photon triplets, but of the many approaches considered, none has been technically feasible. Here we report the observation of photon triplets generated by cascaded down-conversion. Each triplet originates from a single pump photon, and therefore quantum correlations will extend over all three photons in a way not achievable with independently created photon pairs. Our photon-triplet source will allow experimental interrogation of novel quantum correlations, the generation of tripartite entanglement without post-selection and the generation of heralded entangled photon pairs suitable for linear optical quantum computing. Two of the triplet photons have a wavelength matched for optimal transmission in optical fibres, suitable for three-party quantum communication. Furthermore, our results open interesting regimes of non-linear optics, as we observe spontaneous down-conversion pumped by single photons, an interaction also highly relevant to optical quantum computing.

  5. Processing of Enceladus' surface ice by energetic electrons, soft X-ray and VUV photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza Bergantini, Alexandre; Pilling, Sergio; Jones, Brant; Kaiser, Ralf

    Enceladus is a tiny, yet extremely interesting, moon of Saturn. It presents unique features in the Solar system, such as the chemically rich icy surface and the interior driven by intense geological activity, revealed by hot spots in the Enceladus’ south pole, a region dubbed the “Tiger Stripes” (Porco et al. 2006 Science). Enceladus’ frozen surface is dominated by H_2O (both in crystalline and amorphous form) and small amounts of carbon dioxide, methane, and ammonia, among other molecules in minor concentration. These molecules held the most important single elements for life as we know (i.e. CHON). In this work we present the results from several experiments on the processing of analogue of Enceladus ice surface by energetic electrons (5 keV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons in extreme-ultra-high vacuum regime (base pressure: 4x10(-11) mbar) in the W.M. Keck Astrochemistry laboratory in the University of Hawaii at Manoa, and the processing of the same ice by soft X-ray photons, using a high-vacuum portable chamber from the Laboratorio de Astroquimica e Astrobiologia (LASA/UNIVAP) coupled to the spherical grating monochromator (SGM) beamline, in the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source (LNLS). The experiments consist in the irradiation of a mixture, analogue to the Enceladus' ice surface (H_2O:CO_2:CH_4:NH_3 - 10:1:1:1), in different temperatures (5.5 K, 35 K, and 72 K). The samples were produced by the adsorption of the mixture in very low temperatures (5.5 K and 12 K), and the results were analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region (4000-400 cm(-1) or 2.5-25.0 mum range), as well as by time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (1 to 200 amu). The absolute dissociation cross sections of the parent molecules and the formation cross section of the daughter species were determined. Among the produced species, CO, OCN(-) , H_2CO, and HCONH_2 were easily detected, and the time-of-flight data shows the production of species with molecular masses up to

  6. Light trapping by direction-dependent light transmission in front-surface photonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayagaki, Takeshi; Kishimoto, Yuko; Hoshi, Yusuke; Usami, Noritaka

    2014-12-01

    Front-surface photonic nanostructures contribute both reduced reflection loss and light trapping to increase optical absorption in solar cells. We investigated the effect of sub-wavelength photonic nanostructures on light trapping in thin-film crystalline silicon solar cells. We clarified that, even though the angle distribution of scattered light is small compared with that in the case of Lambertian scattering, light trapping enhances with increasing depth of the surface photonic nanostructure, which originates from the direction-dependent light transmission in the surface photonic nanostructure. Our findings indicate that this direction-dependent light transmission contributes to the advanced photon management in thin-film solar cells.

  7. Direct detection of a single photon by humans

    PubMed Central

    Tinsley, Jonathan N.; Molodtsov, Maxim I.; Prevedel, Robert; Wartmann, David; Espigulé-Pons, Jofre; Lauwers, Mattias; Vaziri, Alipasha

    2016-01-01

    Despite investigations for over 70 years, the absolute limits of human vision have remained unclear. Rod cells respond to individual photons, yet whether a single-photon incident on the eye can be perceived by a human subject has remained a fundamental open question. Here we report that humans can detect a single-photon incident on the cornea with a probability significantly above chance. This was achieved by implementing a combination of a psychophysics procedure with a quantum light source that can generate single-photon states of light. We further discover that the probability of reporting a single photon is modulated by the presence of an earlier photon, suggesting a priming process that temporarily enhances the effective gain of the visual system on the timescale of seconds. PMID:27434854

  8. Soft nanostructured films for directing the assembly of functional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, D.; Kang, M.; Leal, C.

    2017-04-01

    Lipids are a class of biological small molecules with hydrophilic and hydrophobic constituents forming the structural membranes in cells. Over the past century an extensive understanding of lipid biology and biophysics has been developed illuminating lipids as an intricate, highly tunable, and hierarchical soft-matter system. In addition to serving as cell membrane models, lipids have been investigated as microphase separated structures in aqueous solutions. In terms of applications lipids have been realized as powerful structural motifs for the encapsulation and cellular delivery of genetic material. More recently, lipids have also revealed promise as thin film materials, exhibiting long-range periodic nano-scale order and tunable orientation. In this review we summarize the pertinent understanding of lipid nanostructure development in bulk aqueous systems followed by the current and potential perturbations to these results induced by introduction of a substrate. These effects are punctuated by a summary of our published results in the field of lipid thin films with added nucleic acids and key results introducing hard materials into lipid nanostructured substrates.

  9. Soft nanostructured films for directing the assembly of functional materials.

    PubMed

    Steer, D; Kang, M; Leal, C

    2017-04-07

    Lipids are a class of biological small molecules with hydrophilic and hydrophobic constituents forming the structural membranes in cells. Over the past century an extensive understanding of lipid biology and biophysics has been developed illuminating lipids as an intricate, highly tunable, and hierarchical soft-matter system. In addition to serving as cell membrane models, lipids have been investigated as microphase separated structures in aqueous solutions. In terms of applications lipids have been realized as powerful structural motifs for the encapsulation and cellular delivery of genetic material. More recently, lipids have also revealed promise as thin film materials, exhibiting long-range periodic nano-scale order and tunable orientation. In this review we summarize the pertinent understanding of lipid nanostructure development in bulk aqueous systems followed by the current and potential perturbations to these results induced by introduction of a substrate. These effects are punctuated by a summary of our published results in the field of lipid thin films with added nucleic acids and key results introducing hard materials into lipid nanostructured substrates.

  10. Three-dimensional photonic crystals created by single-step multi-directional plasma etching.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsuyoshi; Kitano, Keisuke; Ishizaki, Kenji; Noda, Susumu

    2014-07-14

    We fabricate 3D photonic nanostructures by simultaneous multi-directional plasma etching. This simple and flexible method is enabled by controlling the ion-sheath in reactive-ion-etching equipment. We realize 3D photonic crystals on single-crystalline silicon wafers and show high reflectance (>95%) and low transmittance (<-15dB) at optical communication wavelengths, suggesting the formation of a complete photonic bandgap. Moreover, our method simply demonstrates Si-based 3D photonic crystals that show the photonic bandgap effect in a shorter wavelength range around 0.6 μm, where further fine structures are required.

  11. Highly Directional Room-Temperature Single Photon Device.

    PubMed

    Livneh, Nitzan; Harats, Moshe G; Istrati, Daniel; Eisenberg, Hagai S; Rapaport, Ronen

    2016-04-13

    One of the most important challenges in modern quantum optical applications is the demonstration of efficient, scalable, on-chip single photon sources, which can operate at room temperature. In this paper we demonstrate a room-temperature single photon source based on a single colloidal nanocrystal quantum dot positioned inside a circular bulls-eye shaped hybrid metal-dielectric nanoantenna. Experimental results show that 20% of the photons are emitted into a very low numerical aperture (NA < 0.25), a 20-fold improvement over a free-standing quantum dot, and with a probability of more than 70% for a single photon emission. With an NA = 0.65 more than 35% of the single photon emission is collected. The single photon purity is limited only by emission from the metal, an obstacle that can be bypassed with careful design and fabrication. The concept presented here can be extended to many other types of quantum emitters. Such a device paves a promising route for a high purity, high efficiency, on-chip single photon source operating at room temperature.

  12. Time lag between hard and soft X-ray photons in QPO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stollman, G. M.; Van Paradijs, J.; Hasinger, G.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Van Der Klis, M.

    1987-01-01

    The millisec-order delay between quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed from Cyg X-2 and GX 5-1, in a high-energy and a low-energy bandpass, may be due to the Compton scattering of photons in a cloud of hot electron gas, depending on optical depth, electron temperature, and cloud radius, as well as input photon spectra. Monte Carlo simulations are used to demonstrate how the observed delay and X-ray spectrum can be used to constrain the size of the scattering cloud, for an assumed input spectrum of photons. Both QPO in emergent photons and a time lag between high and low energy photons can be generated not only by the scattering of an oscillating signal in a constant cloud, but also by the scattering of a constant source of input photons through a cloud with oscillating optical depth.

  13. An ultra-fast superconducting Nb nanowire single-photon detector for soft x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Inderbitzin, K.; Engel, A.; Schilling, A.; Il'in, K.; Siegel, M.

    2012-10-15

    Although superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) are well studied regarding the detection of infrared/optical photons and keV-molecules, no studies on continuous x-ray photon counting by thick-film detectors have been reported so far. We fabricated a 100 nm thick niobium x-ray SNSPD (an X-SNSPD) and studied its detection capability of photons with keV-energies in continuous mode. The detector is capable to detect photons even at reduced bias currents of 0.4%, which is in sharp contrast to optical thin-film SNSPDs. No dark counts were recorded in extended measurement periods. Strikingly, the signal amplitude distribution depends significantly on the photon energy spectrum.

  14. Directed Two-Photon Absorption in CdSe Nanoplatelets Revealed by k-Space Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, Jan; Scott, Riccardo; Prudnikau, Anatol V; Antanovich, Artsiom; Owschimikow, Nina; Artemyev, Mikhail; Climente, Juan I; Woggon, Ulrike; Grosse, Nicolai B; Achtstein, Alexander W

    2017-10-11

    We show that two-photon absorption (TPA) is highly anisotropic in CdSe nanoplatelets, thus promoting them as a new class of directional two-photon absorbers with large cross sections. Comparing two-dimensional k-space spectroscopic measurements of the one-photon and two-photon excitation of an oriented monolayer of platelets, it is revealed that TPA into the continuum is a directional phenomenon. This is in contrast to one-photon absorption. The observed directional TPA is shown to be related to fundamental band anisotropies of zincblende CdSe and the ultrastrong anisotropic confinement. We recover the internal transition dipole distribution and find that this directionality arises from the intrinsic directionality of the underlying Bloch and envelope functions of the states involved. We note that the photoemission from the CdSe platelets is highly anisotropic following either one- or two-photon excitation. Given the directionality and high TPA cross-section of these platelets, they may, for example, find employment as efficient logic AND elements in integrated photonic devices, or directional photon converters.

  15. Direct frequency comb two-photon laser cooling and trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayich, Andrew; Long, Xueping; Campbell, Wesley C.

    2016-05-01

    Generating and manipulating high energy photons for spectroscopy on electric dipole transitions of atoms and molecules with deeply bound valence electrons is difficult. Further, laser cooling of such species is even more challenging for lack of laser power. A possible solution is to drive two-photon transitions. This may alleviate the photon energy problem and open the door to cold, trapped samples of highly desirable species with tightly bound electrons. We perform a proof of principle experiment with rubidium by driving a two-photon transition with an optical frequency comb. We perform optical cooling and extend this technique to trapping, where we are able to make a magneto-optical trap in one dimension. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation CAREER program.

  16. Minimal NCSM Direct Photon Production in Proton-antiproton Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadou, I.; Mebarki, N.; Bekli, M. R.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we present the results of our calculations for the direct photons with proton-antiproton collision in Minimal Non-Commutative Standard Model at a center-of-mass energy √ s = 1.96 Tev. The analytical expression of the differential cross section of the two subprocesses is deduced after applying a series of rotation from the equatorial coordinates system to the laboratory frame. Subsequently, we have calculated the inclusive cross section in both space-space and space-time cases independently, by averaging over all unknown angles except the scattering angle and the colatitudes γ of electric-like vector ěc {θ }E and magnetic-like vector ěc {θ }B. Thus, comparison with the experimental CDF data of Tevatron allowed us to deduce two larges bounds on the non-commutativity parameter: {Λ}_{bound}^{space-space} =449.93± 29.20GeV and {Λ }_{bound}^{space-time} =459.83± 16.40 GeV. Moreover, the analysis between the difference experiment-theory and the purely non-commutative contribution, for γ varying between 0 ∘ to 90 ∘, allowed us to deduce a Pearson correlation coefficient: 0,58 ≤ ρ s p a c e-s p a c e ≤0,64 and 0,55 ≤ ρ s p a c e-t i m e ≤0,61. We deduce that the perpendicular to the earth rotation axis, given by γ = 90∘, is the preferred orientation of ěc {θ }E and ěc {θ }B.

  17. Minimal NCSM Direct Photon Production in Proton-antiproton Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadou, I.; Mebarki, N.; Bekli, M. R.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we present the results of our calculations for the direct photons with proton-antiproton collision in Minimal Non-Commutative Standard Model at a center-of-mass energy √ s = 1.96 Tev. The analytical expression of the differential cross section of the two subprocesses is deduced after applying a series of rotation from the equatorial coordinates system to the laboratory frame. Subsequently, we have calculated the inclusive cross section in both space-space and space-time cases independently, by averaging over all unknown angles except the scattering angle and the colatitudes γ of electric-like vector ěc {θ }E and magnetic-like vector ěc {θ }B. Thus, comparison with the experimental CDF data of Tevatron allowed us to deduce two larges bounds on the non-commutativity parameter: {Λ}_{bound}^{space-space} =449.93± 29.20GeV and {Λ }_{bound}^{space-time} =459.83± 16.40 { GeV}. Moreover, the analysis between the difference experiment-theory and the purely non-commutative contribution, for γ varying between 0 ∘ to 90 ∘, allowed us to deduce a Pearson correlation coefficient: 0,58 ≤ ρ s p a c e- s p a c e ≤0,64 and 0,55 ≤ ρ s p a c e- t i m e ≤0,61. We deduce that the perpendicular to the earth rotation axis, given by γ = 90∘, is the preferred orientation of ěc {θ }E and ěc {θ }B.

  18. Soft X-Ray Irradiation of Methanol Ice: Formation of Products as a Function of Photon Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Ciaravella, A.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Jiménez-Escobar, A.; Juang, K.-J.; Yih, T.-S.

    2013-12-01

    Pure methanol ices have been irradiated with monochromatic soft X-rays of 300 and 550 eV close to the 1s resonance edges of C and O, respectively, and with a broadband spectrum (250-1200 eV). The infrared (IR) spectra of the irradiated ices show several new products of astrophysical interest such as CH2OH, H2CO, CH4, HCOOH, HCOCH2OH, CH3COOH, CH3OCH3, HCOOCH3, and (CH2OH)2, as well as HCO, CO, and CO2. The effect of X-rays is the result of the combined interactions of photons and electrons with the ice. A significant contribution to the formation and growth of new species in the CH3OH ice irradiated with X-rays is given by secondary electrons, whose energy distribution depends on the energy of X-ray photons. Within a single experiment, the abundances of the new products increase with the absorbed energy. Monochromatic experiments show that product abundances also increase with the photon energy. However, the abundances per unit energy of newly formed species show a marked decrease in the broadband experiment as compared to irradiations with monochromatic photons, suggesting a possible regulatory role of the energy deposition rate. The number of new molecules produced per absorbed eV in the X-ray experiments has been compared to those obtained with electron and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiments.

  19. Direct Measurements of Edge Diffraction from Soft Underwater Acoustic Panels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    AD- A 2 83 198 UMENTATION PAGE Form Approved rn eu to h ou r P er 0 in~ g d w * ii. fat re wle 0O M B N o . 0 7 0 4 - 1 8 8 = "rt W o00MoG&t of...SPONSORING/MONITORING ]k• •.,(•. t z ,. .•AGENCY REPORT NUMBER OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH 1 AGENC REOR NUM- BOER 800 N. QUINCY ST. WSL 2 - ARLINGTON, VA 22217...kHz. (a) Directly radiated waveform. This waveform was captured with the bydrophone (b) ( O ) situated at the nominal 5-cm oflet positioa however, the

  20. Accuracy of measurements of small changes in soft tissue mass by use of dual-photon absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Lands, L C; Heigenhauser, G J; Gordon, C; Jones, N L; Webber, C E

    1991-08-01

    Dual-photon absorptiometry (DPA) has recently been applied to the assessment of body composition. To evaluate the accuracy of DPA in detecting small changes in the lean soft tissue mass, we performed DPA with the use of the Norland 2600 Dichromatic densitometer on six healthy adult males before and after a 30-ml/kg transfusion of saline and before and after exercise in a warm environment, resulting in a greater than or equal to 1-kg weight loss. Absolute weight [baseline pretransfusion r2 = 0.999, standard error of estimate (SEE) = 590 g; posttransfusion r2 = 0.999, SEE = 300 g; baseline pretranspiration r2 = 0.999, SEE = 230 g; posttranspiration r2 = 0.999, SEE = 240 g] was accurately reflected in DPA total mass. Weight changes due to transfusion were poorly reflected by changes in DPA total mass (r2 = 0.417, SEE = 404 g). However, changes posttranspiration were accurately reflected in the DPA total mass (r2 = 0.886, SEE = 106 g posttranspiration). Similarly, weight changes due to transfusion were poorly measured by changes in DPA soft mass (r2 = 0.478, SEE = 365 g), but changes posttranspiration were highly correlated with DPA soft mass changes (r2 = 0.909, SEE = 92 g). Weight changes were not reflected by changes in the DPA lean soft tissue mass (r2 = 0.006, SEE = 1,737 posttransfusion, r2 = 0.094, SEE = 1,038 g posttranspiration). DPA-derived nonfat mass was highly correlated with skinfold-derived nonfat mass (r2 = 0.96, SEE = 2,400 g). Accuracy of total and soft tissue measurements implied correct mineral mass assessment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Use of sol-gel-derived titania coating for direct soft tissue attachment.

    PubMed

    Areva, Sami; Paldan, Hannu; Peltola, Timo; Närhi, Timo; Jokinen, Mika; Lindén, Mika

    2004-08-01

    A firm bond between an implant and the surrounding soft tissue is important for the performance of many medical devices (e.g., stents, canyls, and dental implants). In this study, the performance of nonresorbable and reactive sol-gel-derived nano-porous titania (TiO(2)) coatings in a soft tissue environment was investigated. A direct attachment between the soft tissue and the sol-gel-derived titania coatings was found in vivo after 2 days of implantation, whereas the titanium control implants showed no evidence of soft tissue attachment. The coated implants were in immediate contact with the connective tissue, whereas the titanium controls formed a gap and a fibrous capsule on the implant-tissue interface. The good soft tissue attachment of titania coatings may result from their ability to initiate calcium phosphate nucleation and growth on their surfaces (although the formation of poorly crystalline bonelike apatite does not occur). Thus, the formation of a bonelike CaP layer is not crucial for their integration in soft tissue. The formation of bonelike apatite was hindered by the adsorption of proteins onto the initially formed amorphous calcium phosphate growth centers, thus preventing the dissolution/reprecipitation processes required for the formation of poorly crystalline bonelike apatite. These findings might open novel application areas for sol-gel-derived titania-based coatings.

  2. Nonperturbative-transverse-momentum effects and evolution in dihadron and direct photon-hadron angular correlations in p+p collisions at s=510GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; ...

    2017-04-04

    Dihadron and isolated direct photon-hadron angular correlations are measured in p+p collisions at √s=510 GeV. Correlations of charged hadrons of 0.7T<10 GeV/c with π0 mesons of 4T<15 GeV/c or isolated direct photons of 7T direct photon or π0. Nonperturbative evolution effects are extracted from Gaussian fits to the away-side inclusive-charged-hadron yields for different trigger-particle transverse momenta (pmore » $$trig\\atop{T}$$). The Gaussian widths and root mean square of pout are reported as a function of the interaction hard scale p$$trig\\atop{T}$$ to investigate possible transverse-momentum-dependent evolution differences between the π0-h± and direct photon-h± correlations and factorization breaking effects. The widths are found to decrease with p$$trig\\atop{T}$$, which indicates that the Collins-Soper-Sterman soft factor is not driving the evolution with the hard scale in nearly back-to-back dihadron and direct photon-hadron production in p+p collisions. This behavior is in contrast to Drell-Yan and semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering measurements.« less

  3. Directed Assembly of Soft Anisotropic Nanoparticles by Colloid Electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuai; Mable, Charlotte J; Armes, Steven P; Crespy, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Directed assembly of triblock copolymer worms to produce nanostructured fibers is achieved via colloid electrospinning. These copolymer worms are conveniently prepared by polymerization-induced self-assembly in concentrated aqueous dispersion. Addition of a second water-soluble component, poly(vinyl alcohol), is found to be critical for the production of well-defined fibers: trial experiments performed using the worms alone produce only spherical microparticles. Transmission electron microscopy studies confirm that the worm morphology survives electrospinning and the worms become orientated parallel to the main axis of the fibers during their generation. The average deviant angle (θdev ) between the worm orientation and fiber axis decreases from 17° to 9° as the worm/PVA mass ratio increases from 1.15:1 to 5:1, indicating a greater degree of worm alignment within fibers with higher worm contents and smaller fiber diameters. Thus triblock copolymer fibers of ≈300 ± 120 nm diameter can be readily produced that comprise aligned worms on the nanoscale.

  4. Direct photon production in d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Adler, S. S.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bruner, N.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Camard, X.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chand, P.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deák, F.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Devismes, A.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finck, C.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fox, B. D.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S.-Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hansen, A. G.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; Hidas, P.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Ikonnikov, V. V.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Inuzuka, M.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Johnson, S. C.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Katou, K.; Kawabata, T.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Kempel, T.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, G.-B.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Kohara, R.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kuberg, C. H.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Martinez, G.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McCain, M. C.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, G. C.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Ouchida, M.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Penev, V.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pierson, A.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Qualls, J. M.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, S. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sanfratello, L.; Sano, S.; Santo, R.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Schutz, Y.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sziklai, J.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tojo, J.; Tomášek, L.; Tomita, Y.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; Uam, T. J.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Velkovsky, M.; Vértesi, R.; Veszprémi, V.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Volkov, M. A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Willis, N.; Winter, D.; Wohn, F. K.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zimányi, J.; Zolin, L.; Zong, X.

    2013-05-01

    Direct photons have been measured in sNN=200 GeV d+Au collisions at midrapidity. A wide pT range is covered by measurements of nearly real virtual photons (1photons (5direct photons in d+Au collisions over the scaled p+p cross section is consistent with unity. Theoretical calculations assuming standard cold-nuclear-matter effects describe the data well for the entire pT range. This indicates that the large enhancement of direct photons observed in Au+Au collisions for 1.0

  5. Quantitative analysis of directional spontaneous emission spectra from light sources in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; Vos, Willem L.

    2005-05-15

    We have performed angle-resolved measurements of spontaneous-emission spectra from laser dyes and quantum dots in opal and inverse opal photonic crystals. Pronounced directional dependencies of the emission spectra are observed: angular ranges of strongly reduced emission adjoin with angular ranges of enhanced emission. It appears that emission from embedded light sources is affected both by the periodicity and by the structural imperfections of the crystals: the photons are Bragg diffracted by lattice planes and scattered by unavoidable structural disorder. Using a model comprising diffuse light transport and photonic band structure, we quantitatively explain the directional emission spectra. This work provides detailed understanding of the transport of spontaneously emitted light in real photonic crystals, which is essential in the interpretation of quantum optics in photonic-band-gap crystals and for applications wherein directional emission and total emission power are controlled.

  6. Direct photon production from hadronic sources in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Kiselev, S. M.; Sharkov, G. B.

    2008-09-15

    The low p{sub T} direct photon production from a variety of the hadronic sources is studied within the microscopic hadron-string dynamics transport approach for p+C, p+Pb, and Pb+Pb collisions at 160A GeV. The direct photon emission from elementary hadronic scatterings as well as meson-meson bremsstrahlung are incorporated. The influence of in-medium effects such as a collisional broadening of the vector-meson spectral functions on the photon emission rate is found to be hardly observable in the final spectra that are dominated by bremsstrahlung-type processes. The uncertainties in the subtraction of the 'background' from the photon decay of hadronic resonances inside the hot and dense fireball is investigated, additionally. Our findings are relevant for the interpretation and extraction of experimental data on direct photon production at low p{sub T}.

  7. Impact of Spacecraft Shielding on Direct Ionization Soft Error Rates for sub-130 nm Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Xapsos, Michael A.; Stauffer, Craig A.; Jordan, Michael M.; Sanders, Anthony B.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Oldham, Timothy R.; Marshall, Paul W.; Heidel, David F.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.

    2010-01-01

    We use ray tracing software to model various levels of spacecraft shielding complexity and energy deposition pulse height analysis to study how it affects the direct ionization soft error rate of microelectronic components in space. The analysis incorporates the galactic cosmic ray background, trapped proton, and solar heavy ion environments as well as the October 1989 and July 2000 solar particle events.

  8. Direct laser writing defects in holographic lithography-created photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong-Bo; Nakamura, Atsushi; Kaneko, Koshiro; Shoji, Satoru; Kawata, Satoshi

    2005-04-15

    As a well-established laser fabrication approach, holographic lithography, or multibeam interference patterning, is known for its capability to create long-range ordered large-volume photonic crystals (PhCs) rapidly. Its broad use is, however, hampered by difficulty in inducing artificially designed defects for device functions. We use pinpoint femtosecond laser ablation to remove and two-photon photopolymerization to add desired defective features to obtain photonic acceptors and photonic donors, respectively, in an otherwise complete PhC matrix produced by holographic lithography. The combined use of the two direct laser writing technologies would immediately make holographic lithography a promising industrial tool for PhC manufacture.

  9. Optical design of the Short Pulse Soft X-ray Spectroscopy beamline at the Advanced Photon Source

    PubMed Central

    Reininger, R.; Keavney, D. J.; Borland, M.; Young, L.

    2013-01-01

    The Short Pulse X-ray facility planned for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) upgrade will provide two sectors with photon beams having picosecond pulse duration. The Short Pulse Soft X-ray Spectroscopy (SPSXS) beamline will cover the 150–2000 eV energy range using an APS bending magnet. SPSXS is designed to take full advantage of this new timing capability in addition to providing circular polarized radiation. Since the correlation between time and electron momentum is in the vertical plane, the monochromator disperses in the horizontal plane. The beamline is designed to maximize flux and preserve the time resolution by minimizing the number of optical components. The optical design allows the pulse duration to be varied from 1.5 to 100 ps full width at half-maximum (FWHM) without affecting the energy resolution, and the resolution to be changed with minimal effect on the pulse duration. More than 109 photons s−1 will reach the sample with a resolving power of 2000 and a pulse duration of ∼2 ps for photon energies between 150 and 1750 eV. The spot size expected at the sample position will vary with pulse duration and exit slit opening. At 900 eV and at a resolving power of 2000 the spot will be ∼10 µm × 10 µm with a pulse duration of 2.3 ps FWHM. PMID:23765311

  10. Photon-Noise Limited Direct Detector Based on Disorder-Controlled Electron Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, B.; McGrath, W.; Gershenson, M.; Sergeev, A.

    1999-01-01

    We present a new concept for a hot-electron direct detector (HEDD) capable of counting single millimeter-wave photons. The detector is based on a transition edge sensor (1-meu size bridge) made form a disordered superconducting film.

  11. Photon-Noise Limited Direct Detector Based on Disorder-Controlled Electron Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, B.; McGrath, W.; Gershenson, M.; Sergeev, A.

    1999-01-01

    We present a new concept for a hot-electron direct detector (HEDD) capable of counting single millimeter-wave photons. The detector is based on a transition edge sensor (1-meu size bridge) made form a disordered superconducting film.

  12. Direct photon measurements by the D{O} experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Abachi, S.

    1996-07-01

    We report a measurement of the cross section for production of isolated photons with transverse energy E{sub T} > 12 GeV in the central (absolute value of {eta} < 0.9) and forward (1.6 < absolute value of {eta} < 2.5) rapidity regions for {bar p}p collisions at center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.8 TeV, using an integrated luminosity of 13 pb{sup {minus}1}. The cross section is compared with a next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD calculation. We also present preliminary measurements of the center of mass scattering angle distribution and of the correlations between the rapidity of the photon and that of the leading jet in the event.

  13. Search for direct photons in Υ(4S) decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narain, M.; Heintz, U.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lovelock, D. M. J.; Schamberger, R. D.; Willins, J.; Yanagisawa, C.; Franzini, P.; Tuts, P. M.

    1990-11-01

    We have searched for photon signals in Υ(4S) decays, indicative of large decay rates involving annihilation of the bb¯ pair rather than decays to BB¯ meson pairs. We do not observe any evidence for such signals. We also obtain a model-independent upper limit of (4.5-6.0)% for the branching ratio of Υ(4S)-->ggX, for 0

  14. Hard photons in heavy-ion collisions: Direct or statistical\\?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, N.; Bock, R.; Emling, H.; Freifelder, R.; Gobbi, A.; Grosse, E.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Kulessa, R.; Matulewicz, T.; Rami, F.; Simon, R. S.; Stelzer, H.; Wessels, J.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A. A.; Kühn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Gnirs, M.; Pelte, D.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Moretto, L. G.

    1988-04-01

    Photons with energies from 2 to 60 MeV have been measured in coincidence with binary fragments in the reaction 92Mo+92Mo at an incident energy of 19.5A MeV. The rapid change of the γ-ray spectrum and multiplicity with the fragment total kinetic energy in the exit channel indicates that the γ rays are emitted statistically by the highly excited fragments. Temperatures as high as 6 MeV are inferred.

  15. Measurement of identified and inclusive photon second-harmonic parameter and implications for direct photon production in [FORMULA: SEE TEXT] Au+Au.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2006-01-27

    The azimuthal distribution of identified pi0 and inclusive photons has been measured in [FORMULA: SEE TEXT] Au+Au collisions with the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The second-harmonic parameter (nu2) was measured to describe the observed anisotropy of the azimuthal distribution. The measured inclusive photon is consistent with the value expected for the photons from hadron decay and is also consistent with the lack of direct photon signal over the measured pT range 1-6 GeV/c. An attempt is made to extract nu2 of direct photons.

  16. Adaptive model-based assistive control for pneumatic direct driven soft rehabilitation robots.

    PubMed

    Wilkening, Andre; Ivlev, Oleg

    2013-06-01

    Assistive behavior and inherent compliance are assumed to be the essential properties for effective robot-assisted therapy in neurological as well as in orthopedic rehabilitation. This paper presents two adaptive model-based assistive controllers for pneumatic direct driven soft rehabilitation robots that are based on separated models of the soft-robot and the patient's extremity, in order to take into account the individual patient's behavior, effort and ability during control, what is assumed to be essential to relearn lost motor functions in neurological and facilitate muscle reconstruction in orthopedic rehabilitation. The high inherent compliance of soft-actuators allows for a general human-robot interaction and provides the base for effective and dependable assistive control. An inverse model of the soft-robot with estimated parameters is used to achieve robot transparency during treatment and inverse adaptive models of the individual patient's extremity allow the controllers to learn on-line the individual patient's behavior and effort and react in a way that assist the patient only as much as needed. The effectiveness of the controllers is evaluated with unimpaired subjects using a first prototype of a soft-robot for elbow training. Advantages and disadvantages of both controllers are analyzed and discussed.

  17. Frequency splitter based on the directional emission from surface modes in dielectric photonic crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Tasolamprou, Anna C.; Zhang, Lei; Kafesaki, Maria; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2015-05-19

    We demonstrate the numerical design and the experimental validation of frequency dependent directional emission from a dielectric photonic crystal structure. The wave propagates through a photonic crystal line-defect waveguide, while a surface layer at the termination of the photonic crystal enables the excitation of surface modes and a subsequent grating layer transforms the surface energy into outgoing propagating waves of the form of a directional beam. Furthermore, the angle of the beam is controlled by the frequency and the structure operates as a frequency splitter in the intermediate and far field region.

  18. Soft X-ray irradiation of methanol ice: Formation of products as a function of photon energy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.-J.; Juang, K.-J.; Yih, T.-S.; Ciaravella, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Jiménez-Escobar, A.

    2013-12-01

    Pure methanol ices have been irradiated with monochromatic soft X-rays of 300 and 550 eV close to the 1s resonance edges of C and O, respectively, and with a broadband spectrum (250-1200 eV). The infrared (IR) spectra of the irradiated ices show several new products of astrophysical interest such as CH{sub 2}OH, H{sub 2}CO, CH{sub 4}, HCOOH, HCOCH{sub 2}OH, CH{sub 3}COOH, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, HCOOCH{sub 3}, and (CH{sub 2}OH){sub 2}, as well as HCO, CO, and CO{sub 2}. The effect of X-rays is the result of the combined interactions of photons and electrons with the ice. A significant contribution to the formation and growth of new species in the CH{sub 3}OH ice irradiated with X-rays is given by secondary electrons, whose energy distribution depends on the energy of X-ray photons. Within a single experiment, the abundances of the new products increase with the absorbed energy. Monochromatic experiments show that product abundances also increase with the photon energy. However, the abundances per unit energy of newly formed species show a marked decrease in the broadband experiment as compared to irradiations with monochromatic photons, suggesting a possible regulatory role of the energy deposition rate. The number of new molecules produced per absorbed eV in the X-ray experiments has been compared to those obtained with electron and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiments.

  19. Opportunities and challenges for photon diagnostics at the soft X-ray FEL FLASH in simultaneous operation mode (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, Marion; Treusch, Rolf; Plönjes-Palm, Elke; Faatz, Bart; Tiedtke, Kai; Braune, Markus; Keitel, Barbara

    2017-06-01

    FLASH operates two distinguished undulator sections driven by one linear accelerator. In the 11th year of user operation the grown demands for detailed photon beam performances are doubled approached. The more complex machine settings and setup times require a more and more efficient determination of its characteristics concerning electron- and photon-beams. The photon diagnostics systems, e.g. gas monitor detection, photon-ion spectroscopy, or diffractive tools, not only have to deal on a regular basis with fundamental wavelengths between 4nm and 90nm, also they have to be reliable from 1µJ up to 1mJ of average single pulse energy. For the success of the experiments the error bars of many diagnostics measurements need to be pushed into their current limits and developments to go further are always issued. Especial, the pulse duration in conjunction with the spectral width has been accessed in the last year. Direct approaches of fundamental wavelengths below the Nitrogene K-edge and higher harmonics in and below the water window were achieved. While in principal distinguished to each other, the photon diagnostics tools of FLASH1 and FLASH2 add-up to a more complete understanding of the other. Together they allow for a better perspective towards further developments and a more suitable use of beam times. The intermingled knowledge of electron- and photon-beams is essential for an FEL particular in simultaneous operation mode. Examples out of regular user operation and distinguished FEL-studies are given to illustrate the current state of the photon diagnostics at FLASH.

  20. Soft-photon emission effects and radiative corrections for electromagnetic processes at very high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Higher-order electromagnetic processes involving particles at ultrahigh energies are discussed, with particular attention given to Compton scattering with the emission of an additional photon (double Compton scattering). Double Compton scattering may have significance in the interaction of a high-energy electron with the cosmic blackbody photon gas. At high energies the cross section for double Compton scattering is large, though this effect is largely canceled by the effects of radiative corrections to ordinary Compton scattering. A similar cancellation takes place for radiative pair production and the associated radiative corrections to the radiationless process. This cancellation is related to the well-known cancellation of the infrared divergence in electrodynamics.

  1. The effect of ionizing photons (VUV + soft X-rays) in the equatorial and polar surfaces of the Europa moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilling, Sergio; Alexandre Souza Bergantini, M.

    Europa is the sixth-closest moon of the planet Jupiter, and the smallest of the four Galilean satellites, but still the sixth-largest moon in the Solar System being only slightly smaller than Earth's Moon. Its cold surface is covered mainly by water ice and a small fraction of other molecular frozen species such as CO _{2}, NH _{3}, and SO _{2}. Since Europa has only a very thin O _{2} rich atmosphere, the surface is constantly exposed to space ionizing agents such as UV and soft X-rays photons, electrons and ions. In this work we investigate the effects produced by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and soft X-rays (and possibly secondary electrons) on the surface of Europa Moon, simulating this way the space weathering and the prebiotic photochemistry induced by solar photons on this moon. The experiments have been performed using a high vacuum portable chamber from the Laboratorio de Astroquimica e Astrobiologia (LASA/UNIVAP) coupled to the spherical grating monochromator (SGM) beamline in the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source (LNLS) at Campinas, Brazil. The beamline was operated in off-focus and white beam mode, which produces a wide band spectral range of photons, mainly from 6 eV up to 1200 eV, with the total average flux at the sample of about 1x10 (14) photons cm (-2) s (-1) . The experiments simulate roughly 10.7 years of solar irradiation (energy delivered) on the Europa surface. In-situ sample analyses were performed by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The samples were produced by the adsorption of a gaseous mixture containing H _{2}O:CO _{2}:NH _{3}:SO _{2} (10:1:1:1) at very low temperature (12 K) and than were slowly heated (2 K/min) to the temperatures in which the irradiation occur, i.e. at 90K and 50K, simulating this way the equatorial and polar regions of the moon. This scenario simulates the cold molecular delivery from comets in the early phases of this Jupiter’s moon. The infrared spectra of irradiated samples have presented the formation

  2. Direct Photonic-Plasmonic Coupling and Routing in Single Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Rouxue; Pausauskie, Peter; Huang, Jiaxing; Yang, Piedong

    2009-10-20

    Metallic nanoscale structures are capable of supporting surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), propagating collective electron oscillations with tight spatial confinement at the metal surface. SPPs represent one of the most promising structures to beat the diffraction limit imposed by conventional dielectric optics. Ag nano wires have drawn increasing research attention due to 2D sub-100 nm mode confinement and lower losses as compared with fabricated metal structures. However, rational and versatile integration of Ag nanowires with other active and passive optical components, as well as Ag nanowire based optical routing networks, has yet to be achieved. Here, we demonstrate that SPPs can be excited simply by contacting a silver nanowire with a SnO2 nanoribbon that serves both as an unpolarized light source and a dielectric waveguide. The efficient coupling makes it possible to measure the propagation-distance-dependent waveguide spectra and frequency-dependent propagation length on a single Ag nanowire. Furthermore, we have demonstrated prototypical photonic-plasmonic routing devices, which are essential for incorporating low-loss Ag nanowire waveguides as practical components into high-capacity photonic circuits.

  3. LOPA-based direct laser writing of multi-dimensional and multi-functional photonic submicrostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Fei; Tong, Quang Cong; Nguyen, Dam Thuy Trang; Huong, Au Thi; Odessey, Rachel; Saudrais, Florent; Lai, Ngoc Diep

    2017-02-01

    We have recently developed a simple fabrication technique, called low one-photon absorption (LOPA) direct laser writing (DLW), to realize multi-dimensional and multi-functional polymer-based photonic submicrostructures. This technique employs a continuous-wave laser at 532 nm-wavelength with only few milliwatts and a simple optical setup, allowing to decrease the cost of the fabrication system by a factor of ten as compared to a commercial DLW system. In this report, we present various photonic structures, such as 2D and 3D micro- resonators, photonic and magnetic submicrostructures, and nonlinear optical structures fabricated by this LOPA- based DLW method. We also discuss about potential applications of those fabricated multi-dimensional and multi-functional photonic submicrostructures in opto-electronics, bio, as well as in opto-mechanics.

  4. Direct photonic coupling of a semiconductor quantum dot and a trapped ion.

    PubMed

    Meyer, H M; Stockill, R; Steiner, M; Le Gall, C; Matthiesen, C; Clarke, E; Ludwig, A; Reichel, J; Atatüre, M; Köhl, M

    2015-03-27

    Coupling individual quantum systems lies at the heart of building scalable quantum networks. Here, we report the first direct photonic coupling between a semiconductor quantum dot and a trapped ion and we demonstrate that single photons generated by a quantum dot controllably change the internal state of a Yb^{+} ion. We ameliorate the effect of the 60-fold mismatch of the radiative linewidths with coherent photon generation and a high-finesse fiber-based optical cavity enhancing the coupling between the single photon and the ion. The transfer of information presented here via the classical correlations between the σ_{z} projection of the quantum-dot spin and the internal state of the ion provides a promising step towards quantum-state transfer in a hybrid photonic network.

  5. Report on the workshop on new directions in soft x-ray near-threshold phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Lindle, D.W.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1988-07-01

    The ''Workshop on New Directions in Soft X-Ray Near-Threshold Phenomena'' was held at the Asilomar Conference Center in Pacific Grove, CA on March 1--4, 1987. It was attended by 59 scientists from 8 countries, representing 27 institutions. Major funding for the meeting was donated by L-Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, who hosted and organized two previous workshops on photoabsorption and scattering in the soft x-ray energy range. Additional funding was provided by the User's Group of the Advanced Light Source. The Workshop, as its name suggests, emphasized physical phenomena in atoms, molecules, and solids near inner-shell thresholds. Of particular interest were threshold ionization, post-collisional interaction, resonant photoemission and fluorescence, and multi-electron effects such as shake-up and shake-off. In these areas and others, special consideration was given to presenting recent discoveries and potential ''new directions'' for future work.

  6. Physics of reflective optics for the soft gamma-ray photon energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Perea, Monica; Descalle, Marie -Anne; Soufli, Regina; Ziock, Klaus P.; Alameda, Jennifer; Baker, Sherry L.; McCarville, Tom J.; Honkimaki, Veijo; Ziegler, Eric; Jakobsen, Anders C.; Christensen, Finn E.; Pivovaroff, Michael J.

    2013-07-12

    Traditional multilayer reflective optics that have been used in the past for imaging at x-ray photon energies as high as 200 keV are governed by classical wave phenomena. However, their behavior at higher energies is unknown, because of the increasing effect of incoherent scattering and the disagreement between experimental and theoretical optical properties of materials in the hard x-ray and gamma-ray regimes. Here, we demonstrate that multilayer reflective optics can operate efficiently and according to classical wave physics up to photon energies of at least 384 keV. We also use particle transport simulations to quantitatively determine that incoherent scattering takes place in the mirrors but it does not affect the performance at the Bragg angles of operation. Furthermore, our results open up new possibilities of reflective optical designs in a spectral range where only diffractive optics (crystals and lenses) and crystal monochromators have been available until now.

  7. Physics of Reflective Optics for the Soft Gamma-Ray Photon Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Perea, Mónica; Descalle, Marie-Anne; Soufli, Regina; Ziock, Klaus P.; Alameda, Jennifer; Baker, Sherry L.; McCarville, Tom J.; Honkimäki, Veijo; Ziegler, Eric; Jakobsen, Anders C.; Christensen, Finn E.; Pivovaroff, Michael J.

    2013-07-01

    Traditional multilayer reflective optics that have been used in the past for imaging at x-ray photon energies as high as 200 keV are governed by classical wave phenomena. However, their behavior at higher energies is unknown, because of the increasing effect of incoherent scattering and the disagreement between experimental and theoretical optical properties of materials in the hard x-ray and gamma-ray regimes. Here, we demonstrate that multilayer reflective optics can operate efficiently and according to classical wave physics up to photon energies of at least 384 keV. We also use particle transport simulations to quantitatively determine that incoherent scattering takes place in the mirrors but it does not affect the performance at the Bragg angles of operation. Our results open up new possibilities of reflective optical designs in a spectral range where only diffractive optics (crystals and lenses) and crystal monochromators have been available until now.

  8. Physics of reflective optics for the soft gamma-ray photon energy range.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Perea, Mónica; Descalle, Marie-Anne; Soufli, Regina; Ziock, Klaus P; Alameda, Jennifer; Baker, Sherry L; McCarville, Tom J; Honkimäki, Veijo; Ziegler, Eric; Jakobsen, Anders C; Christensen, Finn E; Pivovaroff, Michael J

    2013-07-12

    Traditional multilayer reflective optics that have been used in the past for imaging at x-ray photon energies as high as 200 keV are governed by classical wave phenomena. However, their behavior at higher energies is unknown, because of the increasing effect of incoherent scattering and the disagreement between experimental and theoretical optical properties of materials in the hard x-ray and gamma-ray regimes. Here, we demonstrate that multilayer reflective optics can operate efficiently and according to classical wave physics up to photon energies of at least 384 keV. We also use particle transport simulations to quantitatively determine that incoherent scattering takes place in the mirrors but it does not affect the performance at the Bragg angles of operation. Our results open up new possibilities of reflective optical designs in a spectral range where only diffractive optics (crystals and lenses) and crystal monochromators have been available until now.

  9. FLUKA and PENELOPE simulations of 10 keV to 10 MeV photons in LYSO and soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, M. P. W.; Böhlen, T. T.; Fassò, A.; Ferrari, A.; Ortega, P. G.; Sala, P. R.

    2014-02-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of electromagnetic particle interactions and transport by FLUKA and PENELOPE were compared. 10 keV to 10 MeV incident photon beams impinged a LYSO crystal and a soft-tissue phantom. Central-axis as well as off-axis depth doses agreed within 1 s.d.; no systematic under- or over-estimate of the pulse height spectra was observed from 100 keV to 10 MeV for both materials, agreement was within 5%. Simulation of photon and electron transport and interactions at this level of precision and reliability is of significant impact, for instance, on treatment monitoring of hadrontherapy where a code like FLUKA is needed to simulate the full suite of particles and interactions (not just electromagnetic). At the interaction-by-interaction level, apart from known differences in condensed history techniques, two-quanta positron annihilation at rest was found to differ between the two codes. PENELOPE produced a 511 keV sharp line, whereas FLUKA produced visible acolinearity, a feature recently implemented to account for the momentum of shell electrons.

  10. Direct observation of bosonic quantum interference of surface plasmon polaritons using photon-number-resolving detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Go; Fukuda, Daiji; Inoue, Shuichiro

    2014-08-01

    Quantum plasmonics is a field of research combining plasmonics with quantum optics and investigates interactions between photons and metallic nanostructures. So far, it has been proven that quantum properties of single photons to excite single surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are preserved in the process of photon-SPP-photon mode conversion in plasmonic nanostructures, which suggests the potential application of SPPs to the quantum information processing (QIP). Recently the Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) interference of single SPPs was observed in a plasmonic circuitry. However, the visibility was below the classical limit (50%) due to the simultaneous excitation of distinguishable SPP modes. We employed a directional coupler based on long-range surface-plasmon-polariton waveguides (LRSPP-DC) and superconducting photon-number-resolving detectors to directly observe the bosonic quantum interference of single SPPs beyond the classical limit. In addition, we demonstrated the indistinguishability of photons that excite single SPPs is well preserved in the process of photon-SPP mode conversion.

  11. Recent results on direct photons from CDF (Collider Detector at Fermilab)

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.M.

    1990-06-01

    We report on preliminary measurements of direct photons in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV from the 1988--89 run of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The inclusive direct photon cross section, measured for photon transverse momentum in the range 13 < P{sub t} < 68 GeV, has an excess at low P{sub t} compared to recent Quantum Chromodynamic (QCD) calculations. The pseudorapidity distribution of the away-side jet, for events with 27 < P{sub t} < 33 GeV, agrees with QCD predictions. Measurements of the K{sub t} kick in photon-jet events are also presented. 8 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Direct calculation of thermal emission for three-dimensionally periodic photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Chan, David L C; Soljacić, Marin; Joannopoulos, J D

    2006-09-01

    We perform direct thermal emission calculations for three-dimensionally periodic photonic crystal slabs using stochastic electrodynamics following the Langevin approach, implemented via a finite-difference time-domain algorithm. We demonstrate that emissivity and absorptivity are equal, by showing that such photonic crystal systems emit as much radiation as they absorb, for every frequency, up to statistical fluctuations. We also study the effect of surface termination on absorption and emission spectra from these systems.

  13. Direct calculation of thermal emission for three-dimensionally periodic photonic crystal slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, David L. C.; Soljačić, Marin; Joannopoulos, J. D.

    2006-09-01

    We perform direct thermal emission calculations for three-dimensionally periodic photonic crystal slabs using stochastic electrodynamics following the Langevin approach, implemented via a finite-difference time-domain algorithm. We demonstrate that emissivity and absorptivity are equal, by showing that such photonic crystal systems emit as much radiation as they absorb, for every frequency, up to statistical fluctuations. We also study the effect of surface termination on absorption and emission spectra from these systems.

  14. Role of Absorbing Nanocrystal Cores in Soft Photonic Crystals: A Spectroscopy and SANS Study.

    PubMed

    Rauh, Astrid; Carl, Nico; Schweins, Ralf; Karg, Matthias

    2017-08-17

    Periodic superstructures of plasmonic nanoparticles have attracted significant interest because they can support coupled plasmonic modes, making them interesting for plasmonic lasing, metamaterials, and as light-management structures in thin-film optoelectronic devices. We have recently shown that noble metal hydrogel core-shell colloids allow for the fabrication of highly ordered 2-dimensional plasmonic lattices that show surface lattice resonances as the result of plasmonic/diffractive coupling (Volk, K.; Fitzgerald, J. P. S.; Ruckdeschel, P.; Retsch, M.; König, T. A. F.; Karg, M. Reversible Tuning of Visible Wavelength Surface Lattice Resonances in Self-Assembled Hybrid Monolayers. Adv. Optical Mater. 2017, 5, 1600971, DOI: 10.1002/adom.201600971). In the present work, we study the photonic properties and structure of 3-dimensional crystalline superstructures of gold hydrogel core-shell colloids and their pitted counterparts without gold cores. We use far-field extinction spectroscopy to investigate the optical response of these superstructures. Narrow Bragg peaks are measured, independently of the presence or absence of the gold cores. All crystals show a significant reduction in low-wavelength scattering. This leads to a significant enhancement of the plasmonic properties of the samples prepared from gold-nanoparticle-containing core-shell colloids. Plasmonic/diffractive coupling is not evident, which we mostly attribute to the relatively small size of the gold cores limiting the effective coupling strength. Small-angle neutron scattering is applied to study the crystal structure. Bragg peaks of several orders clearly assignable to an fcc arrangement of the particles are observed for all crystalline samples in a broad range of volume fractions. Our results indicate that the nanocrystal cores do not influence the overall crystallization behavior or the crystal structure. These are important prerequisites for future studies on photonic materials built from core

  15. Soft-mask fabrication of gallium arsenide nanomembranes for integrated quantum photonics.

    PubMed

    Midolo, L; Pregnolato, T; Kiršanskė, G; Stobbe, S

    2015-12-04

    We report on the fabrication of quantum photonic integrated circuits based on suspended GaAs membranes. The fabrication process consists of a single lithographic step followed by inductively coupled-plasma dry etching through an electron-beam-resist mask and wet etching of a sacrificial layer. This method does not require depositing, etching, and stripping a hard mask, greatly reducing fabrication time and costs, while at the same time yielding devices of excellent structural quality. We discuss in detail the procedures for cleaning the resist residues caused by the plasma etching and present a statistical analysis of the etched feature size after each fabrication step.

  16. Direct-Photon Spectra and Anisotropic Flow in Heavy Ion Collisions from Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iatrakis, Ioannis; Kiritsis, Elias; Shen, Chun; Yang, Di-Lun

    2017-03-01

    The thermal-photon emission from strongly coupled gauge theories at finite temperature is calculated by using holographic models for QCD in the Veneziano limit (V-QCD). These emission rates are then embedded in hydrodynamic simulations combined with prompt photons from hard scattering and the thermal photons from hadron gas to analyze the spectra and anisotropic flow of direct photons at RHIC and LHC. The results from different sources responsible for the thermal photons in the quark gluon plasma (QGP) including the weakly coupled QGP (wQGP) from perturbative calculations, strongly coupled N = 4 super Yang-Mills (SYM) plasma (as a benchmark for reference), and Gubser's phenomenological model mimicking the strongly coupled QGP (sQGP) are then compared. It is found that the direct-photon spectra are enhanced in the strongly coupled scenario compared with the ones in the wQGP, especially at intermediate and high momenta, which improve the agreements with data. Moreover, by using IP-glassma initial states, both the elliptic flow and triangular flow of direct photons are amplified at high momenta (pT > 2.5 GeV) for V-QCD, while they are suppressed at low momenta compared to wQGP. The distinct results in holography stem from the blue-shift of emission rates in strong coupling. In addition, the spectra and flow in small collision systems were evaluated for future comparisons. It is found that thermal photons from the deconfined phase are substantial to reconcile the spectra and flow at high momenta.

  17. Electroweak Symmetry Breaking from the Soft Portal into Dark Matter and Prediction for Direct Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kadastik, Mario; Kannike, Kristjan; Racioppi, Antonio; Raidal, Martti

    2010-05-21

    Scalar dark matter (DM) can have dimensionful coupling to the Higgs boson - the soft portal into DM - which is predicted to be unsuppressed by the underlying SO(10) grand unified theory (GUT). The dimensionful coupling can be large, {mu}/v>>1, without spoiling the perturbativity of low energy theory up to the GUT scale. We show that the soft portal into DM naturally triggers radiative electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) via large 1-loop DM corrections to the effective potential. In this scenario, EWSB, the DM thermal freeze-out cross section, and DM scattering on nuclei are all dominated by the same coupling, predicting the DM mass range to be 700 GeVdirect detection cross section is predicted to be just below the present experimental bounds.

  18. Physics of reflective optics for the soft gamma-ray photon energy range

    DOE PAGES

    Fernandez-Perea, Monica; Descalle, Marie -Anne; Soufli, Regina; ...

    2013-07-12

    Traditional multilayer reflective optics that have been used in the past for imaging at x-ray photon energies as high as 200 keV are governed by classical wave phenomena. However, their behavior at higher energies is unknown, because of the increasing effect of incoherent scattering and the disagreement between experimental and theoretical optical properties of materials in the hard x-ray and gamma-ray regimes. Here, we demonstrate that multilayer reflective optics can operate efficiently and according to classical wave physics up to photon energies of at least 384 keV. We also use particle transport simulations to quantitatively determine that incoherent scattering takesmore » place in the mirrors but it does not affect the performance at the Bragg angles of operation. Furthermore, our results open up new possibilities of reflective optical designs in a spectral range where only diffractive optics (crystals and lenses) and crystal monochromators have been available until now.« less

  19. Consistent simulation of direct-photon production in hadron collisions including associated two-jet production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odaka, Shigeru; Kurihara, Yoshimasa

    2016-05-01

    We have developed an event generator for direct-photon production in hadron collisions, including associated 2-jet production in the framework of the GR@PPA event generator. The event generator consistently combines γ + 2-jet production processes with the lowest-order γ + jet and photon-radiation (fragmentation) processes from quantum chromodynamics (QCD) 2-jet production using a subtraction method. The generated events can be fed to general-purpose event generators to facilitate the addition of hadronization and decay simulations. Using the obtained event information, we can simulate photon isolation and hadron-jet reconstruction at the particle (hadron) level. The simulation reasonably reproduces measurement data obtained at the large hadron collider (LHC) concerning not only the inclusive photon spectrum, but also the correlation between the photon and jet. The simulation implies that the contribution of the γ + 2-jet is very large, especially in low photon-pT ( ≲ 50 GeV) regions. Discrepancies observed at low pT, although marginal, may indicate the necessity for the consideration of further higher-order processes. Unambiguous particle-level definition of the photon-isolation condition for the signal events is desired to be given explicitly in future measurements.

  20. Resonant soft X-ray reflectivity of ultrathin polymer films at the C-edge: A direct approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibaud, Alain; Bal, Jayanta Kumar; Gullikson, Eric M.; Wang, Cheng; Vignaud, Guillaume

    2016-09-01

    The use of resonant soft X-ray reflectivity (RSXRR) in s-polarization is presented with the aim to show how far it is possible to go in the understanding the evolution of the refractive index n (E ) =1 -δ (E ) -i β (E ) of a ultrathin polystyrene film when the RSXRR is measured through the C-edge. We evidence that a direct fit to the data provides a very good estimation of δ (E ) and β (E ) in a large range of energies. Nevertheless, at some specific energy close to C-edge we observe that it is not possible to obtain a satisfactory fit to the data though the same formalism is applied to calculate the reflectivity. We show that even though we take into account the energy resolution of the incident beam, we still end up with a poor fit at these energies. Incorporating the strong contribution of 2nd order photons appeared near C-edge we could not eliminate the discrepancy. Probably the data normalisations have some impacts on such discrepancies at some specific energies.

  1. A new soft x-ray autocorrelator—direct evaluation of the temporal properties of FEL pulses at 24 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitzner, R.; Siemer, B.; Roling, S.; Wöstmann, M.; Noll, T.; Siewert, F.; Sorokin, A. A.; Richter, M.; Tiedtke, K.; Zacharias, H.

    2010-06-01

    To provide two jitter-free soft x-ray pulses for femtosecond x-ray pump and probe experiments a split and delay unit (autocorrelator) has been constructed for the VUV—FEL in Hamburg (FLASH). Here we report experiments applying this autocorrelator to examine the average temporal properties of FEL pulses delivered from FLASH at 24 nm (51.8 eV). In a linear autocorrelation experiment the spatio-temporal coherence properties are measured for both the first and the third harmonic of the FEL pulses. Furthermore, we report on the first evaluation of the pulse length from the time-resolved observation of doubly charged helium ions produced by direct two-photon double ionization at 24 nm. In summary the determination of the longitudinal pulse parameter of FLASH at 24 nm to 6 fs and 29±5 fs for the coherence time and the pulse length (FWHM) respectively proofs the autocorrelator as a valuable tool for time resolved two pulse X-ray experiments.

  2. Softly, Softly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Abigail

    2008-01-01

    The term "soft skills" encompasses a cluster of personality traits, language abilities, personal habits and, ultimately, values and attitudes. Soft skills complement "harder", more technical, skills, such as being able to read or type a letter, but they also have a significant impact on the ability of people to do their jobs…

  3. Softly, Softly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Abigail

    2008-01-01

    The term "soft skills" encompasses a cluster of personality traits, language abilities, personal habits and, ultimately, values and attitudes. Soft skills complement "harder", more technical, skills, such as being able to read or type a letter, but they also have a significant impact on the ability of people to do their jobs…

  4. Measurement of direct-photon production at the Fermilab Tevatron fixed target energies

    SciTech Connect

    Apanasevich, L.; Bacigalupi, J.; Pellett, D.; Tripathi, S.M.; Baker, W.; Johnstone, C.; Lukens, P.; Skow, D.; Begel, M.; Barbaro, L. de; DeSoi, W.; Dunlea, J.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferbel, T.; Ftacnik, J.; Ginther, G.; Lobkowicz, F.; Mansour, J.; Osborne, G.; Prebys, E.

    2004-11-01

    Measurements of the production of high transverse momentum direct photons by a 515 GeV/c {pi}{sup -} beam and 530 and 800 GeV/c proton beams in interactions with beryllium and hydrogen targets are presented. The data span the kinematic ranges of 3.5direct-photon cross sections are compared with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations and expectations based on a phenomenological parton-k{sub T} model.

  5. Analysis of strategies to improve the directionality of square lattice band-edge photonic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Haroldo T; Schneider, Vitor M; Cazo, Rogério M; Barbosa, Carmem L

    2005-05-20

    Recently, photonic crystal band-edge structures have been analyzed in the literature. However, most devices that have been presented so far emit light in different directions. We present a modal analysis (no gain included) of a few schemes to improve the directionality of these devices, i.e., in such a way that light that exits from them will travel mainly in a certain direction, eventually coupling its energy to a wide waveguide.

  6. Band structure of germanium carbides for direct bandgap silicon photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, C. A. Stillwell, R. A.; Wistey, M. A.; O'Brien, W. A.; Penninger, M. W.; Schneider, W. F.; Gillett-Kunnath, M.; Zajicek, J.; Yu, K. M.; Kudrawiec, R.

    2016-08-07

    Compact optical interconnects require efficient lasers and modulators compatible with silicon. Ab initio modeling of Ge{sub 1−x}C{sub x} (x = 0.78%) using density functional theory with HSE06 hybrid functionals predicts a splitting of the conduction band at Γ and a strongly direct bandgap, consistent with band anticrossing. Photoreflectance of Ge{sub 0.998}C{sub 0.002} shows a bandgap reduction supporting these results. Growth of Ge{sub 0.998}C{sub 0.002} using tetrakis(germyl)methane as the C source shows no signs of C-C bonds, C clusters, or extended defects, suggesting highly substitutional incorporation of C. Optical gain and modulation are predicted to rival III–V materials due to a larger electron population in the direct valley, reduced intervalley scattering, suppressed Auger recombination, and increased overlap integral for a stronger fundamental optical transition.

  7. Centrality dependence of direct photon production in (square root)S(NN) = 200 GeV Au + Au collisions.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2005-06-17

    The first measurement of direct photons in Au + Au collisions at (square root)S(NN) = 200 GeV is presented. The direct photon signal is extracted as a function of the Au + Au collision centrality and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. The direct photon yield is shown to scale with the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions for all centralities.

  8. Directivity of 100 keV-1 MeV photon sources in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, S. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.

    1988-03-01

    Stereoscopic observations of 0.1-1.0 MeV photon sources in solar flares made with spectrometers aboard the ISEE 3 and PVO (Pioneer Venus Orbiter) have been analyzed to determine the directivity of the photon sources and its possible dependence on photon energy. During the period October 1, 1978-October 31, 1980, a total of 44 solar flares were observed simultaneously by the two instruments. Of these, 39 flares were in full view of both the instruments, the remaining five being partially occulted by the photosphere from the line of sight of at least one instrument. The view angles theta(P) and theta(I) of the PVO and ISEE 3 instruments with respect to the outward solar radius at the flare site varied from one flare to another and were in the range 9-88 deg. The difference between the two view angles varied from 1 deg to 66 deg. The observations of differential photon energy spectra averaged over more than about 16 s do not indicate any systematic directivity. In most flares the directivity of 0.1-1.0 MeV photon sources is found to be less than about 2.5.

  9. Set of instruments for solar EUV and soft X-ray monitoring onboard satellite Coronas-Photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Yury; Kochemasov, Alexey; Kuzin, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Sylwester, Janusz; Yurov, Vitaly

    Coronas-Photon mission is the third satellite of the Russian Coronas program on solar activity observation. The main goal of the "Coronas-Photon" is the study of solar hard electromagnetic radiation in the wide energy range from UV up to high energy gamma-radiation (2000MeV). Scientific payload for solar radiation observation consists of three types of instruments: Monitors (Natalya-2M, Konus-RF, RT-2, Penguin-M, BRM, PHOKA, Sphin-X, SOKOL spectral and timing measurements of full solar disk radiation have timing in flare/burst mode up to one msec. Instruments Natalya-2M, Konus-RF, RT-2 will cover the wide energy range of hard X-rays and soft gamma-rays (15keV to 2000MeV) and will together constitute the largest area detectors ever used for solar observations. Detectors of gamma-ray monitors are based on structured inorganic scintillators. For X-ray and EUV monitors the scintillation phoswich detectors, gas proportional counter, CdZnTe assembly and filter-covered Si-diodes are used. Telescope-spectrometer TESIS for imaging solar spectroscopy in X-rays has angular resolution up to 1arcsec in three spectral lines. Satellite platform and scientific payload is under construction to be launched in autumn 2008. Satellite orbit is circular with initial height 550km and inclination 82.5degrees. Accuracy of the spacecraft orientation to the Sun is better 3arcmin. In the report the capability of PHOKA, SphinX, SOKOL and TESIS as well as the observation program are described and discussed.

  10. Nonperturbative-transverse-momentum effects and evolution in dihadron and direct photon-hadron angular correlations in p +p collisions at √{s } =510 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Andrieux, V.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Ayuso, C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Boer, M.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butler, C.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cervantes, R.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Dixit, D.; Do, J. H.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dumancic, M.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Elder, T.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fan, W.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hill, K.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ito, Y.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Ji, Z.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jorjadze, V.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapukchyan, D.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karthas, S.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, M. H.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kincses, D.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kudo, S.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lallow, E. O.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leitgab, M.; Leung, Y. H.; Lewis, B.; Lewis, N. A.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, M. X.; Loggins, V.-R.; Loggins, V.-R.; Lovasz, K.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Majoros, T.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malaev, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Masuda, H.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mihalik, D. E.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitsuka, G.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Morrow, S. I. M.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagai, K.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagashima, T.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Novotny, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oide, H.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ottino, G. J.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Peng, J.-C.; Peng, W.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perezlara, C. E.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Phipps, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Pun, A.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Richford, D.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Runchey, J.; Ryu, M. S.; Safonov, A. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, K.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shioya, T.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Smith, K. L.; Snowball, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Syed, S.; Sziklai, J.; Takahara, A.; Takeda, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnai, G.; Tennant, E.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Ueda, Y.; Ujvari, B.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Carson, S.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vukman, N.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Wang, Z.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; Wolin, S.; Wong, C. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xu, C.; Xu, Q.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamamoto, H.; Yanovich, A.; Yin, P.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zharko, S.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    Dihadron and isolated direct photon-hadron angular correlations are measured in p +p collisions at √{s }=510 GeV . Correlations of charged hadrons of 0.7 direct photons of 7 direct photon or π0. Nonperturbative evolution effects are extracted from Gaussian fits to the away-side inclusive-charged-hadron yields for different trigger-particle transverse momenta (pTtrig ). The Gaussian widths and root mean square of pout are reported as a function of the interaction hard scale pTtrig to investigate possible transverse-momentum-dependent evolution differences between the π0-h± and direct photon-h± correlations and factorization breaking effects. The widths are found to decrease with pTtrig , which indicates that the Collins-Soper-Sterman soft factor is not driving the evolution with the hard scale in nearly back-to-back dihadron and direct photon-hadron production in p +p collisions. This behavior is in contrast to Drell-Yan and semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering measurements.

  11. Direct Nanoimprint of Metal Bilayer for Tunnable Metal Photonic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Sangkeun; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Choi, Dae-Geun; Lee, Jihye; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Eung-Sug

    2013-10-01

    Tunable metal optical properties were realized by directly nanoimprinting metal onto silver-coated poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bilayer glass substrates. Imprinting at elevated temperatures enabled the molding of a stamp pattern consisting of a hexagonal pillar array with a 265 nm diameter and 530 nm pitch size, which produced a corrugated-metal nanohole array. The transmittance of the sample imprinted at 200 °C and 50 bar was uniquely improved from below 20% to more than 30% in the visible-infrared region, and its reflectance was reduced by more than 65% compared to a reference sample. The optical properties of the investigated metal depended significantly on the imprint temperature and relatively less on the imprint pressure and deposited silver film thickness. The improved transmittance was obtained only for the direct-imprinted silver-PMMA and not when the silver was simply deposited onto the predefined PMMA pattern. The presented fabrication strategy enables the provision of accessible optical tunability as well as improved cost-labor effectiveness for metal nanostructuring.

  12. Quantum state-controlled directional spontaneous emission of photons into a nanophotonic waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Mitsch, R.; Sayrin, C.; Albrecht, B.; Schneeweiss, P.; Rauschenbeutel, A.

    2014-01-01

    The spin of light in subwavelength-diameter waveguides can be orthogonal to the propagation direction of the photons because of the strong transverse confinement. This transverse spin changes sign when the direction of propagation is reversed. Using this effect, we demonstrate the directional spontaneous emission of photons by laser-trapped caesium atoms into an optical nanofibre and control their propagation direction by the excited state of the atomic emitters. In particular, we tune the spontaneous emission into the counter-propagating guided modes from symmetric to strongly asymmetric, where more than % of the optical power is launched into one or the other direction. We expect our results to have important implications for research in quantum nanophotonics and for implementations of integrated optical signal processing in the quantum regime. PMID:25502565

  13. Template-Directed Directionally Solidified 3D Mesostructured AgCl-KCl Eutectic Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinwoo; Aagesen, Larry K; Choi, Jun Hee; Choi, Jaewon; Kim, Ha Seong; Liu, Jinyun; Cho, Chae-Ryong; Kang, Jin Gu; Ramazani, Ali; Thornton, Katsuyo; Braun, Paul V

    2015-08-19

    3D mesostructured AgCl-KCl photonic crystals emerge from colloidal templating of eutectic solidification. Solvent removal of the KCl phase results in a mesostructured AgCl inverse opal. The 3D-template-induced confinement leads to the emergence of a complex microstructure. The 3D mesostructured eutectic photonic crystals have a large stop band ranging from the near-infrared to the visible tuned by the processing. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Effective soft-decision demosaicking using directional filtering and embedded artifact refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Tsung; Chen, Wen-Jan; Tai, Shen-Chuan

    2009-04-01

    Demosaicking is an interpolation process that transforms a color filter array (CFA) image into a full-color image in a single-sensor imaging pipeline. In all demosaicking techniques, the interpolation of the green components plays a central role in dictating the visual quality of reconstructed images because green light is of maximum sensitivity in the human visual system. Guided by this point, we propose a new soft-decision demosaicking algorithm using directional filtering and embedded artifact refinement. The novelty of this approach is twofold. First, we lift the constraint of the Bayer CFA that results in the absence of diagonal neighboring green color values for directionally recovering diagonal edges. The developed directional interpolation method is fairly robust in dealing with the four edge features, namely, vertical, horizontal, 45-deg diagonal, and 135-deg diagonal. In addition, the proposed embedded refinement scheme provides an efficient way for soft-decision-based algorithms to achieve improved results with fewer computations. We have compared this new approach to six state-of-the-art methods, and it can outstandingly preserve more edge details and handle fine textures well, without requiring a high computational cost.

  15. Workshop report on new directions in soft x-ray photoabsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, R.; Del Grande, N.K.; Lindau, I.; Manson, S.; Merts, A.L.; Pratt, R.

    1984-09-17

    The Workshop Report integrates what was said at the Workshop on New Directions in Soft X-Ray Photoabsorption, which focused on the region from 100 eV to 10 keV. The report clarifies the current state of theory and experiment and identifies the opportunities which new theoretical methods and experimental facilities could be expected to provide. The understanding of photoabsorption (which requires experimental photoabsorption cross section data) is a key to understanding the properties and behavior of atoms, molecules and solids. The Workshop participants were forty-three physicists and quantum chemists, from twenty-four institutions in four countries, all interested in photoabsorption from different perspectives.

  16. Direct imaging of optimal photonic nanojets from core-shell microcylinders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-Yang; Hsiao, Kai-Lung

    2015-11-15

    We first experimentally evaluate the direct imaging of photonic nanojets from core-shell microcylinders. The optimal photonic nanojet with long length, a high intensity spot, and low divergence is observed at the designed gold-silver-coating microcylinder. A special microcylinder consists of multilayered metallic shells (gold, silver, and copper) and a dielectric core (polydimethylsiloxane) at a diameter of 5 μm and a height of 6 μm. The electromagnetic distributions inside and outside the core-shell microcylinders are calculated by using the finite-difference time-domain method. The direct-imaging measurements for photonic nanojets are performed with a scanning-optical-microscope system. Such core-shell microcylinders provide new pathways for high-resolution optical imaging, which are useful for biophotonics, plasmonics, and optical data storage.

  17. Direct observation of the optical plasma resonance of Ag by photon-assisted tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Farrier, M. G.; Gustafson, T. K.

    1976-01-01

    Photon-assisted tunneling is proposed for the investigation of optical plasma resonances; this is demonstrated by the direct observation of the Ag resonance in appropriate Ag-Al2O3-Al structures. A spectral scan of the ratio of the signals photoinduced by the p and s polarizations shows a large enhancement corresponding to the plasma resonance of Ag.

  18. Direct Writing of Three-Dimensional Macroporous Photonic Crystals on Pressure-Responsive Shape Memory Polymers.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yin; Ni, Yongliang; Leo, Sin-Yen; Wang, Bingchen; Basile, Vito; Taylor, Curtis; Jiang, Peng

    2015-10-28

    Here we report a single-step direct writing technology for making three-dimensional (3D) macroporous photonic crystal patterns on a new type of pressure-responsive shape memory polymer (SMP). This approach integrates two disparate fields that do not typically intersect: the well-established templating nanofabrication and shape memory materials. Periodic arrays of polymer macropores templated from self-assembled colloidal crystals are squeezed into disordered arrays in an unusual shape memory "cold" programming process. The recovery of the original macroporous photonic crystal lattices can be triggered by direct writing at ambient conditions using both macroscopic and nanoscopic tools, like a pencil or a nanoindenter. Interestingly, this shape memory disorder-order transition is reversible and the photonic crystal patterns can be erased and regenerated hundreds of times, promising the making of reconfigurable/rewritable nanooptical devices. Quantitative insights into the shape memory recovery of collapsed macropores induced by the lateral shear stresses in direct writing are gained through fundamental investigations on important process parameters, including the tip material, the critical pressure and writing speed for triggering the recovery of the deformed macropores, and the minimal feature size that can be directly written on the SMP membranes. Besides straightforward applications in photonic crystal devices, these smart mechanochromic SMPs that are sensitive to various mechanical stresses could render important technological applications ranging from chromogenic stress and impact sensors to rewritable high-density optical data storage media.

  19. Direct photon production in NCG QCD at the tevatron and LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Bekli, M. R.; Mebarki, N.; Chadou, I.

    2012-06-27

    The minimal NCSM contribution of a direct photon production at the Tevatron and LHC is obtained and the phenomenological implications are discussed. Some behaviors are discussed. It is shown that the effect of the space-time noncommutativity becomes important at very high energies leading to a violation of unitarity.

  20. Ultraprecise phase manipulation in integrated photonic quantum circuits with generalized directional couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Heilmann, R.; Keil, R.; Gräfe, M.; Nolte, S.; Szameit, A.

    2014-08-11

    We present an innovative approach for ultra-precise phase manipulation in integrated photonic quantum circuits. To this end, we employ generalized directional couplers that utilize a detuning of the propagation constant in optical waveguides by the overlap of adjacent waveguide modes. We demonstrate our findings in experiments with classical as well as quantum light.

  1. Direction dependent diffusion of aligned magnetic rods by means of x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Joachim; Märkert, Christian; Fischer, Birgit; Müller, Leonard

    2013-01-25

    Rodlike hematite particles in suspension align perpendicular to an external magnetic field due to a negative anisotropy of their magnetic susceptibility Δχ. The diffusion tensor consists of two principal constants D(∥) and D(⊥) for the diffusion parallel and perpendicular to the long particle axis. X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy is capable of probing the diffusive motion in optically opaque suspensions of rodlike hematite particles parallel to the direction of the scattering vector Q. Choosing Q parallel or perpendicular to the direction of an external magnetic field H the direction dependent intermediate scattering function is measured by means of x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. From the intermediate scattering function in both directions the principal diffusion constants D(∥) and D(⊥) are determined. The ratio D(∥)/D(⊥) increases with increasing aspect ratio of the particles and can be described via a rescaled theoretical approach for prolate ellipsoids of revolution.

  2. Measurement of direct photons in Au+Au collisions at √(s(NN))=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Jamel, A; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chai, J-S; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Gadrat, S; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Iinuma, H; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kawagishi, T; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khanzadeev, A; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, Y-S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakamura, T; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Willis, N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2012-10-12

    We report the measurement of direct photons at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at √(s(NN))=200 GeV. The direct photon signal was extracted for the transverse momentum range of 4 GeV/cphotons from the inclusive photon sample. The direct photon nuclear modification factor R(AA) was calculated as a function of p(T) for different Au+Au collision centralities using the measured p+p direct photon spectrum and compared to theoretical predictions. R(AA) was found to be consistent with unity for all centralities over the entire measured p(T) range. Theoretical models that account for modifications of initial direct photon production due to modified parton distribution functions in Au and the different isospin composition of the nuclei predict a modest change of R(AA) from unity. They are consistent with the data. Models with compensating effects of the quark-gluon plasma on high-energy photons, such as suppression of jet-fragmentation photons and induced-photon bremsstrahlung from partons traversing the medium, are also consistent with this measurement.

  3. Highly directional emission and photon beaming from nanocrystal quantum dots embedded in metallic nanoslit arrays.

    PubMed

    Livneh, Nitzan; Strauss, Ayelet; Schwarz, Ilai; Rosenberg, Itamar; Zimran, Adiel; Yochelis, Shira; Chen, Gang; Banin, Uri; Paltiel, Yossi; Rapaport, Ronen

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate a directional beaming of photons emitted from nanocrystal quantum dots that are embedded in a subwavelength metallic nanoslit array with a divergence angle of less than 4°. We show that the eigenmodes of the structure result in localized electromagnetic field enhancements at the Bragg cavity resonances, which could be controlled and engineered in both real and momentum space. The photon beaming is achieved using the enhanced resonant coupling of the quantum dots to these Bragg cavity modes, which dominates the emission properties of the quantum dots. We show that the emission probability of a quantum dot into the narrow angular mode is 20 times larger than the emission probability to all other modes. Engineering nanocrystal quantum dots with subwavelength metallic nanostructures is a promising way for a range of new types of active optical devices, where spatial control of the optical properties of nanoemitters is essential, on both the single and many photons level.

  4. Measurement of direct photon emission in the K(L) ---> pi+ pi- gamma decay mode

    SciTech Connect

    Abouzaid, E.; Arenton, M.; Barker, A.R.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellavance, A.; Blucher, E.; Bock, G.J.; Cheu, E.; Coleman, R.; Corcoran, M.D.; Corti, G.; /Virginia U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-04-01

    In this paper the KTeV collaboration reports the analysis of 112.1 x 10{sup 3} candidate K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} decays including a background of 671 {+-} 41 events with the objective of determining the photon production mechanisms intrinsic to the decay process. These decays have been analyzed to extract the relative contributions of the Cp violating bremsstrahlung process and the CP conserving M1 and CP violating E1 direct photon emission processes. The M1 direct photon emission amplitude and its associated vector form factor parameterized as |{bar g}{sub M1}|(1 + a{sub 1}/a{sub 2}/(M{sub {rho}}{sup 2}-M{sub K}{sup 2}) + 2M{sub K}E{sub {gamma}}) have been measured to be |{bar g}{sub M1}| = 1.198 {+-} 0.035(stat) {+-} 0.086(syst) and a{sub 1}/a{sub 2} = =0.738 {+-} 0.007(stat) {+-} 0.018(syst) GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} respectively. An upper limit for the CP violating E1 direct emission amplitude |g{sub E1}| {le} 0.1 (90%CL) has been found. The overall ratio of direct photon emission (DE) to total photon emission including the bremsstrahlung process (IB) has been determined to be DE/(DE + IB) = 0.689 {+-} 0.021 for E{sub {gamma}} {ge} 20 MeV.

  5. Direct Laser Writing of Magneto-Photonic Sub-Microstructures for Prospective Applications in Biomedical Engineering.

    PubMed

    Au, Thi Huong; Trinh, Duc Thien; Tong, Quang Cong; Do, Danh Bich; Nguyen, Dang Phu; Phan, Manh-Huong; Lai, Ngoc Diep

    2017-05-09

    We report on the fabrication of desired magneto-photonic devices by a low one-photon absorption (LOPA) direct laser writing (DLW) technique on a photocurable nanocomposite consisting of magnetite ( Fe 3 O 4 ) nanoparticles and a commercial SU-8 photoresist. The magnetic nanocomposite was synthesized by mixing Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles with different kinds of SU-8 photoresists. We demonstrated that the degree of dispersion of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles in the nanocomposite depended on the concentration of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles, the viscosity of SU-8 resist, and the mixing time. By tuning these parameters, the most homogeneous magnetic nanocomposite was obtained with a concentration of about 2 wt % of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles in SU-8 2005 photoresist for the mixing time of 20 days. The LOPA-based DLW technique was employed to fabricate on demand various magneto-photonic submicrometer structures, which are similar to those obtained without Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. The magneto-photonic 2D and 3D structures with sizes as small as 150 nm were created. We demonstrated the strong magnetic field responses of the magneto-photonic nanostructures and their use as micro-actuators when immersed in a liquid solution.

  6. Engineering cellular fibers for musculoskeletal soft tissues using directed self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Nathan R; Koppes, Ryan A; Chrisey, Douglas B; Corr, David T

    2013-05-01

    Engineering strategies guided by developmental biology may enhance and accelerate in vitro tissue formation for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. In this study, we looked toward embryonic tendon development as a model system to guide our soft tissue engineering approach. To direct cellular self-assembly, we utilized laser micromachined, differentially adherent growth channels lined with fibronectin. The micromachined growth channels directed human dermal fibroblast cells to form single cellular fibers, without the need for a provisional three-dimensional extracellular matrix or scaffold to establish a fiber structure. Therefore, the resulting tissue structure and mechanical characteristics were determined solely by the cells. Due to the self-assembly nature of this approach, the growing fibers exhibit some key aspects of embryonic tendon development, such as high cellularity, the rapid formation (within 24 h) of a highly organized and aligned cellular structure, and the expression of cadherin-11 (indicating direct cell-to-cell adhesions). To provide a dynamic mechanical environment, we have also developed and characterized a method to apply precise cyclic tensile strain to the cellular fibers as they develop. After an initial period of cellular fiber formation (24 h postseeding), cyclic strain was applied for 48 h, in 8-h intervals, with tensile strain increasing from 0.7% to 1.0%, and at a frequency of 0.5 Hz. Dynamic loading dramatically increased cellular fiber mechanical properties with a nearly twofold increase in both the linear region stiffness and maximum load at failure, thereby demonstrating a mechanism for enhancing cellular fiber formation and mechanical properties. Tissue engineering strategies, designed to capture key aspects of embryonic development, may provide unique insight into accelerated maturation of engineered replacement tissue, and offer significant advances for regenerative medicine applications in tendon

  7. Direct Visualization of Conformation and Dense Packing of DNA-Based Soft Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Lettinga, Paul M.; Dhont, Jan K. G.; Stiakakis, Emmanuel

    2014-12-01

    Soft colloids—such as polymer-coated particles, star polymers, block-copolymer micelles, microgels—constitute a broad class of materials where microscopic properties such as deformability and penetrability of the particle play a key role in tailoring their macroscopic properties which is of interest in many technological areas. The ability to access these microscopic properties is not yet demonstrated despite its great importance. Here we introduce novel DNA-coated colloids with star-shaped architecture that allows accessing the above local structural information by directly visualizing their intramolecular monomer density profile and arm's free-end locations with confocal fluorescent microscopy. Compression experiments on a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice formed by these macromolecular assemblies reveal an exceptional resistance to mutual interpenetration of their charged corona at pressures approaching the MPa range. Furthermore, we find that this lattice, in a close packing configuration, is surprisingly tolerant to particle size variation. We anticipate that these stimuli-responsive materials could aid to get deeper insight in a wide range of problems in soft matter, including the study and design of biomimetic lubricated surfaces.

  8. Combination of direct laser writing and soft lithography molds for combined nano- and microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumler, M.; Kollmuss, M.; Baier, L.; Michel, F.; Förthner, M.; Becker, M.; Rommel, M.; Frey, L.

    2016-10-01

    This work presents a novel approach for combined micro- and nanofabrication based on the local laser exposure of an UV-curing material through a structured mold. The proposed process makes use of the high freedom of design of direct laser writing (DLW) and the high resolution of soft lithography molds (made e.g. from PDMS). By optimizing the exposure process it was possible to fabricate locally defined hierarchical structures with a height of around 16 μm, that are fully covered with nanometer-sized holes using OrmoComp®. Manual test imprints showed that the fabricated structures can be used for "step and repeat" nanoimprint processes. Furthermore, the local transfer of nanostructures into two different soft lithography resists (Katiobond 110707, mr-NIL210) was investigated. Diffusion of resist components into the PDMS mold was observed and could be prohibited by the use of hybrid molds, which employ OrmoComp® as structure containing layer. First experiments revealed successful transfer of the mold's nanostructures into mr-NIL210 but still leave room for improvement concerning the process parameters.

  9. Computer-aided design of nanostructures from self- and directed-assembly of soft matter building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Trung Dac

    2011-12-01

    Functional materials that are active at nanometer scales and adaptive to environment have been highly desirable for a huge array of novel applications ranging from photonics, sensing, fuel cells, smart materials to drug delivery and miniature robots. These bio-inspired features imply that the underlying structure of this type of materials should possess a well-defined ordering as well as the ability to reconfigure in response to a given external stimulus such as temperature, electric field, pH or light. In this thesis, we employ computer simulation as a design tool, demonstrating that various ordered and reconfigurable structures can be obtained from the self- and directed-assembly of soft matter nano-building blocks such as nanoparticles, polymer-tethered nanoparticles and colloidal particles. We show that, besides thermodynamic parameters, the self-assembly of these building blocks is governed by nanoparticle geometry, the number and attachment location of tethers, solvent selectivity, balance between attractive and repulsive forces, nanoparticle size polydispersity, and field strength. We demonstrate that higher-order nanostructures, i.e. those for which the correlation length is much greater than the length scale of individual assembling building blocks, can be hierarchically assembled. For instance, bilayer sheets formed by laterally tethered rods fold into spiral scrolls and helical structures, which are able to adopt different morphologies depending on the environmental condition. We find that a square grid structure formed by laterally tethered nanorods can be transformed into a bilayer sheet structure, and vice versa, upon shortening, or lengthening, the rod segments, respectively. From these inspiring results, we propose a general scheme by which shape-shifting particles are employed to induce the reconfiguration of pre-assembled structures. Finally, we investigate the role of an external field in assisting the formation of assembled structures that would

  10. A stable frequency comb directly referenced to rubidium electromagnetically induced transparency and two-photon transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dong; Wu, Jiutao; Zhang, Shuangyou; Ren, Quansheng; Zhang, Zhigang; Zhao, Jianye

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate an approach to create a stable erbium-fiber-based frequency comb at communication band by directly locking the combs to two rubidium atomic transitions resonances (electromagnetically induced transparency absorption and two-photon absorption), respectively. This approach directly transfers the precision and stability of the atomic transitions to the comb. With its distinguishing feature of compactness by removing the conventional octave-spanning spectrum and f-to-2f beating facilities and the ability to directly control the comb's frequency at the atomic transition frequency, this stable optical comb can be widely used in optical communication, frequency standard, and optical spectroscopy and microscopy.

  11. A stable frequency comb directly referenced to rubidium electromagnetically induced transparency and two-photon transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Dong; Wu, Jiutao; Zhang, Shuangyou; Ren, Quansheng; Zhang, Zhigang; Zhao, Jianye

    2014-03-17

    We demonstrate an approach to create a stable erbium-fiber-based frequency comb at communication band by directly locking the combs to two rubidium atomic transitions resonances (electromagnetically induced transparency absorption and two-photon absorption), respectively. This approach directly transfers the precision and stability of the atomic transitions to the comb. With its distinguishing feature of compactness by removing the conventional octave-spanning spectrum and f-to-2f beating facilities and the ability to directly control the comb's frequency at the atomic transition frequency, this stable optical comb can be widely used in optical communication, frequency standard, and optical spectroscopy and microscopy.

  12. Direct determination of resonance phase shifts of soft x-ray diffraction in thin films by momentum-transfer-sensitive three-wave interference

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.-H.; Lee, Y.-R.; Chang, Y.-Y.; Chu, C.-H.; Tsai, Y.-W.; Liu, Y.-J.; Chang, S.-L.; Hsieh, C.-H.; Chou, L.-J.

    2008-09-01

    A method for direct determination of resonance phase shifts in a (001) CdTe/InSb thin-film system is developed using soft x-ray three-wave resonance diffraction. At the (002) Bragg peaks of CdTe and InSb, two inversion-symmetry related three-wave diffractions are systematically identified according to crystal symmetry and the resonance phase shifts versus photon energies are measured without turning the thin film upside down. The momentum-transfer selectivity at (002) reflections facilitates the quantitative determination of the phase shifts near the Cd L{sub 3}, Te L{sub 3}, and Sb L{sub 2} edges.

  13. Quasi-crystalline and disordered photonic structures fabricated using direct laser writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnik, Artem D.; Pinegin, Konstantin V.; Bulashevich, Grigorii A.; Rybin, Mikhail V.; Limonov, Mikhail F.; Samusev, Kirill B.

    2017-09-01

    Direct laser writing is a rapid prototyping technology that has been utilized for the fabrication of micro- and nano-scale materials that have a perfect structure in most of the cases. In this study we exploit the direct laser writing to create several classes of non-periodic materials, such as quasi-crystalline lattices and three-dimensional (3D) objects with an orientation disorder in structural elements. Among quasi-crystalline lattices we consider Penrose tiling and Lévy-type photonic glasses. Images of the fabricated structures are obtained with a scanning electron microscope. In experiment we study the optical diffraction from 3D woodpile photonic structures with orientation disorder and analyze diffraction patters observed on a flat screen positioned behind the sample. With increasing of the disorder degree, we find an impressive transformation of the diffraction patterns from perfect Laue picture to a speckle pattern.

  14. All-optical switching structure based on a photonic crystal directional coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta-Soto, F.; Martínez, A.; García, J.; Ramos, F.; Sanchis, P.; Blasco, J.; Martí, J.

    2004-01-01

    A novel all-optical switching structure based on a photonic crystal directional coupler is proposed and analyzed. Efficient optical switching is achieved by modifying the refractive index of the coupling region between the coupled waveguides by means of an optical control signal that is confined in the central region. Small length (around 1.1 mm) and low optical power consumption (over 1.5 W) are the main features estimated for this switching structure.

  15. Nuclear effects in high-p{sub T} production of direct photons and neutral mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Apanasevich, L.; Bacigalupi, J.; Pellett, D.; Tripathi, S.M.; Baker, W.; Johnstone, C.; Lukens, P.; Skow, D.; Begel, M.; Barbaro, L. de; DeSoi, W.; Dunlea, J.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferbel, T.; Ftacnik, J.; Ginther, G.; Lobkowicz, F.; Mansour, J.; Osborne, G.; Prebys, E.

    2005-08-01

    We present results on the production of direct photons, {pi}{sup 0}, and {eta} mesons on nuclear targets at large transverse momenta (p{sub T}). The data are from 530 and 800 GeV/c proton beams and 515 GeV/c {pi}{sup -} beams incident upon copper and beryllium targets that span the kinematic range of 1.0

  16. Direct measurement of the biphoton Wigner function through two-photon interference

    PubMed Central

    Douce, T.; Eckstein, A.; Walborn, S. P.; Khoury, A. Z.; Ducci, S.; Keller, A.; Coudreau, T.; Milman, P.

    2013-01-01

    The Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) experiment was a benchmark in quantum optics, evidencing the non–classical nature of photon pairs, later generalized to quantum systems with either bosonic or fermionic statistics. We show that a simple modification in the well-known and widely used HOM experiment provides the direct measurement of the Wigner function. We apply our results to one of the most reliable quantum systems, consisting of biphotons generated by parametric down conversion. A consequence of our results is that a negative value of the Wigner function is a sufficient condition for non-gaussian entanglement between two photons. In the general case, the Wigner function provides all the required information to infer entanglement using well known necessary and sufficient criteria. The present work offers a new vision of the HOM experiment that further develops its possibilities to realize fundamental tests of quantum mechanics using simple optical set-ups. PMID:24346262

  17. Polymer photonic-molecule microlaser fabricated by femtosecond laser direct writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiulan; Zhan, Xuepeng; Hou, Zhishan; Chen, Qidai; Xu, Huailiang

    2016-03-01

    We report on fabrication of dye-doped polymer photonic-molecule (PM) microlasers by femtosecond laser direct writing (FsLDW) and investigate their lasing behaviors by changing the distance between the two disks in the microcavities. It is found that when the distance of two disks becomes smaller, the coupling between two disks occurs, leading to a decrease of the lasing modes. But, when two disks are crossed, the circular symmetric of whispering-gallery mode cavities are broken, increasing the lasing thresholds. With the three-dimensional (3D) fabrication capacity of FsLDW, our result opens up a possibility of investigating complex 3D coupled microcavities for photonic device integration.

  18. Multi-direction high-efficiency second harmonic generation in ellipse structure nonlinear photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bao-Qin; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Rong-Juan; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2014-10-13

    We have designed and fabricated a lithium niobate (LN) nonlinear photonic crystal (NPC) with a two-dimensional (2D) ellipse structure of inverse poling domains. The structure can offer continuously varying reciprocal lattice vectors in different directions to compensate the phase-mismatching during the second harmonic generation (SHG) for diverse pump wavelengths. We consider three propagation directions with large effective nonlinear susceptibility and measure the nonlinear conversion efficiency of SHG. The experimental data are in good agreement with the quantitative calculation results using the effective susceptibility model with pump depletion. With high-efficiency SHG in multiple propagation direction, the 2D ellipse structure of LN NPC has the potential to realize various broadband nonlinear frequency conversion processes in different propagation direction with a single crystal.

  19. λ/26 silver nanodots fabricated by direct laser writing through highly sensitive two-photon photoreduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yaoyu; Gu, Min

    2013-11-18

    We demonstrated an approach to break the diffraction limit and realise deep-subwavelength two-photon direct laser writing by employing a highly sensitive photoreduction process. The photoreduction photosensitivity increased by at least 4 times while the wavelength of the fabrication laser beam was tuned from 800 nm to 580 nm. The increase of the photosensitivity resulted in improved resolution for the silver dot fabrication. By developing the photoreduction material with adding electron donors, the photosensitivity further increased and enabled the realisation of a single silver dot at 22 nm which is λ/26 for the wavelength of the fabrication laser beam.

  20. Adaptive optics enhanced direct laser writing of high refractive index gyroid photonic crystals in chalcogenide glass.

    PubMed

    Cumming, Benjamin P; Turner, Mark D; Schröder-Turk, Gerd E; Debbarma, Sukanta; Luther-Davies, Barry; Gu, Min

    2014-01-13

    Chiral gyroid photonic crystals are fabricated in the high refractive index chalcogenide glass arsenic trisulfide with an adaptive optics enhanced direct laser writing system. The severe spherical aberration imparted when focusing into the arsenic trisulfide is mitigated with a defocus decoupled aberration compensation technique that reduces the level of aberration that must be compensated by over an order of magnitude. The fabricated gyroids are shown to have excellent uniformity after our adaptive optics method is employed, and the transmission spectra of the gyroids are shown to have good agreement with numerical simulations that are based on a uniform and diffraction limited fabrication resolution.

  1. Directly laser-written integrated photonics devices including diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jiyeon; Ramme, Mark; Richardson, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Femtosecond laser-written integrated devices involving Fresnel Zone Plates (FZPs) and waveguide arrays are demonstrated as built-in optical couplers. These structures were fabricated in borosilicate glass using a direct laser writing technique. The optical properties of these integrated photonic structures were investigated using CW lasers and high-resolution CCDs. For a single FZP coupled to a single waveguide, the overall coupling efficiency was 9%. A multiplexed optical coupler composed of three FZP layers was demonstrated to couple three waveguides simultaneously in a waveguide array. Structures of this type can be used as platforms for multichannel waveguide coupling elements or as microfluidic sensors that require higher light collecting efficiency.

  2. Geant4 simulation of optical photon transport in scintillator tile with direct readout by silicon photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpachev, S.; Chadeeva, M.

    2017-01-01

    The direct coupling of silicon photomultiplier to the scintillator tile is considered to be the main option for active elements of the highly granular hadron calorimeter developed for future linear collider experiments. In this study, the response of the scintillator-SiPM system to minimum ionising particles was simulated using the optical photon transport functionality available in the Geant4 package. The uniformity of response for both flat tile and tile with dimple was estimated from the simulations and compared to the experimental results obtained in the previous studies.

  3. Efficient coupling between a photonic crystal nanocavity and a waveguide with directional end-facet emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ling; Mock, Adam; O'Brien, John

    2012-05-01

    Monolithic integration of photonic crystal lasers and waveguides is proposed using quantum well intermixing. Coupling between a double-heterostructure nanocavity and a regular single-line-defect waveguide is optimized to have a high coupling efficiency (93%) and a high quality factor (6.8 × 103) without fine-tuning of the lattice. The design is completed with a waveguide exit of robust directional far-field. All calculations were performed using the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method.

  4. Polarization insensitive silicon photonic ROADM with selectable communication direction for radio access networks.

    PubMed

    Sorianello, Vito; Angelis, Gabriele De; Cassese, Tommaso; Preite, Massimo Valerio; Velha, Philippe; Bianchi, Alberto; Romagnoli, Marco; Testa, Francesco

    2016-12-15

    We report on an experimental prototype of a low-cost silicon photonic reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexer (ROADM). The device is able to operate with up to 12 wavelength division multiplexing channels. In order to control the polarization of the multi-wavelength signal at the input of the device, an integrated polarization controller is investigated as an alternative to the polarization diversity device architecture. The integrated ROADM is equipped with optical switches for the selection of the path direction and variable optical attenuators for optical power control. We demonstrate the polarization insensitive routing of 10 Gb/s channels between two ROADM nodes with error-free transmission.

  5. Direct fabrication of silicon photonic devices on a flexible platform and its application for strain sensing.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Varghese, Leo T; Xuan, Yi; Wang, Jian; Niu, Ben; Qi, Minghao

    2012-08-27

    We demonstrate a process to fabricate silicon photonic devices directly on a plastic film which is both flexible and transparent. This process allows the integration of complex structures on plastic films without the need of transferring from another substrate. Waveguides, grating couplers, and microring resonators are fabricated and optically characterized. An optical strain sensor is shown as an application using 5 µm-radius microring resonators on the flexible substrate. When strain is applied, resonance wavelength shifts of the microring resonators are observed. Contributions of different effects are analyzed and evaluated. Finally, we measure the influence of residual strain and confirm the material undergoes elastic deformation within the applied strain range.

  6. Focusing and photon flux measurements of the 2.88-nm radiation at the sample plane of the soft x-ray microscope, based on capillary discharge source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, M. Fahad; Jancarek, Alexandr; Nevrkla, Michal; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Limpouch, Jiri; Pina, Ladislav

    2015-05-01

    Feasibility measurements leading to the development of a Soft X-ray (SXR) microscopy setup, based on capillary discharge XUV source is presented. Here the Z-pinching plasma is acting as a source of XUV radiation, emitting incoherent radiation in the "water-window" (λ = 2.3 - 4.4 nm) region of interest (natural contrast between the carbon and oxygen edges).This soft X-ray microscopy setup will realize imaging of the biological objects with high spatial resolution. The 2.88 nm radiation line is filtered out from the water-window band, and is focused by an axi-symmetric ellipsoidal mirror, coated with nickle. The focussed spot size is measured and reported. Flux measurements for the available number of photons (photons/pulse) at the sample plane has been carried out with AXUV PIN diode at the sample plane (slightly out of focus). For imaging, a fresnel zone plate lens will be used as an objective. The overall compact transmission SXR microscopy setup design is presented.

  7. Web mining in soft computing framework: relevance, state of the art and future directions.

    PubMed

    Pal, S K; Talwar, V; Mitra, P

    2002-01-01

    The paper summarizes the different characteristics of Web data, the basic components of Web mining and its different types, and the current state of the art. The reason for considering Web mining, a separate field from data mining, is explained. The limitations of some of the existing Web mining methods and tools are enunciated, and the significance of soft computing (comprising fuzzy logic (FL), artificial neural networks (ANNs), genetic algorithms (GAs), and rough sets (RSs) are highlighted. A survey of the existing literature on "soft Web mining" is provided along with the commercially available systems. The prospective areas of Web mining where the application of soft computing needs immediate attention are outlined with justification. Scope for future research in developing "soft Web mining" systems is explained. An extensive bibliography is also provided.

  8. Direct generation of linearly polarized single photons with a deterministic axis in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Puchtler, Tim J.; Patra, Saroj K.; Zhu, Tongtong; Ali, Muhammad; Badcock, Tom J.; Ding, Tao; Oliver, Rachel A.; Schulz, Stefan; Taylor, Robert A.

    2017-07-01

    We report the direct generation of linearly polarized single photons with a deterministic polarization axis in self-assembled quantum dots (QDs), achieved by the use of non-polar InGaN without complex device geometry engineering. Here, we present a comprehensive investigation of the polarization properties of these QDs and their origin with statistically significant experimental data and rigorous k·p modeling. The experimental study of 180 individual QDs allows us to compute an average polarization degree of 0.90, with a standard deviation of only 0.08. When coupled with theoretical insights, we show that these QDs are highly insensitive to size differences, shape anisotropies, and material content variations. Furthermore, 91% of the studied QDs exhibit a polarization axis along the crystal [1-100] axis, with the other 9% polarized orthogonal to this direction. These features give non-polar InGaN QDs unique advantages in polarization control over other materials, such as conventional polar nitride, InAs, or CdSe QDs. Hence, the ability to generate single photons with polarization control makes non-polar InGaN QDs highly attractive for quantum cryptography protocols.

  9. High-energy resummation of direct photon production at hadronic colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diana, Giovanni; Rojo, Juan; Ball, Richard D.

    2010-10-01

    Direct photon production is an important process at hadron colliders, being relevant both for precision measurement of the gluon density, and as background to Higgs and other new physics searches. Here we explore the implications of recently derived results for high-energy resummation of direct photon production for the interpretation of measurements at the Tevatron and the LHC. The effects of resummation are compared to various sources of theoretical uncertainties like PDFs and scale variations. We show how the high-energy resummation procedure stabilizes the logarithmic enhancement of the cross section at high energy which is present at any fixed order in the perturbative expansion starting at NNLO. The effects of high-energy resummation are found to be negligible at Tevatron, while they enhance the cross section by a few percent for pT≲10 GeV at the LHC. Our results imply that the discrepancy at small pT between fixed order NLO and Tevatron data cannot be explained by unresummed high-energy contributions.

  10. High zenithal directivity from a dipole antenna on a photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. R.; McMahon, O. B.

    1996-02-01

    A strip dipole on a (111)-oriented face centered cubic photonic crystal is found to have a copolarized directivity and radiative gain of 9.1 and 7.2±1.4, respectively, along the zenith and at a frequency in the first stop band of 18.0 GHz. Under the same conditions, the maximum copolarized directivity and radiative gain were 10.0 and 8.1±1.6, respectively, in the H-plane 5° down from the zenith. The zenithal results correspond to a 5.5-times greater radiation intensity than displayed by the same dipole in free space. From power balance measurements, only 10% of this enhancement is attributed to superior power transfer between the generator and antenna. The remainder is associated with constructive interference between the primary antenna radiation and radiation reflected from the crystal.

  11. Direction-independent fiber inclinometer based on simplified hollow core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuhui; Liu, Ningliang; Hou, Maoxiang; Guo, Jiangtao; Li, Zhihua; Lu, Peixiang

    2013-02-15

    A fiber optical inclinometer based on modal interferometer is demonstrated for bend angle sensing. The device consists of a piece of simplified hollow core photonic crystal fiber sandwiched between single mode fibers with lateral offset. The measurement of bend angles up to 45° is demonstrated, and the spectrum exhibits a blueshift of over 50 nm. The sensitivity is found to increase with the applied bend angles and reaches 2.4 nm/deg at 45°, and the response is independent of the direction of bending. A low temperature sensitivity of 0.5 pm/°C is observed between room temperature and 1000°C. Due to its capacity for withstanding high temperature, the device can work as a direction-independent inclinometer in high-temperature environments.

  12. 3D Monte Carlo model with direct photon flux recording for optimal optogenetic light delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Younghoon; Kim, Dongmok; Lee, Jihoon; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang

    2017-02-01

    Configuring the light power emitted from the optical fiber is an essential first step in planning in-vivo optogenetic experiments. However, diffusion theory, which was adopted for optogenetic research, precluded accurate estimates of light intensity in the semi-diffusive region where the primary locus of the stimulation is located. We present a 3D Monte Carlo model that provides an accurate and direct solution for light distribution in this region. Our method directly records the photon trajectory in the separate volumetric grid planes for the near-source recording efficiency gain, and it incorporates a 3D brain mesh to support both homogeneous and heterogeneous brain tissue. We investigated the light emitted from optical fibers in brain tissue in 3D, and we applied the results to design optimal light delivery parameters for precise optogenetic manipulation by considering the fiber output power, wavelength, fiber-to-target distance, and the area of neural tissue activation.

  13. New design of a triplexer using ring resonator integrated with directional coupler based on photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yaw-Dong; Shih, Tien-Tsorng; Lee, Jian-Jang

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we proposed the design of directional coupler integrated with ring resonator based on two-dimensional photonic crystals (2D PCs) to develop a triplexer filter. It can be widely used as the fiber access network element for multiplexer-demultiplexer wavelength selective in fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) communication systems. The directional coupler is chosen to separate the wavelengths of 1490nm and 1310nm. The ring resonator separates the wavelength of 1550nm. The transmission efficiency is larger than 90%. Besides, the total size of propose triplexer is only 19μm×12μm. We present simulation results using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for the proposed structure.

  14. Direct photon production in Pb–Pb collisions at sNN=2.76 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; ...

    2016-01-19

    We studied the direct photon production at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV in the transverse momentum range 0.9 < pT < 14 GeV/c. Photons were detected with the highly segmented electromagnetic calorimeter PHOS and via conversions in the ALICE detector material with the e+e- pair reconstructed in the central tracking system. Our results of the two methods were combined and direct photon spectra were measured for the 0-20%, 20-40%, and 40-80% centrality classes. For all three classes, agreement was found with perturbative QCD calculations for pT greater than or similar to 5 GeV/c. Direct photon spectramore » down to pT approximate to 1 GeV/c could be extracted for the 20-40% and 0-20% centrality classes. Furthermore, the significance of the direct photon signal for 0.9 < pT < 2.1 GeV/c is 2.6 sigma for the 0-20% class. The spectrum in this pT range and centrality class can be described by an exponential with an inverse slope parameter of (297 ± 12stat ± 41syst) MeV. State-of-the-art models for photon production in heavy-ion collisions agree with the data within uncertainties.« less

  15. Direct photon production in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Mohisin Khan, M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Munzer, R. H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Naik, B.; Nair, R.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Natal da Luz, H.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Papcun, P.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Sozzi, F.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Weiser, D. F.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasar, C.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2016-03-01

    Direct photon production at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV was studied in the transverse momentum range 0.9 Photons were detected with the highly segmented electromagnetic calorimeter PHOS and via conversions in the ALICE detector material with the e+e- pair reconstructed in the central tracking system. The results of the two methods were combined and direct photon spectra were measured for the 0-20%, 20-40%, and 40-80% centrality classes. For all three classes, agreement was found with perturbative QCD calculations for pT ≳ 5 GeV / c. Direct photon spectra down to pT ≈ 1 GeV / c could be extracted for the 20-40% and 0-20% centrality classes. The significance of the direct photon signal for 0.9 photon production in heavy-ion collisions agree with the data within uncertainties.

  16. Measurement of direct photon production in p+p collisions at sqrt[s] = 200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Jamel, A; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Cussonneau, J P; d'Enterria, D; Das, K; David, G; Deák, F; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Fields, D E; Finck, C; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Gadrat, S; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hidas, P; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Horaguchi, T; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inuzuka, M; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Katou, K; Kawabata, T; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Kohara, R; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Le Bornec, Y; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McCain, M C; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Newby, J; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, H; Okada, K; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Penev, V; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Pierson, A; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qualls, J M; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Uam, T J; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Willis, N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L; Zong, X; Van Hecke, H W

    2007-01-05

    Cross sections for midrapidity production of direct photons in p+p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are reported for transverse momenta of 3 < pT < 16 GeV/c. Next-to-leading order perturbative QCD (pQCD) describes the data well for pT >5 GeV/c, where the uncertainties of the measurement and theory are comparable. We also report on the effect of requiring the photons to be isolated from parton jet energy. The observed fraction of isolated photons is well described by pQCD for pT >7 GeV/c.

  17. Direct and indirect effects of a new disease of alcyonacean soft corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slattery, M.; Renegar, D. A.; Gochfeld, D. J.

    2013-09-01

    Alcyonacean soft corals form major components of the biomass and biodiversity on many shallow Indo-Pacific reefs. In spite of the observed increase in marine diseases worldwide, disease has rarely been reported from this taxonomic group. Here, we describe a chronic tissue loss disease affecting soft corals of the genus Sinularia on reefs in Guam. The disease presents as a diffuse wrinkling of the otherwise smooth fingers, followed by tissue sloughing, necrosis, and disintegration. Until a cause has been confirmed, we propose the name Sinularia Tissue Loss Disease. This disease was first observed at low prevalence (<1 %) in 2001 affecting Sinularia polydactyla and it was later found in Sinularia maxima and the hybrid S. maxima x polydactyla. Disease prevalence is now significantly greater in the hybrid (11-12 %) than in either parent species (2-3 %). Histological examination of healthy and affected tissues of hybrid soft corals demonstrates a loss of structural integrity, increased densities of amoebocytes and inclusion of unidentified foreign eukaryotic cells that resemble oocysts, in the diseased tissues. The presence of disease is associated with reduced concentrations of cellular protein levels, although lipids and carbohydrates were unaffected. Results from a common garden transplant experiment indicate that disease also has an indirect effect on hybrid soft corals by increasing rates of butterflyfish predation over the levels found on healthy hybrids or on healthy and diseased parent species. Our results indicate that interactions between the parent and hybrid soft coral populations are more dynamic than previously reported. Loss of hybrid soft corals on already degraded back-reefs of Guam could have significant repercussions for these reef communities.

  18. Targeted therapy in soft tissue sarcoma-a novel direction in therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chun Jek; Yang, Jia-Lin; Crowe, Philip; Goldstein, David

    2013-09-01

    Inherent or acquired resistance to chemotherapy is a significant problem in the treatment of soft tissue sarcomas. Over the past decade, the discovery and characterization of aberrant signaling pathways and the identification of agents that can specifically target them has led to their introduction as novel treatment options in soft-tissue sarcomas (STS). Trials of monotherapy with targeted agents have shown results below expectations often because of activation of alternative signaling pathways. This review examines the potential for tactical combinations of these drugs to overcome this problem.

  19. Direct frequency comb optical frequency standard based on two-photon transitions of thermal atoms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S. Y.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y. L.; Leng, J. X.; Yang, W. P.; Zhang, Z. G.; Zhao, J. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Optical clocks have been the focus of science and technology research areas due to their capability to provide highest frequency accuracy and stability to date. Their superior frequency performance promises significant advances in the fields of fundamental research as well as practical applications including satellite-based navigation and ranging. In traditional optical clocks, ultrastable optical cavities, laser cooling and particle (atoms or a single ion) trapping techniques are employed to guarantee high stability and accuracy. However, on the other hand, they make optical clocks an entire optical tableful of equipment, and cannot work continuously for a long time; as a result, they restrict optical clocks used as very convenient and compact time-keeping clocks. In this article, we proposed, and experimentally demonstrated, a novel scheme of optical frequency standard based on comb-directly-excited atomic two-photon transitions. By taking advantage of the natural properties of the comb and two-photon transitions, this frequency standard achieves a simplified structure, high robustness as well as decent frequency stability, which promise widespread applications in various scenarios. PMID:26459877

  20. Direct transfer of classical non-separable states into hybrid entangled two photon states.

    PubMed

    Jabir, M V; Apurv Chaitanya, N; Mathew, Manoj; Samanta, G K

    2017-08-04

    Hybrid entangled states, having entanglement between different degrees-of-freedom (DoF) of a particle pair, are of great interest for quantum information science and communication protocols. Among different DoFs, the hybrid entangled states encoded with polarization and orbital angular momentum (OAM) allow the generation of qubit-qudit entangled states, macroscopic entanglement with very high quanta of OAM and improvement in angular resolution in remote sensing. Till date, such hybrid entangled states are generated by using a high-fidelity polarization entangled states and subsequent imprinting of chosen amount of OAM using suitable mode converters such as spatial light modulator in complicated experimental schemes. Given that the entangled sources have feeble number of photons, loss of photons during imprinting of OAM using diffractive optical elements limits the use of such hybrid states for practical applications. Here we report, on a simple generic experimental scheme to generate hybrid entangled states in polarization and OAM through direct transfer of classical non-separable states of the pump beam in parametric down conversion process. As a proof of principle, using local non-separable pump states of OAM mode l = 3, we have produced quantum hybrid entangled states with entanglement witness parameter of ~1.25 ± 0.03 violating by 8 standard deviation.

  1. Direct frequency comb optical frequency standard based on two-photon transitions of thermal atoms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S Y; Wu, J T; Zhang, Y L; Leng, J X; Yang, W P; Zhang, Z G; Zhao, J Y

    2015-10-13

    Optical clocks have been the focus of science and technology research areas due to their capability to provide highest frequency accuracy and stability to date. Their superior frequency performance promises significant advances in the fields of fundamental research as well as practical applications including satellite-based navigation and ranging. In traditional optical clocks, ultrastable optical cavities, laser cooling and particle (atoms or a single ion) trapping techniques are employed to guarantee high stability and accuracy. However, on the other hand, they make optical clocks an entire optical tableful of equipment, and cannot work continuously for a long time; as a result, they restrict optical clocks used as very convenient and compact time-keeping clocks. In this article, we proposed, and experimentally demonstrated, a novel scheme of optical frequency standard based on comb-directly-excited atomic two-photon transitions. By taking advantage of the natural properties of the comb and two-photon transitions, this frequency standard achieves a simplified structure, high robustness as well as decent frequency stability, which promise widespread applications in various scenarios.

  2. Demonstration and experimental evaluation of a bi-directional 10-GHz microwave photonic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaldívar-Huerta, I. E.; Correa-Mena, A. G.; Hernández-Nava, P.; García-Juárez, A.; Rodríguez-Asomoza, J.; Lee, Min Won

    2016-09-01

    A bi-directional 10-GHz microwave photonic filter is proposed and experimentally evaluated. Its frequency response consists of a series of microwave band-pass windows obtained by the interaction of externally modulated multimode laser diodes emitting around of 1550 nm associated to the chromatic dispersion parameter of an optical fiber, as well as the length of the optical link. Microwave band-pass windows exhibit on average a-3 dB bandwidth of 378 MHz. This electro-optical system shows an efficient configuration and good performance. Potentially, filtered microwave signals can be used as electrical carriers in optical communication systems to transmit and distribute services such as video, voice and data.

  3. Direct Photon Production at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2016-12-13

    We present the first calculation of direct photon production at next-to-next-to leading order (NNLO) accuracy in QCD. For this process, although the final state cuts mandate only the presence of a single electroweak boson, the underlying kinematics resembles that of a generic vector boson plus jet topology. In order to regulate the infrared singularities present at this order we use the $N$-jettiness slicing procedure, applied for the first time to a final state that at Born level includes colored partons but no required jet. We compare our predictions to ATLAS 8 TeV data and find that the inclusion of the NNLO terms in the perturbative expansion, supplemented by electroweak corrections, provides an excellent description of the data with greatly reduced theoretical uncertainties.

  4. Direct molecule-specific glucose detection by Raman spectroscopy based on photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuan; Zhang, Alissa Y; Wheeler, Damon A; Bond, Tiziana C; Gu, Claire; Li, Yat

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the first step toward the development of a glucose biosensor based on Raman spectroscopy and a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) probe. Historically, it has been very challenging to detect glucose directly by Raman spectroscopy due to its inherently small Raman scattering cross-section. In this work, we report the first quantitative glucose Raman detection in the physiological concentration range (0-25 mM) with a low laser power (2 mW), a short integration time (30 s), and an extremely small sampling volume (~50 nL) using the highly sensitive liquid-filled PCF probe. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate the molecular specificity of this technique in the presence of a competing sugar, such as fructose. High sensitivity, flexibility, reproducibility, low cost, small sampling volume, and in situ remote sensing capability make PCF a very powerful platform for potential glucose detection based on Raman spectroscopy.

  5. High-capacity quantum secure direct communication using hyper-entanglement of photonic qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jiarui; Pan, Ziwen; Wang, Tie-Jun; Wang, Sihai; Wang, Chuan

    2016-11-01

    Hyper-entanglement is a system constituted by photons entangled in multiple degrees of freedom (DOF), being considered as a promising way of increasing channel capacity and guaranteeing powerful eavesdropping safeguard. In this work, we propose a coding scheme based on a 3-particle hyper-entanglement of polarization and orbital angular momentum (OAM) system and its application as a quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) protocol. The OAM values are specially encoded by Fibonacci sequence and the polarization carries information by defined unitary operations. The internal relations of the secret message enhances security due to principle of quantum mechanics and Fibonacci sequence. We also discuss the coding capacity and security property along with some simulation results to show its superiority and extensibility.

  6. High Transverse Momentum Direct Photon Production at Fermilab Fixed-Target Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Apanasevich, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of the production of high transverse momentum direct photons and π0 mesons by proton beams at 530 and 800 GeV/c and π- beams at 515 GeV/c incident on beryllium, copper, and liquid hydrogen targets. The data were collected by Fermilab experiment E706 during the 1990 and 1991-92 fixed target runs. The apparatus included a large, finely segmented lead and liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter and a charged particle spectrometer featuring silicon strip detectors in the target region and proportional wire chambers and drift tubes downstream of a large aperture analysis magnet. The inclusive cross sections are presented as functions of transverse momentum and rapidity. The measurements are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations and to results from previous experiments.

  7. Direct Photon Production at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2017-06-01

    We present the first calculation of direct photon production at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) accuracy in QCD. For this process, although the final-state cuts mandate only the presence of a single electroweak boson, the underlying kinematics resembles that of a generic vector boson plus jet topology. In order to regulate the infrared singularities present at this order, we use the N -jettiness slicing procedure, applied for the first time to a final state that at the Born level includes colored partons but no required jet. We compare our predictions to ATLAS 8 TeV data and find that the inclusion of the NNLO terms in the perturbative expansion, supplemented by electroweak corrections, provides an excellent description of the data with greatly reduced theoretical uncertainties.

  8. Precise Measurement of the Photon Directional Asymmetry in the np → dgamma Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, David

    This work presents analysis and results for the NPDGamma experiment, measuring the spin-correlated photon directional asymmetry in the vec np → dgamma radiative capture of polarized, cold neutrons on a parahydrogen target. The parity-violating (PV) component of this asymmetry Agamma,PV is unambiguously related to the DeltaI = 1 component of the hadronic weak interaction due to pion exchange. Measurements in the second phase of NPDGamma were taken at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) from late 2012 to early 2014, and then again in the first half of 2016 for an unprecedented level of statistics in order to obtain a measurement that is precise with respect to theoretical predictions of Agamma, PV = O (10-8). Theoretical and experimental background, description of the experimental apparatus, analysis methods, and results for the high-statistics measurements are given.

  9. First Direct-Detection Constraints on eV-Scale Hidden-Photon Dark Matter with DAMIC at SNOLAB.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A; Amidei, D; Bertou, X; Butner, M; Cancelo, G; Castañeda Vázquez, A; Cervantes Vergara, B A; Chavarria, A E; Chavez, C R; de Mello Neto, J R T; D'Olivo, J C; Estrada, J; Fernandez Moroni, G; Gaïor, R; Guardincerri, Y; Hernández Torres, K P; Izraelevitch, F; Kavner, A; Kilminster, B; Lawson, I; Letessier-Selvon, A; Liao, J; Matalon, A; Mello, V B B; Molina, J; Privitera, P; Ramanathan, K; Sarkis, Y; Schwarz, T; Settimo, M; Sofo Haro, M; Thomas, R; Tiffenberg, J; Tiouchichine, E; Torres Machado, D; Trillaud, F; You, X; Zhou, J

    2017-04-07

    We present direct detection constraints on the absorption of hidden-photon dark matter with particle masses in the range 1.2-30  eV c^{-2} with the DAMIC experiment at SNOLAB. Under the assumption that the local dark matter is entirely constituted of hidden photons, the sensitivity to the kinetic mixing parameter κ is competitive with constraints from solar emission, reaching a minimum value of 2.2×10^{-14} at 17  eV c^{-2}. These results are the most stringent direct detection constraints on hidden-photon dark matter in the galactic halo with masses 3-12  eV c^{-2} and the first demonstration of direct experimental sensitivity to ionization signals <12  eV from dark matter interactions.

  10. First Direct-Detection Constraints on eV-Scale Hidden-Photon Dark Matter with DAMIC at SNOLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Amidei, D.; Bertou, X.; Butner, M.; Cancelo, G.; Castañeda Vázquez, A.; Cervantes Vergara, B. A.; Chavarria, A. E.; Chavez, C. R.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Estrada, J.; Fernandez Moroni, G.; Gaïor, R.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hernández Torres, K. P.; Izraelevitch, F.; Kavner, A.; Kilminster, B.; Lawson, I.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Liao, J.; Matalon, A.; Mello, V. B. B.; Molina, J.; Privitera, P.; Ramanathan, K.; Sarkis, Y.; Schwarz, T.; Settimo, M.; Sofo Haro, M.; Thomas, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Tiouchichine, E.; Torres Machado, D.; Trillaud, F.; You, X.; Zhou, J.; Damic Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    We present direct detection constraints on the absorption of hidden-photon dark matter with particle masses in the range 1.2 - 30 eV c-2 with the DAMIC experiment at SNOLAB. Under the assumption that the local dark matter is entirely constituted of hidden photons, the sensitivity to the kinetic mixing parameter κ is competitive with constraints from solar emission, reaching a minimum value of 2.2 ×10-14 at 17 eV c-2 . These results are the most stringent direct detection constraints on hidden-photon dark matter in the galactic halo with masses 3 - 12 eV c-2 and the first demonstration of direct experimental sensitivity to ionization signals <12 eV from dark matter interactions.

  11. First Direct Detection Constraints on eV-Scale Hidden Photon Dark Matter with DAMIC at SNOLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; et al.

    2016-11-09

    We present direct detection constraints on the absorption of hidden-photon dark matter with particle masses in the range 1.2-30 eV$c^{-2}$ with the DAMIC experiment at SNOLAB. Under the assumption that the local dark matter is entirely constituted of hidden photons, the sensitivity to the kinetic mixing parameter $\\kappa$ is competitive with constraints from solar emission, reaching a minimum value of 2.2$\\times$$10^{-14}$ at 17 eV$c^{-2}$. These results are the most stringent direct detection constraints on hidden-photon dark matter with masses 3-12 eV$c^{-2}$ and the first demonstration of direct experimental sensitivity to ionization signals $<$12 eV from dark matter interactions.

  12. Thermal cure effects on electromechanical properties of conductive wires by direct ink write for 4D printing and soft machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Quanyi; Dunn, Conner K.; Wang, Lei; Dunn, Martin L.; Qi, H. Jerry; Wang, Tiejun

    2017-04-01

    Recent developments in soft materials and 3D printing are promoting the rapid development of novel technologies and concepts, such as 4D printing and soft machines, that in turn require new methods for fabricating conductive materials. Despite the ubiquity of silver nanoparticles (NPs) in the conducting electrodes of printed electronic devices, their potential use in stretchable conductors has not been fully explored in 4D printing and soft machines. This paper studies the effect of thermal cure conditions on conductivity and electro-mechanical behaviors of silver ink by the direct ink write (DIW) printing approach. We found that the electro-mechanical properties of silver wires can be tailored by controlling cure time and cure temperature to achieve conductivity as well as stretchability. For the silver NP ink we used in the experiments, silver wires cured at 80 °C for 10–30 min have conductivity >1% bulk silver, Young’s modulus <100 MPa, yield strain ∼9%, and can retain conductivity up to 300% strain. In addition, under stress controlled cyclic loading/unloading conditions, the resistance of these wires is only about 1.3 times the initial value after the 100th repeat cycle (7.6% maximum strain in the first cycle). Silver wires cured at 120 °C for 10–20 min are more sensitive to strain and have a yield strain of around 6%. These properties indicate that the silver ink can be used to fabricate stretchable electrodes and flex sensors. Using the DIW fabrication method, we printed silver ink patterns on the surface of 3D printed polymer parts, with the future goal of constructing fully 3D printed arbitrarily formed soft and stretchable devices and of applying them to 4D printing. We demonstrated a fully printed functional soft-matter sensor and a circuit element that can be stretched by as much as 45%.

  13. Direct visualization of tear film on soft contact lens using ultra-high resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhua; Jiao, Shuliang; Ruggeri, Marco; Wehbe, Hassan M.

    2008-02-01

    The integrity of the tear film on the surface of contact lenses is essential to maintaining visual clarity and the overall health of the superficial structures of the eye (cornea and conjunctiva) for contact lens wearers. It is very critical to evaluate pre- and post-lens tear films in contact lens practice to make sure the lens is properly fitted. Improper lens fitting may cause ocular discomfort, visual distortion and ocular infection. It is very often for soft contact lens wearers to experience dry eye, especially in the afternoon after wearing the lens for a period of time. Dry eye has been a common cause of contact lens drop-off. There is currently no method available to directly visualize the tears on and underneath the contact lens in situ on human eye, mainly due to the extremely difficulty in imaging the micrometer-thin tear layer. An ultra-high resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography has been developed with a telecentric light delivery system mounted with a slit-lamp. The system has a 3 micrometer depth resolution with a scan width up to 15 mm. The system was used to image soft contact lenses on the human eye. For the first time to our knowledge, tear films on the center and edge of the soft contact lens were directly visualized in vivo.

  14. An intensity modulation and coherent balanced detection intersatellite microwave photonic link using polarization direction control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuan; Zhu, Zihang; Zhao, Shanghong; Li, Yongjun; Han, Lei; Zhao, Jing

    2014-03-01

    A simple approach for high loss intersatellite microwave photonic link with intensity modulation and coherent balanced detection is proposed. In the transmitter, the double sideband-suppressed carrier (DSB-SC) modulated optical signal and optical carrier (OC) are combined by employing a polarization combiner to chose and control the signals polarization directions, while in the receiver, they are selected respectively by using a polarization splitter for they have orthogonal polarization directions. The separated DSB-SC signal and OC put into balanced detectors and the coherent detection is realized without a local oscillator (LO). At the output, the fundamental signal is augmented and the third-order distortion is suppressed for the DSB-SC modulation, the second-order distortion is removed for the balanced detection and the noise is reduced for the polarization direction control. The signal to noise and distortion ratio (SNDR) can be optimized by adjusting the power of OC and modulation index. The simulation results show that, a SNDR higher than 30 dB can be obtained for the proposed method, which is in agreement with the theoretical analysis.

  15. Universal deformation of soft substrates near a contact line and the direct measurement of solid surface stresses.

    PubMed

    Style, Robert W; Boltyanskiy, Rostislav; Che, Yonglu; Wettlaufer, J S; Wilen, Larry A; Dufresne, Eric R

    2013-02-08

    Droplets deform soft substrates near their contact lines. Using confocal microscopy, we measure the deformation of silicone gel substrates due to glycerol and fluorinated-oil droplets for a range of droplet radii and substrate thicknesses. For all droplets, the substrate deformation takes a universal shape close to the contact line that depends on liquid composition, but is independent of droplet size and substrate thickness. This shape is determined by a balance of interfacial tensions at the contact line and provides a novel method for direct determination of the surface stresses of soft substrates. Moreover, we measure the change in contact angle with droplet radius and show that Young's law fails for small droplets when their radii approach an elastocapillary length scale. For larger droplets the macroscopic contact angle is constant, consistent with Young's law.

  16. Universal Deformation of Soft Substrates Near a Contact Line and the Direct Measurement of Solid Surface Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Style, Robert W.; Boltyanskiy, Rostislav; Che, Yonglu; Wettlaufer, J. S.; Wilen, Larry A.; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2013-02-01

    Droplets deform soft substrates near their contact lines. Using confocal microscopy, we measure the deformation of silicone gel substrates due to glycerol and fluorinated-oil droplets for a range of droplet radii and substrate thicknesses. For all droplets, the substrate deformation takes a universal shape close to the contact line that depends on liquid composition, but is independent of droplet size and substrate thickness. This shape is determined by a balance of interfacial tensions at the contact line and provides a novel method for direct determination of the surface stresses of soft substrates. Moreover, we measure the change in contact angle with droplet radius and show that Young’s law fails for small droplets when their radii approach an elastocapillary length scale. For larger droplets the macroscopic contact angle is constant, consistent with Young’s law.

  17. Waveguide Plasmon Resonance of Arrayed Metallic Nanostructures Patterned on a Soft Substrate by Direct Contact Printing Lithography.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei-Xiang; Wu, Chun-Ying; Lee, Yung-Chun

    2017-08-13

    This paper presents a direct contact printing method to obtain arrayed metallic nanostructures on a soft polymer substrate. It utilizes a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold replicated from silicon molds to transfer metallic nanopatterns onto a polymer substrate based on differences in interfacial bonding energy. Arrayed metallic nanodisks with a disk diameter down to 180 nm and a center-to-center pitch around 400 nm are experimentally patterned on a PET substrate. The patterned metallic nanostructures are then spin-coated with a polymer layer; which mechanically secures the patterned nanostructures and optically allows waveguide plasmon resonance being excited by incident EM waves. Both experimental works and theoretical modeling are given to illustrate the behaviors of different types of plasmon resonance. These arrayed metallic nanostructures patterned on a soft polymer substrate and their tunable optical characteristics open up many possibilities in future engineering applications.

  18. Comparison of dual-photon absorptiometry systems for total-body bone and soft tissue measurements: Dual-energy X-rays versus gadolinium 153

    SciTech Connect

    Russell-Aulet, M.; Wang, J.; Thornton, J.; Pierson, R.N. Jr. )

    1991-04-01

    A total of 81 subjects (41 males and 40 females) were scanned by dual-photon absorptiometry by 153Gd source (DPA; Lunar DP4) and by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA; Lunar-DPX) within a 24 h period. Total-body bone mineral density (TBMD), calcium content (Ca), and soft tissue mass (ST) were determined with a precision of about 1-1.5% using DPA and 0.5-1.0% using DEXA. Measurements of TBMD, Ca, ST, bone area (area), percentage fat, and regional bone mineral densities (BMD) were compared. Paired t-tests showed small but significant differences between all measurements. Correlations (r) for TBMD, Ca, area, ST, percentage fat, arm BMD, leg BMD, and trunk BMD were 0.99, 0.99, 0.97, 0.99, 0.97, 0.99, 0.99, and 0.98. There were small systematic differences for TBMD (less than 1%), calcium (3%), bone area (3%), soft tissue mass (7%), and percentage fat (9%) between the two approaches. Regression equations are given relating these measurements.

  19. Increased light extraction and directional emission control in gallium nitride photonic crystal light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGroddy, Kelly C.

    GaN has become the prominent material for blue-green light emitting diodes (LEDs) and efficient white light sources. Advancements in LED efficiency for lighting has the potential to dramatically impact energy consumption world wide. A limiting factor to achieving high efficiencies in GaN LEDs is the light extraction efficiency. This work addresses many key issues pertaining to the use of PhCs to increase the extraction efficiency and emission directionality of GaN LEDs. Limitations in extraction efficiency of GaN photonic crystal light emitting diodes (LEDs) are addressed by implementing an LED design using both 2D photonic crystals (PhCs) in-plane and index guiding layers (IGLs) in the vertical direction. The effects of PhCs on light extraction and emission directionality from GaN LEDs are studied experimentally. Angular resolved electroluminescence clearly shows the combined effect of controlling the vertical mode profile with the IGLs and tailoring the emission profile with the periodicity of the PhC lattice. Various materials are used to increase the index contrast of the IGL and the effects are measured. Increases in vertical emission as high as 3.5x are achieved for PhC LEDs with an Al0.12Ga0.88N IGL over non-PhC LEDs with a ˜30% improvement attributed to the incorporation of the AlGaN IGL. This enhancement is achieved by tailoring both the directionality and guided mode control. The impact of incorporating PhCs and IGLs on LED device design and performance are addressed. Effects of etching the PhCs near the QWs have been observed and explanations for this behavior will be discussed. It will be shown that an un-doped IGL can severely limit current spreading in the n-type side of the device and have a detrimental impact on device performance. Finally, a method of patterning PhCs with periodicities as small as 230nm by laser interference lithography and imprint lithography has been developed to provide a fast, inexpensive method of pattering PhCs over large

  20. Directed-Assembly of Carbon Nanotubes on Soft Substrates for Flexible Biosensor Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyoung Woo; Koh, Juntae; Lee, Byung Yang; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Joohyung; Hong, Seunghun; Yi, Mihye; Jhon, Young Min

    2009-03-01

    We developed a method to selectively assemble and align carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on soft substrates for flexible biosensors. In this strategy, thin oxide layer was deposited on soft substrates via low temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and linker-free assembly process was applied onto the oxide surface where the assembly of carbon nanotubes was guided by methyl-terminated molecular patterns on the oxide surface. The electrical characterization of the fabricated CNT devices exhibited typical p-type gating effect and 1/f noise behavior. The bare oxide regions near CNTs were functionalized with glutamate oxidase to fabricate selective biosensors to detect two forms of glutamate substances existing in different situations: L-glutamic acid, a neuro-transmitting material, and monosodium glutamate, a food additive.

  1. Directed assembly of carbon nanotubes on soft substrates for use as a flexible biosensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Juntae; Yi, Mihye; Lee, Byung Yang; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Joohyung; Jhon, Young Min; Hong, Seunghun

    2008-12-01

    We have developed a method to selectively assemble and align carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on soft substrates for use as flexible biosensors. In this strategy, a thin oxide layer was deposited on soft substrates via low temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and a linker-free assembly process was applied on the oxide surface where the assembly of carbon nanotubes was guided by methyl-terminated molecular patterns on the oxide surface. The electrical characterization of the fabricated CNT devices exhibited a typical p-type gating effect and 1/f noise behavior. The bare oxide regions near CNTs were functionalized with glutamate oxidase to fabricate selective biosensors to detect two forms of glutamate substances existing in different situations: L-glutamic acid, a neurotransmitting material, and monosodium glutamate, a food additive.

  2. Acid-Base Pairs in Lewis Acidic Zeolites Promote Direct Aldol Reactions by Soft Enolization.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer D; Van de Vyver, Stijn; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-08-17

    Hf-, Sn-, and Zr-Beta zeolites catalyze the cross-aldol condensation of aromatic aldehydes with acetone under mild reaction conditions with near quantitative yields. NMR studies with isotopically labeled molecules confirm that acid-base pairs in the Si-O-M framework ensemble promote soft enolization through α-proton abstraction. The Lewis acidic zeolites maintain activity in the presence of water and, unlike traditional base catalysts, in acidic solutions.

  3. Direct Observation of Phase Transition Dynamics in Suspensions of Soft Colloidal Hydrogel Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae Kyu; Meng, Zhiyong; Lyon, L. Andrew; Breedveld, Victor

    2008-07-01

    Due to the tunability of their softness and volume as a function of temperature, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAm) hydrogel particles have emerged as a model system for soft colloidal spheres. By introducing AAc as comonomer, one can also tune the particle volume via pH. We report on the phase behavior of these stimuli-responsive colloids as measured with a microdialysis cell. This device, which integrates microfluidics with Particle Tracking Video-microscopy allows for simple and quick investigation of the phase behavior of suspensions the soft colloidal hydrogel as a function of pH as well as its packing density. In particular, we demonstrate the existence of an unusually broad liquid/crystal coexistence region as a function of effective particle volume fraction. Additionally, we reveal that nonequilibrium jammed states can be created in the coexistence region upon sudden large changes of pH. The phase diagram is indicative of complex interparticle interactions with weakly attractive components.

  4. Direct writing of fiber optic components in photonic crystal fibers and other specialty fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Luis Andre; Sezerman, Omur; Best, Garland; Ng, Mi Li; Kane, Saidou

    2016-04-01

    Femtosecond direct laser writing has recently shown great potential for the fabrication of complex integrated devices in the cladding of optical fibers. Such devices have the advantage of requiring no bulk optical components and no breaks in the fiber path, thus reducing the need for complicated alignment, eliminating contamination, and increasing stability. This technology has already found applications using combinations of Bragg gratings, interferometers, and couplers for the fabrication of optical filters, sensors, and power monitors. The femtosecond laser writing method produces a local modification of refractive index through non-linear absorption of the ultrafast laser pulses inside the dielectric material of both the core and cladding of the fiber. However, fiber geometries that incorporate air or hollow structures, such as photonic crystal fibers (PCFs), still present a challenge since the index modification regions created by the writing process cannot be generated in the hollow regions of the fiber. In this work, the femtosecond laser method is used together with a pre-modification method that consists of partially collapsing the hollow holes using an electrical arc discharge. The partial collapse of the photonic band gap structure provides a path for femtosecond laser written waveguides to couple light from the core to the edge of the fiber for in-line power monitoring. This novel approach is expected to have applications in other specialty fibers such as suspended core fibers and can open the way for the integration of complex devices and facilitate miniaturization of optical circuits to take advantage of the particular characteristics of the PCFs.

  5. Direct writing of large-area plasmonic photonic crystals using single-shot interference ablation.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zhaoguang; Zhang, Xinping

    2011-04-08

    We report direct writing of metallic photonic crystals (MPCs) through a single-shot exposure of a thin film of colloidal gold nanoparticles to the interference pattern of a single UV laser pulse before a subsequent annealing process. This is defined as interference ablation, where the colloidal gold nanoparticles illuminated by the bright interference fringes are removed instantly within a timescale of about 6 ns, which is actually the pulse length of the UV laser, whereas the gold nanoparticles located within the dark interference fringes remain on the substrate and form grating structures. This kind of ablation has been proven to have a high spatial resolution and thus enables successful fabrication of waveguided MPC structures with the optical response in the visible spectral range. The subsequent annealing process transforms the grating structures consisting of ligand-covered gold nanoparticles into plasmonic MPCs. The annealing temperature is optimized to a range from 250 to 300 °C to produce MPCs of gold nanowires with a period of 300 nm and an effective area of 5 mm in diameter. If the sample of the spin-coated gold nanoparticles is rotated by 90° after the first exposure, true two-dimensional plasmonic MPCs are produced through a second exposure to the interference pattern. Strong plasmonic resonance and its coupling with the photonic modes of the waveguided MPCs verifies the success of this new fabrication technique. This is the simplest and most efficient technique so far for the construction of large-area MPC devices, which enables true mass fabrication of plasmonic devices with high reproducibility and high success rate.

  6. Challenges of direct photon production at forward rapidities and large pT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krelina, Michal; Cepila, Jan; Nemchik, Jan

    2017-02-01

    Direct photons produced in interactions with nuclear targets represent a cleaner probe for investigation of nuclear effects than hadrons, since photons have no final state interaction and no energy loss or absorption is expected in the produced hot medium. Therefore, besides the Cronin enhancement at medium-high transverse momenta pT and isospin effects at larger pT , one should not expect any nuclear effects. However, this fact is in contrast to the PHENIX data providing an evidence for a significant large-pT suppression at mid rapidities in central d + Au and Au + Au collisions that cannot be induced by coherent phenomena (gluon shadowing, Color Glass Condensate). We demonstrate that such an unexpected results is subject to deficit of energy induced universally by multiple initial state interactions (ISI) towards the kinematic limits (large Feynman xF and/or large {x_T} = 2{p_T}/\\sqrt s ). For this reason, in order to enhance the effects of coherence, one should be cautious going to forward rapidities and higher energies. In the LHC kinematic region ISI corrections are irrelevant at mid rapidities but cause rather strong suppression at forward rapidities and large pT . Numerical calculations of invariant pT spectra and the nuclear modification factor were performed within two different models, the color dipole formalism and the model based on kT -factorization, which are successfully confronted with available data from the RHIC and LHC collider experiments. Finally, we perform also predictions for a strong onset of ISI corrections at forward rapidities and corresponding expected suppression can be verified by the future measurements at LHC.

  7. Low loss photonic components in high index bismuth borate glass by femtosecond laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weijia; Corbari, Costantino; Kazansky, Peter G; Sakaguchi, Koichi; Carvalho, Isabel C S

    2008-09-29

    Single mode, low loss waveguides were fabricated in high index bismuth borate glass by femtosecond laser direct writing. A specific set of writing parameters leading to waveguides perfectly mode matched to standard single-mode fibers at 1.55 microm with an overall insertion loss of approximately 1 dB and with propagation loss below 0.2 dB/cm was identified. Photonic components such as Y-splitters and directional couplers were also demonstrated. A close agreement between their performances and theoretical predictions based upon the characterization of the waveguide properties is shown. Finally, the nonlinear refractive index of the waveguides has been measured to be 6.6 x 10(-15) cm(2)/W by analyzing self-phase modulation of the propagating femtosecond laser pulse at the wavelength of 1.46 microm. Broadening of the transmitted light source as large as 500 nm was demonstrated through a waveguide with the length of 1.8 cm.

  8. III-V/Si hybrid photonic devices by direct fusion bonding

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Katsuaki; Watanabe, Katsuyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Monolithic integration of III-V compound semiconductors on silicon is highly sought after for high-speed, low-power-consumption silicon photonics and low-cost, light-weight photovoltaics. Here we present a GaAs/Si direct fusion bonding technique to provide highly conductive and transparent heterojunctions by heterointerfacial band engineering in relation to doping concentrations. Metal- and oxide-free GaAs/Si ohmic heterojunctions have been formed at 300°C; sufficiently low to inhibit active material degradation. We have demonstrated 1.3 μm InAs/GaAs quantum dot lasers on Si substrates with the lowest threshold current density of any laser on Si to date, and AlGaAs/Si dual-junction solar cells, by p-GaAs/p-Si and p-GaAs/n-Si bonding, respectively. Our direct semiconductor bonding technique opens up a new pathway for realizing ultrahigh efficiency multijunction solar cells with ideal bandgap combinations that are free from lattice-match restrictions required in conventional heteroepitaxy, as well as enabling the creation of novel high performance and practical optoelectronic devices by III-V/Si hybrid integration. PMID:22470842

  9. III-V/Si hybrid photonic devices by direct fusion bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki; Watanabe, Katsuyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2012-04-01

    Monolithic integration of III-V compound semiconductors on silicon is highly sought after for high-speed, low-power-consumption silicon photonics and low-cost, light-weight photovoltaics. Here we present a GaAs/Si direct fusion bonding technique to provide highly conductive and transparent heterojunctions by heterointerfacial band engineering in relation to doping concentrations. Metal- and oxide-free GaAs/Si ohmic heterojunctions have been formed at 300°C sufficiently low to inhibit active material degradation. We have demonstrated 1.3 μm InAs/GaAs quantum dot lasers on Si substrates with the lowest threshold current density of any laser on Si to date, and AlGaAs/Si dual-junction solar cells, by p-GaAs/p-Si and p-GaAs/n-Si bonding, respectively. Our direct semiconductor bonding technique opens up a new pathway for realizing ultrahigh efficiency multijunction solar cells with ideal bandgap combinations that are free from lattice-match restrictions required in conventional heteroepitaxy, as well as enabling the creation of novel high performance and practical optoelectronic devices by III-V/Si hybrid integration.

  10. Directed assembly of colloidal particles for micro/nano photonics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuebing

    2017-02-01

    Bottom-up fabrication of complex structures with chemically synthesized colloidal particles as building blocks pave an efficient and cost-effective way towards micro/nano photonics with unprecedented functionality and tunability. Novel properties can arise from quantum effects of colloidal particles, as well as inter-particle interactions and spatial arrangement in particle assemblies. Herein, I discuss our recent developments and applications of three types of techniques for directed assembly of colloidal particles: moiré nanosphere lithography (MNSL), bubble-pen lithography (BPL), and optothermal tweezers (OTTs). Specifically, MNSL provides an efficient approach towards creating moiré metasurface with tunable and multiband optical responses from visible to mid-infrared regime. Au moiré metasurfaces have been applied for surface-enhanced infrared spectroscopy, optical capture and patterning of bacteria, and photothermal denaturation of proteins. BPL is developed to pattern a variety of colloidal particles on plasmonic substrates and two-dimensional atomic-layer materials in an arbitrary manner. The laser-directed microbubble captures and immobilizes nanoparticles through coordinated actions of Marangoni convection, surface tension, gas pressure, and substrate adhesion. OTTs are developed to create dynamic nanoparticle assemblies at low optical power. Such nanoparticle assemblies have been used for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for molecular analysis in their native environments.

  11. Application of photon Doppler velocimetry to direct impact Hopkinson pressure bars

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, Lewis J. Jardine, Andrew P.

    2016-02-15

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion, and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently, these advantages are gained at the expense of all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the experimental determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. In this paper, we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using photon Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and the precision of measurements. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains in fully dense metals, and improvement for all strains in slow and non-equilibrating materials.

  12. Two-wave photon Doppler velocimetry measurements in direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Lewis J.; Jardine, Andrew P.

    2015-09-01

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently advantages are gained at a significant cost: the fact that input bar data is unavailable removes all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. Recently photon Doppler velocimetry methods have been developed, which can replace strain gauges on Hopkinson bars. In this paper we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system, with the same level of convenience. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and improving the accuracy and convenience of Doppler velocimetry on Hopkinson bars. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains.

  13. Small-scale in vivo imaging of soft tissues by radioscopy using single X-ray photon counting.

    PubMed

    Hanus, Robert; Dammer, Jirí; Holý, Tomás; Jakůbek, Jan; Pospísil, Stanislav; Tykva, Richard

    2007-06-01

    A method has been developed for routine laboratory visualisation of small-scale soft tissue by means of transmission X-ray radioscopy and tomography. Using termites as models, imaging quality with a spatial resolution of about 3 mum was achieved and 3D tomographic reconstruction was demonstrated. A termite worker individual was visualized before and after its metamorphosis towards the soldier caste. The developed methodology represents a non-invasive and real-time way of acquiring 3D anatomic data with a high contrast so that it is a promising candidate to become a tool for routine investigations in life sciences.

  14. Low Momentum Direct Photons in Au + Au collisions at √{ s} = 39 GeV and 62 . 4 GeV measured by the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, Vladimir; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Direct photons, which are produced during all stages of a heavy-ion collision, directly probe the conditions of their production environment. The large yield and large anisotropy of low momentum direct photons observed in 200 GeV Au + Au collisions pose a significant challenge to theoretical models. Measurements at lower collision energy may provide new insight on the origin of the low momentum direct photons. Direct photons are difficult to measure with electromagnetic calorimeters, in particular at low momentum, because of neutral hadron and minimal-ionizing particle contamination, large decay photon backgrounds, and worsening calorimeter resolution. Therefore PHENIX has measured the direct photons at √{ s} = 200 GeV via their external conversion to di-electron pairs. This method virtually eliminates the hadron contamination due to a very clean photon identification based on di-electron pair. The same method is also used in our current analysis of the direct photons at two lower energies. We will present the current status on the measurements of the low momentum direct photons at √{ s} = 39 GeV and 62 . 4 GeV.

  15. Direct measurements of forces induced by Bloch surface waves in a one-dimensional photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Shilkin, Daniil A; Lyubin, Evgeny V; Soboleva, Irina V; Fedyanin, Andrey A

    2015-11-01

    An experimental study of the interaction between a single dielectric microparticle and the evanescent field of the Bloch surface wave in a one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal is reported. The Bloch surface wave-induced forces on a 1 μm polystyrene sphere were measured by photonic force microscopy. The results demonstrate the potential of 1D photonic crystals for the optical manipulation of microparticles and suggest a novel approach for utilizing light in lab-on-a-chip devices.

  16. Direct transitions from high-K isomers to low-K bands -- {gamma} softness or coriolis coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.; Narimatsu, Kanako; Ohtsubo, Shin-Ichi

    1996-12-31

    Recent measurements of direct transitions from high-K isomers to low-K bands reveal severe break-down of the K-selection rule and pose the problem of how to understand the mechanism of such K-violation. The authors recent systematic calculations by using a simple {gamma}-tunneling model reproduced many of the observed hindrances, indicating the importance of the {gamma} softness. However, there are some data which cannot be explained in terms of the {gamma}-degree of freedom. In this talk, the authors also discuss the results of conventional Coriolis coupling calculations, which is considered to be another important mechanism.

  17. Many-Electron Response of Gas-Phase Fullerene Materials to Ultraviolet and Soft X-ray Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Himadri S.; Magrakvelidze, Maia

    2015-06-01

    This article briefly reviews primary theoretical methods employed from the beginning of the century to predict the response of empty fullerenes, fullerenes endohedrally confining varieties of atoms, and few-layer fullerene nanoonions to the external electromagnetic radiations from ultraviolet to soft x-ray frequencies. Comparisons with available measurements are shown wherever possible and the success of the time-dependent local density approximation (TDLDA) method is predominantly emphasized. For the ionization process, various effects of the coherence, such as, the plasmon resonances, atom-fullerene dynamical hybridization, many-body correlations based on the interchannel coupling in the continuum, and Auger-intercoulombic hybrid multicenter decays of innershell holes are discussed. Finally, a broad outlook is presented that includes attosecond physics with fullerene materials, photoresponse of non-spherical fullerenes as well as fullerenes with off-centered confinements, the bare ion-impact ionization of fullerenes, and explorations beyond spherical systems to cylindrical carbon-nanotubes.

  18. Two-photon direct laser writing of ultracompact multi-lens objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gissibl, Timo; Thiele, Simon; Herkommer, Alois; Giessen, Harald

    2016-08-01

    Current lens systems are restricted in size, shape and dimensions by limitations of manufacturing. Multi-lens elements with non-spherical shapes are required for high optical performance and to correct for aberrations when imaging at wide angles and large fields. Here we present a novel concept in optics that overcomes all of the aforementioned difficulties and opens the new field of 3D printed micro- and nano-optics with complex lens designs. We demonstrate the complete process chain, from optical design, manufacturing by femtosecond two-photon direct laser writing and testing to the application of multi-lens objectives with sizes around 100 µm, and validate their high performance and functionality by quantitative measurements of the modulation transfer function and aberrations. The unprecedented flexibility of our method paves the way towards printed optical miniature instruments such as endoscopes, fibre-imaging systems for cell biology, new illumination systems, miniature optical fibre traps, integrated quantum emitters and detectors, and miniature drones and robots with autonomous vision.

  19. Silicon nanocrystal-based photonic crystal slabs with broadband and efficient directional light emission.

    PubMed

    Ondič, L; Varga, M; Pelant, I; Valenta, J; Kromka, A; Elliman, R G

    2017-07-18

    Light extraction from a thin planar layer can be increased by introducing a two-dimensional periodic pattern on its surface. This structure, the so-called photonic crystal (PhC) slab, then not only enhances the extraction efficiency of light but can direct the extracted emission into desired angles. Careful design of the structures is important in order to have a spectral overlap of the emission with extraction (leaky) modes. We show that by fabricating PhC slabs with optimized dimensions from silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) active layers, the extraction efficiency of vertical light emission from SiNCs at a particular wavelength can be enhanced ∼ 11 times compared to that of uncorrugated SiNCs-rich layer. More importantly, increased light emission can be obtained in a broad spectral range and, simultaneously, the extracted light can stay confined within relatively narrow angle around the normal to the sample plane. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that the physical origin of the enhancement is such that light originating from SiNCs first couples to leaky modes of the PhCs and is then efficiently extracted into the surrounding.

  20. A POD reduced order model for resolving angular direction in neutron/photon transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Buchan, A.G.; Calloo, A.A.; Goffin, M.G.; Dargaville, S.; Fang, F.; Pain, C.C.; Navon, I.M.

    2015-09-01

    This article presents the first Reduced Order Model (ROM) that efficiently resolves the angular dimension of the time independent, mono-energetic Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE). It is based on Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and uses the method of snapshots to form optimal basis functions for resolving the direction of particle travel in neutron/photon transport problems. A unique element of this work is that the snapshots are formed from the vector of angular coefficients relating to a high resolution expansion of the BTE's angular dimension. In addition, the individual snapshots are not recorded through time, as in standard POD, but instead they are recorded through space. In essence this work swaps the roles of the dimensions space and time in standard POD methods, with angle and space respectively. It is shown here how the POD model can be formed from the POD basis functions in a highly efficient manner. The model is then applied to two radiation problems; one involving the transport of radiation through a shield and the other through an infinite array of pins. Both problems are selected for their complex angular flux solutions in order to provide an appropriate demonstration of the model's capabilities. It is shown that the POD model can resolve these fluxes efficiently and accurately. In comparison to high resolution models this POD model can reduce the size of a problem by up to two orders of magnitude without compromising accuracy. Solving times are also reduced by similar factors.

  1. Theoretical investigation of the capture effect in intensity-modulation direct-detection microwave photonic links.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyyed Esmail; Banai, Ali

    2013-10-01

    We introduce the capture effect concept in microwave photonic links (MWPLs) for the first time to our knowledge. The capture effect or the small-signal suppression is the change in the amplitude ratio of the two signals between input and output of the intensity-modulation direct-detection (IMDD) MWPLs. An analytical explanation of the performance of external IMDD MWPLs due to the effects of nonlinearity combined with sum of several input sinusoidal signals is given. We have investigated the suppression of a weaker signal in these links. General analytic expression for the small-signal suppression is derived using a nonlinear analytical approach. We show that the small-signal suppression is quite dependent on the input back-off, the power ratio of input signals, and on the number of input sinusoidal signals. The theoretical maximum possible signal suppression was found to be 6 dB. This analytical asymptotic value is verified by numerical results. We show the influence of the capture effect of the nonlinear MWPL on the optoelectronic oscillator operation that is verified by experimental data in the literature that has already been published.

  2. FoCal - A high granularity electromagnetic calorimeter for forward direct photon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.

    2017-02-01

    The measurement of direct photon production at forward rapidity (y ∼ 3 - 5) at the LHC provides access to the structure of protons and nuclei at very small values of fractional momentum (x ∼10-5) . FoCal, an extremely-high-granularity Forward Calorimeter covering 3.3 < η < 5.3 is proposed as a detector upgrade to the ALICE experiment. To facilitate the design of the upgrade and to perform generic R&D necessary for such a novel calorimeter, a compact high-granularity electromagnetic calorimeter prototype has been built. The corresponding R&D studies are the focus of this paper. The prototype is a Si/W sampling calorimeter. It was instrumented with 24 layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors, a total of 39 M pixels. We report on performance studies of the prototype with test beams at DESY and CERN in a broad energy range. The results of the measurements demonstrate a very small Molière radius (∼ 11 mm) and good linearity of the response. Unique results on the detailed lateral shower shape, which are crucial for the two-shower separation capabilities, are presented. We compare the measurements to GEANT-based MC simulations, which additionally include a modeling of charge diffusion. The studies demonstrate the feasibility of this high-granularity technology for use in the proposed detector upgrade. They also show the extremely high potential of this technology for future calorimeter development.

  3. Direct laser writing of three-dimensional network structures as templates for disordered photonic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberko, Jakub; Muller, Nicolas; Scheffold, Frank

    2013-10-01

    In the present article we substantially expand on our recent study about the fabrication of mesoscale polymeric templates of disordered photonic network materials [Haberko and Scheffold, Opt. Expr.OPEXFF1094-408710.1364/OE.21.001057 21, 1057 (2013)]. We present a detailed analysis and discussion of important technical aspects related to the fabrication and characterization of these fascinating materials. Compared to our initial report we were able to reduce the typical structural length scale of the seed pattern from a=3.3μm to a=2μm, bringing it closer to the technologically relevant fiber-optic communications wavelength range around λ˜1.5μm. We have employed scanning electron microscopy coupled with focused ion beam cutting to look inside the bulk of the samples of different heights. Moreover, we demonstrate the use of laser scanning confocal microscopy to assess the real space structure of the samples fabricated by direct laser writing. We address in detail questions about scalability, finite size effects, and geometrical distortions. We also study the effect of the lithographic voxel shape, that is, the ellipsoidal shape of the laser pen used in the fabrication process. To this end we employ detailed numerical modeling of the scattering function using a discrete dipole approximation scheme.

  4. Identification of the direction of the neural network activation with a cellular resolution by fast two-photon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiuli; Quan, Tingwei; Zeng, Shaoqun; Lv, Xiaohua

    2011-08-01

    Spatiotemporal activity patterns in local neural networks are fundamental to understanding how information is processed and stored in brain microcircuits. Currently, imaging techniques are able to map the directional activation of macronetworks across brain areas; however, these strategies still fail to resolve the activation direction for fine microcircuits with cellular spatial resolution. Here, we show the capability to identify the activation direction of a multicell network with a cellular resolution and millisecond precision by using fast two-photon microscopy and cross correlation procedures. As an example, we characterized a directional neuronal network in an epilepsy brain slice to provide different initiation delay among multiple neurons defined at a millisecond scale.

  5. Coherent supercontinuum bandwidth limitations under femtosecond pumping at 2 µm in all-solid soft glass photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Klimczak, Mariusz; Siwicki, Bartłomiej; Zhou, Binbin; Bache, Morten; Pysz, Dariusz; Bang, Ole; Buczyński, Ryszard

    2016-12-26

    Two all-solid glass photonic crystal fibers with all-normal dispersion profiles are evaluated for coherent supercontinuum generation under pumping in the 2.0 μm range. In-house boron-silicate and commercial lead-silicate glasses were used to fabricate fibers optimized for either flat dispersion, albeit with lower nonlinearity, or with larger dispersion profile curvature but with much higher nonlinearity. Recorded spectra at the redshifted edge reached 2500-2800 nm depending on fiber type. Possible factors behind these differences are discussed with numerical simulations. The fiber enabling the broadest spectrum is suggested as an efficient first stage of an all-normal dispersion cascade for coherent supercontinuum generation exceeding 3000 nm.

  6. A new architecture as transparent electrodes for solar and IR applications based on photonic structures via soft lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Transparent conducting electrodes with the combination of high optical transmission and good electrical conductivity are essential for solar energy harvesting and electric lighting devices. Currently, indium tin oxide (ITO) is used because ITO offers relatively high transparency (>80%) to visible light and low sheet resistance (Rs = 10 ohms/square (Ω /2)) for electrical conduction. However, ITO is costly due to limited indium reserves, and it is brittle. These disadvantages have motivated the search for other conducting electrodes with similar or better properties. There has been research on a variety of electrode structures involving carbon nanotube networks, graphene films, nanowire and nanopatterned meshes and grids. Due to their novel characteristics in light manipulation and collection, photonic crystal structures show promise for further improvement. Here, we report on a new architecture consisting of nanoscale high aspect ratio metallic photonic structures as transparent electrodes fabricated via a combination of processes. For (Au) and silver (Ag) structures, the visible light transmission can reach as high as 80%, and the sheet resistance of the structure can be as low as 3.2Ω /2. The optical transparency of the high aspect ratio metal structures at visible wavelength range is comparable to that of ITO glass, while their sheet resistance is more than 3 times lower, which indicates a much higher electrical conductivity of the metal structures. Furthermore, the high aspect ratio metal structures have very high infrared (IR) reflection (90%) for the transverse magnetic (TM) mode, which can lead to the development of fabrication of metallic structures as IR filters for heat control applications. Investigations of interdigitated structures based on the high aspect ratio metal electrodes are ongoing to study the feasibility in smart window applications in light transmission modulation.

  7. Measurement of Feynman- spectra of photons and neutrons in the very forward direction in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Buniatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J. G.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Herbst, M.; Hladkỳ, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krüger, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lytkin, L.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Morozov, A.; Müller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J. E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rusakov, S.; Šálek, D.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P. D.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wünsch, E.; Žáček, J.; Zhang, Z.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2014-06-01

    Measurements of normalised cross sections for the production of photons and neutrons at very small angles with respect to the proton beam direction in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA are presented as a function of the Feynman variable and of the centre-of-mass energy of the virtual photon-proton system . The data are taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of . The measurement is restricted to photons and neutrons in the pseudorapidity range and covers the range of negative four momentum transfer squared at the positron vertex GeV, of inelasticity and of GeV. To test the Feynman scaling hypothesis the dependence of the dependent cross sections is investigated. Predictions of deep-inelastic scattering models and of models for hadronic interactions of high energy cosmic rays are compared to the measured cross sections.

  8. Soft Nanocomposite Based Multi-point, Multi-directional Strain Mapping Sensor Using Anisotropic Electrical Impedance Tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyosang; Kwon, Donguk; Cho, Haedo; Park, Inkyu; Kim, Jung

    2017-01-25

    The practical utilization of soft nanocomposites as a strain mapping sensor in tactile sensors and artificial skins requires robustness for various contact conditions as well as low-cost fabrication process for large three dimensional surfaces. In this work, we propose a multi-point and multi-directional strain mapping sensor based on multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-silicone elastomer nanocomposites and anisotropic electrical impedance tomography (aEIT). Based on the anisotropic resistivity of the sensor, aEIT technique can reconstruct anisotropic resistivity distributions using electrodes around the sensor boundary. This strain mapping sensor successfully estimated stretch displacements (error of 0.54 ± 0.53 mm), surface normal forces (error of 0.61 ± 0.62 N), and multi-point contact locations (error of 1.88 ± 0.95 mm in 30 mm × 30 mm area for a planar shaped sensor and error of 4.80 ± 3.05 mm in 40 mm × 110 mm area for a three dimensional contoured sensor). In addition, the direction of lateral stretch was also identified by reconstructing anisotropic distributions of electrical resistivity. Finally, a soft human-machine interface device was demonstrated as a practical application of the developed sensor.

  9. Soft Nanocomposite Based Multi-point, Multi-directional Strain Mapping Sensor Using Anisotropic Electrical Impedance Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyosang; Kwon, Donguk; Cho, Haedo; Park, Inkyu; Kim, Jung

    2017-01-01

    The practical utilization of soft nanocomposites as a strain mapping sensor in tactile sensors and artificial skins requires robustness for various contact conditions as well as low-cost fabrication process for large three dimensional surfaces. In this work, we propose a multi-point and multi-directional strain mapping sensor based on multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-silicone elastomer nanocomposites and anisotropic electrical impedance tomography (aEIT). Based on the anisotropic resistivity of the sensor, aEIT technique can reconstruct anisotropic resistivity distributions using electrodes around the sensor boundary. This strain mapping sensor successfully estimated stretch displacements (error of 0.54 ± 0.53 mm), surface normal forces (error of 0.61 ± 0.62 N), and multi-point contact locations (error of 1.88 ± 0.95 mm in 30 mm × 30 mm area for a planar shaped sensor and error of 4.80 ± 3.05 mm in 40 mm × 110 mm area for a three dimensional contoured sensor). In addition, the direction of lateral stretch was also identified by reconstructing anisotropic distributions of electrical resistivity. Finally, a soft human-machine interface device was demonstrated as a practical application of the developed sensor.

  10. Soft Nanocomposite Based Multi-point, Multi-directional Strain Mapping Sensor Using Anisotropic Electrical Impedance Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyosang; Kwon, Donguk; Cho, Haedo; Park, Inkyu; Kim, Jung

    2017-01-01

    The practical utilization of soft nanocomposites as a strain mapping sensor in tactile sensors and artificial skins requires robustness for various contact conditions as well as low-cost fabrication process for large three dimensional surfaces. In this work, we propose a multi-point and multi-directional strain mapping sensor based on multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-silicone elastomer nanocomposites and anisotropic electrical impedance tomography (aEIT). Based on the anisotropic resistivity of the sensor, aEIT technique can reconstruct anisotropic resistivity distributions using electrodes around the sensor boundary. This strain mapping sensor successfully estimated stretch displacements (error of 0.54 ± 0.53 mm), surface normal forces (error of 0.61 ± 0.62 N), and multi-point contact locations (error of 1.88 ± 0.95 mm in 30 mm × 30 mm area for a planar shaped sensor and error of 4.80 ± 3.05 mm in 40 mm × 110 mm area for a three dimensional contoured sensor). In addition, the direction of lateral stretch was also identified by reconstructing anisotropic distributions of electrical resistivity. Finally, a soft human-machine interface device was demonstrated as a practical application of the developed sensor. PMID:28120886

  11. Dielectrophoretic bending of directly printed free-standing ultra-soft nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Galliker, P.; Schneider, J.; Poulikakos, D.

    2014-02-17

    Electrohydrodynamic printing has shown superior resolution compared to conventional ink-jet printing, but the use of electrically charged liquid commonly leads to unwanted repulsion effects posing a threshold to resolution capabilities. However, a recently demonstrated controlled dripping process of nanoscale, particle-laden droplets, could circumvent such resolution obstacles even on insulating substrates. Here, we show that so-printed free-standing nanostructures can be autonomously deformed, and mechanically characterized due to the presence of the electrified nozzle, or, after voltage termination, due to transient charge residuals on the structures themselves. Dielectrophoretic forces, arising between two subsequently printed nanopillars lead to their contactless bending and to the formation of out-of-plane arc structures arising from the connection of the pillar apexes. Once connected, the ultra-soft nanopillars are found to be tightly merged and could, for example, serve in electronics as out of plane nanobonds.

  12. Dielectrophoretic bending of directly printed free-standing ultra-soft nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galliker, P.; Schneider, J.; Poulikakos, D.

    2014-02-01

    Electrohydrodynamic printing has shown superior resolution compared to conventional ink-jet printing, but the use of electrically charged liquid commonly leads to unwanted repulsion effects posing a threshold to resolution capabilities. However, a recently demonstrated controlled dripping process of nanoscale, particle-laden droplets, could circumvent such resolution obstacles even on insulating substrates. Here, we show that so-printed free-standing nanostructures can be autonomously deformed, and mechanically characterized due to the presence of the electrified nozzle, or, after voltage termination, due to transient charge residuals on the structures themselves. Dielectrophoretic forces, arising between two subsequently printed nanopillars lead to their contactless bending and to the formation of out-of-plane arc structures arising from the connection of the pillar apexes. Once connected, the ultra-soft nanopillars are found to be tightly merged and could, for example, serve in electronics as out of plane nanobonds.

  13. Polarization dependence of the direct two photon transitions of 87Rb atoms by erbium: Fiber laser frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shaoyang; Xia, Wei; Zhang, Yin; Zhao, Jianye; Zhou, Dawei; Wang, Qing; Yu, Qi; Li, Kunqian; Qi, Xianghui; Chen, Xuzong

    2016-11-01

    The femtosecond fiber-based optical frequency combs have been proved to be powerful tools for investigating the energy levels of atoms and molecules. In this paper, an Er-doped fiber femtosecond optical frequency comb has been implemented for studying the polarization dependence of 5S-5D two-photon transitions in thermal gas of atomic rubidium 87 using an entirely symmetrical optical configuration. By changing the polarization states of the counter-propagating light beams, the polarization dependence of direct two photon transition spectrum is demonstrated, and a dramatic variation (up to 5.5 times) of the two-photon transitions strength has been observed. The theory for the polarization dependence of two photon transition based on the second-order perturbation was established, which is in good agreement with the experimental results. The measurement results indicate that the polarization state manipulation with the existing frequency comb is used for femtosecond optical frequency comb based two photon transition spectroscopic purposes, which will improve the precision measurement of the absolute transition frequency and related applications.

  14. Single photon ionization of van der Waals clusters with a soft x-ray laser: (SO2)n and (SO2)n(H2O)m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, F.; Heinbuch, S.; Rocca, J. J.; Bernstein, E. R.

    2006-10-01

    van der Waals cluster (SO2)n is investigated by using single photon ionization of a 26.5eV soft x-ray laser. During the ionization process, neutral clusters suffer a small fragmentation because almost all energy is taken away by the photoelectron and a small part of the photon energy is deposited into the (SO2)n cluster. The distribution of (SO2)n clusters decreases roughly exponentially with increasing cluster size. The photoionization dissociation fraction of I[(SO2)n-1SO+]/I[(SO2)n+] decreases with increasing cluster size due to the formation of cluster. The metastable dissociation rate constants of (SO2)n+ are measured in the range of (0.6-1.5)×104s-1 for cluster sizes 5⩽n⩽16. Mixed SO2-H2O clusters are studied at different experimental conditions. At the condition of high SO2 concentration (20% SO2 partial pressure), (SO2)n + cluster ions dominate the mass spectrum, and the unprotonated mixed cluster ions (SO2)nH2O+ (1⩽n⩽5) are observed. At the condition of low SO2 concentration (5% SO2 partial pressure) (H2O)nH+ cluster ions are the dominant signals, and protonated cluster ions (SO2)(H2O)nH+ are observed. The mixed clusters, containing only one SO2 or H2O molecule, SO2(H2O)nH+ and (SO2)nH2O+ are observed, respectively.

  15. Single photon ionization of hydrogen bonded clusters with a soft x-ray laser: (HCOOH)x and (HCOOH)y(H2O)z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinbuch, S.; Dong, F.; Rocca, J. J.; Bernstein, E. R.

    2007-06-01

    Pure, neutral formic acid (HCOOH)n+1 clusters and mixed (HCOOH)/(H2O) clusters are investigated employing time of flight mass spectroscopy and single photon ionization at 26.5eV using a very compact, capillary discharge, soft x-ray laser. During the ionization process, neutral clusters suffer little fragmentation because almost all excess energy above the vertical ionization energy is taken away by the photoelectron, leaving only a small part of the photon energy deposited into the (HCOOH)n +1+ cluster. The vertical ionization energy minus the adiabatic ionization energy is enough excess energy in the clusters to surmount the proton transfer energy barrier and induce the reaction (HCOOH)n +1+→(HCOOH)nH++HCOO making the protonated (HCOOH)nH+ series dominant in all data obtained. The distribution of pure (HCOOH)nH+ clusters is dependent on experimental conditions. Under certain conditions, a magic number is found at n =5. Metastable dissociation rate constants of (HCOOH)nH+ are measured in the range (0.1-0.8)×104s-1 for cluster sizes 4

  16. Electro-magnetic physics studies at RHIC: Neutral pion production, direct photon HBT, photon elliptic flow in gold-gold collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV and the Muon Telescope Detector simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoji

    Electro-magnetic (E&M) probes such as direct photons and muons (mu) are important tools to study the properties of the extremely hot and dense matter created in heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In this thesis, several topics of E&M physics will be addressed, including neutral pion (pi0) production, direct photon HBT, and photon elliptic flow (v2) in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. A discussion on the simulation study of the new Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) will also be presented. The pi0 production is a fundamental measurement of hadron production and prerequisite for the background study of direct photons. Neutral pions are reconstructed using the photons detected by the STAR Barrel Electro-magnetic Calorimeter (BEMC) and the Time Projection Chamber (TPC). Spectra of pi 0 are measured at transverse momentum 1 < pT < 12 GeV/c near mid-rapidity (0 < eta < 0.8) in 200 GeV Au+Au collisions. The spectra and nuclear modification factors RCP and RAA are compared to earlier pi+/- and pi0 results. Direct photon Hanbury-Brown and Twiss (HBT) correlations can reveal information of the system size throughout the whole collision. A first attempt of direct photon HBT study at RHIC in 200 GeV Au+Au collisions is done using photons detected by the STAR BEMC and TPC. All unknown correlation at small Qinv is observed, whose magnitude is much larger than the expected HBT signal, and possible causes of the correlation will be discussed. Direct photon elliptic flow (v2) at intermediate to high pT is sensitive to the source of direct photon production. Results of inclusive photon v2 in 200 GeV Au+Au collisions are presented. The v2 of pi0 decay photons is calculated from the previously published pi results. The comparison between inclusive and decay photon v 2 indicates that direct photon v2 is small. A new large-area Muon Telescope Detector at mid-rapidity at RHIC is proposed and under investigation, using the Long-strip Multi-Gap Resistive Plate

  17. Coherent photon scattering background in sub- GeV/c2 direct dark matter searches

    DOE PAGES

    Robinson, Alan E.

    2017-01-18

    Here, proposed dark matter detectors with eV-scale sensitivities will detect a large background of atomic (nuclear) recoils from coherent photon scattering of MeV-scale photons. This background climbs steeply below ~10 eV, far exceeding the declining rate of low-energy Compton recoils. The upcoming generation of dark matter detectors will not be limited by this background, but further development of eV-scale and sub-eV detectors will require strategies, including the use of low nuclear mass target materials, to maximize dark matter sensitivity while minimizing the coherent photon scattering background.

  18. Coherent photon scattering background in sub-GeV /c2 direct dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alan E.

    2017-01-01

    Proposed dark matter detectors with eV-scale sensitivities will detect a large background of atomic (nuclear) recoils from coherent photon scattering of MeV-scale photons. This background climbs steeply below ˜10 eV , far exceeding the declining rate of low-energy Compton recoils. The upcoming generation of dark matter detectors will not be limited by this background, but further development of eV-scale and sub-eV detectors will require strategies, including the use of low nuclear mass target materials, to maximize dark matter sensitivity while minimizing the coherent photon scattering background.

  19. Dual-photon absorptiometry: Comparison of bone mineral and soft tissue mass measurements in vivo with established methods

    SciTech Connect

    Heymsfield, S.B.; Wang, J.; Heshka, S.; Kehayias, J.J.; Pierson, R.N.

    1989-06-01

    This study extended initial observations that indicated the potential of dual-photon absorptiometry (DPA) to measure total-body bone mineral (TBBM) and fat in vivo. DPA-derived TBBM and fat were compared with established methods in 13 subjects (aged 24-94 y) who underwent measurement of body density (Db), total-body water (TBW), potassium (TBK), calcium (TBCa, delayed-gamma neutron activation), and nitrogen (prompt-gamma neutron activation). TBBM was highly correlated with TBCa (r = 0.95, p less than 0.001) and the slope of TBCa vs TBBM (0.34) was similar to Ca content of ashed skeleton (0.34-0.38). DPA-measured fat (means +/- SD, 16.7 +/- 4.9 kg) correlated significantly (r = 0.79-0.94; p less than 0.01-0.001) with fat established by Db (16.3 +/- 5.4 kg), TBW (16.0 +/- 4.3 kg), TBK (17.7 +/- 4.6 kg), combined TBW-neutron activation (17.6 +/- 5.9 kg), and means of all four methods (16.9 +/- 4.8 kg). DPA thus offers a new opportunity to study human skeleton in vivo and to quantify fat by a method independent from the classical assumption that bone represents a fixed fraction of fat-free body mass.

  20. Soft X-ray detection and photon counting spectroscopy with commercial 4H-SiC Schottky photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, S.; Gohil, T.; Lioliou, G.; Barnett, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    The results of electrical characterisation and X-ray detection measurements of two different active area (0.06 mm2 and 0.5 mm2) commercial 4H-SiC Schottky photodiodes at room temperature are reported. The devices exhibited low dark currents (less than 10 pA) even at a high electric field strengths (403 kV/cm for 0.06 mm2 diodes; 227 kV/cm for 0.5 mm2 diodes). The results of the X-ray measurements indicate that the diodes can be used as photon counting spectroscopic X-ray detectors with modest energy resolutions: FWHM at 5.9 keV of 1.8 keV and 3.3 keV, for the 0.06 mm2 and 0.5 mm2 devices, respectively. Noise analysis of the photodiodes coupled to a custom low noise charge sensitive preamplifier is also presented.

  1. Design and Demonstration of a Microbiaxial Optomechanical Device for Multiscale Characterization of Soft Biological Tissues with Two-Photon Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Joseph T.; Borowicz, Stacy M.; Rader, Jacob H.; Utzinger, Urs; Azhar, Mohamad; Vande Geest, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    The biomechanical response of tissues serves as a valuable marker in the prediction of disease and in understanding the related behavior of the body under various disease and age states. Alterations in the macroscopic biomechanical response of diseased tissues are well documented; however, a thorough understanding of the microstructural events that lead to these changes is poorly understood. In this article we introduce a novel microbiaxial optomechanical device that allows two-photon imaging techniques to be coupled with macromechanical stimulation in hydrated planar tissue specimens. This allows that the mechanical response of the microstructure can be quantified and related to the macroscopic response of the same tissue sample. This occurs without the need to fix tissue in strain states that could introduce a change in the microstructural configuration. We demonstrate the passive realignment of fibrous proteins under various types of loading, which demonstrates the ability of tissue microstructure to reinforce itself in periods of high stress. In addition, the collagen and elastin response of tissue during viscoelastic behavior is reported showing interstitial fluid movement and fiber realignment potentially responsible for the temporal behavior. We also demonstrate that nonhomogeneities in fiber strain exist over biaxial regions of assumed homogeneity. PMID:21226989

  2. Photonic Nanostructures Patterned by Thermal Nanoimprint Directly into Organo-Metal Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Pourdavoud, Neda; Wang, Si; Mayer, André; Hu, Ting; Chen, Yiwang; Marianovich, André; Kowalsky, Wolfgang; Heiderhoff, Ralf; Scheer, Hella-Christin; Riedl, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Photonic nanostructures are created in organo-metal halide perovskites by thermal nanoimprint lithography at a temperature of 100 °C. The imprinted layers are significantly smoothened compared to the initially rough, polycrystalline layers and the impact of surface defects is substantially mitigated upon imprint. As a case study, 2D photonic crystals are shown to afford lasing with ultralow lasing thresholds at room temperature.

  3. Enhancement of directional broadband luminescence from a scintillation film via guided-mode resonance in a photonic crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhichao; Liu, Bo; Cheng, Chuanwei; Zhang, Haifeng; Chen, Hong; Gu, Mu; Liu, Jinliang; Chen, Liang; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Xue, Chaofan; Wu, Yanqing

    2017-01-01

    Scintillation films play an important role in radiation detection. Improved light output and control of emission directionality are critical for practical applications. To obtain enhancement of broadband directional luminescence from a Lu2SiO5:Ce3+ scintillation film, a special photonic crystal structure is deposited on the film surface to provide multiple guided-mode resonances. The structure can be designed according to the application requirements. Numerical simulations are performed to analyze the enhancement. Overall, this method could be used when directional emission is required for radiation detection.

  4. Direct Photon Center-of-Mass Angular Distributions in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ =1.8-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Nakae, Leslie F.

    1992-04-01

    The center-of-mass angular distribution of direct photon events, resulting from protonantiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV, as measured by the Collider Detector at Fermilab ( CDF) during the 1988-1089 experimental run, is presented . The direct photon events are identified primarily through the direct photon's characteristic isolation from other particles. The main source of background is from rare fragmentation of QCD partons into single isolated neutral mesons, which decay into two or more photons. The background is removed statistically by exploitation of tile expected difference in the resulting shower profiles. The resulting angular distribution for direct photons, in the transverse momemtum range from 22 to 45 Ge V is found to agree favorably with the predictions of Quantum Cbromodynamics (QCD) for an interaction with a fermion (spin 1/2) propagator

  5. Wide-angle stop-gap chalcogenide photonic crystals generated by direct multiple-line laser writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoletti, E.; Bulla, D.; Luther-Davies, B.; Gu, M.

    2011-12-01

    We present the fabrication and the angle-resolved optical characterizations of three-dimensional chalcogenide photonic crystals with a wide-angle stop gap. Multiple-line scanning provides an effective remedy to the elongation of the focal spot in the z direction during direct laser writing fabrication in high refractive index and highly nonlinear chalcogenide glasses. The aspect ratio of the rods is reduced from 4.46 to 1.53, thus allowing the successful fabrication of three-dimensional chalcogenide photonic crystals with a face-centered cubic symmetry and quasi-circular rods. Suppression of the angle-resolved transmission spectra is observed at a wide range of incident angles.

  6. Direct virtual photon production in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alekseev, I.; Anderson, D. M.; Aoyama, R.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Behera, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Brown, D.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chankova-Bunzarova, N.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elsey, N.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Esumi, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Ewigleben, J.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Federicova, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fujita, J.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Harlenderova, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, T.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, P.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jowzaee, S.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Kocmanek, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulathunga, N.; Kumar, L.; Kvapil, J.; Kwasizur, J. H.; Lacey, R.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lidrych, J.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, Y.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, P.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Mallick, D.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nie, M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Nonaka, T.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Rehbein, M. J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roth, J. D.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Saur, M.; Schambach, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Schweid, B. R.; Seger, J.; Sergeeva, M.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sugiura, T.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Z.; Zyzak, M.

    2017-07-01

    We report the direct virtual photon invariant yields in the transverse momentum ranges 1 6 GeV / c the production follows TAA scaling. Model calculations with contributions from thermal radiation and initial hard parton scattering are consistent within uncertainties with the direct virtual photon invariant yield.

  7. A directional coupling scheme for efficient coupling between Si3N4 photonic and hybrid slot-based plasmonic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketzaki, D.; Dabos, G.; Weeber, J. C.; Dereux, A.; Tsiokos, D.; Pleros, N.

    2017-02-01

    Slot-based plasmonic waveguides have attracted significant attention owing to their unique ability to confine light within nanometer-scale. In this context, enhanced localized light-matter interaction and control have been exploited to demonstrate novel concepts in data communication and sensing applications revealing the immense potential of plasmonic slot waveguides. However, inherent light absorption in the metallic parts included is such structures hampers the scaling of plasmonic devices and limits their application diversity. A promising solution of such issues is the use of hybrid plasmo-photonic configurations. Hybrid slot waveguides have been introduced as the means to reduce such propagation losses while maintaining their functional advantages. In addition, their co-integration with low-loss photonic waveguides can enable the development of more complex structures with acceptable overall losses. In such scenario, light needs to be efficiently transferred from the photonic to the plasmonic components and/or backwards. Based on this rationale, in this work a hybrid slot-based structure is adopted to achieve highly efficient light transfer between photonic and plasmonic slot waveguides in the near-infrared spectrum region (λ=1550 nm). This transition is realized with the aid of a directional coupling scheme. For this purpose, a Si3N4 bus waveguide (photonic branch) is located below an Aubased metallic slot (plasmonic branch) forming a hybrid waveguide element. The combined configuration, as it is shown with the aid of numerical simulations , is capable of supporting two hybrid guided modes with quasi-even and odd symmetry allowing the development of a power exchange mechanism between the two branches. In this context, a new directional coupling structure has been designed which can achieve power transmission per transition over 68% within a coupling length of the order of just several microns.

  8. The Coherent Photon Scattering Background in Sub-GeV/$c^2$ Direct Dark Matter Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Alan E.

    2016-10-24

    Proposed dark matter detectors with eV-scale sensitivities will detect a large background of atomic (nuclear) recoils from coherent photon scattering. This background climbs steeply below $\\sim10$~eVnr, far exceeding the declining rate of low-energy Compton recoils. The upcoming generation of dark matter detectors will not be limited by this background, but further development of eV-scale and sub-eV detectors will require the use of low-$Z$ target materials, such as helium, to avoid a large rate of coherent photon scattering.

  9. Soft X-Ray Studies of Pu Electronic Structure: Past Lessons From XAS and Future Direction With BIS

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Yu, S W; Chung, B W; Waddill, G D; Kutepov, A L

    2008-12-10

    Synchrotron-radiation-based spectroscopies such as X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) have contributed greatly to our improved understanding of Pu electronic structure. However, significant questions remain concerning the nature of Pu electronic structure. Perhaps the missing piece of the puzzle is the direct experimental determination of the unoccupied electronic structure using high energy inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (IPES) or Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (BIS). Past BIS studies of Th and U indicate the feasibility and utility of Pu studies. To this end, a new BIS capability has been developed in our laboratory. Electron stimulated emission of photons has been carried out using the XES-350 monochromator and detector system. Our preliminary results and future plans will be presented.

  10. New Directions in Nanofibrous Scaffolds for Soft Tissue Engineering and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Handorf, Andrew M.; Ionescu, Lara C.; Li, Wan-Ju; Mauck, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the role of nano-structure and nano-scale materials for tissue engineering applications. We detail a scaffold production method (electrospinning) for the production of nanofiber-based scaffolds that can approximate many critical features of the normal cellular microenvironment, and so foster and direct tissue formation. Further, we describe new and emerging methods to increase the applicability of these scaffolds for in vitro and in vivo application. This discussion includes a focus on methods to further functionalize scaffolds to promote cell infiltration, methods to tune scaffold mechanics to meet in vivo demands, and methods to control the release of pharmaceuticals and other biologic agents to modulate the wound environment and foster tissue regeneration. This review provides a perspective in the state-of-the-art of the production, application, and functionalization of these unique nanofibrous structures, and outlines future directions in this growing field. PMID:19751124

  11. Frequency-Modulated Microwave Photonic Links with Direct Detection: Review and Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-15

    splitters was suggested by [13]. In this case, balanced photodetection was used to cancel AM. Such an interferometer was experimentally veried by [14...residual intensity modulation as well as imperfect common- mode rejection from the balanced photodetection . 3.2 Filter coecients The frequency...Numerical model of an FM photonic link with two discriminator lters and balanced detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 3.2.1

  12. Direct charge sharing observation in single-photon-counting pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, G.; Maiorino, M.; Blanchot, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Garcia, J.; Lozano, M.; Martinez, R.; Puigdengoles, C.; Ullan, M.

    2007-04-01

    In photon-counting imaging devices, charge sharing can limit the detector spatial resolution and contrast, as multiple counts can be induced in adjacent pixels as a result of the spread of the charge cloud generated from a single X-ray photon of high energy in the detector bulk. Although debated for a long time, the full impact of charge sharing has not been completely assessed. In this work, the importance of charge sharing in pixellated CdTe and silicon detectors is studied by exposing imaging devices to different low activity sources. These devices are made of Si and CdTe pixel detector bump-bonded to Medipix2 single-photon-counting chips with a 55 μm pixel pitch. We will show how charge sharing affects the spatial detector resolution depending on incident particle type (alpha, beta and gamma), detector bias voltage and read-out chip threshold. This study will give an insight on the impact on the design and operation of pixel detectors coupled to photon-counting devices for imaging applications.

  13. Non-thermal photons and direct photodissociation of H2, HD and HeH+ in the chemistry of the primordial Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, C. M.; Kazandjian, M. V.; Galli, D.; Heays, A. N.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2017-10-01

    Non-thermal photons deriving from radiative transitions among the internal ladder of atoms and molecules are an important source of photons in addition to thermal and stellar sources in many astrophysical environments. In the present work, the calculation of reaction rates for the direct photodissociation of some molecules relevant in early Universe chemistry is presented; in particular, the calculations include non-thermal photons deriving from the recombination of primordial hydrogen and helium atoms for the cases of H2, HD and HeH+. New effects on the fractional abundances of chemical species are investigated and the fits for the HeH+ photodissociation rates by thermal photons are provided.

  14. Measuring Mix in Direct-Drive Cryogenic DT Implosions Using Soft X-Ray Narrowband Backlighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Jacobs-Perkins, D. W.; Jungquist, R. K.; Mileham, C.; Nilson, P. M.; Sangster, T. C.; Theobald, W.

    2014-10-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor mix is widely seen as the major source of perturbations, which limit the performance of low-adiabat cryogenic implosions in both direct- and indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments. Backlit images of cryogenic direct-drive implosions recorded with a narrowband x-ray imager using an aspherically bent quartz crystal for the Si Heα line at ~ 1.86 keV show a clear signature of carbon from the CD outer shell of the cryogenic target mixing into the DT layer at the end of the acceleration phase. These implosions are driven on a low adiabat with a high in-flight aspect ratio (IFAR). Comparison with post-processed 1-D hydrodynamic simulations show that the absorption seen in the backlit images is ~ 5 × larger than expected, consistent with mixing ~ 0.2% of carbon into the DT shell. Experiments with a slightly higher adiabat and lower IFAR match the predictions of clean 1-D simulations showing no signature of carbon mix. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  15. Observation of direct photons in ϒ and ϒ ‧ decays and determination of the QCD scale parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schamberger, R. D.; Horstkotte, J. E.; Klopfenstein, C.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Sivertz, M.; Spencer, L. J.; Franzini, P.; Son, D.; Youssef, S.; Tuts, P. M.; Zhao, T.; Herb, S. W.; Han, K.; Imlay, R.; Levman, G.; Metcalf, W.; Sreedhar, V.; Dietl, H.; Eigen, G.; Lorenz, E.; Mageras, G.; Pauss, F.; Vogel, H.

    1984-04-01

    Using the CUSB detector, we have measured the high energy direct photon spectrum from ϒ and ϒ ‧ decays. These photons are assumed to arise from the decays ϒ, ϒ‧ → γgg. We determine the ration >( gggg/>(ggg) to be 0.0299 ± 0.0059 for the ϒ and 0.0337 ± 0.0114 for the ϒ ‧. From these results we obtain: αs = 0.226 -0.042+0.067, λ overlineMS = 116 -57+105MeV for ϒ → γgg, and αS = 0.197 -0.055+0.123, λ overlineMS = 80 -59+195MeV for ϒ‧ → gggg.

  16. Direct photon measurement in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahlmüller, Baldo

    2016-12-01

    The ALICE experiment has measured the direct photon spectra in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV for three different centrality selections. The measurement was performed emplying a method utilizing conversion of photons into e+e- pairs in the detector material, and a method using the PHOS calorimeter. The two measurements were combined in order to measure direct photons over a broad transverse momentum range of 0.9 direct photon signal was observed in the thermal region 0.9 direct photon spectrum can be described by an exponential with an inverse slope parameter of (304 ±11stat ±40syst) MeV, without subtracting the hard scattering component, which is somewhat larger than the inverse slope parameter of the direct photon spectrum at RHIC energies. Within uncertainties, the data can be described by different models for photon production in heavy-ion collisions. These proceedings provide a summary of the results published in [J. Adam, others (ALICE Collaboration), Direct photon production in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV, arxiv:arXiv:1509.07324] and [J. Adam, others (ALICE Collaboration), Supplemental figures: Direct photon production in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV. URL https://cds.cern.ch/record/2102398.

  17. Soft X-ray Studies of Pu Electronic Structure: Past Lessons and Future Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Yu, S W

    2008-02-07

    Photoelectron Spectroscopy (PES) and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS, Figure 1) have contributed greatly to our improved understanding of Pu electronic structure. From these and related measurements, the following has been determined: (1) The Pu 5f spin-orbit splitting is large; (2) The number of Pu5f electrons is near 5; and (3) The Pu 5f spin-orbit splitting effect dominates 5f itineracy. Significant questions remain concerning the nature of Pu electronic structure. Perhaps the missing piece of the puzzle is the direct experimental determination of the unoccupied electronic structure using high energy inverse photoelectron spectroscopy or Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (BIS). Past BIS studies of Th and U indicate the feasibility and utility of Pu studies.

  18. Large strain dynamic compression for soft materials using a direct impact experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenken, T.; Hiermaier, S.

    2006-08-01

    Measurement of strain rate dependent material data of low density low strength materials like polymeric foams and rubbers still poses challenges of a different kind to the experimental set up. For instance, in conventional Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar tests the impedance mismatch between the bars and the specimen makes strain measurement almost impossible. Application of viscoelastic bars poses new problems with wave dispersion. Also, maximum achievable strains and strain rates depend directly on the bar lengths, resulting in large experimental set ups in order to measure relevant data for automobile crash applications. In this paper a modified SHPB will be presented for testing low impedance materials. High strains can be achieved with nearly constant strain rate. A thin film stress measurement has been applied to the specimen/bar interfaces to investigate the initial sample ring up process. The process of stress homogeneity within the sample was investigated on EPDM and PU rubber.

  19. Ultrafast Direct Modulation of a Single-Mode Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Light-Emitting Diode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-15

    modulation speed results from the fast relaxation of the quantum dots used as the active material. By virtue of possessing a small mode volume, our LED...at room temperature, while the high modulation speed results from the fast relaxation of the quantum dots used as the active material. By virtue of...on optical pumping, and is difficult for on-chip integration. Recently, we demonstrated an electrically driven photonic crystal quantum dot (QD

  20. Self-assembled photonic-plasmonic nanotweezers for directed self-assembly of hybrid nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dell, Dakota; Serey, Xavier; Erickson, David

    2014-01-27

    We demonstrate a technique for assembling photonic-plasmonic nanotweezers by optically driving the adsorption of multi-walled carbon nanotubes onto a silicon waveguide. The nanotweezers are then used to trap and release individual polystyrene beads. Additionally, we demonstrate the ability to localize the deposition of metallic nanoparticles to the intersection points between multiple carbon nanotubes with the goal of forming more complex hybrid nanostructures.

  1. Analysis and Application of the Bi-Directional Scatter Distribution Function of Photonic Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Calculated normal-incidence reflectance spectra with TM polarization for five different values of the superstrate refractive index: (a) 1.00, (b...a liquid crystal superstrate [7] (right) SEM image of mold used to create the GMRF [8] 6 Figure 3. 2-D GMRF photonic crystal: (left) 3-D...schematic, without the superstrate [8] (right) SEM image of the mold used to produce the PC[8] superstrate is increased. It is important to note

  2. High-contrast X-ray micro-radiography and micro-CT of ex-vivo soft tissue murine organs utilizing ethanol fixation and large area photon-counting detector

    PubMed Central

    Dudak, Jan; Zemlicka, Jan; Karch, Jakub; Patzelt, Matej; Mrzilkova, Jana; Zach, Petr; Hermanova, Zuzana; Kvacek, Jiri; Krejci, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Using dedicated contrast agents high-quality X-ray imaging of soft tissue structures with isotropic micrometre resolution has become feasible. This technique is frequently titled as virtual histology as it allows production of slices of tissue without destroying the sample. The use of contrast agents is, however, often an irreversible time-consuming procedure and despite the non-destructive principle of X-ray imaging, the sample is usually no longer usable for other research methods. In this work we present the application of recently developed large-area photon counting detector for high resolution X-ray micro-radiography and micro-tomography of whole ex-vivo ethanol-preserved mouse organs. The photon counting detectors provide dark-current-free quantum-counting operation enabling acquisition of data with virtually unlimited contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thanks to the very high CNR even ethanol-only preserved soft-tissue samples without addition of any contrast agent can be visualized in great detail. As ethanol preservation is one of the standard steps of tissue fixation for histology, the presented method can open a way for widespread use of micro-CT with all its advantages for routine 3D non-destructive soft-tissue visualisation. PMID:27461900

  3. The direct and indirect bandgaps of unstrained SixGe1-x-ySny and their photonic device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moontragoon, P.; Soref, R. A.; Ikonic, Z.

    2012-10-01

    Using empirical pseudopotential theory, the direct (Γ) and indirect bandgaps (L and X) of unstrained crystalline SixGe1-x-ySny have been calculated over the entire xy composition range. The results are presented as energy-contour maps on ternary diagrams along with a ternary plot of the predicted lattice parameters. A group of 0.2 to 0.6 eV direct-gap SiGeSn materials is found for a variety of mid-infrared photonic applications. A set of "slightly indirect" SiGeSn alloys having a direct gap at 0.8 eV (but with a smaller L-Γ separation than in Ge) have been identified. These materials will function like Ge in various telecom photonic devices. Hetero-layered SiGeSn structures are described for infrared light emitters, amplifiers, photodetectors, and modulators (free carrier or Franz-Keldysh). We have examined in detail the optimized design space for mid-infrared SiGeSn-based multiple-quantum-well laser diodes, amplifiers, photodetectors, and quantum-confined Stark effect modulators.

  4. A direction-selective flattening filter for clinical photon beams. Monte Carlo evaluation of a new concept.

    PubMed

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Willborn, Kay; Rühmann, Antje; Poppe, Björn

    2011-07-21

    A new concept for the design of flattening filters applied in the generation of 6 and 15 MV photon beams by clinical linear accelerators is evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation. The beam head of the Siemens Primus accelerator has been taken as the starting point for the study of the conceived beam head modifications. The direction-selective filter (DSF) system developed in this work is midway between the classical flattening filter (FF) by which homogeneous transversal dose profiles have been established, and the flattening filter-free (FFF) design, by which advantages such as increased dose rate and reduced production of leakage photons and photoneutrons per Gy in the irradiated region have been achieved, whereas dose profile flatness was abandoned. The DSF concept is based on the selective attenuation of bremsstrahlung photons depending on their direction of emission from the bremsstrahlung target, accomplished by means of newly designed small conical filters arranged close to the target. This results in the capture of large-angle scattered Compton photons from the filter in the primary collimator. Beam flatness has been obtained up to any field cross section which does not exceed a circle of 15 cm diameter at 100 cm focal distance, such as 10 × 10 cm(2), 4 × 14.5 cm(2) or less. This flatness offers simplicity of dosimetric verifications, online controls and plausibility estimates of the dose to the target volume. The concept can be utilized when the application of small- and medium-sized homogeneous fields is sufficient, e.g. in the treatment of prostate, brain, salivary gland, larynx and pharynx as well as pediatric tumors and for cranial or extracranial stereotactic treatments. Significant dose rate enhancement has been achieved compared with the FF system, with enhancement factors 1.67 (DSF) and 2.08 (FFF) for 6 MV, and 2.54 (DSF) and 3.96 (FFF) for 15 MV. Shortening the delivery time per fraction matters with regard to workflow in a radiotherapy department

  5. A direction-selective flattening filter for clinical photon beams. Monte Carlo evaluation of a new concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Willborn, Kay; Rühmann, Antje; Poppe, Björn

    2011-07-01

    A new concept for the design of flattening filters applied in the generation of 6 and 15 MV photon beams by clinical linear accelerators is evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation. The beam head of the Siemens Primus accelerator has been taken as the starting point for the study of the conceived beam head modifications. The direction-selective filter (DSF) system developed in this work is midway between the classical flattening filter (FF) by which homogeneous transversal dose profiles have been established, and the flattening filter-free (FFF) design, by which advantages such as increased dose rate and reduced production of leakage photons and photoneutrons per Gy in the irradiated region have been achieved, whereas dose profile flatness was abandoned. The DSF concept is based on the selective attenuation of bremsstrahlung photons depending on their direction of emission from the bremsstrahlung target, accomplished by means of newly designed small conical filters arranged close to the target. This results in the capture of large-angle scattered Compton photons from the filter in the primary collimator. Beam flatness has been obtained up to any field cross section which does not exceed a circle of 15 cm diameter at 100 cm focal distance, such as 10 × 10 cm2, 4 × 14.5 cm2 or less. This flatness offers simplicity of dosimetric verifications, online controls and plausibility estimates of the dose to the target volume. The concept can be utilized when the application of small- and medium-sized homogeneous fields is sufficient, e.g. in the treatment of prostate, brain, salivary gland, larynx and pharynx as well as pediatric tumors and for cranial or extracranial stereotactic treatments. Significant dose rate enhancement has been achieved compared with the FF system, with enhancement factors 1.67 (DSF) and 2.08 (FFF) for 6 MV, and 2.54 (DSF) and 3.96 (FFF) for 15 MV. Shortening the delivery time per fraction matters with regard to workflow in a radiotherapy department

  6. Preamplifier impulse-response shape-driven shot-noise in direct-detection photon-counting laser radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youmans, Douglas G.

    2001-09-01

    The number of photons returning form a target in a given time interval is well described by a negative-binomial distributed random variable. A photomultipler tube (PMT) photon-counting detector is optimal for direct detection, and the number of detected-photon 'electron pulses' produced is also negative-binomially distributed per time bin, with a reduced mean due to the device quantum efficiency. These time distributed electron pulses are amplified and filtered by the preamplifier electronics prior to digitization and signal processing. The voltage output pulse per individual photo-electron event is known as the 'impulse-response- function' of the detector and preamplifier. In this study we employ a typical analog preamplifier filter response, modeled as a Butterworth lowpass filter of order two, which filters a 200 ps wideband PMT input voltage pulse. The random summation of these lowpass voltage impulse-responses, as created by the negative-binomial photon arrival times and random photo-electron creation, is the classical electronic 'shot-noise' random process. We derive numerically the voltage probability density function of this negative- binomial/impulse-response driven shot-noise random process following the stochastic process literature. We also show a technique to include PMT variations in gain, known as the 'pulse height distribution,' and to incorporate Gaussian baseline-noise voltage. Agreement with AMOR experiments is shown to be excellent. In addition, a Monte Carlo realization is presented, using the same impulse-response temporal shape, which also gives excellent agreement with AMOR data and with the analytical/numerical calculations.

  7. Precision direct photon spectra at high energy and comparison to the 8 TeV ATLAS data

    DOE PAGES

    Schwartz, Matthew D.

    2016-09-01

    The direct photon spectrum is computed to the highest currently available precision and compared to ATLAS data from 8 TeV collisions at the LHC. The prediction includes threshold resummation at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic order through the program PeTeR, matched to next-to-leading fixed order with fragmentation effects using JetPhox and includes the resummation of leading-logarithmic electroweak Sudakov effects. Remarkably, improved agreement with data can be seen when each component of the calculation is added successively. This comparison demonstrates the importance of both threshold logs and electroweak Sudakov effects. Numerical values for the predictions are included.

  8. Direct photon pair production at the LHC to O(α) in TeV scale gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. C.; Mathews, Prakash; Ravindran, V.; Tripathi, Anurag

    2009-09-01

    The first results on next-to-leading order QCD corrections to production of direct photon pairs in hadronic collisions in the extra dimension models — ADD and RS are presented. Various kinematical distributions are obtained to order α in QCD by taking into account all the parton level subprocesses. Our Monte Carlo based code incorporates all the experimental cuts suitable for physics studies at the LHC. We estimate the impact of the QCD corrections on various observables and find that they are significant. We also show the reduction in factorization scale uncertainty when O(α) effects are included.

  9. Femtosecond laser direct writing of large-area two-dimensional metallic photonic crystal structures on tungsten surfaces.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Hongzhen; Yang, Jianjun; Wang, Fei; Yang, Yang; Sun, Julong

    2015-10-05

    Metallic photonic crystals (MPCs) and metamaterials operating in the visible spectrum are required for high-temperature nanophotonics, but they are often difficult to construct. This study demonstrates a new approach to directly write two-dimensional (2D) MPCs on tungsten surfaces through the cylindrical focusing of two collinear femtosecond laser beams with certain temporal delays and orthogonal linear polarizations. Results are physically attributed to the laser-induced transient crossed temperature grating patterns and tempo-spatial thermal correlations. Optical properties of the fabricated MPCs are characterized. Such a simple and efficient technique can be used to fabricate large-area, 2D microstructures on metal surfaces for potential applications.

  10. Direct Observation of the Coherent Nuclear Response after the Absorption of a Photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebel, M.; Schnedermann, C.; Bassolino, G.; Taylor, G.; Watts, A.; Kukura, P.

    2014-06-01

    How molecules convert light energy to perform a specific transformation is a fundamental question in photophysics. Ultrafast spectroscopy reveals the kinetics associated with electronic energy flow, but little is known about how absorbed photon energy drives nuclear motion. Here we used ultrabroadband transient absorption spectroscopy to monitor coherent vibrational energy flow after photoexcitation of the retinal chromophore. In the proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, we observed coherent activation of hydrogen-out-of-plane wagging and backbone torsional modes that were replaced by unreactive coordinates in the solution environment, concomitant with a deactivation of the reactive relaxation pathway.

  11. Direct observation of the coherent nuclear response after the absorption of a photon.

    PubMed

    Liebel, M; Schnedermann, C; Bassolino, G; Taylor, G; Watts, A; Kukura, P

    2014-06-13

    How molecules convert light energy to perform a specific transformation is a fundamental question in photophysics. Ultrafast spectroscopy reveals the kinetics associated with electronic energy flow, but little is known about how absorbed photon energy drives nuclear motion. Here we used ultrabroadband transient absorption spectroscopy to monitor coherent vibrational energy flow after photoexcitation of the retinal chromophore. In the proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, we observed coherent activation of hydrogen-out-of-plane wagging and backbone torsional modes that were replaced by unreactive coordinates in the solution environment, concomitant with a deactivation of the reactive relaxation pathway.

  12. Unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from experimental transmission data, with direct independent validation

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, E. S. M.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: In a recent computational study, an improved physics-based approach was proposed for unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from transmission data. In this approach, energy differentiation is improved by simultaneously using transmission data for multiple attenuators and detectors, and the unfolding robustness is improved by using a four-parameter functional form to describe the photon spectrum. The purpose of the current study is to validate this approach experimentally, and to demonstrate its application on a typical clinical linac. Methods: The validation makes use of the recent transmission measurements performed on the Vickers research linac of National Research Council Canada. For this linac, the photon spectra were previously measured using a NaI detector, and the incident electron parameters are independently known. The transmission data are for eight beams in the range 10-30 MV using thick Be, Al and Pb bremsstrahlung targets. To demonstrate the approach on a typical clinical linac, new measurements are performed on an Elekta Precise linac for 6, 10 and 25 MV beams. The different experimental setups are modeled using EGSnrc, with the newly added photonuclear attenuation included. Results: For the validation on the research linac, the 95% confidence bounds of the unfolded spectra fall within the noise of the NaI data. The unfolded spectra agree with the EGSnrc spectra (calculated using independently known electron parameters) with RMS energy fluence deviations of 4.5%. The accuracy of unfolding the incident electron energy is shown to be {approx}3%. A transmission cutoff of only 10% is suitable for accurate unfolding, provided that the other components of the proposed approach are implemented. For the demonstration on a clinical linac, the unfolded incident electron energies and their 68% confidence bounds for the 6, 10 and 25 MV beams are 6.1 {+-} 0.1, 9.3 {+-} 0.1, and 19.3 {+-} 0.2 MeV, respectively. The unfolded spectra

  13. Femtosecond laser inscription of asymmetric directional couplers for in-fiber optical taps and fiber cladding photonics.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Jason R; Fernandes, Luís A; Herman, Peter R

    2015-06-29

    Precise alignment of femtosecond laser tracks in standard single mode optical fiber is shown to enable controllable optical tapping of the fiber core waveguide light with fiber cladding photonic circuits. Asymmetric directional couplers are presented with tunable coupling ratios up to 62% and bandwidths up to 300 nm at telecommunication wavelengths. Real-time fiber monitoring during laser writing permitted a means of controlling the coupler length to compensate for micron-scale alignment errors and to facilitate tailored design of coupling ratio, spectral bandwidth and polarization properties. Laser induced waveguide birefringence was harnessed for polarization dependent coupling that led to the formation of in-fiber polarization-selective taps with 32 dB extinction ratio. This technology enables the interconnection of light propagating in pre-existing waveguides with laser-formed devices, thereby opening a new practical direction for the three-dimensional integration of optical devices in the cladding of optical fibers and planar lightwave circuits.

  14. Recoil and power corrections in high-xT direct photon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterman, George; Vogelsang, Werner

    2005-01-01

    We study a class of nonperturbative corrections to single-inclusive photon cross sections at measured transverse momentum pT, in the large-xT limit. We develop an extension of the joint (threshold and transverse momentum) resummation formalism, appropriate for large xT, in which there are no kinematic singularities associated with recoil, and for which matching to fixed-order and to threshold resummation at next-to-leading logarithm (NLL) is straightforward. Beyond NLL, we find contributions that can be attributed to recoil from initial-state radiation. Associated power corrections occur as inverse powers of p2T and are identified from the infrared structure of integrals over the running coupling. They have significant energy-dependence and decrease from typical fixed-target to collider energies. Energy conservation, which is incorporated into joint resummation, moderates the effects of perturbative recoil and power corrections for large xT.

  15. Soft Pion Processes

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Nambu, Y.

    1968-01-01

    My talk is concerned with a review, not necessarily of the latest theoretical developments, but rather of an old idea which has contributed to recent theoretical activities. By soft pion processes I mean processes in which low energy pions are emitted or absorbed or scattered, just as we use the word soft photon in a similar context. Speaking more quantitatively, we may call a pion soft if its energy is small compared to a natural scale in the reaction. This scale is determined by the particular dynamics of pion interaction, and one may roughly say that a pion is soft if its energy is small compared to the energies of the other individual particles that participate in the reaction. It is important to note at this point that pion is by far the lightest member of all the hadrons, and much of the success of the soft pion formulas depends on this fact.

  16. Fabrication of controllable form submicrometer structures on positive photoresist by one-photon absorption direct laser writing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Quang Cong; Do, Minh Thanh; Journet, Bernard; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle; Lai, Ngoc Diep

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a very simple and low-cost method based on one-photon absorption direct laser writing technique to fabricate arbitrary two-dimensional (2D) polymeric submicrometer structures with controllable form. In this technique, a continuous-wave green laser beam (532 nm) with very weak power is tightly focused into a positive photoresist (S1805) by a high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens (OL), depolymerizing the polymer in a local submicrometer region. The focusing spot is then moved in a controllable trajectory by a 3D piezo translation stage, resulting in desired structures. The low absorption effect of the photoresist at the excitation wavelength allows obtaining structures with submicrometer size and great depth. In particular, by controlling the exposure dose, e.g. the scanning speed, and the scanning configuration, the structures have been created in positive (cylindrical material in air) or negative (air holes) form. The 2D square structures with periods in between 0.6 μm and 1 μm and with a feature size of about 150 nm have been demonstrated with an OL of NA = 0.9 (air-immersion). The fabricated results are well consistent with those obtained numerically by using a vectorial diffraction theory for high NA OLs. This investigation should be very useful for fabrication of photonic and plasmonic templates.

  17. One-step fabrication of submicrostructures by low one-photon absorption direct laser writing technique with local thermal effect

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dam Thuy Trang; Tong, Quang Cong; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle; Lai, Ngoc Diep

    2016-01-07

    In this work, local thermal effect induced by a continuous-wave laser has been investigated and exploited to optimize the low one-photon absorption (LOPA) direct laser writing (DLW) technique for fabrication of polymer-based microstructures. It was demonstrated that the temperature of excited SU8 photoresist at the focusing area increases to above 100 °C due to high excitation intensity and becomes stable at that temperature thanks to the use of a continuous-wave laser at 532 nm-wavelength. This optically induced thermal effect immediately completes the crosslinking process at the photopolymerized region, allowing obtain desired structures without using the conventional post-exposure bake (PEB) step, which is usually realized after the exposure. Theoretical calculation of the temperature distribution induced by local optical excitation using finite element method confirmed the experimental results. LOPA-based DLW technique combined with optically induced thermal effect (local PEB) shows great advantages over the traditional PEB, such as simple, short fabrication time, high resolution. In particular, it allowed the overcoming of the accumulation effect inherently existed in optical lithography by one-photon absorption process, resulting in small and uniform structures with very short lattice constant.

  18. Centrality dependence of the direct photon yield and elliptic flow in heavy-ion collisions at √sNN =200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnyk, O.; Cassing, W.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.

    2014-03-01

    We calculate the centrality dependence of direct photons produced in Au+Au collisions at the invariant collision energy √sNN =200 GeV and their transverse momentum spectra within the parton-hadron-string dynamics transport approach. As sources for "direct" photons, we incorporate the interactions of quarks and gluons as well as hadronic interactions (π +π→ρ+γ, ρ +π→π+γ, meson-meson bremsstrahlung m +m→m+m+γ, and meson-baryon bremsstrahlung m +B→m+B+γ), the decays of ϕ and a1 mesons, and the photons produced in the initial hard collisions. We find that the transverse momentum pT spectra of the "thermal" photons (i.e., the direct photons after the pQCD contribution is subtracted) deviate from exponential distributions and, consequently, observe a strong dependence of the inverse slope parameter Teff on the fitting range in pT. On the other hand, all the obtained "effective temperatures" are well above the critical temperature for the deconfinement phase transition even for peripheral collisions, reflecting primarily a "blue shift" due to radial collective motion of hadrons. Our calculations suggest that the channel decomposition of the observed spectrum changes with centrality with an increasing (dominant) contribution of hadronic sources for more peripheral reactions. Furthermore, the thermal photon yield is found to scale roughly with the number of participant nucleons as Npartα with α ≈ 1.5, whereas the partonic contribution scales with an exponent αp≈1.75. Additionally, we provide predictions for the centrality dependence of the direct photon elliptic flow v2(pT). The photons from the hot deconfined matter in the early stages of the collision carry a much smaller elliptic flow than the final hadrons. Consequently, the direct photon v2 in the most central bin is of the order of a few percent. On the other hand, the elliptic flow of direct photons is considerably larger in more peripheral collisions, approaching that of hadrons.

  19. Direct observation of exceptional points in coupled photonic-crystal lasers with asymmetric optical gains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Hwang, Min-Soo; Kim, Ha-Reem; Choi, Jae-Hyuck; No, You-Shin; Park, Hong-Gyu

    2016-12-01

    Although counter-intuitive features have been observed in non-Hermitian optical systems based on micrometre-sized cavities, the achievement of a simplified but unambiguous approach to enable the efficient access of exceptional points (EPs) and the phase transition to desired lasing modes remains a challenge, particularly in wavelength-scale coupled cavities. Here, we demonstrate coupled photonic-crystal (PhC) nanolasers with asymmetric optical gains, and observe the phase transition of lasing modes at EPs through tuning of the area of graphene cover on one PhC cavity and systematic scanning photoluminescence measurements. As the gain contrast between the two identical PhC cavities exceeds the intercavity coupling, the phase transition occurs from the bonding/anti-bonding lasing modes to the single-amplifying lasing mode, which is confirmed by the experimental measurement of the mode images and the theoretical modelling of coupled cavities with asymmetric gains. In addition, we demonstrate active tuning of EPs by controlling the optical loss of graphene through electrical gating.

  20. Direct transfer of metallic photonic structures onto end facets of optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinping; Liu, Feifei; Lin, Yuanhai

    2016-07-01

    We present a flexible approach to transfer metallic photonic crystals (MPCs) onto end facets of optical fibers. The MPCs were initially fabricated on a glass substrate with a spacer layer of indium tin oxide (ITO), which was used as a buffer layer in the transferring process. The fiber ends were firstly welded on the top surface of the MPCs by a drop of polymer solution after the solvent evaporated. The ITO layer was then etched by hydrochloric acid (HCl), so that the MPCs got off the substrate and were transferred to the fiber ends. Alternatively, the MPCs may be also etched off the substrate first by immersing the sample in HCl. The ultra-thin MPC sheet consisting of gold nanolines interlaced with photoresist gratings was then transferred to cap the fiber ends. In the later approach, we can choose which side of the MPCs to be used as the contact with the fiber facet. Such methods enabled convenient nanostructuring on optical fiber tips and achieving miniaturized MPC devices with compact integration, extending significantly applications of MPCs. In particular, the fabrications presented in this manuscript enrich the lab-on-fiber engineering techniques and the resultant devices have potential applications in remote sensing and detection systems.

  1. Direct observation of exceptional points in coupled photonic-crystal lasers with asymmetric optical gains

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Hwang, Min-Soo; Kim, Ha-Reem; Choi, Jae-Hyuck; No, You-Shin; Park, Hong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Although counter-intuitive features have been observed in non-Hermitian optical systems based on micrometre-sized cavities, the achievement of a simplified but unambiguous approach to enable the efficient access of exceptional points (EPs) and the phase transition to desired lasing modes remains a challenge, particularly in wavelength-scale coupled cavities. Here, we demonstrate coupled photonic-crystal (PhC) nanolasers with asymmetric optical gains, and observe the phase transition of lasing modes at EPs through tuning of the area of graphene cover on one PhC cavity and systematic scanning photoluminescence measurements. As the gain contrast between the two identical PhC cavities exceeds the intercavity coupling, the phase transition occurs from the bonding/anti-bonding lasing modes to the single-amplifying lasing mode, which is confirmed by the experimental measurement of the mode images and the theoretical modelling of coupled cavities with asymmetric gains. In addition, we demonstrate active tuning of EPs by controlling the optical loss of graphene through electrical gating. PMID:28000688

  2. Directing solar photons to sustainably meet food, energy, and water needs

    DOE PAGES

    Gencer, Emre; Miskin, Caleb; Sun, Xingshu; ...

    2017-06-09

    As we approach a “Full Earth” of over ten billion people within the next century, unprecedented demands will be placed on food, energy and water (FEW) supplies. The grand challenge before us is to sustainably meet humanity’s FEW needs using scarcer resources. To overcome this challenge, we propose the utilization of the entire solar spectrum by redirecting solar photons to maximize FEW production from a given land area. We present novel solar spectrum unbundling FEW systems (SUFEWS), which can meet FEW needs locally while reducing the overall environmental impact of meeting these needs. The ability to meet FEW needs locallymore » is critical, as significant population growth is expected in less-developed areas of the world. As a result, the proposed system presents a solution to harness the same amount of solar products (crops, electricity, and purified water) that could otherwise require ~60% more land if SUFEWS were not used—a major step for Full Earth preparedness.« less

  3. Continuous-time photon-stimulated desorption spectroscopy studies on soft x-ray-induced reactions of CF{sub 3}Br adsorbed on Si(111)-7x7

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, W.-C.; Wang, S.-K.; He, T.-M.; Chou, L.-C.; Hsieh, Y.-C.; Liao, K.-Y.; Chen, H.-C.; Wen, C.-R.

    2011-10-28

    Continuous-time core-level photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) spectroscopy was used to study the soft x-ray-induced reactions of CF{sub 3}Br molecules adsorbed on Si(111)-7x7 near the Si(2p) edge (98-110 eV). The monochromatic synchrotron radiation was employed as a soft x-ray light source in the photon-induced reactions and also as a probe for investigating the produced fluorination states of the bonding surface Si atom in the positive-ion PSD spectroscopy. Several different surface coverages were investigated. The PSD spectra from the low-CF{sub 3}Br-covered surfaces show the production of surface SiF species, while those from the high-CF{sub 3}Br-covered surfaces depict the formation of surface SiF, SiF{sub 2}, and SiF{sub 3} species. The photolysis cross section of the submonolayer CF{sub 3}Br-covered surface is determined as {approx}4.3x10{sup -18} cm{sup 2}. A comparison with the results on CF{sub 3}Cl/Si(111)-7x7 surface is discussed.

  4. Complex-envelope alternating-direction-implicit FDTD method for simulating active photonic devices with semiconductor/solid-state media.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpreet; Ravi, Koustuban; Wang, Qian; Ho, Seng-Tiong

    2012-06-15

    A complex-envelope (CE) alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach to treat light-matter interaction self-consistently with electromagnetic field evolution for efficient simulations of active photonic devices is presented for the first time (to our best knowledge). The active medium (AM) is modeled using an efficient multilevel system of carrier rate equations to yield the correct carrier distributions, suitable for modeling semiconductor/solid-state media accurately. To include the AM in the CE-ADI-FDTD method, a first-order differential system involving CE fields in the AM is first set up. The system matrix that includes AM parameters is then split into two time-dependent submatrices that are then used in an efficient ADI splitting formula. The proposed CE-ADI-FDTD approach with AM takes 22% of the time as the approach of the corresponding explicit FDTD, as validated by semiconductor microdisk laser simulations.

  5. Direct-writing colloidal photonic crystal microfluidic chips by inkjet printing for label-free protein detection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weizhi; Li, Mingzhu; Ye, Changqing; Jiang, Lei; Song, Yanlin

    2012-09-07

    Integrating photonic crystals (PC) into microfluidic systems has attracted immense interest for its novel functions. However, it is still a great challenge to fabricate PC microfluidic chips rapidly with complex functions. In this work, a direct-writing colloidal PC microchannel was firstly achieved by inkjet printing and was used for the surface-tension-confined microfluidic immune assay. PC channels with different structure colors have been successfully integrated on one chip. The fabricated chip has the advantages of rapid fabrication, quick fluidic transport and can monitor the fluidic fluxion using the naked eye. Utilizing this PC microfluidic chip, a colorimetric label-free immune assay was realized without nonspecific adsorption interference of the target.

  6. Facile fabrication of a superhydrophobic cage by laser direct writing for site-specific colloidal self-assembled photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Kwon, Hyuk-Jun; Paeng, Dongwoo; Yeo, Junyeob; Elhadj, Selim; Grigoropoulos, Costas P

    2016-04-08

    Micron-sized ablated surface structures with nano-sized 'bumpy' structures were produced by femtosecond (fs) laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film under ambient conditions. Upon just a single step, the processed surface exhibited hierarchical micro/nano morphology. In addition, due to the tribological properties of PTFE, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) could be replicated from the laser-ablated PTFE surface without anti-adhesive surface treatment. By controlling the design of the ablated patterns, tunable wettability and superhydrophobicity were achieved on both PTFE and PDMS replica surfaces. Furthermore, using fs laser ablation direct writing, a flexible superhydrophobic PDMS cage formed by superhydrophobic patterns encompassing the unmodified region was demonstrated for aqueous droplet positioning and trapping. Through evaporation-driven colloidal self-assembly in this superhydrophobic cage, a colloidal droplet containing polystyrene (PS) particles dried into a self-assembled photonic crystal, whose optical band gap could be manipulated by the particle size.

  7. Multi-objective direct optimization of dynamic acceptance and lifetime for potential upgrades of the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, M.; Sajaev, V.; Emery, L.; Xiao, A.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2010-08-24

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a 7 GeV storage ring light source that has been in operation for well over a decade. In the near future, the ring may be upgraded, including changes to the lattice such as provision of several long straight sections (LSS). Because APS beamlines are nearly fully built out, we have limited freedom to place LSSs in a symmetric fashion. Arbitrarily-placed LSSs will drastically reduce the symmetry of the optics and would typically be considered unworkable. We apply a recently-developed multi-objective direct optimization technique that relies on particle tracking to compute the dynamic aperture and Touschek lifetime. We show that this technique is able to tune sextupole strengths and select the working point in such a way as to recover the dynamic and momentum acceptances. We also show the results of experimental tests of lattices developed using these techniques.

  8. Direct calibration in megavoltage photon beams using Monte Carlo conversion factor: validation and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Wright, Tracy; Lye, Jessica E; Ramanathan, Ganesan; Harty, Peter D; Oliver, Chris; Webb, David V; Butler, Duncan J

    2015-01-21

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) has established a method for ionisation chamber calibrations using megavoltage photon reference beams. The new method will reduce the calibration uncertainty compared to a (60)Co calibration combined with the TRS-398 energy correction factor. The calibration method employs a graphite calorimeter and a Monte Carlo (MC) conversion factor to convert the absolute dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water. EGSnrc is used to model the linac head and doses in the calorimeter and water phantom. The linac model is validated by comparing measured and modelled PDDs and profiles. The relative standard uncertainties in the calibration factors at the ARPANSA beam qualities were found to be 0.47% at 6 MV, 0.51% at 10 MV and 0.46% for the 18 MV beam. A comparison with the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) as part of the key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K6 gave results of 0.9965(55), 0.9924(60) and 0.9932(59) for the 6, 10 and 18 MV beams, respectively, with all beams within 1σ of the participant average. The measured kQ values for an NE2571 Farmer chamber were found to be lower than those in TRS-398 but are consistent with published measured and modelled values. Users can expect a shift in the calibration factor at user energies of an NE2571 chamber between 0.4-1.1% across the range of calibration energies compared to the current calibration method.

  9. Direct catalytic asymmetric addition of allyl cyanide to ketones via soft Lewis acid/hard Brønsted base/hard Lewis base catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Ryo; Kumagai, Naoya; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2010-04-21

    We report that a hard Lewis base substantially affects the reaction efficiency of direct catalytic asymmetric gamma-addition of allyl cyanide (1a) to ketones promoted by a soft Lewis acid/hard Brønsted base catalyst. Mechanistic studies have revealed that Cu/(R,R)-Ph-BPE and Li(OC(6)H(4)-p-OMe) serve as a soft Lewis acid and a hard Brønsted base, respectively, allowing for deprotonative activation of 1a as the rate-determining step. A ternary catalytic system comprising a soft Lewis acid/hard Brønsted base and an additional hard Lewis base, in which the basicity of the hard Brønsted base Li(OC(6)H(4)-p-OMe) was enhanced by phosphine oxide (the hard Lewis base) through a hard-hard interaction, outperformed the previously developed binary soft Lewis acid/hard Brønsted base catalytic system, leading to higher yields and enantioselectivities while using one-tenth the catalyst loading and one-fifth the amount of 1a. This second-generation catalyst allows efficient access to highly enantioenriched tertiary alcohols under nearly ideal atom-economical conditions (0.5-1 mol % catalyst loading and a substrate molar ratio of 1:2).

  10. Visualization of Bloch surface waves and directional propagation effects on one-dimensional photonic crystal substrate.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Ju; Lin, I-Sheng

    2016-07-11

    This paper reports a novel approach to the direct observation of Bloch surface waves, wherein a layer of fluorescent material is deposited directly on the surface of a semi-infinite periodic layered cell. A set of surface nano-gratings is used to couple pumping light to Bloch surface waves, while the sample is rotated until the pumping light meets the quasi-phase matching conditions. This study investigated the directional propagation of waves on stripe and circular one-dimensional grating structures by analyzing the dispersion relationship of the first two eigen modes. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed scheme in visualizing Bloch surface waves, which could be extended to a variety of other devices.

  11. Encapsulation of Polymer Colloids in a Sol-Gel Matrix. Direct-Writing of Coassembling Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Mikosch, Annabel; Kuehne, Alexander J C

    2016-03-22

    The spontaneous self-assembly of polymer colloids into ordered arrangements provides a facile strategy for the creation of photonic crystals. However, these structures often suffer from defects and insufficient cohesion, which result in flaking and delamination from the substrate. A coassembly process has been developed for convective assembly, resulting in large-area encapsulated colloidal crystals. However, to generate patterns or discrete deposits in designated places, convective assembly is not suitable. Here we experimentally develop conditions for direct-writing of coassembling monodisperse dye-doped polystyrene particles with a sol-gel precursor to form solid encapsulated photonic crystals. In a simple procedure the colloids are formulated in a sol-gel precursor solution, drop-cast on a flat substrate, and dried. We here establish the optimal parameters to form reproducible highly ordered photonic crystals with good optical performance. The obtained photonic crystals interact with light in the visible spectrum with a narrow optical stop-gap.

  12. Direct photon production and jet energy-loss in small systems. The XXVth International Conference on Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chun; Park, Chanwook; Paquet, Jean-François; Denicol, Gabriel S.; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-12-01

    Two types of penetrating probes, direct photon and QCD jets, are investigated in the background of a small and rapidly expanding droplet of quark-gluon plasma. The additional thermal electromagnetic radiation results in a ∼50% enhancement of the direct photons. In high multiplicity p+Pb collisions, jets can lose a sizeable fraction of their initial energy, leading to a charged hadron RpA of ∼0.8 at a transverse momentum around 10GeV. Those two proposed measurements can help understand the apparent collective behaviour observed in small collision systems.

  13. Length minimization design considerations in photonic integrated circuits incorporating directional couplers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Joseph T.; Radens, Carl J.; Kauffman, Michael T.

    1991-01-01

    Because directional couplers involve channel waveguides which are very close to one another, transition regions to regions where channel waveguides are widely separated are utilized. The total length of a directional coupler and transition regions can be minimized for a particular degree of field confinement. Calculations presented for LiNbO3-, GaAlAs-, and SiO2/Si-based optical channel waveguides demonstrate the presence of a minimum total length corresponding to a particular degree of field confinement. The overall length at the minimum is shown to be significantly lower than for other values of field confinement allowing single-mode operation. This implies that either more devices can be integrated on a substrate or that less material is needed for an integrated optical circuit.

  14. Towards perfect light coupling and absorption in nanomembranes with omni-directional anti-reflection and photonic crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadha, Arvinder Singh

    investigated in detail. The front-surface Fresnel reflection is reduced with the incorporation of an omni-directional anti-reflection coating (Omni-ARC) based on nanostructures or by deposition of graded refractive index (GRIN) films. A design methodology based on the comparison of the rate of change of the refractive index profile of nanostructures of different shapes and thickness as an equivalent GRIN film suggests the minimum feature size needed to give near perfect ARC. Numerical models were built to account for the non - uniform GRIN film deposition on both rigid and flexible, flat and curved surfaces resulting from the variation in the resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) process technology. With the miniaturization of the devices, the effect of finite beam size and finite active area of the photonic components on the optical properties like transmission, reflection and scattering loss was studied as well. All the numerical studies presented in the thesis are validated by experimental results.

  15. Soft Ionization of Saturated Hydrocarbons, Alcohols and Nonpolar Compounds by Negative-Ion Direct Analysis in Real-Time Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, Robert B.; Dane, A. John

    2013-03-01

    Large polarizable n-alkanes (approximately C18 and larger), alcohols, and other nonpolar compounds can be detected as negative ions when sample solutions are injected directly into the sampling orifice of the atmospheric pressure interface of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer with the direct analysis in real time (DART) ion source operating in negative-ion mode. The mass spectra are dominated by peaks corresponding to [M + O2]‾•. No fragmentation is observed, making this a very soft ionization technique for samples that are otherwise difficult to analyze by DART. Detection limits for cholesterol were determined to be in the low nanogram range.

  16. Centrality dependence of low-momentum direct-photon production in Au +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'Ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bing, X.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K.-B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Masumoto, S.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.

    2015-06-01

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured the centrality dependence of the direct photon yield from Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV down to pT=0.4 GeV /c . Photons are detected via photon conversions to e+e- pairs and an improved technique is applied that minimizes the systematic uncertainties that usually limit direct photon measurements, in particular at low pT. We find an excess of direct photons above the Ncoll-scaled yield measured in p +p collisions. This excess yield is well described by an exponential distribution with an inverse slope of about 240 MeV /c in the pT range 0.6 -2.0 GeV /c . While the shape of the pT distribution is independent of centrality within the experimental uncertainties, the yield increases rapidly with increasing centrality, scaling approximately with Npartα, where α =1.38 ±0.03 (stat )±0.07 (syst ) .

  17. Centrality dependence of low-momentum direct-photon production in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; ...

    2015-06-05

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured the centrality dependence of the direct photon yield from Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV down to pT = 0.4 GeV/c. Photons are detected via photon conversions to e⁺e⁻ pairs and an improved technique is applied that minimizes the systematic uncertainties that usually limit direct photon measurements, in particular at low pT . We find an excess of direct photons above the Ncoll-scaled yield measured in p+p collisions. This excess yield is well described by an exponential distribution with an inverse slope of about 240 MeV/c in the pT range from 0.6–2.0more » GeV/c. In this study, while the shape of the pT distribution is independent of centrality within the experimental uncertainties, the yield increases rapidly with increasing centrality, scaling approximately with N α part, where α = 1.38±0.03(stat)±0.07(syst).« less

  18. Direct measurement of nanoparticle interactions using near-field photonics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schein, Perry; O'Dell, Dakota; Erickson, David

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticle suspensions are used in numerous biomedical applications ranging from sensing and diagnostics to in vivo therapeutic agents and drug delivery mechanisms. One key challenge in developing these technologies is engineering particles that remain stable in the presence of physiological salt concentrations and different pH regimes encountered in applications. Here, we show an approach for high-throughput characterization of nanoparticle stability by directly measuring the interaction energy profiles between nanoparticles and surfaces. As nanoparticles are trapped and propelled along an optical waveguide, they scatter light. Our technique takes advantage of the confined Brownian motion exhibited by the particles as they fluctuate about the equilibrium position between the optical and particle-surface interaction forces. In this way, unlike colloidal probe atomic force microscopy, this technique is capable of making measurements that are not limited by thermal noise, and capable of mapping interaction energy profiles on the sub-kT scale, driven by sub-pN forces. We demonstrate direct measurement of the interactions between protein-coated gold nanoparticles with 50 nm diameters and surfaces in a variety of experimental conditions including changes in specific ions present, overall ionic strength and pH, giving insight into the dynamics of these biologically relevant systems at the nanoscale. These direct measurements on particles with sub-100 nm diameters offer new insights into suspension stability missed by indirect measurements such as absorbance spectroscopy, zeta-potential, and dynamic light scattering, and allow for the detailed study of sub-populations in a heterogeneous sample. Additionally, the sub-pN force resolution makes this a suitable platform for fundamental biophysical studies.

  19. Direct observation of a photon spin-induced constant acceleration in macroscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delannoy, G.; Emile, O.; Le Floch, A.

    2005-02-01

    The use of a spider silk allows the direct observation of the dynamics induced by the transfer of angular momentum of laser light in a Beth-type experiment. In the optical domain, a uniform angular acceleration of a macroscopic object is demonstrated in agreement with the expected equation of motion. The intrinsic angular momentum exerts a stable torque thats modulus can be continuously adjusted from 0to10-12Nm by changing the optical power. Moreover, a macroscopic no-node mirror is proposed to improve the optical angular momentum transfer in micro-manipulation in the context of optical tweezers.

  20. Photonic Modulation Using Bi-Directional Diamond Shaped Ring Lasers at 1550 NM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    Infotonics Technology Center worked collaboratively to characterize and eventually package diode-based, diamond-shaped cavity, ring lasers that operate at...laser modes provide a direct means for realizing the Sagnac effect, which has been well established in gyro technology with gas and fiber lasers...Injection Wavelength Investigation……………………………………...15 4.1.2 Injection Frequency Investigation……………………………………….19 4.1.3 Gain Quenching Investigations

  1. Mesh-based Monte Carlo method for fibre-optic optogenetic neural stimulation with direct photon flux recording strategy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Younghoon; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang

    2016-03-21

    We propose a Monte Carlo (MC) method based on a direct photon flux recording strategy using inhomogeneous, meshed rodent brain atlas. This MC method was inspired by and dedicated to fibre-optics-based optogenetic neural stimulations, thus providing an accurate and direct solution for light intensity distributions in brain regions with different optical properties. Our model was used to estimate the 3D light intensity attenuation for close proximity between an implanted optical fibre source and neural target area for typical optogenetics applications. Interestingly, there are discrepancies with studies using a diffusion-based light intensity prediction model, perhaps due to use of improper light scattering models developed for far-field problems. Our solution was validated by comparison with the gold-standard MC model, and it enabled accurate calculations of internal intensity distributions in an inhomogeneous near light source domain. Thus our strategy can be applied to studying how illuminated light spreads through an inhomogeneous brain area, or for determining the amount of light required for optogenetic manipulation of a specific neural target area.

  2. Direct Observation of Phagocytosis and NET-formation by Neutrophils in Infected Lungs using 2-photon Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hasenberg, Mike; Köhler, Anja; Bonifatius, Susanne; Jeron, Andreas; Gunzer, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    After the gastrointestinal tract, the lung is the second largest surface for interaction between the vertebrate body and the environment. Here, an effective gas exchange must be maintained, while at the same time avoiding infection by the multiple pathogens that are inhaled during normal breathing. To achieve this, a superb set of defense strategies combining humoral and cellular immune mechanisms exists. One of the most effective measures for acute defense of the lung is the recruitment of neutrophils, which either phagocytose the inhaled pathogens or kill them by releasing cytotoxic chemicals. A recent addition to the arsenal of neutrophils is their explosive release of extracellular DNA-NETs by which bacteria or fungi can be caught or inactivated even after the NET releasing cells have died. We present here a method that allows one to directly observe neutrophils, migrating within a recently infected lung, phagocytosing fungal pathogens as well as visualize the extensive NETs that they have produced throughout the infected tissue. The method describes the preparation of thick viable lung slices 7 hours after intratracheal infection of mice with conidia of the mold Aspergillus fumigatus and their examination by multicolor time-lapse 2-photon microscopy. This approach allows one to directly investigate antifungal defense in native lung tissue and thus opens a new avenue for the detailed investigation of pulmonary immunity. PMID:21673640

  3. Theory of direct and indirect effect of two-photon absorption on nonlinear optical losses in high power semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrutin, E. A.; Ryvkin, B. S.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the transverse laser structure on two-photon absorption (TPA) related effects in high-power diode lasers is analysed theoretically. The direct effect of TPA is found to depend significantly on the transverse waveguide structure, and predicted to be weaker in broad and asymmetric waveguide designs. The indirect effect of TPA, via carrier generation in the waveguide and free-carrier absorption, is analysed for the case of a symmetric laser waveguide and shown to be strongly dependent on the active layer position. With the active layer near the mode peak, the indirect effect is weaker than the direct effect due to the population of TPA-created carriers being efficiently depleted by their diffusion and capture into the active layer, whereas for the active layer position strongly shifted towards the p-cladding, the indirect effect can become the dominant power limitation at very high currents. It is shown that for optimizing a laser design for pulsed high power operation, both TPA related effects and the inhomogeneous carrier accumulation in the waveguide caused by diffusive current need to be taken into account.

  4. Measuring the isotropization time of quark-gluon plasma from direct photons at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Lusaka; Roy, Pradip

    2009-05-15

    We calculate transverse momentum distribution of direct photons from various sources by taking into account the initial state momentum anisotropy of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and late stage transverse flow effects. To evaluate the photon yield from hadronic matter we include the contributions from baryon-meson reactions. The total photon yield, calculated for various combinations of initial conditions and transition temperatures, is then compared with the recent measurement of photon transverse momentum distribution by the PHENIX Collaboration. It is shown that because of the initial state anisotropy the photon yield from the QGP is larger by a factor of 8-10 than that of the isotropic case in the intermediate p{sub T} regime. It is also demonstrated that the presence of such an anisotropy can describe the PHENIX photon data better than the isotropic case in the present model. We show that the isotropization time thus extracted lies within the range 1.5{>=}{tau}{sub iso}{>=}0.5 fm/c for the initial conditions used here.

  5. Measurement of the center-of-mass energy dependence of isolated direct photon production in proton-antiproton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partos, Dana Sarah

    2001-08-01

    We present a measurement of the s dependence of isolated prompt photon production in hadronic collisions. Prompt photon samples from 1.8 TeV and 0.63 TeV pp¯ collisions were recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. Two independent background subtraction methods, shower shape and conversion rates, were calibrated and used to calculate the photon cross sections. The shapes of the measured cross sections as a function of photon transverse momentum were not adequately predicted by current calculations of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). One possible explanation for the disagreement between data and theory, an incorrect parameterization of the proton's parton distribution function, is excluded by a comparison of the cross sections as a function of photon xT, the fraction of the proton's momentum carried by the photon.

  6. Direct photon elliptic flow at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Min; Lee, Chang-Hwan; Teaney, Derek; Zahed, Ismail

    2017-07-01

    We use an event-by-event hydrodynamical description of the heavy-ion collision process with Glauber initial conditions to calculate the thermal emission of photons. The photon rates in the hadronic phase follow from a spectral function approach and a density expansion, while in the partonic phase they follow from the Arnold-Moore-Yaffe (AMY) perturbative rates. The calculated photon elliptic flows are lower than those reported recently by both the ALICE and PHENIX collaborations.

  7. Organic printed photonics: From microring lasers to integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuang; Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhao, Yan; Dong, Chun-Hua; Wei, Cong; Wang, Hanlin; Liu, Yunqi; Guo, Guang-Can; Yao, Jiannian; Zhao, Yong Sheng

    2015-09-01

    A photonic integrated circuit (PIC) is the optical analogy of an electronic loop in which photons are signal carriers with high transport speed and parallel processing capability. Besides the most frequently demonstrated silicon-based circuits, PICs require a variety of materials for light generation, processing, modulation, and detection. With their diversity and flexibility, organic molecular materials provide an alternative platform for photonics; however, the versatile fabrication of organic integrated circuits with the desired photonic performance remains a big challenge. The rapid development of flexible electronics has shown that a solution printing technique has considerable potential for the large-scale fabrication and integration of microsized/nanosized devices. We propose the idea of soft photonics and demonstrate the function-directed fabrication of high-quality organic photonic devices and circuits. We prepared size-tunable and reproducible polymer microring resonators on a wafer-scale transparent and flexible chip using a solution printing technique. The printed optical resonator showed a quality (Q) factor higher than 4 × 10(5), which is comparable to that of silicon-based resonators. The high material compatibility of this printed photonic chip enabled us to realize low-threshold microlasers by doping organic functional molecules into a typical photonic device. On an identical chip, this construction strategy allowed us to design a complex assembly of one-dimensional waveguide and resonator components for light signal filtering and optical storage toward the large-scale on-chip integration of microscopic photonic units. Thus, we have developed a scheme for soft photonic integration that may motivate further studies on organic photonic materials and devices.

  8. Organic printed photonics: From microring lasers to integrated circuits

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chuang; Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhao, Yan; Dong, Chun-Hua; Wei, Cong; Wang, Hanlin; Liu, Yunqi; Guo, Guang-Can; Yao, Jiannian; Zhao, Yong Sheng

    2015-01-01

    A photonic integrated circuit (PIC) is the optical analogy of an electronic loop in which photons are signal carriers with high transport speed and parallel processing capability. Besides the most frequently demonstrated silicon-based circuits, PICs require a variety of materials for light generation, processing, modulation, and detection. With their diversity and flexibility, organic molecular materials provide an alternative platform for photonics; however, the versatile fabrication of organic integrated circuits with the desired photonic performance remains a big challenge. The rapid development of flexible electronics has shown that a solution printing technique has considerable potential for the large-scale fabrication and integration of microsized/nanosized devices. We propose the idea of soft photonics and demonstrate the function-directed fabrication of high-quality organic photonic devices and circuits. We prepared size-tunable and reproducible polymer microring resonators on a wafer-scale transparent and flexible chip using a solution printing technique. The printed optical resonator showed a quality (Q) factor higher than 4 × 105, which is comparable to that of silicon-based resonators. The high material compatibility of this printed photonic chip enabled us to realize low-threshold microlasers by doping organic functional molecules into a typical photonic device. On an identical chip, this construction strategy allowed us to design a complex assembly of one-dimensional waveguide and resonator components for light signal filtering and optical storage toward the large-scale on-chip integration of microscopic photonic units. Thus, we have developed a scheme for soft photonic integration that may motivate further studies on organic photonic materials and devices. PMID:26601256

  9. Medium modification of jet fragmentation in Au+Au collisions at √[s(NN)]=200 GeV measured in direct photon-hadron correlations.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Ta'ani, H; Alexander, J; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Asano, H; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Baumgart, S; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bing, X; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Castera, P; Chang, B S; Chang, W C; Charvet, J-L; Chen, C-H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choi, S; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Ding, L; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Gainey, K; Gal, C; Garishvili, A; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H-Å; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Javani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E-J; Kim, H J; Kim, K-B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y-J; Kim, Y K; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klatsky, J; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komatsu, Y; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Krizek, F; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Layton, D; Lebedev, A; Lee, B; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitgab, M; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Lewis, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Masumoto, S; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D K; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Miyachi, Y; Miyasaka, S; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagae, T; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nattrass, C; Nederlof, A; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Oka, M; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Reynolds, R; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Rykov, V L; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakashita, K; Sakata, H; Samsonov, V; Sano, M; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Semenov, V; Sen, A; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slunečka, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Soumya, M; Sourikova, I V; Sparks, N A; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sukhanov, A; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Tennant, E; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Todoroki, T; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomášek, L; Tomášek, M; Tomita, Y; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tsuji, T; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vargyas, M; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vossen, A; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Wolin, S; Wood, J P; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Yasin, Z; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zelenski, A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2013-07-19

    The jet fragmentation function is measured with direct photon-hadron correlations in p+p and Au+Au collisions at √[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The p(T) of the photon is an excellent approximation to the initial p(T) of the jet and the ratio z(T)=p(T)(h)/p(T)(γ) is used as a proxy for the jet fragmentation function. A statistical subtraction is used to extract the direct photon-hadron yields in Au+Au collisions while a photon isolation cut is applied in p+p. I(AA), the ratio of hadron yield opposite the photon in Au+Au to that in p+p, indicates modification of the jet fragmentation function. Suppression, most likely due to energy loss in the medium, is seen at high z(T). The associated hadron yield at low z(T) is enhanced at large angles. Such a trend is expected from redistribution of the lost energy into increased production of low-momentum particles.

  10. Study of direct single photons and correlated particles in proton-proton collisions at. sqrt. s = 62. 4 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Angelis, A. L.S.; Besch, H. J.; Blumenfeld, B. J.

    1980-01-01

    As part of a study of large p/sub T/ phenomena in proton-proton collisions at the CERN ISR, a search for direct single photon production has been performed. A statistical division of the data sample into the fraction consistent with single photon production and the fraction due to multiphoton decays of neutral hadrons is accomplished by measuring the average conversion probability for the sample in a one radiation length thick converter. The fraction of the sample attributable to direct single photon production is < ..gamma../all > = 0.074 +- 0.012 for 6 GeV/c < p/sub T/ < 10 GeV/C, and < ..gamma../all > = 0.26 +- 0.04 for p/sub T/ > 10 GeV/c, with an additional systematic uncertainty of +- 0.05 for both values. It is found that single photons are produced preferentially with no accompanying particles on the same side. The ratio of positive to negative particles on the away side is found to be 3.7 +- 1.2 at high x/sub E/ and p/sub T/ for the single photon events.

  11. Medium Modification of Jet Fragmentation in Au+Au Collisions at sNN=200GeV Measured in Direct Photon-Hadron Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bing, X.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deaton, M. B.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K.-B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klatsky, J.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Masumoto, S.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Newby, J.

    2013-07-01

    The jet fragmentation function is measured with direct photon-hadron correlations in p+p and Au+Au collisions at sNN=200GeV. The pT of the photon is an excellent approximation to the initial pT of the jet and the ratio zT=pTh/pTγ is used as a proxy for the jet fragmentation function. A statistical subtraction is used to extract the direct photon-hadron yields in Au+Au collisions while a photon isolation cut is applied in p+p. IAA, the ratio of hadron yield opposite the photon in Au+Au to that in p+p, indicates modification of the jet fragmentation function. Suppression, most likely due to energy loss in the medium, is seen at high zT. The associated hadron yield at low zT is enhanced at large angles. Such a trend is expected from redistribution of the lost energy into increased production of low-momentum particles.

  12. Information Leakage Problem in Efficient Bidirectional Quantum Secure Direct Communication with Single Photons in Both Polarization and Spatial-Mode Degrees of Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Han-Wu; Liu, Wen-Jie

    2016-11-01

    The information leakage problem in the efficient bidirectional quantum secure direct communication protocol with single photons in both polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom is pointed out. Next, a way to revise this protocol to a truly secure one is given. We hope people pay more attention to the information leakage problem in order to design truly secure quantum communication protocols.

  13. A DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM OPACITY TO H I IONIZING PHOTONS

    SciTech Connect

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Worseck, Gabor

    2009-11-10

    We present a new method to directly measure the opacity from H I Lyman limit (LL) absorption kappa{sub LL} along quasar sight lines by the intergalactic medium (IGM). The approach analyzes the average ('stacked') spectrum of an ensemble of quasars at a common redshift to infer the mean free path lambda{sup 912}{sub mfp} to ionizing radiation. We apply this technique to 1800 quasars at z = 3.50-4.34 drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), giving the most precise measurements on kappa{sub LL} at any redshift. From z = 3.6 to 4.3, the opacity increases steadily as expected and is well parameterized by lambda{sup 912}{sub mfp} = lambda{sub 0} - b {sub l}ambda(z - 3.6) with lambda{sub 0} = (48.4 +- 2.1) h{sup -1}{sub 72} Mpc and b{sub l}ambda = (38.0 +- 5.3) h {sup -1}{sub 72} Mpc (proper distance). The relatively high lambda{sup 912} {sub mfp} values indicate that the incidence of systems which dominate kappa{sub LL} evolves less strongly at z > 3 than that of the Lyalpha forest. We infer a mean free path three times higher than some previous estimates, a result which has important implications for the photoionization rate derived from the emissivity of star-forming galaxies and quasars. Finally, our analysis reveals a previously unreported, systematic bias in the SDSS quasar sample related to the survey's color targeting criteria. This bias potentially affects all z approx 3 IGM studies using the SDSS database.

  14. Single shot x-ray phase contrast imaging using a direct conversion microstrip detector with single photon sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kagias, M.; Cartier, S.; Wang, Z.; Stampanoni, M.; Bergamaschi, A.; Dinapoli, R.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.

    2016-06-06

    X-ray phase contrast imaging enables the measurement of the electron density of a sample with high sensitivity compared to the conventional absorption contrast. This is advantageous for the study of dose-sensitive samples, in particular, for biological and medical investigations. Recent developments relaxed the requirement for the beam coherence, such that conventional X-ray sources can be used for phase contrast imaging and thus clinical applications become possible. One of the prominent phase contrast imaging methods, Talbot-Lau grating interferometry, is limited by the manufacturing, alignment, and photon absorption of the analyzer grating, which is placed in the beam path in front of the detector. We propose an alternative improved method based on direct conversion charge integrating detectors, which enables a grating interferometer to be operated without an analyzer grating. Algorithms are introduced, which resolve interference fringes with a periodicity of 4.7 μm recorded with a 25 μm pitch Si microstrip detector (GOTTHARD). The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated by an experiment at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source on a polyethylene sample.

  15. Direct measurements of multi-photon induced nonlinear lattice dynamics in semiconductors via time-resolved x-ray scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Williams, G. Jackson; Lee, Sooheyong; Walko, Donald A.; ...

    2016-12-22

    Nonlinear optical phenomena in semiconductors present several fundamental problems in modern optics that are of great importance for the development of optoelectronic devices. In particular, the details of photo-induced lattice dynamics at early time-scales prior to carrier recombination remain poorly understood. We demonstrate the first integrated measurements of both optical and structural, material-dependent quantities while also inferring the bulk impulsive strain profile by using high spatial-resolution time-resolved x-ray scattering (TRXS) on bulk crystalline gallium arsenide. Our findings reveal distinctive laser-fluence dependent crystal lattice responses, which are not described by previous TRXS experiments or models. The initial linear expansion of themore » crystal upon laser excitation stagnates at a laser fluence corresponding to the saturation of the free carrier density before resuming expansion in a third regime at higher fluences where two-photon absorption becomes dominant. Our interpretations of the lattice dynamics as nonlinear optical effects are confirmed by numerical simulations and by additional measurements in an n-type semiconductor that allows higher-order nonlinear optical processes to be directly observed as modulations of x-ray diffraction lineshapes.« less

  16. 3D integration of microfluidics and microoptics inside photosensitive glass by femtosecond laser direct writing for photonic biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Koji; Wang, Zhongke; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2008-02-01

    Optical waveguides with a propagation loss of around 0.5 dB/cm are written inside photosensitive Foturan glass by internal modification of refractive index using femtosecond (fs) laser. Integration of the optical wafveguides with a micromirror enables us to bend the guided laser beam at an angle of 90° with a bending loss of less than 0.3 dB. In the meanwhile, a plano-convex microlens is completely embedded inside the Foturan glass chip via formation of a three-dimensional (3D) hollow microstructure using fs laser direct writing followed by heat treatment and successive wet etching. This technique can also be used to fabricate microfluidic devices and therefore realizes 3D integration of microoptical and microfluidic components by one continuous procedure. Subsequently, microoptical waveguides are further integrated into the single glass chip. Demonstration of optical measurements using the integrated microchip reveals that photonic biosensing can be performed with an efficiency increased by a factor of 8 for fluorescence detection and by a factor of 3 for absorption detection.

  17. Single shot x-ray phase contrast imaging using a direct conversion microstrip detector with single photon sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagias, M.; Cartier, S.; Wang, Z.; Bergamaschi, A.; Dinapoli, R.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Stampanoni, M.

    2016-06-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging enables the measurement of the electron density of a sample with high sensitivity compared to the conventional absorption contrast. This is advantageous for the study of dose-sensitive samples, in particular, for biological and medical investigations. Recent developments relaxed the requirement for the beam coherence, such that conventional X-ray sources can be used for phase contrast imaging and thus clinical applications become possible. One of the prominent phase contrast imaging methods, Talbot-Lau grating interferometry, is limited by the manufacturing, alignment, and photon absorption of the analyzer grating, which is placed in the beam path in front of the detector. We propose an alternative improved method based on direct conversion charge integrating detectors, which enables a grating interferometer to be operated without an analyzer grating. Algorithms are introduced, which resolve interference fringes with a periodicity of 4.7 μm recorded with a 25 μm pitch Si microstrip detector (GOTTHARD). The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated by an experiment at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source on a polyethylene sample.

  18. Direct measurements of multi-photon induced nonlinear lattice dynamics in semiconductors via time-resolved x-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Williams, G. Jackson; Lee, Sooheyong; Walko, Donald A.; Watson, Michael A.; Jo, Wonhuyk; Lee, Dong Ryeol; Landahl, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear optical phenomena in semiconductors present several fundamental problems in modern optics that are of great importance for the development of optoelectronic devices. In particular, the details of photo-induced lattice dynamics at early time-scales prior to carrier recombination remain poorly understood. We demonstrate the first integrated measurements of both optical and structural, material-dependent quantities while also inferring the bulk impulsive strain profile by using high spatial-resolution time-resolved x-ray scattering (TRXS) on bulk crystalline gallium arsenide. Our findings reveal distinctive laser-fluence dependent crystal lattice responses, which are not described by previous TRXS experiments or models. The initial linear expansion of the crystal upon laser excitation stagnates at a laser fluence corresponding to the saturation of the free carrier density before resuming expansion in a third regime at higher fluences where two-photon absorption becomes dominant. Our interpretations of the lattice dynamics as nonlinear optical effects are confirmed by numerical simulations and by additional measurements in an n-type semiconductor that allows higher-order nonlinear optical processes to be directly observed as modulations of x-ray diffraction lineshapes. PMID:28004757

  19. Direct measurements of multi-photon induced nonlinear lattice dynamics in semiconductors via time-resolved x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, G. Jackson; Lee, Sooheyong; Walko, Donald A.; Watson, Michael A.; Jo, Wonhuyk; Lee, Dong Ryeol; Landahl, Eric C.

    2016-12-01

    Nonlinear optical phenomena in semiconductors present several fundamental problems in modern optics that are of great importance for the development of optoelectronic devices. In particular, the details of photo-induced lattice dynamics at early time-scales prior to carrier recombination remain poorly understood. We demonstrate the first integrated measurements of both optical and structural, material-dependent quantities while also inferring the bulk impulsive strain profile by using high spatial-resolution time-resolved x-ray scattering (TRXS) on bulk crystalline gallium arsenide. Our findings reveal distinctive laser-fluence dependent crystal lattice responses, which are not described by previous TRXS experiments or models. The initial linear expansion of the crystal upon laser excitation stagnates at a laser fluence corresponding to the saturation of the free carrier density before resuming expansion in a third regime at higher fluences where two-photon absorption becomes dominant. Our interpretations of the lattice dynamics as nonlinear optical effects are confirmed by numerical simulations and by additional measurements in an n-type semiconductor that allows higher-order nonlinear optical processes to be directly observed as modulations of x-ray diffraction lineshapes.

  20. A VUV detection system for the direct photonic identification of the first excited isomeric state of 229Th

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiferle, Benedict; von der Wense, Lars; Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Thirolf, Peter G.

    2016-03-01

    With an expected energy of 7.6(5) eV, 229Th possesses the lowest excited nuclear state in the landscape of all presently known nuclei. The energy corresponds to a wavelength of about 160 nm and would conceptually allow for an optical laser excitation of a nuclear transition. We report on a VUV optical detection system that was designed for the direct detection of the isomeric ground-state transition of 229Th. 229(m)Th ions originating from a 233U α-recoil source are collected on a micro electrode that is placed in the focus of an annular parabolic mirror. The latter is used to parallelize the UV fluorescence that may emerge from the isomeric ground-state transition of 229Th. The parallelized light is then focused by a second annular parabolic mirror onto a CsI-coated position-sensitive MCP detector behind the mirror exit. To achieve a high signal-to-background ratio, a small spot size on the MCP detector needs to be achieved. Besides extensive ray-tracing simulations of the optical setup, we present a procedure for its alignment, as well as test measurements using a D2 lamp, where a focal-spot size of ≈100 μm has been achieved. Assuming a purely photonic decay, a signal-to-background ratio of ≈7000:1 could be achieved.

  1. Direct measurements of multi-photon induced nonlinear lattice dynamics in semiconductors via time-resolved x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Williams, G Jackson; Lee, Sooheyong; Walko, Donald A; Watson, Michael A; Jo, Wonhuyk; Lee, Dong Ryeol; Landahl, Eric C

    2016-12-22

    Nonlinear optical phenomena in semiconductors present several fundamental problems in modern optics that are of great importance for the development of optoelectronic devices. In particular, the details of photo-induced lattice dynamics at early time-scales prior to carrier recombination remain poorly understood. We demonstrate the first integrated measurements of both optical and structural, material-dependent quantities while also inferring the bulk impulsive strain profile by using high spatial-resolution time-resolved x-ray scattering (TRXS) on bulk crystalline gallium arsenide. Our findings reveal distinctive laser-fluence dependent crystal lattice responses, which are not described by previous TRXS experiments or models. The initial linear expansion of the crystal upon laser excitation stagnates at a laser fluence corresponding to the saturation of the free carrier density before resuming expansion in a third regime at higher fluences where two-photon absorption becomes dominant. Our interpretations of the lattice dynamics as nonlinear optical effects are confirmed by numerical simulations and by additional measurements in an n-type semiconductor that allows higher-order nonlinear optical processes to be directly observed as modulations of x-ray diffraction lineshapes.

  2. Direct measurements of multi-photon induced nonlinear lattice dynamics in semiconductors via time-resolved x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G. Jackson; Lee, Sooheyong; Walko, Donald A.; Watson, Michael A.; Jo, Wonhuyk; Lee, Dong Ryeol; Landahl, Eric C.

    2016-12-22

    Nonlinear optical phenomena in semiconductors present several fundamental problems in modern optics that are of great importance for the development of optoelectronic devices. In particular, the details of photo-induced lattice dynamics at early time-scales prior to carrier recombination remain poorly understood. We demonstrate the first integrated measurements of both optical and structural, material-dependent quantities while also inferring the bulk impulsive strain profile by using high spatial-resolution time-resolved x-ray scattering (TRXS) on bulk crystalline gallium arsenide. Our findings reveal distinctive laser-fluence dependent crystal lattice responses, which are not described by previous TRXS experiments or models. The initial linear expansion of the crystal upon laser excitation stagnates at a laser fluence corresponding to the saturation of the free carrier density before resuming expansion in a third regime at higher fluences where two-photon absorption becomes dominant. Our interpretations of the lattice dynamics as nonlinear optical effects are confirmed by numerical simulations and by additional measurements in an n-type semiconductor that allows higher-order nonlinear optical processes to be directly observed as modulations of x-ray diffraction lineshapes.

  3. High-quality photonic crystals with a nearly complete band gap obtained by direct inversion of woodpile templates with titanium dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Marichy, Catherine; Muller, Nicolas; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Scheffold, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystal materials are based on a periodic modulation of the dielectric constant on length scales comparable to the wavelength of light. These materials can exhibit photonic band gaps; frequency regions for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden due to the depletion of the density of states. In order to exhibit a full band gap, 3D PCs must present a threshold refractive index contrast that depends on the crystal structure. In the case of the so-called woodpile photonic crystals this threshold is comparably low, approximately 1.9 for the direct structure. Therefore direct or inverted woodpiles made of high refractive index materials like silicon, germanium or titanium dioxide are sought after. Here we show that, by combining multiphoton lithography and atomic layer deposition, we can achieve a direct inversion of polymer templates into TiO2 based photonic crystals. The obtained structures show remarkable optical properties in the near-infrared region with almost perfect specular reflectance, a transmission dip close to the detection limit and a Bragg length comparable to the lattice constant. PMID:26911540

  4. High-quality photonic crystals with a nearly complete band gap obtained by direct inversion of woodpile templates with titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Marichy, Catherine; Muller, Nicolas; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S; Scheffold, Frank

    2016-02-25

    Photonic crystal materials are based on a periodic modulation of the dielectric constant on length scales comparable to the wavelength of light. These materials can exhibit photonic band gaps; frequency regions for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden due to the depletion of the density of states. In order to exhibit a full band gap, 3D PCs must present a threshold refractive index contrast that depends on the crystal structure. In the case of the so-called woodpile photonic crystals this threshold is comparably low, approximately 1.9 for the direct structure. Therefore direct or inverted woodpiles made of high refractive index materials like silicon, germanium or titanium dioxide are sought after. Here we show that, by combining multiphoton lithography and atomic layer deposition, we can achieve a direct inversion of polymer templates into TiO2 based photonic crystals. The obtained structures show remarkable optical properties in the near-infrared region with almost perfect specular reflectance, a transmission dip close to the detection limit and a Bragg length comparable to the lattice constant.

  5. Continuous-wave operation and 10-Gb/s direct modulation of InAsP/InP sub-wavelength nanowire laser on silicon photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Masato; Yokoo, Atsushi; Nozaki, Kengo; Birowosuto, Muhammad Danang; Tateno, Kouta; Zhang, Guoqiang; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Shinya, Akihiko; Notomi, Masaya

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrated sub-wavelength (˜111 nm diameter) single nanowire (NW) continuous wave (CW) lasers on silicon photonic crystal in the telecom-band with direct modulation at 10 Gb/s by optical pumping at cryogenic temperatures. To estimate the small signal response and pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS) modulation of our CW lasers, we employed a new signal detection technique that employs a superconducting single photon detector and a time-correlated single photon counting module. The results showed that our NW laser was unambiguously modulated at above 10 Gb/s and an open eye pattern was obtained. This is the first demonstration of a telecom-band CW NW laser with high-speed PRBS modulation.

  6. Quasi-simultaneous acquisition of hard electron ionization and soft single-photon ionization mass spectra during GC/MS analysis by rapid switching between both ionization methods: analytical concept, setup, and application on diesel fuel.

    PubMed

    Eschner, Markus S; Gröger, Thomas M; Horvath, Thomas; Gonin, Marc; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2011-05-15

    This work describes the realization of rapid switching between hard electron ionization (EI) and soft single-photon ionization (SPI) integrated in a compact orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photons of 9.8 eV (126 nm) emitted from the innovative electron-beam-pumped rare-gas excimer light source (EBEL) filled with argon are focused into the ion chamber by an ellipsoidal mirror optic for accomplishing of SPI. This novel orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer with switching capability was hyphenated to one-dimensional gas chromatography (GC) and comprehensive two-dimensional (2D) gas chromatography (GC × GC) for the first time. Within this demonstration study, a maximum switching frequency of 80 Hz was applied for investigation of a mineral-oil-type diesel sample. This approach allows the quasi-simultaneous acquisition of complementary information about the fragmentation pattern (EI) as well as the molecular mass (SPI) of compounds within a single analysis. Furthermore, by application of a polar GC column for separation, the SPI data can be displayed in a 2D contour plot, leading to a comprehensive 2D characterization (GC × MS), whereas the typical group-type assignment for diesel is also met.

  7. ALFT's Soft X-Ray Source Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panarella, Emilio

    2002-11-01

    ALFT (www.alft.com) was funded by the Federal and Provincial governments of Canada in 1987 to pursue the objective of making soft X-ray sources for microlithography.For 15 years ALFT has successfully pursued this objective. Recently, the company has found that its sources can complement the synchrotron as provider of soft X-rays for applications that range from biotechnology to nanotechnology.A beam from the Canadian Synchrotron (CLS) will deliver 10^13 photons/sec in a collimated output, whereas the weakest of ALFT's sources delivers an average of 10^15 photons/sec, two orders of magnitude higher than the synchrotron, albeit in the 4 pi direction. The most powerful of ALFT's sources delivers pulses carrying an average of 10^16 photons/sec, with peak flux of 10^24 photons/sec, again in the 4 pi.The proprietary technology of ALFT rests not only on the electron bombardment concept of X-ray production but also, by using a special plasma (the Vacuum Spark), on the pinch phenomenon, thus obtaining better efficiency than conventional sources. By discharging a simple condenser in a very low inductance circuit, a metallic plasma is generated in a vacuum vessel between two electrodes, where plasma pinch and micropinch phenomena raise the plasma temperature and density to values that lead to large soft X-ray production.The talk will present an overview of the VSX soft X-ray source development, examining first the physics of the vacuum spark, then the extendibility to higher power outputs, and then to the engineering issues that have been solved leading to the first product, the VSX 400, a machine that delivers 400 mW of soft X-rays, and to the VSX Z10, a prototype machine that delivers 10 W of X-rays.The recent visits to the CLS and follow-up discussions that are leading towards the placement of one VSX 400 machine in Saskatoon will also reported.

  8. Photon diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, John

    2009-11-01

    In current light models, a particle-like model of light is inconsistent with diffraction observations. A model of light is proposed wherein photon inferences are combined with the cosmological scalar potential model (SPM). That the photon is a surface with zero surface area in the travel direction is inferred from the Michelson-Morley experiment. That the photons in slits are mathematically treated as a linear antenna array (LAA) is inferred from the comparison of the transmission grating interference pattern and the single slit diffraction pattern. That photons induce a LAA wave into the plenum is inferred from the fractal model. Similarly, the component of the photon (the hod) is treated as a single antenna radiating a potential wave into the plenum. That photons are guided by action on the surface of the hod is inferred from the SPM. The plenum potential waves are a real field (not complex) that forms valleys, consistent with the pilot waves of the Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics. Therefore, the Afshar experiment result is explained, supports Bohm, and falsifies Copenhagen. The papers may be viewed at http://web.citcom.net/˜scjh/.

  9. Appearance potential spectroscopy with a photon counting detector and multiple scattering spectral interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Amidani, L.; Pasquini, L.; Boscherini, F.

    2012-08-15

    We describe a soft x-ray appearance potential spectroscopy apparatus, which uses a windowless hyperpure Ge detector operated in the photon counting mode. Direct comparisons of recorded spectra with the self-convolution of x-ray absorption spectra and with ab initio simulations in the multiple scattering framework are reported and discussed.

  10. The effects of shoes with a rounded soft sole in the anterior-posterior direction on leg joint angle and muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Demura, Tomohiro; Demura, Shin-ichi

    2012-09-01

    This study examines the effect of these shoes on the leg joint angle and muscle activity during walking. Ten healthy young male adults (mean age: 24.1±4.3 years) walked on a walkway while wearing one of three kinds of shoes with a rounded soft sole in the anterior-posterior direction (Stretch Walker: SW, mass: 440 g), MBT (Masai Barefoot Technology; similar to the SW in form and material, mass: 600 g), and flat-bottomed shoes (FS, mass: 420 g)). After familiarizing themselves with the shoes, subjects walked twenty laps on the walkway, which was about 40 m long (mean speed: 4.1 km/h). After a sufficient rest, they repeated this with the other shoes. During walking, the volume of muscle discharge was measured once every 2 laps. The mean value of the 10 measurements was used as the evaluation variable for integral values and joint angle, while the right foot touched the ground twice. In conclusion, the range of leg movement during walking was smaller when wearing shoes with a rounded soft sole in the anterior-posterior direction (SW and MBT) than when wearing normal shoes (FS). However, the effects of the SW and MBT on leg muscle activity during walking differ little from wearing the normal shoes during a leisurely 10-min walk. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Carbon contamination of soft X-ray beamlines: dramatic anti-reflection coating effects observed in the 1 keV photon energy region.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, C; Polack, F; Silly, M G; Lagarde, B; Thomasset, M; Kubsky, S; Duval, J P; Risterucci, P; Pilette, B; Yao, I; Bergeard, N; Sirotti, F

    2011-09-01

    Carbon contamination is a general problem of under-vacuum optics submitted to high fluence. In soft X-ray beamlines carbon deposit on optics is known to absorb and scatter radiation close to the C K-edge (280 eV), forbidding effective measurements in this spectral region. Here the observation of strong reflectivity losses is reported related to carbon deposition at much higher energies around 1000 eV, where carbon absorptivity is small. It is shown that the observed effect can be modelled as a destructive interference from a homogeneous carbon thin film.

  12. Direct detection of transcription factors in cotyledons during seedling development using sensitive silicon-substrate photonic crystal protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sarah I; Tan, Yafang; Shamimuzzaman, Md; George, Sherine; Cunningham, Brian T; Vodkin, Lila

    2015-03-01

    Transcription factors control important gene networks, altering the expression of a wide variety of genes, including those of agronomic importance, despite often being expressed at low levels. Detecting transcription factor proteins is difficult, because current high-throughput methods may not be sensitive enough. One-dimensional, silicon-substrate photonic crystal (PC) arrays provide an alternative substrate for printing multiplexed protein microarrays that have greater sensitivity through an increased signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescent signal compared with performing the same assay upon a traditional aminosilanized glass surface. As a model system to test proof of concept of the silicon-substrate PC arrays to directly detect rare proteins in crude plant extracts, we selected representatives of four different transcription factor families (zinc finger GATA, basic helix-loop-helix, BTF3/NAC [for basic transcription factor of the NAC family], and YABBY) that have increasing transcript levels during the stages of seedling cotyledon development. Antibodies to synthetic peptides representing the transcription factors were printed on both glass slides and silicon-substrate PC slides along with antibodies to abundant cotyledon proteins, seed lectin, and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. The silicon-substrate PC arrays proved more sensitive than those performed on glass slides, detecting rare proteins that were below background on the glass slides. The zinc finger transcription factor was detected on the PC arrays in crude extracts of all stages of the seedling cotyledons, whereas YABBY seemed to be at the lower limit of their sensitivity. Interestingly, the basic helix-loop-helix and NAC proteins showed developmental profiles consistent with their transcript patterns, indicating proof of concept for detecting these low-abundance proteins in crude extracts.

  13. Direct Observation of Two-Step Photon Absorption in an InAs/GaAs Single Quantum Dot for the Operation of Intermediate-Band Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Tomohiro; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Katsuyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-08

    We present the first direct observation of two-step photon absorption in an InAs/GaAs single quantum dot (QD) using photocurrent spectroscopy with two lasers. The sharp peaks of the photocurrent are shifted due to the quantum confined Stark effect, indicating that the photocurrent from a single QD is obtained. In addition, the intensity of the peaks depends on the power of the secondary laser. These results reveal the direct demonstration of the two-step photon absorption in a single QD. This is an essential result for both the fundamental operation and the realization of ultrahigh solar-electricity energy conversion in quantum dot intermediate-band solar cells.

  14. Optical measurement with direct traceability to the primary standards of length and time - Toward a system of metrology based entirely on the properties of the photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Roy

    1993-03-01

    It is proposed that the primary standards of length and time have now reached a sufficient level of maturity that they may be removed from the standards laboratories and used directly for measurement calibration with minimal recourse to the use of intermediate secondary standards. In particular, if a measurement can be configured to give a time-related output such as decay time, time of flight (TOF), frequency, or phase shift, then direct traceability to the primary atomic clock standard can be realized through use of the LORAN C or global position satellite systems. Twelve illustrative examples are considered covering a wide range of optical and spectroscopic measurements. This approach is then extended to mass, the remaining primary standard that is not currently photon-based. An optical definition of mass is realizable in terms of length and time through the angular momentum properties of the photon measured using the torsion balance.

  15. Neutron-skin effect in direct-photon and charged-hadron production in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helenius, Ilkka; Paukkunen, Hannu; Eskola, Kari J.

    2017-03-01

    A well-established observation in nuclear physics is that in neutron-rich spherical nuclei the distribution of neutrons extends farther than the distribution of protons. In this work, we scrutinize the influence of this so called neutron-skin effect on the centrality dependence of high-p_T direct-photon and charged-hadron production. We find that due to the estimated spatial dependence of the nuclear parton distribution functions, it will be demanding to unambiguously expose the neutron-skin effect with direct photons. However, when taking a ratio between the cross sections for negatively and positively charged high-p_T hadrons, even centrality-dependent nuclear-PDF effects cancel, making this observable a better handle on the neutron skin. Up to 10% effects can be expected for the most peripheral collisions in the measurable region.

  16. Collision-induced photon echo at the transition 0{r_reversible}1 in ytterbium vapor: Direct proof of depolarizing collision anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Rubtsova, N. N.; Gol'dort, V. G.; Ishchenko, V. N.; Khvorostov, E. B.; Kochubei, S. A.; Reshetov, V. A.; Yevseyev, I. V.

    2011-09-15

    A collision-induced photon echo arising at the transition 0{r_reversible}1 of ytterbium in the presence of heavy atomic buffer is investigated. Collision-induced echo signal appears in the case of mutually orthogonal linear polarizations of exciting pulses and it is absent without buffer. Collision-induced echo power grows with buffer pressure up to the maximum value and decays exponentially at further buffer pressure growth. Collision-induced echo power is essentially less than that of the ordinary echo generated by pulses with parallel polarizations in the same mixture, and its polarization is linear with the polarization vector directed along that of the first exciting pulse. All the properties of collision-induced photon echo are explained on the basis of collision relaxation dependence on the direction of active atom velocity.

  17. Tensional acoustomechanical soft metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Fengxian; Lu, Tianjian

    2016-06-01

    We create acoustomechanical soft metamaterials whose response to uniaxial tensile stressing can be easily tailored by programming acoustic wave inputs, resulting in force versus stretch curves that exhibit distinct monotonic, s-shape, plateau and non-monotonic snapping behaviors. We theoretically demonstrate this unique metamaterial by considering a thin soft material sheet impinged by two counter-propagating ultrasonic wave inputs across its thickness and stretched by an in-plane uniaxial tensile force. We establish a theoretical acoustomechanical model to describe the programmable mechanics of such soft metamaterial, and introduce the first- and second-order tangential stiffness of its force versus stretch curve to boundary different behaviors that appear during deformation. The proposed phase diagrams for the underlying nonlinear mechanics show promising prospects for designing tunable and switchable photonic/phononic crystals and microfluidic devices that harness snap-through instability.

  18. Tensional acoustomechanical soft metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Fengxian; Lu, Tianjian

    2016-01-01

    We create acoustomechanical soft metamaterials whose response to uniaxial tensile stressing can be easily tailored by programming acoustic wave inputs, resulting in force versus stretch curves that exhibit distinct monotonic, s-shape, plateau and non-monotonic snapping behaviors. We theoretically demonstrate this unique metamaterial by considering a thin soft material sheet impinged by two counter-propagating ultrasonic wave inputs across its thickness and stretched by an in-plane uniaxial tensile force. We establish a theoretical acoustomechanical model to describe the programmable mechanics of such soft metamaterial, and introduce the first- and second-order tangential stiffness of its force versus stretch curve to boundary different behaviors that appear during deformation. The proposed phase diagrams for the underlying nonlinear mechanics show promising prospects for designing tunable and switchable photonic/phononic crystals and microfluidic devices that harness snap-through instability. PMID:27264106

  19. Tensional acoustomechanical soft metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Xin, Fengxian; Lu, Tianjian

    2016-06-06

    We create acoustomechanical soft metamaterials whose response to uniaxial tensile stressing can be easily tailored by programming acoustic wave inputs, resulting in force versus stretch curves that exhibit distinct monotonic, s-shape, plateau and non-monotonic snapping behaviors. We theoretically demonstrate this unique metamaterial by considering a thin soft material sheet impinged by two counter-propagating ultrasonic wave inputs across its thickness and stretched by an in-plane uniaxial tensile force. We establish a theoretical acoustomechanical model to describe the programmable mechanics of such soft metamaterial, and introduce the first- and second-order tangential stiffness of its force versus stretch curve to boundary different behaviors that appear during deformation. The proposed phase diagrams for the underlying nonlinear mechanics show promising prospects for designing tunable and switchable photonic/phononic crystals and microfluidic devices that harness snap-through instability.

  20. Photonic Bandgaps in Photonic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Gates, Amanda L.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Gregory, Don A.; Witherow, William K.; Paley, Mark S.; Frazier, Donald O.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This talk will focus on photonic bandgaps that arise due to nearly free photon and tight-binding effects in coupled microparticle and ring-resonator systems. The Mie formulation for homogeneous spheres is generalized to handle core/shell systems and multiple concentric layers in a manner that exploits an analogy with stratified planar systems, thereby allowing concentric multi-layered structures to be treated as photonic bandgap (PBG) materials. Representative results from a Mie code employing this analogy demonstrate that photonic bands arising from nearly free photon effects are easily observed in the backscattering, asymmetry parameter, and albedo for periodic quarter-wave concentric layers, though are not readily apparent in extinction spectra. Rather, the periodicity simply alters the scattering profile, enhancing the ratio of backscattering to forward scattering inside the bandgap, in direct analogy with planar quarter-wave multilayers. PBGs arising from tight-binding may also be observed when the layers (or rings) are designed such that the coupling between them is weak. We demonstrate that for a structure consisting of N coupled micro-resonators, the morphology dependent resonances split into N higher-Q modes, in direct analogy with other types of oscillators, and that this splitting ultimately results in PBGs which can lead to enhanced nonlinear optical effects.

  1. Vesicle Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, Sylvie; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-04-03

    Thin membranes, under appropriate boundary conditions, can self-assemble into vesicles, nanoscale bubbles that encapsulate and hence protect or transport molecular payloads. In this paper, we review the types and applications of light fields interacting with vesicles. By encapsulating light-emitting molecules (e.g. dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as particles and imaging agents. Vesicle imaging can take place also under second harmonic generation from vesicle membrane, as well as employing mass spectrometry. Light fields can also be employed to transport vesicles using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or directly pertrurbe the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy).

  2. Separation of contributions of isovector E2 and E1 giant resonances in direct and inverse reactions with real and virtual photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhilavyan, L. Z.; Lapik, A. M.; Nedorezov, V. G.; Tulupov, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    A brief overview of the methods for separating the contributions of isovector electric quadrupole ( E2) and dominant dipole ( E1) giant resonances in atomic nuclei, which are excited in direct and inverse reactions with photons (real and virtual), is given. The basic parameters of isovector giant resonance E2, which were declared to date by applying some of these methods to the results with 208Pb, are also presented.

  3. Nuclear effects in high- pT production of direct photons and neutral mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Apanasevich, L.; Bacigalupi, J.; Baker, W.; Begel, M.; Blusk, S.; Bromberg, C.; Chang, P.; Choudhary, B.; Chung, W. H.; de Barbaro, L.; DeSoi, W.; Długosz, W.; Dunlea, J.; Engels, E.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferbel, T.; Ftacnik, J.; Garelick, D.; Ginther, G.; Glaubman, M.; Gutierrez, P.; Hartman, K.; Huston, J.; Johnstone, C.; Kapoor, V.; Kuehler, J.; Lirakis, C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Lukens, P.; Mansour, J.; Maul, A.; Miller, R.; Oh, B. Y.; Osborne, G.; Pellett, D.; Prebys, E.; Roser, R.; Shepard, P.; Shivpuri, R.; Skow, D.; Slattery, P.; Sorrell, L.; Striley, D.; Toothacker, W.; Tripathi, S. M.; Varelas, N.; Weerasundara, D.; Whitmore, J. J.; Yasuda, T.; Yosef, C.; Zieliński, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2005-08-01

    The authors present results on the production of direct photons, {pi}{sup 0}, {eta} mesons on nuclear targets at large transverse momenta (p{sub T}). The data are from 530 and 800 GeV/c proton beams and 515 GeV/c {pi}{sup -} beams incident upon copper and beryllium targets that span the kinematic range of 1.0 < p{sub T} {approx}< 10 GeV/c at central rapidities.

  4. Direct Synthesis of Controlled-Size Nanospheres inside Nanocavities of Self-Organized Photopolymerizing Soft Oxometalates [PW12 O40 ]n (n=1100-7500).

    PubMed

    Das, Kousik; Roy, Soumyajit

    2015-09-01

    The unusual self-assembly of {(BMIm)2 (DMIm)[PW12 O40 ]}n (n=1100-7500) (BMIm=1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium, DMIm=3,3'-dimethyl-1,1'-diimidazolium) soft oxometalates (SOMs) with controlled size and a hollow nanocavity was exploited for the photochemical synthesis of polymeric nanospheres within the nanocavity of the SOM. The SOM vesicle has been characterized by using several techniques, including dynamic light scattering (DLS), static light scattering (SLS), attenuated total reflection (ATR) IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, microscopy, and zeta-potential analysis. The self-assembly and stabilization of this soft-oxometalate vesicle has been shown by means of counter-ion condensation. The immediate implication of such stabilization-the variation of the dielectric constant with the hydrodynamic radius of the vesicle-has been used to synthesize vesicles of controlled size. Such vesicles of varying size have been used as templates for polymerization reactions that produce polymeric spheres of controlled size. Direct evidence shows that the SOM behaves as a model heterogeneous catalytic system. Such surfactant- and initiator-free photochemical synthetic routes for obtaining uniform latex spheres could be used in the making of optical bandgap materials, inverse opals, and paints. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Single photon ionization of van der Waals clusters with a soft x-ray laser: (CO2)n and (CO2)n(H2O)m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinbuch, S.; Dong, F.; Rocca, J. J.; Bernstein, E. R.

    2006-10-01

    Pure neutral (CO2)n clusters and mixed (CO2)n(H2O)m clusters are investigated employing time of flight mass spectroscopy and single photon ionization at 26.5eV. The distribution of pure (CO2)n clusters decreases roughly exponentially with increasing cluster size. During the ionization process, neutral clusters suffer little fragmentation because almost all excess cluster energy above the vertical ionization energy is taken away by the photoelectron and only a small part of the photon energy is deposited into the (CO2)n cluster. Metastable dissociation rate constants of (CO2)n+ are measured in the range of (0.2-1.5)×104s-1 for cluster sizes of 5⩽n⩽16. Mixed CO2-H2O clusters are studied under different generation conditions (5% and 20% CO2 partial pressures and high and low expansion pressures). At high CO2 concentration, predominant signals in the mass spectrum are the (CO2)n + cluster ions. The unprotonated cluster ion series (CO2)nH2O+ and (CO2)n(H2O)2+ are also observed under these conditions. At low CO2 concentration, protonated cluster ions (H2O)nH+ are the dominant signals, and the protonated CO2(H2O)nH+ and unprotonated (H2O)n+ and (CO2)(H2O)n+ cluster ion series are also observed. The mechanisms and dynamics of the formation of these neutral and ionic clusters are discussed.

  6. Detection of caffeine in tea, instant coffee, green tea beverage, and soft drink by direct analysis in real time (DART) source coupled to single-quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhao, Pengyue; Zhang, Fengzu; Bai, Aijuan; Pan, Canping

    2013-01-01

    Ambient ionization direct analysis in real time (DART) coupled to single-quadrupole MS (DART-MS) was evaluated for rapid detection of caffeine in commercial samples without chromatographic separation or sample preparation. Four commercial samples were examined: tea, instant coffee, green tea beverage, and soft drink. The response-related parameters were optimized for the DART temperature and MS fragmentor. Under optimal conditions, the molecular ion (M+H)+ was the major ion for identification of caffeine. The results showed that DART-MS is a promising tool for the quick analysis of important marker molecules in commercial samples. Furthermore, this system has demonstrated significant potential for high sample throughput and real-time analysis.

  7. Microwave Photonic Architecture for Direction Finding of LPI Emitters: Front End Analog Circuit Design and Component Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    14  III.  INNOVATIVE SYSTEM DESIGN ....................................................................15  A.  RF...DF System from Previous Design . Source: [11].............11  Figure 3.  Improved Design of Photonics DF System ...obtain DF information in computing the AOA. The type of DF technique employed influences the complexity of system design , cost of construction, and

  8. Direct measurement of the position accuracy for low energy X-ray photons with a pnCCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihle, S.; Holl, P.; Kalok, D.; Hartmann, R.; Ryll, H.; Steigenhöfer, D.; Strüder, L.

    2017-02-01

    We undertook a comparative study on optimizing the position accuracy of pnCCDs for single X-ray photon measurements. Various methods were analyzed by Monte Carlo simulations and related to experimental data obtained with a focused X-ray beam. Even with low energy photons of 1320 eV, a position accuracy much smaller than the actual pixel size of 48 μm × 48 μm can be achieved. This is possible since signal charges from a single photon interaction spread into more than one pixel, allowing a reconstruction of the original point of interaction. We found that a) making a decision on which pixels to use for the reconstruction and b) choosing a centroiding algorithm for carrying out the reconstruction were particularly crucial. For a) we introduce a new and superior method using a two step analysis with an adaptive pattern. It is compared to using a threshold or a fixed pattern. For b) we present a Center-of-Gravity method with a Gaussian correction taking into account the shape of the signal charge cloud. Both methods are also optimized for fast execution by implementing lookup tables rather than time consuming calculations. Our results show that with the appropriate analysis an uncertainty of the position measurement of better than 3.0 μm rms for 1320 eV photons is possible.

  9. Direct Photon Differential Cross-Section in $\\bar{p}$p Collisions at 1.8-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Maghakian, Arthur George

    1996-01-01

    Data taken from the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) during the 1992-1993 run are used to measure the cross section for production of isolated prompt photons in $\\bar{p}$p collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV. Prompt photon production in $\\bar{p}$p collisions is sensitive to the gluon structure function of the proton and therefore can provide a test of QCD. This measurement is a significant improvement over the 1989 measurement due to the addition of the Central Preradiator Chambers, the neural network hardware trigger upgrades, and the six times increase in integrated luminosity. Two different methods, conversion method and profile method, were used to separate prom pt photons from photons produced by decay of hadrons. The profile method was used from 10-16 GeV PT and the conversion method at PT > 16 GeV. The cross section, measured as a function of transverse momentum, is in general agreement with next-to-leading order QCD predictions over five orders of magnitude but has a steeper slope at low PT.

  10. Enhanced production of direct photons in Au + Au collisions at square root(S(NN)) = 200 GeV and implications for the initial temperature.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Al-Jamel, A; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chai, J-S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J-L; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, Y-S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y-S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Lim, H; Liska, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Li, X; Li, X H; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Masek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Mikes, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, H; Okada, K; Oka, M; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakata, H; Samsonov, V; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slunecka, M; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomásek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vertesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Willis, N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yanovich, A; Yasin, Z; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2010-04-02

    The production of e+ e- pairs for m(e+ e-)<0.3 GeV/c2 and 1photon internal conversions, the invariant yield of direct photons is deduced. In central Au+Au collisions, the excess of the direct photon yield over p+p is exponential in transverse momentum, with an inverse slope T=221+/-19(stat)+/-19(syst) MeV. Hydrodynamical models with initial temperatures ranging from T(init) approximately 300-600 MeV at times of approximately 0.6-0.15 fm/c after the collision are in qualitative agreement with the data. Lattice QCD predicts a phase transition to quark gluon plasma at approximately 170 MeV.

  11. New double soft emission theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachazo, Freddy; He, Song; Yuan, Ellis Ye

    2015-09-01

    We study the behavior of the tree-level S-matrix of a variety of theories as two particles become soft. By analogy with the recently found subleading soft theorems for gravitons and gluons, we explore subleading terms in double soft emissions. We first consider double soft scalar emissions and find subleading terms that are controlled by the angular momentum operator acting on hard particles. The order of the subleading theorems depends on the presence or not of color structures. Next we obtain a compact formula for the leading term in a double soft photon emission. The theories studied are a special Galileon, Dirac-Born-Infeld, Einstein-Maxwell-Scalar, nonlinear sigma model and Yang-Mills-Scalar. We use the recently found Cachazo-He-Yuan representation of these theories in order to give a simple proof of the leading order part of all these theorems.

  12. Higher-order processes of excitation energy transfer in supramolecular complexes: Liouville space analysis of bridge molecule mediated transfer and direct photon exchange.

    PubMed

    May, Volkhard

    2008-09-21

    Long-range electronic excitation energy transfer is studied in the framework of a generalized master equation approach, which offers a systematic account for higher-order processes. Bridge molecule mediated transfer is confronted with the direct excitation energy exchange via photon emission and absorption. It is the central aim of this paper to present a systematic study of fourth-order rates, which describe both types of transfer processes characterized by the presence of intermediate states. While such a Liouville space formulation of rates is known from bridge mediated transfer, it is new for the case of photon mediated processes. In the former case, however, a novel approach to account for intermediate state relaxation is introduced. Finally and for illustration, some estimates are offered for the length dependence of the various discussed transfer rates.

  13. Precision Measurement of the B→Xsγ Photon Energy Spectrum, Branching Fraction, and Direct CP Asymmetry ACP(B→Xs+dγ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Lu, M.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-11-01

    The photon spectrum in the inclusive electromagnetic radiative decays of the B meson, B→Xsγ plus B→Xdγ, is studied using a data sample of (382.8±4.2)×106Υ(4S)→BB¯ decays collected by the BABAR experiment at SLAC. The spectrum is used to extract the branching fraction B(B→Xsγ)=(3.21±0.33)×10-4 for Eγ>1.8GeV and the direct CP asymmetry ACP(B→Xs+dγ)=0.057±0.063. The effects of detector resolution and Doppler smearing are unfolded to measure the photon energy spectrum in the B meson rest frame.

  14. Precision measurement of the B → Xs γ photon energy spectrum, branching fraction, and direct CP asymmetry A(CP)((B → X(s+d)γ).

    PubMed

    Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Edwards, A J; Adametz, A; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Dauncey, P D; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Griessinger, K; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Behn, E; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Dallapiccola, C; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Cheaib, R; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Biassoni, P; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Martinelli, M; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Lu, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Voss, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Miyashita, T S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Zambito, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Ahmed, H; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

    2012-11-09

    The photon spectrum in the inclusive electromagnetic radiative decays of the B meson, B → X(s)γ plus B → X(d)γ, is studied using a data sample of (382.8 ± 4.2) × 10(6)Υ(4S) → BB decays collected by the BABAR experiment at SLAC. The spectrum is used to extract the branching fraction B(B → X(s)γ) = (3.21 ± 0.33) × 10(-4) for E(γ) >1.8 GeV and the direct CP asymmetry A(CP) (B → X(s+d)γ) = 0.057 ± 0.063. The effects of detector resolution and Doppler smearing are unfolded to measure the photon energy spectrum in the B meson rest frame.

  15. Parametrization of direct and soft steric-undulatory forces between DNA double helical polyelectrolytes in solutions of several different anions and cations.

    PubMed

    Podgornik, R; Rau, D C; Parsegian, V A

    1994-04-01

    Directly measured forces between DNA helices in ordered arrays have been reduced to simple force coefficients and mathematical expressions for the interactions between pairs of molecules. The tabulated force parameters and mathematical expressions can be applied to parallel molecules or, by transformation, to skewed molecules of variable separation and mutual angle. This "toolbox" of intermolecular forces is intended for use in modelling molecular interactions, assembly, and conformation. The coefficients characterizing both the exponential hydration and the electrostatic interactions depend strongly on the univalent counterion species in solution, but are only weakly sensitive to anion type and temperature (from 5 to 50 degrees C). Interaction coefficients for the exponentially varying hydration force seen at spacings less than 10 to 15 A between surfaces are extracted directly from pressure versus interaxial distance curves. Electrostatic interactions are only observed at larger spacings and are always coupled with configurational fluctuation forces that result in observed exponential decay lengths that are twice the expected Debye-Huckel length. The extraction of electrostatic force parameters relies on a theoretical expression describing steric forces of molecules "colliding" through soft exponentially varying direct interactions.

  16. Soft connectedness of soft topological space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sanjay

    2017-07-01

    Recently, Shabir and Naz in [4] introduced the notion of Soft Topological Spaces (STS). They defined and studied about soft topology on the collection τ of soft sets over X. After the initiation of soft topological space many researcher developed its basic theory as like soft continuity, soft compactness and soft countability. Our main objective in this paper is to study the soft connectedness properties of soft topological space and also establish relations of soft connectedness with other properties of STS.

  17. Deterministic photon-emitter coupling in chiral photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söllner, Immo; Mahmoodian, Sahand; Hansen, Sofie Lindskov; Midolo, Leonardo; Javadi, Alisa; Kiršanskė, Gabija; Pregnolato, Tommaso; El-Ella, Haitham; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Jin Dong; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Engineering photon emission and scattering is central to modern photonics applications ranging from light harvesting to quantum-information processing. To this end, nanophotonic waveguides are well suited as they confine photons to a one-dimensional geometry and thereby increase the light-matter interaction. In a regular waveguide, a quantum emitter interacts equally with photons in either of the two propagation directions. This symmetry is violated in nanophotonic structures in which non-transversal local electric-field components imply that photon emission and scattering may become directional. Here we show that the helicity of the optical transition of a quantum emitter determines the direction of single-photon emission in a specially engineered photonic-crystal waveguide. We observe single-photon emission into the waveguide with a directionality that exceeds 90% under conditions in which practically all the emitted photons are coupled to the waveguide. The chiral light-matter interaction enables deterministic and highly directional photon emission for experimentally achievable on-chip non-reciprocal photonic elements. These may serve as key building blocks for single-photon optical diodes, transistors and deterministic quantum gates. Furthermore, chiral photonic circuits allow the dissipative preparation of entangled states of multiple emitters for experimentally achievable parameters, may lead to novel topological photon states and could be applied for directional steering of light.

  18. Deterministic photon-emitter coupling in chiral photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Söllner, Immo; Mahmoodian, Sahand; Hansen, Sofie Lindskov; Midolo, Leonardo; Javadi, Alisa; Kiršanskė, Gabija; Pregnolato, Tommaso; El-Ella, Haitham; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Jin Dong; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Engineering photon emission and scattering is central to modern photonics applications ranging from light harvesting to quantum-information processing. To this end, nanophotonic waveguides are well suited as they confine photons to a one-dimensional geometry and thereby increase the light-matter interaction. In a regular waveguide, a quantum emitter interacts equally with photons in either of the two propagation directions. This symmetry is violated in nanophotonic structures in which non-transversal local electric-field components imply that photon emission and scattering may become directional. Here we show that the helicity of the optical transition of a quantum emitter determines the direction of single-photon emission in a specially engineered photonic-crystal waveguide. We observe single-photon emission into the waveguide with a directionality that exceeds 90% under conditions in which practically all the emitted photons are coupled to the waveguide. The chiral light-matter interaction enables deterministic and highly directional photon emission for experimentally achievable on-chip non-reciprocal photonic elements. These may serve as key building blocks for single-photon optical diodes, transistors and deterministic quantum gates. Furthermore, chiral photonic circuits allow the dissipative preparation of entangled states of multiple emitters for experimentally achievable parameters, may lead to novel topological photon states and could be applied for directional steering of light.

  19. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  20. Broadband infrared supercontinuum generation in a soft-glass photonic crystal fiber pumped with a sub-picosecond Er-doped fiber laser mode-locked by a graphene saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczynski, Ryszard; Sobon, Grzegorz; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Klimczak, Mariusz; Stepniewski, Grzegorz; Pysz, Dariusz; Martynkien, Tadeusz; Kasztelanic, Rafal; Stepien, Ryszard; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2013-10-01

    A fiber-based supercontinuum source, comprising a graphene mode-locked erbium fiber laser and a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber (PCF), is reported. The nonlinear fiber has zero-dispersion wavelength shifted towards 1500 nm specifically for pumping with compact femtosecond and sub-picosecond fiber lasers operating in this spectral area. A chirped pulse amplification system seeded by a graphene mode-locked laser, generating linearly polarized 850 fs pulses and a pulse energy of 20 nJ at a repetition rate of 50 MHz, was used as the pump source. A 6 cm long, soft-glass PCF sample enabled generation of a supercontinuum spanning over an octave from 1000 to over 2300 nm in a 20 dB dynamic range. The measured results are interpreted numerically, based on a solution to the nonlinear Schrödinger equation using the split-step Fourier method; assignment of the nonlinear processes taking part in the observed broadening is proposed. The developed model is then used to estimate supercontinuum performance in the presented fiber with improved experimental conditions.

  1. Self-Supporting Nanoclay as Internal Scaffold Material for Direct Printing of Soft Hydrogel Composite Structures in Air.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yifei; Liu, Chengcheng; Chai, Wenxuan; Compaan, Ashley; Huang, Yong

    2017-05-24

    Three dimensional (3D) bioprinting technology enables the freeform fabrication of complex constructs from various hydrogels and is receiving increasing attention in tissue engineering. The objective of this study is to develop a novel self-supporting direct hydrogel printing approach to extrude complex 3D hydrogel composite structures in air without the help of a support bath. Laponite, a member of the smectite mineral family, is investigated to serve as an internal scaffold material for the direct printing of hydrogel composite structures in air. In the proposed printing approach, due to its yield-stress property, Laponite nanoclay can be easily extruded through a nozzle as a liquid and self-supported after extrusion as a solid. Its unique crystal structure with positive and negative charges enables it to be mixed with many chemically and physically cross-linked hydrogels, which makes it an ideal internal scaffold material for the fabrication of various hydrogel structures. By mixing Laponite nanoclay with various hydrogel precursors, the hydrogel composites retain their self-supporting capacity and can be printed into 3D structures directly in air and retain their shapes before cross-linking. Then, the whole structures are solidified in situ by applying suitable cross-linking stimuli. The addition of Laponite nanoclay can effectively improve the mechanical and biological properties of hydrogel composites. Specifically, the addition of Laponite nanoclay results in a significant increase in the Young's modulus of each hydrogel-Laponite composite: 1.9-fold increase for the poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA)-Laponite composite, 7.4-fold increase for the alginate-Laponite composite, and 3.3-fold increase for the gelatin-Laponite composite.

  2. Soft leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ambrosio, Giancarlo; Giudice, Gian F.; Raidal, Martti

    2003-11-01

    We study "soft leptogenesis", a new mechanism of leptogenesis which does not require flavour mixing among the right-handed neutrinos. Supersymmetry soft-breaking terms give a small mass splitting between the CP-even and CP-odd right-handed sneutrino states of a single generation and provide a CP-violating phase sufficient to generate a lepton asymmetry. The mechanism is successful if the lepton-violating soft bilinear coupling is unconventionally (but not unnaturally) small. The values of the right-handed neutrino masses predicted by soft leptogenesis can be low enough to evade the cosmological gravitino problem.

  3. Nanostructured SERS substrates produced by nanosphere lithography and plastic deformation through direct peel-off on soft matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tzyy-Jiann; Hsu, Kai-Chieh; Liu, Yi-Cheng; Lai, Chih-Hsien; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel fragmented-film surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate produced by nanosphere lithography and direct peel-off for SERS efficacy enhancement. The 2D hexagonally close-packed polystyrene nanospheres on the polydimethylsilozane (PDMS) substrate are covered with silver film and then directly peeled off using sticky tape. During the peel-off process, the pulling force induces the stretch and contraction of the PDMS substrate and causes fracture of the 2D triangular silver film. Under laser excitation, a stronger localized electric field is induced in the smaller cracks and enhances the SERS intensity. The origin of this SERS enhancement is confirmed by numerical simulation using the finite element method and substrate annealing to smoothen the cracks. For the case using nanospheres with a diameter of 740 nm, an enhancement factor 6.5 × 106 can be achieved. The proposed fragmented-film SERS substrate gains 1.8 and 2.6 times larger Raman intensity at the 1358 cm-1 SERS peak than those using pyramidal silver islands and silver nanoshell array. The proposed SERS substrate has the features of easy fabrication, low production cost, short fabrication time and high enhancement factor.

  4. Magnitude estimation of softness

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Robert M.; Hester, Kim D.; Green, Barry G.

    2008-01-01

    The human capacity to estimate the magnitude of softness of silicone rubber disks of differing compliance was studied under experimental conditions that altered the mode of contact. Subjects were able to scale softness regardless of whether they (1) actively indented each specimen by tapping or pressing it with the finger pad, (2) received passive indentation of the finger pad by each specimen via a force controlled tactile stimulator, thus eliminating kinesthetic cues, or (3) actively indented each specimen with a stylus that was manipulated either by tapping with one finger, or held by two fingers in a precision grip, thereby removing tactile cues provided by direct mechanical contact between the finger pad and specimen. Ratings of softness were independent of moderate variations in peak compressional force and force-rate. Additionally, functions for scaling softness were affected by the mode of contact; the slopes of the functions were greater in the tasks with a complete complement of compliance cues. When subjects were asked to classify objects as either hard or soft, specimens were classified as soft if the compliance were greater than that of the human finger. This suggests that the classification of softness depends on whether the object conforms to the body, and that tactile information about the spatial profile of object deformation is sufficient for the magnitude scaling of softness. But typically, kinesthetic information about the magnitude of object displacement, along with contact vibratory cues is also used while judging softness especially in the absence of direct skin contact with the object when using a tool. PMID:18679665

  5. Direct observation of photocarrier electron dynamics in C60 films on graphite by time-resolved two-photon photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuta, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Ohta, Tsutomu; Nakaya, Masato; Eguchi, Toyoaki; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2016-10-01

    Time-resolved two-photon photoemission (TR-2PPE) spectroscopy is employed to probe the electronic states of a C60 fullerene film formed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), acting as a model two-dimensional (2D) material for multi-layered graphene. Owing to the in-plane sp2-hybridized nature of the HOPG, the TR-2PPE spectra reveal the energetics and dynamics of photocarriers in the C60 film: after hot excitons are nascently formed in C60 via intramolecular excitation by a pump photon, they dissociate into photocarriers of free electrons and the corresponding holes, and the electrons are subsequently detected by a probe photon as photoelectrons. The decay rate of photocarriers from the C60 film into the HOPG is evaluated to be 1.31 × 1012 s‑1, suggesting a weak van der Waals interaction at the interface, where the photocarriers tentatively occupy the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of C60. The photocarrier electron dynamics following the hot exciton dissociation in the organic thin films has not been realized for any metallic substrates exhibiting strong interactions with the overlayer. Furthermore, the thickness dependence of the electron lifetime in the LUMO reveals that the electron hopping rate in C60 layers is 3.3 ± 1.2 × 1013 s‑1.

  6. Direct observation of photocarrier electron dynamics in C60 films on graphite by time-resolved two-photon photoemission

    PubMed Central

    Shibuta, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Ohta, Tsutomu; Nakaya, Masato; Eguchi, Toyoaki; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved two-photon photoemission (TR-2PPE) spectroscopy is employed to probe the electronic states of a C60 fullerene film formed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), acting as a model two-dimensional (2D) material for multi-layered graphene. Owing to the in-plane sp2-hybridized nature of the HOPG, the TR-2PPE spectra reveal the energetics and dynamics of photocarriers in the C60 film: after hot excitons are nascently formed in C60 via intramolecular excitation by a pump photon, they dissociate into photocarriers of free electrons and the corresponding holes, and the electrons are subsequently detected by a probe photon as photoelectrons. The decay rate of photocarriers from the C60 film into the HOPG is evaluated to be 1.31 × 1012 s−1, suggesting a weak van der Waals interaction at the interface, where the photocarriers tentatively occupy the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of C60. The photocarrier electron dynamics following the hot exciton dissociation in the organic thin films has not been realized for any metallic substrates exhibiting strong interactions with the overlayer. Furthermore, the thickness dependence of the electron lifetime in the LUMO reveals that the electron hopping rate in C60 layers is 3.3 ± 1.2 × 1013 s−1. PMID:27775005

  7. Soft x-ray response of the x-ray CCD camera directly coated with optical blocking layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, S.; Kohmura, T.; Kawai, K.; Kaneko, K.; watanabe, T.; Tsunemi, H.; Hayashida, K.; Anabuki, N.; Nakajima, H.; Ueda, S.; Tsuru, T. G.; Dotani, T.; Ozaki, M.; Matsuta, K.; Fujinaga, T.; Kitamoto, S.; Murakami, H.; Hiraga, J.; Mori, K.; ASTRO-H SXI Team

    2012-03-01

    We have developed the back-illuminated X-ray CCD camera (BI-CCD) to observe Xray in space. The X-ray CCD has a sensitivity not only for in X-ray but also in both Optical and UV light, X-ray CCD has to equip a filter to cut off optical light as well as UV light. The X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) onboard Suzaku satellite equipped with a thin film (OBF: Optical Blocking Filter) to cut off optical light and UV light. OBF is always in danger tearing by the acousmato or vibration during the launch, and it is difficult to handle on the ground because of its thickness. Instead of OBF, we have newly developed and produced OBL (Optical Blocking Layer), which is directly coating on the X-ray CCD surface.

  8. Direct growth of comet-like superstructures of Au-ZnO submicron rod arrays by solvothermal soft chemistry process

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Liming; Bao, Ningzhong Yanagisawa, Kazumichi; Zheng, Yanqing; Domen, Kazunari; Gupta, Arunava; Grimes, Craig A.

    2007-01-15

    The synthesis, characterization and proposed growth process of a new kind of comet-like Au-ZnO superstructures are described here. This Au-ZnO superstructure was directly created by a simple and mild solvothermal reaction, dissolving the reactants of zinc acetate dihydrate and hydrogen tetrachloroaurate tetrahydrate (HAuCl{sub 4}.4H{sub 2}O) in ethylenediamine and taking advantage of the lattice matching growth between definitized ZnO plane and Au plane and the natural growth habit of the ZnO rods along [001] direction in solutions. For a typical comet-like Au-ZnO superstructure, its comet head consists of one hemispherical end of a central thick ZnO rod and an outer Au-ZnO thin layer, and its comet tail consists of radially standing ZnO submicron rod arrays growing on the Au-ZnO thin layer. These ZnO rods have diameters in range of 0.2-0.5 {mu}m, an average aspect ratio of about 10, and lengths of up to about 4 {mu}m. The morphology, size and structure of the ZnO superstructures are dependent on the concentration of reactants and the reaction time. The HAuCl{sub 4}.4H{sub 2}O plays a key role for the solvothermal growth of the comet-like superstructure, and only are ZnO fibers obtained in absence of the HAuCl{sub 4}.4H{sub 2}O. The UV-vis absorption spectrum shows two absorptions at 365-390 nm and 480-600 nm, respectively attributing to the characteristic of the ZnO wide-band semiconductor material and the surface plasmon resonance of the Au particles. - Graphical abstract: One-step solvothermal synthesis of novel comet-like superstructures of radially standing ZnO submicron rod arrays.

  9. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  10. Crystalline mesoporous tungsten oxide nanoplate monoliths synthesized by directed soft template method for highly sensitive NO{sub 2} gas sensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hoa, Nguyen Duc; Duy, Nguyen Van; Hieu, Nguyen Van

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Mesoporous WO{sub 3} nanoplate monoliths were obtained by direct templating synthesis. ► Enable effective accession of the analytic molecules for the sensor applications. ► The WO{sub 3} sensor exhibited a high performance to NO{sub 2} gas at low temperature. -- Abstract: Controllable synthesis of nanostructured metal oxide semiconductors with nanocrystalline size, porous structure, and large specific surface area is one of the key issues for effective gas sensor applications. In this study, crystalline mesoporous tungsten oxide nanoplate-like monoliths with high specific surface areas were obtained through instant direct-templating synthesis for highly sensitive nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) sensor applications. The copolymer soft template was converted into a solid carbon framework by heat treatment in an inert gas prior to calcinations in air to sustain the mesoporous structure of tungsten oxide. The multidirectional mesoporous structures of tungsten oxide with small crystalline size, large specific surface area, and superior physical characteristics enabled the rapid and effective accession of analytic gas molecules. As a result, the sensor response was enhanced and the response and recovery times were reduced, in which the mesoporous tungsten oxide based gas sensor exhibited a superior response of 21,155% to 5 ppm NO{sub 2}. In addition, the developed sensor exhibited selective detection of low NO{sub 2} concentration in ammonia and ethanol at a low temperature of approximately 150 °C.

  11. Case-based learning in endocrine physiology: an approach toward self-directed learning and the development of soft skills in medical students.

    PubMed

    Gade, Shubhada; Chari, Suresh

    2013-12-01

    The Medical Council of India, in the recent Vision 2015 document, recommended curricular reforms for undergraduates. Case-based learning (CBL) is one method where students are motivated toward self-directed learning and to develop analytic and problem-solving skills. An overview of thyroid physiology was given in a didactic lecture. A paper-based case scenario of multinodular goiter was given to phase I Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery students in two sessions. An attitude survey of the students and teachers was done using a Likert scale ranging from strongly disagrees to strongly agree. A pretest and posttest were conducted. The students opined that CBL helped them to better their understanding of a particular topic, gave them better retention of knowledge, helped them to relate clinical conditions to basic sciences, improved soft skills such as communication skills and group dynamics, and promoted a better teacher-student relationship. There was significant improvement in student's performance when pre- and posttest scores were compared (P = 0.018). Furthermore, faculty members opined that CBL promoted self-study and problem-solving abilities of the students. In conclusion, CBL motivates students toward self-directed learning and to develop analytic and problem-solving skills; thus, CBL could be beneficial for students' entry into clinical departments and, finally, in managing patients.

  12. The Center-of-mass angular distribution of direct photons at $S^{(1/2)}$ = 1.8-TeV observed with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinov, Paul Michael

    1995-12-01

    The study of center-of-mass angular distribution of direct photons produced in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.8TeV with the D0 detector is described. The photons are detected and identified using a liquid argon calorimeter, with charged particle rejection provided by tracking chambers. The photons are restricted to the central region (n ≤ 0.75), but center-of-mass system for the hard scattering is reconstructed using the information from reconstructed jets. A method for avoiding possible bias due to edges of the calorimeter is presented. The background, due mainly to rare fragmentations of a jet into a leading neutral meson, are subtracted statistically using the expected variation in the longitudinal profile of the electromagnetic shower. The angular distribution in the range of η* from 0 to 1.5 (cos θ* from 0 to 0.9) is compared to next-to-leading order QCD predictions, and found to be in good agreement.

  13. In Situ Observation of Directed Nanoparticle Aggregation During the Synthesis of Ordered Nanoporous Metal in Soft Templates

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, Lucas R.; Robinson, David B.; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Hartnett, Ryan J.; Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.; Arslan, Ilke

    2014-02-11

    The prevalent approach to developing new nanomaterials is a trial and error process of iteratively altering synthesis procedures and then characterizing the resulting nanostructures. This is fundamentally limited in that the growth processes that occur during synthesis can only be inferred from the final synthetic structure. Directly observing real-time nanomaterial growth provides unprecedented insight into the relationship between synthesis conditions and product evolution, and facilitates a mechanistic approach to nanomaterial development. Here we use in situ liquid stage scanning transmission electron microscopy to observe the growth of mesoporous palladium in a solvated block copolymer (BCP) template under various synthesis conditions, and ultimately determine a refined synthesis procedure that yields ordered pores. We find that at low organic solvent (tetrahydrofuran, THF) content, the BCP assembles into a rigid, cylindrical micelle array with a high degree of short-range order, but poor long-range order. Upon slowing the THF evaporation rate using a solvent-vapor anneal step, the long-range order is greatly improved. The electron beam induces nucleation of small particles in the aqueous phase around the micelles. The small particles then flocculate and grow into denser structures that surround the micelles, forming an ordered mesoporous structure. The microscope observations revealed that template disorder can be addressed prior to reaction, and is not invariably induced by the growth process itself, allowing us to more quickly optimize the synthetic method. This work was conducted in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-76RL01830. This research

  14. Measurements of the spatial structure and directivity of 100 KeV photon sources in solar flares using PVO and ISEE-3 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Kinsey A.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this grant was to measure the spatial structure and directivity of the hard X-ray and low energy gamma-ray (100 keV-2 MeV) continuum sources in solar flares using stereoscopic observations made with spectrometers aboard the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) and Third International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE-3) spacecraft. Since the hard X-ray emission is produced by energetic electrons through the bremsstrahlung process, the observed directivity can be directly related to the 'beaming' of electrons accelerated during the flare as they propagate from the acceleration region in the corona to the chromosphere/transition region. Some models (e.g., the thick-target model) predict that most of the impulsive hard X-ray/low energy gamma-ray source is located in the chromosphere, the effective height of the X-ray source above the photosphere increasing with the decrease in the photon energy. This can be verified by determining the height-dependence of the photon source through stereoscopic observations of those flares which are partially occulted from the view of one of the two spacecraft. Thus predictions about beaming of electrons as well as their spatial distributions could be tested through the analysis proposed under this grant.

  15. Two-photon excited fluorescence in the LYB:Eu monoclinic crystal: towards a new scheme of single-beam dual-voxel direct laser writing in crystals.

    PubMed

    Petit, Y; Royon, A; Marquestaut, N; Dussauze, M; Fargues, A; Veber, P; Jubera, V; Cardinal, T; Canioni, L

    2013-01-14

    We report on two-photon excited fluorescence in the oriented Eu(3+)doped LYB monoclinic crystal under femtosecond laser tight focusing. Due to spatial walk-off, the two polarization modes of the incident femtosecond beam simultaneously provide the independent excitation of two distinct focuses, leading to a single-beam dual-voxel nonlinear excitation of fluorescence below material modification threshold. These observations emphasize on the anisotropy of both two-photon absorption as well as fluorescence emission. They demonstrate the localized control of the nonlinear energy deposit, thanks to the adjustment of both the input power and polarization, by properly balancing the injected energy in each voxel. Such approach should be considered for future direct laser writing of waveguides in propagation directions out of the dielectric axes, so as to optimally cope with the highly probable anisotropy of laser-induced material modification thresholds in these crystals. These results open new ways for further potential developments in direct laser writing as the simultaneous inscription of double-line structures for original waveguides processes.

  16. Co-phasing of a diluted aperture synthesis instrument for direct imaging. II. Experimental demonstration in the photon-counting regime with a temporal hypertelescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyeron, L.; Delage, L.; Baudoin, R.; Gomes, J. T.; Grossard, L.; Reynaud, F.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Amongst the new techniques currently developed for high-resolution and high-dynamics imaging, the hypertelescope architecture is very promising for direct imaging of objects such as exoplanets. The performance of this instrument strongly depends on the co-phasing process accuracy. In a previous high-flux experimental study with an eight-telescope array, we successfully implemented a co-phasing system based on the joint use of a genetic algorithm and a sub-aperture piston phase diversity using the object itself as a source for metrology. Aims: To fit the astronomical context, we investigate the impact of photon noise on the co-phasing performance operating our laboratory prototype at low flux. This study provides experimental results on the sensitivity and the dynamics that could be reached for real astrophysical observations. Methods: Simulations were carried out to optimize the critical parameters to be applied in the co-phasing system running in the photon-counting regime. We used these parameters experimentally to acquire images with our temporal hypertelescope test bench for different photon flux levels. A data reduction method allows highly contrasted images to be extracted. Results: The optical path differences have been servo-controlled over one hour with an accuracy of 22.0 nm and 15.7 nm for 200 and 500 photons/frame, respectively. The data reduction greatly improves the signal-to-noise ratio and allows us to experimentally obtain highly contrasted images. The related normalized point spread function is characterized by a 1.1 × 10-4 and 5.4 × 10-5 intensity standard deviation over the dark field (for 15 000 snapshots with 200 and 500 photons/frame, respectively). Conclusions: This laboratory experiment demonstrates the potential of our hypertelescope concept, which could be directly transposed to a space-based telescope array. Assuming eight telescopes with a 30 cm diameter, the I-band limiting magnitude of the main star would be 7.3, allowing

  17. Photonic generation of ultra-wideband signals by direct current modulation on SOA section of an SOA-integrated SGDBR laser.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hui; Yu, Yonglin; Shu, Tan; Huang, Dexiu; Jiang, Shan; Barry, Liam P

    2010-03-29

    Photonic ultra-wideband (UWB) pulses are generated by direct current modulation of a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) section of an SOA-integrated sampled grating distributed Bragg reflector (SGDBR) laser. Modulation responses of the SOA section of the laser are first simulated with a microwave equivalent circuit model. Simulated results show a resonance behavior indicating the possibility to generate UWB signals with complex shapes in the time domain. The UWB pulse generation is then experimentally demonstrated for different selected wavelength channels with an SOA-integrated SGDBR laser.

  18. Information Leakage in Efficient Bidirectional Quantum Secure Direct Communication with Single Photons in Both Polarization and Spatial-Mode Degrees of Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cai; Situ, Haozhen

    2016-11-01

    Recently, Wang et al. presented a bidirectional quantum secure direct communication protocol with single photons in both polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom (Int. J. Theor. Phys. 54(10): 3443-3453, 2015). They claimed that their protocol was efficient and removed the drawback of information leakage. However, we found that the information leakage actually exists in their protocol. In this paper, we analyze Wang et al.'s protocol in detail. In addition, we propose an improvement to avoid the information leakage. The security of the improved protocol has also been discussed.

  19. Polarization tensor of a photon in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katkov, V. M.

    2017-07-01

    The polarization operator is investigated at arbitrary photon energy in a constant and homogeneous electric field of the strength E. When the photon energy is less than the vacuum energy = eEℏ / mc , the found probability describes the absorption of a soft photon by virtual electron and positron in an electric field. At this energy, the main contribution to the probability gives the process of the absorption of a soft photon by real electron and positron produced by an electric field.

  20. Two Photon Exchange for Exclusive Pion Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Afanaciev, Andrei V.; Aleksejevs, Aleksandrs G.; Barkanova, Svetlana G.

    2013-09-01

    We perform detailed calculations of two-photon-exchange QED corrections to the cross section of pion electroproduction. The results are obtained with and without the soft-photon approximation; analytic expressions for the radiative corrections are derived. The relative importance of the two-photon correction is analyzed for the kinematics of several experiments at Jefferson Lab. A significant, over 20%, effect due to two-photon exchange is predicted for the backward angles of electron scattering at large transferred momenta.

  1. Molecularly imprinted photonic crystals for the direct label-free distinguishing of L-proline and D-proline.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongli; Pan, Zeng; Yuan, Yanxia; Sun, Zhiming; Ma, Junkui; Huang, Guanbo; Xing, Fubao; Gao, Jianping

    2013-10-28

    Novel molecularly imprinted photonic crystals (IPCs) for the highly sensitive label-free detection of L-proline and for the chiral recognition of L/D-proline were reported. A series of L-proline imprinted polyacrylamide photonic crystals (PAM-LPIPCs) and poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) photonic crystals (PAM-co-AA-LPIPCs) were fabricated via the in situ polymerization of polystyrene opal. The PAM-LPIPCs exhibit good molecular response in L-proline solutions and can be visualized by the naked eye much like a pH test paper. The concentration of imprinted molecules (L-proline) in aqueous solution can be detected by the chromatic signal (structural color) or the optical signal (λmax). Furthermore, the responsivity and sensitivity of the PAM-co-AA-LPIPCs can be improved by increasing the amount of the imprinted content or the proportion of AA, or by decreasing the ratio of the cross-linking agent. When all these factors were balanced, a PAM2-co-AA0.4-LP0.5 IPC with good strength, high responsivity, high sensitivity and specific molecular recognition was obtained. It is found that the presented crystals can show obvious response to L-proline solution even at a low concentration of 1%. The PAM2-co-AA0.4-LP0.5 IPC not only very selectively distinguishes between L-proline and nicotinic acid, but it is also good at chiral recognition between L-proline and D-proline. What is more, the response is rapid and reversible and the IPC is recyclable.

  2. Directly generating orbital angular momentum in second-harmonic waves with a spirally poled nonlinear photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Dunzhao; Zhu, Yunzhi; Zhong, Weihao; Cui, Guoxin; Wang, Huijun; He, Ying; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Yanqing; Xiao, Min

    2017-06-01

    Based on nonlinear holography, we propose a 2D spirally poled LiNbO3 nonlinear photonic crystal that generates orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of second-harmonic (SH) waves. In this crystal, the generated SH waves from positive and negative domains have a π phase difference, which is used to compose a nonlinear Fresnel zone plate for an experimental demonstration of generating SH OAM states at the designed focusing spot. In addition, the crystal can be used to detect input OAM states of fundamental beams without significantly disturbing their wave fronts.

  3. Direct measurements of two photon exchange on lepton-proton elastic scattering using simultaneous electron-positron beams in CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adikaram, Dasuni Kalhari

    The electric (GE) and magnetic ( GM) form factors of the proton are fundamental observables which characterize its charge and magnetization distributions. There are two methods to measure the proton form factors: the Rosenbluth separation method and the polarization transfer technique. However, the ratio of the electric and magnetic form factors measured by those methods significantly disagree at momentum transfer Q2 > 1 GeV2. The most likely explanation of this discrepancy is the inclusion of two-photon exchange (TPE) amplitude contributions to the elastic electron-proton cross section which significantly changes the extraction of GE from the Rosenbluth separation measurement. The Jefferson Lab CLAS TPE experiment determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections. The primary electron beam was used to create an intense bremsstrahlung photon beam. Some of the photons were then converted to a mixed e+/ e- beam which then interacted with a liquid hydrogen target. The e+p and e-p events were detected by the CLAS (CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer). The elastic cross section ratios ((sigma( e+p)/(sigma(e -p)) were measured over a wide range of virtual photon polarization epsilon and Q2. The cross section ratios displayed a strong epsilon dependence at Q2 = 1.45 GeV2. There is no significant Q2 dependence observed at epsilon = 0.45. The results are consistent with a recent measurement at the VEPP-3 lepton storage ring in Novosibirsk and with the hadronic calculation by Blunders, Melnitchouk and Tjon. The hadronic calculation resolves the disagreement between the Rosenbluth separation and polarization transfer extractions of GE/GM at Q2 up to 2 -- 3 GeV2. Applying the GLAS TPE correction to the Rosenbluth cross section measurements significantly decreases the extracted value of GE and brings it into good agreement with the polarization transfer measurement at Q2˜1.75 GeV2. Thus, these

  4. Results on hadronic events from the MAC detector at PEP. I. Direct photon production. II. Precision R measurement and energy-energy correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Heltsley, B.K.

    1984-07-01

    Direct photon production in hadronic events from e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. hadrons has been studied at ..sqrt..s=29 GeV using the MAC detector at PEP. Both the charge asymmetry in the final state jets and total yield have been used to determine values of quark charges, which are in good agreement with the predictions of the fractionally charged quark-parton model. Limits have been established for anomalous sources of direct photons. Measurements of the total cross section and energy-energy correlations for e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. hadrons at ..sqrt..s=29 GeV with the MAC detector are presented. Two complementary event selections for the precision R measurement are described, one accepting events over nearly the entire 4..pi.. solid angle (minimizing extrapolation to unseen phase space), and the other restricted to wide angles (reducing two-photon backgrounds). The two methods agree, yield R = 3.93 +- 0.10 (which includes the effects of higher order radiative corrections), and given ..cap alpha../sub s/ = 0.19 +- 0.07, independent of fragmentation. The asymmetry in the energy-energy correlation cross section yields different results for ..cap alpha../sub s/ in different models, 0.185 in the string model and from 0.105 to 0.140 for incoherent jet formation, depending on the gluon fragmentation and momentum conservation algorithms. The string fragmentation model provides a satisfactory description of the measured correlation cross section, whereas incoherent jet fragmentation does not. 35 references.

  5. Compact ultrafast orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer for on-line gas analysis by electron impact ionization and soft single photon ionization using an electron beam pumped rare gas excimer lamp as VUV-light source.

    PubMed

    Mühlberger, F; Saraji-Bozorgzad, M; Gonin, M; Fuhrer, K; Zimmermann, R

    2007-11-01

    Orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometers (oaTOFMS), which are exhibiting a pulsed orthogonal extraction of ion bunches into the TOF mass analyzer from a continuous primary ion beam, are well-suited for continuous ionization methods such as electron impact ionization (EI). Recently an electron beam pumped rare gas excimer lamp (EBEL) was introduced, which emits intensive vacuum UV (VUV) radiation at, e.g., 126 nm (argon excimer) and is well suited as the light source for soft single photon ionization (SPI) of organic molecules. In this paper, a new compact oaTOFMS system which allows switching between SPI, using VUV-light from an EBEL-light source, and conventional EI is described. With the oaTOFMS system, EBEL-SPI and EI mass spectral transients can be recorded at very high repetition rates (up to 100 kHz), enabling high duty cycles and therefore good detection efficiencies. By using a transient recorder card with the capability to perform on-board accumulation of the oaTOF transients, final mass spectra with a dynamic range of 106 can be saved to the hard disk at a rate of 10 Hz. As it is possible to change the ionization modes (EI and SPI) rapidly, a comprehensive monitoring of complex gases with highly dynamic compositions, such as cigarette smoke, is possible. In this context, the EI based mass spectra address the bulk composition (compounds such as water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, etc. in the up to percentage concentration range) as well as some inorganic trace gases such as argon, sulfur dioxide, etc. down to the low ppm level. The EBEL-SPI mass spectra on the other hand are revealing the organic composition down to the lower ppb concentration range.

  6. Directionality control through selective excitation of low-order guided modes in thin-film InGaN photonic crystal light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Rangel, Elizabeth; Matioli, Elison; Choi, Yong-Seok; Weisbuch, Claude; Speck, J. S.; Hu, Evelyn L.

    2011-01-01

    This letter explores the impact of quantum well placement and photonic crystal (PhC) etch depth on the emission directionality of thin-film InGaN PhC light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The far-field pattern of 800-nm-thick PhC LEDs is tuned by varying only the etch depth of a surface-patterned hexagonal PhC from 90 to 440 nm. This dependence on etch depth is shown to arise from the preferential excitation of a subset of the allowed guided modes. Selective excitation of the TE{sub 0} and TE{sub 1} modes is utilized to achieve a vertically directional emission pattern comprised of only these two modes.

  7. Photonic Equations of Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, A B; Crenshaw, M E

    2004-09-17

    Although the concept of the photon as a quantum particle is sharpened by the quantization of the energy of the classical radiation field in a cavity, the photon's spin has remained a classical degree of freedom. The photon is considered a spin-1 particle, although only two classical polarization states transverse to its direction of propagation are allowed. Effectively therefore the photon is a spin-1/2 particle, although it still obeys Bose-Einstein statistics because the photon-photon interaction is zero. Here they show that the two polarization states of the photon can be quantized using Pauli's spin vector, such that a suitable equation of motion for the photon is Dirac's relativistic wave equation for zero mass and zero charge. Maxwell's equations for a free photon are inferred from the Dirac-field formalism and thus provide proof of this claim. For photons in the presence of electronic sources for electromagnetic fields we posit Lorentz-invariant inhomogeneous photonic equations of motion. Electro-dynamic operator equations are inferred from this modified Dirac-field formalism which reduce to Maxwell's equations if spin-dependent terms in the radiation-matter interaction are dropped.

  8. Bridging the ``green gap'' of LEDs: giant light output enhancement and directional control of LEDs via embedded nano-void photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Lin; Liu, Che-Yu; Krishnan, Chirenjeevi; Lin, Da-Wei; Chu, You-Chen; Chen, Tzu-Pei; Shen, Tien-Lin; Kao, Tsung-Sheng; Charlton, Martin D. B.; Yu, Peichen; Lin, Chien-Chung; Kuo, Hao-Chung; He-Hau, Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Green LEDs do not show the same level of performance as their blue and red cousins, greatly hindering the solid-state lighting development, which is the so-called ``green gap''. In this work, nano-void photonic crystals (NVPCs) were fabricated to embed within the GaN/InGaN green LEDs by using epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) and nano-sphere lithography techniques. The NVPCs act as an efficient scattering back-reflector to outcouple the guided and downward photons, which not only boost the light extraction efficiency of LEDs with an enhancement of 78% but also collimate the view angle of LEDs from 131.5° to 114.0°. This could be because of the highly scattering nature of NVPCs which reduce the interference giving rise to Fabry-Perot resonance. Moreover, due to the threading dislocation suppression and strain relief by the NVPCs, the internal quantum efficiency was increased by 25% and droop behavior was reduced from 37.4% to 25.9%. The enhancement of light output power can be achieved as high as 151% at a driving current of 350 mA. Giant light output enhancement and directional control via NVPCs point the way towards a promising avenue of solid-state lighting.Green LEDs do not show the same level of performance as their blue and red cousins, greatly hindering the solid-state lighting development, which is the so-called ``green gap''. In this work, nano-void photonic crystals (NVPCs) were fabricated to embed within the GaN/InGaN green LEDs by using epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) and nano-sphere lithography techniques. The NVPCs act as an efficient scattering back-reflector to outcouple the guided and downward photons, which not only boost the light extraction efficiency of LEDs with an enhancement of 78% but also collimate the view angle of LEDs from 131.5° to 114.0°. This could be because of the highly scattering nature of NVPCs which reduce the interference giving rise to Fabry-Perot resonance. Moreover, due to the threading dislocation suppression and

  9. Burning DT Plasmas with Ultrafast Soft X-Ray Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Skupsky, S.

    2012-10-01

    Fast ignition with narrowband, coherent ultrafast soft x-ray pulsesfootnotetextS. X. Hu, V. N. Goncharov, and S. Skupsky, ``Burning Plasmas with Ultrashort Soft-X-Ray Flashing,'' to be published in Physics of Plasmas. has been investigated for cryogenic deuterium--tritium (DT) plasma conditions achieved on the OMEGA Laser System. In contrast to using hard x-rays (hν = 3 to 6 keV) proposed in the original x-ray fast-ignition proposal, we find that soft x-ray sources with hν 500-eV photons can be more suitable for igniting the dense DT plasmas. Two-dimensional radiation--hydrodynamics simulations have identified the breakeven conditions for realizing such a ``hybrid'' ignition scheme (direct-drive compression with soft x-ray heating) with 50-μm-offset targets: an ˜10-ps soft x-ray pulse (hν 500 eV) with a total energy of 500 to 1000 J to be focused into a 10-μm spot size. A variety of x-ray pulse parameters have also been investigated for optimization. It is noted that an order of magnitude increase in neutron yield has been predicted even with x-ray energy as low as ˜50 J. Scaling this idea to a 1-MJ large-scale NIF target, a gain above ˜30 can be reached with the same soft x-ray pulse at 1.65-kJ energy. Even though such energetic x-ray sources do not currently exist, we hope that the proposed ignition scheme may stimulate efforts on generating powerful soft x-ray sources in future. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  10. Inclusive pi^0, eta, and direct photon production at high transverse momentum in p+p and d+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-07

    We report a measurement of high-p{sub T} inclusive {pi}{sup 0}, {eta}, and direct photon production in p + p and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV at midrapidity (0 < {eta} < 1). Photons from the decay {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} were detected in the Barrel Electromagnetic Calorimeter of the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} decay was also observed and constituted the first {eta} measurement by STAR. The first direct photon cross section measurement by STAR is also presented, the signal was extracted statistically by subtracting the {pi}{sup 0}, {eta}, and {omega}(782) decay background from the inclusive photon distribution observed in the calorimeter. The analysis is described in detail, and the results are found to be in good agreement with earlier measurements and with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations.

  11. Absorbed dose in AgBr in direct film for photon energies ( < 150 keV): relation to optical density. Theoretical calculation and experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Helmrot, E; Alm Carlsson, G

    1996-01-01

    In the radiological process it is necessary to develop tools so as to explore how X-rays can be used in the most effective way. Evaluation of models to derive measures of image quality and risk-related parameters is one possibility of getting such a tool. Modelling the image receptor, an important part of the imaging chain, is then required. The aim of this work was to find convenient and accurate ways of describing the blackening of direct dental films by X-rays. Since the beginning of the 20th century, the relation between optical density and photon interactions in the silver bromide in X-ray films has been investigated by many authors. The first attempts used simple quantum theories with no consideration of underlying physical interaction processes. The theories were gradually made more realistic by the introduction of dosimetric concepts and cavity theory. A review of cavity theories for calculating the mean absorbed dose in the AgBr grains of the film emulsion is given in this work. The cavity theories of GREENING (15) and SPIERS-CHARLTON (37) were selected for calculating the mean absorbed dose in the AgBr grains relative to the air collision kerma (Kc,air) of the incident photons of Ultra-speed and Ektaspeed (intraoral) films using up-to-date values of interaction coefficients. GREENING'S theory is a multi-grain theory and the results depend on the relative amounts of silver bromide and gelatine in the emulsion layer. In the single grain theory of SPIERS-CHARLTON, the shape and size of the silver bromide grain are important. Calculations of absorbed dose in the silver bromide were compared with measurements of optical densities in Ultra-speed and Ektaspeed films for a broad range (25-145 kV) of X-ray energy. The calculated absorbed dose values were appropriately averaged over the complete photon energy spectrum, which was determined experimentally using a Compton spectrometer. For the whole range of tube potentials used, the measured optical densities of the

  12. Soft Hair on Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, Stephen W.; Perry, Malcolm J.; Strominger, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    It has recently been shown that Bondi-van der Burg-Metzner-Sachs supertranslation symmetries imply an infinite number of conservation laws for all gravitational theories in asymptotically Minkowskian spacetimes. These laws require black holes to carry a large amount of soft (i.e., zero-energy) supertranslation hair. The presence of a Maxwell field similarly implies soft electric hair. This Letter gives an explicit description of soft hair in terms of soft gravitons or photons on the black hole horizon, and shows that complete information about their quantum state is stored on a holographic plate at the future boundary of the horizon. Charge conservation is used to give an infinite number of exact relations between the evaporation products of black holes which have different soft hair but are otherwise identical. It is further argued that soft hair which is spatially localized to much less than a Planck length cannot be excited in a physically realizable process, giving an effective number of soft degrees of freedom proportional to the horizon area in Planck units.

  13. Soft Hair on Black Holes.

    PubMed

    Hawking, Stephen W; Perry, Malcolm J; Strominger, Andrew

    2016-06-10

    It has recently been shown that Bondi-van der Burg-Metzner-Sachs supertranslation symmetries imply an infinite number of conservation laws for all gravitational theories in asymptotically Minkowskian spacetimes. These laws require black holes to carry a large amount of soft (i.e., zero-energy) supertranslation hair. The presence of a Maxwell field similarly implies soft electric hair. This Letter gives an explicit description of soft hair in terms of soft gravitons or photons on the black hole horizon, and shows that complete information about their quantum state is stored on a holographic plate at the future boundary of the horizon. Charge conservation is used to give an infinite number of exact relations between the evaporation products of black holes which have different soft hair but are otherwise identical. It is further argued that soft hair which is spatially localized to much less than a Planck length cannot be excited in a physically realizable process, giving an effective number of soft degrees of freedom proportional to the horizon area in Planck units.

  14. Exponential Localization of Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo

    1998-06-01

    It is shown that photons can be localized in space with an exponential falloff of the energy density and photodetection rates. The limits of localization are determined by the fundamental Paley-Wiener theorem. A direct mathematical connection between the spatial localization of photons and the decay in time of quantum mechanical systems is established.

  15. On the optimization, and the intensity dependence, of the excitation rate for the absorption of two-photons due to the direct permanent dipole moment excitation mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Meath, William J.

    2016-07-15

    A model two-level dipolar molecule, and the rotating wave approximation and perturbation theory, are used to investigate the optimization and the laser intensity dependence of the two-photon excitation rate via the direct permanent dipole mechanism. The rate is proportional to the square of the laser intensity I only for small intensities and times when perturbation theory is applicable. An improvement on perturbation theory is provided by a small time RWA result for the rate which is not proportional to I{sup 2}; rather it is proportional to the square of an effective intensity I{sub eff}. For each laser intensity the optimum RWA excitation rate as a function of time, for low intensities, is proportional to I, not I{sup 2}, and for high intensities it is proportional to I{sub eff}. For a given two-photon transition the laser-molecule coupling optimizes for an intensity I{sub max} which, for example, leads to a maximum possible excitation rate as a function of time. The validity of the RWA results of this paper, and the importance of including the effects of virtual excited states, are also discussed briefly.

  16. Measurement of B (B→Xsγ), the B→Xsγ photon energy spectrum, and the direct CP asymmetry in B→Xs+dγ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Lu, M.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    The photon spectrum in B→Xsγ decay, where Xs is any strange hadronic state, is studied using a data sample of (382.8±4.2)×106 e+e-→Υ(4S)→BB¯ events collected by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II collider. The spectrum is used to measure the branching fraction B(B→Xsγ)=(3.21±0.15±0.29±0.08)×10-4 and the first, second, and third moments ⟨Eγ⟩=2.267±0.019±0.032±0.003GeV, ⟨(Eγ-⟨Eγ⟩)2⟩=0.0484±0.0053±0.0077±0.0005GeV2, and ⟨(Eγ-⟨Eγ⟩)3⟩=-0.0048±0.0011±0.0011±0.0004GeV3, for the range Eγ>1.8GeV, where Eγ is the photon energy in the B-meson rest frame. Results are also presented for narrower Eγ ranges. In addition, the direct CP asymmetry ACP(B→Xs+dγ) is measured to be 0.057±0.063. The spectrum itself is also unfolded to the B-meson rest frame; that is the frame in which theoretical predictions for its shape are made.

  17. Bridging the "green gap" of LEDs: giant light output enhancement and directional control of LEDs via embedded nano-void photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Lin; Liu, Che-Yu; Krishnan, Chirenjeevi; Lin, Da-Wei; Chu, You-Chen; Chen, Tzu-Pei; Shen, Tien-Lin; Kao, Tsung-Sheng; Charlton, Martin D B; Yu, Peichen; Lin, Chien-Chung; Kuo, Hao-Chung; He, Jr-Hau

    2016-01-14

    Green LEDs do not show the same level of performance as their blue and red cousins, greatly hindering the solid-state lighting development, which is the so-called "green gap". In this work, nano-void photonic crystals (NVPCs) were fabricated to embed within the GaN/InGaN green LEDs by using epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) and nano-sphere lithography techniques. The NVPCs act as an efficient scattering back-reflector to outcouple the guided and downward photons, which not only boost the light extraction efficiency of LEDs with an enhancement of 78% but also collimate the view angle of LEDs from 131.5° to 114.0°. This could be because of the highly scattering nature of NVPCs which reduce the interference giving rise to Fabry-Perot resonance. Moreover, due to the threading dislocation suppression and strain relief by the NVPCs, the internal quantum efficiency was increased by 25% and droop behavior was reduced from 37.4% to 25.9%. The enhancement of light output power can be achieved as high as 151% at a driving current of 350 mA. Giant light output enhancement and directional control via NVPCs point the way towards a promising avenue of solid-state lighting.

  18. Applications of the direct photon absorption technique for measuring bone mineral content in vivo. Determination of body composition in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The bone mineral content, BMC, determined by monoenergetic photon absorption technique, of 29 different locations on the long bones and vertebral columns of 24 skeletons was measured. Compressive tests were made on bone from these locations in which the maximum load and maximum stress were measured. Also the ultimate strain, modulus of elasticity and energy absorbed to failure were determined for compact bone from the femoral diaphysis and cancellous bone from the eighth through eleventh thoracic vertebrae. Correlations and predictive relationships between these parameters were examined to investigate the applicability of using the BMC at sites normally measured in vivo, i.e. radius and ulna in estimating the BMC and/or strength of the spine or femoral neck. It was found that the BMC at sites on the same bone were highly correlated r = 0.95 or better; the BMC at sites on different bones were also highly interrelated, r = 0.85. The BMC at various sites on the long bones could be estimated to between 10 and 15 per cent from the BMC of sites on the radius or ulna.

  19. Soft-agar-coated filter method for early detection of viable and thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH)- or TDH-related hemolysin-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus in seafood.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Sachiko; Okura, Masatoshi; Osawa, Ro

    2006-07-01

    A novel method for detecting viable and thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH)-producing or TDH-related hemolysin (TRH)-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus in seafood was developed. The method involved (i) enrichment culture, selective for viable, motile cells penetrating a soft-agar-coated filter paper, and (ii) a multiplex PCR assay targeting both the TDH gene (tdh) and TRH gene (trh) following DNase pretreatment on the test culture to eradicate any incidental DNAs that might have been released from dead cells of tdh- or trh-positive (tdh+ trh+) strains and penetrated the agar-coated filter. A set of preliminary laboratory tests performed on 190 ml of enrichment culture that had been inoculated simultaneously with ca. 100 viable cells of a strain of tdh+ trh+ V. parahaemolyticus and dense populations of a viable strain of tdh- and trh-negative V. parahaemolyticus or Vibrio alginolyticus indicated that the method detected the presence of viable tdh+ trh+ strains. Another set of preliminary tests on 190 ml of enrichment culture that had been initially inoculated with a large number of dead cells of the tdh+ trh+ strain together with dense populations of the tdh- and trh-negative strains confirmed that the method did not yield any false-positive results. Subsequent quasi-field tests using various seafood samples (ca. 20 g), each of which was experimentally contaminated with either or both hemolysin-producing strains at an initial density of ca. 5 to 10 viable cells per gram, demonstrated that contamination could be detected within 2 working days.

  20. Azimuthally anisotropic emission of low-momentum direct photons in Au + Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Al-Ta'Ani, H.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Danley, T. W.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, R.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K.-B.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kochenda, L.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Masumoto, S.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xie, W.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured second- and third-order Fourier coefficients of the azimuthal distributions of direct photons emitted at midrapidity in Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV for various collision centralities. Combining two different analysis techniques, results were obtained in the transverse momentum range of 0.4

  1. Direct evidence of single quantum dot emission from GaN islands formed at threading dislocations using nanoscale cathodoluminescence: A source of single photons in the ultraviolet

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Gordon Berger, Christoph; Veit, Peter; Metzner, Sebastian; Bertram, Frank; Bläsing, Jürgen; Dadgar, Armin; Strittmatter, André; Christen, Jürgen; Callsen, Gordon; Kalinowski, Stefan; Hoffmann, Axel

    2015-06-22

    Intense emission from GaN islands embedded in AlN resulting from GaN/AlN quantum well growth is directly resolved by performing cathodoluminescence spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Line widths down to 440 μeV are measured in a wavelength region between 220 and 310 nm confirming quantum dot like electronic properties in the islands. These quantum dot states can be structurally correlated to islands of slightly enlarged thicknesses of the GaN/AlN quantum well layer preferentially formed in vicinity to dislocations. The quantum dot states exhibit single photon emission in Hanbury Brown-Twiss experiments with a clear antibunching in the second order correlation function at zero time delay.

  2. Azimuthally anisotropic emission of low-momentum direct photons in Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; ...

    2016-12-06

    Inmore » this paper, the PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured second- and third-order Fourier coefficients of the azimuthal distributions of direct photons emitted at midrapidity in Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV for various collision centralities. Combining two different analysis techniques, results were obtained in the transverse momentum range of 0.4 < pT < 4.0 GeV/c. At low pT the second-order coefficients, v2, are similar to the ones observed in hadrons. Third-order coefficients, v3, are nonzero and almost independent of centrality. These new results on v2 and v3, combined with previously published results on yields, are compared to model calculations that provide yields and asymmetries in the same framework. Finally, those models are challenged to explain simultaneously the observed large yield and large azimuthal anisotropies.« less

  3. Prospects of direct search for dark photon and dark Higgs in SeaQuest/E1067 experiment at the Fermilab main injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming Xiong

    2017-03-01

    In this review, we present the current status and prospects of the dark sector physics search program of the SeaQuest/E1067 fixed target dimuon experiment at Fermilab Main Injector. There has been tremendous excitement and progress in searching for new physics in the dark sector in recent years. Dark sector refers to a collection of currently unknown particles that do not directly couple with the Standard Model (SM) strong and electroweak (EW) interactions but assumed to carry gravitational force, thus could be candidates of the missing Dark Matter (DM). Such particles may interact with the SM particles through “portal” interactions. Two of the simple possibilities are being investigated in our initial search: (1) dark photon and (2) dark Higgs. They could be within immediate reach of current or near future experimental search. We show there is a unique opportunity today at Fermilab to directly search for these particles in a highly motivated but uncharted parameter space in high-energy proton-nucleus collisions in the beam-dump mode using the 120 GeV proton beam from the Main Injector. Our current search window covers the mass range 0.2-10 GeV/c2, and in the near future, by adding an electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal) to the spectrometer, we can further explore the lower mass region down to about ˜1 MeV/c2 through the di-electron channel. If dark photons (and/or dark Higgs) were observed, they would revolutionize our understanding of the fundamental structures and interactions of our universe.

  4. Soft drinks in schools.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    This statement is intended to inform pediatricians and other health care professionals, parents, superintendents, and school board members about nutritional concerns regarding soft drink consumption in schools. Potential health problems associated with high intake of sweetened drinks are 1) overweight or obesity attributable to additional calories in the diet; 2) displacement of milk consumption, resulting in calcium deficiency with an attendant risk of osteoporosis and fractures; and 3) dental caries and potential enamel erosion. Contracts with school districts for exclusive soft drink rights encourage consumption directly and indirectly. School officials and parents need to become well informed about the health implications of vended drinks in school before making a decision about student access to them. A clearly defined, district-wide policy that restricts the sale of soft drinks will safeguard against health problems as a result of overconsumption.

  5. Measurement of the cross section for direct-photon production in association with a heavy quark in pp[over ¯] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; De Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; d'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucà, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2013-07-26

    We report on a measurement of the cross section for direct-photon production in association with a heavy quark using the full data set of sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV proton-antiproton collisions corresponding to 9.1  fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measurements are performed as a function of the photon transverse momentum, covering a photon transverse momentum between 30 and 300 GeV, photon rapidities |yγ|<1.0, a heavy-quark-jet transverse momentum pTjet>20  GeV, and jet rapidities |yjet|<1.5. The results are compared with several theoretical predictions.

  6. Soft electronics for soft robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Rebecca K.

    2015-05-01

    As advanced as modern machines are, the building blocks have changed little since the industrial revolution, leading to rigid, bulky, and complex devices. Future machines will include electromechanical systems that are soft and elastically deformable, lending them to applications such as soft robotics, wearable/implantable devices, sensory skins, and energy storage and transport systems. One key step toward the realization of soft systems is the development of stretchable electronics that remain functional even when subject to high strains. Liquid-metal traces embedded in elastic polymers present a unique opportunity to retain the function of rigid metal conductors while leveraging the deformable properties of liquid-elastomer composites. However, in order to achieve the potential benefits of liquid-metal, scalable processing and manufacturing methods must be identified.

  7. Near Infrared Graphene Quantum Dots-Based Two-Photon Nanoprobe for Direct Bioimaging of Endogenous Ascorbic Acid in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li-Li; Wu, Yong-Xiang; Zhang, Dai-Liang; Hu, Xiao-Xiao; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Peng; Song, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong

    2017-04-04

    Ascorbic acid (AA), as one of the most important vitamins, participates in various physiological reactions in the human body and is implicated with many diseases. Therefore, the development of effective methods for monitoring the AA level in living systems is of great significance. Up to date, various technologies have been developed for the detection of AA. However, few methods can realize the direct detection of endogenous AA in living cells. In this work, we for the first time reported that near-infrared (NIR) graphene quantum dots (GQD) possessed good two-photon fluorescence properties with a NIR emission at 660 nm upon exciting with 810 nm femtosecond pulses and a two-photon (TP) excitation action cross-section (δΦ) of 25.12 GM. They were then employed to construct a TP nanoprobe for detection and bioimaging of endogenous AA in living cells. In this nanosystem, NIR GQDs (NGs), which exhibited lower fluorescence background in living system to afford improved fluorescence imaging resolution, were acted as fluorescence reporters. Also CoOOH nanoflakes were chosen as fluorescence quenchers by forming on the surface of NGs. Once AA was introduced, CoOOH was reduced to Co(2+), which resulted in a "turn-on" fluorescence signal of NGs. The proposed nanoprobe demonstrated high sensitivity toward AA, with the observed LOD of 270 nM. It also showed high selectivity to AA with excellent photostability. Moreover, the nanoprobe was successfully used for TP imaging of endogenous AA in living cells as well as deep tissue imaging.

  8. Photonics for life.

    PubMed

    Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Bassi, Andrea; Comelli, Daniela; Cova, Sergio; Farina, Andrea; Ghioni, Massimo; Rech, Ivan; Pifferi, Antonio; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Taroni, Paola; Torricelli, Alessandro; Tosi, Alberto; Valentini, Gianluca; Zappa, Franco

    2011-01-01

    Light is strictly connected with life, and its presence is fundamental for any living environment. Thus, many biological mechanisms are related to light interaction or can be evaluated through processes involving energy exchange with photons. Optics has always been a precious tool to evaluate molecular and cellular mechanisms, but the discovery of lasers opened new pathways of interactions of light with biological matter, pushing an impressive development for both therapeutic and diagnostic applications in biomedicine. The use of light in different fields has become so widespread that the word photonics has been utilized to identify all the applications related to processes where the light is involved. The photonics area covers a wide range of wavelengths spanning from soft X-rays to mid-infrared and includes all devices related to photons as light sources, optical fibers and light guides, detectors, and all the related electronic equipment. The recent use of photons in the field of telecommunications has pushed the technology toward low-cost, compact, and efficient devices, making them available for many other applications, including those related to biology and medicine where these requirements are of particular relevance. Moreover, basic sciences such as physics, chemistry, mathematics, and electronics have recognized the interdisciplinary need of biomedical science and are translating the most advanced researches into these fields. The Politecnico school has pioneered many of them,and this article reviews the state of the art of biomedical research at the Politecnico in the field internationally known as biophotonics.

  9. Soft normed rings.

    PubMed

    Uluçay, Vakkas; Şahin, Mehmet; Olgun, Necati

    2016-01-01

    Molodtsov introduced the concept of soft sets, which can be seen as a new mathematical tool for dealing with uncertainty. In this paper, we initiate the study of soft normed rings by soft set theory. The notions of soft normed rings, soft normed ideals, soft complete normed rings are introduced and also several related properties and examples are given.

  10. Measurement of the Nuclear Dependence of Direct Photon and Neutral Meson Production at High Transverse Momentum by Negative 515-GeV/c Pions Incident on Beryllium and Copper Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sorrell, Lee Ronald

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear dependence of inclusive direct photon production and inclusive neutral meson production by a 515 GeV/c $\\pi^-$ beam has been measured using data collected by the E706 experiment during the 19.90 fixed, target run at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The experiment utilized a finely segmented liquid argon calorimeter and a high precision charged particle spectrometer to make precision measurements of inclusive direct photon, neutral pion, and $\\eta$ production in the rapidity interval from -0.75 < $y$ < 0.75. The $\\pi^0$ data is reported for the $P_T$ range from 0.6 GeV /c to 12 GeV /c, while the $\\eta$ data is reported for the range from 3.5 GeV /c to 7.0 GeV /c. The direct photon nuclear dependence results are reported for the range from approxlmately 4.0 GeV/c to 8.5 GeV/c. The data from the beryllium and copper targets have been fit using the parameterization $\\sigma_A$ = $\\sigma_0$ x $A^{\\alpha}$. The neutral meson results are in good agreement with previous charged meson results. The direct photon results are consistent with no anomalous enhancement.

  11. Disordered photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, Diederik S.

    2013-03-01

    What do lotus flowers have in common with human bones, liquid crystals with colloidal suspensions, and white beetles with the beautiful stones of the Taj Mahal? The answer is they all feature disordered structures that strongly scatter light, in which light waves entering the material are scattered several times before exiting in random directions. These randomly distributed rays interfere with each other, leading to interesting, and sometimes unexpected, physical phenomena. This Review describes the physics behind the optical properties of disordered structures and how knowledge of multiple light scattering can be used to develop new applications. The field of disordered photonics has grown immensely over the past decade, ranging from investigations into fundamental topics such as Anderson localization and other transport phenomena, to applications in imaging, random lasing and solar energy.

  12. Direct measurement of Lubberts effect in CsI:Tl scintillators using single x-ray photon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howansky, Adrian; Lubinsky, A. R.; Ghose, S. K.; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Zhao, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The imaging performance of an indirect flat panel detector (I-FPD) is fundamentally limited by that of its scintillator. The scintillator's modulation transfer function (MTF) varies as a function of the depth of x-ray interaction in the layer, due to differences in the lateral spread of light before detection by the optical sensor. This variation degrades the spatial frequency-dependent detective quantum efficiency (DQE(f)) of I-FPDs, and is quantified by the Lubberts effect. The depth-dependent MTFs of various scintillators used in I-FPDs have been estimated using Monte Carlo simulations, but have never been measured directly. This work presents the first experimental measurements of the depth-dependent MTF of thallium-doped cesium iodide (CsI) and terbium-doped Gd2O2S (GOS) scintillators with thickness ranging from 200 - 1000 μm. Light bursts from individual x-ray interactions occurring at known, fixed depths within a scintillator are imaged using an ultra-high-sensitivity II-EMCCD (image-intensifier, electron multiplying charge coupled device) camera. X-ray interaction depth in the scintillator is localized using a micro-slit beam of parallel synchrotron radiation (32 keV), and varied by translation in 50 +/- 1 µm depth intervals. Fourier analysis of the imaged light bursts is used to deduce the MTF versus x-ray interaction depth z. Measurements of MTF(z,f) are used to calculate presampling MTF(f) with RQA-M3, RQA5 and RQA9 beam qualities and compared with conventional slanted edge measurements. Images of the depth-varying light bursts are used to derive each scintillator's Lubberts function for a 32 keV beam.

  13. Optomechanical soft metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiangjun; He, Wei; Liu, Yifan; Xin, Fengxian; Lu, Tian Jian

    2017-06-01

    We present a new type of optomechanical soft metamaterials, which is different from conventional mechanical metamaterials, in that they are simple isotropic and homogenous materials without resorting to any complex nano/microstructures. This metamaterial is unique in the sense that its responses to uniaxial forcing can be tailored by programmed laser inputs to manifest different nonlinear constitutive behaviors, such as monotonic, S-shape, plateau, and non-monotonic snapping performance. To demonstrate the novel metamaterial, a thin sheet of soft material impinged by two counterpropagating lasers along its thickness direction and stretched by an in-plane tensile mechanical force is considered. A theoretical model is formulated to characterize the resulting optomechanical behavior of the thin sheet by combining the nonlinear elasticity theory of soft materials and the optical radiation stress theory. The optical radiation stresses predicted by the proposed model are validated by simulations based on the method of finite elements. Programmed optomechanical behaviors are subsequently explored using the validated model under different initial sheet thicknesses and different optical inputs, and the first- and second-order tangential stiffness of the metamaterial are used to plot the phase diagram of its nonlinear constitutive behaviors. The proposed optomechanical soft metamaterial shows great potential in biological medicine, microfluidic manipulation, and other fields.

  14. Fabrication of submicron chalcogenide glass photonic crystal by resist-free nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jianghui; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Peiqing; Tang, Junzhou; Xu, Yinsheng; Chen, Feifei; Shen, Xiang; Dai, Shixun

    2017-09-01

    We reported the fabrication of submicron photonic crystal with As40Se40Te20 chalcogenide glass by resist-free thermal nanoimprint using a soft stamp. The As40Se40Te20 glass was prepared with melt-quenching method, and measured to have broad transmission range, high linear and nonlinear refractive index, and good thermal stability. Due to the very low glass transition temperature, the thermal nanoimprint was accomplished directly on the resist-free bulk glass with the soft stamp. By choosing suitable imprint condition, submicron chalcogenide glass photonic crystal with the band gap covering telecom wavelength was obtained. Taking advantage of the high nonlinearity of As40Se40Te20 glass, the imprinted PC structure may have potential applications for all-optical switch in optical communications.

  15. Jet-like correlations with direct-photon and neutral-pion triggers at √{sNN} = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Anderson, D. M.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, Y.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Luo, S.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, H.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, J.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y. F.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2016-09-01

    Azimuthal correlations of charged hadrons with direct-photon (γdir) and neutral-pion (π0) trigger particles are analyzed in central Au+Au and minimum-bias p + p collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV in the STAR experiment. The charged-hadron per-trigger yields at mid-rapidity from central Au+Au collisions are compared with p + p collisions to quantify the suppression in Au+Au collisions. The suppression of the away-side associated-particle yields per γdir trigger is independent of the transverse momentum of the trigger particle (pTtrig), whereas the suppression is smaller at low transverse momentum of the associated charged hadrons (pTassoc). Within uncertainty, similar levels of suppression are observed for γdir and π0 triggers as a function of zT (≡pTassoc / pTtrig). The results are compared with energy-loss-inspired theoretical model predictions. Our studies support previous conclusions that the lost energy reappears predominantly at low transverse momentum, regardless of the trigger energy.

  16. Direct laser writing of synthetic poly(amino acid) hydrogels and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylates by two-photon polymerization.

    PubMed

    Käpylä, Elli; Sedlačík, Tomáš; Aydogan, Dogu Baran; Viitanen, Jouko; Rypáček, František; Kellomäki, Minna

    2014-10-01

    The additive manufacturing technique of direct laser writing by two-photon polymerization (2PP-DLW) enables the fabrication of three-dimensional microstructures with superior accuracy and flexibility. When combined with biomimetic hydrogel materials, 2PP-DLW can be used to recreate the microarchitectures of the extracellular matrix. However, there are currently only a limited number of hydrogels applicable for 2PP-DLW. In order to widen the selection of synthetic biodegradable hydrogels, in this work we studied the 2PP-DLW of methacryloylated and acryloylated poly(α-amino acid)s (poly(AA)s). The performance of these materials was compared to widely used poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylates (PEGdas) in terms of polymerization and damage thresholds, voxel size, line width, post-polymerization swelling and deformation. We found that both methacryloylated and acryloylated poly(AA) hydrogels are suitable to 2PP-DLW with a wider processing window than PEGdas. The poly(AA) with the highest degree of acryloylation showed the greatest potential for 3D microfabrication.

  17. Jet-like correlations with direct-photon and neutral-pion triggers at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; ...

    2016-07-22

    Azimuthal correlations of charged hadrons with direct-photon (γdir) and neutral-pion (π0) trigger particles are analyzed in central Au+Au and minimum-bias p+p collisions atmore » $$\\sqrt{s}$$$_{NN}$$ =200 GeV in the STAR experiment. The charged-hadron per-trigger yields at mid-rapidity from central Au+Au collisions are compared with p+p collisions to quantify the suppression in Au+Au collisions. The suppression of the away-side associated-particle yields per γdir trigger is independent of the transverse momentum of the trigger particle (P$$trig\\atop{T}$$, whereas the suppression is smaller at low transverse momentum of the associated charged hadrons (P$$assoc\\atop{T}$$). Within uncertainty, similar levels of suppression are observed for γdir and π0 triggers as a function of zT ($$\\equiv$$ P$$assoc\\atop{T}$$/$P$$trig\\atop{T}$$). The results are compared with energy-loss-inspired theoretical model predictions. In conclusion, our studies support previous conclusions that the lost energy reappears predominantly at low transverse momentum, regardless of the trigger energy.« less

  18. Chaperone probes and bead-based enhancement to improve the direct detection of mRNA using silicon photonic sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Kindt, Jared T; Bailey, Ryan C

    2012-09-18

    Herein, we describe the utility of chaperone probes and a bead-based signal enhancement strategy for the analysis of full length mRNA transcripts using arrays of silicon photonic microring resonators. Changes in the local refractive index near microring sensors associated with biomolecular binding events are transduced as a shift in the resonant wavelength supported by the cavity, enabling the sensitive analysis of numerous analytes of interest. We employ the sensing platform for both the direct and bead-enhanced detection of three different mRNA transcripts, achieving a dynamic range spanning over 4 orders of magnitude and demonstrating expression profiling capabilities in total RNA extracts from the HL-60 cell line. Small, dual-use DNA chaperone molecules were developed and found to both enhance the binding kinetics of mRNA transcripts by disrupting complex secondary structure and serve as sequence-specific linkers for subsequent bead amplification. Importantly, this approach does not require amplification of the mRNA transcript, thereby allowing for simplified analyses that do not require expensive enzymatic reagents or temperature ramping capabilities associated with RT-PCR-based methods.

  19. Direct electron pair production in. pi. /sup -/p interactions at 16 GeV/c and a model for direct lepton and photon production at low P/sub T/

    SciTech Connect

    Blockus, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Leith, D.W.G.S.

    1981-07-01

    The production of prompt electron-positron pairs in 16 GeV/c ..pi../sup -/p collisions has been measured using the LASS spectrometer at SLAC. An excess of events is observed above the estimated contributions of direct and Dalitz decay of known resonances in the kinematic range defined by 0.1 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.45, 0 less than or equal to P/sub T/ less than or equal to 0.8 GeV/c and 0.2 less than or equal to M(e/sup +/e/sup -/) less than or equal to 0.7 GeV/c/sup 2/. The excess signal decreases slowly with increasing M, but exhibits very steep x and P/sub T//sup 2/ dependence. The contribution of this signal to the e/sup +/e/sup -//..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ and ..gamma../..pi.. ratios is discussed. Detailed comparisons are made between e/sup +/e/sup -/ distributions and the corresponding low mass ..mu../sup +/..mu../sup -/ distributions, and a simple production mechanism is proposed which describes the 16 GeV/c data well. The implications for direct photon production are presented, and it is shown that the model provides simultaneously a good description of the experimental data on the (e/..pi..) and (..mu../..pi..) ratios for p/sub T/ < 1 GeV/c.

  20. Inclusive direct photon production in the central and forward rapidity regions in proton - anti-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1800-GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Jerger, Steven A.

    1997-01-01

    A study of isolated direct photon production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy √s= 1800 Ge V is reported, as measured at the D0 Fermilab Tevatron. Cross sections for the central (0 ≤ |η| ≤0.9) and forward (1.6 ≤ |η| ≤2.5) rapidity regions are presented as a function of photon (15 GeV≤ ET ≤ 150 GeV ), and compared with a next-to-leading order QCD calculation. In the central the data and theory are consistent in both shape and normalization; however, in the forward region the data are consistently above the theory, especially in the ET region below ~30 Ge V. A preliminary measurement of the correlation between the rapidity of the photon and that of the leading in the event shows qualitative agreement between the data and theoretical prediction.

  1. Burning plasmas with ultrashort soft-x-ray flashing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Skupsky, S.

    2012-07-01

    Fast ignition with narrow-band coherent x-ray pulses has been revisited for cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma conditions achieved on the OMEGA Laser System. In contrast to using hard-x-rays (hv = 3-6 keV) proposed in the original x-ray fast-ignition proposal, we find that soft-x-ray sources with hv ≈ 500 eV photons can be suitable for igniting the dense DT-plasmas achieved on OMEGA. Two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulations have identified the break-even conditions for realizing such a "hybrid" ignition scheme (direct-drive compression with soft-x-ray heating) with 50-μm-offset targets: ˜10 ps soft-x-ray pulse (hv ≈ 500 eV) with a total energy of 500-1000 J to be focused into a 10 μm spot-size. A variety of x-ray pulse parameters have also been investigated for optimization. It is noted that an order of magnitude increase in neutron yield has been predicted even with x-ray energy as low as ˜50 J. Scaling this idea to a 1 MJ large-scale target, a gain above ˜30 can be reached with the same soft-x-ray pulse at 1.65 kJ energy. Even though such energetic x-ray sources do not currently exist, we hope that the proposed ignition scheme may stimulate efforts on generating powerful soft-x-ray sources in the near future.

  2. Burning plasmas with ultrashort soft-x-ray flashing

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Skupsky, S.

    2012-07-15

    Fast ignition with narrow-band coherent x-ray pulses has been revisited for cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma conditions achieved on the OMEGA Laser System. In contrast to using hard-x-rays (hv = 3-6 keV) proposed in the original x-ray fast-ignition proposal, we find that soft-x-ray sources with hv Almost-Equal-To 500 eV photons can be suitable for igniting the dense DT-plasmas achieved on OMEGA. Two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulations have identified the break-even conditions for realizing such a 'hybrid' ignition scheme (direct-drive compression with soft-x-ray heating) with 50-{mu}m-offset targets: {approx}10 ps soft-x-ray pulse (hv Almost-Equal-To 500 eV) with a total energy of 500-1000 J to be focused into a 10 {mu}m spot-size. A variety of x-ray pulse parameters have also been investigated for optimization. It is noted that an order of magnitude increase in neutron yield has been predicted even with x-ray energy as low as {approx}50 J. Scaling this idea to a 1 MJ large-scale target, a gain above {approx}30 can be reached with the same soft-x-ray pulse at 1.65 kJ energy. Even though such energetic x-ray sources do not currently exist, we hope that the proposed ignition scheme may stimulate efforts on generating powerful soft-x-ray sources in the near future.

  3. Career Directions--Photonics Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2012-01-01

    Many of the advances in telecommunications and medicine are due to laser and fiber-optic technology. This technology has led to devices that provide faster and richer communication, advanced surgeries, and faster healing times, as well as amazing robotics for manufacturing. But, as with all equipment, someone has to install and maintain it. That…

  4. Career Directions--Photonics Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2012-01-01

    Many of the advances in telecommunications and medicine are due to laser and fiber-optic technology. This technology has led to devices that provide faster and richer communication, advanced surgeries, and faster healing times, as well as amazing robotics for manufacturing. But, as with all equipment, someone has to install and maintain it. That…

  5. Soft Mappings Space

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Taha Yasin; Bayramov, Sadi

    2014-01-01

    Various soft topologies are being introduced on a given function space soft topological spaces. In this paper, soft compact-open topology is defined in functional spaces of soft topological spaces. Further, these functional spaces are studied and interrelations between various functional spaces with soft compact-open topology are established. PMID:25374936

  6. Direct treatment of high-strength soft drink wastewater using a down-flow hanging sponge reactor: performance and microbial community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Liao, Junhui; Fang, Curtis; Yu, Jimmy; Sathyagal, Arun; Willman, Eric; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2017-07-01

    A stand-alone down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) system with a two-stage configuration was operated for 700 days to treat synthetic soft drink wastewater at 3000 mg/L chemical oxygen demand (COD). Throughout the operation, >90% COD and total organic carbon (TOC) removal efficiency was obtained by the first stage, and a final effluent of COD <60 mg/L (TOC <20 mg/L) was consistently maintained with the second stage. Lower organic removal efficiency was observed to closely correlate with lower pH, higher volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration, and higher suspended solid (SS) in the effluent. Occasionally, biomass sloughing was observed as a cause to unstable reactor performance in the first stage. The microbial community of the retained biomass on the sponges differed significantly based on spatial locations of sponges, sampling time points, and loading shocks. In general, Proteobacteria were found to be more abundant in the reactor at an organic removal efficiency >80% than that at <50%. Specifically, operational taxonomic units closely related to Tolumonas auensis and Rivicola pingtungensis were identified as important populations that were responsible for degrading the major substrate in the soft drink wastewater toward to the end of the reactor operation. In addition, high abundance of Bacteroidetes in the reactor was speculated to be responsible for the VFA accumulation in the effluent. This study demonstrated that stand-alone DHS reactor could be used in treating high-strength wastewater efficiently.

  7. Direct evidence of layer-by-layer assembly of polyelectrolyte multilayers on soft and porous temperature-sensitive PNiPAM microgel using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wong, John E; Müller, Claus B; Laschewsky, André; Richtering, Walter

    2007-07-26

    We describe the layer-by-layer assembly of polyelectrolyte multilayers on soft and porous temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAM) microgel. Microgels are not hard and rigid but rather are soft and porous particles, and polyelectrolytes not only interdigitate with each other during multilayer formation but also with the microgel. Because of this difference, there could be concerns about the feasibility of the layer-by-layer technique on these systems. The argument is that the layer being deposited is stripping the underlying layer instead of anchoring to the latter, and common methods of characterizing film growth on particles such as zeta-potentials will still show "successful" charge reversal. To address this issue, we used two differently labeled polyelectrolytes during the deposition. Because of the small size of the microgel (400 nm) studied, we cannot distinguish between polyelectrolytes adsorbed on or in the microgel. However, with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we can clearly distinguish between free labeled polyelectrolytes and those that are bound to the microgel. Dual-color correlation confirms the presence of both polyelectrolytes bound to the same particle while fluorescence imaging (on a dry sample) provides the visual proof.

  8. Direct observation of ferromagnetism in grain boundary phase of Nd-Fe-B sintered magnet using soft x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, T.; Yasui, A.; Kotani, Y.; Iwai, H.; Akiya, T.; Ohkubo, T.; Hono, K.; Hirosawa, S.; Gohda, Y.

    2014-11-17

    We have investigated the magnetism of the grain boundary (GB) phase in a Nd{sub 14.0}Fe{sub 79.7}Cu{sub 0.1}B{sub 6.2} sintered magnet using soft x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) at the Fe L{sub 2,3}-edges. Soft XMCD spectra were measured from the fractured surface that was confirmed to be covered with a thin GB phase by Auger electron spectroscopy. The magnetic moment of Fe in the GB phase was estimated to be m{sub GB}=1.4 μ{sub B} at 30 °C using the sum rule analysis for XMCD spectra, which is 60% of that of Fe in the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound. The temperature dependence of m{sub GB} evaluated with reference to Fe in the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase indicated that the Curie temperature of the GB phase is more than 50 °C lower compared to that of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B.

  9. Soft Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilles de Gennes, Pierre; Edwards, Introduction By Sam

    1997-04-01

    Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, one of the greatest physicists of the twentieth century, died in 1984. Dirac's college, St. John's of Cambridge, generously endowed annual lectures to be held at Cambridge University in his memory. This volume contains a much expanded version of the 1994 Dirac Lecture by Nobel Laureate Pierre Gilles de Gennes. The book presents an impressionistic tour of the physics of soft interfaces. Full of insight and interesting asides, it not only provides an accessible introduction to this topic, but also lays down many markers and signposts that will be of interest to researchers in physics or chemistry. Features discussions of wetting and dewetting, the dynamics of different types of interface and adhesion and polymer/polymer welding.

  10. Construction of a New VUV/Soft X-ray Undulator Beamline BL-13A in the Photon Factory for Study of Organic Thin Films and Biomolecules Adsorbed on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mase, Kazuhiko; Toyoshima, Akio; Kikuchi, Takashi; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Amemiya, Kenta; Ito, Kenji

    2010-06-23

    A planar undulator beamline, BL-13A, covering 30-1,000 eV has been constructed in the Photon Factory. The main scientific targets are investigations of organic thin films and biomolecules adsorbed on well-defined surfaces using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A variable-included-angle Monk-Gillieson mounting monochromator with varied-line-spacing plane gratings is used to achieve a high photon flux of 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} photons/s with a high resolution (E/{Delta}E) of 7,000-30,000. A typical spot size on the sample position is estimated to be 130 {mu}m (horizontal)x40 {mu}m (vertical). After commissioning, BL-13A will be open for users from January 2010.

  11. Photonic Hypercrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narimanov, Evgenii E.

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a new "universality class" of artificial optical media—photonic hypercrystals. These hyperbolic metamaterials, with periodic spatial variation of dielectric permittivity on subwavelength scale, combine the features of optical metamaterials and photonic crystals. In particular, surface waves supported by a hypercrystal possess the properties of both the optical Tamm states in photonic crystals and surface-plasmon polaritons at the metal-dielectric interface.

  12. Photon absorptiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the detection and treatment of osteoporosis. This paper is a review of the merits and limitations of the various noninvasive modalities currently available for the measurement of bone mineral density with special emphasis placed upon the nuclear medicine techniques of single-photon and dual-photon absorptiometry. The clinicians should come away with an understanding of the relative advantages and disadvantages of photon absorptiometry and its optimal clinical application. 49 references.

  13. Topological photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S. C.

    2008-03-01

    We associate intrinsic energy equal to hν /2 with the spin angular momentum of photon, and propose a topological model based on orbifold in space and tifold in time as topological obstructions. The model is substantiated using vector wavefield disclinations. The physical photon is suggested to be a particlelike topological photon and a propagating wave such that the energy hν of photon is equally divided between spin energy and translational energy, corresponding to linear momentum of hν /c. The enigma of wave-particle duality finds natural resolution, and the proposed model gives new insights into the phenomena of interference and emission of radiation.

  14. Soft X-ray techniques to study mesoscale magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, Jeffrey B.

    2003-06-26

    Heterogeneity in magnetization (M) is ubiquitous in modern systems. Even in nominally homogeneous materials, domains or pinning centers typically mediate magnetization reversal. Fundamental lengths determining M structure include the domain wall width and the exchange stiffness length, typically in the 4-400 nm range. Chemical heterogeneity (phase separation, polycrystalline microstructure, lithographic or other patterning, etc.) with length scales from nanometers to microns is often introduced to influence magnetic properties. With 1-2 nm wavelengths {lambda}, soft x-rays in principle can resolve structure down to {lambda}/2, and are well suited to study these mesoscopic length scales [1, 2]. This article highlights recent advances in resonant soft x-ray methods to resolve lateral magnetic structure [3], and discusses some of their relative merits and limitations. Only techniques detecting x-ray photons (rather than photo-electrons) are considered [4], since they are compatible with strong applied fields to probe relatively deeply into samples. The magneto-optical (MO) effects discovered by Faraday and Kerr were observed in the x-ray range over a century later, first at ''hard'' wavelengths in diffraction experiments probing interatomic magnetic structure [5]. In the soft x-ray range, magnetic linear [6] and circular [7] dichroism spectroscopies first developed that average over lateral magnetic structure. These large resonant MO effects enable different approaches to study magnetic structure or heterogeneity that can be categorized as microscopy or scattering [1]. Direct images of magnetic structure result from photo-emission electron microscopes [4, 8] and zone-plate microscopes [9, 10]. Scattering techniques extended into the soft x-ray include familiar specular reflection that laterally averages over structure but can provide depth-resolved information, and diffuse scattering and diffraction that provide direct information about lateral magnetic structure

  15. Direct Detection of Transcription Factors in Cotyledons during Seedling Development Using Sensitive Silicon-Substrate Photonic Crystal Protein Arrays1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sarah I.; Tan, Yafang; Shamimuzzaman, Md; George, Sherine; Cunningham, Brian T.; Vodkin, Lila

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors control important gene networks, altering the expression of a wide variety of genes, including those of agronomic importance, despite often being expressed at low levels. Detecting transcription factor proteins is difficult, because current high-throughput methods may not be sensitive enough. One-dimensional, silicon-substrate photonic crystal (PC) arrays provide an alternative substrate for printing multiplexed protein microarrays that have greater sensitivity through an increased signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescent signal compared with performing the same assay upon a traditional aminosilanized glass surface. As a model system to test proof of concept of the silicon-substrate PC arrays to directly detect rare proteins in crude plant extracts, we selected representatives of four different transcription factor families (zinc finger GATA, basic helix-loop-helix, BTF3/NAC [for basic transcription factor of the NAC family], and YABBY) that have increasing transcript levels during the stages of seedling cotyledon development. Antibodies to synthetic peptides representing the transcription factors were printed on both glass slides and silicon-substrate PC slides along with antibodies to abundant cotyledon proteins, seed lectin, and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. The silicon-substrate PC arrays proved more sensitive than those performed on glass slides, detecting rare proteins that were below background on the glass slides. The zinc finger transcription factor was detected on the PC arrays in crude extracts of all stages of the seedling cotyledons, whereas YABBY seemed to be at the lower limit of their sensitivity. Interestingly, the basic helix-loop-helix and NAC proteins showed developmental profiles consistent with their transcript patterns, indicating proof of concept for detecting these low-abundance proteins in crude extracts. PMID:25635113

  16. Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscles, tendons, fat, and blood vessels. Soft tissue sarcoma is a cancer of these soft tissues. There ... have certain genetic diseases. Doctors diagnose soft tissue sarcomas with a biopsy. Treatments include surgery to remove ...

  17. Necrotizing soft tissue infection

    MedlinePlus

    Necrotizing fasciitis; Fasciitis - necrotizing; Flesh-eating bacteria; Soft tissue gangrene; Gangrene - soft tissue ... Many different types of bacteria can cause this infection. A very severe and usually deadly form of necrotizing soft tissue infection is due to the ...

  18. Silicon photonic heater-modulator

    DOEpatents

    Zortman, William A.; Trotter, Douglas Chandler; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-07-14

    Photonic modulators, methods of forming photonic modulators and methods of modulating an input optical signal are provided. A photonic modulator includes a disk resonator having a central axis extending along a thickness direction of the disk resonator. The disk resonator includes a modulator portion and a heater portion. The modulator portion extends in an arc around the central axis. A PN junction of the modulator portion is substantially normal to the central axis.

  19. Pseudo single crystal, direct-band-gap Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} on amorphous dielectric layers towards monolithic 3D photonic integration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haofeng; Brouillet, Jeremy; Wang, Xiaoxin; Liu, Jifeng

    2014-11-17

    We demonstrate pseudo single crystal, direct-band-gap Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} crystallized on amorphous layers at <450 °C towards 3D Si photonic integration. We developed two approaches to seed the lateral single crystal growth: (1) utilize the Gibbs-Thomson eutectic temperature depression at the tip of an amorphous GeSn nanotaper for selective nucleation; (2) laser-induced nucleation at one end of a GeSn strip. Either way, the crystallized Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} is dominated by a single grain >18 μm long that forms optoelectronically benign twin boundaries with others grains. These pseudo single crystal, direct-band-gap Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} patterns are suitable for monolithic 3D integration of active photonic devices on Si.

  20. Soft hypergroups and soft hypergroup homomorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvachandran, Ganeshsree; Salleh, Abdul Razak

    2013-04-01

    Soft set is a general mathematical tool for dealing with uncertainties and imprecision. Many complicated problems in economics, engineering, environment, social science, medical science and other fields involve uncertain data. These problems cannot be solved using existing classical methods such as fuzzy set theory and rough set theory. Hence the concept of soft sets was introduced as a new mathematical tool for dealing with uncertainties that is free from the difficulties affecting the existing methods. The theory of hyperstructures and hyperalgebra on the other hand, was introduced as an extension of the classical theory of sets as well as the theory of abstract algebra. This theory states that in an algebraic hyperstructure, the composition of two elements is a set. The study of soft hyperstructures which is an extension of the theory of soft sets and the theory of algebraic hyperstructures began with the introduction of the notion of soft hypergroupoids and soft subhypergroupoids. In this paper, we study the theory of soft hyperalgebra by introducing the notion of soft hypergroups and soft subhypergroups as an extension of the notion of soft sets, algebraic hyperstructures and soft hyperstructures. This is followed by the introduction of the notion of soft homomorphism of hypergroups. Furthermore the basic properties and structural characteristics of these notions are studied and discussed.

  1. The photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Russell L.

    2009-10-01

    There are no TEM waves, only photons. Lets build a photon, using a radio antenna. A short antenna (2L<< λ) simplifies the calculation, letting B fall off everywhere as 1/r^2. The Biot-Savart law finds B = (μ0/4π)(LI0/r^2)θφt. The magnetic flux thru a semi-circle of radius λ/2 is set equal to the flux quantum h/e, determining the needed source strength, LI0. From this, one can integrate the magnetic energy density over a sphere of radius λ/2 and finds it to be 1.0121 hc/λ. Pretty close. A B field collapses when the current ceases, but the photon evades this by creating a ɛ0E / t displacement current at center that fully supports the toroidal B assembly as it moves at c. This E=vxB arises because the photon moves at c. Stopped, a photon decays. At every point along the photon's path, an observer will note a transient oscillation of an E field. This sources the EM ``guiding wave'', carrying little or no energy and expanding at c. At the head of the photon, all these spherical guiding waves gather ``in-phase'' as a planar wavefront. This model speaks to all the many things we know about light. The photon is tiny, but its guiding wave is huge.

  2. Soft translations and soft extensions of BCI/BCK-algebras.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Nazra; Rani, Nazia; Ali, Muhammad Irfan; Hussain, Azhar

    2014-01-01

    The concept of soft translations of soft subalgebras and soft ideals over BCI/BCK-algebras is introduced and some related properties are studied. Notions of Soft extensions of soft subalgebras and soft ideals over BCI/BCK-algebras are also initiated. Relationships between soft translations and soft extensions are explored.

  3. Frequency Agile Microwave Photonic Notch Filter in a Photonic Chip

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-21

    frequency measurement (IFM) system was also explored. 4. Results and discussions: a. High extinction tunable notch filter in a chalcogenide chip [Optica...Microwave photonic filters based on SBS have shown excellent properties in terms of high resolution and extinction . Although efficiently generated in soft...sidebands’ spectra. d. High resolution microwave frequency measurement with on-chip SBS [Optica 3, 30 (2016)] The high extinction cancellation

  4. Multi-mJ mid-infrared kHz OPCPA and Yb-doped pump lasers for tabletop coherent soft x-ray generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data Sy