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Sample records for direct surface magnetometry

  1. Direct surface magnetometry with photoemission magnetic x-ray dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Goodman, K.W.; Schumann, F.O.

    1997-04-01

    Element specific surface magnetometry remains a central goal of synchrotron radiation based studies of nanomagnetic structures. One appealing possibility is the combination of x-ray absorption dichroism measurements and the theoretical framework provided by the {open_quotes}sum rules.{close_quotes} Unfortunately, sum rule analysis are hampered by several limitations including delocalization of the final state, multi-electronic phenomena and the presence of surface dipoles. An alternative experiment, Magnetic X-Ray Dichroism in Photoelectron Spectroscopy, holds out promise based upon its elemental specificity, surface sensitivity and high resolution. Computational simulations by Tamura et al. demonstrated the relationship between exchange and spin orbit splittings and experimental data of linear and circular dichroisms. Now the authors have developed an analytical framework which allows for the direct extraction of core level exchange splittings from circular and linear dichroic photoemission data. By extending a model initially proposed by Venus, it is possible to show a linear relation between normalized dichroism peaks in the experimental data and the underlying exchange splitting. Since it is reasonable to expect that exchange splittings and magnetic moments track together, this measurement thus becomes a powerful new tool for direct surface magnetometry, without recourse to time consuming and difficult spectral simulations. The theoretical derivation will be supported by high resolution linear and circular dichroism data collected at the Spectromicroscopy Facility of the Advanced Light Source.

  2. Mercury's Surface Magnetic Field Determined from Proton-Reflection Magnetometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winslow, Reka M.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Anderson, Brian J.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Lillis, Robert J.; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2014-01-01

    Solar wind protons observed by the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit about Mercury exhibit signatures of precipitation loss to Mercury's surface. We apply proton-reflection magnetometry to sense Mercury's surface magnetic field intensity in the planet's northern and southern hemispheres. The results are consistent with a dipole field offset to the north and show that the technique may be used to resolve regional-scale fields at the surface. The proton loss cones indicate persistent ion precipitation to the surface in the northern magnetospheric cusp region and in the southern hemisphere at low nightside latitudes. The latter observation implies that most of the surface in Mercury's southern hemisphere is continuously bombarded by plasma, in contrast with the premise that the global magnetic field largely protects the planetary surface from the solar wind.

  3. Optical Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, Dmitry; Kimball, Derek F. Jackson

    2013-03-01

    Part I. Principles and Techniques: 1. General principles and characteristics of optical magnetometers D. F. Jackson Kimball, E. B. Alexandrov and D. Budker; 2. Quantum noise in atomic magnetometers M. V. Romalis; 3. Quantum noise, squeezing, and entanglement in radio-frequency optical magnetometers K. Jensen and E. S. Polzik; 4. Mx and Mz magnetometers E. B. Alexandrov and A. K. Vershovskiy; 5. Spin-exchange-relaxation-free (serf) magnetometers I. Savukov and S. J. Seltzer; 6. Optical magnetometry with modulated light D. F. Jackson Kimball, S. Pustelny, V. V. Yashchuk and D. Budker; 7. Microfabricated atomic magnetometers S. Knappe and J. Kitching; 8. Optical magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond V. M. Acosta, D. Budker, P. R. Hemmer, J. R. Maze and R. L. Walsworth; 9. Magnetometry with cold atoms W. Gawlik and J. M. Higbie; 10. Helium magnetometers R. E. Slocum, D. D. McGregor and A. W. Brown; 11. Surface coatings for atomic magnetometry S. J. Seltzer, M.-A. Bouchiat and M. V. Balabas; 12. Magnetic shielding V. V. Yashchuk, S.-K. Lee and E. Paperno; Part II. Applications: 13. Remote detection magnetometry S. M. Rochester, J. M. Higbie, B. Patton, D. Budker, R. Holzlöhner and D. Bonaccini Calia; 14. Detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with atomic magnetometers M. P. Ledbetter, I. Savukov, S. J. Seltzer and D. Budker; 15. Space magnetometry B. Patton, A. W. Brown, R. E. Slocum and E. J. Smith; 16. Detection of biomagnetic fields A. Ben-Amar Baranga, T. G. Walker and R. T. Wakai; 17. Geophysical applications M. D. Prouty, R. Johnson, I. Hrvoic and A. K. Vershovskiy; Part III. Broader Impact: 18. Tests of fundamental physics with optical magnetometers D. F. Jackson Kimball, S. K. Lamoreaux and T. E. Chupp; 19. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscopes E. A. Donley and J. Kitching; 20. Commercial magnetometers and their application D. C. Hovde, M. D. Prouty, I. Hrvoic and R. E. Slocum; Index.

  4. Experimental Investigation of High Temperature Superconducting Imaging Surface Magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, M.A.; Matlachov, A.N.; Kraus, R.H., Jr.

    1999-06-21

    The behavior of high temperature superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in the presence of high temperature superconducting surfaces has been investigated. When current sources are placed close to a superconducting imaging surface (SIS) an image current is produced due to the Meissner effect. When a SQUID magnetometer is placed near such a surface it will perform in a gradiometric fashion provided the SQUID and source distances to the SIS are much less than the size of the SIS. We present the first ever experimental verification of this effect for a high temperature SIS. Results are presented for two SQUID-SIS configurations, using a 100 mm diameter YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} disc as the SIS. These results indicate that when the current source and sensor coil (SQUID) are close to the SIS, the behavior is that of a first-order gradiometer. The results are compared to analytic solutions as well as the theoretical predictions of a finite element model.

  5. First application of proton reflection magnetometry with MESSENGER to estimate Mercury's surface magnetic field strength (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, R. M.; Johnson, C. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Gershman, D. J.; Raines, J. M.; Lillis, R. J.; Korth, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first use of proton reflection magnetometry, a novel adaptation of electron reflectometry, to estimate Mercury's surface field strength. We use measurements of protons by MESSENGER's Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) in 8-s integration times. Because of the limited field of view of FIPS, we average pitch-angle distributions by accumulating proton data from multiple integration periods and orbits over selected geographical regions. Proton loss cones are evident in both the northern hemisphere cusp region as well as on the nightside at low latitudes in the southern hemisphere. The existence of the loss cones provides confirmation of proton precipitation to the surface in these regions. The loss cone pitch-angle cut-offs are gradual rather than sharp, which we attribute in part to wave-particle scattering causing pitch-angle diffusion. Fitting diffusion curves to the pitch-angle distributions yields estimates of both the cut-off pitch angle, αc, and an average Dαt, where Dα is the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient and t is the diffusion time. The in-situ magnetic field together with αc provide an estimate of the surface magnetic field strength. The results are within 10% of a magnetospheric model for the surface field at the mapped surface locations, but are systematically lower than the model predictions. This discrepancy is consistent with the presence of near-surface plasma, which locally lowers the actual total magnetic field at the surface but is not included in the vacuum-field magnetospheric model. As consistency checks, we have confirmed that the loss cone size decreases with increasing altitude and that the surface magnetic field strength increases with increasing latitude. Our results confirm the offset dipole structure at the surface and demonstrate that proton reflection magnetometry is a practical method for inferring the surface magnetic field strength at Mercury. Further observations may resolve regional-scale structure in the

  6. Magnetometry 101

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA satellites use very sensitive devices called magnetometers to measure the magnetic fields of planets. Like very sensitive compasses, these devices can measure both direction and strength of pl...

  7. Remote Atmospheric Nonlinear Optical Magnetometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-28

    considered in the magnetometry model are shown in Fig. 4. The ground state is split by the Zeeman effect into three levels 1 , 2 , and 3 and the...wakefield polarization rotation and, ii) polarization changes in resonance fluorescence emission (Hanle effect ). The major challenges for these...the atmospheric oxygen transitions and the strength of the effective magnetic dipole interaction

  8. Torque magnetometry in unconventional superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lu

    This thesis describes torque magnetometry studies on unconventional superconductors. Torque magnetometry measures the anisotropic magnetization of samples by recording their torque signals in a tilted magnetic field. Applied to superconductors, this method provides a reliable way to measure the field dependence of magnetization with high resolution under extreme conditions: DC magnetic fields from zero to 45.2 T, and temperature from 300 mK to 300K. The results can be used to determine many important parameters, such as the upper critical field H c2, the superconducting condensation energy, the onset temperature of diamagnetic signals, and so on. We carried out the torque magnetometry measurements on unconventional superconductors---high Tc superconductors and the p-wave superconductor Sr2RuO4---and uncovered new features that do not exist in conventional BCS superconductors. In high Tc superconductors, our torque magnetometry studies focus on the properties of the vortex liquid state. First, by comparing the observed magnetization curves with the Nernst effect results in Bi 2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta, we confirm that the unusually large Nernst effect signals originate from the surviving vortex liquid state above Tc. Second, the M-H curves near the critical temperature Tc suggest that the nature of the transition is the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. Near Tc, the magnetization response at low field is strongly nonlinear, and the T dependence of the magnetic susceptibility in the low-field limit approaches the predicted curve from the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. Third, the measurements in intense magnetic field up to 45 T reveal the unusual, weak T-dependence of Hc2. These observations strongly support the existence of the vortex liquid state above Tc. The superconducting state is destroyed by the phase fluctuation of the pair condensate, while the pair condensate keeps its amplitude above T c. Further studies in single-layered high Tc superconductors reveal more

  9. Angular-resolved magnetometry beyond triclinic crystals part II: torque magnetometry of Cp*ErCOT single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, Mauro; Cucinotta, Giuseppe; Boulon, Marie-Emmanuelle; El Hallak, Fadi; Gao, Song; Sessoli, Roberta

    2014-10-20

    The experimental investigation of the molecular magnetic anisotropy in crystals in which the magnetic centers are symmetry related, but do not have a parallel orientation has been approached by using torque magnetometry. A single crystal of the orthorhombic organometallic Cp*ErCOT [Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadiene anion (C5Me5(-)); COT=cyclooctatetraenedianion (C8H8(2-))] single-molecule magnet, characterized by the presence of two nonparallel families of molecules in the crystal, has been investigated above its blocking temperature. The results confirm an Ising-type anisotropy with the easy direction pointing along the pseudosymmetry axis of the complex, as previously suggested by out-of-equilibrium angular-resolved magnetometry. The use of torque magnetometry, not requiring the presence of magnetic hysteresis, proves to be even more powerful for these purposes than standard single-crystal magnetometry. Furthermore, exploiting the sensitivity and versatility of this technique, magnetic anisotropy has been investigated up to 150 K, providing additional information on the crystal-field splitting of the ground J multiplet of the Er(III) ion.

  10. Surface passivation optimization using DIRECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwiseon; Graf, Peter A.; Jones, Wesley B.; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2006-03-01

    The calculation of the electronic structure of a nanostructure must take into account surface effects. In experiments, the dangling bonds at the surface of a semiconductor nanostructure are passivated by other semiconductors or by organic ligands. In either case, photoluminescence measurements reveal that the emission comes from bulk-like, dot-interior states. These observations suggest that an approach to passivating a simulated nanostructure would be to attach “pseudo-atoms” to each dangling bond. Here we present an automated methodology for generating surface passivating pseudo potentials for bulk empirical pseudo potentials. Our method is based on the global optimization method DIRECT. We apply it to two materials, CdSe and InP. Incorporated into a larger computational nanoscience infrastructure, our work represents a much needed improvement in the usability of the empirical pseudo potential method.

  11. Surface passivation optimization using DIRECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Peter A.; Kim, Kwiseon; Jones, Wesley B.; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2007-06-01

    We describe a systematic and efficient method of determining pseudo-atom positions and potentials for use in nanostructure calculations based on bulk empirical pseudopotentials (EPMs). Given a bulk EPM for binary semiconductor X, we produce parameters for pseudo-atoms necessary to passivate a nanostructure of X in preparation for quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations. These passivants are based on the quality of the wave functions of a set of small test structures that include the passivants. Our method is based on the global optimization method DIRECT. It enables and/or streamlines surface passivation for empirical pseudopotential calculations.

  12. Torque Magnetometry and Susceptometry using Split-Beam Optomechanical Nanocavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdous, Tayyaba; Wu, Nathanael; Wu, Marcelo; Fani Sani, Fatemeh; Losby, Joseph; Barclay, Paul; Freeman, Mark

    A large number of sensitive magnetometry methods are limited to cryogenic operation. We present a highly sensitive torque magnetometer using a photonic crystal optomechanical split-beam nanocavity operating in air at room temperature. The chip-based magnetometer is proficient for probing both the net magnetization and AC susceptibility of individual magnetic microstructures. This is demonstrated through the observation of nanoscale Barkhausen transitions in the magnetic hysteresis of a permalloy thin-film element. Control of the vector direction of the radio frequency drive allows detection of accompanying AC susceptibility terms.

  13. Mx Magnetometry Optimisation in Unshielded Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingleby, Stuart; Griffin, Paul; Arnold, Aidan; Riis, Erling; Hunter, Dominic

    2016-05-01

    Optically pumped magnetometry in unshielded environments is potentially of great advantage in a wide range of surveying and security applications. Optimisation of OPM modulation schemes and feedback in the Mx scheme offers enhanced sensitivity through noise cancellation and decoherence suppression. The work presented demonstrates capability for software-controlled optimisation of OPM performance in ambient fields in the 0 . 5 G range. Effects on magnetometer bandwidth and sensitivity are discussed. Supported by UK National Quantum Technologies Programme.

  14. Assessing composition gradients in multifilamentary superconductors by means of magnetometry methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, T.; Hecher, J.; Bernardi, J.; Pfeiffer, S.; Senatore, C.; Eisterer, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present two magnetometry-based methods suitable for assessing gradients in the critical temperature and hence the composition of multifilamentary superconductors: AC magnetometry and scanning Hall probe microscopy. The novelty of the former technique lies in the iterative evaluation procedure we developed, whereas the strength of the latter is the direct visualization of the temperature dependent penetration of a magnetic field into the superconductor. Using the example of a PIT Nb3Sn wire, we demonstrate the application of these techniques, and compare the respective results to each other and to EDX measurements of the Sn distribution within the sub-elements of the wire.

  15. Coronal Magnetometry in the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Tomczyk, Steven

    Coronal magnetic field plays a crucial role in solar activity. However, due to the high temperature, low density and weak magnetic field properties of the corona, it is hard to directly measure coronal magnetic field, especially for the vector magnetic field. In this presentation, I will briefly review the past endeavor to measure the coronal magnetic field and present current methodology. I will introduce in more detail about the proposed Coronal Magnetism Telescopes of China (COMTEC) and the Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory (COSMO) in the United States of America. Both of them are dedicated to measure the vector magnetic field in the corona as well as chromospheric magnetic field. They, once established, will certainly contribute much to the comprehensive understanding of important questions in solar physics, such as coronal and chromospheric heating, solar wind acceleration, global and long-time variation of coronal magnetic field, etc.

  16. Optimizing phase-estimation algorithms for diamond spin magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusran, N. M.; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev

    2014-07-01

    We present a detailed theoretical and numerical study discussing the application and optimization of phase-estimation algorithms (PEAs) to diamond spin magnetometry. We compare standard Ramsey magnetometry, the nonadaptive PEA (NAPEA), and quantum PEA (QPEA) incorporating error checking. Our results show that the NAPEA requires lower measurement fidelity, has better dynamic range, and greater consistency in sensitivity. We elucidate the importance of dynamic range to Ramsey magnetic imaging with diamond spins, and introduce the application of PEAs to time-dependent magnetometry.

  17. Directional emittance surface measurement system and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puram, Chith K. (Inventor); Daryabeigi, Kamran (Inventor); Wright, Robert (Inventor); Alderfer, David W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and process for measuring the variation of directional emittance of surfaces at various temperatures using a radiometric infrared imaging system. A surface test sample is coated onto a copper target plate provided with selective heating within the desired incremental temperature range to be tested and positioned onto a precision rotator to present selected inclination angles of the sample relative to the fixed positioned and optically aligned infrared imager. A thermal insulator holder maintains the target plate on the precision rotator. A screen display of the temperature obtained by the infrared imager, and inclination readings are provided with computer calculations of directional emittance being performed automatically according to equations provided to convert selected incremental target temperatures and inclination angles to relative target directional emittance values. The directional emittance of flat black lacquer and an epoxy resin measurements obtained are in agreement with the predictions of the electromagnetic theory and with directional emittance data inferred from directional reflectance measurements made on a spectrophotometer.

  18. Achieving High Sensitivity in Cavity Optomechanical Magnetometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-08

    Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Magnetometry, cavity optomechanical sensing, photonic sensing, microfabrication REPORT DOCUMENTATION...of  experimental  set-­‐up.  FPC:   Fiber  polarization  controller.   Fig.  3  Sensitivity  as  a  function  of...function  of  signal  frequency.   Fig.  5  Photograph  of  assembled  CaF   crystal  resonator  sensor.   Fig.  6

  19. Characterizing and imaging magnetic nanoparticles by optical magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, A.; Colombo, S.; Dolgovskiy, V.; Grujić, Z. D.; Lebedev, V.; Zhang, J.

    2017-01-01

    We review our ongoing work on deploying optical (atomic) magnetometry for measuring the magnetic response of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) samples, yielding MNP size distributions, and other sample parameters like Néel relaxation time τ, saturation magnetisation Ms , anisotropy constant K and magnetic susceptibility χ. We address magnetorelaxation (MRX) signals, in which the decaying magnetisation M(t) following a magnetising pulse is recorded by a single atomic magnetometer or by a novel magnetic source imaging camera (MSIC) allowing spatially resolved MRX studies of distributed MNP samples. We further show that optical magnetometers can be used for a direct measurement of the M(H) and dM/dH(H) dependencies of MNP samples, the latter forming the basis for an optical magnetometer implementation of the MPI (Magnetic Particle Imaging) method. All experiments are in view of developing biomedical imaging modalities.

  20. Atomic-Scale Magnetometry of Dynamic Magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bree, J.; Flatté, M. E.

    2017-02-01

    The spatial resolution of imaging magnetometers has benefited from scanning probe techniques. The requirement that the sample perturbs the scanning probe through a magnetic field external to its volume limits magnetometry to samples with pre-existing magnetization. We propose a magnetometer in which the perturbation is reversed: the probe's magnetic field generates a response of the sample, which acts back on the probe and changes its energy. For an NV- spin center in diamond this perturbation changes the fine-structure splitting of the spin ground state. Sensitive measurement techniques using coherent detection schemes then permit detection of the magnetic response of paramagnetic and diamagnetic materials. This technique can measure the thickness of magnetically dead layers with better than 0.1 Å accuracy.

  1. Mars, Moon, Mercury: Magnetometry Constrains Planetary Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, John E. P.

    2015-04-01

    We have long appreciated that magnetic measurements obtained about a magnetized planet are of great value in probing the deep interior. The existence of a substantial planetary magnetic field implies dynamo action requiring an electrically conducting, fluid core in convective motion and a source of energy to maintain it. Application of the well-known Lowe's spectrum may in some cases identify the dynamo outer radius; where secular variation can be measured, the outer radius can be estimated using the frozen flux approximation. Magnetic induction may be used to probe the electrical conductivity of the mantle and crust. These are useful constraints that together with gravity and/or other observables we may infer the state of the interior and gain insight into planetary evolution. But only recently has it become clear that space magnetometry can do much more, particularly about a planet that once sustained a dynamo that has since disappeared. Mars is the best example of this class: the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft globally mapped a remanent crustal field left behind after the demise of the dynamo. This map is a magnetic record of the planet's evolution. I will argue that this map may be interpreted to constrain the era of dynamo activity within Mars; to establish the reversal history of the Mars dynamo; to infer the magnetization intensity of Mars crustal rock and the depth of the magnetized crustal layer; and to establish that plate tectonics is not unique to planet Earth, as has so often been claimed. The Lunar magnetic record is in contrast one of weakly magnetized and scattered sources, not easily interpreted as yet in terms of the interior. Magnetometry about Mercury is more difficult to interpret owing to the relatively weak field and proximity to the sun, but MESSENGER (and ultimately Beppi Columbo) may yet map crustal anomalies (induced and/or remanent).

  2. Modification of Surface Energy via Direct Laser Ablative Surface Patterning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J., Jr. (Inventor); Belcher, Marcus A. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hopkins, John W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Surface energy of a substrate is changed without the need for any template, mask, or additional coating medium applied to the substrate. At least one beam of energy directly ablates a substrate surface to form a predefined topographical pattern at the surface. Each beam of energy has a width of approximately 25 micrometers and an energy of approximately 1-500 microJoules. Features in the topographical pattern have a width of approximately 1-500 micrometers and a height of approximately 1.4-100 micrometers.

  3. Directional self-cleaning superoleophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Law, Kock-Yee

    2012-08-14

    In this work, we report the creation of a grooved surface comprising 3 μm grooves (height ~4 μm) separated by 3 μm from each other on a silicon wafer by photolithography. The grooved surface was then modified chemically with a fluorosilane layer (FOTS). The surface property was studied by both static and dynamic contact angle measurements using water, hexadecane, and a polyethylene wax ink as the probing liquids. Results show that the grooved surface is both superhydrophobic and superoleophobic. Its observed contact angles agree well with the calculated Cassie-Baxter angles. More importantly, we are able to make a replica of the composite wax ink-air interface and study it by SEM. Microscopy results not only show that the droplet of the wax ink "sits" on air in the composite interface but also further reveal that the ink drop actually pins underneath the re-entrant structure in the side wall of the grooved structure. Contact angle measurement results indicate that wetting on the grooved surface is anisotropic. Although liquid drops are found to have lower static and advancing contact angles in the parallel direction, the drops are found to be more mobile, showing smaller hysteresis and lower sliding angles (as compared to the FOTS wafer surface and a comparable 3-μm-diameter pillar array FOTS surface). The enhanced mobility is attributable to the lowering of the resistance against an advancing liquid because 50% of the advancing area is made of a solid strip where the liquid likes to wet. This also implies that the contact line for advancing is no longer smooth but rather is ragged, having the solid strip area leading the wetting and the air strip area trailing behind. This interpretation is supported by imaging the geometry of the contact lines using molten ink drops recovered from the sliding angle experiments in both the parallel and orthogonal directions. Because the grooved surface is mechanically stronger against mechanical abrasion, the self

  4. Magnetometry and archaeological prospection in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba Pingarron, L.; Laboratorio de Prospeccion Arqueologica

    2013-05-01

    Luis Barba Laboratorio de Prospección Arqueológica Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México The first magnetic survey in archaeological prospection was published in 1958 in the first number of Archaeometry, in Oxford. That article marked the beginning of this applications to archaeology. After that, magnetic field measurements have become one of the most important and popular prospection tools. Its most outstanding characteristic is the speed of survey that allows to cover large areas in short time. As a consequence, it is usually the first approach to study a buried archaeological site. The first attempts in Mexico were carried out in 196. Castillo and Urrutia, among other geophysical techniques, used a magnetometer to study the northern part of the main plaza, zocalo, in Mexico City to locate some stone Aztec sculptures. About the same time Morrison et al. in La Venta pyramid used a magnetometer to measure total magnetic field trying to find a substructure. Some years later Brainer and Coe made a magnetic survey to locate large stone Olmec heads in San Lorenzo Tenochtitlan, Veracruz. Technology development has provided everyday more portable and accurate instruments to measure the magnetic field. The first total magnetic field proton magnetometers were followed by differential magnetometers and more recently gradiometers. Presently, multiple sensor magnetometers are widely used in European archaeology. The trend has been to remove the environmental and modern interference and to make more sensitive the instruments to the superficial anomalies related to most of the archaeological sites. There is a close relationship between the geology of the region and the way magnetometry works in archaeological sites. Archaeological prospection in Europe usually needs very sensitive instruments to detect slight magnetic contrast of ditches in old sediments. In contrast, volcanic conditions in Mexico produce large magnetic contrast

  5. Single spin magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, Nicholas Edward Kennedy

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a solid-state point defect with an electronic spin that has accessible quantum mechanical properties. At room temperature, the electronic ground state sub-levels of the NV center can be initialized and read out using optical pumping, as well as coherently controlled using microwave frequency fields. This thesis focuses on using the spin state of the NV center for highly-sensitive magnetometry under ambient conditions. In particular, when the diamond surface is properly prepared, we demonstrate that NV centers can be used to measure the magnetic fluctuations stemming from individual molecules and ions attached or adsorbed to the surface. This thesis begins by introducing the physical and electronic structure of the NV center at room temperature, followed by the fundamental measurements that allow us to use the NV center as a sensitive magnetometer. Combining our sensitive NV center magnetometer with techniques from chemistry and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we demonstrate the all-optical detection of a single-molecule electron spin at room temperature. Finally, we discuss the time-resolved detection of individual electron spins adsorbing onto the surface of nano-diamonds. By extending our techniques to nano-diamonds, we move closer towards textit{in vitro} magnetic field sensing that could be pivotal for better disease diagnosis and drug development.

  6. Precision magnetometry using NV centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Sage, David; Pham, Linh My; Bar-Gill, Nir; Belthangady, Chinmay; Arai, Keigo; Walsworth, Ronald

    2012-06-01

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center in diamond promises to be an extremely useful tool for precise optical magnetometry. Individual NV centers can function as atomic-scale magnetometers, for high spatial-resolution measurements, with close proximity between the field source and sensor. Improved sensitivities may be achieved by averaging the signal from many NV centers, with a resulting trade-off between sensitivity and spatial resolution. Here, we report the best magnetic field sensitivity that has thus far been achieved using a large ensemble of NV centers. These results take advantage of many recent developments, including a technique to dramatically improve the fluorescence photon collection efficiency, dynamical decoupling of the NV spins from their spin-bath environment, and improved diamond engineering to reduce magnetic impurities and increase the density of NV centers. These ongoing efforts suggest that, with additional improvements, NV magnetometers may achieve comparable sensitivities to the best magnetometers that presently exist, with the added practical benefits associated with being a robust, solid-state, room-temperature device.

  7. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Sarah; Kucera, Therese; White, Stephen; Dove, James; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake; Rachmeler, Laurel; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine

    2016-03-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  8. FORWARD: A Toolset for Multiwavelength Coronal Magnetometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Sarah E.; Kucera, Therese A.; White, Stephen M.; Dove, James B.; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake C.; Rachmeler, Laurel A.; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  9. A combined magnetometry and gravity study across Zagros orogeny in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, Maysam; Oskooi, Behrooz

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the structural geology and the tectonic conditions of the Zagros orogeny along the route of Qom to Kermanshah cities were investigated using the combined geophysical methods of the airborne magnetometry and the ground-based gravity data. Airborne magnetometry data of Iran with a line space of survey, 7.5 km, were used to model the magnetic susceptibility property along the route. At first, the airborne magnetic data were stably 500-m downward continued to the ground surface in order to enhance minor changes of the Earth's magnetic field over the studied region. Afterward, 3D inverse modeling of the magnetic data was implemented to the downward continued data, and subsequently the section of magnetic susceptibility variation along the desired route was extracted and imaged at depth. The acquired model could appropriately predict the observed magnetic data, showing low misfit values between the observation and the predicted data. The analytic signal filter was applied to the reduced-to-pole (RTP) magnetic data leading to the determination of the active and probable hidden faults in the structural zones of the Zagros, such as Sanandaj-Sirjan, Central Domain (CD) and Urumieh-Dokhtar based upon the generated peaks along the profile of analytic signal filter. In addition, the density variations of the subsurface geological layers were determined by 3D inverting of the ground-based gravity data over the whole study area, and extracting this property along the route. The joint models of magnetic susceptibility and density variation could appropriately localize the traces of faults along with the geologically and tectonically structural boundaries in the region. The locations of faults correspond well to the variation of geophysical parameters on the inverted sections. Probable direction, slope and extension at depth of these faults were also determined on the sections, indicating a high tectonized zone of the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ) parallel to the zone of

  10. Target parameter and error estimation using magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, S. J.; Witten, A. J.; Won, I. J.; Taylor, D.

    The problem of locating and identifying buried unexploded ordnance from magnetometry measurements is addressed within the context of maximum likelihood estimation. In this approach, the magnetostatic theory is used to develop data templates, which represent the modeled magnetic response of a buried ferrous object of arbitrary location, iron content, size, shape, and orientation. It is assumed that these objects are characterized both by a magnetic susceptibility representing their passive response to the earth's magnetic field and by a three-dimensional magnetization vector representing a permanent dipole magnetization. Analytical models were derived for four types of targets: spheres, spherical shells, ellipsoids, and ellipsoidal shells. The models can be used to quantify the Cramer-Rao (error) bounds on the parameter estimates. These bounds give the minimum variance in the estimated parameters as a function of measurement signal-to-noise ratio, spatial sampling, and target characteristics. For cases where analytic expressions for the Cramer-Rao bounds can be derived, these expressions prove quite useful in establishing optimal sampling strategies. Analytic expressions for various Cramer-Rao bounds have been developed for spherical- and spherical shell-type objects. An maximum likelihood estimation algorithm has been developed and tested on data acquired at the Magnetic Test Range at the Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Tech Center in Indian Head, Maryland. This algorithm estimates seven target parameters. These parameters are the three Cartesian coordinates (x, y, z) identifying the buried ordnance's location, the three Cartesian components of the permanent dipole magnetization vector, and the equivalent radius of the ordnance assuming it is a passive solid iron sphere.

  11. Spin precession by pulsed inductive magnetometry in thin amorphous plates

    SciTech Connect

    Magni, Alessandro; Bottauscio, Oriano; Caprile, Ambra Celegato, Federica; Ferrara, Enzo; Fiorillo, Fausto

    2014-05-07

    Broadband magnetic loss and damping behavior of Co-based amorphous ribbons and thin films have been investigated. The permeability and loss response of the transverse anisotropy ribbon samples in the frequency range DC to 1 GHz is interpreted in terms of combined and distinguishable contributions to the magnetization process by domain wall displacements and magnetization rotations. The latter alone are shown to survive at the highest frequencies, where the losses are calculated via coupled Maxwell and Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert (LLG) equations. Remarkably high values of the LLG damping coefficient α = 0.1–0.2 are invoked in this theoretical prediction. Direct measurements of α by pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry are thus performed, both in these laminae and in amorphous films of identical composition, obtaining about one order of magnitude increase of the α value upon the 100 nm÷10 μm thickness range. This confirms that dissipation by eddy currents enters the LLG equation via large increase of the damping coefficient.

  12. He I VECTOR MAGNETOMETRY OF FIELD-ALIGNED SUPERPENUMBRAL FIBRILS

    SciTech Connect

    Schad, T. A.; Penn, M. J.; Lin, H.

    2013-05-10

    Atomic-level polarization and Zeeman effect diagnostics in the neutral helium triplet at 10830 A in principle allow full vector magnetometry of fine-scaled chromospheric fibrils. We present high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of superpenumbral fibrils in the He I triplet with sufficient polarimetric sensitivity to infer their full magnetic field geometry. He I observations from the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter are paired with high-resolution observations of the H{alpha} 6563 A and Ca II 8542 A spectral lines from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer from the Dunn Solar Telescope in New Mexico. Linear and circular polarization signatures in the He I triplet are measured and described, as well as analyzed with the advanced inversion capability of the ''Hanle and Zeeman Light'' modeling code. Our analysis provides direct evidence for the often assumed field alignment of fibril structures. The projected angle of the fibrils and the inferred magnetic field geometry align within an error of {+-}10 Degree-Sign . We describe changes in the inclination angle of these features that reflect their connectivity with the photospheric magnetic field. Evidence for an accelerated flow ({approx}40 m s{sup -2}) along an individual fibril anchored at its endpoints in the strong sunspot and weaker plage in part supports the magnetic siphon flow mechanism's role in the inverse Evershed effect. However, the connectivity of the outer endpoint of many of the fibrils cannot be established.

  13. Role of exchange interaction in nitrogen vacancy center based magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Cong Son; Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Chen, Zilong; Krivitsky, Leonid A.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a multilayer device comprising a thin-film-based ferromagnetic heterostructure (FMH) deposited on a diamond layer doped with nitrogen vacancy centers (NVC's). We find that when the NVC's are in close proximity (1-2 nm) to the FMH, the exchange energy is comparable to, and may even surpass, the magnetostatic interaction energy. This calls forth the need to consider and utilize both effects in magnetometry based on NVC's in diamond. As the distance between the FMH and NVC is decreased to the subnanometer scale, the exponential increase in the exchange energy suggests spintronic applications of NVC's beyond magnetometry, such as detection of spin Hall effect or spin currents.

  14. An airborne magnetometry study across Zagros collision zone along Ahvaz-Isfahan route in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskooi, Behrooz; Abedi, Maysam

    2015-12-01

    Convergence between the Eurasian and Arabian plates formed the Zagros orogenic belt between Late Cretaceous and Pliocene as a relatively young and active fold-thrust belt in Iran. The structural geology along Ahvaz to Isfahan route across Zagros is investigated employing magnetic data in order to determine the crustal structure in the collision zone of the two Palaeo-continents. Airborne magnetometry data with a line space of survey of 7.5 km have been used to image the variations of the apparent magnetic susceptibility along this route. At first the airborne data were stably 500-m downward continued to the ground surface in order to enhance subtle changes of the Earth's magnetic field. Then 3D inverse modeling of magnetic data was implemented, while the cross section of the magnetic susceptibility variations along the route was mapped down to a depth of 100 km. The acquired magnetic susceptibility model could appropriately predict the observed magnetic data as well. In addition, the analytic signal filter was applied to the reduced-to-pole magnetic data leading to the determination of active faults in Zagros fold-thrust belt (ZFTB) structural zone based upon the generated peaks. Some probable locations of fault events were also suggested in Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ). The locations of faults correspond well to the magnetic susceptibility variations on the inverted section. Probable direction, slope and depth extension of these faults were also plotted on the magnetic susceptibility model, showing an intensively tectonized zone of the SSZ. The main difference between two domains is that the Eurasian plate seems to contain high magnetic susceptible materials compared to the Arabian plate. The recovered model of the apparent magnetic susceptibility values indicated that the average thickness of the non-magnetic sedimentary units is about 11 km and the Curie depth locates approximately at depth of 24 km for the whole studied area.

  15. Concentric artificial impedance surface for directional sound beamforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kyungjun; Anzan-Uz-Zaman, Md.; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Jung, Joo-Yun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin

    2017-03-01

    Utilizing acoustic metasurfaces consisting of subwavelength resonant textures, we design an artificial impedance surface by creating a new boundary condition. We demonstrate a circular artificial impedance surface with surface impedance modulation for directional sound beamforming in three-dimensional space. This artificial impedance surface is implemented by revolving two-dimensional Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path. Physically, the textured surface has inductive surface impedance on its inner circular patterns and capacitive surface impedance on its outer circular patterns. Directional receive beamforming can be achieved using an omnidirectional microphone located at the focal point formed by the gradient-impeding surface. In addition, the uniaxial surface impedance patterning inside the circular aperture can be used for steering the direction of the main lobe of the radiation pattern.

  16. First order reversal curves (FORC) analysis of individual magnetic nanostructures using micro-Hall magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlit, Merlin; Eibisch, Paul; Akbari, Maryam; Porrati, Fabrizio; Huth, Michael; Müller, Jens

    2016-11-01

    Alongside the development of artificially created magnetic nanostructures, micro-Hall magnetometry has proven to be a versatile tool to obtain high-resolution hysteresis loop data and access dynamical properties. Here we explore the application of First Order Reversal Curves (FORC)—a technique well-established in the field of paleomagnetism for studying grain-size and interaction effects in magnetic rocks—to individual and dipolar-coupled arrays of magnetic nanostructures using micro-Hall sensors. A proof-of-principle experiment performed on a macroscopic piece of a floppy disk as a reference sample well known in the literature demonstrates that the FORC diagrams obtained by magnetic stray field measurements using home-built magnetometers are in good agreement with magnetization data obtained by a commercial vibrating sample magnetometer. We discuss in detail the FORC diagrams and their interpretation of three different representative magnetic systems, prepared by the direct-write Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition (FEBID) technique: (1) an isolated Co-nanoisland showing a simple square-shaped hysteresis loop, (2) a more complex CoFe-alloy nanoisland exhibiting a wasp-waist-type hysteresis, and (3) a cluster of interacting Co-nanoislands. Our findings reveal that the combination of FORC and micro-Hall magnetometry is a promising tool to investigate complex magnetization reversal processes within individual or small ensembles of nanomagnets grown by FEBID or other fabrication methods. The method provides sub-μm spatial resolution and bridges the gap of FORC analysis, commonly used for studying macroscopic samples and rather large arrays, to studies of small ensembles of interacting nanoparticles with the high moment sensitivity inherent to micro-Hall magnetometry.

  17. First order reversal curves (FORC) analysis of individual magnetic nanostructures using micro-Hall magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Pohlit, Merlin; Eibisch, Paul; Akbari, Maryam; Porrati, Fabrizio; Huth, Michael; Müller, Jens

    2016-11-01

    Alongside the development of artificially created magnetic nanostructures, micro-Hall magnetometry has proven to be a versatile tool to obtain high-resolution hysteresis loop data and access dynamical properties. Here we explore the application of First Order Reversal Curves (FORC)-a technique well-established in the field of paleomagnetism for studying grain-size and interaction effects in magnetic rocks-to individual and dipolar-coupled arrays of magnetic nanostructures using micro-Hall sensors. A proof-of-principle experiment performed on a macroscopic piece of a floppy disk as a reference sample well known in the literature demonstrates that the FORC diagrams obtained by magnetic stray field measurements using home-built magnetometers are in good agreement with magnetization data obtained by a commercial vibrating sample magnetometer. We discuss in detail the FORC diagrams and their interpretation of three different representative magnetic systems, prepared by the direct-write Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition (FEBID) technique: (1) an isolated Co-nanoisland showing a simple square-shaped hysteresis loop, (2) a more complex CoFe-alloy nanoisland exhibiting a wasp-waist-type hysteresis, and (3) a cluster of interacting Co-nanoislands. Our findings reveal that the combination of FORC and micro-Hall magnetometry is a promising tool to investigate complex magnetization reversal processes within individual or small ensembles of nanomagnets grown by FEBID or other fabrication methods. The method provides sub-μm spatial resolution and bridges the gap of FORC analysis, commonly used for studying macroscopic samples and rather large arrays, to studies of small ensembles of interacting nanoparticles with the high moment sensitivity inherent to micro-Hall magnetometry.

  18. Direct imaging of localized surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Sinan; Karademir, Ertugrul; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2011-09-01

    In this Letter, we report on dark field imaging of localized surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in plasmonic waveguiding bands formed by plasmonic coupled cavities. We image the light scattered from SPPs in the plasmonic cavities excited by a tunable light source. Tuning the excitation wavelength, we measure the localization and dispersion of the plasmonic cavity mode. Dark field imaging has been achieved in the Kretschmann configuration using a supercontinuum white-light laser equipped with an acoustooptic tunable filter. Polarization dependent spectroscopic reflection and dark field imaging measurements are correlated and found to be in agreement with finite-difference time-domain calculations.

  19. First demonstration of transcontinental SQUID magnetometry (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourie, C.; Febvre, P.; Pozzo di Borgo, E.; Waysand, G.; Gouws, D.; Saunderson, E.; Henry, S.; Gaffet, S.; Janse van Vuuren, L.; Lochner, E. T.; Matladi, T.; Kwisanga, C.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first simultaneous measurements from an ultra-sensitive dual-node transcontinental SQUID magnetometer network, available in real time on the internet. A three-axis low temperature SQUID sensor at LSBB Underground Research Laboratory, Rustrel, France (43.841 N, 5.484 E) and a two-axis high temperature SQUID sensor at SANSA Space Science in Hermanus, South Africa (34.424 S, 19.223 E), form the sensitive nodes of the network. Data are measured and GPS time stamped continuously at 125 Hz. The low-Tc SQUID at LSBB URL (known as a [SQUID]2 system) is inside a shielded steel capsule underneath 500 meters of karstic rock, which allows a low magnetic noise floor. The less sensitive high-Tc SQUID at SANSA Space Science is completely unshielded, and housed only in a magnetically neutral hut, 50 metres from a calibrated fluxgate node of the INTERMAGNET network, to protect it against the weather. The network, which is more sensitive than observatory fluxgate magnetometers, detects Earth's magnetosphere pulsations, Schumann waves, mesopause resonance, breathing modes of the Earth and oceanic swell. Our goal is further to extract directional or polarization information if earthquake precursors are observed again, as with the Sichuan-Wenchuan earthquake on 12 May 2008. In the medium term, we are exploring the possibility to extend the network with more spatially distributed SQUID sensors, such as at the South African National Antarctic Expedition's SANAE IV base in Antarctica.

  20. Polarization controlled directional propagation of Bloch surface wave.

    PubMed

    Kovalevich, Tatiana; Boyer, Philippe; Suarez, Miguel; Salut, Roland; Kim, Myun-Sik; Herzig, Hans Peter; Bernal, Maria-Pilar; Grosjean, Thierry

    2017-03-06

    Bloch surface waves (BSWs) are recently developing alternative to surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Due to dramatically enhanced propagation distance and strong field confinement these surface states can be successfully used in on-chip all-optical integrated devices of increased complexity. In this work we propose a highly miniaturized grating based BSW coupler which is gathering launching and directional switching functionalities in a single element. This device allows to control with polarization the propagation direction of Bloch surface waves at subwavelength scale, thus impacting a large panel of domains such as optical circuitry, function design, quantum optics, etc.

  1. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals

    SciTech Connect

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E.; Spiliotis, Alexandros K.; Rakitzis, T. Peter; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit

    2015-09-14

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces.

  2. Bioinspired Directional Surfaces for Adhesion, Wetting and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Matthew J.; Sekeroglu, Koray

    2013-01-01

    In Nature, directional surfaces on insect cuticle, animal fur, bird feathers, and plant leaves are comprised of dual micro-nanoscale features that tune roughness and surface energy. This feature article summarizes experimental and theoretical approaches for the design, synthesis and characterization of new bioinspired surfaces demonstrating unidirectional surface properties. The experimental approaches focus on bottom-up and top-down synthesis methods of unidirectional micro- and nanoscale films to explore and characterize their anomalous features. The theoretical component of the review focuses on computational tools to predict the physicochemical properties of unidirectional surfaces. PMID:23526120

  3. Directed single molecule diffusion triggered by surface energy gradients.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Pierre; Zhang, Zhenyu; Golestanian, Ramin; Leggett, Graham J; Geoghegan, Mark

    2009-10-27

    We demonstrate the diffusion of single poly(ethylene glycol) molecules on surfaces which change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic over a few micrometers. These gradients in surface energy are shown to drive the molecular diffusion in the direction of the hydrophilic component. The polymer diffusion coefficients on these surfaces are measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and are shown to be elevated by more than an order of magnitude compared to surfaces without the surface energy gradient. Along the gradient, the diffusion is asymmetric, with diffusion coefficients approximately 100 times greater in the direction of the gradient than orthogonal to it. This diffusion can be explained by a Stokes-Einstein treatment of the surface-adsorbed polymer.

  4. Plasmon Surface Polariton Dispersion by Direct Optical Observation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swalen, J. D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes several simple experiments that can be used to observe directly the dispersion curve of plasmon surface polaritons (PSP) on flat metal surfaces. A method is described of observing the increonental change in the wave vector of the PSP due to coatings that differ in thickness by a few nanometers. (Author/CS)

  5. Precision Magnetometry and Systematic Effects in the Nab Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Jason; Nab Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Nab experiment will determine the electron-neutrino correlation parameter a with a precision of δa / a =10-3 and the Fierz interference term b to δb = 3 ×10-3 in unpolarized neutron β decay. A long asymmetric spectrometer is optimized to achieve fast proton momentum longitudinalization and the required narrow proton momentum response function. A reliable relation of the measured proton TOF to a requires detailed knowledge of the effective proton pathlength, which imposes requirements on the precision of the magnetic fields in the Nab spectrometer. The Nab magnetometry goals, associated systematics, and some initial results will be discussed.

  6. Nonlinear optical magnetometry with accessible in situ optical squeezing

    DOE PAGES

    Otterstrom, N.; Pooser, R. C.; Lawrie, B. J.

    2014-11-14

    In this paper, we demonstrate compact and accessible squeezed-light magnetometry using four-wave mixing in a single hot rubidium vapor cell. The strong intrinsic coherence of the four-wave mixing process results in nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) on each mode of a two-mode relative-intensity squeezed state. Finally, this framework enables 4.7 dB of quantum noise reduction while the opposing polarization rotation signals of the probe and conjugate fields add to increase the total signal to noise ratio.

  7. Directional motion of evaporating droplets on gradient surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li; Li, Zhigang; Yao, Shuhuai

    2012-08-01

    Evaporation of sessile water droplets on surfaces with wettability gradients was studied. The wettability gradient was generated by fabricating non-uniformly distributed cylindrical micropillars on silicon surfaces. During the evaporation, it was found that the center of mass of the droplet moved either in or against the direction of the wettability gradient, depending on the configuration of the micropillars. An energy-based theoretical criterion was derived to predict the moving direction. The theoretical predications agreed well with the experimental observations. The results provide a parametric design basis to control the contact line dynamics and directional transport of evaporating droplets.

  8. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication. PMID:27562634

  9. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-08-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication.

  10. Magnetometry and Ground-Penetrating Radar Studies in the Sihuas Valley, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisnicki, E.; Papadimitrios, K.; Bank, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Quillcapampa la Antigua site in Peru's Sihuas Valley is a settlement from Peru's Middle Horizon (600-100 A.D.). Archaeological interest in the area stems from the question of whether ancient civilizations were able to have extensive state control of distant groups, or whether state influence occurred through less direct ties (e.g., marriage, religion, or trade). Our geophysical surveys are preliminary to archaeological digging in the area. Ground-penetrating radar and magnetometry attempt to locate areas of interest for focused archaeological excavation, characterize the design of architectural remains and burial mounds in the area, and allow archaeologists to interpret the amount of influence the Wari civilization had on the local residents.

  11. Liquid Crystals Indicate Directions Of Surface Shear Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.

    1996-01-01

    Report consisting of main text of U.S. Patent 5,394,752 presents detailed information on one aspect of method of using changes in colors of liquid-crystal coatings to indicate instantaneous directions of flow-induced shear stresses (skin friction) on aerodynamic surfaces.

  12. Directional surface enhanced Raman scattering on gold nano-gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillibert, Raymond; Sarkar, Mitradeep; Bryche, Jean-François; Yasukuni, Ryohei; Moreau, Julien; Besbes, Mondher; Barbillon, Grégory; Bartenlian, Bernard; Canva, Michael; Lamy de la Chapelle, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Directional plasmon excitation and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) emission were demonstrated for 1D and 2D gold nanostructure arrays deposited on a flat gold layer. The extinction spectrum of both arrays exhibits intense resonance bands that are redshifted when the incident angle is increased. Systematic extinction analysis of different grating periods revealed that this band can be assigned to a propagated surface plasmon of the flat gold surface that fulfills the Bragg condition of the arrays (Bragg mode). Directional SERS measurements demonstrated that the SERS intensity can be improved by one order of magnitude when the Bragg mode positions are matched with either the excitation or the Raman wavelengths. Hybridized numerical calculations with the finite element method and Fourier modal method also proved the presence of the Bragg mode plasmon and illustrated that the enhanced electric field of the Bragg mode is particularly localized on the nanostructures regardless of their size.

  13. Direct Multifield Volume Ray Casting of Fiber Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kui; Knoll, Aaron; Isaac, Benjamin J; Carr, Hamish; Pascucci, Valerio

    2017-01-01

    Multifield data are common in visualization. However, reducing these data to comprehensible geometry is a challenging problem. Fiber surfaces, an analogy of isosurfaces to bivariate volume data, are a promising new mechanism for understanding multifield volumes. In this work, we explore direct ray casting of fiber surfaces from volume data without any explicit geometry extraction. We sample directly along rays in domain space, and perform geometric tests in range space where fibers are defined, using a signed distance field derived from the control polygons. Our method requires little preprocess, and enables real-time exploration of data, dynamic modification and pixel-exact rendering of fiber surfaces, and support for higher-order interpolation in domain space. We demonstrate this approach on several bivariate datasets, including analysis of multi-field combustion data.

  14. Coulomb-blockade and Pauli-blockade magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Széchenyi, Gábor; Pályi, András

    2017-01-01

    Scanning-probe magnetometry is a valuable experimental tool to investigate magnetic phenomena at the micro- and nanoscale. We theoretically analyze the possibility of measuring magnetic fields via the electrical current flowing through quantum dots. We characterize the shot-noise-limited magnetic-field sensitivity of two devices: a single dot in the Coulomb blockade regime, and a double dot in the Pauli blockade regime. Constructing such magnetometers using carbon nanotube quantum dots would benefit from the large, strongly anisotropic and controllable g tensors, the low abundance of nuclear spins, and the small detection volume allowing for nanoscale spatial resolution; we estimate that a sensitivity below 1 μ T/√{Hz} can be achieved with this material. As quantum dots have already proven to be useful as scanning-probe electrometers, our proposal highlights their potential as hybrid sensors having in situ switching capability between electrical and magnetic sensing.

  15. Temperature Dependent Anisotropy of Oxypnictide Superconductors Studied by Torque Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyeneth, Stephen; Puzniak, Roman; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D.; Katrych, Sergiy; Bukowski, Zbigniew; Karpinski, Janusz; Mosele, Urs; Kohout, Stefan; Roos, Josef; Keller, Hugo

    2009-03-01

    Single crystals of different oxypnictide superconductors of the family ReFeAsO1-xFy (Re = Sm, Nd, Pr) with various carrier dopings and with masses m˜100 ng have been investigated by means of torque magnetometry. We present most recent data, obtained by using highly sensitive piezoresistive torque sensors from which the superconducting anisotropy parameter γ and the in-plane magnetic penetration depth λab were extracted. As an important result γ was found to increase strongly as the temperature is decreased from Tc down to low temperatures. This unconventional temperature dependence of γ is similar to that observed in the two-band superconductor MgB2 and cannot be explained within the classical Ginzburg-Landau model. This scenario strongly suggests a new multi-band mechanism in the novel class of oxypnictide high-temperature superconductors.

  16. Directional transport of impinging capillary jet on wettability engineered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aritra; Chatterjee, Souvick; Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine

    2015-11-01

    Impingement of capillary jet on a surface is important for applications like heat transfer, or for liquid manipulation in bio-microfluidic devices. Using wettability engineered surfaces, we demonstrate pump-less and directional transport of capillary jet on a flat surface. Spatial contrast of surface energy and a wedge-shape geometry of the wettability confined track on the substrate facilitate formation of instantaneous spherical bulges upon jet impingement; these bulges are further transported along the superhydrophilic tracks due to Laplace pressure gradient. Critical condition warranted for formation of liquid bulge along the varying width of the superhydrophilic track is calculated analytically and verified experimentally. The work throws light on novel fluid phenomena of unidirectional jet impingement on wettability confined surfaces and provides a platform for innovative liquid manipulation technique for further application. By varying the geometry and wettability contrast on the surface, one can achieve volume flow rates of ~ O(100 μL/sec) and directionally guided transport of the jet liquid, pumplessly at speeds of ~ O(10cm/sec).

  17. Overview of bureau research directed towards surface powered haulage safety

    SciTech Connect

    May, J.P.; Aldinger, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    Surface mining operations, including mills and preparation plants, employ over 260,000 people. This represents a significant contribution to our nation`s economy and an important source of skilled and well-paying jobs. As mine production has shifted from underground to surface, and with continuing advances in underground mine safety, surface mining has unfortunately become the leader in mine fatalities. In 1994 surface mining accidents accounted for 49% of all mine fatalities, followed by underground mining with 37% and mills and preparation plants with 14%. The U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) has targeted surface mining as an important research priority to reduce the social and economic costs associated with fatalities and lost-work-time injuries. USBM safety research focuses on the development of technologies that can enhance productivity and reduce mining costs through a reduction in the number and severity of mining accidents. This report summarizes a number of completed and ongoing research programs directed towards surface powered haulage--the single largest category of fatalities in surface mining and a major cause of lost workdays. Research products designed for industry are highlighted and future USBM surface mining safety research is discussed.

  18. Polarization controlled directional excitation of Bloch surface waves (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevich, Tatiana; Boyer, Philippe; Bernal, Maria-Pilar; Kim, Myun-Sik; Herzig, Hans Peter; Grosjean, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Bloch surface waves (BSWs) are electromagnetic surface waves which can be excited at the interface between periodic dielectric multilayer and a surrounding medium. In comparison with surface plasmon polaritons these surface states perform high quality factor due to low loss characteristics of dielectric materials and can be exited both by TE and TM polarized light. A platform consisting of periodic stacks of alternative SiO2 and Si3N4 layers is designed and fabricated to work at the wavelength of 1.55 µm. The platform has an application in sensing and in integrated optics domain. A standard way of BSW excitation is coupling via Kretschmann configuration, but in this work we investigate a grating coupling of BSWs. Grating parameters are analytically and numerically optimized by RCWA and FDTD methods in order to obtain the best coupling conditions. The light is launched orthogonally to the surface of the photonic crystal and the grating. Due to a special grating configuration we demonstrate directionality of the BSW propagation depending on polarization of the incident light. The structure was experimentally realized on the surface of the photonic crystal by FIB milling. Experimental results are in a good agreement with a theory. The investigated configuration can be successfully used as a BSW launcher in on-chip all-optical integrated systems and work as a surface wave switch or modulator.

  19. How Direction of Illumination Affects Visually Perceived Surface Roughness

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yun-Xian; Landy, Michael S.; Maloney, Laurence T.

    2009-01-01

    We examined visual estimation of surface roughness using random computer-generated three-dimensional (3D) surfaces rendered under a mixture of diffuse lighting and a punctate source. The angle between the tangent to the plane containing the surface texture and the direction to the punctate source was varied from 50 to 70 degrees across lighting conditions. Observers were presented with pairs of surfaces under different lighting conditions and indicated which 3D surface appeared rougher. Surfaces were viewed either in isolation or in scenes with added objects whose shading, cast shadows and specular highlights provided information about the spatial distribution of illumination. All observers perceived surfaces to be markedly rougher with decreasing illuminant angle. Performance in scenes with added objects was no closer to constant than that in scenes without added objects. We identified four novel cues that are valid cues to roughness under any single lighting condition but that are not invariant under changes in lighting condition. We modeled observers’ deviations from roughness constancy as a weighted linear combination of these “pseudo-cues” and found that they account for a substantial amount of observers’ systematic deviations from roughness constancy with changes in lighting condition. PMID:16881794

  20. Waveguide-coupled directional Raman radiation for surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Li, Jin-Yang; Wang, Li; Lu, Dan-Feng; Qi, Zhi-Mei

    2015-09-07

    Kretschmann-type waveguide structures, including Plasmon Waveguide (PW) and Resonant Mirror (RM), have been applied in interfacial Raman spectroscopy due to the following unique features: (1) unlike the classic surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates made of either gold or silver, both PW and RM can be prepared using a large variety of inexpensive materials; (2) the field enhancement factors using these structures can be theoretically predicted and experimentally controlled, which enables us to manipulate the surface Raman sensitivity with high repeatability; (3) the use of transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) modes for Raman excitation allows us to evaluate the orientation of target molecules immobilized on the waveguide surface; (4) the unwanted impact of noble metals on the Raman fingerprints of target molecules, which is often observed for conventional SERS substrates, can be avoided upon the use of dielectric waveguides. In this paper, guided-mode-coupled directional Raman emission, which is an additional important feature of the waveguide Raman technique, was theoretically investigated based on the optical reciprocity theorem combined with the Fresnel equations. The simulation results indicate that the directional Raman emission from a dipole located within the field confinement and penetration depth of a guided mode depends on both the orientation of the dipole and its distance from the waveguide surface. Raman light from the TE-oriented dipoles is launched into the prism coupler at the TE-mode resonance angle and that from the non-TE-oriented dipoles propagates at the TM-mode resonance angle. The intensity of the guided-mode-excited Raman signal propagating at the mode resonance angle is proportional to the fourth power of the mode field (E(4)) at the depth of the dipole from the waveguide surface. This means that the guided-mode-excited and guided-mode-coupled directional Raman spectroscopy has a detection depth that is as

  1. Directed long-range molecular migration energized by surface reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harikumar, K. R.; Polanyi, John C.; Zabet-Khosousi, Amir; Czekala, Piotr; Lin, Haiping; Hofer, Werner A.

    2011-05-01

    The recoil of adsorbates away (desorption) and towards (reaction) surfaces is well known. Here, we describe the long-range recoil of adsorbates in the plane of a surface, and accordingly the novel phenomenon of reactions occurring at a substantial distance from the originating event. Three thermal and three electron-induced surface reactions are shown by scanning tunnelling microscopy to propel their physisorbed ethylenic products across the rough surface of Si(100) over a distance of up to 200 Å before an attachment reaction. The recoil energy in the ethylenic products comes from thermal exoergicity or from electronic excitation of chemisorbed alkenes. We propose that the mechanism of migration is a rolling motion, because the recoiling molecule overcomes raised surface obstacles. Electronic excitation of propene causes directional recoil and often end-to-end inversion, suggesting cartwheeling. Ab initio calculations of the halogenation and electron-induced reactions support a model in which asymmetric forces between the molecule and the surface induce rotation and therefore migration.

  2. Directional motion of evaporating droplets on gradient surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shuhuai; Xu, Li; Li, Zhigang

    2012-11-01

    Droplet evaporation on surfaces has various applications in drying problems such as ink-jet printing, pesticide spraying, chemical or biological detection, and DNA microarray spotting technology. Controlling evaporating droplets via substrate morphology and/or wetting properties allows for efficient deposition of sample molecules in these applications. In this work, evaporation of sessile water droplets on surfaces with wettability gradients was studied. The wettability gradient was generated by fabricating non-uniformly distributed cylindrical micropillars on silicon surfaces. During the evaporation, it was found, along the wettability gradient, that the contact line on one side was strongly pinned, while the contact line on the other side depinned and gradually receded, making the center of mass of the droplet move either in or against the direction the wettability gradient, depending on the configuration of the micropillars. The theoretical criterion predicting the moving direction was derived based on the excess free energy and the energy barrier during the evaporation. The theoretical predications agreed well with the experimental observations. The results provide a parametric design basis to control the contact line dynamics and directional transport of evaporating droplets. This work was supported by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong under General Research Fund (Grant No. 621110).

  3. Engineered microtopographies and surface chemistries direct cell attachment and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Chelsea Marie

    topographically modified surface (R2=0.82). Functionalized PEGDMA hydrogels significantly reduced attachment and attachment strength of Navicula and C. marina. These hydrogels also reduced attachment of zoospores of Ulva compared to PDMSe. Attachment of Ulva to microtopographies in PDMSe and PEGDMA-co-HEMA negatively correlated with ERIII*Re (R2 = 0.94 and R2 = 0.99, respectively). Incorporating a surface energy term into this equation created a correlation between the attachment densities of cells from two evolutionarily diverse groups on substrates of two surface chemistries with an equation that describes the various microtopographies and surface chemistries in terms of surface energy (R2 = 0.80). The current Attachment Model can now be used to design engineered antifouling surface microtopographies and chemistries that inhibit the attachment of organisms from three evoluntionarily diverse groups. Hydrogels based on PEGDMA were also chosen as a substratum material for mammalian cell culture. Capturing endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and inducing differentiation into the endothelial cell (EC) phenotype is the ideal way to re-endothelialize a small-diameter vascular graft. Substratum elasticity has been reported to direct stem cell differentiation into specific lineages. Functionalized PEGDMA hydrogels provided good compliance, high fidelity of topographic features and sites for surface modification with biomolecules. Fibronectin grafting and topography both increased EC attachment. This combination of adjustable elasticity, surface chemistry and topography has the potential to promote the capture and differentiation of EPCs into a confluent EC monolayer. Engineered microtopographies replicated in PDMSe directed elongation and alignment of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) and human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) compared to smooth surfaces. Engineered cellular micro-environments were created with specific surface energies defined by chemistry

  4. Direct Scattering, Trapping, and Desorption in Atom-Surface Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Guoqing; Manson, J. R.

    2008-08-01

    Maxwell is credited as the first to invoke the assumption that an impinging gas beam scatters from a surface with a direct contribution exhibiting little change in state and a trapping-desorption fraction that desorbs in equilibrium [J. C. Maxwell, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. LondonPTRSAV0370-2316 170, 231 (1879)10.1098/rstl.1879.0067]. Here a classical mechanical scattering theory is developed to describe direct scattering, trapping, and subsequent desorption of the incident beam. This theory allows a rigorous test of the Maxwell assumption and determines the conditions under which it is valid. The theory also gives quantitative explanations of important new experimental measurements [K. D. Gibson, N. Isa, and S. J. Sibener, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 13 083 (2003)JCPSA60021-960610.1063/1.1628672] for direct and trapping-desorption scattering of Ar atoms by a self-assembled layer of 1-decanethiol on Au(111).

  5. Direct scattering, trapping, and desorption in atom-surface collisions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guoqing; Manson, J R

    2008-08-08

    Maxwell is credited as the first to invoke the assumption that an impinging gas beam scatters from a surface with a direct contribution exhibiting little change in state and a trapping-desorption fraction that desorbs in equilibrium [J. C. Maxwell, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London 170, 231 (1879)]. Here a classical mechanical scattering theory is developed to describe direct scattering, trapping, and subsequent desorption of the incident beam. This theory allows a rigorous test of the Maxwell assumption and determines the conditions under which it is valid. The theory also gives quantitative explanations of important new experimental measurements [K. D. Gibson, N. Isa, and S. J. Sibener, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 13 083 (2003)] for direct and trapping-desorption scattering of Ar atoms by a self-assembled layer of 1-decanethiol on Au(111).

  6. Smoothing and roughening of slip surfaces in direct shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagy, Amir; Badt, Nir; Hatzor, Yossef H.

    2015-04-01

    Faults in the upper crust contain discrete slip surfaces which have absorbed a significant part of the shear displacement along them. Field measurements demonstrate that these surfaces are rough at all measurable scales and indicate that surfaces of relatively large-slip faults are statistically smoother than those of small-slip faults. However, post faulting and surface erosion process that might affect the geometry of outcrops cannot be discounted in such measurements. Here we present experimental results for the evolution of shear surface topography as function of slip distance and normal stress in direct shear experiments. A single prismatic fine grain limestone block is first fractured in tension mode using the four-point bending test methodology and then the fracture surface topography is scanned using a laser profilometer. We then shear the obtained tensile fracture surfaces in direct shear, ensuring the original fracture surfaces are in a perfectly matching configuration at the beginning of the shear test. First, shearing is conducted to distances varying from 5 to 15 mm under constant normal stress of 2MPa and a constant displacement rate of 0.05 mm/s using two closed-loop servo controlled hydraulic pistons, supplying normal and shear forces (Davidesko et al., 2014). In the tested configuration peak shear stress is typically attained after a shear displacement of about 2-3 mm, beyond which lower shear stress is required to continue shearing at the preset displacement rate of 0.05 mm/s as is typical for initially rough joints. Following some initial compression the interface begins to dilate and continues to do so until the end of the test. The sheared tensile fracture surface is then scanned again and the geometrical evolution, in term of RMS roughness and power spectral density (PSD) is analyzed. We show that shearing smooth the surface along all our measurements scales. The roughness ratio, measured by initial PSD / final PSD for each wavelength

  7. Detection of bottom ferromagnetic electrode oxidation in magnetic tunnel junctions by magnetometry measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wei; Nam, Dao N. H.; Lu, Jiwei; Wolf, Stuart A.

    2010-12-01

    Surface oxidation of the bottom ferromagnetic (FM) electrode, one of the major detrimental factors to the performance of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), is difficult to avoid during the fabrication process of the MTJ's tunnel barrier. Since Co rich alloys are commonly used for the FM electrodes in MTJs, overoxidation of the tunnel barrier results in the formation of a CoO antiferromagnetic (AF) interface layer which couples with the bottom FM electrode to form a typical AF/FM exchange bias (EB) system. In this work, surface oxidation of the CoFe and CoFeB bottom electrodes was detected via magnetometry measurements of EB characterizations including the EB field, training effect, uncompensated spin density, and enhanced coercivity. Variations in these parameters were found to be related to the surface oxidation of the bottom electrode, among them the change in coercivity is most sensitive. Annealed samples show evidence for an oxygen migration back to the MgO tunnel barrier by annealing.

  8. Magnetism Matters: Coronal Magnetometry Using Multi-Wavelength Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Sarah E.

    2015-08-01

    The solar coronal magnetic field is key both to solving fundamental problems in solar physics such as coronal heating and solar wind acceleration, and to predicting the internal magnetic structure and thus space-weather impact of coronal mass ejections. I will describe the current state of the art in coronal magnetometry, and present results from the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) at Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO), which since 2011 has taken polarimetric observations of the solar corona in the near-infrared on a near-daily basis. I will discuss work in progress that utilizes forward modeling to synthesize polarimetric data at multiple heights and vantage points, and at wavelengths from radio to infrared to visible to ultraviolet. The goal is to use such synthetic testbeds to determine the ideal set of observations for constraining the coronal magnetic field, and to establish a Data-Optimized Coronal Field Model (DOC-FM) that efficiently incorporates these data into global magnetic models. This work will provide essential tools and motivation for the planning and implementation of future coronal polarimetric projects and missions spanning a broad range of wavelengths.

  9. Surface modification of carbon fuels for direct carbon fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Zhu, Zhonghua; Chen, Jiuling; De Marco, Roland; Dicks, Andrew; Bradley, John; Lu, Gaoqing

    The direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) is a promising power-generation device that has much higher efficiency (80%) and less emissions than conventional coal-fired power plants. Two commercial carbons (activated carbon and carbon black) pre-treated with HNO 3, HCl or air plasma are tested in a DCFC. The correlation between the surface properties and electrochemical performance of the carbon fuels is explored. The HNO 3-treated carbon fuels have the highest electrochemical reactivity in the DCFC due to the largest degree of surface oxygen functional groups. The overall effect on changing the electrochemical reactivity of carbon fuels is in the order HNO 3 > air plasma ≈ HCl. Product gas analysis indicates that complete oxidation of carbon to CO 2 can be achieved at 600-700 °C.

  10. Advances in direct and diffraction methods for surface structural determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, S. Y.

    1999-08-01

    I describe recent advances in low-energy electron diffraction holography and photoelectron diffraction holography. These are direct methods for determining the surface structure. I show that for LEED and PD spectra taken in an energy and angular mesh, the relative phase between the reference wave and the scattered wave has a known geometric form if the spectra are always taken from within a small angular cone in the near backscattering direction. By using data in the backscattering small cone at each direction of interest, a simple algorithm is developed to invert the spectra and extract object atomic positions with no input of calculated dynamic factors. I also describe the use of a convergent iterative method of PD and LEED. The computation time of this method scales as N2, where N is the dimension of the propagator matrix, rather than N3 as in conventional Gaussian substitutional methods. Both the Rehr-Albers separable-propagator cluster approach and the slab-type non-separable approach can be cast in the new iterative form. With substantial savings in computational time and no loss in numerical accuracy, this method is very useful in applications of multiple scattering theory, particularly for systems involving either very large unit cells (>300 atoms) or where no long-range order is present.

  11. Direct Fabrication of Micro/Nano-Patterned Surfaces by Vertical-Directional Photofluidization of Azobenzene Materials.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaeho; Cho, Wonhee; Jung, Yeon Sik; Kang, Hong Suk; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2017-02-28

    Anisotropic movement of azobenzene materials (i.e., azobenzene molecules incorporated in polymer, glass, or supramolecules) has provided significant opportunities for the fabrication of micro/nanoarchitectures. The examples include circular holes, line gaps, ellipsoidal holes, and nanofunnels. However, all of the previous studies have only focused on the lateral directional movement for the structural shaping of azobenzene materials. Herein, we propose structural shaping based on a vertical directional movement of azobenzene materials. To do this, light with oblique incidence, containing normal direction light polarization, was illuminated onto azobenzene materials film contact with patterned elastomeric molds (i.e., PDMS) so that the resulting vertical directional movement of azobenzene materials fills in the cavities of the molds and results in pattern formation. As a result, a range of patterns with sizes of features from micro- to sub-100 nm scale was successfully fabricated in a large area (few cm(2)), and the structural height was deterministically controlled by simply adjusting irradiation time. In addition to the notable capability of fabricating the single-scale structures, the technique provides a facile way to fabricate complex hierarchical multiscale structures, ensuring its versatility and wide applicability to various applications. As a selected exemplary application of the multiscale structures, a superhydrophobic surface has been successfully demonstrated.

  12. Direct surface-enhanced Raman scattering analysis of DNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Luca; Krpetić, Željka; van Lierop, Danny; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A; Graham, Duncan

    2015-01-19

    The exploration of the genetic information carried by DNA has become a major scientific challenge. Routine DNA analysis, such as PCR, still suffers from important intrinsic limitations. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has emerged as an outstanding opportunity for the development of DNA analysis, but its application to duplexes (dsDNA) has been largely hampered by reproducibility and/or sensitivity issues. A simple strategy is presented to perform ultrasensitive direct label-free analysis of unmodified dsDNA with the means of SERS by using positively charged silver colloids. Electrostatic adhesion of DNA promotes nanoparticle aggregation into stable clusters yielding intense and reproducible SERS spectra at nanogram level. As potential applications, we report the quantitative recognition of hybridization events as well as the first examples of SERS recognition of single base mismatches and base methylations (5-methylated cytosine and N6-methylated Adenine) in duplexes.

  13. Direct versus hydrogen assisted CO dissociation on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, Dominic

    2012-02-01

    We present investigations of the formation of precursor hydrocarbon species relevant to production of liquid hydrocarbons on low index surfaces of various important noble and transition metals. The formation could occur via the so-called carbide mechanism where direct CO dissociation takes place, followed by stepwise hydrogenation of C yielding CHx species. Formation of precursor CHx species could also potentially take place through hydrogenated CO intermediates. First-principles calculations of energetics and barriers of CO conversion to hydrocarbons species were performed using plane-wave periodic density functional theory. Our calculations indicate that the two pathways are generally competitive on transition metals. A microkinetic model, with input thermodynamics and kinetic parameters estimated from electronic structure calculations, has been developed. The two pathways will be further examined using microkinetic approach to determine whether the aforementioned finding holds at realistic conditions.

  14. Interior Characterization of Europa using Magnetometry (ICEMAG): Probing the Europan Ocean and Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, C. A.; Jia, X.; Joy, S. P.; Khurana, K. K.; Murphy, N.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Weiss, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic induction is a powerful tool for probing the subsurface. The magnetometer on the Galileo mission to Jupiter found compelling evidence for subsurface oceans on Europa, Ganymede and Callisto; however, the single induction frequency measured did not allow characteristics of the ocean to be discerned. The Interior Characterization of Europa using MAGnetometry (ICEMAG) instrument, selected for NASA's Europa mission payload in May 2015, is designed to measure Europa's induction response at multiple frequencies with high accuracy. ICEMAG definitively assesses the ice shell thickness, and the conductivity and thickness of the subsurface ocean. This knowledge informs models of Europa's thermal evolution and allows evaluation of processes that have cycled material between the depths and the surface. Magnetic field measurements also determine the electrical currents associated with coupling of plumes to the corotating magnetospheric plasma and coupling of Europa to the Jovian ionosphere. ICEMAG utilizes UCLA fluxgate magnetic field sensors as well as JPL helium sensors in an integrated magnetic measurement system. The advent of laser-pumped helium sensors and advances in digital signal sampling enables an innovative multi-sensor magnetometer to be flown that is able to monitor spacecraft fields and maintain absolute accuracy of the measurement at a level of ~1 nT over time scales of years, without special maneuvers such as spacecraft rolls.

  15. Orientation dependent cantilever torque magnetometry in high magnetic fields and low lemperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaparala, M. V.

    1996-03-01

    The measurement of the magnetic torque τ, as a function of the orientation of the field with respect to the sample axes θ, is a very sensitive and direct method for measuring the anisotropy of magnetic thin films, high Tc superconductors, and other anisotropic systems. With traditional torque magnetometers the limitations of the available sample volume at cryogenic temperature has necessitated the use of a horizontal field, split coil magnets. While solenoid coil vertical field magnets provide much higher fields, the sample space limitations have excluded their use in these measurements. We have designed and built a rotator for the high field magnets at NHMFL that will accomodate the single crystal silicon cantilever magnetometer(M. Chaparala, O.H. Chung and M.J. Naughton, A.I.P. Conf. Proc. 273, 407 (1992).). With this setup we have extended the range of torque magnetometry to high magnetic fields (20T) and low temperatures (0.5K). The setup has an ultimate angular resolution of about a millidegree. I will summarize on the design and performance of this rotator/cantilever torque magnetometer combination and present the results of the the torque measurements on a Tl_2212 single crystal.

  16. Multi-terminal multi-junction dc SQUID for nanoscale magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltzer, Alexander Y.; Uri, Aviram; Zeldov, Eli

    2016-11-01

    Miniaturization of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) is of major importance for the development of sensitive scanning nanoscale magnetometry tools. The high sensitivity of nanoSQUIDs is restricted, however, to only particular periodic values of the applied magnetic field, making accurate measurements at intermediate values of the field impossible. We present a theoretical investigation of a multi-terminal, multi-junction SQUID (mSQUID) that lifts this limitation by providing electrical means for a continuous shift of the quantum interference pattern with respect to the applied field. Analysis of 4-terminal, 4-junction and 3-terminal, 3-junction mSQUIDs shows that operation at maximum sensitivity can be obtained at any value of the magnetic field by applying control current to the extra terminals. The model describes the variation and the shift of the interference pattern as a function of the control currents, junction asymmetries, and the mSQUID inductance. The mSQUID is also shown to provide a direct measurement of the current-phase relations of superconducting junctions. The derived model provides a quantitative description of the recently developed multi-terminal nanoSQUID-on-tip.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against surface molecules of tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. Therefore MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells, and provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. This project also involves investigations of cell-cell interactions in a gravity-based environment. It will provide a base of scientific information necessary to expand the focus of the project in future years to microgravity and hypergravity-based environments. This project also has the potential to yield important materials (e.g., cellular products) which may prove useful in the diagnosis and/or treatment of certain human diseases. Moreover, this project supports the training of both undergraduate and graduate students; thus, it will assist in developing a pool of future scientists with research experience in an area (gravitational biology) of interest to NASA.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonial antibodies (MAbs) directed against surface molecules of tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues which are not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. In brief, MCS combine the relevance or organized tissues with in vitro methodology making the MCS a good model system to study the interactions of mammalian cells, and thereby provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. This project also involves investigations of cell-cell interactions in a gravity-based environment. It will provide an important base of scientific information for future comparative studies on the effects of hypergravity and simulated microgravity environments on cell-cell interactions. This project also has the potential to yield important materials (e.g. cellular products) which may be useful for the diagnosis and/or treatment of certain human diseases. Moreover, this project supports the training of one undergraduate and one graduate student; thus, it will also assist in developing a pool of future scientists with research experience in gravitational biology research.

  19. Compact magnetic antennas for directional excitation of surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongmin; Palomba, Stefano; Park, Yongshik; Zentgraf, Thomas; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2012-09-12

    Plasmonics is considered as one of the most promising candidates for implementing the next generation of ultrafast and ultracompact photonic circuits. Considerable effort has been made to scale down individual plasmonic components into the nanometer regime. However, a compact plasmonic source that can efficiently generate surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and deliver SPPs to the region of interest is yet to be realized. Here, bridging the optical antenna theory and the recently developed concept of metamaterials, we demonstrate a subwavelength, highly efficient plasmonic source for directional generation of SPPs. The designed device consists of two nanomagnetic resonators with detuned resonant frequencies. At the operating wavelength, incident photons can be efficiently channeled into SPP waves modulated by the electric field polarization. By tailoring the relative phase at resonance and the separation between the two nanoresonators, SPPs can be steered to predominantly propagate along one specific direction. This novel magnetic nanoantenna paves a new way to manipulate photons in the near-field, and also could be useful for SPP-based nonlinear applications, active modulations, and wireless optical communications.

  20. Water transport mechanism through open capillaries analyzed by direct surface modifications on biological surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hirai, Yuji; Yabu, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Tsujii, Kaoru; Shimozawa, Tateo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2013-10-01

    Some small animals only use water transport mechanisms passively driven by surface energies. However, little is known about passive water transport mechanisms because it is difficult to measure the wettability of microstructures in small areas and determine the chemistry of biological surfaces. Herein, we developed to directly analyse the structural effects of wettability of chemically modified biological surfaces by using a nanoliter volume water droplet and a hi-speed video system. The wharf roach Ligia exotica transports water only by using open capillaries in its legs containing hair- and paddle-like microstructures. The structural effects of legs chemically modified with a self-assembled monolayer were analysed, so that the wharf roach has a smart water transport system passively driven by differences of wettability between the microstructures. We anticipate that this passive water transport mechanism may inspire novel biomimetic fluid manipulations with or without a gravitational field.

  1. Water transport mechanism through open capillaries analyzed by direct surface modifications on biological surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hirai, Yuji; Yabu, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Tsujii, Kaoru; Shimozawa, Tateo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2013-10-23

    Some small animals only use water transport mechanisms passively driven by surface energies. However, little is known about passive water transport mechanisms because it is difficult to measure the wettability of microstructures in small areas and determine the chemistry of biological surfaces. Herein, we developed to directly analyse the structural effects of wettability of chemically modified biological surfaces by using a nanoliter volume water droplet and a hi-speed video system. The wharf roach Ligia exotica transports water only by using open capillaries in its legs containing hair- and paddle-like microstructures. The structural effects of legs chemically modified with a self-assembled monolayer were analysed, so that the wharf roach has a smart water transport system passively driven by differences of wettability between the microstructures. We anticipate that this passive water transport mechanism may inspire novel biomimetic fluid manipulations with or without a gravitational field.

  2. Holographic LEED: A direct method for surface crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vamvakas, John Athanasios

    Since 1960's Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) has been one of the most reliable methods for surface crystallography. It has solved hundreds of structures over the past 20-25 years and continues to be a powerful tool in the hands of crystallographers. Yet, the main disadvantage of the method is the fact that it is very time consuming. The programs that do the multiple scattering calculations can run literally for days! The key part of the method is the initial "guess" of a structure that will be close the one being seeked. A wrong guess would lead to huge amounts of wasted time and effort. We suggest a direct method that can give us a pretty good idea of the structure under determination. We call this method of ours: Holographic LEED (h-LEED) because it is based on the ideas of Dennis Gabor, the inventor of holography. The 3D images h-LEED reconstructs from LEED diffraction patterns can be reliably used to initialize LEED thus reducing the annoying computation time as well as the effort required by the crystallographer. We show that h-LEED produces good images for p(2× 2) reconstruction of adsorbed atoms by testing it on two adsorption systems: O/Ni(001) and K/Ni(001). The images were reconstructed from both diffuse LEED patterns from disordered adsorbates and superstructure Bragg spots from ordered adsorbates.

  3. Individual vortex nucleation/annihilation in ferromagnetic nanodots with broken symmetry observed by micro-Hall magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ščepka, T.; Polakovič, T.; Šoltýs, J.; Tóbik, J.; Kulich, M.; Kúdela, R.; Dérer, J.; Cambel, V.

    2015-11-01

    We studied vortex nucleation/annihilation process and its temperature dependence in micromagnetic objects with lowered symmetry using micro-Hall magnetometry. Magnetization reversal curves were obtained for the Pacman-like nanodots placed directly on Hall probes. Lowered symmetry of the object leads to good control of its chirality. Vortex nucleation and annihilation fields strongly depend on the angle of the external in-plane magnetic field with respect on the nanodot symmetry. The micromagnetic simulations support the experimental results - the vortex nucleation fields are controlled by local magnetization configurations present in the object (C-, S-, and double S-states) for field just above vortex nucleation field. The experiments also confirm that the vortex nucleation proceeds via thermal activation over an energy barrier.

  4. Surface directed assembly of conjugated polymers for optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ziqi

    Conjugated polymers combining the optical and electronic properties of semiconductors with advantages of organic materials are being explored as active components in various types of thin-film electronic and optoelectronic devices. The realization of conjugated polymer based electronics and optoelectronics critically depends on developing novel approaches for assembling this new class of materials into a controlled fashion. We have developed new non-photolithographic methods for the spatial deposition of conjugated polymers. As a proof-of-concept of these methods, the well-known luminescent polymer, poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV), has been used as a model structure in our work. One strategy is based on the modification of solid substrates with microcontact-printed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) that serve as templates for the deposition of PPVs from solution. Conjugated polymer patterns have also been generated by directly stamping of PPVs onto the reactive SAMs-coated substrates. In both methods, PPVs were covalently immobilized onto the supporting surface through the formation of amide bonds, thus rendering great stability of the resulting patterns. Well-defined PPV micropatterns have been fully characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence optical microscopy. The interaction between PPVs and the underlying surface was analyzed by grazing-angle reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Many applications based on conjugated polymers require the controlled assembly of the polymers as multilayer structures, in which molecules with different functionality can be incorporated into individual layers with precisely controlled thickness. We have developed a series of layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly approaches to multilayer conjugated polymer thin films. Hydrogen-bonding interaction and covalent coupling reaction have been utilized

  5. Direct adhesive measurements between wood biopolymer model surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Emil; Johansson, Erik; Wågberg, Lars; Pettersson, Torbjörn

    2012-10-08

    For the first time the dry adhesion was measured for an all-wood biopolymer system using Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics. The polydimethylsiloxane hemisphere was successfully surface-modified with a Cellulose I model surface using layer-by-layer assembly of nanofibrillated cellulose and polyethyleneimine. Flat surfaces of cellulose were equally prepared on silicon dioxide substrates, and model surfaces of glucomannan and lignin were prepared on silicon dioxide using spin-coating. The measured work of adhesion on loading and the adhesion hysteresis was found to be very similar between cellulose and all three wood polymers, suggesting that the interaction between these biopolymers do not differ greatly. Surface energy calculations from contact angle measurements indicated similar dispersive surface energy components for the model surfaces. The dispersive component was dominating the surface energy for all surfaces. The JKR work of adhesion was lower than that calculated from contact angle measurements, which partially can be ascribed to surface roughness of the model surfaces and overestimation of the surface energies from contact angle determinations.

  6. Direct chemical vapor deposition of graphene on dielectric surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Yuegang; Ismach, Ariel

    2014-04-29

    A substrate is provided that has a metallic layer on a substrate surface of a substrate. A film made of a two dimensional (2-D) material, such as graphene, is deposited on a metallic surface of the metallic layer. The metallic layer is dewet and/or removed to provide the film on the substrate surface.

  7. Direct imaging with a hypertelescope of red supergiant stellar surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, F.; Chiavassa, A.; Mourard, D.; Tarmoul, N.

    2010-07-01

    High angular resolution images obtained with a hypertelescope can strongly constrain the radiative-hydrodynamics simulations of red supergiant (RSG) stars, in terms of intensity contrast, granulation size and temporal variations of the convective motions that are visible on their surface. The characterization of the convective pattern in RSGs is crucial to solve the mass-loss mechanism which contributes heavily to the chemical enrichment of the Galaxy. We show here how the astrophysical objectives and the array configuration are highly dependent to design a hypertelescope. For a given field of view and a given resolution, there is a trade-off between the array geometry and the number of required telescopes to optimize either the (u,v) coverage (to recover the intensity distribution) or the dynamic range (to recover the intensity contrast). To obtain direct snapshot images of Betelgeuse with a hypertelescope, a regular and uniform layout of telescopes is the best array configuration to recover the intensity contrast and the distribution of both large and small granulation cells, but it requires a huge number of telescopes (several hundreds or thousands). An annular configuration allows a reasonable number of telescopes (lower than one hundred) to recover the spatial structures but it provides a low-contrast image. Concerning the design of a pupil densifier to combine all the beams, the photometric fluctuations are not critical (Delta photometry < 50%) contrary to the residual piston requirements (OPD < λ/8) which requires the development of an efficient cophasing system to fully exploit the imaging capability of a hypertelecope.

  8. Direct observation of drops on slippery lubricant-infused surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Frank; Xie, Jing; Encinas, Noemí; Hardy, Alexandre; Klapper, Markus; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Vollmer, Doris

    2015-10-14

    For a liquid droplet to slide down a solid planar surface, the surface usually has to be tilted above a critical angle of approximately 10°. By contrast, droplets of nearly any liquid "slip" on lubricant-infused textured surfaces - so termed slippery surfaces - when tilted by only a few degrees. The mechanism of how the lubricant alters the static and dynamic properties of the drop remains elusive because the drop-lubricant interface is hidden. Here, we image the shape of drops on lubricant-infused surfaces by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The contact angle of the drop-lubricant interface with the substrate exceeds 140°, although macroscopic contour images suggest angles as low as 60°. Confocal microscopy of moving drops reveals fundamentally different processes at the front and rear. Drops recede via discrete depinning events from surface protrusions at a defined receding contact angle, whereas the advancing contact angle is 180°. Drops slide easily, as the apparent contact angles with the substrate are high and the drop-lubricant interfacial tension is typically lower than the drop-air interfacial tension. Slippery surfaces resemble superhydrophobic surfaces with two main differences: drops on a slippery surface are surrounded by a wetting ridge of adjustable height and the air underneath the drop in the case of a superhydrophobic surface is replaced by lubricant in the case of a slippery surface.

  9. Method for measuring surface shear stress magnitude and direction using liquid crystal coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method is provided for determining surface shear magnitude and direction at every point on a surface. The surface is covered with a shear stress sensitive liquid crystal coating and illuminated by white light from a normal direction. A video camera is positioned at an oblique angle above the surface to observe the color of the liquid crystal at that angle. The shear magnitude and direction are derived from the color information. A method of calibrating the device is also provided.

  10. Direct determination of surface tension in the lung.

    PubMed

    Schürch, S; Goerke, J; Clements, J A

    1976-12-01

    We have used the spreading behavior of small drops of several fluorocarbon fluids and silicone oil on air-liquid interfaces to measure the surface tension of lungs in situ. The test fluids were calibrated in a surface balance at 37 degrees on monolayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. At particular surface tensions characteristic of each fluid used, an increase in the tension of 1 mN/m or less caused the droplets to spread reversibly from a sphere to a lens shape. Using micropipettes we placed such droplets on the alveolar surfaces of excised rat lungs held at functional residual capacity and 37 degrees and found that the surface tension remained below 9 mN/m for at least 30 min. The surface tension-volume relationship was linear for tensions ranging from 9 to 20 mN/m.

  11. Signal enhancement in cantilever magnetometry based on a co-resonantly coupled sensor

    PubMed Central

    Körner, Julia; Reiche, Christopher F; Gemming, Thomas; Büchner, Bernd; Gerlach, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cantilever magnetometry is a measurement technique used to study magnetic nanoparticles. With decreasing sample size, the signal strength is significantly reduced, requiring advances of the technique. Ultrathin and slender cantilevers can address this challenge but lead to increased complexity of detection. We present an approach based on the co-resonant coupling of a micro- and a nanometer-sized cantilever. Via matching of the resonance frequencies of the two subsystems we induce a strong interplay between the oscillations of the two cantilevers, allowing for a detection of interactions between the sensitive nanocantilever and external influences in the amplitude response curve of the microcantilever. In our magnetometry experiment we used an iron-filled carbon nanotube acting simultaneously as nanocantilever and magnetic sample. Measurements revealed an enhancement of the commonly used frequency shift signal by five orders of magnitude compared to conventional cantilever magnetometry experiments with similar nanomagnets. With this experiment we do not only demonstrate the functionality of our sensor design but also its potential for very sensitive magnetometry measurements while maintaining a facile oscillation detection with a conventional microcantilever setup. PMID:27547621

  12. Compact Magnetic Antennas for Directional Excitation of Surface Plasmons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Steininger, G.; Koch, M.; von Plessen, G.; Feldmann, J. Launching surface plasmons into nanoholes in metal films. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2000, 76, 140−142...plasmons at single nanoholes in Au films. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2004, 85, 467−469. (14) Baudrion, A.-L.; et al. Coupling efficiency of light to surface

  13. Land Surface Albedo from MERIS Reflectances Using MODIS Directional Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaaf, Crystal L. B.; Gao, Feng; Strahler, Alan H.

    2004-01-01

    MERIS Level 2 surface reflectance products are now available to the scientific community. This paper demonstrates the production of MERIS-derived surface albedo and Nadir Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) adjusted reflectances by coupling the MERIS data with MODIS BRDF products. Initial efforts rely on the specification of surface anisotropy as provided by the global MODIS BRDF product for a first guess of the shape of the BRDF and then make use all of the coincidently available, partially atmospherically corrected, cloud cleared, MERIS observations to generate MERIS-derived BRDF and surface albedo quantities for each location. Comparisons between MODIS (aerosol-corrected) and MERIS (not-yet aerosol-corrected) surface values from April and May 2003 are also presented for case studies in Spain and California as well as preliminary comparisons with field data from the Devil's Rock Surfrad/BSRN site.

  14. Direct measurement of surface carbon concentrations. [in lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filleux, C.; Tombrello, T. A.; Burnett, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of surface concentrations of carbon in lunar soils and soil breccias provide information on the origin of carbon in the regolith. The reaction C-12 (d, p sub zero) is used to measure 'surface' and 'volume' concentrations in lunar samples. This method has a depth resolution of 1 micron, which permits only a 'surface' and a 'volume' component to be measured. Three of four Apollo 16 double drive tube samples show a surface carbon concentration of about 8 by 10 to the 14th power/sq cm, whereas the fourth sample gave 4 by 10 to the 14th power/sq cm. It can be convincingly shown that the measured concentration does not originate from fluorocarbon or hydrocarbon contaminants. Surface adsorbed layers of CO or CO2 are removed by a sputter cleaning procedure using a 2-MeV F beam. It is shown that the residual C concentration of 8 by 10 to the 14th power/sq cm cannot be further reduced by increased F fluence, and it is therefore concluded that it is truly lunar. If one assumes that the measured surface C concentration is a steady-state concentration determined only by a balance between solar-wind implantation and sputtering, a sputter erosion rate of 0.1 A/yr is obtained. However, it would be more profitable to use an independently derived sputter erosion rate to test the hypothesis of a solar-wind origin of the surface carbon.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to surface molecules of mammalian tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, three dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture; therefore, MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells. Additionally, they provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules.

  16. Status and directions of modified tribological surfaces by ion processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1988-01-01

    An overview is presented of recent advances in modifying contacting surfaces in motion by the various ion assisted surface coating/modification processes to reduce and control tribological failures. The ion assisted coating processes and the surface modification processes offer the greatest potential to custom tailor and optimize the tribological performance. Hard, wear resistant and low shear coatings deposited by the ion assisted processes are discussed. Primarily the recent advances of sputtered MoS2 ion plated Au, Ag, Pb lubricating films and sputtered and ion plated hard, wear resistant TiN, HfN, TiC films are described in terms of structural property performance interrelationships which lead to improved adhesion, cohesion, nucleation, morphological growth, density, film thickness as determined by structural and chemical characterization and frictional and wear behavior. Also, the recent tribological advances using the surface modification processes such as ion implantation, ion beam mixing is discussed with emphasis on the development of lubricous high temperature ceramic surfaces.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAb's) to surface molecules involved in the cell-cell interactions of mammalian cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). MCS are highly organized 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics in vivo tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. They also provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. In brief, MCS combine the relevance of organized tissues with the accuracy of in vitro methodology. Further, one can manipulate these MCS experimentally to discern important information about their biology.

  18. Solution of magnetometry problems related to monitoring remote pipeline systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Andrey V.; Denisov, Alexey Y.; Narkhov, Eugene D.; Sapunov, Vladimir A.

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to solve two fundamental tasks, i.e., to design the pipeline model with sufficient adequacy and reproducibility, and to solve the inverse problem for the transition from the experimental data on the magnetic field in the measurement area directly to the pipeline characteristics, which are necessary for mapping pipes location and finding coordinates of welds. The paper presents a mathematical ideal pipeline model in the geomagnetic field without considering the pipe material. The solution of the direct and inverse problems are described, and the directions of the model development and methods of data interpretation are presented.

  19. Surface control bent sub for directional drilling of petroleum wells

    DOEpatents

    Russell, Larry R.

    1986-01-01

    Directional drilling apparatus for incorporation in a drill string, wherein a lower apparatus section is angularly deviated from vertical by cam action and wherein rotational displacement of the angularly deviated apparatus section is overcome by additional cam action, the apparatus being operated by successive increases and decreases of internal drill string pressure.

  20. Direct determination of surface albedos from satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mekler, Y.; Joseph, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    An empirical method to measure the spectral surface albedo of surfaces from Landsat imagery is presented and analyzed. The empiricism in the method is due only to the fact that three parameters of the solution must be determined for each spectral photograph of an image on the basis of independently known albedos at three points. The approach is otherwise based on exact solutions of the radiative transfer equation for upwelling intensity. Application of the method allows the routine construction of spectral albedo maps from satelite imagery, without requiring detailed knowledge of the atmospheric aerosol content, as long as the optical depth is less than 0.75, and of the calibration of the satellite sensor.

  1. High directivity optical antenna substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Chu, Yizhuo; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2012-08-22

    A two-dimensional array of gold optical antennas integrated with a one-dimensional array of gold strips and mirrors is introduced and fabricated. The experimental results show that this design achieves average surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors as high as 1.2 × 10(10) , which is more than two orders of magnitude larger than optical antennas without the gold strips and gold mirror.

  2. Direct laser fabrication of nanowires on semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghizadeh, Anahita; Yang, Haeyeon

    2016-03-01

    Periodic nanowires are observed from (001) orientation of Si and GaAs when the surfaces are irradiated interferentially by high power laser pulses. These nanowires are self-assembled and can be strain-free while their period is consistent with interference period. The nanowire morphologies are studied by atomic force microscopy. The observed period between nanowires depends on the wavelengths used and interference angle. The nanowire width increases with laser intensity. The narrowest nanowires observed have the width smaller than 20 nm, which is more than 10 times smaller than the interference period.

  3. A direct immunoassay for detecting diatoms in groundwater as an indicator of the direct influence of surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, C.E.; Schrock, R.M.; Reilly, T.J.; Baehr, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    Groundwater under the direct influence of surface water (GWUDISW) is of concern in communities where growing public demand on groundwater resources has resulted in increased withdrawals and hydraulic stress near surface water bodies. Under these conditions, contaminants such as methyl-tert butyl ether (MTBE) and biological materials have been detected in domestic wells. Other contaminants and pathogens associated with surface water are not routinely tested for in groundwater-supplied systems. To address the need for methods to easily identify potentially vulnerable supplies, a direct immunoassay for the quantitative detection of diatoms in raw water samples was developed as a measure of surface water influence on groundwater. Cell wall preparations from Nitzschia palea Ku??tzing, a freshwater diatom found throughout North America, were used to produce a polyclonal antibody that was applied in a direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) developed to detect the presence of N. palea cell wall components. The direct immunoassay allows detection at 500 cells L-1, a level similar to diatom concentrations observed in samples of groundwater collected near the test site. This investigation was the first attempt to utilize an ELISA as an indicator of surface water influence on groundwater. Further research is needed to develop more specific diatom-based monoclonal antibodies, determine cross-reactivity, and optimize sample processing and ELISA procedures for development of a standardized method. ?? Springer 2005.

  4. A direct immunoassay for detecting diatoms in groundwater as an indicator of the direct influence of surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, C.E.; Schrock, R.M.; Reilly, T.J.; Baehr, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    Groundwater under the direct influence of surface water (GWUDISW) is of concern in communities where growing public demand on groundwater resources has resulted in increased withdrawals and hydraulic stress near surface water bodies. Under these conditions, contaminants such as methyl-tert butyl ether (MTBE) and biological materials have been detected in domestic wells. Other contaminants and pathogens associated with surface water are not routinely tested for in groundwater-supplied systems. To address the need for methods to easily identify potentially vulnerable supplies, a direct immunoassay for the quantitative detection of diatoms in raw water samples was developed as a measure of surface water influence on groundwater. Cell wall preparations from Nitzschia palea Kützing, a freshwater diatom found throughout North America, were used to produce a polyclonal antibody that was applied in a direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) developed to detect the presence of N. palea cell wall components. The direct immunoassay allows detection at 500 cells L−1, a level similar to diatom concentrations observed in samples of groundwater collected near the test site. This investigation was the first attempt to utilize an ELISA as an indicator of surface water influence on groundwater. Further research is needed to develop more specific diatom-based monoclonal antibodies, determine cross-reactivity, and optimize sample processing and ELISA procedures for development of a standardized method.

  5. Layer selective magnetometry in ultrathin magnetic structures by polarised neutron reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, J. A. C.; Lee, J.; Hope, S.; Lauhoff, G.; Penfold, J.; Bucknall, D.

    1997-06-01

    We discuss the application of polarised neutron reflection to layer selective vector magnetometry measurements in thin magnetic films. To illustrate the application of PNR, we review recent measurements of the absolute moment in X/Fe/Ag(001) structures with X = Pd, Ag, Au and Cu and compare the results with the predictions based on theoretical calculations which take into account the measured interface roughness. For the case of strained fct Ni/Cu(001) structures we illustrate the use of PNR as a self-calibrating magnetometric technique in determining both the magnetic layer thickness and total sample moment for which a reduced moment per Ni atom is observed. Finally we present measurements of the layer dependent moments in FeNi/Cu/Co spin valve structures. We show that by comparing the PNR measurements with SQUID magnetometry measurements of the total sample moment we are able to determine the interface moments on an atomic scale.

  6. Layer selective magnetometry in ultrathin magnetic structures by polarised neutron reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, J. A. C.; Lee, J.; Hope, S.; Lauhoff, G.; Penfold, J.; Bucknall, D.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the application of polarised neutron reflection to layer selective vector magnetometry measurements in thin magnetic films. To illustrate the application of PNR, we review recent measurements of the absolute moment in X/Fe/Ag(001) structures with X = Pd, Ag, Au and Cu and compare the results with the predictions based on theoretical calculations which take into account the measured interface roughness. For the case of strained fct Ni/Cu(001) structures we illustrate the use of PNR as a self-calibrating magnetometric technique in determining both the magnetic layer thickness and total sample moment for which a reduced moment per Ni atom is observed. Finally we present measurements of the layer dependent moments in FeNi/Cu/Co spin valve structures. We show that by comparing the PNR measurements with SQUID magnetometry measurements of the total sample moment we are able to determine the interface moments on an atomic scale.

  7. Vector magnetometry sensor for internal inspection of gas distribution mains. Final report, February 1995-August 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Farra, R.; Fowler, T.

    1997-06-01

    There is a recognized need for an advanced distribution pipe inspection system which can operate in 4` and 6` diameter pipes. This program developed a prototype sensor car based on vector magnetometry. The prototype sensor system was tested in the laboratory. Test data is presented showing defect detection capability for defects as small as 25% of the pipe wall. Field tests were also conducted with mixed results. Varying corrosion levels were observed. However, specific defects were difficult to identify.

  8. Electrocatalysis: A Direct Alcohol Fuel Cell and Surface Science Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Braunchweig, B; Hibbitts, David D; Neurock, Matthew; Wieckowski, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we discuss some of the advances in surface science and theory that have enabled a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms that govern the electrocatalysis. More specifically, we examine in detail the electrooxidation of C-1 and C-2 alcohol molecules in both acidic and basic media. A combination of detailed in situ spectroscopic measurements along with density functional theory calculations have helped to establish the mechanisms that control the reaction paths and the influence of acidic and alkaline media. We discuss some of the synergies and differences between electrocatalysis and aqueous phase heterogeneous catalysis. Such analyses begin to establish a common language and framework by which to compare as well as advance both fields. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A spiral plasmonic lens with directional excitation of surface plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qingrui; Zhang, Chi; Hu, Xinhua

    2016-01-01

    Conventional plasmonic lenses are composed of curved slits carved through metallic films. Here, we propose a new plasmonic lens based on a metallic slit with an auxiliary groove. When the lens is illumined normally, only inward surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can be generated and then focused into a hot spot at the center of the lens. The focusing effect is theoretically investigated by varying the groove parameters and incident polarizations. It is found that this phenomenon exists for both the circular and linear polarizations of incidence. Under optimal groove parameters, the intensity of the focal spot in our lens can be 2.5 times of that in one without grooves for both linearly and circularly polarized illuminations. PMID:27562227

  10. Electrocatalysis: A direct alcohol fuel cell and surface science perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Braunchweig, B; Neurock, Matthew; Wieckowski, A.; Hibbitts, David D

    2012-01-01

    In this report, we discuss some of the advances in surface science and theory that have ena bled a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms that govern the electrocatalysis.More specifically, we examine in detail the electrooxidation ofC1 and Cz alcohol molecules in both acidic and basic media. A combination of detailed in situ spectroscopic measurements along with density functional theory calculations have helped to establish the mechanisms that control the reaction paths and the innuence of acidic and alkaline media. We discuss some of the synergies and differences between electrocatalysis and aqueous phase heterogeneous catalysis.Such analyses begin to establish a common language and framework by which to compare as well as advance both fields.

  11. Low temperature investigation of the Bose glass by local Hall probe magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shung, Emmin

    This thesis describes the application of the technique of local Hall probe magnetometry to the investigation of vortex dynamics and pinning in the Bose glass superconductor at low temperatures. It is organized as follows. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the physics of vortices with particular emphasis on pinning and dynamics in the low temperature glassy states. The Bean critical state model and the Nelson-Vinokur Bose Glass mapping are discussed. Motivation is then given for the intimate study of the local vortex density as a probe of vortex pinning and dynamics. In Chapter 2, the technique of local Hall probe magnetometry is detailed, including the design, fabrication and use of magnetometers uniquely suited for low temperature and high field applications. The remaining chapters are dedicated to measurements of vortex pinning and dynamics in the Bose Glass by local Hall probe magnetometry. Measurements of the local magnetic field profile of a Bose Glass superconductor in the critical state are described in Chapter 3. A sharp dependence of the critical current on local vortex density is revealed and a modified version of the Bean model is proposed. In Chapter 4, an approach to finding signatures of quantum creep in measurements of magnetization relaxation from the Bean critical state is motivated and discussed. Chapter 5 describes measurements in which discrete fluctuations in the local vortex density are resolved. Microscopic information about vortex-vortex interactions is gained by studying the temperature and field dependence of fluctuation rates. Chapter 6 concludes.

  12. Registration accuracy and practicability of laser-directed surface matching.

    PubMed

    Schlaier, J; Warnat, J; Brawanski, A

    2002-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the registration accuracy and practicability of a new laser registration technique in comparison to marker registration. From January to August 2001, 36 patients (23 male, 13 female) with brain lesions were operated with navigational guidance. Thirty-five patients were registered by paired-point registration. In 16 patients, a second registration was carried out using a special laser pointer for surface matching (z-touch trade mark, BrainLab, Heimstetten, Germany). Accuracy was evaluated by touching seven anatomic landmarks and a target fiducial with the nonsterile pointer. The distance from the virtual pointer tip to these points was determined on the monitor display (600% zoom). Laser registration is fully retrospective and allows registrations when no markers are applied. z-touch trade mark registration is more sophisticated and time-consuming than marker-based registration (registration time for z-touch trade mark = 7.4 +/- 3.7 min; for markers = 4.1 +/- 1.7 min; p < 0.005). Marker registration proved to be more accurate than z-touch trade mark registration with regard to localization of anatomical landmarks and target fiducials (precision with z-touch trade mark = 2.77 +/- 1.64 mm; with markers = 1.31 +/- 0.87 mm; p < 0.01). Although the registration error was increased and preparation time prolonged with the z-touch trade mark technique, it proved to be a valuable option, especially in children.

  13. Anisotropie magnetique du La2NiMnO6 multiferroique par magnetometrie statique et spectroscopie de resonance ferromagnetique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagnon, Dany

    In this research, magnetic properties of thin films composed of both double- (La2NiMnO6 or LNMOo) and simple-perovskites (LaNi0.5Mn0.5O3 ou LNMOd) are studied. This mixt phase (LNMOm) possesses two magnetic transitions; one for each phase present. It has previously been shown that this phase possesses a higher Curie temperature than LNMOo, approaching room temperature. This property makes room temperature ferromagnetic resonance measurements possible. Angular FMR measurement has already been achieved, but the magnetic anisotropy resulting isn’t completely understood. The goal of this study is to increase our understanding of this anisotropy to get new informations on the structure of the samples. To achieve this goal, thin films of LNMOm have been deposited by PLD on three different substrates; LSAT(001), LSAT(011) and LSAT(111). LSAT has been chosen for his insulating properties limiting the losses in the microwave cavities used for FMR measurements and for his very smooth surface. One sample of LNMOm on LAO(001) was also fabricated by Mangala Singh from the laboratoire des matériaux quantiques during a summer internship of the author. Some of the results obtained on this sample were used in this work. The samples were first characterized using static magnetometry. All samples possess two magnetic transitions, one at low temperature corresponding to the disordered phase and one at high temperature corresponding to the ordered phase. The temperature of these transitions were obtained with precision using the inflection point method. The high temperature transition was then confirmed using magnetocaloric effect, which gave the exact same values. The transition temperature of the ordered phase of all samples was between 268 and 271 K, while the transition of the disordered phase was between 60 and 110 K. A third transition at really low temperature was observed on some samples. The volume and volumic fraction of the ordered and disordered phases were approximated

  14. Room temperature wafer direct bonding of smooth Si surfaces recovered by Ne beam surface treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashima, Yuichi; Maeda, Atsuhiko; Takagi, Hideki

    2013-06-01

    We examined the applicability of a Ne fast atom beam (FAB) to surface activated bonding of Si wafers at room temperature. With etching depth more than 1.5 nm, the bonding strength comparable to Si bulk strength was attained. Moreover, we found the improvement of the bonding strength by surface smoothing effect of the Ne FAB. Silicon surface roughness decreased from 0.40 to 0.17 nm rms by applying a Ne FAB of 30 nm etching depth. The bonding strength between surfaces recovered by Ne FAB surface smoothing was largely improved and finally became equivalent to Si bulk strength.

  15. Chemically directing d-block heterometallics to nanocrystal surfaces as molecular beacons of surface structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Evelyn L.; Gilmore, Keith; Sawvel, April M.; Hammack, Aaron T.; Doris, Sean E.; Aloni, Shaul; Altoe, Virginia; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Cohen, Bruce E.; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Milliron, Delia J.; Prendergast, David; Helms, Brett A.

    2015-07-28

    Our understanding of structure and bonding in nanoscale materials is incomplete without knowledge of their surface structure. Needed are better surveying capabilities responsive not only to different atoms at the surface, but also their respective coordination environments. We report here that d-block organometallics, when placed at nanocrystal surfaces through heterometallic bonds, serve as molecular beacons broadcasting local surface structure in atomic detail. This unique ability stems from their elemental specificity and the sensitivity of their d-orbital level alignment to local coordination environment, which can be assessed spectroscopically. Re-surfacing cadmium and lead chalcogenide nanocrystals with iron- or ruthenium-based molecular beacons is readily accomplished with trimethylsilylated cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyls. For PbSe nanocrystals with iron-based beacons, we show how core-level X-ray spectroscopies and DFT calculations enrich our understanding of both charge and atomic reorganization at the surface when beacons are bound.

  16. Chemically directing d-block heterometallics to nanocrystal surfaces as molecular beacons of surface structure

    DOE PAGES

    Rosen, Evelyn L.; Gilmore, Keith; Sawvel, April M.; ...

    2015-07-28

    Our understanding of structure and bonding in nanoscale materials is incomplete without knowledge of their surface structure. Needed are better surveying capabilities responsive not only to different atoms at the surface, but also their respective coordination environments. We report here that d-block organometallics, when placed at nanocrystal surfaces through heterometallic bonds, serve as molecular beacons broadcasting local surface structure in atomic detail. This unique ability stems from their elemental specificity and the sensitivity of their d-orbital level alignment to local coordination environment, which can be assessed spectroscopically. Re-surfacing cadmium and lead chalcogenide nanocrystals with iron- or ruthenium-based molecular beacons ismore » readily accomplished with trimethylsilylated cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyls. For PbSe nanocrystals with iron-based beacons, we show how core-level X-ray spectroscopies and DFT calculations enrich our understanding of both charge and atomic reorganization at the surface when beacons are bound.« less

  17. Magnetometry of micro-magnets with electrostatically defined Hall bars

    SciTech Connect

    Lachance-Quirion, Dany; Camirand Lemyre, Julien; Bergeron, Laurent; Sarra-Bournet, Christian; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel

    2015-11-30

    Micro-magnets are key components for quantum information processing with individual spins, enabling arbitrary rotations and addressability. In this work, characterization of sub-micrometer sized CoFe ferromagnets is performed with Hall bars electrostatically defined in a two-dimensional electron gas. Due to the ballistic nature of electron transport in the cross junction of the Hall bar, anomalies such as the quenched Hall effect appear near zero external magnetic field, thus hindering the sensitivity of the magnetometer to small magnetic fields. However, it is shown that the sensitivity of the diffusive limit can be almost completely restored at low temperatures using a large current density in the Hall bar of about 10 A/m. Overcoming the size limitation of conventional etched Hall bars with electrostatic gating enables the measurement of magnetization curves of 440 nm wide micro-magnets with a signal-to-noise ratio above 10{sup 3}. Furthermore, the inhomogeneity of the stray magnetic field created by the micro-magnets is directly measured using the gate-voltage-dependent width of the sensitive area of the Hall bar.

  18. Torque magnetometry study of magnetically ordered state and spin reorientation in the quasi-one-dimensional S =1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet CuSb2O6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herak, Mirta; Žilić, Dijana; Matković Čalogović, Dubravka; Berger, Helmuth

    2015-05-01

    The antiferromagnetically ordered state of the monoclinic quasi-one-dimensional S =1 /2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet CuSb2O6 was studied combining torque magnetometry with a phenomenological approach to magnetic anisotropy. This system is known to have a number of different twins in the monoclinic β phase, which differ in the orientation of the two CuO6 octahedra in the unit cell resulting in different orientation of magnetic axes with respect to crystal axes for each twin. We performed torque measurements in magnetic fields H ≤0.8 T on a sample where a certain type of twin was shown to be dominant by ESR spectroscopy. The measured data reveal that the easy axis is the crystallographic b axis for this sample. Phenomenological magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy invariant to crystal symmetry operations was used to model the spin axis direction in zero and finite magnetic fields. Our model reproduces the value of the spin-flop field HSF=1.25 T found in literature. A combination of this approach with our torque results shows that the spin axis will flop in the direction of the maximal value of measured g tensor when the magnetic field H >HSF is applied along the easy axis direction. Our analysis of magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy predicts two possibilities for the easy axis direction in this system, b or a , connected to different crystallographic twins that can be realized in CuSb2O6 . These results offer a possibility to reconcile the different reports of easy axis direction found in literature for this system and also nicely demonstrate how a combination of torque magnetometry and a phenomenological approach to magnetic anisotropy can be used to determine the value of the spin-flop field and the direction of spin axis in antiferromagnets in both H HSF by performing measurements in fields significantly smaller than HSF.

  19. Lidar in-space technology experiment measurements of sea surface directional reflectance and the link to surface wind speed.

    PubMed

    Menzies, R T; Tratt, D M; Hunt, W H

    1998-08-20

    The dependence of sea surface directional reflectance on surface wind stress suggests a method for deriving surface wind speed from space-based lidar measurements of sea surface backscatter. In particular, lidar measurements in the nadir angle range from 10 degrees to 30 degrees appear to be most sensitive to surface wind-speed variability in the regime below 10 m/s. The Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) shuttle lidar mission of September 1994 provided a unique opportunity to measure directional backscatter at selected locations by use of the landmark track maneuver and to measure fixed-angle backscatter from the ocean surfaces on a global scale. During the landmark track maneuver the shuttle orbiter orientation and roll axis are adjusted continuously to maintain the lidar footprint at a fixed location for a duration of ~1 min. Several data sets were converted to calibrated reflectance units and compared with a surface reflectance model to deduce surface wind speeds. Comparisons were made with ERS-1 scatterometer data and surface measurements.

  20. Enhanced Cu-to-Cu direct bonding by controlling surface physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Po-Hao; Liang, Sin-Yong; Song, Jenn-Ming; Huang, Shang-Kun; Chiu, Ying-Ta; Hung, Chih-Pin

    2017-03-01

    Cu-to-Cu direct bonding is one of the key technologies for three-dimensional (3D) chip stacking. This research proposes a new concept to enhance Cu-to-Cu direct bonding through the control of surface physical properties. A linear relationship between bonding strength and the H/\\sqrt{R} value of the bonding face (H: subsurface hardness, R: surface roughness) was found. Low vacuum air plasma and thermal annealing were adopted to adjust the surface physical conditions. Instead of surface activation, an acceleration in copper atom diffusion due to plasma-induced compressive stress accounts for the improvement in bonding strength.

  1. Visualization of Bloch surface waves and directional propagation effects on one-dimensional photonic crystal substrate.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Ju; Lin, I-Sheng

    2016-07-11

    This paper reports a novel approach to the direct observation of Bloch surface waves, wherein a layer of fluorescent material is deposited directly on the surface of a semi-infinite periodic layered cell. A set of surface nano-gratings is used to couple pumping light to Bloch surface waves, while the sample is rotated until the pumping light meets the quasi-phase matching conditions. This study investigated the directional propagation of waves on stripe and circular one-dimensional grating structures by analyzing the dispersion relationship of the first two eigen modes. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed scheme in visualizing Bloch surface waves, which could be extended to a variety of other devices.

  2. Direct observation of enhanced magnetic moments in Fe/Ag(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, C. L.; Chen, J.; Mulhollan, G. A.; Erskine, J. L.; Markert, J. T.

    1994-04-01

    The magnetic properties of ultrathin (1-5 monolayer) Fe films on Ag(100) substrates were investigated using SQUID magnetometry. Films were grown in pairs (one bulklike, the other thin), and characterized in situ by low-energy electron diffraction, Auger spectroscopy, and the surface magneto-optic Kerr effect. The films were than capped with Au and studied with a SQUID magnetometer over the temperature range 2-340 K. We report here a direct observation of enhanced magnetic moments for Fe on Ag(100), with interface moments enhanced as much as 29%.

  3. Surface-Charge-Based Micro-Models--A Solid Foundation for Learning about Direct Current Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirvonen, P. E.

    2007-01-01

    This study explores how the use of a surface-charge-based instructional approach affects introductory university level students' understanding of direct current (dc) circuits. The introduced teaching intervention includes electrostatics, surface-charge-based micro-models that explain the existence of an electric field inside the current-carrying…

  4. Facile modification of silica substrates provides a platform for direct-writing surface click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Oberhansl, Sabine; Hirtz, Michael; Lagunas, Anna; Eritja, Ramon; Martinez, Elena; Fuchs, Harald; Samitier, Josep

    2012-02-20

    Please click here: a facile two-step functionalization strategy for silicon oxide-based substrates generates a stable platform for surface click chemistry via direct writing. The suitability of the obtained substrates is proven by patterning with two different direct-writing techniques and three different molecules.

  5. Surface Wettability Modification of Cyclic Olefin Polymer by Direct Femtosecond Laser Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Wang, Xincai; Zheng, Hongyu; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of laser irradiation on surface wettability of cyclic olefin polymer (COP) was investigated. Under different laser parameters, a superhydrophilic or a superhydrophobic COP surface with a water contact angle (WCA) of almost 0° or 163°, respectively, could be achieved by direct femtosecond laser irradiation. The laser power deposition rate (PDR) was found to be a key factor on the wettability of the laser-treated COP surface. The surface roughness and surface chemistry of the laser-irradiated samples were characterized by surface profilometer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively; they were found to be responsible for the changes of the laser-induced surface wettability. The mechanisms involved in the laser surface wettability modification process were discussed.

  6. Smooth Optimal Quantum Control for Robust Solid-State Spin Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nöbauer, Tobias; Angerer, Andreas; Bartels, Björn; Trupke, Michael; Rotter, Stefan; Schmiedmayer, Jörg; Mintert, Florian; Majer, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a simple yet versatile optimal quantum control technique that achieves tailored robustness against qubit inhomogeneities and control errors while requiring minimal bandwidth. We apply the technique to nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond and verify its performance using quantum process tomography. In a wide-field NV center magnetometry scenario, we achieve a homogeneous sensitivity across a 33% drop in control amplitude, and we improve the sensitivity by up to 2 orders of magnitude for a normalized detuning as large as 40%, achieving a value of 20 nT Hz-1 /2 μ m3 /2 in sensitivity times square root volume.

  7. μSR and magnetometry study of superconducting 5% Pt-doped IrTe2

    DOE PAGES

    Wilson, M. N.; Medina, T.; Munsie, T. J.; ...

    2016-11-11

    In this paper, we present magnetometry and muon spin rotation ( SR) measurements of the superconducting dichalcogenide Ir0.95Pt0.05Te2. From both sets of measurements we calculate the penetration depth and thence superfluid density as a function of temperature. The temperature dependence of the superfluid densities from both sets of data indicate fully gapped superconductivity that can be fit to a conventional s-wave model and yield fitting parameters consistent with a BCS weak coupling superconductor. Finally, we therefore see no evidence for exotic superconductivity in Ir0.95Pt0.05Te2.

  8. Wind Direction Estimates from Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery of the Sea Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Wind Direction Estimates from Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery of the Sea Surface George S. Young The Pennsylvania State University 503... directions with respect to the orientation of common microscale and mesoscale quasi-two dimensional phenomena seen in SAR imagery of the sea...and col regions on the wind direction -dependent retrieval of wind speed from SAR via CMOD-4. a. Use the results of this error analysis to

  9. Surface roughness analysis after machining of direct laser deposited tungsten carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, S.; Twardowski, P.; Chwalczuk, T.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, an experimental surface roughness analysis in machining of tungsten carbide is presented. The tungsten carbide was received using direct laser deposition technology (DLD). Experiments carried out included milling of tungsten carbide samples using monolithic torus cubic boron nitride (CBN) tool and grinding with the diamond cup wheel. The effect of machining method on the generated surface topography was analysed. The 3D surface topographies were measured using optical surface profiler. The research revealed, that surface roughness generated after the machining of tungsten carbide is affected by feed per tooth (fz) value related to kinematic-geometric projection only in a minor extent. The main factor affecting machined surface roughness is the occurrence of micro grooves and protuberances on the machined surface, as well as other phenomena connected, inter alia, with the mechanism for material removal.

  10. Modulating contact angle hysteresis to direct fluid droplets along a homogenous surface.

    PubMed

    Luo, Mingxiang; Gupta, Rohini; Frechette, Joelle

    2012-02-01

    The shape and motion of drops on surfaces is governed by the balance between the driving and the pinning forces. Here we demonstrate control over the motion of droplets on an inclined surface by exerting control over the contact angle hysteresis. The external modulation of contact angle hysteresis is achieved through a voltage-induced local molecular reorganization within the surface film at the solid-liquid interface. We show that tuning contact angle hysteresis alone is sufficient to direct and deform drops when subjected to a constant external driving force, here gravity, in the absence of a pre-defined surface energy gradient or pattern. We also show that the observed stretching and contraction of the drops mimic the motion of an inchworm. Such reversible manipulation of the pinning forces could be an attractive means to direct drops, especially with the dominance of surface forces at micro-/nanoscale.

  11. Direct Measurement of Core-Level Relaxation Dynamics on a Surface-Adsorbate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miaja-Avila, L.; Saathoff, G.; Mathias, S.; Yin, J.; La-O-Vorakiat, C.; Bauer, M.; Aeschlimann, M.; Murnane, M. M.; Kapteyn, H. C.

    2008-07-01

    The coupling between electronic states in a surface-adsorbate system is fundamental to the understanding of many surface interactions. In this Letter, we present the first direct time-resolved observations of the lifetime of core-excited states of an atom adsorbed onto a surface. By comparing laser-assisted photoemission from a substrate with a delayed Auger decay process from an adsorbate, we measure the lifetime of the 4d-1 core level of xenon on Pt(111) to be 7.1±1.1fs. This result opens up time-domain measurements of surface dynamics where energy-resolved measurements may provide incomplete information.

  12. Magnetometry and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of phosphine- and thiol-capped gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, E.; Muñoz-Márquez, M. A.; Fernández, A.; Crespo, P.; Hernando, A.; Lucena, R.; Conesa, J. C.

    2010-03-01

    In the last years, the number of studies performed by wholly independent research groups that confirm the permanent magnetism, first observed in our research lab, for thiol-capped Au nanoparticles (NPs) has rapidly increased. Throughout the years, the initial magnetometry studies have been completed with element-specific magnetization measurements based on, for example, the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism technique that have allowed the identification of gold as the magnetic moment carrier. In the research work here presented, we have focused our efforts in the evaluation of the magnetic behavior and iron impurities content in the synthesized samples by means of superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry and electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry, respectively. As a result, hysteresis cycles typical of a ferromagnetic material have been measured from nominally iron-free gold NPs protected with thiol, phosphine, and chlorine ligands. It is also observed that for samples containing both, capped gold NPs and highly diluted iron concentrations, the magnetic behavior of the NPs is not affected by the presence of paramagnetic iron impurities. The hysteresis cycles reported for phosphine-chlorine-capped gold NPs confirm that the magnetic behavior is not exclusively for the metal-thiol system.

  13. Directional motion of water drop on ratchet-like superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Xianliang; Zhang, Jihua

    2011-05-01

    In this article, directional movements of drops on the ratchet-like superhydrophobic surfaces were observed. High-speed CCD images showed the caterpillar-like crawl of a drop on the inclined superhydrophobic surfaces as it rolled along the ridge of ratchet. In contrast, along the opposite direction, the movement of the drop only depended on the end of triple phase contact line while the front of contact line was pinned. The sliding angle (SA) measurements indicated that the ratchet-like superhydrophobic surfaces had directional drop retention traits. Moreover, the reduction of the rise angle ω1, the height d of the ratchet's ridge and the volume V of the drop can greatly enhance the directional difference of drop retention on the ratchet-like superhydrophobic surfaces. Therefore, it was concluded that the superhydrophobicity and the periodic ratchet-like microstructures were the keys to the directional drop sliding at one-dimensional level. We believe that these findings would be helpful to better understand the ratchet-like effect on the superhydrophobic surfaces and guide some novel engineering applications.

  14. Illustrating Surface Shape in Volume Data via Principal Direction-Driven 3D Line Integral Convolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria

    1997-01-01

    The three-dimensional shape and relative depth of a smoothly curving layered transparent surface may be communicated particularly effectively when the surface is artistically enhanced with sparsely distributed opaque detail. This paper describes how the set of principal directions and principal curvatures specified by local geometric operators can be understood to define a natural 'flow' over the surface of an object, and can be used to guide the placement of the lines of a stroke texture that seeks to represent 3D shape information in a perceptually intuitive way. The driving application for this work is the visualization of layered isovalue surfaces in volume data, where the particular identity of an individual surface is not generally known a priori and observers will typically wish to view a variety of different level surfaces from the same distribution, superimposed over underlying opaque structures. By advecting an evenly distributed set of tiny opaque particles, and the empty space between them, via 3D line integral convolution through the vector field defined by the principal directions and principal curvatures of the level surfaces passing through each gridpoint of a 3D volume, it is possible to generate a single scan-converted solid stroke texture that may intuitively represent the essential shape information of any level surface in the volume. To generate longer strokes over more highly curved areas, where the directional information is both most stable and most relevant, and to simultaneously downplay the visual impact of directional information in the flatter regions, one may dynamically redefine the length of the filter kernel according to the magnitude of the maximum principal curvature of the level surface at the point around which it is applied.

  15. Direct patterning in sub-surface of stainless steel using laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Li, Z L; Liu, T; Khin, C C; Tan, A C; Khoong, L E; Zheng, H Y; Zhou, W

    2010-07-19

    This paper reports for the first time on the direct creating microcavities in sub-surface of stainless steel using a single Nd:YAG laser pulse. The low peak power density is used in the process, which is in the order of 1 MW/cm(2). The formation of the microcavities in the sub-surface of stainless steel is an evidence of volume expulsion during laser-metal interaction. Direct patterning in the sub-surface of stainless steel is demonstrated by realizing a series of microcavities to form a pre-designed pattern. Potential applications of sub-surface patterning in metal, such as security marking, micro-heater, micro-insulator and micro-sensor, are discussed.

  16. Direct measurement of core-level relaxation dynamics on a surface- adsorbate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jing; Miaja-Avila, Luis; Saathoff, Guido; La-O-Vorakiat, Chan; Murnane, Margaret; Kapteyn, Henry; Mathias, Stefan; Aeschlimann, Martin; Bauer, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Electronic coupling between an adsorbate and the surface on which it resides is fundamental to the understanding of many surface interactions. However, the interaction of highly-excited adsorbate states is an area that has been explored only indirectly to-date. In this work, we present the first direct time-resolved observations of the lifetime of core-excited states of an atom adsorbed onto a surface. By implementing laser-assisted Auger decay on an adsorbate/surface system, we directly measure the lifetime of the 4d-1 core level of Xenon on Pt(111) to be 7.1 ± 1.1 fs. This result opens up time domain measurements of highly-excited state dynamics in materials systems where, because of complex interactions, energy-resolved measurements provide incomplete information.

  17. Direct measurement of core-level relaxation dynamics on a surface- adsorbate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jing; Miaja-Avila, Luis; Saathoff, Guido; La-O-Vorakiat, Chan; Murnane, Margaret; Kapteyn, Henry; Mathias, Stefan; Aeschlimann, Martin; Bauer, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Electronic coupling between an adsorbate and the surface on which it resides is fundamental to the understanding of many surface interactions. However, the interaction of highly-excited adsorbate states is an area that has been explored only indirectly to-date. In this work, we present the first direct time-resolved observations of the lifetime of core-excited states of an atom adsorbed onto a surface. By implementing laser-assisted Auger decay on an adsorbate/surface system, we directly measure the lifetime of the 4d-1 core level of Xenon on Pt(111) to be 7.1 ± 1.1 fs. This result opens up time domain measurements of highly-excited state dynamics in materials systems where, because of complex interactions, energy-resolved measurements provide incomplete information.

  18. Direct observation of blocked nanoscale surface evaporation on SiO2 nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Neng; Xu, Jun; Sun, Li-Tao; Martini, Matteo; Huang, Qing-An; Hu, Xiao-Hui; Xu, Tao; Bi, Heng-Chang; Sun, Jun

    2012-10-01

    Nano-scale surface evaporation of SiO2 nanodroplets from a volcano-shaped tip (tip diameter d ˜ 20 nm to 70 nm) was observed directly using an in situ transmission electron microscopy method. Au nanoparticles, those precipitated in the SiO2 matrix after an Au catalyzed growth, diffused and pinned onto the evaporation surface, which induced blocked evaporation dynamics. Our observations provide direct evidences of blocked evaporation dynamics caused by small-sized nanoparticles at the nanometer scale.

  19. Increased efficiency of direct nanoimprinting on planar and curved bulk titanium through surface modification☆

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Andrew I.M.; Seunarine, Krishna; Khokhar, Ali Z.; MacLaren, Ian; Brydone, Alistair S.; Moran, David A.J.; Gadegaard, Nikolaj

    2013-01-01

    In this work the direct transfer of nanopatterns into titanium is demonstrated. The nanofeatures are imprinted at room temperature using diamond stamps in a single step. We also show that the imprint properties of the titanium surface can be altered by anodisation yielding a significant reduction in the required imprint force for pattern transfer. The anodisation process is also utilised for curved titanium surfaces where a reduced imprint force is preferable to avoid sample deformation and damage. We finally demonstrate that our process can be applied directly to titanium rods. PMID:24748699

  20. Direct Epoxidation of Propylene over Stabilized Cu+ Surface Sites on Ti Modified Cu2O

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, X.; Kattel, S.; Xiong, K.; ...

    2015-07-17

    Direct propylene epoxidation by O2 is a challenging reaction because of the strong tendency for complete combustion. Results from the current study demonstrate the feasibility to tune the epoxidation selectivity by generating highly dispersed and stabilized Cu+ active sites in a TiCuOx mixed oxide. The TiCuOx surface anchors the key surface intermediate, oxametallacycle, leading to higher selectivity for epoxidation of propylene.

  1. Direct synthesis of sp-bonded carbon chains on graphite surface by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, A.; Rybachuk, M.; Lu, Q.-B.; Duley, W. W.

    2007-09-24

    Microscopic phase transformation from graphite to sp-bonded carbon chains (carbyne) and nanodiamond has been induced by femtosecond laser pulses on graphite surface. UV/surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectra displayed the local synthesis of carbyne in the melt zone while nanocrystalline diamond and trans-polyacetylene chains form in the edge area of gentle ablation. These results evidence possible direct 'writing' of variable chemical bonded carbons by femtosecond laser pulses for carbon-based applications.

  2. Surface formation in direct chill (DC) casting of 6082 aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, N.; Carlberg, T.

    2016-03-01

    Surface defects in aluminium billet production are a real problem for the subsequent extrusion procedure. Extrusion productivity can be influenced by the surface properties, which is defined as surface appearance, surface segregation zone depth and large Mg2Si and β-particles (Al5FeSi). In this research the surface formation during DC casting of 6082 aluminium billets produced by the air slip technology is studied. The surface microstructures of 6082 aluminium alloys with smooth and wavy surface appearances were investigated, including segregation zone depths and phase formation. The results were discussed based on the exudation of liquid metal through the mushy zone. The specific appearance of the wavy surface of 6082 alloys was correlated to how the oxide skin adheres to the underlying mushy zone and coupled to the dendritic coherency and surface tension of the skin. The occurrence of different phases at the very surface and in the layer just below was explained by variations in solidification directions and subsequent segregation patterns.

  3. Direct Cortical Mapping via Solving Partial Differential Equations on Implicit Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yonggang; Thompson, Paul M.; Dinov, Ivo; Osher, Stanley; Toga, Arthur W.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for cortical mapping that computes a direct map between two cortical surfaces while satisfying constraints on sulcal landmark curves. By computing the map directly, we can avoid conventional intermediate parameterizations and help simplify the cortical mapping process. The direct map in our method is formulated as the minimizer of a flexible variational energy under landmark constraints. The energy can include both a harmonic term to ensure smoothness of the map and general data terms for the matching of geometric features. Starting from a properly designed initial map, we compute the map iteratively by solving a partial differential equation (PDE) defined on the source cortical surface. For numerical implementation, a set of adaptive numerical schemes are developed to extend the technique of solving PDEs on implicit surfaces such that landmark constraints are enforced. In our experiments, we show the flexibility of the direct mapping approach by computing smooth maps following landmark constraints from two different energies. We also quantitatively compare the metric preserving property of the direct mapping method with a parametric mapping method on a group of 30 subjects. Finally, we demonstrate the direct mapping method in the brain mapping applications of atlas construction and variability analysis. PMID:17379568

  4. Direct cortical mapping via solving partial differential equations on implicit surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yonggang; Thompson, Paul M; Dinov, Ivo; Osher, Stanley; Toga, Arthur W

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for cortical mapping that computes a direct map between two cortical surfaces while satisfying constraints on sulcal landmark curves. By computing the map directly, we can avoid conventional intermediate parameterizations and help simplify the cortical mapping process. The direct map in our method is formulated as the minimizer of a flexible variational energy under landmark constraints. The energy can include both a harmonic term to ensure smoothness of the map and general data terms for the matching of geometric features. Starting from a properly designed initial map, we compute the map iteratively by solving a partial differential equation (PDE) defined on the source cortical surface. For numerical implementation, a set of adaptive numerical schemes are developed to extend the technique of solving PDEs on implicit surfaces such that landmark constraints are enforced. In our experiments, we show the flexibility of the direct mapping approach by computing smooth maps following landmark constraints from two different energies. We also quantitatively compare the metric preserving property of the direct mapping method with a parametric mapping method on a group of 30 subjects. Finally, we demonstrate the direct mapping method in the brain mapping applications of atlas construction and variability analysis.

  5. The use of hyperspectral / directional data in land surface process models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauser, W.; Schneider, K.; Bach, H.

    2002-06-01

    The presentation analyses the role of land surface parameters, in particular those, which can be derived from hyperspectral/directional remote sensing data, for land surface process models. Land surface process models are used to understand and predict the dominant cycles of energy, water, carbon, nutrients and humans on the plant on the local, regional and global scale. They address environmental issues of great importance like the carbon budget and the availability and quality of water as a basis for life. Land surface process models use land surface parameters to characterize the properties of the land surface and to solve the underlying physically based models. Among these parameters are vegetation type, leaf area index (LAI), fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active solar radiation, biomass, soilmoisture or chlorophyll-content. The main characteristics of the cycles on the land surface are complexity as well as large temporal dynamics and spatial heterogeneity on all considered scales. Conventional, state of the art modelling of land surface processes usually derive the temporal and spatial distribution of the parameters involved from interpolation of point measurements, which either leads to large errors or creates prohibitive sampling efforts. Recently land surface process models have learned to treat spatial processes in a spatial way and are now prepared to digest spatially explicit input information e.g. from remote sensing soruces. Remote Sensing data and especially hyperspectral/directional data can be used to derive land surface parameters. Their main advantage for land surface process modelling is, that they can implicitly measure the temporal dynamics and spatial heterogeneity of the reflection of the land surface. Parameter models convert the directional reflectance spectra into spatial fields of land surface parameter values. They in turn can be used as spatially distributed inputs to the process models. In the classical approach (and usually

  6. Direct writing anisotropy on crystalline silicon surface by linearly polarized femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengjun; Jiang, Lan; Hu, Jie; Han, Weina; Lu, Yongfeng

    2013-06-01

    An interesting anisotropy phenomenon in femtosecond laser processing of crystalline silicon is revealed by changing the angle between the writing direction and the laser polarization. The experimental results indicate the surface patterning is dependent on the laser polarization direction, showing that it is beneficial to forming continuous, ordered, and better-controlled ripples when the writing direction is parallel to the laser polarization. The anisotropy is attributed mainly to the elliptical shape of the induced ripples. The formation mechanisms of the elliptical ripples are also discussed. This observation promotes the fabrication of self-assembled subwavelength structures, which is important for electro-optic devices.

  7. Amplification and directional emission of surface acoustic waves by a two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Lei; Pipe, Kevin P.

    2015-01-12

    Amplification of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by electron drift in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is analyzed analytically and confirmed experimentally. Calculations suggest that peak power gain per SAW radian occurs at a more practical carrier density for a 2DEG than for a bulk material. It is also shown that SAW emission with tunable directionality can be achieved by modulating a 2DEG's carrier density (to effect SAW generation) in the presence of an applied DC field that amplifies SAWs propagating in a particular direction while attenuating those propagating in the opposite direction.

  8. Photo-Induced Click Chemistry for DNA Surface Structuring by Direct Laser Writing.

    PubMed

    Kerbs, Antonina; Mueller, Patrick; Kaupp, Michael; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Quick, Alexander S; Abt, Doris; Wegener, Martin; Niemeyer, Christof M; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Fruk, Ljiljana

    2017-02-15

    Oligonucleotides containing photo-caged dienes were prepared and shown to react quantitatively in a light-induced Diels-Alder cycloaddition with functional maleimides in aqueous solution within minutes. Due to its high yield and fast rate, the reaction was exploited for DNA surface patterning with sub-micrometer resolution employing direct laser writing (DLW). Functional DNA arrays were written by direct laser writing (DLW) in variable patterns, which were further encoded with fluorophores and proteins through DNA directed immobilization. This mild and efficient light-driven platform technology holds promise for the fabrication of complex bioarrays with sub-micron resolution.

  9. New directions in lubrication, materials, wear, and surface interactions - Tribology in the 80's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, W. R. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    New directions in tribology are described. A range of topics is addressed, extending from fundamental research on tribological materials of all kinds and their surface effects, to final technological applications in mechanical components such as bearings, gears, and seals. The general topics addressed include: importance and definition of materials in tribology; future directions of research in adhesion and friction, wear and wear-resistant materials, and liquid lubricants and additives; status and new directions in elastohydrodynamic lubrication and solid lubricants; and tribological materials for mechanical components of the future.

  10. Evaluation of Schottky barrier diodes fabricated directly on processed 4H-SiC(0001) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yasuhisa; Shirasawa, Yuki; Okamoto, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2011-04-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a suitable substrate for low-power-consumption power devices and high-temperature applications. However, this material is difficult to machine because of its hardness and chemical inertness, and many machining methods have been studied intensively in recent years. In this paper, we present a simple method to evaluate the electrical properties of the processed surface using the ideal factor n of a Schottky barrier diode (SBD) fabricated directly on the processed surface. Upon comparing the values of n for SBDs fabricated on a damaged SiC surface and a non-damaged SiC surface, we found that there is a significant difference in the dispersion and magnitude of n. Furthermore, by combining this technique with slope etching, we were able to estimate the thickness of the damaged sub-surface layer.

  11. Depth and surface roughness control on laser micromachined polyimide for direct-write deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratap, Bhanu; Arnold, Craig B.; Pique, Alberto

    2003-01-01

    We are examining surface characteristics of ultraviolet pulsed-laser micromachined structures in polymide as a function of the incident laser energy and the distance between subsequent laser spots in order to prepare surfaces for laser direct-write deposition of metals. Variations in the spot-to-spot translation distance provide an alternative means of average depth and roughness control when compared to fluence changes and focal distance variations. We find that the average depth is proportional to the inverse of the translation distance, while the root mean square surface roughness reaches a minimum when the translation distance is approximately equal to the full width half maximum of a single ablation mark on the surface. Conductive silver metal lines are deposited on the surface machined features demonstrating the ability to produce conductors with good adhesion over stepped structures on polyimide.

  12. Directed assembly of Au nanoparticles onto planar surfaces via multiple hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Zirbs, Ronald; Kienberger, Ferry; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Binder, Wolfgang H

    2005-08-30

    We have developed a new concept to effect nanoparticle binding on surfaces by use of directed, specific molecular interactions. Hamilton-type receptors displaying a binding strength of approximately 10(5) M(-)(1) were covalently fixed onto self-assembled monolayers via Sharpless-type "click" reactions, thus representing an efficient method to control the densities of ligands over a range from low to complete surface coverage. Au nanoparticles covered with the matching barbituric acid receptors bound with high selectivity onto this surface by a self-assembly process mediated by multiple hydrogen bonds. The binding process was investigated with atomic force microscopy. Moderate control of particle density was achieved by controlling the receptor density on the self-assembled monolayer surface. The method opens a general approach to nanoparticle and small object binding onto patterned surfaces.

  13. Direct visualization of photoinduced glassy dynamics on the amorphous silicon carbide surface by STM movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Nienhaus, Lea; Haasch, Richard T.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Glassy dynamics can be controlled by light irradiation. Sub- and above-bandgap irradiation cause numerous phenomena in glasses including photorelaxation, photoexpansion, photodarkening and pohtoinduced fluidity. We used scanning tunneling microscopy to study surface glassy dynamics of amorphous silicon carbide irradiated with above- bandgap 532 nm light. Surface clusters of ~ 4-5 glass forming unit in diameter hop mostly in a two-state fashion, both without and with irradiation. Upon irradiation, the average surface hopping activity increases by a factor of 3. A very long (~1 day) movie of individual clusters with varying laser power density provides direct evidence for photoinduced enhanced hopping on the glass surfaces. We propose two mechanisms: heating and electronic for the photoenhanced surface dynamics.

  14. Continuous directional water transport on the peristome surface of Nepenthes alata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Liwen; Liu, Hongliang; Jiang, Ying; Zhang, Deyuan; Han, Zhiwu; Jiang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Numerous natural systems contain surfaces or threads that enable directional water transport. This behaviour is usually ascribed to hierarchical structural features at the microscale and nanoscale, with gradients in surface energy and gradients in Laplace pressure thought to be the main driving forces. Here we study the prey-trapping pitcher organs of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata. We find that continuous, directional water transport occurs on the surface of the ‘peristome’—the rim of the pitcher—because of its multiscale structure, which optimizes and enhances capillary rise in the transport direction, and prevents backflow by pinning in place any water front that is moving in the reverse direction. This results not only in unidirectional flow despite the absence of any surface-energy gradient, but also in a transport speed that is much higher than previously thought. We anticipate that the basic ‘design’ principles underlying this behaviour could be used to develop artificial fluid-transport systems with practical applications.

  15. DETECTION OF A GROUND-WATER/SURFACE-WATER INTERFACE WITH DIRECT-PUSH EQUIPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground-water/surface-water interface (GSI) was documented at the Thermo Chem CERCLA Site in Muskegon, MI via direct-push (DP) sampling. At that time, contaminated ground water flowed from the upland area of the site into the Black Creek floodplain. DP rods equipped with a 1.5...

  16. Electric field-directed fibroblast locomotion involves cell surface molecular reorganization and is calcium independent

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Directional cellular locomotion is thought to involve localized intracellular calcium changes and the lateral transport of cell surface molecules. We have examined the roles of both calcium and cell surface glycoprotein redistribution in the directional migration of two murine fibroblastic cell lines, NIH 3T3 and SV101. These cell types exhibit persistent, cathode directed motility when exposed to direct current electric fields. Using time lapse phase contrast microscopy and image analysis, we have determined that electric field-directed locomotion in each cell type is a calcium independent process. Both exhibit cathode directed motility in the absence of extracellular calcium, and electric fields cause no detectable elevations or gradients of cytosolic free calcium. We find evidence suggesting that galvanotaxis in these cells involves the lateral redistribution of plasma membrane glycoproteins. Electric fields cause the lateral migration of plasma membrane concanavalin A receptors toward the cathode in both NIH 3T3 and SV101 fibroblasts. Exposure of directionally migrating cells to Con A inhibits the normal change of cell direction following a reversal of electric field polarity. Additionally, when cells are plated on Con A- coated substrata so that Con A receptors mediate cell-substratum adhesion, cathode-directed locomotion and a cathodal accumulation of Con A receptors are observed. Immunofluorescent labeling of the fibronectin receptor in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts suggests the recruitment of integrins from large clusters to form a more diffuse distribution toward the cathode in field-treated cells. Our results indicate that the mechanism of electric field directed locomotion in NIH 3T3 and SV101 fibroblasts involves the lateral redistribution of plasma membrane glycoproteins involved in cell-substratum adhesion. PMID:7929557

  17. Understanding gas-surface interactions from direct force measurements using a specialized torsion balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, S. R.; Hoffbauer, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    The first comprehensive measurements of the magnitude and direction of the forces exerted on surfaces by molecular beams are discussed and used to obtain information about the microscopic properties of the gas-surface interactions. This unique approach is not based on microscopic measurements of the scattered molecules. The reduced force coefficients are introduced as a new set of parameters that completely describe the macroscopic average momentum transfer to a surface by an incident molecular beam. By using a specialized torsion balance and molecular beams of N2, CO, CO2, and H2, the reduced force coefficients are determined from direct measurements of the force components exerted on surface of a solar panel array material, Kapton, SiO2-coated Kapton, and Z-93 as a function of the angle of incidence ranging from 0 degrees to 85 degrees. The absolute flux densities of the molecular beams were measured using a different torsion balance with a beam-stop that nullified the force of the scattered molecules. Standard time-of-flight techniques were used to determine the flux-weighted average velocities of the various molecular beams ranging from 1600 m/s to 4600 m/s. The reduced force coefficients can be used to directly obtain macroscopic average properties of the scattered molecules, such as the flux-weighted average velocity and translational energy, that can then be used to determine microscopic details concerning gas-surface interactions without the complications associated with averaging microscopic measurements.

  18. High-sensitivity single NV magnetometry by spin-to-charge state mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskula, Jean-Christophe; Shields, Brendan; Bauch, Erik; Lukin, Mikhail; Walsworth, Ronald; Trifonov, Alexei

    2015-05-01

    Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond are atom-like quantum system in a solid state matrix whom its structure allows optical readout of the electronic spin. However, the optimal duration of optical readout is limited by a singlet state lifetime making single shot spin readout out of reach. On the other side, the NV center charge state readout can be extremely efficient (up to 99% fidelity) by using excitation at 594 nm. We will present a new method of spin readout utilizing a spin-depending photoionization process to map the electronic spin state of the NV onto the its charge state. Moreover, pre-selection on the charged state allows to minimize data acquisition time. This scheme improves single NV AC magnetometry by a factor of 5 and will benefit other single NV center experiments as well.

  19. Statistical magnetometry on isolated NiCo nanowires and nanowire arrays: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergelius, Philip; Garcia Fernandez, Javier; Martens, Stefan; Zocher, Michael; Böhnert, Tim; Vega Martinez, Victor; de la Prida, Victor Manuel; Görlitz, Detlef; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2016-04-01

    The first-order reversal curve (FORC) method can be used to extract information about the interaction and switching field distribution of ferromagnetic nanowire arrays, yet it remains challenging to acquire reliable values. Within ordered pores of anodic alumina templates we electrochemically synthesize eight different Ni x Co1-x samples with x varying between 0.05 and 1. FORC diagrams are acquired using vibrating sample magnetometry. By dissolving the template and using the magneto-optical Kerr effect, we measure the hysteresis loops of up to 100 different and isolated nanowires for each sample to gain precise information about the intrinsic switching field distribution. Values of the interaction field are extracted from a deshearing of the major hysteresis loop. We present a comparative study between all methods in order to evaluate and reinforce current FORC theory with experimental findings.

  20. Realization of a closed-cycle dilution refrigerator for nanoscale magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Ravi; Narla, Anirudh; Sun, Yu-Dong; Antler, Natania; Siddiqi, Irfan

    2011-03-01

    We present the implementation of a mechanical pump-free, dilution refrigerator with an automatic cool-down protocol. The cooling process utilizes a liquid nitrogen pre-cool circuit, a pulse tube cooler, and a custom internal dilution unit manufactured by Chase Cryogenics. The dilution unit employs charcoal sorption pumps and electronic heat switches to regulate the condensation and subsequent evaporative cooling of 3 He, 4 He, and a mash of both in three separate chambers. We achieve a base temperature of 85 mK with a 10-15 hour hold time. The unit presents a simple, compact, low vibration platform for conducting a wide spectrum of low temperature transport experiments. As an example, we present microwave frequency SQUID magnetometry data collected in this unit.

  1. Broadband magnetometry by infrared-absorption detection of nitrogen-vacancy ensembles in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, V. M.; Bauch, E.; Jarmola, A.; Zipp, L. J.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Budker, D.

    2010-10-25

    We demonstrate magnetometry by detection of the spin state of high-density nitrogen-vacancy ensembles in diamond using optical absorption at 1042 nm. With this technique, measurement contrast, and collection efficiency can approach unity, leading to an increase in magnetic sensitivity compared to the more common method of collecting red fluorescence. Working at 75 K with a sensor with effective volume 50x50x300 {mu}m{sup 3}, we project photon shot-noise limited sensitivity of 5 pT in one second of acquisition and bandwidth from dc to a few megahertz. Operation in a gradiometer configuration yields a noise floor of 7 nT{sub rms} at {approx}110 Hz in one second of acquisition.

  2. Exchange coupling in hybrid anisotropy magnetic multilayers quantified by vector magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, C. Miles, J. J.; Thomson, T.; Anh Nguyen, T. N.; Fang, Y.; Dumas, R. K.; Åkerman, J.

    2015-05-07

    Hybrid anisotropy thin film heterostructures, where layers with perpendicular and in-plane anisotropy are separated by a thin spacer, are novel materials for zero/low field spin torque oscillators and bit patterned media. Here, we report on magnetization reversal and exchange coupling in a archetypal Co/Pd (perpendicular)-NiFe (in-plane) hybrid anisotropy system studied using vector vibrating sample magnetometry. This technique allows us to quantify the magnetization reversal in each individual magnetic layer, and measure of the interlayer exchange as a function of non-magnetic spacer thickness. At large (>1 nm) spacer thicknesses Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida-like exchange dominates, with orange-peel coupling providing a significant contribution only for sub-nm spacer thickness.

  3. Scalable Spin Squeezing for Quantum-Enhanced Magnetometry with Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muessel, W.; Strobel, H.; Linnemann, D.; Hume, D. B.; Oberthaler, M. K.

    2014-09-01

    A major challenge in quantum metrology is the generation of entangled states with a macroscopic atom number. Here, we demonstrate experimentally that atomic squeezing generated via nonlinear dynamics in Bose-Einstein condensates, combined with suitable trap geometries, allows scaling to large ensemble sizes. We achieve a suppression of fluctuations by 5.3(5) dB for 12 300 particles, from which we infer that similar squeezing can be obtained for more than 107 atoms. With this resource, we demonstrate quantum-enhanced magnetometry by swapping the squeezed state to magnetically sensitive hyperfine levels that have negligible nonlinearity. We find a quantum-enhanced single-shot sensitivity of 310(47) pT for static magnetic fields in a probe volume as small as 90 μm3.

  4. Monolayer of Hydrazine Facilitates the Direct Covalent Attachment of C60 Fullerene to a Silicon Surface.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Teplyakov, Andrew V

    2017-02-13

    The development of oxygen-free organic-inorganic interfaces has led to new schemes for the functionalization of silicon surfaces with nitrogen-based chemical groups. However, building layers of large structures directly on this functionalized surface has remained elusive. This work confirms the path to form a stable interface between silicon and buckminsterfullerene C60 based on covalent chemical bonds. The starting point for this modification is the hydrazine-reacted Si(111) surface with the diamine functionality, which is further reacted directly with the C60 molecules. The chemistry of this process is confirmed spectroscopically and microscopically and can be used to form organic-inorganic interfaces separated by a single layer of nitrogen.

  5. The DIPSI (Direct Implicit Plasma Surface Interactions) computer code user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R.J. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Cohen, B.I. )

    1990-06-01

    DIPSI (Direct Implicit Plasma Surface Interactions) is a one-dimensional, bounded particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code designed to investigate the interaction of plasma with a solid surface, such as a limiter or divertor plate in a tokamak fusion device. Plasma confinement and transport may be studied in a system which includes an applied magnetic field (oriented normal to the solid surface) and/or a self-consistent electrostatic potential. The PIC code DIPSI is an offshoot of the PIC code TESS (Tandem Experiment Simulation Studies) which was developed to study plasma confinement in mirror devices. The codes DIPSI and TESS are direct descendants of the PIC code ES1 that was created by A. B. Langdon. This document provides the user with a brief description of the methods used in the code and a tutorial on the use of the code. 11 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. Multisensor satellite data integration for sea surface wind speed and direction determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glackin, D. L.; Pihos, G. G.; Wheelock, S. L.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques to integrate meteorological data from various satellite sensors to yield a global measure of sea surface wind speed and direction for input to the Navy's operational weather forecast models were investigated. The sensors were launched or will be launched, specifically the GOES visible and infrared imaging sensor, the Nimbus-7 SMMR, and the DMSP SSM/I instrument. An algorithm for the extrapolation to the sea surface of wind directions as derived from successive GOES cloud images was developed. This wind veering algorithm is relatively simple, accounts for the major physical variables, and seems to represent the best solution that can be found with existing data. An algorithm for the interpolation of the scattered observed data to a common geographical grid was implemented. The algorithm is based on a combination of inverse distance weighting and trend surface fitting, and is suited to combing wind data from disparate sources.

  7. Oblique projection approach to generating trajectory along arbitrary direction on NURBS surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xubing; Hu, Guofan; Xiong, Youlun

    2013-03-01

    Aiming at geometric rules of trajectory generation, the oblique projection approach is proposed to generating trajectories along arbitrary direction to improve reach-ability and provide more choices for 5-axis machining. First of all, a middle plane is constructed with the normal direction at the center point and passing through the center point of the encapsulating box. Secondly, a set of parallel and equidistant lines in the middle plane is constructed as the source object of oblique projection, and the inclination angles of the line set are uniformed as any value in the range of 0 to 2π. Thirdly, oblique projections are employed to produce projection trajectories on the machined surface. Finally, a user function APathGenerator V1.0 is developed in UG NX. The algorithm is robust and provides a feasible way to control direction angle and trajectory gap for the 5-axis machining of any smooth surfaces whether concave, convex or mixed.

  8. Improving Ku-band Scatterometer Ocean Surface Wind Direction Retrievals in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, R. C.; Zhang, J.; Black, P. G.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical cyclones are regions of very strong rain and very high winds, both of which present major challenges to surface wind vector retrieval from Ku-band scatterometers. Wind speed and wind direction retrievals can incur severe errors in regions of high rain rates. One particular signature of rain contamination is wind directions in the across-swath direction, which often leads to displaced circulation centers. Recently, Stiles et al. (2014) developed a method for retrieving QuikSCAT tropical cyclone wind speeds using a neural network approach that was tuned using H*WIND surface wind analyses and passive microwave-estimated rain rates from satellites. We are developing a scene-wide methodology by which a set of dynamically-consistent wind directions can be estimated from these wind speeds. The method is based on an iterative use of a tropical cyclone-specific sea-level pressure retrieval technique that we developed. The sea-level pressure analysis uses a boundary layer model that includes the dynamical shallowing of the tropical cyclone boundary layer toward the storm center, a roll-off in surface drag at high wind speeds, and, storm motion-corrected nonlinear mean flow advection effects. Scene-wide consistency is enforced by the integral nature (with respect to the surface wind vector field) of the derived surface pressure pattern and a constraint that the geostrophic contribution to the total flow is non-divergent. We are currently developing methods to evaluate the retrieved wind directions based on HRD aircraft observations and a limited-domain wind vector partitioning of the retrieved wind vectors into irrotational, non-divergent, and, background flow deformation contributions.

  9. Investigation of surface termination by directional elastic peak electron spectroscopy: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jurczyszyn, M.; Miszczuk, A.; Morawski, I.; Zasada, I.

    2014-07-01

    Experimental and theoretical details concerning the directional elastic peak electron spectroscopy are presented. The application of this experimental method to the identification of a crystalline structure of surface layers is shown for Cu(111) and Ru(0001), which enables the analysis of different surface terminations associated with different sequences of atoms along the surface normal. Theoretical data are obtained by applying the multiple scattering theory and different sources of phase shifts. The quantitative analysis performed by an R-factor reveals almost the same populations of A and B terminated (0001) terraces and proves explicitly the presence of steps of atomic height on the clean Ru(0001) surface. This is not the case for the Cu(111) surface, where the terrace termination does not affect the distribution of atomic directions within the first few atomic layers. The averaging of theoretical data versus scattering volume defined by the sphere radius R{sub max} around the emitter site is discussed in view of the computation time optimization. - Highlights: • We examined the structure and surface termination of fcc and hcp monocrystals. • Crystalline structure within the first few atomic layers was determined by DEPES. • Multiple scattering formalism was used to obtain theoretical results. • Populations of terraces with different terminations were determined. • Scattering parameters are discussed in the context of computation time optimization.

  10. Direct imaging of Pt single atoms adsorbed on TiO2 (110) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chang, Teng-Yuan; Tanaka, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Ryo; Toyoura, Kazuaki; Matsunaga, Katsuyuki; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Shibata, Naoya

    2014-01-08

    Noble metal nanoparticles (e.g., gold and platinum) supported on TiO2 surfaces are utilized in many technological applications such as heterogeneous catalysts. To fully understand their enhanced catalytic activity, it is essential to unravel the interfacial interaction between the metal atoms and TiO2 surfaces at the level of atomic dimensions. However, it has been extremely difficult to directly characterize the atomic-scale structures that result when individual metal atoms are adsorbed on the TiO2 surfaces. Here, we show direct atomic-resolution images of individual Pt atoms adsorbed on TiO2 (110) surfaces using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Subangstrom spatial resolution enables us to identify five different Pt atom adsorption sites on the TiO2 (110) surface. Combining this with systematic density functional theory calculations reveals that the most favorable Pt adsorption sites are on vacancy sites of basal oxygen atoms that are located in subsurface positions relative to the top surface bridging oxygen atoms.

  11. Surface preparation for high purity alumina ceramics enabling direct brazing in hydrogen atmospheres

    DOEpatents

    Cadden, Charles H.; Yang, Nancy Yuan Chi; Hosking, Floyd M.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for preparing the surface of a high purity alumina ceramic or sapphire specimen that enables direct brazing in a hydrogen atmosphere using an active braze alloy. The present invention also relates to a method for directly brazing a high purity alumina ceramic or sapphire specimen to a ceramic or metal member using this method of surface preparation, and to articles produced by this brazing method. The presence of silicon, in the form of a SiO.sub.2 -containing surface layer, can more than double the tensile bond strength in alumina ceramic joints brazed in a hydrogen atmosphere using an active Au-16Ni-0.75 Mo-1.75V filler metal. A thin silicon coating applied by PVD processing can, after air firing, produce a semi-continuous coverage of the alumina surface with a SiO.sub.2 film. Room temperature tensile strength was found to be proportional to the fraction of air fired surface covered by silicon-containing films. Similarly, the ratio of substrate fracture versus interface separation was also related to the amount of surface silicon present prior to brazing. This process can replace the need to perform a "moly-manganese" metallization step.

  12. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow over a liquid-infused micro-grooved surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jaehee; Jung, Taeyong; Choi, Haecheon; Kim, John

    2016-11-01

    Recently a superhydrophobic surface has drawn much attention as a passive device to achieve high drag reduction. Despite the high performance promised at ideal conditions, maintaining the interface in real flow conditions is an intractable problem. A non-wetting surface, known as the slippery liquid-infused porous surface (SLIPS) or the lubricant-impregnated surface (LIS), has shown a potential for drag reduction, as the working fluid slips at the interface but cannot penetrate into the lubricant layer. In the present study, we perform direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow over a liquid-infused micro-grooved surface to investigate the effects of this surface on the interfacial slip and drag reduction. The flow rate of water is maintained constant corresponding to Reτ 180 in a fully developed turbulent channel flow, and the lubricant layer is shear-driven by the turbulent water flow. The lubricant layer is also simulated with the assumption that the interface is flat (i.e. the surface tension effect is neglected). The solid substrate in which the lubricant is infused is modelled as straight ridges using an immersed boundary method. DNS results show that drag reduction by the liquid-infused surface is highly dependent on the viscosity of the lubricant.

  13. Surface magnetization processes in soft magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupu, N.; Lostun, M.; Chiriac, H.

    2010-05-01

    The surface magnetization processes taking place in simple permalloy (Py) and FeGa nanowires, Py/Cu, CoFeB/Cu, CoNiP/Cu, FeGa/Py, and FeGa/CoFeB multilayered nanowires have been studied by magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) magnetometry. The results indicate a strong correlation between the direction of the anisotropy axis relative to the direction of the applied field and the plane of incidence of the laser spot, as well as the effect of dipolar interactions between the nanowires or between the ferromagnetic layers on the magnetization reversal. The larger laser spots are inducing more noise in the MOKE hysteresis loops because of the dimensional imperfections along the nanowires.

  14. Evaluation of Surface Microtopography Engineered by Direct Laser Interference for Bacterial Anti-Biofouling.

    PubMed

    Valle, Jaione; Burgui, Saioa; Langheinrich, Denise; Gil, Carmen; Solano, Cristina; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Helbig, Ralf; Lasagni, Andrés; Lasa, Iñigo

    2015-08-01

    Modification of the biomaterial surface topography is a promising strategy to prevent bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. In this study, we use direct laser interference patterning (DLIP) to modify polystyrene surface topography at sub-micrometer scale. The results revealed that three-dimensional micrometer structures have a profound impact on bacterial adhesion. Thus, line- and pillar-like patterns enhanced S. aureus adhesion, whereas complex lamella microtopography reduced S. aureus adhesion in static and continuous flow culture conditions. Interestingly, lamella-like textured surfaces retained the capacity to inhibit S. aureus adhesion both when the surface is coated with human serum proteins and when the material is implanted subcutaneously in a foreign-body associated infection model.

  15. Direct surface engineering of silicon nanoparticles prepared by collinear double-pulse ns laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdieh, M. H.; Momeni, A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we study the photoluminescence properties of colloidal silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs) in distilled water, with the aim of clarifying the role of surface characteristics on the emission properties. We will show that double-pulse ns laser ablation (DPLA) of a silicon target in water with different inter-pulse delay times of i.e. 5 and 10 ns can result in production of colloidal Si NPs with different PL emission intensities at the visible spectral range of 550-650 nm. The results reveal that DPLA process at the different delay times can induce different oxide related surface characteristics on the Si NPs through the direct surface engineering of the nanoparticles. A detailed analysis of the PL emissions using the stochastic quantum confinement model explained that the different emission behaviors of the colloids are associated with the oxide-related surface states which are contributed as radiative centers in the PL process.

  16. Radial Wettable Gradient of Hot Surface to Control Droplets Movement in Directions

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shile; Wang, Sijie; Tao, Yuanhao; Shang, Weifeng; Deng, Siyan; Zheng, Yongmei; Hou, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    A radial wettable gradient was fabricated on the surface of graphite plate by a simple one-step anodic oxidation process. It was found that the direction and value of the wettable gradient could be easily controlled by adjusting current and oxidation time gradient. With the increase of surface temperature, droplets on surface not only exhibited the transition of boiling mode, but also showed the controlled radial spreading, evaporation and movement behaviors. These phenomena could be attributed to the cooperation of wettability force, hysteresis force and vapor pressure (Leidenfrost effect). Especially, the controlled radial convergence or divergence of droplets with high velocity were realized on the surfaces with either inside or outside radial gradient, which would have crucial applications in the design of microfluidic devices and the exploration of the biotechnology. PMID:25975722

  17. Engineering nanostructured porous SiO2 surfaces for bacteria detection via "direct cell capture".

    PubMed

    Massad-Ivanir, Naama; Shtenberg, Giorgi; Tzur, Adi; Krepker, Maksym A; Segal, Ester

    2011-05-01

    An optical label-free biosensing platform for bacteria detection ( Escherichia coli K12 as a model system) based on nanostructured oxidized porous silicon (PSiO(2)) is introduced. The biosensor is designed to directly capture the target bacteria cells on its surface with no prior sample processing (such as cell lysis). The optical reflectivity spectrum of the PSiO(2) nanostructure displays Fabry-Pérot fringes characteristic of thin-film interference, enabling direct, real-time observation of bacteria attachment within minutes. The PSiO(2) optical nanostructure is synthesized and used as the optical transducer element. The porous surface is conjugated with specific monoclonal antibodies (immunoglobulin G's) to provide the active component of the biosensor. The immobilization of the antibodies onto the biosensor system is confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescent labeling experiments, and refractive interferometric Fourier transform spectroscopy. We show that the immobilized antibodies maintain their immunoactivity and specificity when attached to the sensor surface. Exposure of these nanostructures to the target bacteria results in "direct cell capture" onto the biosensor surface. These specific binding events induce predictable changes in the thin-film optical interference spectrum of the biosensor. Our preliminary studies demonstrate the applicability of these biosensors for the detection of low bacterial concentrations. The current detection limit of E. coli K12 bacteria is 10(4) cells/mL within several minutes.

  18. NOx Direct Decomposition: Potentially Enhanced Thermodynamics and Kinetics on Chemically Modified Ferroelectric Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakekhani, Arvin; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2014-03-01

    NOx are regulated pollutants produced during automotive combustion. As part of an effort to design catalysts for NOx decomposition that operate in oxygen rich environment and permit greater fuel efficiency, we study chemistry of NOx on (001) ferroelectric surfaces. Changing the polarization at such surfaces modifies electronic properties and leads to switchable surface chemistry. Using first principles theory, our previous work has shown that addition of catalytic RuO2 monolayer on ferroelectric PbTiO3 surface makes direct decomposition of NO thermodynamically favorable for one polarization. Furthermore, the usual problem of blockage of catalytic sites by strong oxygen binding is overcome by flipping polarization that helps desorb the oxygen. We describe a thermodynamic cycle for direct NO decomposition followed by desorption of N2 and O2. We provide energy barriers and transition states for key steps of the cycle as well as describing their dependence on polarization direction. We end by pointing out how a switchable order parameter of substrate,in this case ferroelectric polarization, allows us to break away from some standard compromises for catalyst design(e.g. the Sabatier principle). This enlarges the set of potentially catalytic metals. Primary support from Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing, North America, Inc.

  19. Efficient directional excitation of surface plasmons by a single-element nanoantenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wenjie; Liu, Shang; Liao, Huimin; Li, Zhi; Sun, Chengwei; Chen, Jianjun; Gong, Qihuang

    Directional light scattering is important in basic research and real applications. This area has been successfully downscaled to wavelength and subwavelength scales with the development of optical antennas, especially single-element nanoantennas. Here we show, by adding an auxiliary resonant structure to a single-element plasmonic nanoantenna, the highly efficient lowest-order antenna mode can be effectively transferred into inactive higher-order modes. Based on this mode conversion, scattered optical fields can be well manipulated by utilizing the interference between different antenna modes. Both broadband directional excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and inversion of SPP launching direction at different wavelengths are experimentally demonstrated as typical examples. The proposed strategy based on mode conversion and mode interference provides new opportunities for the design of nanoscale optical devices, especially directional nanoantennas.

  20. Laser direct micromilling of copper-based bioelectrode with surface microstructure array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Ling, Wei-song; Liu, Wei; Peng, Youjian; Peng, Juehao

    2015-10-01

    The laser direct micromilling is proposed to fabricate the microstructure arrays on the surface of dry bioelectrodes using red copper material. Based on the principle of laser machining and SEM results, the forming process of microstructure arrays on the surface of copper-based bioelectrodes is discussed. When the process parameters are varied, the effect of process spacing, laser output power, scanning speed and number of scan on the morphology and geometrical dimension of microstructure array of bioelectrode is investigated. The results show that the cone surface microstructure can be fabricated when process spacing is set to 0.1 mm. Surface roughness of microstructure is greatly changed with different scanning speeds. The height of surface microstructure and recast layer is greatly increased with increasing laser output power. When smaller laser output power or less number of scan are selected, surface microstructure array is difficult to be fabricated. However, it is easy to generate the damage of surface microstructure when the larger output power or excessive scanning times are selected. Moreover, our developed copper-based bioelectrode shows a hydrophobic property when the spacings are selected in the range of 0.1-0.3 mm. Eventually, the optimized process parameters are obtained to fabricate the bioelectrode with cone microstructure array.

  1. Stereo imaging and cytocompatibility of a model dental implant surface formed by direct laser fabrication.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Carlo; Raspanti, Mario; Traini, Tonino; Piattelli, Adriano; Sammons, Rachel

    2009-03-01

    Direct laser fabrication (DLF) allows solids with complex geometry to be produced by sintering metal powder particles in a focused laser beam. In this study, 10 Ti6Al4V alloy model dental root implants were obtained by DLF, and surface characterization was carried out using stereo scanning electron microscopy to produce 3D reconstructions. The surfaces were extremely irregular, with approximately 100 microm deep, narrow intercommunicating crevices, shallow depressions and deep, rounded pits of widely variable shape and size, showing ample scope for interlocking with the host bone. Roughness parameters were as follows: R(t), 360.8 microm; R(z), 358.4 microm; R(a), 67.4 microm; and R(q), 78.0 microm. Disc specimens produced by DLF with an identically prepared surface were used for biocompatibility studies with rat calvarial osteoblasts: After 9 days, cells had attached and spread on the DLF surface, spanning across the crevices, and voids. Cell density was similar to that on a commercial rough microtextured surface but lower than on commercial smooth machined and smooth-textured grit-blasted, acid-etched surfaces. Human fibrin clot extension on the DLF surface was slightly improved by inorganic acid etching to increase the microroughness. With further refinements, DLF could be an economical means of manufacturing implants from titanium alloys.

  2. Generating grids directly on CAD database surfaces using a parametric evaluator approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatzhe, Timothy D.; Melson, Thomas G.

    1995-01-01

    A very important, but often overlooked step in grid generation is acquiring a suitable geometry definition of the vehicle to be analyzed. In the past, geometry was usually obtained by generating a number of cross-sections of each component. A number of recent efforts have focussed on non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces (NURBS) to provide as single type of analytic surface to deal with inside the grid generator. This approach has required the development of tools to read other types of surfaces and convert them, either exactly or by approximation, into a NURBS surface. This paper describes a more generic parametric evaluator approach, which does not rely on a particular surface type internal to the grid generation system and is less restrictive in the number of surface types that can be represented exactly. This approach has been implemented in the McDonnell Douglas grid generation system, MACGS, and offers direct access to all types of surfaces from a Unigraphics part file.

  3. Direct investigation of (sub-) surface preparation artifacts in GaAs based materials by FIB sectioning.

    PubMed

    Belz, Jürgen; Beyer, Andreas; Torunski, Torsten; Stolz, Wolfgang; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    The introduction of preparation artifacts is almost inevitable when producing samples for (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM). These artifacts can be divided in extrinsic artifacts like damage processes and intrinsic artifacts caused by the deviations from the volume strain state in thin elastically strained material systems. The reduction and estimation of those effects is of great importance for the quantitative analysis of (S)TEM images. Thus, optimized ion beam preparation conditions are investigated for high quality samples. Therefore, the surface topology is investigated directly with atomic force microscopy (AFM) on the actual TEM samples. Additionally, the sectioning of those samples by a focused ion beam (FIB) is used to investigate the damage depth profile directly in the TEM. The AFM measurements show good quantitative agreement of sample height modulation due to strain relaxation to finite elements simulations. Strong indications of (sub-) surface damage by ion beams are observed. Their influence on high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging is estimated with focus on thickness determination by absolute intensity methods. Data consolidation of AFM and TEM measurements reveals a 3.5nm surface amorphization, negligible surface roughness on the scale of angstroms and a sub-surface damage profile in the range of up to 8.0nm in crystalline gallium arsenide (GaAs) and GaAs-based ternary alloys. A correction scheme for thickness evaluation of absolute HAADF intensities is proposed and applied for GaAs based materials.

  4. Constructive, collaborative, contextual, and self-directed learning in surface anatomy education.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Esther M; Sieben, Judith M; Smailbegovic, Ida; de Bruin, Anique B H; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy education often consists of a combination of lectures and laboratory sessions, the latter frequently including surface anatomy. Studying surface anatomy enables students to elaborate on their knowledge of the cadaver's static anatomy by enabling the visualization of structures, especially those of the musculoskeletal system, move and function in a living human being. A recent development in teaching methods for surface anatomy is body painting, which several studies suggest increases both student motivation and knowledge acquisition. This article focuses on a teaching approach and is a translational contribution to existing literature. In line with best evidence medical education, the aim of this article is twofold: to briefly inform teachers about constructivist learning theory and elaborate on the principles of constructive, collaborative, contextual, and self-directed learning; and to provide teachers with an example of how to implement these learning principles to change the approach to teaching surface anatomy. Student evaluations of this new approach demonstrate that the application of these learning principles leads to higher student satisfaction. However, research suggests that even better results could be achieved by further adjustments in the application of contextual and self-directed learning principles. Successful implementation and guidance of peer physical examination is crucial for the described approach, but research shows that other options, like using life models, seem to work equally well. Future research on surface anatomy should focus on increasing the students' ability to apply anatomical knowledge and defining the setting in which certain teaching methods and approaches have a positive effect.

  5. Surface hopping dynamics of direct trans --> cis photoswitching of an azobenzene derivative in constrained adsorbate geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floß, Gereon; Granucci, Giovanni; Saalfrank, Peter

    2012-12-01

    With ongoing miniaturization of electronic devices, the need for individually addressable, switchable molecules arises. An example are azobenzenes on surfaces which have been shown to be switchable between trans and cis forms. Here, we examine the "direct" (rather than substrate-mediated) channel of the trans → cis photoisomerization after ππ* excitation of tetra-tert-butyl-azobenzene physisorbed on surfaces mimicking Au(111) and Bi(111), respectively. In spirit of the direct channel, the electronic structure of the surface is neglected, the latter merely acting as a rigid platform which weakly interacts with the molecule via Van-der-Waals forces. Starting from thermal ensembles which represent the trans-form, sudden excitations promote the molecules to ππ*-excited states which are non-adiabatically coupled among themselves and to a nπ*-excited and the ground state, respectively. After excitation, relaxation to the ground state by internal conversion takes place, possibly accompanied by isomerization. The process is described here by "on the fly" semiclassical surface hopping dynamics in conjunction with a semiempirical Hamiltonian (AM1) and configuration-interaction type methods. It is found that steric constraints imposed by the substrate lead to reduced but non-vanishing, trans → cis reaction yields and longer internal conversion times than for the isolated molecule. Implications for recent experiments for azobenzenes on surfaces are discussed.

  6. Polarized properties of the directional-hemispherical reflectance and emissivity of an opaque surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Richard A.

    1992-12-01

    The measurement of temperature of the earth's surface from space is an important remote sensing parameter and depends upon the surface emissivity. Directional-hemispherical emissivities have been measured for several different soil samples with 10 micrometers CO2 laser radiation. The CO2 laser is a possible polarized source for active remote sensing. The angular variation of the directional-hemispherical emissivity has been calculated from directional reflectance measurements for horizontal and vertical polarized CO2 radiation on different soil samples and they depended upon the polarization of the incident light. In this paper it is demonstrated that the directional-hemispherical reflectance, absorbance, and emissivity are 4 X 4 Mueller matrices. For uniform incident radiance of definite state of polarization incident on an area dA' within a projected solid angle d(Omega) ' equals Cos(Theta) 'd(omega) ' at angles ((Theta) ', (phi) ') Kirchhoff's formula relating the emissivity and reflectance involves definite sums and/or differences of Mueller matrix components of the reflectance and emissivity and depends on the polarization of the incident light. The directional-hemispherical emissivity of opaque soil samples are polarization dependent.

  7. Bragg gratings in surface-core fibers: Refractive index and directional curvature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osório, Jonas H.; Oliveira, Ricardo; Aristilde, Stenio; Chesini, Giancarlo; Franco, Marcos A. R.; Nogueira, Rogério N.; Cordeiro, Cristiano M. B.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we report, to our knowledge, the first extended study of the inscription of Bragg gratings in surface-core fibers and their application in refractive index and directional curvature sensing. The research ranges from fiber fabrication and grating inscription in untapered and tapered fibers to the performance of simulations and sensing measurements. Maximum sensitivities of 40 nm/RIU and 202.7 pm/m-1 were attained in refractive index and curvature measurements respectively. The obtained results compares well to other fiber Bragg grating based devices. Ease of fabrication, robustness and versatility makes surface-core fibers an interesting platform when exploring fiber sensing devices.

  8. Surface Rebound of Relativistic Dislocations Directly and Efficiently Initiates Deformation Twinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing-Jie; Li, Ju; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Ma, Evan

    2016-10-01

    Under ultrahigh stresses (e.g., under high strain rates or in small-volume metals) deformation twinning (DT) initiates on a very short time scale, indicating strong spatial-temporal correlations in dislocation dynamics. Using atomistic simulations, here we demonstrate that surface rebound of relativistic dislocations directly and efficiently triggers DT under a wide range of laboratory experimental conditions. Because of its stronger temporal correlation, surface rebound sustained relay of partial dislocations is shown to be dominant over the conventional mechanism of thermally activated nucleation of twinning dislocations.

  9. Large molecules on surfaces: deposition and intramolecular STM manipulation by directional forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Leonhard

    2010-03-01

    Intramolecular manipulation of single molecules on a surface with a scanning tunnelling microscope enables the controlled modification of their structure and, consequently, their physical and chemical properties. This review presents examples of intramolecular manipulation experiments with rather large molecules, driven by directional, i.e. chemical or electrostatic, forces between tip and molecule. It is shown how various regimes of forces can be explored and characterized with one and the same manipulation of a single molecule by changing the tip-surface distance. Furthermore, different deposition techniques under ultrahigh vacuum conditions are discussed because the increasing functionality of such molecules can lead to fragmentation during the heating step, making their clean deposition difficult.

  10. Statistical parameters of the spatiotemporal variability of the wind direction in the surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishov, E. A.; Koprov, B. M.; Koprov, V. M.

    2017-01-01

    Multipoint measurements of wind direction were carried out during the expedition of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IPA RAS), in Tsimlyansk in 2012. Spatial correlation functions for the transverse direction and temporal correlation functions for the longitudinal direction are plotted under stable and unstable stratification of the atmosphere. The longitudinal correlation radius is much higher than the transverse one, and radii in daytime realizations are larger than in nighttime. To determine the stratification conditions, an ultrasonic anemometer-thermometer was used. Autospectra of wind direction fluctuations were plotted. They include long segments of power dependence on the frequency. The spectral correlation coefficients of variations in the wind direction versus intersensor distance in the transverse direction are also calculated. A set of fast-response thermometers was used in the experiment. They allowed temperature mapping, i.e., plotting the time variations in the isothermal surface altitude. That analysis was also applied to visualization of the spatiotemporal variability of wind direction. The resulting data were used for planning the helicity measurements in the Tsimlyansk expedition in 2014.

  11. MZI optical isolator with Si-wire waveguides by surface-activated direct bonding.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Yuya; Ito, Masatoshi; Shirato, Yuya; Mizumoto, Tetsuya

    2012-07-30

    We fabricate a Mach-Zehnder interferometer-based optical isolator using a silicon-wire waveguide with magneto-optic garnet cladding using direct bonding techniques. Using Si-wire waveguides, the size of the device is greatly reduced from that of our previous device. We investigate surface-activated direct bonding with nitrogen plasma treatment, which shows better bonding results than oxygen plasma treatment. A large magneto-optic phase shift of 0.8π and an optical isolation of 18 dB are obtained at a wavelength of 1322 nm.

  12. Directional surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence from nickel thin films: Fixed angle observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenberg, Micah; Aslan, Kadir; Hortle, Elinor; Geddes, Chris D.

    2009-04-01

    Directional surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence (SPCC) from nickel thin films is demonstrated. Free-space and angular-dependent SPCC emission from blue, green and turquoise chemiluminescent solutions placed onto nickel thin films attached to a hemispherical prism were measured. SPCC emission was found to be highly directional and preferentially p-polarized, in contrast to the unpolarized and isotropic chemiluminescence emission. The largest SPCC emission for all chemiluminescence solutions was observed at a fixed observation angle of 60°, which was also predicted by theoretical Fresnel calculations. It was found that nickel thin films did not have a catalytic effect on chemiluminescence emission.

  13. Application of x-ray direct methods to surface reconstructions: The solution of projected superstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrelles, X.; Rius, J.; Boscherini, F.; Heun, S.; Mueller, B. H.; Ferrer, S.; Alvarez, J.; Miravitlles, C.

    1998-02-01

    The projections of surface reconstructions are normally solved from the interatomic vectors found in two-dimensional Patterson maps computed with the intensities of the in-plane superstructure reflections. Since for difficult reconstructions this procedure is not trivial, an alternative automated one based on the ``direct methods'' sum function [Rius, Miravitlles, and Allmann, Acta Crystallogr. A52, 634 (1996)] is shown. It has been applied successfully to the known c(4×2) reconstruction of Ge(001) and to the so-far unresolved In0.04Ga0.96As (001) p(4×2) surface reconstruction. For this last system we propose a modification of one of the models previously proposed for GaAs(001) whose characteristic feature is the presence of dimers along the fourfold direction.

  14. Determine electric field directions at semiconductor surfaces by femtosecond frequency domain interferometric second harmonic (FDISH) generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, C. A.; Zhu, X.-Y.

    2016-10-01

    Optical excitations at semiconductor surfaces or interfaces are accompanied by transient interfacial electric fields due to charge redistribution or transfer. While such transient fields may be probed by time-resolved second harmonic generation (TR-SHG), it is difficult to determine the field direction, which is invaluable to unveiling the underlying physics. Here we apply a time-resolved frequency domain interferometric second harmonic (TR-FDISH) generation technique to determine the phase relationship between the SH field emitted from bulk GaAs(1 0 0) and the transient SH field from the space charge region. The interference between these two SH fields allow us to unambiguously determine the directions of transient electric fields. Since SH fields from a static bulk contribution and a changing electric field contribution are present at most semiconductor surfaces or interfaces under optical excitation, the TR-FDISH technique is of general significance to probing the dynamics of interfacial charge transfer/redistribution.

  15. Molecular simulation of protein-surface interactions: Benefits, problems, solutions, and future directions (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Latour, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    While the importance of protein adsorption to materials surfaces is widely recognized, little is understood at this time regarding how to design surfaces to control protein adsorption behavior. All-atom empirical force field molecular simulation methods have enormous potential to address this problem by providing an approach to directly investigate the adsorption behavior of peptides and proteins at the atomic level. As with any type of technology, however, these methods must be appropriately developed and applied if they are to provide realistic and useful results. Three issues that are particularly important for the accurate simulation of protein adsorption behavior are the selection of a valid force field to represent the atomic-level interactions involved, the accurate representation of solvation effects, and system sampling. In this article, each of these areas is addressed and future directions for continued development are presented. PMID:19809597

  16. Effect of ion beam irradiation and rubbing on the directional behavior and alignment mechanism of liquid crystals on polyimide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang-Min; Oh, Byeong-Yun; Kim, Young-Hwan; Seo, Dae-Shik

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ion beam (IB) irradiation and rubbing on the directional behavior and alignment mechanism of liquid crystals (LCs) on polyimide (PI) surfaces. We found that the LC direction follows the IB irradiation alignment direction on the PI surface regardless of whether the irradiation occurs before or after rubbing. We assumed that the LC direction depends strongly on the C-O bonds created from C=O bonds on the PI surface broken by IB irradiation and conducted an investigation of the chemical bonding state of the PI surface by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  17. Understanding gas-surface interactions from direct force measurements using a specialized torsion balance

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, S.R.; Hoffbauer, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    The first comprehensive measurements of the magnitude and direction of the forces exerted on surfaces by molecular beams are discussed and used to obtain information about the microscopic properties of the gas-surface interactions. This unique approach is not based on microscopic measurements of the scattered molecules. The reduced force coefficients are introduced as a new set of parameters that completely describe the macroscopic average momentum transfer to a surface by an incident molecular beam. By using a specialized torsion balance and molecular beams of N{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}, the reduced force coefficients are determined from direct measurements of the force components exerted on surface of a solar panel array material, Kapton, SiO{sub 2}-coated Kapton, and Z-93 as a function of the angle of incidence ranging from 0{degrees} to 85{degrees}. The absolute flux densities of the molecular beams were measured using a different torsion balance with a beam-stop that nullified the force of the scattered molecules. Standard time-of-flight techniques were used to determine the flux-weighted average velocities of the various molecular beams ranging from 1600 m/s to 4600 m/s. The reduced force coefficients can be used to directly obtain macroscopic average properties of the scattered molecules, such as the flux-weighted average velocity and translational energy, that can then be used to determine microscopic details concerning gas-surface interactions without the complications associated with averaging microscopic measurements.

  18. Computationally Efficient Numerical Model for the Evolution of Directional Ocean Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malej, M.; Choi, W.; Goullet, A.

    2011-12-01

    The main focus of this work has been the asymptotic and numerical modeling of weakly nonlinear ocean surface wave fields. In particular, a development of an efficient numerical model for the evolution of nonlinear ocean waves, including extreme waves known as Rogue/Freak waves, is of direct interest. Due to their elusive and destructive nature, the media often portrays Rogue waves as unimaginatively huge and unpredictable monsters of the sea. To address some of these concerns, derivations of reduced phase-resolving numerical models, based on the small wave steepness assumption, are presented and their corresponding numerical simulations via Fourier pseudo-spectral methods are discussed. The simulations are initialized with a well-known JONSWAP wave spectrum and different angular distributions are employed. Both deterministic and Monte-Carlo ensemble average simulations were carried out. Furthermore, this work concerns the development of a new computationally efficient numerical model for the short term prediction of evolving weakly nonlinear ocean surface waves. The derivations are originally based on the work of West et al. (1987) and since the waves in the ocean tend to travel primarily in one direction, the aforementioned new numerical model is derived with an additional assumption of a weak transverse dependence. In turn, comparisons of the ensemble averaged randomly initialized spectra, as well as deterministic surface-to-surface correlations are presented. The new model is shown to behave well in various directional wave fields and can potentially be a candidate for computationally efficient prediction and propagation of extreme ocean surface waves - Rogue/Freak waves.

  19. Novel surface treatment materials for aligning block-co-polymer in directed self-assembly processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Someya, Yasunobu; Wakayama, Hiroyuki; Endo, Takafumi; Sakamoto, Rikimaru

    2014-03-01

    Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) process is one of the attractive processes for creating the very fine pitch pattern. Especially, the contact hole shrink processes with block-co-polymer (BCP) or polymer blend materials were attractive processes for creating very small size hole patterns with better CD uniformity compare to general photo-lithography patterning. In general contact hole shrink process, the pattern of Spin-on Carbon Hardmask (SOC) or the photo Resist pattern created by Negative-Tone Development (NTD) process were selected for guide patterns. Since the alignment property of BCP was affected by the surface of these guide materials, it is important to control the surface condition of guide in order to obtain good shrunk contact hole patterns. In this study, we will report the surface treatment materials to control the surface condition of guide patterns such as SOC or NTD resist to achieve the better contact hole shrink performance. These materials were attached to guide pattern surface and controlled the surface energy.

  20. Direct visualization of surface acoustic waves along substrates using smoke particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ming K.; Friend, James R.; Yeo, Leslie Y.

    2007-11-01

    Smoke particles (SPs) are used to directly visualize surface acoustic waves (SAWs) propagating on a 128°-rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate. By electrically exciting a SAW device in a compartment filled with SP, the SP were found to collect along the regions where the SAW propagates on the substrate. The results of the experiments show that SPs are deposited adjacent to regions of large vibration amplitude and form a clear pattern corresponding to the surface wave profile on the substrate. Through an analysis of the SAW-induced acoustic streaming in the air adjacent to the substrate and the surface acceleration measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer, we postulate that the large transverse surface accelerations due to the SAW ejects SP from the surface and carries them aloft to relatively quiescent regions nearby via acoustic streaming. Offering finer detail than fine powders common in Chladni figures [E. Chladni, Entdeckungen über die Theorie des Klanges (Weidmanns, Erben und Reich, Leipzig, Germany, 1787)] the approach is an inexpensive and a quick counterpart to laser interferometric techniques, presenting a means to explore the controversial phenomena of particle agglomeration on surfaces.

  1. Direct transfer of multilayer graphene grown on a rough metal surface using PDMS adhesion engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Heejun; Kang, Il-Suk; Lee, Youngbok; Cha, Yun Jeong; Yoon, Dong Ki; Ahn, Chi Won; Lee, Wonhee

    2016-09-01

    The direct transfer of graphene using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamping has advantages such as a ‘pick-and-place’ capability and no chemical residue problems. However, it is not easy to apply direct PDMS stamping to graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition on rough, grainy metal surfaces due to poor contact between the PDMS and graphene. In this study, graphene consisting of a mixture of monolayers and multiple layers grown on a rough Ni surface was directly transferred without the use of an adhesive layer. Liquid PDMS was cured on graphene to effect a conformal contact with the graphene. A fast release of graphene from substrate was achieved by carrying out wet-etching-assisted mechanical peeling. We also carried out a thermal post-curing of PDMS to control the level of adhesion between PDMS and graphene and hence facilitate a damage-free release of the graphene. Characterization of the transferred graphene by micro-Raman spectroscopy, SEM/EDS and optical microscopy showed neither cracks nor contamination from the transfer. This technique allows a fast and simple transfer of graphene, even for multilayer graphene grown on a rough surface.

  2. Directional fluorescence emission co-enhanced by localized and propagating surface plasmons for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Wu, Lin; Wong, Ten It; Bauch, Martin; Zhang, Qingwen; Zhang, Jinling; Liu, Xiaohu; Zhou, Xiaodong; Bai, Ping; Dostalek, Jakub; Liedberg, Bo

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the simultaneous excitation of localized surface plasmons (LSPs) and propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) on a thin metallic film with an array of nanoholes for the enhancement of fluorescence intensity in heterogeneous bioassays. Experiments supported by simulations reveal that the co-excitation of PSP and LSP modes on the nanohole array in a Kretschmann configuration allows for fluorescence enhancement of about 102 as compared to a flat Au surface irradiated off-resonance. Moreover, this fluorescence signal was about 3-fold higher on the substrate supporting both PSPs and LSPs than that on a flat surface where only PSPs were resonantly excited. Simulations also indicated the highly directional fluorescence emission as well as the high fluorescence collection efficiency on the nanohole array substrate. Our contribution attempts to de-convolute the origin of this enhancement and identify further ways to maximize the efficiency of surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy for implementation in ultra-sensitive bioassays.We investigated the simultaneous excitation of localized surface plasmons (LSPs) and propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) on a thin metallic film with an array of nanoholes for the enhancement of fluorescence intensity in heterogeneous bioassays. Experiments supported by simulations reveal that the co-excitation of PSP and LSP modes on the nanohole array in a Kretschmann configuration allows for fluorescence enhancement of about 102 as compared to a flat Au surface irradiated off-resonance. Moreover, this fluorescence signal was about 3-fold higher on the substrate supporting both PSPs and LSPs than that on a flat surface where only PSPs were resonantly excited. Simulations also indicated the highly directional fluorescence emission as well as the high fluorescence collection efficiency on the nanohole array substrate. Our contribution attempts to de-convolute the origin of this enhancement and identify further ways to maximize

  3. NASA Workshop on future directions in surface modeling and grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandalsem, W. R.; Smith, R. E.; Choo, Y. K.; Birckelbaw, L. D.; Vogel, A. A.

    1992-01-01

    Given here is a summary of the paper sessions and panel discussions of the NASA Workshop on Future Directions in Surface Modeling and Grid Generation held a NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, December 5-7, 1989. The purpose was to assess U.S. capabilities in surface modeling and grid generation and take steps to improve the focus and pace of these disciplines within NASA. The organization of the workshop centered around overviews from NASA centers and expert presentations from U.S. corporations and universities. Small discussion groups were held and summarized by group leaders. Brief overviews and a panel discussion by representatives from the DoD were held, and a NASA-only session concluded the meeting. In the NASA Program Planning Session summary there are five recommended steps for NASA to take to improve the development and application of surface modeling and grid generation.

  4. Realization of autofocusing system for laser direct writing on non-planar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianbo; Liang, Yiyong; Yang, Guoguang

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents an autofocusing system for laser direct writing on non-planar surfaces, including focus error signal detection and focusing control. The focus error signal detection is based on modified confocal techniques, which features easy implementation, independence of the tilt angles of non-planar surfaces, and excellent suppression of common-mode noise or variable system factors. We also present a macro/micro dual-drive mechanism and its synchronous operation for focusing control on non-planar surfaces. Finally, a performance evaluation of the autofocusing system is presented. The uniform line width of 2.1 μm for a pattern on a convex spherical substrate with a curvature radius of 100 mm shows the autofocusing system performs well.

  5. Cu-Cu direct bonding achieved by surface method at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Jun; Ichiyanagi, Yuko

    2014-02-20

    The metal bonding is a key technology in the processes for the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and the semiconductor devices to improve functionality and higher density integration. Strong adhesion between surfaces at the atomic level is crucial; however, it is difficult to achieve close bonding in such a system. Cu films were deposited on Si substrates by vacuum deposition, and then, two Cu films were bonded directly by means of surface activated bonding (SAB) at room temperature. The two Cu films, with the surface roughness Ra about 1.3nm, were bonded by using SAB at room temperature, however, the bonding strength was very weak in this method. In order to improve the bonding strength between the Cu films, samples were annealed at low temperatures, between 323 and 473 K, in air. As the result, the Cu-Cu bonding strength was 10 times higher than that of the original samples without annealing.

  6. Full-field 3D shape measurement of specular surfaces by direct phase to depth relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zonghua; Liu, Yue; Huang, Shujun; Niu, Zhenqi; Guo, Jiao; Gao, Nan; Gao, Feng; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a new Phase Measuring Deflectometry (PMD) method to measure specular object having discontinuous surfaces. A mathematical model is established to directly relate absolute phase and depth, instead of phase and gradient. Based on the model, a hardware measuring system has been set up, which consists of a beam splitter to change the optical path, and two LCD screens to display the same sinusoidal fringe patterns. By using model-based and machine vision method, system calibration is accomplished to provide the required parameters and conditions. The verification tests are given to evaluate the effectiveness of the developed system. The 3D shape of an artificial step having multiple specular surfaces and a concave mirror has been measured. Initial experimental results show that the proposed measurement method can obtain 3D shape of specular objects with discontinuous surface effectively.

  7. On-surface molecular nanoarchitectonics: From self-assembly to directed assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, Yutaka

    2016-11-01

    The rogress of on-surface molecular nanoarchitectonics over the last two decades has been reviewed. Over the early period in the 1990s-2000s, molecular self-assemblies were intensively studied, where van der Waals (vdW) interaction was predominant. After that, in the 2000s, selective intermolecular interactions based on hydrogen bonds and metal-molecule coordination enabled one to direct the assembling behaviors. Here, the concept of this directed assembly is opposite to that of the vdW-based self-assembly because the resulting architectures are purposefully tailored by programing intermolecular interaction. These efforts brought forth fruit in the on-surface syntheses of covalent bond networks. Particularly in the 2010s, on-surface covalent coupling was applied to graphene nanoribbons, where widths and edge structures can be precisely defined on the atomic scale. These works have the potential to bridge fundamental material nanoarchitectonics and functional device fabrication. In this paper, such a historical development of on-surface molecular nanoarchitectonics is reviewed, with the specific emphasis on the superiority of scanning tunneling microscopy.

  8. Carbon Nanotubes Covalently Attached to Functionalized Surfaces Directly through the Carbon Cage.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mackenzie G; Gao, Fei; BenDhiab, Ibtihel; Teplyakov, Andrew

    2017-02-07

    The covalent attachment of nonfunctionalized and carboxylic acid-functionalized carbon nanotubes to amine-terminated organic monolayers on gold and silicon surfaces is investigated. It is well established that the condensation reaction between a carboxylic acid and an amine is a viable method to anchor carbon nanotubes to solid substrates. The work presented here shows that the presence of the carboxylic group on the nanotube is not required for attachment to occur, as direct attachment via the substrate amine and the nanotube cage can take place. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirm the presence of carbon nanotubes in intimate contact with the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is utilized to compare the surface chemistry of the functionalized and nonfunctionalized carbon nanotubes and is supported by a computational investigation. Ion fragments attributed to the direct attachment between the surface and carbon nanotube cage are detected by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. The overall attachment scheme is evaluated and can be further used on multiple carbonaceous materials attached to solid substrates.

  9. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; ...

    2014-12-03

    In our work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1–2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. Moreover, the H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, wemore » find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. Then, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.« less

  10. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Wirth, B. D.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1-2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. The H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, we find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. After this point, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.

  11. Direct measurement of desorption and diffusion energies of O and N atoms physisorbed on amorphous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, M.; Congiu, E.; Dulieu, F.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Physisorbed atoms on the surface of interstellar dust grains play a central role in solid state astrochemistry. Their surface reactivity is one source of the observed molecular complexity in space. In experimental astrophysics, the high reactivity of atoms also constitutes an obstacle to measuring two of the fundamental properties in surface physics, namely desorption and diffusion energies, and so far direct measurements are non-existent for O and N atoms. Aims: We investigated the diffusion and desorption processes of O and N atoms on cold surfaces in order to give boundary conditions to astrochemical models. Methods: Here we propose a new technique for directly measuring the N- and O-atom mass signals. Including the experimental results in a simple model allows us to almost directly derive the desorption and diffusion barriers of N atoms on amorphous solid water ice (ASW) and O atoms on ASW and oxidized graphite. Results: We find a strong constraint on the values of desorption and thermal diffusion energy barriers. The measured barriers for O atoms are consistent with recent independent estimations and prove to be much higher than previously believed ( Edes = 1410-160+290; Edif = 990 -360+530 K on ASW). As for oxygen atoms, we propose that the combination Edes - Edif = 1320-750 K is a sensible choice among the possible pairs of solutions. Also, we managed to measure the desorption and diffusion energy of N atoms for the first time (Edes = 720-80+160; Edif = 525-200+260 K on ASW) in the thermal hopping regime and propose that the combination Edes-Edif = 720-400 K can be reasonably adopted in models. The value of Edif for N atoms is slightly lower than previously suggested, which implies that the N chemistry on dust grains might be richer.

  12. Co thin films deposited directly on ZnO polar surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Daichi; Shibata, Naoya; Tsukazaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    A ferromagnetic (FM)-metal/oxide stack is the key structure determining the performance of spintronic devices. However, the effect of the electronic polarity of the oxide on the magnetic properties of the adjacent FM-metal has not been investigated previously. Here, we report the magnetic and structural properties of Co ultra-thin films sputter deposited directly on the Zn- and O-polar surfaces of ZnO substrates. The magnetic anisotropy and Curie temperature exhibit dramatic polarity-dependent differences for films on these surfaces. Structural analyses reveal that the heterointerface of the Co/O-polar surface is rather diffusive, whereas that of the Co/Zn-polar surface is atomically flat. These results suggest that the surface polarity plays a key role in determining the properties of the film. This novel FM-metal/polar-oxide system is expected to add new functionality to spintronic devices and provide an ideal basis for investigating the effect of a built-in electric field on the magnetism in a metallic monolayer. PMID:27897251

  13. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces with gas pockets using linearized boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jongmin; Bose, Sanjeeb; Garcia-Mayoral, Ricardo; Mani, Ali

    2012-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are shown to be effective for surface drag reduction under laminar regime by both experiments and simulations (see for example, Ou and Rothstein, Phys. Fluids 17:103606, 2005). However, such drag reduction for fully developed turbulent flow maintaining the Cassie-Baxter state remains an open problem due to high shear rates and flow unsteadiness of turbulent boundary layer. Our work aims to develop an understanding of mechanisms leading to interface breaking and loss of gas pockets due to interactions with turbulent boundary layers. We take advantage of direct numerical simulation of turbulence with slip and no-slip patterned boundary conditions mimicking the superhydrophobic surface. In addition, we capture the dynamics of gas-water interface, by deriving a proper linearized boundary condition taking into account the surface tension of the interface and kinematic matching of interface deformation and normal velocity conditions on the wall. We will show results from our simulations predicting the dynamical behavior of gas pocket interfaces over a wide range of dimensionless surface tensions. Supported by the Office of Naval Research and the Kwanjeong Educational Scholarship Foundation.

  14. Directed block copolymer self-assembly implemented via surface-embedded electrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mei-Ling; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2016-02-01

    Block copolymer (BCP) nanolithography is widely recognized as a promising complementary approach to circumvent the feature size limits of conventional photolithography. The directed self-assembly of BCP thin film to form ordered nanostructures with controlled orientation and localized pattern has been the key challenge for practical nanolithography applications. Here we show that BCP nanopatterns can be directed on localized surface electrets defined by electron-beam irradiation to realize diverse features in a simple, effective and non-destructive manner. Charged electrets can generate a built-in electric field in BCP thin film and induce the formation of perpendicularly oriented microdomain of BCP film. The electret-directed orientation control of BCP film can be either integrated with mask-based patterning technique or realized by electron-beam direct-writing method to fabricate microscale arbitrary lateral patterns down to single BCP cylinder nanopattern. The electret-directed BCP self-assembly could provide an alternative means for BCP-based nanolithography, with high resolution.

  15. Directed block copolymer self-assembly implemented via surface-embedded electrets

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mei-Ling; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Block copolymer (BCP) nanolithography is widely recognized as a promising complementary approach to circumvent the feature size limits of conventional photolithography. The directed self-assembly of BCP thin film to form ordered nanostructures with controlled orientation and localized pattern has been the key challenge for practical nanolithography applications. Here we show that BCP nanopatterns can be directed on localized surface electrets defined by electron-beam irradiation to realize diverse features in a simple, effective and non-destructive manner. Charged electrets can generate a built-in electric field in BCP thin film and induce the formation of perpendicularly oriented microdomain of BCP film. The electret-directed orientation control of BCP film can be either integrated with mask-based patterning technique or realized by electron-beam direct-writing method to fabricate microscale arbitrary lateral patterns down to single BCP cylinder nanopattern. The electret-directed BCP self-assembly could provide an alternative means for BCP-based nanolithography, with high resolution. PMID:26876792

  16. Surface electromyogram analysis of the direction of isometric torque generation by the first dorsal interosseous muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Suresh, Nina L.; Zev Rymer, William

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a novel technique using high density surface electromyogram (EMG) recordings can be used to detect the directional dependence of muscle activity in a multifunctional muscle, the first dorsal interosseous (FDI). We used surface EMG recordings with a two-dimensional electrode array to search for inhomogeneous FDI activation patterns with changing torque direction at the metacarpophalangeal joint, the locus of action of the FDI muscle. The interference EMG distribution across the whole FDI muscle was recorded during isometric contraction at the same force magnitude in five different directions in the index finger abduction-flexion plane. The electrode array EMG activity was characterized by contour plots, interpolating the EMG amplitude between electrode sites. Across all subjects the amplitude of the flexion EMG was consistently lower than that of the abduction EMG at the given force. Pattern recognition methods were used to discriminate the isometric muscle contraction tasks with a linear discriminant analysis classifier, based on the extraction of two different feature sets of the surface EMG signal: the time domain (TD) feature set and a combination of autoregressive coefficients and the root mean square amplitude (AR+RMS) as a feature set. We found that high accuracies were obtained in the classification of different directions of the FDI muscle isometric contraction. With a monopolar electrode configuration, the average overall classification accuracy from nine subjects was 94.1 ± 2.3% for the TD feature set and 95.8 ± 1.5% for the AR+RMS feature set. Spatial filtering of the signal with bipolar electrode configuration improved the average overall classification accuracy to 96.7 ± 2.7% for the TD feature set and 98.1 ± 1.6% for the AR+RMS feature set. The distinct EMG contour plots and the high classification accuracies obtained from this study confirm distinct interference EMG pattern distributions as a

  17. Hydrogenation of FeCoZr-Al2O3 nanocomposites studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, A.; Kasiuk, J.; Fedotova, J.; Szilagyi, E.; Przewoznik, J.; Kapusta, Cz.; Marszalek, M.

    2009-02-01

    Hydrogenation effects on crystalline and magnetic structure of nanocomposites (FeCoZr) x (Al2O3)100 - x , 38 ≤ x ≤ 63 at.% are studied by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetometry. Variations of local structure, blocking temperature and mean FeCoZr nanoparticles’ volume are discussed with respect to (i) composition and (ii) two competing processes—H2 incorporation and annealing—occurred during treatment in H2 plasma.

  18. Surface-Directed Synthesis of Erbium-Doped Yttrium Oxide Nanoparticles within Organosilane Zeptoliter Containers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an approach to synthesize rare earth oxide nanoparticles using high temperature without aggregation of the nanoparticles. The dispersity of the nanoparticles is controlled at the nanoscale by using small organosilane molds as reaction containers. Zeptoliter reaction vessels prepared from organosilane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used for the surface-directed synthesis of rare earth oxide (REO) nanoparticles. Nanopores of octadecyltrichlorosilane were prepared on Si(111) using particle lithography with immersion steps. The nanopores were filled with a precursor solution of erbium and yttrium salts to confine the crystallization step to occur within individual zeptoliter-sized organosilane reaction vessels. Areas between the nanopores were separated by a matrix film of octadecyltrichlorosilane. With heating, the organosilane template was removed by calcination to generate a surface array of erbium-doped yttria nanoparticles. Nanoparticles synthesized by the surface-directed approach retain the periodic arrangement of the nanopores formed from mesoparticle masks. While bulk rare earth oxides can be readily prepared by solid state methods at high temperature (>900 °C), approaches for preparing REO nanoparticles are limited. Conventional wet chemistry methods are limited to low temperatures according to the boiling points of the solvents used for synthesis. To achieve crystallinity of REO nanoparticles requires steps for high-temperature processing of samples, which can cause self-aggregation and dispersity in sample diameters. The facile steps for particle lithography address the problems of aggregation and the requirement for high-temperature synthesis. PMID:25163977

  19. Directional Surface Plasmon Coupled Luminescence for Analytical Sensing Applications: Which Metal, What Wavelength, What Observation Angle?

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Kadir; Geddes, Chris D.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of luminescent species in the near-field to both induce and couple to surface plasmons has been known for many years, with highly directional emission from films (Surface Plasmon Coupled Luminescence, SPCL) facilitating the development of sensitive near-field assay sensing platforms, to name but just one application. Because of the near-field nature of the effect, only luminescent species (fluorescence, chemiluminescence and phosphorescence) within a few hundred nanometers from the surface play a role in coupling, which in terms of biosensing, provides for limited penetration into optically dense media, such as in whole blood. Another attractive feature is the highly polarized and angular dependent emission which allows both fixed angle and wavelength dependent emission angles to be realized at high polarization ratios. In this paper, a generic procedure based on theoretical Fresnel calculations, which outlines the step-by-step selection of an appropriate metal for SPCL applications is presented. It is also shown that 11 different metals have differing properties in different spectral regions and offer either fixed angle or wavelength-dependent angular shifts in emission. In addition, it is shown that both chemiluminescence and phosphorescence can also be observed in a highly directional manner similar to coupled fluorescence. PMID:19601619

  20. Surface-directed synthesis of erbium-doped yttrium oxide nanoparticles within organosilane zeptoliter containers.

    PubMed

    Englade-Franklin, Lauren E; Morrison, Gregory; Verberne-Sutton, Susan D; Francis, Asenath L; Chan, Julia Y; Garno, Jayne C

    2014-09-24

    We introduce an approach to synthesize rare earth oxide nanoparticles using high temperature without aggregation of the nanoparticles. The dispersity of the nanoparticles is controlled at the nanoscale by using small organosilane molds as reaction containers. Zeptoliter reaction vessels prepared from organosilane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used for the surface-directed synthesis of rare earth oxide (REO) nanoparticles. Nanopores of octadecyltrichlorosilane were prepared on Si(111) using particle lithography with immersion steps. The nanopores were filled with a precursor solution of erbium and yttrium salts to confine the crystallization step to occur within individual zeptoliter-sized organosilane reaction vessels. Areas between the nanopores were separated by a matrix film of octadecyltrichlorosilane. With heating, the organosilane template was removed by calcination to generate a surface array of erbium-doped yttria nanoparticles. Nanoparticles synthesized by the surface-directed approach retain the periodic arrangement of the nanopores formed from mesoparticle masks. While bulk rare earth oxides can be readily prepared by solid state methods at high temperature (>900 °C), approaches for preparing REO nanoparticles are limited. Conventional wet chemistry methods are limited to low temperatures according to the boiling points of the solvents used for synthesis. To achieve crystallinity of REO nanoparticles requires steps for high-temperature processing of samples, which can cause self-aggregation and dispersity in sample diameters. The facile steps for particle lithography address the problems of aggregation and the requirement for high-temperature synthesis.

  1. Laterally patterned spin-valve superlattice: Magnetometry and polarized neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Brüssing, F.; Devishvili, A.; Zabel, H.; Toperverg, B. P.; Badini Confalonieri, G. A.; Theis-Bröhl, K.

    2015-04-07

    The magnetization reversal of magnetic multilayers with spin-valve like characteristics, patterned into an array of parallel stripes, was structurally and magnetically analyzed, in detail, via x-ray scattering, magnetometry, and polarized neutron reflectivity. Each stripe contains a multiple repetition of the layer sequence [Fe/Cr/Co/Cr]. X-ray and neutron scattering maps of the patterned multilayer show rich details resulting from the superposition of Bragg peaks representing the lateral in-plane periodicity and the out-of-plane multilayer period. Detailed analysis of specular and off-specular polarized neutron intensity was used to ascertain the antiparallel alignment of the Co and Fe magnetization within the kink region of their combined hysteresis loop between the coercive fields of Fe and Co layers. This includes also an examination of domain formation and inter- as well as intra-stripe correlation effects upon magnetization reversal. Our combined study shows that the shape induced anisotropy via patterning is capable of overriding the four-fold crystal anisotropy but is unable to eliminate the ripple domain state of the Co layers, already present in the continuous multilayer.

  2. In vitro toxicity of gallium arsenide in alveolar macrophages evaluated by magnetometry, cytochemistry and morphology.

    PubMed

    Okada, M; Karube, H; Niitsuya, M; Aizawa, Y; Okayasu, I; Kotani, M

    1999-12-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), a chemical compound of gallium and arsenic, causes various toxic effects including pulmonary diseases in animals. Since the toxicity is not completely investigated, GaAs has been used in workplaces as the material of various semiconductor products. The present study was conducted to clarify the toxicity of GaAs particles in the alveolar macrophages of hamsters using magnetometry, enzyme release assays and morphological examinations. Alveolar macrophages obtained from hamsters by tracheobronchial lavage and adhered to the disks in the bottom of wells were exposed to ferrosoferric oxide and GaAs particles. Ferrosoferric oxide particles were magnetized externally and the remanent magnetic field was measured. Relaxation, a fast decline of the remanent magnetic fields radiated from the alveolar macrophages, was delayed and decay constants were decreased dose-dependently due to exposure to GaAs. Because the relaxation is thought to be associated with cytoskeleton, the exposure of GaAs may have impaired the motor function of them. Enzyme release assay and morphological findings indicated the damage to the macrophages. Thus the cytotoxicity causes cytostructural changes and cell death. According to DNA electrophoresis and the TUNEL method, necrotic changes occur more frequently than apoptotic changes.

  3. Torque magnetometry study of Fe and Ni doped SmB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsman, Colin; Li, Gang; Lawson, Benjamin; Yu, Fan; Asaba, Tomoya; Wang, Xiangfeng; Paglione, Johnpierre; Li, Lu

    2015-03-01

    There has been renewed interest in the past few years regarding Samarium Hexaboride, a promising candidate to be a topological Kondo insulator. Work on this material represents an extension of the categorization of materials by the topology of their electronic band structure into systems with strong correlation effects. It is known that by introducing magnetic impurities, such as Iron, Nickel, and Europium, the magnetic ground state of SmB6 could be greatly altered. In this study we will present our torque magnetometry data of Fe and Ni doped SmB6, down to 20 mK, and up to 45 Tesla. It is found that the overall symmetry of the angular dependence of torque with respect to magnetic field changed for both Fe-doped SmB6 and Ni-doped SmB6. For pure SmB6, the angular dependence is proportional to sin (2 θ) , as expected for a paramagnetic material. By contrast, for Fe-doped SmB6 and Ni-doped SmB6, the torque vs. tilt angle profile becomes sin (4 θ) . Furthermore, for FexSmB6 the field dependence of torque shows a sharp bend feature around 9 Tesla, which softens with elevating temperature, and could be related to magnetic moment re-alignment.

  4. A handheld SPIO-based sentinel lymph node mapping device using differential magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waanders, S.; Visscher, M.; Wildeboer, R. R.; Oderkerk, T. O. B.; Krooshoop, H. J. G.; ten Haken, B.

    2016-11-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy has become a staple tool in the diagnosis of breast cancer. By replacing the morbidity-plagued axillary node clearance with removing only those nodes most likely to contain metastases, it has greatly improved the quality of life of many breast cancer patients. However, due to the use of ionizing radiation emitted by the technetium-based tracer material, the current sentinel lymph node biopsy has serious drawbacks. Most urgently, the reliance on radioisotopes limits the application of this procedure to small parts of the developed world, and it imposes restrictions on patient planning and hospital logistics. Magnetic alternatives have been tested in recent years, but all have their own drawbacks, mostly related to interference from metallic instruments and electromagnetic noise coming from the human body. In this paper, we demonstrate an alternative approach that utilizes the unique nonlinear magnetic properties of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles to eliminate the drawbacks of both the traditional gamma-radiation centered approach and the novel magnetic techniques pioneered by others. Contrary to many other nonlinear magnetic approaches however, field amplitudes are limited to 5 mT, which enables handheld operation without additional cooling. We show that excellent mass sensitivity can be obtained without the need for external re-balancing of the probe to negate any influences from the human body. Additionally, we show how this approach can be used to suppress artefacts resulting from the presence of metallic instruments, which are a significant dealbreaker when using conventional magnetometry-based approaches.

  5. The power of torque magnetometry: defect induced switching in hexaferrite nano-structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisfi, A.; Pokharel, S.; Morgan, W.; Warren, G.; Wuttig, M.

    2014-10-01

    The presence of magnetic heterogeneities in ferromagnetic systems can reduce their performances in applications such as data storage media and permanent magnets. The detection and the full characterization of these heterogeneities is difficult especially when they are present in a very low concentration within ferromagnetic systems. Here, torque magnetometry is applied to investigate the magnetism of heterogeneities in two-dimensional hexaferrite structures. The study was conducted on a two-dimensional BaFe12O19 structure with decoupled nano-platelets grown on oxidized silicon buffered with ZnO. Measured torque curves reveal anomalous effects manifested by the presence of reversible and hysteretic kinks at large and low magnetic fields respectively. These kinks represent the contribution of magnetic heterogeneities to the global anisotropy of the film in addition to the two-fold symmetry of the major perpendicular anisotropy component. The heterogeneities consist of two types of nano-metric crystallites with the same magnitude of anisotropy as the major magnetic phase, but tilted about -74° and 74° from the normal to the film plane. These results are supported by various types of material characterization (SEM, XPS, XRD, MFM and VSM) and are well reproduced with a simple theoretical model that replicates the symmetry, switching and the easy axes alignment of the heterogeneities magnetization.

  6. The power of torque magnetometry: defect induced switching in hexaferrite nano-structures.

    PubMed

    Lisfi, A; Pokharel, S; Morgan, W; Warren, G; Wuttig, M

    2014-10-17

    The presence of magnetic heterogeneities in ferromagnetic systems can reduce their performances in applications such as data storage media and permanent magnets. The detection and the full characterization of these heterogeneities is difficult especially when they are present in a very low concentration within ferromagnetic systems. Here, torque magnetometry is applied to investigate the magnetism of heterogeneities in two-dimensional hexaferrite structures. The study was conducted on a two-dimensional BaFe₁₂O₁₉ structure with decoupled nano-platelets grown on oxidized silicon buffered with ZnO. Measured torque curves reveal anomalous effects manifested by the presence of reversible and hysteretic kinks at large and low magnetic fields respectively. These kinks represent the contribution of magnetic heterogeneities to the global anisotropy of the film in addition to the two-fold symmetry of the major perpendicular anisotropy component. The heterogeneities consist of two types of nano-metric crystallites with the same magnitude of anisotropy as the major magnetic phase, but tilted about -74° and 74° from the normal to the film plane. These results are supported by various types of material characterization (SEM, XPS, XRD, MFM and VSM) and are well reproduced with a simple theoretical model that replicates the symmetry, switching and the easy axes alignment of the heterogeneities magnetization.

  7. Biomimetic integrin-specific surfaces to direct osteoblastic function and tissue healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Timothy Andrew

    Current orthopedic implant technologies used suffer from slow rates of osseointegration, short lifetime, and lack of mechanical integrity as a result of poorly controlled cell-surface interactions. Recent biologically-inspired surface strategies (biomimetic) have focused on mimicking the biofunctionality of the extracellular matrix (ECM) by using short, adhesive oligopeptides, such as arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) present in numerous ECM components. However, these strategies have yielded mixed results in vivo and marginal bone healing responses. The central goal of this dissertation project was to engineer bioactive surfaces that specifically target integrin receptors important for osteogenic functions in order to improve bone tissue repair. In order to create integrin-specific interfaces, integrin-specific ligands reconstituting the fibronectin (FN) secondary/tertiary structure were first engineered and functionalized on material surfaces using several robust presentation schemes. We demonstrated that FN-mimetic-functionalized surfaces that directed alpha 5beta1 binding enhanced osteoblast and stromal cell integrin binding and adhesion, osteogenic signaling, and osteoblastic differentiation compared to various other RGD-based ligand-functionalized surfaces. Next, we investigated the effect of integrin-specific biointerfaces to modulate bone healing in a rat tibia implant bone model. We demonstrated, using a robust polymer brush system, that bioactive coatings on titanium implants that conferred high alpha5beta1 integrin specificity in vitro enhanced bone formation and implant integration in vivo. Moreover, we showed that integrin specificity can be engineered using different immobilization schemes, including clinically-relevant ligand dip-coating, and promote the same robust in vivo effect. Furthermore, we investigate the synergistic roles of integrin specificity and ligand clustering on cell response by engineering biointerfaces presenting trimeric and

  8. Development of high-rate electro-fluidic directed assembly of nanoelements on insulating surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirman, Asli

    Directed assembly of nanoelements has been used to fabricate devices for diverse applications including electronics, energy and materials. The challenge in using such techniques consists of developing highly scalable, high-rate assembly techniques for precisely placing nanoelements. Two promising examples are template-directed fluidic assembly and electric field induced assembly. In template-directed fluidic assembly, the substrate is vertically dipped into a nanoelement solution and slowly withdrawn creating a capillary force at the air-liquid interface. The withdrawal speed of the substrate needs to be slow to achieve the necessary nanoelement concentration near the template. On the other hand, electric field induced assembly techniques are very fast and robust. In this technique, two electrodes are utilized to create an electric field to direct nanoelements to the assembly region. Thus, assembly inherently results on conducting surfaces. We enhanced the previously described techniques and developed a new nanomanufacturing method called electro-fluidic directed assembly, which places nanoelements on insulating surfaces in a very short time. The electro-fluidic directed assembly is conducted on an insulating layer by having a thin conductive film underneath. The conductive layer serves to create an electrophoretic force on the suspended nanoelements. The applied electric field attracts charged nanoelements toward the template and quickly replenishes the concentration in the assembly region as a consequence fast pulling speeds results in higher assembly efficiencies. In this study, governing parameters and important process kinetics, such as applied voltage and pH of the solution, were studied to establish a repeatable and robust assembly technique. A generalized assembly efficiency graph was obtained for different pulling speeds. We were also able to examine monolayer and multilayer assemblies with different geometries down to 100 nm scale. We have demonstrated

  9. Determination of Aerosol Optical Depth and Land Surface Directional Reflectances Using Multiangle Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martonchik, John V.

    1997-01-01

    Spectral aerosol optical depths, surface hemispherical-directional reflectance factors, and bihemispherical reflectances (albedos) are retrieved for an area of Glacier National Park using spectral, multiangle imagery obtained with the airborne advanced solid state array spectroradiometer (ASAS). The retrieval algorithms are described and are identical in principle to those being devised for use by the multiangle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) which will fly on the EOS-AMI spacecraft in 1998. As part of its science mission, MISR will produce global coverage of both aerosol amounts an an surface reflection properties. The results in this paper represent the initial effort in applying the MISR algorithms to real data. These algorithms will undergo additional testing and validation as more multiangle data become available.

  10. Surface chain cleavage behavior of PBIA fiber induced by direct fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zheng; Wu, Peng; Li, Baoyin; Chen, Teng; Liu, Yang; Ren, Mengmeng; Wang, Zaoming; Lai, Wenchuan; Wang, Xu; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-10-01

    The surface chain cleavage behavior of PBIA fiber induced by direct fluorination was reported based on the analysis of physical and chemical changes on the fiber surface. The chain cleavage product was obtained to evaluate the chemical reaction during the fluorination process, and its impact on composites performance was also involved. DSC, FTIR spectra, UV-vis absorption spectra and H1NMR were utilized to analyze the chemical structure and composition of the chain cleavage product. The results show gaseous fluorine is most likely to attack the benzimidazole and amide bond in PBIA unit, which was also demonstrated by molecular simulation. Owing to the polar groups contained in chain cleavage products, the wettability of epoxy resin to fiber has been improved, leading to an 11.5% increase of adhesive strength of fiber-epoxy composite.

  11. DIRECT COMPARISON OF KINETIC AND LOCAL EQUILIBRIUM FORMULATIONS FOR SOLUTE TRANSPORT AFFECTED BY SURFACE REACTIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, Jean M.; Rubin, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    Modeling transport of reacting solutes in porous media often requires a choice between models based on the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) and models involving reaction kinetics. Direct comparison of the mathematical formulations for these two types of transport models can aid in this choice. For cases of transport affected by surface reaction, such a comparison is made possible by a new derivation procedure. This procedure yields a kinetics-based formulation that is the sum of the LEA formulation and one or more kinetically influenced terms. The dimensionless form of the new kinetics-based formulation facilitates identification of critical parameter groupings which control the approach to transport behavior consistent with LEA model predictions. Results of numerical experiments demonstrate that criteria for LEA applicability can be expressed conveniently in terms of these parameter groupings. The derivation procedure is demonstrated for examples of surface reactions including first-order reversible sorption, Langmuir-type kinetics and binary, homovalent ion exchange.

  12. An Optical Sensor for Measuring the Position and Slanting Direction of Flat Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Ta; Huang, Yen-Sheng; Liu, Chien-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Automated optical inspection is a very important technique. For this reason, this study proposes an optical non-contact slanting surface measuring system. The essential features of the measurement system are obtained through simulations using the optical design software Zemax. The actual propagation of laser beams within the measurement system is traced by using a homogeneous transformation matrix (HTM), the skew-ray tracing method, and a first-order Taylor series expansion. Additionally, a complete mathematical model that describes the variations in light spots on photoelectric sensors and the corresponding changes in the sample orientation and distance was established. Finally, a laboratory prototype system was constructed on an optical bench to verify experimentally the proposed system. This measurement system can simultaneously detect the slanting angles (x, z) in the x and z directions of the sample and the distance (y) between the biconvex lens and the flat sample surface. PMID:27409619

  13. MaterialVis: material visualization tool using direct volume and surface rendering techniques.

    PubMed

    Okuyan, Erhan; Güdükbay, Uğur; Bulutay, Ceyhun; Heinig, Karl-Heinz

    2014-05-01

    Visualization of the materials is an indispensable part of their structural analysis. We developed a visualization tool for amorphous as well as crystalline structures, called MaterialVis. Unlike the existing tools, MaterialVis represents material structures as a volume and a surface manifold, in addition to plain atomic coordinates. Both amorphous and crystalline structures exhibit topological features as well as various defects. MaterialVis provides a wide range of functionality to visualize such topological structures and crystal defects interactively. Direct volume rendering techniques are used to visualize the volumetric features of materials, such as crystal defects, which are responsible for the distinct fingerprints of a specific sample. In addition, the tool provides surface visualization to extract hidden topological features within the material. Together with the rich set of parameters and options to control the visualization, MaterialVis allows users to visualize various aspects of materials very efficiently as generated by modern analytical techniques such as the Atom Probe Tomography.

  14. Surface roughness measurement using spatial-average analysis of objective speckle pattern in specular direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuezeng; Gao, Zhao

    2009-11-01

    The speckle contrast method (SCM) and the light scattering method (LSM) are two of the most promising optical techniques for on-line surface roughness measurement of slightly-rough surface. However, due to the lack of capability in eliminating the influence from the diffuse component of scattered light, SCM and LSM are both sensitive to the variations of surface correlation length. Additionally, for LSM, the presence of speckle noise leads to fluctuations in the measuring results. To solve these problems, an approach based on the spatial-average analysis of the objective speckle pattern in the specular direction, simply called spatial-average method (SAM), is proposed. The SAM establishes the quantitative relationship between a new characteristic parameter extracted from the recorded speckle image and the rms surface roughness, eliminates to a large extent the influence of diffuse light component on the measuring results, and immunizes itself from the speckle noise. The theoretical foundation of SAM is given in details. A computer simulation is then performed to make comparisons among these three methods. Finally an experiment is presented.

  15. Wrinkled, wavelength-tunable graphene-based surface topographies for directing cell alignment and morphology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongying; Tonderys, Daniel; Leggett, Susan E.; Williams, Evelyn Kendall; Kiani, Mehrdad T.; Steinberg, Ruben Spitz; Qiu, Yang; Wong, Ian Y.; Hurt, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Textured surfaces with periodic topographical features and long-range order are highly attractive for directing cell-material interactions. They mimic physiological environments more accurately than planar surfaces and can fundamentally alter cell alignment, shape, gene expression, and cellular assembly into superstructures or microtissues. Here we demonstrate for the first time that wrinkled graphene-based surfaces are suitable as textured cell attachment substrates, and that engineered wrinkling can dramatically alter cell alignment and morphology. The wrinkled surfaces are fabricated by graphene oxide wet deposition onto pre-stretched elastomers followed by relaxation and mild thermal treatment to stabilize the films in cell culture medium. Multilayer graphene oxide films form periodic, delaminated buckle textures whose wavelengths and amplitudes can be systematically tuned by variation in the wet deposition process. Human and murine fibroblasts attach to these textured films and remain viable, while developing pronounced alignment and elongation relative to those on planar graphene controls. Compared to lithographic patterning of nanogratings, this method has advantages in the simplicity and scalability of fabrication, as well as the opportunity to couple the use of topographic cues with the unique conductive, adsorptive, or barrier properties of graphene materials for functional biomedical devices. PMID:25848137

  16. UV Direct Laser Interference Patterning of polyurethane substrates as tool for tuning its surface wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estevam-Alves, Regina; Günther, Denise; Dani, Sophie; Eckhardt, Sebastian; Roch, Teja; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Cestari, Ismar N.; Lasagni, Andrés F.

    2016-06-01

    Direct Laser Interference Patterning (DLIP) is a versatile tool for the fabrication of micro and sub-micropatterns on different materials. In this work, DLIP was used to produce periodic surface structures on polyurethane (PU) substrates with spatial periods ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 μm. The influence of the laser energy density on the quality and topographical characteristics of the produced micropatterns was investigated. To characterize the surface topography of the produced structures, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Confocal Microscopy (CFM) were utilized. It was found that high quality and defect free periodic line-like patterns with spatial periods down to 500 nm could be fabricated, with structure depths between 0.88 up to 1.25 μm for spatial periods larger than 2.0 μm and up to 270 nm for spatial periods between 500 nm and 1.0 μm. Measurements of the contact angle of water on the treated surface allowed to identify an anisotropic wetting behavior depending mainly on the spatial period and filling factor of the structured surfaces.

  17. Direct demonstration of murine thymus-dependent cell surface endogenous immunoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Szenberg, A; Marchalonis, J J; Warner, N L

    1977-01-01

    Antisera raised in mammals to murine immunoglobulin (Ig) do not detect surface Ig on thymus-dependent (T) lymphoma cells as assessed by immunofluorescence analysis. In contrast, chicken antibodies, produced against the (Fab)2 fragment of normal mouse IgG and purified by binding to and elution from IgG-Sepharose 4B, give strong indirect fluorescence with murine T cells and cultured T lymphoma cells. The surface Ig caps, is shed, and reappears, indicating that it is of endogenous origin. Nonlymphoid tumor cells of various myeloid types do not bind this reagent, even though they bear avid Fc receptors. The capacity of chicken antibodies to bind to both bone-marrow-dependent and T cell lymphomas was abolished by adsorption with myeloma-derived kappa chains coupled to Sepharose. The kappa antigenic determinant recognized by the chicken antibodies may thus be different from that seen by mammalian antibodies, and the degree of exposure of Ig on the T lymphoma surface might also affect ease of detectability with these reagents. These data provide direct evidence that T lymphocytes and T lymphoma cells express and synthesize a surface Ig containing determinants that at least 'crossreact with bone-marrow-cell-derived kappa chains. Images PMID:405673

  18. Direct inhibition of cell surface ephrin-B2 by recombinant ephrin-B2/FC.

    PubMed

    Xiaodong, Hu; Zhen, Huang; Min, Sun; Zhiming, Cui; Hongyan, Ji; Chong, Zhang; Xuefeng, Tan; Guohua, Jin

    2013-10-18

    First messengers and viral transfection are the two most common ways to stimulate cells for signal output, although their applications are limited. We investigated mechanisms of inducing neural stem cell differentiation using recombinant ephrin-B2/Fc and found that it acted as a ligand and inhibited endogenous ephrin-B2, which maintenance of the neural progenitor cell state, by direct interference. Our results showed the movement of ephrin-B2/Fc within the cell and indicated that it recycled to the plasma membrane surface, revealing a possible pattern of ephrin trafficking. Our results also serve as proof of concept for the reconstruction of the intracellular domain of ephrin using an artificial receptor to direct input signals in future studies.

  19. Direct detection of aptamer-thrombin binding via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagba, Cynthia V.; Lane, Stephen M.; Cho, Hansang; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2010-07-01

    In this study, we exploit the sensitivity offered by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the direct detection of thrombin using the thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) as molecular receptor. The technique utilizes immobilized silver nanoparticles that are functionalized with thiolated thrombin-specific binding aptamer, a 15-mer (5'-GGTTGGTGTGGTTGG-3') quadruplex forming oligonucleotide. In addition to the Raman vibrational bands corresponding to the aptamer and blocking agent, new peaks (mainly at 1140, 1540, and 1635 cm-1) that are characteristic of the protein are observed upon binding of thrombin. These spectral changes are not observed when the aptamer-nanoparticle assembly is exposed to a nonbinding protein such as bovine serum albumin (BSA). This methodology could be further used for the development of label-free biosensors for direct detection of proteins and other molecules of interest for which aptamers are available.

  20. Bearing splitting and near-surface source ranging in the direct zone of deep water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun-Nan; Zhou, Shi-Hong; Peng, Zhao-Hui; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Ren-He

    2016-12-01

    Sound multipath propagation is very important for target localization and identification in different acoustical zones of deep water. In order to distinguish the multipath characteristics in deep water, the Northwest Pacific Acoustic Experiment was conducted in 2015. A low-frequency horizontal line array towed at the depth of around 150 m on a receiving ship was used to receive the noise radiated by the source ship. During this experiment, a bearing-splitting phenomenon in the direct zone was observed through conventional beamforming of the horizontal line array within the frequency band 160 Hz-360 Hz. In this paper, this phenomenon is explained based on ray theory. In principle, the received signal in the direct zone of deep water arrives from two general paths including a direct one and bottom bounced one, which vary considerably in arrival angles. The split bearings correspond to the contributions of these two paths. The bearing-splitting phenomenon is demonstrated by numerical simulations of the bearing-time records and experimental results, and they are well consistent with each other. Then a near-surface source ranging approach based on the arrival angles of direct path and bottom bounced path in the direct zone is presented as an application of bearing splitting and is verified by experimental results. Finally, the applicability of the proposed ranging approach for an underwater source within several hundred meters in depth in the direct zone is also analyzed and demonstrated by simulations. Project supported by the Program of One Hundred Talented People of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11434012 and 41561144006).

  1. An aspect of denture base retention: direct measurement of force due to surface tension.

    PubMed

    Murray, M D; Darvell, B W

    1991-01-01

    A fixed-volume drop of liquid between a pair of parallel surfaces has been a common model for the denture-mucosa system. The reported one-term equation for the model, the derivation of which is suspect, implies that the acting force is inversely proportional to the square of the separation. Direct measurement of the force, however, showed that a better approximation is given by a two-term equation, with force varying as the inverse of the separation. The need for rigorous theoretical derivation is thereby emphasized. The experimental data suggest that a maximum retention force might occur for denture bases at separations of about 15 microns.

  2. Highly directive Fabry-Perot leaky-wave nanoantennas based on optical partially reflective surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lorente-Crespo, M.; Mateo-Segura, C.

    2015-05-04

    Nanoantennas enhance the conversion between highly localized electromagnetic fields and far-field radiation. Here, we investigate the response of a nano-patch partially reflective surface backed with a silver mirror to an optical source embedded at the centre of the structure. Using full wave simulations, we demonstrate a two orders of magnitude increased directivity compared to the isotropic radiator, 50% power confinement to a 13.8° width beam and a ±16 nm bandwidth. Our antenna does not rely on plasmonic phenomena thus reducing non-radiative losses and conserving source coherence.

  3. Analysis on vertical directional couplers with long range surface plasmons for multilayer optical routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, B.; Veroli, A.; Benedetti, A.

    2016-08-01

    A structure featuring vertical directional coupling of long-range surface plasmon polaritons between strip waveguides at λ = 1.55 μm is investigated with the aim of producing efficient elements that enable optical multilayer routing for 3D photonics. We have introduced a practical computational method to calculate the interaction on the bent part. This method allows us both to assess the importance of the interaction in the bent part and to control it by a suitable choice of the fabrication parameters that helps also to restrain effects due to fabrication issues. The scheme adopted here allows to reduce the insertion losses compared with other planar and multilayer devices.

  4. Axisymmetric confined turbulent jet directed towards the liquid surface from below

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Mohammad M.; Lin, Chin-Shun

    1989-01-01

    A numerical simulation is presented of an axisymmetric turbulent jet discharging axially from below into a cylindrical tank and directed towards the liquid vapor interface. The liquid vapor interface is assumed to be flat and shear free. The k-epsilon turbulence model is used to calculate the eddy viscosity. The turbulence intensity distribution and the length scale associated with the k-epsilon model are calculated as functions of jet flow rates and systems parameters. Numerical results are compared with appropriate experimental data. The problems associated with the free surface boundary conditions for the turbulent quantities are discussed.

  5. Axisymmetric confined turbulent jet directed towards the liquid surface from below

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Mohammad M.; Lin, Chin-Shun

    1988-01-01

    A numerical simulation is presented of an axisymmetric turbulent jet discharging axially from below into a cylindrical tank and directed towards the liquid vapor interface. The liquid vapor interface is assumed to be flat and shear free. The k-epsilon turbulence model is used to calculate the eddy viscosity. The turbulence intensity distribution and the length scale associated with the k-epsilon model are calculated as functions of jet flow rates and systems parameters. Numerical results are compared with appropriate experimental data. The problems associated with the free surface boundary conditions for the turbulent quantities are discussed.

  6. DNA-directed gold nanodimers with tailored ensemble surface-enhanced Raman scattering properties.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiang; Chen, Zhong; Lu, Xuxing; Dai, Gaole; Ni, Weihai; Wang, Qiangbin

    2013-11-13

    Gold nanodimers (GNDs) are assembled with high uniformity as ideal surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates through DNA-directed self-assembly of gold nanoparticles. The interparticle distance within GNDs is precisely tailored on the order of a few nanometers with changing the molecule length of DNA bridge. The ensemble SERS activity of monodispersed GNDs is then rationally engineered by modifying the structural parameters of GNDs including the particle size and interparticle distance. Theoretical studies on the level of single GND evidence the particle size- and interparticle-distance-dependent SERS effects, consistent with the ensemble averaged measurements.

  7. Efficient and direct generation of multidimensional free energy surfaces via adiabatic dynamics without coordinate transformations.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Jerry B; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2008-12-11

    Adiabatic free energy dynamics (AFED) was introduced by Rosso et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 2002, 116, 4389] for computing free energy profiles quickly and accurately using a dynamical adiabatic separation between a set of collective variables or reaction coordinates and the remaining degrees of freedom of a system. This approach has been shown to lead to a significant gain in efficiency versus traditional methods such as umbrella sampling, thermodynamic integration, and free energy perturbation for generating one-dimensional free energy profiles. More importantly, AFED is able to generate multidimensional free energy surfaces efficiently via full sweeps of the surface that rapidly map out the locations of the free energy minima. The most significant drawback to the AFED approach is the need to transform the coordinates into a generalized coordinate system that explicitly contains the collective variables of interest. Recently, Maragliano and Vanden-Eijnden built upon the AFED approach by introducing a set of extended phase-space variables, to which the adiabatic decoupling and high temperature are applied [Chem. Phys. Lett. 2006, 426, 168]. In this scheme, which the authors termed "temperature accelerated molecular dynamics" or TAMD, the need for explicit coordinate transformations is circumvented. The ability of AFED and TAMD to generate free energy surfaces efficiently depends on the thermostatting mechanism employed, since both approaches are inherently nonequilibrium due to the adiabatic decoupling. Indeed, Maragliano and Vanden-Eijnden did not report any direct generation of free energy surfaces within the overdamped Langevin dynamics employed by these authors. Here, we show that by formulating TAMD in a manner that is closer to the original AFED approach, including the generalized Gaussian moment thermostat (GGMT) and multiple time-scale integration, multidimensional free energy surfaces for complex systems can be generated directly from the probability

  8. Carbon Nanotubes Functionalized with Metal Nanoparticles on the Surface for Directional Arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaohong; Qi, Lehua; Hu, Xiaojun; Liang, Junhao

    In order to arrange directionally, multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are functionalized with ferromagnetic cobalt on the surface via the electroless plating method. The uniform and continuous cobalt coating was received in pH = 9 at 45∘C for 30min. It is found that the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups could be successfully introduced on the surface of raw MWCNTs after treated in boiling nitric acid that would provide the active points for cobalt deposition. The diameters of the cobalt (Co)-coated MWCNTs increase to 20-50nm from 8-15nm of purified ones. As a result of nanoscale cobalt coating, MWCNTs show strong ferromagnetism at room temperature. The Co-coated MWCNT respond to magnetic field susceptibly in the distilled water and arrange themselves in the direction of the applied magnetic field up to 1T. The hysteresis curve results show that the coercivity of Co-MWCNTs is 1285.2 Oe, which is about four times that of cobalt powder itself.

  9. Exploiting Differential Surface Display of Chondroitin Sulfate Variants for Directing Neuronal Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Swarup, Vimal P.; Hsiao, Tony W.; Zhang, Jianxing; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan; Hlady, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) proteoglycans (CSPGs) are known to be primary inhibitors of neuronal regeneration at scar sites. However, a variety of CSPGs are also involved in neuronal growth and guidance during other physiological stages. Sulfation patterns of CS chains influence their interactions with various growth factors in the central nervous system (CNS), thus influencing neuronal growth, inhibition, and pathfinding. This report demonstrates the use of differentially sulfated CS chains for neuronal navigation. Surface-immobilized patterns of CS glycosaminoglycan chains were used to determine neuronal preference toward specific sulfations of five CS variants: CS-A, CS-B (dermatan sulfate), CS-C, CS-D, and CS-E. Neurons preferred CS-A, CS-B, and CS-E and avoided CS-C containing lanes. In addition, significant alignment of neurites was observed using underlying lanes containing CS-A, CS-B, and CS-E chains. To utilize differential preference of neurons toward the CS variants, a binary combinations of CS chains were created by backfilling a neuro-preferred CS variant between the microcontact printed lanes of CS-C stripes, which are avoided by neurons. The neuronal outgrowth results demonstrate for the first time that a combination of sulfation variants of CS chains without any protein component of CSPG is sufficient for directing neuronal outgrowth. Biomaterials with surface immobilized GAG chains could find numerous applications as bridging devices for tackling CNS injuries where directional growth of neurons is critical for recovery. PMID:23947484

  10. Remote sensing of directional wave spectra using the surface contour radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Hancock, D. W., III; Hines, D. E.; Kenney, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    A unique radio-oceanographic remote sensing instrument was developed. The 36 GHz airborne Surface Contour Radar (SCR) remotely produces a real-time topographical map of the sea surface beneath the aircraft. It can routinely produce ocean directional wave spectra with off-line data processing. The transmitter is a coherent dual-frequency device that uses pulse compression to compensate for the limited available power at Ka band. The radar has selectable pulse widths of 1, 2, 4, and 10 nanoseconds. The transmitting antenna is a 58 lambda horn fed dielectric lens whose axis is parallel to the longitudinal axis of the aircraft. It illuminates an elliptical mirror which is oriented 45 deg to the lens' longitudinal axis to deflect the beam towards the region beneath the aircraft. The mirror is oscillated in a sinusoidal fashion through mechanical linkages driven to a variable speed motor to scan the transmitter beam (1.2 deg X 1.2 deg) with + or - 16 deg of the perpendicular to the aircraft wings in the plane perpendicular to the aircraft flight direction.

  11. Direct observation of bosonic quantum interference of surface plasmon polaritons using photon-number-resolving detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Go; Fukuda, Daiji; Inoue, Shuichiro

    2014-08-01

    Quantum plasmonics is a field of research combining plasmonics with quantum optics and investigates interactions between photons and metallic nanostructures. So far, it has been proven that quantum properties of single photons to excite single surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are preserved in the process of photon-SPP-photon mode conversion in plasmonic nanostructures, which suggests the potential application of SPPs to the quantum information processing (QIP). Recently the Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) interference of single SPPs was observed in a plasmonic circuitry. However, the visibility was below the classical limit (50%) due to the simultaneous excitation of distinguishable SPP modes. We employed a directional coupler based on long-range surface-plasmon-polariton waveguides (LRSPP-DC) and superconducting photon-number-resolving detectors to directly observe the bosonic quantum interference of single SPPs beyond the classical limit. In addition, we demonstrated the indistinguishability of photons that excite single SPPs is well preserved in the process of photon-SPP mode conversion.

  12. Two-directional pattern of movements on the cell surface of Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Grebecki, A

    1986-07-01

    Particles of latex, glass and precipitated Alcian Blue were studied cinematographically on the surface of migrating Amoeba proteus and in the surrounding medium. The majority of the attached and all unattached particles flow steadily forward in the direction of the endoplasmic streaming and cell locomotion. Flow on the surface is faster than in suspension. Some particles stuck on the membrane move backwards from the frontal region. This retrograde transport is slower than the anterograde flow, and the rate decreases further when the particles approach cell regions adhering to the substratum, accurately following the pattern of the withdrawal of ectoplasm in the same zone. Both movements coexist in the same region and retrograde particles may pass anterograde ones at a distance less than their diameter. Transition from forward flow to backward transport occurs just behind the frontal cap, where the new ectoplasm is formed. The anterograde movement is interpreted as reflecting the general forward flow of the laterally mobile fluid membrane components, which become added to the frontal surface of the locomoting cell; the retrograde movement as retraction of membrane components that, externally, are linked to the transported material and, on the cytoplasmic side, to the contractile microfilamentous layer, as is postulated for cap formation in tissue cells.

  13. Luminescence evolution from alumina ceramic surface before flashover under direct and alternating current voltage in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Yi-Bo; Song, Bai-Peng; Mu, Hai-Bao; Zhang, Guan-Jun; Li, Feng; Wang, Meng

    2016-06-01

    The luminescence evolution phenomena from alumina ceramic surface in vacuum under high voltage of direct and alternating current are reported, with the voltage covering a large range from far below to close to the flashover voltage. Its time resolved and spatial distributed behaviors are examined by a photon counting system and an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) together with a digital camera, respectively. The luminescence before flashover exhibits two stages as voltage increasing, i.e., under a relative low voltage (Stage A), the luminescence is ascribed to radiative recombination of hetero-charges injected into the sample surface layer by Schottky effect; under a higher voltage (Stage B), a stable secondary electron emission process, resulting from the Fowler-Nordheim emission at the cathode triple junction (CTJ), is responsible for the luminescence. Spectrum analysis implies that inner secondary electrons within the surface layer of alumina generated during the SSEE process also participate in the luminescence of Stage B. A comprehensive interpretation of the flashover process is formulated, which might promote a better understanding of flashover issue in vacuum.

  14. Direct Measurement of Surface Dissolution Rates in Potential Nuclear Waste Forms: The Example of Pyrochlore.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Cornelius; Finkeldei, Sarah; Brandt, Felix; Bosbach, Dirk; Luttge, Andreas

    2015-08-19

    The long-term stability of ceramic materials that are considered as potential nuclear waste forms is governed by heterogeneous surface reactivity. Thus, instead of a mean rate, the identification of one or more dominant contributors to the overall dissolution rate is the key to predict the stability of waste forms quantitatively. Direct surface measurements by vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) and their analysis via material flux maps and resulting dissolution rate spectra provide data about dominant rate contributors and their variability over time. Using pyrochlore (Nd2Zr2O7) pellet dissolution under acidic conditions as an example, we demonstrate the identification and quantification of dissolution rate contributors, based on VSI data and rate spectrum analysis. Heterogeneous surface alteration of pyrochlore varies by a factor of about 5 and additional material loss by chemo-mechanical grain pull-out within the uppermost grain layer. We identified four different rate contributors that are responsible for the observed dissolution rate range of single grains. Our new concept offers the opportunity to increase our mechanistic understanding and to predict quantitatively the alteration of ceramic waste forms.

  15. Inbound waves in the solar corona: A direct indicator of Alfvén surface location

    SciTech Connect

    DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2014-06-01

    The tenuous supersonic solar wind that streams from the top of the corona passes through a natural boundary—the Alfvén surface—that marks the causal disconnection of individual packets of plasma and magnetic flux from the Sun itself. The Alfvén surface is the locus where the radial motion of the accelerating solar wind passes the radial Alfvén speed, and therefore any displacement of material cannot carry information back down into the corona. It is thus the natural outer boundary of the solar corona and the inner boundary of interplanetary space. Using a new and unique motion analysis to separate inbound and outbound motions in synoptic visible-light image sequences from the COR2 coronagraph on board the STEREO-A spacecraft, we have identified inbound wave motion in the outer corona beyond 6 solar radii for the first time and used it to determine that the Alfvén surface is at least 12 solar radii from the Sun over the polar coronal holes and 15 solar radii in the streamer belt, well beyond the distance planned for NASA's upcoming Solar Probe Plus mission. To our knowledge, this is the first measurement of inbound waves in the outer solar corona and the first direct measurement of lower bounds for the Alfvén surface.

  16. Active directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons using a phase transition material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun-Je; Yun, Hansik; Park, Kyungsoo; Hong, Jongwoo; Yun, Jeong-Geun; Lee, Kyookeun; Kim, Joonsoo; Jeong, Sun Jae; Mun, Sang-Eun; Sung, Jangwoon; Lee, Yong Wook; Lee, Byoungho

    2017-03-01

    Active switching of near-field directivity, which is an essential functionality for compact integrated photonics and small optoelectronic elements, has been challenging due to small modulation depth and complicated fabrication methods for devices including active optical materials. Here, we theoretically and experimentally realize a nanoscale active directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using a phase transition material for the first time. The SPP switching device with noticeable distinction is demonstrated based on the phase transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2) at the telecom wavelength. As the insulator-to-metal phase transition (IMT) of VO2 induces the large change of VO2 permittivity at telecom wavelengths, the plasmonic response of a nanoantenna made of VO2 can be largely tuned by external thermal stimuli. The VO2-insulator-metal (VIM) nanoantenna and its periodic array, the VIM metagrating, are suggested as optical switches. The directional power distinction ratio is designed to change from 8.13:1 to 1:10.56 by the IMT and it is experimentally verified that the ratio changes from 3.725:1 to 1:3.132 as the VIM metagratings are heated up to 90 °C. With an electro-thermally controllable configuration and an optimized resonant design, we expect potential applications of the active switching mechanism for integrable active plasmonic elements and reconfigurable imaging.

  17. Active directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons using a phase transition material

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Je; Yun, Hansik; Park, Kyungsoo; Hong, Jongwoo; Yun, Jeong-Geun; Lee, Kyookeun; Kim, Joonsoo; Jeong, Sun Jae; Mun, Sang-Eun; Sung, Jangwoon; Lee, Yong Wook; Lee, Byoungho

    2017-01-01

    Active switching of near-field directivity, which is an essential functionality for compact integrated photonics and small optoelectronic elements, has been challenging due to small modulation depth and complicated fabrication methods for devices including active optical materials. Here, we theoretically and experimentally realize a nanoscale active directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using a phase transition material for the first time. The SPP switching device with noticeable distinction is demonstrated based on the phase transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2) at the telecom wavelength. As the insulator-to-metal phase transition (IMT) of VO2 induces the large change of VO2 permittivity at telecom wavelengths, the plasmonic response of a nanoantenna made of VO2 can be largely tuned by external thermal stimuli. The VO2-insulator-metal (VIM) nanoantenna and its periodic array, the VIM metagrating, are suggested as optical switches. The directional power distinction ratio is designed to change from 8.13:1 to 1:10.56 by the IMT and it is experimentally verified that the ratio changes from 3.725:1 to 1:3.132 as the VIM metagratings are heated up to 90 °C. With an electro-thermally controllable configuration and an optimized resonant design, we expect potential applications of the active switching mechanism for integrable active plasmonic elements and reconfigurable imaging. PMID:28262702

  18. Near-Field and Far-Field Directional Conversion of Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Heng-He; Tan, Yunhua; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2016-01-01

    A compact metallic meta-structure is proposed to realize directional conversion between spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) and propagating waves at millimeter wave and THz frequencies. The structure is constructed by embedding two slits or multi-slits array into a subwavelength metallic reflection grating. When the back-side of the structure is illuminated by an oblique beam with a fixed incident angle, the propagating wave will be unidirectionally converted into SSPPs with a considerable efficiency. Both the simulations and experiments demonstrate that the excitation ratio of the SSPPs between the two possible propagating directions (left and right) reaches up to about 340. Furthermore, assisted by the structure, near-field SSPPs can be also converted into far-field narrow beams with particular directions. Through frequency sweeping, wide-angle beam scanning is verified by theory and experiments. The work paves a new way for SSPPs launching and also provides fresh ideas for super-resolution imaging in the longer wavelength range. PMID:27629825

  19. Active directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons using a phase transition material.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Je; Yun, Hansik; Park, Kyungsoo; Hong, Jongwoo; Yun, Jeong-Geun; Lee, Kyookeun; Kim, Joonsoo; Jeong, Sun Jae; Mun, Sang-Eun; Sung, Jangwoon; Lee, Yong Wook; Lee, Byoungho

    2017-03-06

    Active switching of near-field directivity, which is an essential functionality for compact integrated photonics and small optoelectronic elements, has been challenging due to small modulation depth and complicated fabrication methods for devices including active optical materials. Here, we theoretically and experimentally realize a nanoscale active directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using a phase transition material for the first time. The SPP switching device with noticeable distinction is demonstrated based on the phase transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2) at the telecom wavelength. As the insulator-to-metal phase transition (IMT) of VO2 induces the large change of VO2 permittivity at telecom wavelengths, the plasmonic response of a nanoantenna made of VO2 can be largely tuned by external thermal stimuli. The VO2-insulator-metal (VIM) nanoantenna and its periodic array, the VIM metagrating, are suggested as optical switches. The directional power distinction ratio is designed to change from 8.13:1 to 1:10.56 by the IMT and it is experimentally verified that the ratio changes from 3.725:1 to 1:3.132 as the VIM metagratings are heated up to 90 °C. With an electro-thermally controllable configuration and an optimized resonant design, we expect potential applications of the active switching mechanism for integrable active plasmonic elements and reconfigurable imaging.

  20. Near-Field and Far-Field Directional Conversion of Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Heng-He; Tan, Yunhua; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2016-09-01

    A compact metallic meta-structure is proposed to realize directional conversion between spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) and propagating waves at millimeter wave and THz frequencies. The structure is constructed by embedding two slits or multi-slits array into a subwavelength metallic reflection grating. When the back-side of the structure is illuminated by an oblique beam with a fixed incident angle, the propagating wave will be unidirectionally converted into SSPPs with a considerable efficiency. Both the simulations and experiments demonstrate that the excitation ratio of the SSPPs between the two possible propagating directions (left and right) reaches up to about 340. Furthermore, assisted by the structure, near-field SSPPs can be also converted into far-field narrow beams with particular directions. Through frequency sweeping, wide-angle beam scanning is verified by theory and experiments. The work paves a new way for SSPPs launching and also provides fresh ideas for super-resolution imaging in the longer wavelength range.

  1. Near-Field and Far-Field Directional Conversion of Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons.

    PubMed

    Tang, Heng-He; Tan, Yunhua; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2016-09-15

    A compact metallic meta-structure is proposed to realize directional conversion between spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) and propagating waves at millimeter wave and THz frequencies. The structure is constructed by embedding two slits or multi-slits array into a subwavelength metallic reflection grating. When the back-side of the structure is illuminated by an oblique beam with a fixed incident angle, the propagating wave will be unidirectionally converted into SSPPs with a considerable efficiency. Both the simulations and experiments demonstrate that the excitation ratio of the SSPPs between the two possible propagating directions (left and right) reaches up to about 340. Furthermore, assisted by the structure, near-field SSPPs can be also converted into far-field narrow beams with particular directions. Through frequency sweeping, wide-angle beam scanning is verified by theory and experiments. The work paves a new way for SSPPs launching and also provides fresh ideas for super-resolution imaging in the longer wavelength range.

  2. Method and means of directing an ion beam onto an insulating surface for ion implantation or sputtering

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; Siskind, Barry

    1981-01-01

    A beam of ions is directed under control onto an insulating surface by supplying simultaneously a stream of electrons directed at the same surface in a quantity sufficient to neutralize the overall electric charge of the ion beam and result in a net zero current flow to the insulating surface. The ion beam is adapted particularly both to the implantation of ions in a uniform areal disposition over the insulating surface and to the sputtering of atoms or molecules of the insulator onto a substrate.

  3. Label-free direct surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of nucleic acids (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrini, Luca; Morla-Folch, Judit; Gisbert-Quilis, Patricia; Xie, Hainan; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon

    2016-03-01

    Recently, plasmonic-based biosensing has experienced an unprecedented level of attention, with a particular focus on the nucleic acid detection, offering efficient solutions to engineer simple, fast, highly sensitive sensing platforms while overcoming important limitations of PCR and microarray techniques. In the broad field of plasmonics, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy has arisen as a powerful analytical tool for detection and structural characterization of biomolecules. Today applications of SERS to nucleic acid analysis largely rely on indirect strategies, which have been demonstrated very effective for pure sensing purposes but completely dismiss the exquisite structural information provided by the direct acquisition of the biomolecular vibrational fingerprint. Contrarily, direct label-free SERS of nucleic acid shows an outstanding potential in terms of chemical-specific information which, however, remained largely unexpressed mainly because of the inherent poor spectral reproducibility and/or limited sensitivity. To address these limitations, we developed a fast and affordable high-throughput screening direct SERS method for gaining detailed genomic information on nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and for the characterization and quantitative recognition of DNA interactions with exogenous agents. The simple strategy relies on the electrostatic adhesion of DNA/RNA onto positively-charged silver colloids that promotes the nanoparticle aggregation into stable clusters yielding intense and reproducible SERS spectra at picogram level (i.e. the analysis can be performed without the necessity of amplification steps thus providing realistic direct information of the nucleic acid in its native state). We anticipate this method to gain a vast impact and set of applications in different fields, including medical diagnostics, genomic screening, drug discovery, forensic science and even molecular electronics.

  4. A numerical study of the direct contact condensation on a horizontal surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, M. M.; Lin, C. S.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a numerical study of the direct contact condensation on a slowly moving horizontal liquid surface are presented. The geometrical configuration and the input conditions used to obtain numerical solutions are representative to those of experiments of Celata et al. The effects of Prandtl number (Pr), inflow Reynolds number, and Richardson number on the condensation rate are investigated. Numerical predictions of condensation rate for laminar flow are in good agreement with experimental data. The effect of buoyancy on the condensation rate is characterized by Richardson number. A correlation based on the numerical solutions is developed to predict the average condensation Nusselt number in terms of Richardson number, Peclet number, and inflow Reynolds number.

  5. A Genetically Encoded Alkyne Directs Palladium-Mediated Protein Labeling on Live Mammalian Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The merging of site-specific incorporation of small bioorthogonal functional groups into proteins via amber codon suppression with bioorthogonal chemistry has created exciting opportunities to extend the power of organic reactions to living systems. Here we show that a new alkyne amino acid can be site-selectively incorporated into mammalian proteins via a known orthogonal pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair and directs an unprecedented, palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction-driven protein labeling on live mammalian cell surface. A comparison study with the alkyne-encoded proteins in vitro indicated that this terminal alkyne is better suited for the palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction than the copper-catalyzed click chemistry. PMID:25347611

  6. Directional Local Density of States of Classical and Quantum Propagating Surface Plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthel, Martin; Jiang, Quanbo; Pham, Aline; Bellessa, Joel; Genet, Cyriaque; Huant, Serge; Drezet, Aurélien

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally introduce the concept of the local density of states (LDOS) associated with propagative surface plasmons (PSPs) launched along a structured thin gold film (a concept we call PSP LDOS). The alternative method couples a near-field optical microscope, in either the classical or the quantum regime of excitation, to a far-field leakage-radiation microscope. This method allows for selecting and collecting a very narrow portion of the directional SP wave vectors, thereby offering sufficient resolution to probe the collimation efficiency of a SP beam for a source near the focal point of a Bragg parabolic reflector. We are able to build and image the PSP LDOS in a fully integrated quantum SP launcher by depositing a diamond nanocrystal hosting nitrogen-vacancy centers at the focal point of the mirror. Our demonstration of the PSP LDOS with quantized SPs offers alternative prospects in the field of quantum plasmonics.

  7. Defining the antibody cross-reactome directed against the influenza virus surface glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Nachbagauer, Raffael; Choi, Angela; Hirsh, Ariana; Margine, Irina; Iida, Sayaka; Barrera, Aldo; Ferres, Marcela; Albrecht, Randy A; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Bouvier, Nicole M; Ito, Kimihito; Medina, Rafael A; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian

    2017-04-01

    Infection with influenza virus induces antibodies to the viral surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, and these responses can be broadly protective. To assess the breadth and magnitude of antibody responses, we sequentially infected mice, guinea pigs and ferrets with divergent H1N1 or H3N2 subtypes of influenza virus. We measured antibody responses by ELISA of an extensive panel of recombinant glycoproteins representing the viral diversity in nature. Guinea pigs developed high titers of broadly cross-reactive antibodies; mice and ferrets exhibited narrower humoral responses. Then, we compared antibody responses after infection of humans with influenza virus H1N1 or H3N2 and found markedly broad responses and cogent evidence for 'original antigenic sin'. This work will inform the design of universal vaccines against influenza virus and can guide pandemic-preparedness efforts directed against emerging influenza viruses.

  8. Directional, Broad, and Fixed Angle Surface Plasmon Coupled Fluorescence from Iron Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Kadir; Zhang, Yongxia; Geddes, Chris D.

    2010-01-01

    Fixed angle surface plasmon coupled fluorescence (SPCF) from iron thin films is demonstrated for the first time. The optimum thickness of the iron thin films was determined to be 15 nm using Fresnel calculations. The angles of minimum reflectivity for light at 496–814 nm were predicted to occur at a fixed and broad range of angles of 60–70°. Experimental corroboration of these predictions were undertaken by employing fluorescein isothiocyanate (emission peak at 517 nm), rhodamine B (580 nm), zinc phthalocyanine (710 nm), and IR 780 dye (814 nm). SPCF emission from all four fluorophores was directional, p-polarized, and observed at a fixed angle of ∼65°. PMID:20657700

  9. Effects of the type and direction of support surface perturbation on postural responses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Postural control is organized around a task goal. The two most frequently used types of tasks for postural control research are translational (translation along the anterior-posterior axis) and rotational (rotation in sagittal plane) surface perturbations. These types of perturbations rotate the ankle joint, causing different magnitudes and directions of body sway. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the type (translation vs. rotation) and direction (forward/toe up vs. backward/toe down) of the perturbation on postural responses. Method Nineteen healthy subjects were tested with four perturbations, i.e., forward and backward translation and toe up and toe down rotation. The onset latency and magnitude of muscle activations, angular changes, and COM displacements were measured. In addition, the kinematic data were divided into two phases. The initial phase reflected the balance disturbance induced by the platform movement, and the reversal phase reflected the balance reaction. Results The results showed that, in the initial phase, rotational perturbation induced earlier ankle movement and faster and larger vertical COM displacement, while translational and forward/toe up perturbations induced larger head and trunk angular change and faster and larger horizontal COM displacement. In the reversal phase, balance reaction was attained by multi-joint movements. Translational and forward/toe up perturbations that induced larger upper body instability evoked faster muscle activation as well as faster and larger hip or knee joint movements. Conclusions These findings provide insights into an appropriate support surface perturbation for the evaluation and training of balance. PMID:24708582

  10. Direct growth of carbon nanotubes on metal surfaces without an external catalyst and nanocomposite production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddour, Carole Emilie

    The research work presented in this thesis deals with carbon nanotubes (CNTs), an allotrope of carbon with a cylindrical structure consisting of a rolled up graphene sheet. CNTs are generally produced by the decomposition of a carbon source in the presence of a metal catalyst at elevated temperatures. CNTs have outstanding properties and have attracted immense attention in both industry and academia. However, the development of commercial applications of CNTs is slow due to limitations in the large scale production of CNTs and their high cost. Another limitation is the interface resistance generated by external catalyst nanoparticles used in traditional CNT growth methods. In order to eliminate the interface resistance and simultaneously provide CNT growth over large surfaces and varying geometries, a method called direct CNT growth is established to enable the extraction of the CNT structure directly from the metal surface. The novel process for the production of CNTs developed in the present thesis is applied to planar surfaces and spherical particles made of stainless steel (SS) 304. The method is based on the establishment of nanometer scale structures at the surface which act as catalyst nanoparticles while at the same time being integral parts of the material. It uses first a mild chemical etching of the surface, followed by a specific heat treatment performed using either standard chemical vapour deposition (standard-CVD) or fluidized bed CVD (FBCVD) techniques. Acetylene (C2H2) is used as the carbon source and SS 304 acts as both the catalyst and the substrate in the growth process. This direct CNT growth with this substrate dual function eliminates the need of external catalyst nanoparticles deposited onto the surface. The active sites necessary for CNT growth are tailored on the SS itself by means of the two-step treatment process. MWNTs of 20-70 nm in diameter are produced. The CNTs are characterized by Raman Spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA

  11. A new method for multilayered, site-directed immobilization of antibody on polystyrene surface.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bo; Wang, Caiyun; Xie, Xiaomei; Feng, Xi; Li, Yuqin; Cao, Zhijian

    2014-07-18

    Polystyrene is a common substrate material for protein adsorption in biosensors and bioassays. Here, we present a new method for multilayered, site-directed immobilization of antibody on polystyrene surface through the linkage of a genetically engineered ligand and the assembly of staphylococcal protein A (SPA) with immunoglobulin G (IgG). In this method, antibodies were stacked on polystyrene surface layer by layer in a potential three-dimensional way and exposed the analyte-binding sites well. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed that the new method showed a 32-fold higher detection sensitivity compared with the conventional one. Pull-down assay and Western blot analysis further confirmed that it is different from the ones of monolayer adsorption according to the comparison of adsorption capacity. The differentiated introduction of functional ligands, which is the key of this method, might offer a unique idea as a way to interfere with the dynamic behavior of a protein complex during the process of adsorption.

  12. Quantifying surface albedo and other direct biogeophysical climate forcings of forestry activities.

    PubMed

    Bright, Ryan M; Zhao, Kaiguang; Jackson, Robert B; Cherubini, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    By altering fluxes of heat, momentum, and moisture exchanges between the land surface and atmosphere, forestry and other land-use activities affect climate. Although long recognized scientifically as being important, these so-called biogeophysical forcings are rarely included in climate policies for forestry and other land management projects due to the many challenges associated with their quantification. Here, we review the scientific literature in the fields of atmospheric science and terrestrial ecology in light of three main objectives: (i) to elucidate the challenges associated with quantifying biogeophysical climate forcings connected to land use and land management, with a focus on the forestry sector; (ii) to identify and describe scientific approaches and/or metrics facilitating the quantification and interpretation of direct biogeophysical climate forcings; and (iii) to identify and recommend research priorities that can help overcome the challenges of their attribution to specific land-use activities, bridging the knowledge gap between the climate modeling, forest ecology, and resource management communities. We find that ignoring surface biogeophysics may mislead climate mitigation policies, yet existing metrics are unlikely to be sufficient. Successful metrics ought to (i) include both radiative and nonradiative climate forcings; (ii) reconcile disparities between biogeophysical and biogeochemical forcings, and (iii) acknowledge trade-offs between global and local climate benefits. We call for more coordinated research among terrestrial ecologists, resource managers, and coupled climate modelers to harmonize datasets, refine analytical techniques, and corroborate and validate metrics that are more amenable to analyses at the scale of an individual site or region.

  13. Identification of Distant Drug Off-Targets by Direct Superposition of Binding Pocket Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Marcel; Armen, Roger S.

    2013-01-01

    Correctly predicting off-targets for a given molecular structure, which would have the ability to bind a large range of ligands, is both particularly difficult and important if they share no significant sequence or fold similarity with the respective molecular target (“distant off-targets”). A novel approach for identification of off-targets by direct superposition of protein binding pocket surfaces is presented and applied to a set of well-studied and highly relevant drug targets, including representative kinases and nuclear hormone receptors. The entire Protein Data Bank is searched for similar binding pockets and convincing distant off-target candidates were identified that share no significant sequence or fold similarity with the respective target structure. These putative target off-target pairs are further supported by the existence of compounds that bind strongly to both with high topological similarity, and in some cases, literature examples of individual compounds that bind to both. Also, our results clearly show that it is possible for binding pockets to exhibit a striking surface similarity, while the respective off-target shares neither significant sequence nor significant fold similarity with the respective molecular target (“distant off-target”). PMID:24391782

  14. Surface functionalization of carbon nanotubes by direct encapsulation with varying dosages of amphiphilic block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xueping; Li, Jie; Kong, Liang; Wang, Yong

    2015-08-01

    Encapsulation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by amphiphilic block copolymers is an efficient way to stabilize CNTs in solvents. However, the appropriate dosages of copolymers and the assembled structures are difficult to predict and control because of the insufficient understanding on the encapsulation process. We encapsulate multiwalled CNTs with polystyrene-block-poly (4-vinyl pyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) by directly mixing them in acetic acid under sonication. The copolymer forms a lamellar structure along the surface of CNTs with the PS blocks anchoring on the tube wall and the P4VP blocks exposed to the outside. The encapsulated CNTs achieve good dispersibility in polar solvents over long periods. To increase our understanding of the encapsulation process we investigate the assembled structures and stability of copolymer/CNTs mixtures with changing mass ratios. Stable dispersions are obtained at high mass ratios between the copolymer and CNTs, i.e. 2 or 3, with the presence of free spherical micelles. Transmission electron microscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis determine that the threshold for the complete coverage of CNTs by the copolymer occurs at the mass ratio of 1.5. The coated copolymer layer activates the surface of CNTs, enabling further functionalization of CNTs. For instance, atomic layer deposition of TiO2 produces conformal thin layers on the encapsulated CNTs while isolated TiO2 bumps are produced on the pristine, inert CNTs.

  15. Data fusion analysis of a surface direct-current resistivity and well pick data set

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.A.; Lewis, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked with testing, debugging, and refining the Hanford Site data fusion workstation (DFW), with the assistance of Coleman Research Corporation (CRC), before delivering the DFW to the environmental restoration client at the Hanford Site. Data fusion is the mathematical combination (or fusion) of disparate data sets into a single interpretation. The data fusion software used in this study was developed by CRC. This report discusses the results of evaluating a surface direct-current (dc) resistivity and well-pick data set using two methods: data fusion technology and commercially available software (i.e., RESIX Plus from Interpex Ltd., Golden, Colorado), the conventional method of analysis. The report compares the two technologies; describes the survey, procedures, and results; and includes conclusions and recommendations. The surface dc resistivity and well-pick data set had been acquired by PNL from a study performed in May 1993 at Eielson Air Force Base near Fairbanks, Alaska. The resistivity survey data were acquired to map the top of permafrost in support of a hydrogeologic study. This data set provided an excellent opportunity to test and refine the dc resistivity capabilities of the DFW; previously, the data fusion software was untested on dc resistivity data. The DFW was used to evaluate the dc resistivity survey data and to produce a 3-dimensional earth model of the study area.

  16. High surface area electrode materials by direct metallization of porous substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chyan, O.; Chen, J.J.; Liu, M.; Richmond, M.G.; Yang, K.

    1995-12-31

    Recent advances in high surface area (HSA) electrode materials have played an important role in the development of high-performance batteries and fuel cells. HSA electrodes can significantly increase the power-density of batteries and fuel cells by enhancing the heterogeneous electrochemical reaction rate and concurrently reducing battery and fuel cell size and weight. The compactness of HSA electrodes can also reduce the ohmic potential drop, which has the clear advantage of reducing power losses. This paper reports results on utilizing direct metallization of porous substrates to prepare new HSA electrode materials. Specifically, Nickel HSA electrode materials, relevant to the Ni-Cd and metal-hydride rechargeable batteries, were prepared on porous carbon substrates by direct thermolysis of organometallic precursors and/or electroless Ni plating. SEM and XPS characterization results indicate a Ni metallic film was conformally coated over the porous carbon skeleton. The real electroactive areas were determined electrochemically in NaOH solution and results will be discussed in correlation with the metallization conditions.

  17. Surface roughness directed self-assembly of patchy particles into colloidal micelles.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Daniela J; Ni, Ran; Smallenburg, Frank; Hermes, Michiel; Yoon, Kisun; Weitz, David A; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Groenewold, Jan; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Kegel, Willem K

    2012-07-03

    Colloidal particles with site-specific directional interactions, so called "patchy particles", are promising candidates for bottom-up assembly routes towards complex structures with rationally designed properties. Here we present an experimental realization of patchy colloidal particles based on material independent depletion interaction and surface roughness. Curved, smooth patches on rough colloids are shown to be exclusively attractive due to their different overlap volumes. We discuss in detail the case of colloids with one patch that serves as a model for molecular surfactants both with respect to their geometry and their interactions. These one-patch particles assemble into clusters that resemble surfactant micelles with the smooth and attractive sides of the colloids located at the interior. We term these clusters "colloidal micelles". Direct Monte Carlo simulations starting from a homogeneous state give rise to cluster size distributions that are in good agreement with those found in experiments. Important differences with surfactant micelles originate from the colloidal character of our model system and are investigated by simulations and addressed theoretically. Our new "patchy" model system opens up the possibility for self-assembly studies into finite-sized superstructures as well as crystals with as of yet inaccessible structures.

  18. Narrow linewidth emissions from organic crystals with diffraction gratings engraved directly on their surface (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2016-10-01

    In combination with optical cavities, organic semiconductor crystals are powerful candidates for current-injected organic laser devices. For such cavities diffraction gratings are applicable. In common with external diffraction gratings made of dielectrics and oxides, built-in ones are effective for producing narrow linewidth emissions. However, direct fabrication of the diffraction gratings on the surfaces of the organic crystals is still challenging. In the present studies, we directly engraved one-dimensional (1D) diffraction gratings on the flat surfaces of organic semiconductor crystals by using focused ion beam (FIB) lithography, and shaped a distributed feedback resonator (DFB) structure. We chose as the organic semiconductor material 5,5'''''-diphenyl-2,2':5',2'':5'',2''':5''',2'''':5'''',2'''''-sexithiophene (P6T) from among thiophene/phenylene co-oligomers. We grew plate-like crystals of P6T in a vapor phase. The P6T crystals showed emissions with a maximum intensity around 630 nm. We laminated them on Si wafer substrates covered with 300-nm-thick silicon dioxide and 160-nm-thick Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layers. The AZO layer was used to prevent the crystals from being charged during the FIB lithography. We precisely controlled FIB process conditions and obtained the gratings having the equally-spaced 200 (400) grooves with the periods of 240 (200) nm. When we observed the emissions perpendicular to the grating grooves as well as parallel to the crystal surface under ultraviolet light from a mercury lamp, these crystals with the 1D diffraction gratings indicated narrowed emission peaks at 745 (670) nm. From the grating period and the emission peak position, we estimated an order of diffraction and an effective refractive index. We related the effective refractive index with a phase refractive index of the crystal and decided the optimum grating period to be 190 nm to produce the narrowed peak at 630 nm. We fabricated the diffraction grating having the optimum

  19. Giardia Flagellar Motility Is Not Directly Required to Maintain Attachment to Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    House, Susan A.; Richter, David J.; Pham, Jonathan K.; Dawson, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia trophozoites attach to the intestinal microvilli (or inert surfaces) using an undefined “suction-based” mechanism, and remain attached during cell division to avoid peristalsis. Flagellar motility is a key factor in Giardia's pathogenesis and colonization of the host small intestine. Specifically, the beating of the ventral flagella, one of four pairs of motile flagella, has been proposed to generate a hydrodynamic force that results in suction-based attachment via the adjacent ventral disc. We aimed to test this prevailing “hydrodynamic model” of attachment mediated by flagellar motility. We defined four distinct stages of attachment by assessing surface contacts of the trophozoite with the substrate during attachment using TIRF microscopy (TIRFM). The lateral crest of the ventral disc forms a continuous perimeter seal with the substrate, a cytological indication that trophozoites are fully attached. Using trophozoites with two types of molecularly engineered defects in flagellar beating, we determined that neither ventral flagellar beating, nor any flagellar beating, is necessary for the maintenance of attachment. Following a morpholino-based knockdown of PF16, a central pair protein, both the beating and morphology of flagella were defective, but trophozoites could still initiate proper surface contacts as seen using TIRFM and could maintain attachment in several biophysical assays. Trophozoites with impaired motility were able to attach as well as motile cells. We also generated a strain with defects in the ventral flagellar waveform by overexpressing a dominant negative form of alpha2-annexin::GFP (D122A, D275A). This dominant negative alpha2-annexin strain could initiate attachment and had only a slight decrease in the ability to withstand normal and shear forces. The time needed for attachment did increase in trophozoites with overall defective flagellar beating, however. Thus while not directly required for attachment, flagellar motility is

  20. Topology-graph directed separating boundary surfaces approximation of nonmanifold neuroanatomical structures: application to mouse brain olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Koh, Wonryull; McCormick, Bruce H

    2009-04-01

    Boundary surface approximation of 3-D neuroanatomical regions from sparse 2-D images (e.g., mouse brain olfactory bulb structures from a 2-D brain atlas) has proven to be difficult due to the presence of abutting, shared boundary surfaces that are not handled by traditional boundary-representation data structures and surfaces-from-contours algorithms. We describe a data structure and an algorithm to reconstruct separating surfaces among multiple regions from sparse cross-sectional contours. We define a topology graph for each region, that describes the topological skeleton of the region's boundary surface and that shows between which contours the surface patches should be generated. We provide a graph-directed triangulation algorithm to reconstruct surface patches between contours. We combine our graph-directed triangulation algorithm together with a piecewise parametric curve fitting technique to ensure that abutting or shared surface patches are precisely coincident. We show that our method overcomes limitations in 1) traditional contours-from-surfaces algorithms that assume binary, not multiple, regionalization of space, and in 2) few existing separating surfaces algorithms that assume conversion of input into a regular volumetric grid, which is not possible with sparse interplanar resolution.

  1. Directly functionalizable surface platform for protein arrays in undiluted human blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Brault, Norman D; White, Andrew D; Taylor, Allen D; Yu, Qiuming; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2013-02-05

    Protein arrays are a high-throughput approach for proteomic profiling, vital for achieving a greater understanding of biological systems, in addition to disease diagnostics and monitoring therapeutic treatments. In this work, zwitterionic carboxybetaine polymer (pCB) coated substrates were investigated as an array surface platform to enable convenient amino-coupling chemistry on a single directly functionalizable and unblocked film for the sensitive detection of target analytes from undiluted human blood plasma. Using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging sensor, the antibody immobilization conditions which provided excellent spot morphology and the largest antigen response were determined. It was found that pCB functionalization and the corresponding antigen detection both increased with pH and antibody concentration. Additionally, immobilization only required an aqueous buffer without the need for additives to improve spot quality. The nonspecific protein adsorption to undiluted human plasma on both the antibody immobilized pCB spots and the background were found to be about 9 and 6 ng/cm(2), respectively. A subsequent array consisting of three antibodies spotted onto pCB revealed little cross-reactivity for antigens spiked into the undiluted plasma. The low postfunctionalized nonfouling properties combined with antibody amplification showed similar sensitivities achievable with conventional spectroscopic SPR sensors and the same pCB films, but now with high-throughput capabilities. This represents the first demonstration of low fouling properties following antibody functionalization on protein arrays from undiluted human plasma and indicates the great potential of the pCB platform for high-throughput protein analysis.

  2. Imprinting the surface of mesoporous aluminosilicates using organic structure-directing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Kaveri R.

    Combining the positive structural features of mesoporous materials and microporous zeolite aluminosilicates can lead to the synthesis and application of new materials useful for catalytic processes involving large organic reactant molecules. We used organic structure-directing agents (SDAs), typically used for the synthesis of zeolites, to imprint the surface of existing mesoporous materials to create novel materials with enhanced structural properties towards this aim: materials with large well-ordered pores allowing access to large reactants with strong accessible acid sites on the surface of the pores leading to stable and active catalysts. We developed new protocols for incorporating tetrapropyl ammonium and N,N,N-trimethyl-1-adamantylammonium, SDAs used for the synthesis of the zeolites ZSM-5 (MFI) and MCM-22 (MWW) respectively, into the walls of the siliceous mesoporous material SBA-15 by using a combination of an organic solvent (glycerol) and water, to form novel porous materials. We studied the evolution of the modified pore structure of the materials by a battery of characterization techniques. Results indicate that the new materials have well-ordered pores with significantly larger mesopore diameters and structurally modified thinner, denser pore walls. We carried out similar treatments and characterization on the aluminum containing form of SBA-15, Al-SBA-15, with high and low amounts of aluminum. Pair distribution function analysis was used to analyze the structural differences in the materials and catalytic test reactions such as cumene and n-hexane cracking to detect the presence of strong acid sites like the ones in ZSM-5. Results similar to the treatments on the all-silica materials, although promising, led to novel meso-micro aluminosilicate materials with limited increase in or no catalytic activity with reference to the test reactions employed. This led to the conclusion that the aluminum in the materials was merely a spectator and did not

  3. Deriving the velocity distribution of meteoroids from the measured meteoroid impact directionality on the various LDEF surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zook, Herbert A.

    1992-01-01

    Because of spacecraft orbital motion about the Earth, a much higher flux of meteoroids is expected to strike spacecraft surfaces that face in the direction of spacecraft motion (apex direction) than would strike apex facing or trailing edge surfaces. Impact velocities are also higher on apex facing surfaces compared to antapex facing surfaces which futher increases the apex/antapex ratio of spatial density of impact craters of a given size. Measurements of the areal densities of impact craters on the different LDEF surfaces should give important clues about the velocity distribution, and therefore the origins, of meteoroids. Preliminary results appear to support the meteoroid velocity distributions derived by Erickson and by Kessler, which would lead to a mean impact velocity on the LDEF spacecraft of about 19 km/s.

  4. Facile surface glycosylation of PVDF microporous membrane via direct surface-initiated AGET ATRP and improvement of antifouling property and biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jing; Meng, Jian-qiang; Kang, Yin-lin; Du, Qi-yun; Zhang, Yu-feng

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a facile and novel approach for the surface glycosylation of poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) microporous membrane. A glycopolymer poly(D-gluconamidoethyl methacrylate) (PGAMA) was tethered onto the membrane surface via activators generated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP) directly initiated from the PVDF surface. Chemical changes of membrane surface were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was revealed that PGAMA was successfully grafted onto the membrane surface and its grafting density can be modulated in a wide range up to 2.4 μmol/cm2. The effects of glycosylation on membrane morphology, flux and surface hydrophilicity were investigated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) results indicated shrinkage of the surface pore diameters and the growth of the glycopolymer layer on the membrane surface. The static water contact angle (WCA) of the membrane surface decreased from 110° to 30.4° with the increase of grafting density, indicating that the PGAMA grafts dramatically improved the surface hydrophilicity. The protein adsorption and platelets adhesion experiments indicated that the grafted PGAMA could effectively improve the membrane antifouling property and biocompatibility.

  5. Surface Lattice Resonances for Enhanced and Directional Electroluminescence at High Current Densities.

    PubMed

    Zakharko, Yuriy; Held, Martin; Graf, Arko; Rödlmeier, Tobias; Eckstein, Ralph; Hernandez-Sosa, Gerardo; Hähnlein, Bernd; Pezoldt, Jörg; Zaumseil, Jana

    2016-12-21

    Hybrid photonic-plasmonic modes in periodic arrays of metallic nanostructures offer a promising trade-off between high-quality cavities and subdiffraction mode confinement. However, their application in electrically driven light-emitting devices is hindered by their sensitivity to the surrounding environment and to charge injecting metallic electrodes in particular. Here, we demonstrate that the planar structure of light-emitting field-effect transistor (LEFET) ensures undisturbed operation of the characteristic modes. We incorporate a square array of gold nanodisks into the charge transporting and emissive layer of a polymer LEFET in order to tailor directionality and emission efficiency via the Purcell effect and variation of the fractional local density of states in particular. Angle- and polarization-resolved spectra confirm that the enhanced electroluminescence correlates with the dispersion curves of the surface lattice resonances supported by these structures. These LEFETs reach current densities on the order of 10 kA/cm(2), which may pave the way toward practical optoelectronic devices with tailored emission patterns and potentially electrically pumped plasmonic lasers.

  6. Direct measurement of energy barriers on rough and heterogeneous solid surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, T.B.; LaGow, J.; Connelly, G.M.

    1996-12-31

    This paper will deal with the phenomenon of energy barriers to the spread of liquids on solids. These barriers often manifest themselves as a {open_quotes}pinning{close_quotes} of a sessile drop as liquid is added to it. That is, the volume of the drop increases, but the diameter does not. Thus the advancing contact angle ({theta}{sub a}) increases to a maximum. At the point where the hydrostatic pressure in the drop overcomes the {open_quotes}pinning{close_quotes} force the diameter suddenly increases and the drop relaxes to a metastable configuration which has a lower {theta}{sub a}. Energy barriers should be considered in many applications such as the spreading of liquid adhesives where thorough wetting is the goal. The interfacial forces involved are both long-range Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) forces and short-range acid-base (AB) forces. The authors will describe how they measure the energy barriers on real surfaces directly and resolve them into their LW and AB components.

  7. Direct molecular simulation of nitrogen dissociation based on an ab initio potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Paolo Schwartzentruber, Thomas E. Bender, Jason D. Nompelis, Ioannis Candler, Graham V.

    2015-08-15

    The direct molecular simulation (DMS) approach is used to predict the internal energy relaxation and dissociation dynamics of high-temperature nitrogen. An ab initio potential energy surface (PES) is used to calculate the dynamics of two interacting nitrogen molecules by providing forces between the four atoms. In the near-equilibrium limit, it is shown that DMS reproduces the results obtained from well-established quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) analysis, verifying the validity of the approach. DMS is used to predict the vibrational relaxation time constant for N{sub 2}–N{sub 2} collisions and its temperature dependence, which are in close agreement with existing experiments and theory. Using both QCT and DMS with the same PES, we find that dissociation significantly depletes the upper vibrational energy levels. As a result, across a wide temperature range, the dissociation rate is found to be approximately 4–5 times lower compared to the rates computed using QCT with Boltzmann energy distributions. DMS calculations predict a quasi-steady-state distribution of rotational and vibrational energies in which the rate of depletion of high-energy states due to dissociation is balanced by their rate of repopulation due to collisional processes. The DMS approach simulates the evolution of internal energy distributions and their coupling to dissociation without the need to precompute rates or cross sections for all possible energy transitions. These benchmark results could be used to develop new computational fluid dynamics models for high-enthalpy flow applications.

  8. Direct design of two freeform optical surfaces for wide field of view line imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yunfeng; Thienpont, Hugo; Duerr, Fabian

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-fields direct design method aiming to calculate two freeform surfaces with an entrance pupil incorporated for wide field of view on-axis line imaging applications. Both infinite and finite conjugate objectives can be designed with this approach. Since a wide angle imaging system requires more than few discrete perfect imaging points, the multi-fields design approach is based on partial coupling of multiple fields, which guarantees a much more balanced imaging performance over the full field of view. The optical path lengths (OPLs) and image points of numerous off-axis fields are calculated during the procedure, thus very few initial parameters are needed. The procedure to calculate such a freeform lens is explained in detail. We have designed an exemplary monochromatic single lens to demonstrate the functionality of the design method. A rotationally symmetric counterpart following the same specifications is compared in terms of RMS spot radius to demonstrate the clear benefit that freeform lens brings to on-axis line imaging systems. In addition, a practical achromatic wide angle objective is designed by combining our multi-fields design method with classic optical design strategies, serving as a very good starting point for further optimization in a commercial optical design program. The results from the perspective of aberrations plots and MTF values show a very good and well balanced performance over the full field of view.

  9. Direct measurement of VDAC-actin interaction by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Roman, Inge; Figys, Jurgen; Steurs, Griet; Zizi, Martin

    2006-04-01

    VDAC--a mitochondrial channel involved in the control of aerobic metabolism and apoptosis--interacts in vitro and in vivo with a wide repertoire of proteins including cytoskeletal elements. A functional interaction between actin and Neurospora crassa VDAC was reported, excluding other VDAC isoforms. From a recent genome-wide screen of the VDAC interactome, we found that human actin is a putative ligand of yeast VDAC. Since such interaction may have broader implications for various mitochondrial processes, we probed it with Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technology using purified yeast VDAC (YVDAC) and rabbit muscle G-actin (RGA). We show that RGA binds to immobilized YVDAC in a reversible and dose-dependent manner with saturating kinetics and an apparent K(D) of 50 microg/ml (1.2 microM actin). BSA does not bind VDAC regardless of the concentrations. Alternatively, VDAC binds similarly to immobilized RGA but without saturating kinetics. VDAC being known to interact with itself, this latter interaction was directly measured to interpret the RGA signals. VDAC could bind to VDAC without saturating kinetics as expected if higher order binding occurred, and could account for maximally 66% of the non-saturating behavior of VDAC binding onto RGA. Hence, actin-VDAC interactions are not a species-specific oddity and may be a more general phenomenon, the role of which ought to be further investigated.

  10. Capacitive ECG system with direct access to standard leads and body surface potential mapping.

    PubMed

    Oehler, Martin; Schilling, Meinhard; Esperer, Hans Dieter

    2009-12-01

    Capacitive electrodes provide the same access to the human electrocardiogram (ECG) as galvanic electrodes, but without the need of direct electrical skin contact and even through layers of clothing. Thus, potential artifacts as a result of poor electrode contact to the skin are avoided and preparation time is significantly reduced. Our system integrates such capacitive electrodes in a 15 sensor array, which is combined with a Tablet PC. This integrated lightweight ECG system (cECG) is easy to place on the chest wall and allows for simultaneous recordings of 14 ECG channels, even if the patient is slightly dressed, e.g., with a t-shirt. In this paper, we present preliminary results on the performance of the cECG regarding the capability of recording body surface potential maps (BSPMs) and obtaining reconstructed standard ECG leads including Einthoven, Goldberger and, with some limitations, Wilson leads. All signals were measured having the subject lie in a supine position and wear a cotton shirt. Signal quality and diagnostic ECG information of the extracted leads are compared with standard ECG measurements. The results show a very close correlation between both types of ECG measurements. It is concluded that the cECG lends itself to rapid screening in clinically unstable patients.

  11. Surface Lattice Resonances for Enhanced and Directional Electroluminescence at High Current Densities

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid photonic-plasmonic modes in periodic arrays of metallic nanostructures offer a promising trade-off between high-quality cavities and subdiffraction mode confinement. However, their application in electrically driven light-emitting devices is hindered by their sensitivity to the surrounding environment and to charge injecting metallic electrodes in particular. Here, we demonstrate that the planar structure of light-emitting field-effect transistor (LEFET) ensures undisturbed operation of the characteristic modes. We incorporate a square array of gold nanodisks into the charge transporting and emissive layer of a polymer LEFET in order to tailor directionality and emission efficiency via the Purcell effect and variation of the fractional local density of states in particular. Angle- and polarization-resolved spectra confirm that the enhanced electroluminescence correlates with the dispersion curves of the surface lattice resonances supported by these structures. These LEFETs reach current densities on the order of 10 kA/cm2, which may pave the way toward practical optoelectronic devices with tailored emission patterns and potentially electrically pumped plasmonic lasers. PMID:28042593

  12. Elucidation of peptide-directed palladium surface structure for biologically tunable nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Nicholas M; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Slocik, Joseph M; Briggs, Beverly D; Ren, Yang; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Petkov, Valeri; Heinz, Hendrik; Naik, Rajesh R; Knecht, Marc R

    2015-05-26

    Peptide-enabled synthesis of inorganic nanostructures represents an avenue to access catalytic materials with tunable and optimized properties. This is achieved via peptide complexity and programmability that is missing in traditional ligands for catalytic nanomaterials. Unfortunately, there is limited information available to correlate peptide sequence to particle structure and catalytic activity to date. As such, the application of peptide-enabled nanocatalysts remains limited to trial and error approaches. In this paper, a hybrid experimental and computational approach is introduced to systematically elucidate biomolecule-dependent structure/function relationships for peptide-capped Pd nanocatalysts. Synchrotron X-ray techniques were used to uncover substantial particle surface structural disorder, which was dependent upon the amino acid sequence of the peptide capping ligand. Nanocatalyst configurations were then determined directly from experimental data using reverse Monte Carlo methods and further refined using molecular dynamics simulation, obtaining thermodynamically stable peptide-Pd nanoparticle configurations. Sequence-dependent catalytic property differences for C-C coupling and olefin hydrogenation were then elucidated by identification of the catalytic active sites at the atomic level and quantitative prediction of relative reaction rates. This hybrid methodology provides a clear route to determine peptide-dependent structure/function relationships, enabling the generation of guidelines for catalyst design through rational tailoring of peptide sequences.

  13. Elucidation of Peptide-Directed Palladium Surface Structure for Biologically Tunable Nanocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, Nicholas M.; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Slocik, Joseph M.; Briggs, Beverly D.; Ren, Yang; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Petkov, Valeri; Heinz, Hendrik; Naik, Rajesh R.; Knecht, Mark R.

    2015-05-01

    Peptide-enabled synthesis of inorganic nanostructures represents an avenue to access catalytic materials with tunable and optimized properties. This is achieved via peptide complexity and programmability that is missing in traditional ligands for catalytic nanomaterials. Unfortunately, there is limited information available to correlate peptide sequence to particle structure and catalytic activity to date. As such, the application of peptide-enabled nanocatalysts remains limited to trial and error approaches. In this paper, a hybrid experimental and computational approach is introduced to systematically elucidate biomolecule-dependent structure/function relationships for peptide-capped Pd nanocatalysts. Synchrotron X-ray techniques were used to uncover substantial particle surface structural disorder, which was dependent upon the amino acid sequence of the peptide capping ligand. Nanocatalyst configurations were then determined directly from experimental data using reverse Monte Carlo methods and further refined using molecular dynamics simulation, obtaining thermodynamically stable peptide-Pd nanoparticle configurations. Sequence-dependent catalytic property differences for C-C coupling and olefin hydrogenation were then eluddated by identification of the catalytic active sites at the atomic level and quantitative prediction of relative reaction rates. This hybrid methodology provides a clear route to determine peptide-dependent structure/function relationships, enabling the generation of guidelines for catalyst design through rational tailoring of peptide sequences

  14. Direct Pathway to Molecular Photodissociation on Metal Surfaces Using Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Kazuma, Emiko; Jung, Jaehoon; Ueba, Hiromu; Trenary, Michael; Kim, Yousoo

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate molecular photodissociation on single-crystalline metal substrates, driven by visible-light irradiation. The visible-light-induced photodissociation on metal substrates has long been thought to never occur, either because visible-light energy is much smaller than the optical energy gap between the frontier electronic states of the molecule or because the molecular excited states have short lifetimes due to the strong hybridization between the adsorbate molecular orbitals (MOs) and metal substrate. The S-S bond in dimethyl disulfide adsorbed on both Cu(111) and Ag(111) surfaces was dissociated through direct electronic excitation from the HOMO-derived MO (the nonbonding lone-pair type orbitals on the S atoms (nS)) to the LUMO-derived MO (the antibonding orbital localized on the S-S bond (σ*SS)) by irradiation with visible light. A combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations revealed that visible-light-induced photodissociation becomes possible due to the interfacial electronic structures constructed by the hybridization between molecular orbitals and the metal substrate states. The molecule-metal hybridization decreases the gap between the HOMO- and LUMO-derived MOs into the visible-light energy region and forms LUMO-derived MOs that have less overlap with the metal substrate, which results in longer excited-state lifetimes.

  15. Applicability of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering for the direct discrimination of ballpoint pen inks.

    PubMed

    Seifar, R M; Verheul, J M; Ariese, F; Brinkman, U A; Gooijer, C

    2001-08-01

    In situ surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) with excitation at 685 nm is suitable for the direct discrimination of blue and black ballpoint pen inks on paper. For black inks, shorter excitation wavelengths can also be used. For blue inks, SERRS at 514.5 and 457.9 nm does not provide adequate discriminative power. At these excitation wavelengths, the SERRS signals of the Methyl Violet derivatives present in inks easily dominate the overall spectrum because of resonance enhancement and preferential interaction with silver sol particles. At 685 nm, this problem is not encountered as the Methyl Violet derivatives do not show resonance enhancement, while other components may still exhibit resonance. Thirteen blue and thirteen black ink lines were examined. For the blue and black inks, on the basis of the 685 nm SERR spectra, eight and six groups of spectra, respectively, could be distinguished. This discrimination largely agrees with information from thin layer chromatography (TLC) experiments, although some differences in group compositions are found. The in situ SERR spectra show good repeatability with regard to the Raman frequencies, band shapes and relative intensities of the spectral bands. However, absolute intensities cannot be used for discrimination purposes.

  16. Low-temperature direct copper-to-copper bonding enabled by creep on (111) surfaces of nanotwinned Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Min; Lin, Han-Wen; Huang, Yi-Sa; Chu, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Chih; Lyu, Dian-Rong; Chen, Kuan-Neng; Tu, King-Ning

    2015-05-01

    Direct Cu-to-Cu bonding was achieved at temperatures of 150-250 °C using a compressive stress of 100 psi (0.69 MPa) held for 10-60 min at 10-3 torr. The key controlling parameter for direct bonding is rapid surface diffusion on (111) surface of Cu. Instead of using (111) oriented single crystal of Cu, oriented (111) texture of extremely high degree, exceeding 90%, was fabricated using the oriented nano-twin Cu. The bonded interface between two (111) surfaces forms a twist-type grain boundary. If the grain boundary has a low angle, it has a hexagonal network of screw dislocations. Such network image was obtained by plan-view transmission electron microscopy. A simple kinetic model of surface creep is presented; and the calculated and measured time of bonding is in reasonable agreement.

  17. World record in high speed laser surface microstructuring of polymer and steel using direct laser interference patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Valentin; Roch, Teja; Lasagni, Andrés. F.

    2016-03-01

    Periodic surfaces structures with micrometer or submicrometer resolution produced on the surface of components can be used to improve their mechanical, biological or optical properties. In particular, these surfaces can control the tribological performance of parts, for instance in the automotive industry. In the last years, substantial efforts have been made to develop new technologies capable to produce functionalized surfaces. One of these technologies is the Direct Laser Interference Patterning (DLIP) technology, which permits to combine high fabrication speed with high resolution even in the sub-micrometer range. In DLIP, a laser beam is split into two or more coherent beams which are guided to interfere on the work piece surface. This causes modulated laser intensities over the component's surface, enabling the direct fabrication of a periodic pattern based on selective laser ablation or melting. Depending on the angle between the laser beams and the wavelength of the laser, the pattern's spatial period can be perfectly controlled. In this study, we introduce new modular DLIP optical heads, developed at the Fraunhofer IWS and the Technische Universität Dresden for high-speed surface laser patterning of polymers and metals. For the first time it is shown that effective patterning speeds of up to 0.90 m2/min and 0.36 m2/min are possible on polymer and metals, respectively. Line- and dot-like surface architectures with spatial periods between 7 μm and 22 μm are shown.

  18. Scanning tunneling microscopy of electrochemically activated platinum surfaces. A direct ex-situ determination of the electrode nanotopography

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, L.; Gomez, J.; Baro, A.M.; Garcia, N.; Marcos, M.L.; Velasco, J.G.; Vara, J.M.; Arvia, A.J.; Presa, J.; Garcia, A.; Aguilar, M.

    1987-03-18

    A direct scanning tunneling microscopy ex-situ determination on the nanometer scale of the topography of electrochemically highly activated platinum electrodes is presented. A correlation between catalytic activity and surface microtopography becomes evident. This result gives support to a structural model for the activated electrode surface. In the model, a volume with a pebble-like structure allows electrocatalytic processes to occur practically free of diffusion relaxation contributions under usual voltammetric conditions.

  19. Direct Synthesis of Crystalline MoS2 Thin Films on Large Area, Stretchable Polymer Surfaces (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-15

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2016-0239 DIRECT SYNTHESIS OF CRYSTALLINE MoS2 THIN FILMS ON LARGE AREA, STRETCHABLE POLYMER SURFACES (PREPRINT...AREA, STRETCHABLE POLYMER SURFACES (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-11-D-5800-0005 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F...devices on flexible polymer substrates. 15. SUBJECT TERMS MoS2 films, PDMS substrates, photothermal, amorphous material, polymer substrate 16

  20. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic direct determination of low molecular weight biothiols in umbilical cord whole blood.

    PubMed

    Kuligowski, Julia; El-Zahry, Marwa R; Sánchez-Illana, Ángel; Quintás, Guillermo; Vento, Máximo; Lendl, Bernhard

    2016-04-07

    Biothiols play an essential role in a number of biological processes in living organisms including detoxification and metabolism. Fetal to neonatal transition poses a pro-oxidant threat for newborn infants, especially those born prematurely. A reliable and rapid tool for the direct determination of thiols in small volume whole blood (WB) samples would be desirable for its application in clinical practice. This study shows the feasibility of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) using a silver colloid prepared by reduction of silver nitrate using hydroxylamine, as the SERS substrate for the quantification of thiols in WB samples after a simple precipitation step for protein removal. Bands originating from biothiols (790, 714 and 642 cm(-1)) were enhanced by the employed SERS substrate and the specificity of the detected SERS signal was tested for molecules presenting -SH functional groups. A statistically significant correlation between the obtained SERS signals and the thiol concentration measured using a chromatographic reference method in umbilical cord WB samples could be demonstrated. Using WB GSH concentrations obtained from the chromatographic reference procedure, a Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression model covering GSH concentrations from 13 to 2200 μM was calculated obtaining a root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 381 μM when applied to an external test set. The developed approach uses small blood sample volumes (50 μL), which is important for clinical applications, especially in the field of neonatology. This feasibility study shows that the present approach combines all the necessary characteristics for its potential application in clinical practice.

  1. Colorizing of the stainless steel surface by single-beam direct femtosecond laser writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahsan, Md. Shamim; Kim, Yeong Gyu; Lee, Man Seop

    2011-03-01

    This paper reports on the colorizing of the stainless steel surface by controlling the irradiation conditions of a single-beam femtosecond laser. We change the color of the stainless steel surface by femtosecond laser induced periodic self-organized nanogratings or microgratings on the sample surface. Colorizing of metal surface by periodic microholes, produced by femtosecond laser, is achieved for the first time. The laser modified stainless steel surfaces show different colors under different incident or azimuthal angles of the incident light, which changes in color indicate the dependence of the metal color on the angles (incident and azimuthal) of the incident light. We report, for the first time, the changes of metal color due to the change of the azimuthal angles of the incident light. Furthermore, the changes in the color of the laser modified metal surfaces are mainly due to the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on the metal surface. The resonant angle of SPPs is different for different wavelength of light. As a result, under different incident or azimuthal angles different wavelength of light is trapped on the surface depending on the resonance for that particular wavelength; light of other wavelengths react naturally and contributes for the color change of the stainless steel surfaces. Finally, we discovered that the nanostructures produced inside the self-organized nanogratings and microholes play important roles for the propagation of the SPPs in parallel with the nanogratings and mcroholes, which nanostructures are responsible for a complex SPPs excitation on the sample surface.

  2. Spatial and temporal frequency domain laser-ultrasound applied in the direct measurement of dispersion relations of surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünsteidl, Clemens; Veres, István A.; Roither, Jürgen; Burgholzer, Peter; Murray, Todd W.; Berer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present a laser-ultrasound measurement technique which combines adjustable spatial and temporal modulation of the excitation laser beam. Our method spreads the intensity of an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser over a micro-scale pattern on the sample surface to excite surface acoustic waves. The excitation pattern consists of parallel, equidistant lines and the waves generated from the individual lines interfere on the sample surface. Measurement is done in the spatial-temporal frequency domain allowing the direct determination of dispersion relations. The technique performs with high signal-to-noise-ratios and low peak power densities on the sample.

  3. NanoSQUID magnetometry of individual cobalt nanoparticles grown by focused electron beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Pérez, M. J.; Müller, B.; Schwebius, D.; Korinski, D.; Kleiner, R.; Sesé, J.; Koelle, D.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate the operation of low-noise nano superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) based on the high critical field and high critical temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) as ultra-sensitive magnetometers for single magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The nanoSQUIDs exploit the Josephson behavior of YBCO grain boundaries and have been patterned by focused ion beam milling. This allows us to precisely define the lateral dimensions of the SQUIDs so as to achieve large magnetic coupling between the nanoloop and individual MNPs. By means of focused electron beam induced deposition, cobalt MNPs with a typical size of several tens of nm have been grown directly on the surface of the sensors with nanometric spatial resolution. Remarkably, the nanoSQUIDs are operative over extremely broad ranges of applied magnetic field (-1 T \\lt {μ }0H\\lt 1 T) and temperature (0.3 K \\lt T\\lt 80 K). All these features together have allowed us to perform magnetization measurements under different ambient conditions and to detect the magnetization reversal of individual Co MNPs with magnetic moments (1-30) × {10}6 {μ }{{B}}. Depending on the dimensions and shape of the particles we have distinguished between two different magnetic states yielding different reversal mechanisms. The magnetization reversal is thermally activated over an energy barrier, which has been quantified for the (quasi) single-domain particles. Our measurements serve to show not only the high sensitivity achievable with YBCO nanoSQUIDs, but also demonstrate that these sensors are exceptional magnetometers for the investigation of the properties of individual nanomagnets.

  4. ZnO nanostructures directly grown on paper and bacterial cellulose substrates without any surface modification layer.

    PubMed

    Costa, Saionara V; Gonçalves, Agnaldo S; Zaguete, Maria A; Mazon, Talita; Nogueira, Ana F

    2013-09-21

    In this report, hierarchical ZnO nano- and microstructures were directly grown for the first time on a bacterial cellulose substrate and on two additional different papers by hydrothermal synthesis without any surface modification layer. Compactness and smoothness of the substrates are two important parameters that allow the growth of oriented structures.

  5. Laboratory investigation and direct numerical simulation of wind effect on steep surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Druzhinin, Oleg; Ermakova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    particles 20 μm in diameter were injected into the airflow. The images of the illuminated particles were photographed with a digital CCD video camera at a rate of 1000 frames per second. For the each given parameters of wind and waves, a statistical ensemble of 30 movies with duration from 200 to 600 ms was obtained. Individual flow realizations manifested the typical features of flow separation, while the average vector velocity fields obtained by the phase averaging of the individual vector fields were smooth and slightly asymmetrical, with the minimum of the horizontal velocity near the water surface shifted to the leeward side of the wave profile, but do not demonstrate the features of flow separation. The wave-induced pressure perturbations, averaged over the turbulent fluctuations, were retrieved from the measured velocity fields, using the Reynolds equations. It ensures sufficient accuracy for study of the dependence of the wave increment on the wave amplitude. The dependences of the wave growth rate on the wave steepness are weakly decreasing, serving as indirect proof of the non-separated character of flow over waves. Also direct numerical simulation of the airflow over finite amplitude periodic surface wave was performed. In the experiments the primitive 3-dimensional fluid mechanics equations were solved in the airflow over curved water boundary for the following parameters: the Reynolds number Re=15000, the wave steepness ka=0-0.2, the parameter c/u*=0-10 (where u* is the friction velocity and c is the wave celerity). Similar to the physical experiment the instant realizations of the velocity field demonstrate flow separation at the crests of the waves, but the ensemble averaged velocity fields had typical structures similar to those excising in shear flows near critical levels, where the phase velocity of the disturbance coincides with the flow velocity. The wind growth rate determined by the ensemble averaged wave-induced pressure component in phase of the

  6. Tunable negative and positive coercivity for SmCo/(Co/Gd) exchange springs investigated with SQUID magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirtas, S.; Hossu, M. R.; Arikan, M.; Koymen, A. R.; Salamon, M. B.

    2007-12-01

    Temperature dependent static magnetic properties of Co/Gd multilayers, grown on SmCo, are experimentally investigated by means of SQUID magnetometry. The SmCo/(Co/Gd) system shows an exchange spring behavior above the compensation temperature (Tcomp) at which the magnetization of the antiferromagnetically coupled multilayer is zero. Below Tcomp , a tunable negative coercivity state (inverse hysteresis) appears, due to the coupling between the hard SmCo and soft Co/Gd multilayers, irrespective of whether Co or Gd is proximate to the SmCo. However, for the strongly ferromagnetically coupled Co interface layer, negative coercivity persists over a larger temperature interval. The negative coercivity state vanishes if the coercivity of the SmCo layer is increased by controlling the Cu underlayer thickness.

  7. A Multipath Calculation of Surface-Generated Underwater Acoustic Ambient Vertical Directivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-18

    nth Eigenray I Homogeneous Source Intensity Density g( Source Directivity dA = r dr dO 0 Azimuthal Position of Source Relative to Receiver * 2...Directional-Frequency Spectra - Multipath Expansion ( Eigenray ) Approach 5 TD 8431 SLIDE 3 Although the calculations were done with a specific location in...Frequency Spectra - Multipath Expansion ( Eigenray ) Approach 0 0 13 0 TD 8431 Multipath Calculation of the Acoustic Vertical Directional Spectra RESULTS e

  8. Solvent Separating Secondary Metabolites Directly from Biosynthetic Tissue for Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, David; Benkendorff, Kirsten; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2015-01-01

    Marine bioactive metabolites are often heterogeneously expressed in tissues both spatially and over time. Therefore, traditional solvent extraction methods benefit from an understanding of the in situ sites of biosynthesis and storage to deal with heterogeneity and maximize yield. Recently, surface-assisted mass spectrometry (MS) methods namely nanostructure-assisted laser desorption ionisation (NALDI) and desorption ionisation on porous silicon (DIOS) surfaces have been developed to enable the direct detection of low molecular weight metabolites. Since direct tissue NALDI-MS or DIOS-MS produce complex spectra due to the wide variety of other metabolites and fragments present in the low mass range, we report here the use of “on surface” solvent separation directly from mollusc tissue onto nanostructured surfaces for MS analysis, as a mechanism for simplifying data annotation and detecting possible artefacts from compound delocalization during the preparative steps. Water, ethanol, chloroform and hexane selectively extracted a range of choline esters, brominated indoles and lipids from Dicathais orbita hypobranchial tissue imprints. These compounds could be quantified on the nanostructured surfaces by comparison to standard curves generated from the pure compounds. Surface-assisted MS could have broad utility for detecting a broad range of secondary metabolites in complex marine tissue samples. PMID:25786067

  9. Constructive, Collaborative, Contextual, and Self-Directed Learning in Surface Anatomy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Esther M.; Sieben, Judith M.; Smailbegovic, Ida; de Bruin, Anique B. H.; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy education often consists of a combination of lectures and laboratory sessions, the latter frequently including surface anatomy. Studying surface anatomy enables students to elaborate on their knowledge of the cadaver's static anatomy by enabling the visualization of structures, especially those of the musculoskeletal system, move and…

  10. Adhesion of biofilms to inert surfaces: A molecular level approach directed at the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Baty, A M; Frølund, B; Geesey, G G; Langille, S; Quintero, E J; Suci, P A; Weiner, R M

    1996-01-01

    Protein/ligand interactions involved in mediating adhesion between microorganisms and biological surfaces have been well-characterized in some cases (e.g. pathogen/host interactions). The strategies microorganisms employ for attachment to inert surfaces have not been so clearly elucidated. An experimental approach is presented which addresses the issues from the point of view of molecular interactions occurring at the interface.

  11. Direct and large-eddy simulations of the stable atmospheric boundary layer: the effect of unsteadiness and surface variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, S.; Bou-Zeid, E.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding and parameterizing turbulent fluxes in statically-stable atmospheric boundary layers (SABLs), where buoyant forces destroy turbulent kinetic energy, remains a challenging yet very important problem in geophysical fluid dynamics. The complexities of these flows are further exacerbated by the increased sensitivity to unsteadiness and surface variability. To address the role of these exacerbating factors, direct numerical simulations and large eddy simulations are performed. Under the highest stabilities, global intermittency (the almost compete decay of turbulence and then its regeneration) is observed. The intermittent bursts are important to study under these conditions since they become the main agent of vertical transport in the SABL. Under more moderate stabilities, continuous turbulence is maintained, but it is significantly damped compared to neutral flows. This reduction of the TKE under stable conditions is very well known; however, in this study, we show that it is mainly triggered by reduced mechanical production associated with reduced transport of Reynolds stresses from aloft toward the surface, rather than by direct destruction of TKE by buoyancy. Variability of surface temperature is shown to result in excepted flow patterns: TKE is potentially higher under the more stable patches due to advection, and the subsidence and lofting of air over the different patches can counteract the effect of spatial TKE variability on the vertical fluxes. Re_f = 600. (a) Surface Richardson number (R_{i0;t}) versus non-dimensional time (tf) for different stabilities. (b) Non-dimensional volume integrated turbulent kinetic energy per unit area (E). (c) Friction velocity (u_*) and its variation with time and stability. (d) Variation of the angle (Beta) between the geostrophic wind direction and the surface shear stress direction with time and stability. Colormap of the TKE from a heterogeneous surface temperature LES, showing the effect of advection.

  12. Measurement selection for groundwater-surface water investigations using Discrimination-Inference to Reduce Expected Cost Technique (DIRECT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, C.; Ferre, T. P.; Bayley, T.; Hundt, S.

    2012-12-01

    Reliable characterization of groundwater-surface water interaction is confounded by the identification of dominant physical and geochemical processes, system boundaries, and the complex distribution of subsurface hydraulic properties in both space and time. To address uncertainties arising from these factors, investigations of groundwater-surface water interaction typically require field observations of hydrologic states and fluxes. Uncertainties in system characterization are reduced as more data are collected. However, some hydrologic data may be poorly suited or inadequate to reduce the most critical uncertainties in coupled groundwater-surface water systems. This problem may be avoided by undertaking value-of-data analyses before and during field measurement campaigns. This research seeks to identify data most suited to guide objective-driven characterization of groundwater-surface water systems using Discrimination-Inference to Reduce Expected Cost Technique (DIRECT) - a new framework for merging decision support with hydrologic measurement selection. In the framework of DIRECT, candidate hydrologic measurements are assessed based upon their capability to elucidate characteristics of groundwater-surface water systems most pertinent to user-specified objectives such as adequate supply for human uses, in-stream flows, and protection of water quality. DIRECT explicitly considers competing hypotheses of dominant physical and geochemical processes by incorporating multiple conceptual models in the analysis. We present applications of this approach in several diverse environments, including sedimentary basins, glacially-dominated terrain, and permafrost-affected hillslopes. In all of these investigations, DIRECT shows great promise as a tool for refining measurement selection to improve understanding and management of groundwater-surface water systems.

  13. Protein consensus-based surface engineering (ProCoS): a computer-assisted method for directed protein evolution.

    PubMed

    Shivange, Amol V; Hoeffken, Hans Wolfgang; Haefner, Stefan; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2016-12-01

    Protein consensus-based surface engineering (ProCoS) is a simple and efficient method for directed protein evolution combining computational analysis and molecular biology tools to engineer protein surfaces. ProCoS is based on the hypothesis that conserved residues originated from a common ancestor and that these residues are crucial for the function of a protein, whereas highly variable regions (situated on the surface of a protein) can be targeted for surface engineering to maximize performance. ProCoS comprises four main steps: (i) identification of conserved and highly variable regions; (ii) protein sequence design by substituting residues in the highly variable regions, and gene synthesis; (iii) in vitro DNA recombination of synthetic genes; and (iv) screening for active variants. ProCoS is a simple method for surface mutagenesis in which multiple sequence alignment is used for selection of surface residues based on a structural model. To demonstrate the technique's utility for directed evolution, the surface of a phytase enzyme from Yersinia mollaretii (Ymphytase) was subjected to ProCoS. Screening just 1050 clones from ProCoS engineering-guided mutant libraries yielded an enzyme with 34 amino acid substitutions. The surface-engineered Ymphytase exhibited 3.8-fold higher pH stability (at pH 2.8 for 3 h) and retained 40% of the enzyme's specific activity (400 U/mg) compared with the wild-type Ymphytase. The pH stability might be attributed to a significantly increased (20 percentage points; from 9% to 29%) number of negatively charged amino acids on the surface of the engineered phytase.

  14. Quantitative surface topography assessment of directly compressed and roller compacted tablet cores using photometric stereo image analysis.

    PubMed

    Allesø, Morten; Holm, Per; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Holm, René

    2016-05-25

    Surface topography, in the context of surface smoothness/roughness, was investigated by the use of an image analysis technique, MultiRay™, related to photometric stereo, on different tablet batches manufactured either by direct compression or roller compaction. In the present study, oblique illumination of the tablet (darkfield) was considered and the area of cracks and pores in the surface was used as a measure of tablet surface topography; the higher a value, the rougher the surface. The investigations demonstrated a high precision of the proposed technique, which was able to rapidly (within milliseconds) and quantitatively measure the obtained surface topography of the produced tablets. Compaction history, in the form of applied roll force and tablet punch pressure, was also reflected in the measured smoothness of the tablet surfaces. Generally it was found that a higher degree of plastic deformation of the microcrystalline cellulose resulted in a smoother tablet surface. This altogether demonstrated that the technique provides the pharmaceutical developer with a reliable, quantitative response parameter for visual appearance of solid dosage forms, which may be used for process and ultimately product optimization.

  15. Direct monophasic replacement of fatty acid by DMSA on SPION surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, M.; Deb, P.; Vasan, G.; Keil, P.; Kostka, A.; Erbe, A.

    2012-10-01

    Tailoring the surface and understanding the surface characteristics is necessary for biomedical applications of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. In this paper, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were prepared by thermal decomposition of iron nitrate in presence of stearic acid as surfactant. Due to the multilayer organization of surfactant molecules over the nanoparticle surface, the surface potential can be tuned by pH changes and hence the nanoparticles can be made dispersible in nonpolar as well as in polar solvents. We have presented a simple, facile procedure for controlled replacement of stearic acid from maghemite surface and subsequent derivatization by biocompatible dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) to obtain ultrastable hydrophilic nanoparticles with unaltered morphology, phase and properties. The surface chemistry of the functionalized SPIONs was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealing the presence of bound and unbound thiol groups and disulfides, leading to its prolonged stability in aqueous medium. The consequence of spatially selective functionalization on the stability and solubility of surface hydrophilic SPION has also been realized.

  16. Mathematical Modeling of Surface Roughness of Castings Produced Using ZCast Direct Metal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabra, M.; Singh, R.

    2015-04-01

    Aim of this investigation is to develop a mathematical model for predicting surface roughness of castings produced using ZCast process by employing Buckingham's π-theorem. A relationship has been proposed between surface roughness of castings and shell wall thickness of the shell moulds fabricated using 3D printer. Based on model, experiments were performed to obtain the surface roughness of aluminium, brass and copper castings produced using ZCast process based on 3D printing technique. Based on experimental data, three best fitted third-degree polynomial equations have been established for predicting the surface roughness of castings. The predicted surface roughness values were then calculated using established best fitted equations. An error analysis was performed to compare the experimental and predicted data. The average prediction errors obtained for aluminium, brass and copper castings are 10.6, 2.43 and 3.12 % respectively. The obtained average surface roughness (experimental and predicted) values of castings produced are acceptable with the sand cast surface roughness values range (6.25-25 µm).

  17. Fabrication of electrically conductive metal patterns at the surface of polymer films by microplasma-based direct writing.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Souvik; Yang, Rui; Kaumeyer, Michelle; Zorman, Christian A; Rowan, Stuart J; Feng, Philip X-L; Sankaran, R Mohan

    2014-03-12

    We describe a direct-write process for producing electrically conductive metal patterns at the surface of polymers. Thin films of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) loaded with Ag ions are reduced by a scanning, atmospheric-pressure microplasma to form crystalline Ag features with a line width of 300 μm. Materials analysis reveals that the metallization occurs in a thin layer of ∼5 μm near the film surface, suggesting that the Ag ions diffuse to the surface. Sheet resistances of 1-10 Ω/sq are obtained independent of film thickness and Ag volume concentration, which is desirable for producing surface conductivity on polymers while minimizing metal loading.

  18. Direct first-principles simulation of a high-performance electron emitter: Lithium-oxide-coated diamond surface

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki Miyazaki, Takehide; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2014-09-28

    We examined the field emission properties of lithium(Li)/oxygen(O)-co-terminated diamond (001) surface [C(001)-LiO] through real-time electron dynamics simulation under an applied field. The current emitted from this surface was found to be more than four-fold that emitted by an H-terminated (001) surface, the latter being a typical negative electron affinity system. This high performance is attributed to the Li layer, which bends the potential wall of O-induced electron pockets down in the direction of vacuum, thus facilitating electron emission. Detailed analysis of the emitted electrons and the profile of the self-consistent potential elucidated that the role of O atoms changes from an electron barrier on OH-terminated diamond surfaces to an outlet for electron emission on C(001)-LiO.

  19. Native Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Mass Spectrometry: Analysis of Noncovalent Protein Complexes Directly from Dried Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicholas J.; Griffiths, Rian L.; Edwards, Rebecca L.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2015-08-01

    Liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) mass spectrometry is a promising tool for the analysis of intact proteins from biological substrates. Here, we demonstrate native LESA mass spectrometry of noncovalent protein complexes of myoglobin and hemoglobin from a range of surfaces. Holomyoglobin, in which apomyoglobin is noncovalently bound to the prosthetic heme group, was observed following LESA mass spectrometry of myoglobin dried onto glass and polyvinylidene fluoride surfaces. Tetrameric hemoglobin [(αβ)2 4H] was observed following LESA mass spectrometry of hemoglobin dried onto glass and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) surfaces, and from dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper. Heme-bound dimers and monomers were also observed. The `contact' LESA approach was particularly suitable for the analysis of hemoglobin tetramers from DBS.

  20. Direct ambient noise tomography for 3-D near surface shear velocity structure: methodology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H.; Fang, H.; Li, C.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Huang, Y. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography has provided essential constraints on crustal and uppermost mantle shear velocity structure in global seismology. Recent studies demonstrate that high frequency (e.g., ~ 1 Hz) surface waves between receivers at short distances can be successfully retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation and then be used for imaging near surface or shallow crustal shear velocity structures. This approach provides important information for strong ground motion prediction in seismically active area and overburden structure characterization in oil and gas fields. Here we propose a new tomographic method to invert all surface wave dispersion data for 3-D variations of shear wavespeed without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps.The method uses frequency-dependent propagation paths and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic inversion. A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. This avoids the assumption of great-circle propagation that is used in most surface wave tomographic studies, but which is not appropriate in complex media. The wavelet coefficients of the velocity model are estimated with an iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) algorithm, and upon iterations the surface wave ray paths and the data sensitivity matrix are updated from the newly obtained velocity model. We apply this new method to determine the 3-D near surface wavespeed variations in the Taipei basin of Taiwan, Hefei urban area and a shale and gas production field in China using the high-frequency interstation Rayleigh wave dispersion data extracted from ambient noisecross-correlation. The results reveal strong effects of off-great-circle propagation of high-frequency surface waves in these regions with above 30% shear wavespeed variations. The proposed approach is more efficient and robust than the traditional two-step surface wave tomography for imaging complex

  1. Direct Adsorption of Anti-CD34 Antibodies on the Nano-Porous Stent Surface to Enhance Endothelialization

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guowei; Yu, Zhanjiang; Chen, Yongqiang; Chen, Yundai; Tian, Feng; Yang, Xiaoda

    2016-01-01

    Background In-stent restenosis following the insertion of conventional drug-eluting stent has become an extremely serious problem due to coating techniques, with polymer matrices used to bind biological ingredients to the stent surface. However, several studies have indicated that new pro-healing technique could prevent stent thrombosis that can be caused by conventional drug-eluting stents. Methods A novel method of attaching anti-CD34 antibodies directly on the porous surface of a 316L stainless steel bare metal stent was developed in this study, which achieved both high stability of attached anti-CD34 antibodies on the metal stent surface and high antibody activity for stem cell capture. Results The in vitro and in vivo experimental results indicated that the new stent with directly coupled anti-CD34 antibodies can efficiently enhance stent endothelialization. Conclusions This study indicates that we have developed a unique method of attaching anti-CD34 antibodies directly on the porous surface of a 316L stainless steel bare metal stent, which provides a novel polymer-free approach for developing pro-healing stents. PMID:27274167

  2. Surface contour radar observations of the directional wave spectrum during Fasinex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Hancock, D. W., III; Hines, D. E.; Swift, R. N.; Scott, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    The surface control radar (SCR), a 36-GHz computer-controlled airborne radar which generates a false-color coded elevation map of the sea surface below the aircraft in real time, is described. The SCR turned out to be ideal for documenting the wave spectra during Fasinex (the Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment) due to its high spatial resolution and rapid mapping capability over extensive areas. Synoptic weather maps for February 15-18, 1986 are presented.

  3. Direct measurement of the surface dynamics of supercooled liquid-glycerol by optical scanning a film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Guo-Feng; Dong, Shuang-Li; Sun, Jian-Hu; Chen, Rui-Yun; Xiao, Lian-Tuan; Jia, Suo-Tang

    2009-09-01

    The surface dynamics of supercooled liquid-glycerol is studied by scanning the thickness of the glycerol film with single photon detection. Measurements are performed at room temperature well above the glycerol's glass transition temperature. It is shown that the surface dynamics of the glycerol film is very sensitive to the temperature. The linear relationship between the thickness of the film and the viscosity predicted by the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTH) law is also presented experimentally.

  4. A novel optical biosensor for direct and selective determination of serotonin in serum by Solid Surface-Room Temperature Phosphorescence.

    PubMed

    Ramon-Marquez, Teresa; Medina-Castillo, Antonio L; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Alberto; Fernandez-Sanchez, Jorge F

    2016-08-15

    This paper describes a novel biosensor which combines the use of nanotechnology (non-woven nanofibre mat) with Solid Surface-Room Temperature Phosphorescence (SS-RTP) measurement for the determination of serotonin in human serum. The developed biosensor is simple and can be directly applied in serum; only requires a simple clean-up protocol. Therefore it is the first time that serotonin is analysed directly in serum with a non-enzymatic technique. This new approach is based on the covalent immobilization of serotonin directly from serum on a functional nanofibre material (Tiss®-Link) with a preactivated surface for direct covalent immobilization of primary and secondary amines, and the subsequent measurement of serotonin phosphorescent emission from the solid surface. The phosphorescent detection allows avoiding the interference from any fluorescence emission or scattering light from any molecule present in the serum sample which can be also immobilised on the nanofibre material. The determination of serotonin with this SS-RTP sensor overcomes some limitations, such as large interference from the matrix and high cost and complexity of many of the methods widely used for serotonin analysis. The potential applicability of the sensor in the clinical diagnosis was demonstrated by analysing serum samples from seven healthy volunteers. The method was validated with an external reference laboratory, obtaining a correlation coefficient of 0.997 which indicates excellent correlation between the two methods.

  5. Direct retrieval of ocean surface evaporation and latent heat flux from the spacebased observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.; Tang, W.

    2000-01-01

    The Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) provides the opportunity to improve the spacebased estimation of evaporation. An algorithm for retrieving evaporation directly from the radiances observed by the TRMM Microwave Imager and its validation results are described.

  6. A method for the direct measurement of surface tension of collected atmospherically relevant aerosol particles using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hritz, Andrew D.; Raymond, Timothy M.; Dutcher, Dabrina D.

    2016-08-01

    Accurate estimates of particle surface tension are required for models concerning atmospheric aerosol nucleation and activation. However, it is difficult to collect the volumes of atmospheric aerosol required by typical instruments that measure surface tension, such as goniometers or Wilhelmy plates. In this work, a method that measures, ex situ, the surface tension of collected liquid nanoparticles using atomic force microscopy is presented. A film of particles is collected via impaction and is probed using nanoneedle tips with the atomic force microscope. This micro-Wilhelmy method allows for direct measurements of the surface tension of small amounts of sample. This method was verified using liquids, whose surface tensions were known. Particles of ozone oxidized α-pinene, a well-characterized system, were then produced, collected, and analyzed using this method to demonstrate its applicability for liquid aerosol samples. It was determined that oxidized α-pinene particles formed in dry conditions have a surface tension similar to that of pure α-pinene, and oxidized α-pinene particles formed in more humid conditions have a surface tension that is significantly higher.

  7. Direct surface analysis coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry reveals heterogeneous composition of the cuticle of Hibiscus trionum petals.

    PubMed

    Giorio, Chiara; Moyroud, Edwige; Glover, Beverley J; Skelton, Paul C; Kalberer, Markus

    2015-10-06

    Plant cuticle, which is the outermost layer covering the aerial parts of all plants including petals and leaves, can present a wide range of patterns that, combined with cell shape, can generate unique physical, mechanical, or optical properties. For example, arrays of regularly spaced nanoridges have been found on the dark (anthocyanin-rich) portion at the base of the petals of Hibiscus trionum. Those ridges act as a diffraction grating, producing an iridescent effect. Because the surface of the distal white region of the petals is smooth and noniridescent, a selective chemical characterization of the surface of the petals on different portions (i.e., ridged vs smooth) is needed to understand whether distinct cuticular patterns correlate with distinct chemical compositions of the cuticle. In the present study, a rapid screening method has been developed for the direct surface analysis of Hibiscus trionum petals using liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry. The optimized method was used to characterize a wide range of plant metabolites and cuticle monomers on the upper (adaxial) surface of the petals on both the white/smooth and anthocyanic/ridged regions, and on the lower (abaxial) surface, which is entirely smooth. The main components detected on the surface of the petals are low-molecular-weight organic acids, sugars, and flavonoids. The ridged portion on the upper surface of the petal is enriched in long-chain fatty acids, which are constituents of the wax fraction of the cuticle. These compounds were not detected on the white/smooth region of the upper petal surface or on the smooth lower surface.

  8. Establishing Antibacterial Multilayer Films on the Surface of Direct Metal Laser Sintered Titanium Primed with Phase-Transited Lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Binbin; Wang, Haorong; Xu, Ruiqing; Zheng, Guoying; Yang, Jie; Liu, Zihao; Cao, Man; Wu, Mingyao; Song, Jinhua; Li, Neng; Li, Ting; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping; Li, Yanqiu; Zhang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Direct metal laser sintering is a technology that allows the fabrication of titanium (Ti) implants with a functional gradation of porosity and surface roughness according to three-dimensional (3D) computer data. The surface roughness of direct metal laser sintered titanium (DMLS-Ti) implants may provide abundant binding sites for bacteria. Bacterial colonization and subsequent biofilm formation can cause unsatisfactory cell adhesion and implant-related infections. To prevent such infections, a novel phase-transited lysozyme (PTL) was utilized as an initial functional layer to simply and effectively prime DMLS-Ti surfaces for subsequent coating with antibacterial multilayers. The purpose of the present study was to establish a surface with dual biological functionality. The minocycline-loaded polyelectrolyte multilayers of hyaluronic acid (HA) and chitosan (CS) formed via a layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technique on PTL-functionalized DMLS-Ti were designed to inhibit pathogenic microbial infections while allowing the DMLS-Ti itself and the modified coatings to retain acceptable biocompatibility. The experimental results indicate that the DMLS-Ti and the hydrogel treated surfaces can inhibit early bacterial adhesion while completely preserving osteoblast functions. This design is expected to gain considerable interest in the medical field and to have good potential for applications in multifunctional DMLS-Ti implants. PMID:27821857

  9. Establishing Antibacterial Multilayer Films on the Surface of Direct Metal Laser Sintered Titanium Primed with Phase-Transited Lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Binbin; Wang, Haorong; Xu, Ruiqing; Zheng, Guoying; Yang, Jie; Liu, Zihao; Cao, Man; Wu, Mingyao; Song, Jinhua; Li, Neng; Li, Ting; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping; Li, Yanqiu; Zhang, Xu

    2016-11-01

    Direct metal laser sintering is a technology that allows the fabrication of titanium (Ti) implants with a functional gradation of porosity and surface roughness according to three-dimensional (3D) computer data. The surface roughness of direct metal laser sintered titanium (DMLS-Ti) implants may provide abundant binding sites for bacteria. Bacterial colonization and subsequent biofilm formation can cause unsatisfactory cell adhesion and implant-related infections. To prevent such infections, a novel phase-transited lysozyme (PTL) was utilized as an initial functional layer to simply and effectively prime DMLS-Ti surfaces for subsequent coating with antibacterial multilayers. The purpose of the present study was to establish a surface with dual biological functionality. The minocycline-loaded polyelectrolyte multilayers of hyaluronic acid (HA) and chitosan (CS) formed via a layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technique on PTL-functionalized DMLS-Ti were designed to inhibit pathogenic microbial infections while allowing the DMLS-Ti itself and the modified coatings to retain acceptable biocompatibility. The experimental results indicate that the DMLS-Ti and the hydrogel treated surfaces can inhibit early bacterial adhesion while completely preserving osteoblast functions. This design is expected to gain considerable interest in the medical field and to have good potential for applications in multifunctional DMLS-Ti implants.

  10. Direct imaging of electron recombination and transport on a semiconductor surface by femtosecond time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Keiki Yamada, Yuki; Koshihara, Shin-ya; Onda, Ken

    2014-02-03

    Much effort has been devoted to the development of techniques to probe carrier dynamics, which govern many semiconductor device characteristics. We report direct imaging of electron dynamics on semiconductor surfaces by time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy using femtosecond laser pulses. The experiments utilized a variable-repetition-rate femtosecond laser system to suppress sample charging problems. The recombination of photogenerated electrons and the lateral motion of the electrons driven by an external electric field on a GaAs surface were visualized. The mobility was estimated from a linear relationship between the drift velocity and the potential gradient.

  11. Femtosecond laser direct writing of large-area two-dimensional metallic photonic crystal structures on tungsten surfaces.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Hongzhen; Yang, Jianjun; Wang, Fei; Yang, Yang; Sun, Julong

    2015-10-05

    Metallic photonic crystals (MPCs) and metamaterials operating in the visible spectrum are required for high-temperature nanophotonics, but they are often difficult to construct. This study demonstrates a new approach to directly write two-dimensional (2D) MPCs on tungsten surfaces through the cylindrical focusing of two collinear femtosecond laser beams with certain temporal delays and orthogonal linear polarizations. Results are physically attributed to the laser-induced transient crossed temperature grating patterns and tempo-spatial thermal correlations. Optical properties of the fabricated MPCs are characterized. Such a simple and efficient technique can be used to fabricate large-area, 2D microstructures on metal surfaces for potential applications.

  12. The effect of nanoscratching direction on the plastic deformation and surface morphology of InP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J. Y.; Ponce, F. A.; Caldas, P. G.; Prioli, R.; Almeida, C. M.

    2013-11-28

    The microstructure of (001) InP crystals scratched with a sharp diamond tip depends strongly on the scratching direction. The scratch surface is found to conform to the radius of curvature of the tip (∼60 nm) by the formation of atomic crystal steps produced by dislocation glide along (111) planes. 〈110〉 scratches lead to coherent local crystal lattice movement and rotation causing deep dislocation propagation into the crystal and irregular pileups at the sides of the scratch surface. 〈100〉 scratches lead to incoherent lattice movement causing dislocation locking that inhibits their propagation and results in regular pileups.

  13. Measurement of two-state energy landscapes on amorphous hafnium diboride surface by direct observation of dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Mallek, Justin; Cloud, Andrew; Abelson, John; Girolami, Gregory; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Direct visualization of free energy landscape for individual Cooperatively Rearranging Regions (CRRs) is important in glassy dynamics, both for the bulk and the surface. We used scanning tunneling microscopy to track individual CRRs on amorphous hafnium diboride surface, temporally from microseconds to hours with sub-nanometer spatial resolution. CRRs have a diameter of ~5 atoms and mostly relax in a two-state fashion. From single cluster tunneling current traces, we can reconstruct local free energy landscapes, complete with energy difference, barrier height, a numerically defined reaction corrdinate and shape of the free energy minima.

  14. Direct Identification of Dilute Surface Spins on Al2 O3 : Origin of Flux Noise in Quantum Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, S. E.; Adamyan, A. A.; Lindström, T.; Erts, D.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Tzalenchuk, A. Ya.; Danilov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    An on-chip electron spin resonance technique is applied to reveal the nature and origin of surface spins on Al2 O3 . We measure a spin density of 2.2 ×1 017 spins/m2 , attributed to physisorbed atomic hydrogen and S =1 /2 electron spin states on the surface. This is direct evidence for the nature of spins responsible for flux noise in quantum circuits, which has been an issue of interest for several decades. Our findings open up a new approach to the identification and controlled reduction of paramagnetic sources of noise and decoherence in superconducting quantum devices.

  15. Estimation of directional surface wave spectra from a towed research catamaran

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, K.A.; Hara, T.; Bock, E.J.; Karachintsev, A.B.

    1997-01-01

    During the High-Resolution Remote Sensing Main Experiment (1993), wave height was estimated from a moving catamaran using pitch-rate and roll-rate sensors, a three-axis accelerometer, and a capacitive wave wire. The wave spectrum in the frequency band ranging roughly from 0.08 to 0.3 Hz was verified by independent buoy measurements. To estimate the directional frequency spectrum from a wave-wire array, the Data-Adaptive Spectral Estimator is extended to include the Doppler shifting effects of a moving platform. The method is applied to data obtained from a fixed platform during the Ris?? Air-Sea Experiment (1994) and to data obtained from a moving platform during the Coastal Ocean Processes Experiment (1995). Both results show that the propagation direction of the peak wind waves compares well with the measured wind direction. When swells and local wind waves are not aligned, the method can resolve the difference of propagation directions. Using the fixed platform data a numerical test is conducted that shows that the method is able to distinguish two wave systems propagating at the same frequency but in two different directions.

  16. 3D Micropatterned Surface Inspired by Salvinia molesta via Direct Laser Lithography

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetic functional surfaces are attracting increasing attention for their relevant technological applications. Despite these efforts, inherent limitations of microfabrication techniques prevent the replication of complex hierarchical microstructures. Using a 3D laser lithography technique, we fabricated a 3D patterned surface bioinspired to Salvinia molesta leaves. The artificial hairs, with crownlike heads, were reproduced by scaling down (ca. 100 times smaller) the dimensions of natural features, so that microscale hairs with submicrometric resolution were attained. The micropatterned surface, in analogy with the natural model, shows interesting properties in terms of hydrophobicity and air retention when submerged by water, even if realized with a hydrophilic material. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated the capability to promote localized condensation of water droplets from moisture in the atmosphere. PMID:26558410

  17. Thermocapillary migration of a gas bubble in an arbitrary direction with respect to a plane surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, M.; Shankar Subramanian, R.

    1987-01-01

    The thermocapillary migration of a gas bubble in an unbounded fluid in the presence of a neighboring rigid plane surface is considered in the limit of negligible Reynolds and Marangoni numbers. Results are given for a scalar interaction parameter defined as the ratio of the speed of the bubble in the presence of the plane surface to the speed in its absence. It is suggested that the weaker interaction effects noted for the case of thermocapillary migration relative to the case of motion due to a body force such as that caused by a gravitational field is attributable to the more rapid decay, away from the bubble, of the disturbance velocity and temperature gradient fields. The surface is found to exert the greatest influence in the case of motion normal to it, and the weakest influence in the case of parallel motion.

  18. 3D Micropatterned Surface Inspired by Salvinia molesta via Direct Laser Lithography.

    PubMed

    Tricinci, Omar; Terencio, Tercio; Mazzolai, Barbara; Pugno, Nicola M; Greco, Francesco; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2015-11-25

    Biomimetic functional surfaces are attracting increasing attention for their relevant technological applications. Despite these efforts, inherent limitations of microfabrication techniques prevent the replication of complex hierarchical microstructures. Using a 3D laser lithography technique, we fabricated a 3D patterned surface bioinspired to Salvinia molesta leaves. The artificial hairs, with crownlike heads, were reproduced by scaling down (ca. 100 times smaller) the dimensions of natural features, so that microscale hairs with submicrometric resolution were attained. The micropatterned surface, in analogy with the natural model, shows interesting properties in terms of hydrophobicity and air retention when submerged by water, even if realized with a hydrophilic material. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated the capability to promote localized condensation of water droplets from moisture in the atmosphere.

  19. Direct observation and temperature control of the surface Dirac gap in a topological crystalline insulator.

    PubMed

    Wojek, B M; Berntsen, M H; Jonsson, V; Szczerbakow, A; Dziawa, P; Kowalski, B J; Story, T; Tjernberg, O

    2015-10-13

    Since the advent of topological insulators hosting Dirac surface states, efforts have been made to gap these states in a controllable way. A new route to accomplish this was opened up by the discovery of topological crystalline insulators where the topological states are protected by crystal symmetries and thus prone to gap formation by structural changes of the lattice. Here we show a temperature-driven gap opening in Dirac surface states within the topological crystalline insulator phase in (Pb,Sn)Se. By using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, the gap formation and mass acquisition is studied as a function of composition and temperature. The resulting observations lead to the addition of a temperature- and composition-dependent boundary between massless and massive Dirac states in the topological phase diagram for (Pb,Sn)Se (001). Overall, our results experimentally establish the possibility to tune between massless and massive topological states on the surface of a topological system.

  20. A Study of an Optical Lunar Surface Communications Network with High Bandwidth Direct to Earth Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K.; Biswas, A.; Schoolcraft, J.

    2011-01-01

    A lunar surface systems study explores the application of optical communications to support a high bandwidth data link from a lunar relay satellite and from fixed lunar assets. The results show that existing 1-m ground stations could provide more than 99% coverage of the lunar terminal at 100Mb/s data rates from a lunar relay satellite and in excess of 200Mb/s from a fixed terminal on the lunar surface. We have looked at the effects of the lunar regolith and its removal on optical samples. Our results indicate that under repeated dust removal episodes sapphire rather than fused silica would be a more durable material for optical surfaces. Disruption tolerant network protocols can minimize the data loss due to link dropouts. We report on the preliminary results of the DTN protocol implemented over the optical carrier.

  1. Image reversal for direct electron beam patterning of protein coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pesen, Devrim; Erlandsson, Anna; Ulfendahl, Mats; Haviland, David B

    2007-11-01

    Electron beam lithography (EBL) is used to create surfaces with protein patterns, which are characterized by immunofluorescence and atomic force microscopies. Both negative and positive image processes are realized by electron beam irradiation of proteins absorbed on a silicon surface, where image reversal is achieved by selectively binding a second species of protein to the electron beam exposed areas on the first protein layer. Biofunctionality at the cellular level was established by culturing cortical cells on patterned lines of fibronectin adsorbed on a bovine serum albumin background for 7 days in culture.

  2. Power-law electrokinetic behavior as a direct probe of effective surface viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uematsu, Yuki; Netz, Roland R.; Bonthuis, Douwe Jan

    2017-02-01

    An exact solution to the Poisson-Boltzmann and Stokes equations is derived to describe the electric double layer with inhomogeneous dielectric and viscosity profiles in a lateral electric field. In the limit of strongly charged surfaces and low salinity, the electrokinetic flow magnitude follows a power law as a function of the surface charge density. Remarkably, the power-law exponent is determined by the interfacial dielectric constant and viscosity, the latter of which has eluded experimental determination. Our approach provides a novel method to extract the effective interfacial viscosity from standard electrokinetic experiments. We find good agreement between our theory and experimental data.

  3. Direct observation of spin-resolved full and empty electron states in ferromagnetic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Berti, G. Calloni, A.; Brambilla, A.; Bussetti, G.; Duò, L.; Ciccacci, F.

    2014-07-15

    We present a versatile apparatus for the study of ferromagnetic surfaces, which combines spin-polarized photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopies. Samples can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy and analyzed in situ. Spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy analysis is done with a hemispherical electron analyzer coupled to a 25 kV-Mott detector. Inverse photoemission spectroscopy experiments are performed with GaAs crystals as spin-polarized electron sources and a UV bandpass photon detector. As an example, measurements on the oxygen passivated Fe(100)-p(1×1)O surface are presented.

  4. Effects of Tilt Angle, DNA Concentration, and Surface Potential on Directed Alignment of DNA Molecule for the Application to Nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Jin; Hong, Byungyou

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports an efficient approach to control both the density and direction of highly aligned DNA molecules and thus DNA-templated gold nanowires (AuNWs) on Si chips. We utilized tilting method to prepare stretched DNA structures on SiO2/Si substrate and found important parameters in the alignment process that tilt angle, DNA concentration, and surface potential are controlled the density and structure of DNA aligned on the surface. In additional, we also can be directly connected DNA-templated AuNWs between two terminal electrodes on Si chips. This method also describes a simple way to form singled, bundled and networked DNA arrays on Si substrates.

  5. Direct writing of continuous and discontinuous sub-wavelength periodic surface structures on single-crystalline silicon using femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kuladeep, Rajamudili; Sahoo, Chakradhar; Narayana Rao, Desai E-mail: dnr-laserlab@yahoo.com

    2014-06-02

    Laser-induced ripples or uniform arrays of continuous near sub-wavelength or discontinuous deep sub-wavelength structures are formed on single-crystalline silicon (Si) by femtosecond (fs) laser direct writing technique. Laser irradiation was performed on Si wafers at normal incidence in air and by immersing them in dimethyl sulfoxide using linearly polarized Ti:sapphire fs laser pulses of ∼110 fs pulse duration and ∼800 nm wavelength. Morphology studies of laser written surfaces reveal that sub-wavelength features are oriented perpendicular to laser polarization, while their morphology and spatial periodicity depend on the surrounding dielectric medium. The formation mechanism of the sub-wavelength features is explained by interference of incident laser with surface plasmon polaritons. This work proves the feasibility of fs laser direct writing technique for the fabrication of sub-wavelength features, which could help in fabrication of advanced electro-optic devices.

  6. Stimulated Raman signals at conical intersections: Ab initio surface hopping simulation protocol with direct propagation of the nuclear wave function.

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, Markus; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-07-28

    Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy (FSRS) signals that monitor the excited state conical intersections dynamics of acrolein are simulated. An effective time dependent Hamiltonian for two C-H vibrational marker bands is constructed on the fly using a local mode expansion combined with a semi-classical surface hopping simulation protocol. The signals are obtained by a direct forward and backward propagation of the vibrational wave function on a numerical grid. Earlier work is extended to fully incorporate the anharmonicities and intermode couplings.

  7. Stimulated Raman signals at conical intersections: Ab initio surface hopping simulation protocol with direct propagation of the nuclear wave function

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalewski, Markus Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-07-28

    Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy (FSRS) signals that monitor the excited state conical intersections dynamics of acrolein are simulated. An effective time dependent Hamiltonian for two C—H vibrational marker bands is constructed on the fly using a local mode expansion combined with a semi-classical surface hopping simulation protocol. The signals are obtained by a direct forward and backward propagation of the vibrational wave function on a numerical grid. Earlier work is extended to fully incorporate the anharmonicities and intermode couplings.

  8. Submicron-scale surface architecture of tricalcium phosphate directs osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Davison, N L; Luo, X; Schoenmaker, T; Everts, V; Yuan, H; Barrère-de Groot, F; de Bruijn, J D

    2014-04-15

    A current challenge of synthetic bone graft substitute design is to induce bone formation at a similar rate to its biological resorption, matching bone's intrinsic osteoinductivity and capacity for remodelling. We hypothesise that both osteoinduction and resorption can be achieved by altering surface microstructure of beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP). To test this, two TCP ceramics are engineered with equivalent chemistry and macrostructure but with either submicron- or micron-scale surface architecture. In vitro, submicron-scale surface architecture differentiates larger, more active osteoclasts--a cell type shown to be important for both TCP resorption and osteogenesis--and enhances their secretion of osteogenic factors to induce osteoblast differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. In an intramuscular model, submicrostructured TCP forms 20 % bone in the free space, is resorbed by 24 %, and is densely populated by multinucleated osteoclast-like cells after 12 weeks; however, TCP with micron-scale surface architecture forms no bone, is essentially not resorbed, and contains scarce osteoclast-like cells. Thus, a novel submicron-structured TCP induces substantial bone formation and is resorbed at an equivalent rate, potentially through the control of osteoclast-like cells.

  9. Direct electrical control of IgG conformation and functional activity at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, Paola; Caiazzo, Marialuisa; Alessandrini, Andrea; Eggenhöffner, Roberto; Vassalli, Massimo; Facci, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    We have devised a supramolecular edifice involving His-tagged protein A and antibodies to yield surface immobilized, uniformly oriented, IgG-type, antibody layers with Fab fragments exposed off an electrode surface. We demonstrate here that we can affect the conformation of IgGs, likely pushing/pulling electrostatically Fab fragments towards/from the electrode surface. A potential difference between electrode and solution acts on IgGs’ charged aminoacids modulating the accessibility of the specific recognition regions of Fab fragments by antigens in solution. Consequently, antibody-antigen affinity is affected by the sign of the applied potential: a positive potential enables an effective capture of antigens; a negative one pulls the fragments towards the electrode, where steric hindrance caused by neighboring molecules largely hampers the capture of antigens. Different experimental techniques (electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, fluorescence confocal microscopy and electrochemical atomic force spectroscopy) were used to evaluate binding kinetics, surface coverage, effect of the applied electric field on IgGs, and role of charged residues on the phenomenon described. These findings expand the concept of electrical control of biological reactions and can be used to gate electrically specific recognition reactions with impact in biosensors, bioactuators, smart biodevices, nanomedicine, and fundamental studies related to chemical reaction kinetics.

  10. Air-directed attachment of coccoid bacteria to the surface of superhydrophobic lotus-like titanium.

    PubMed

    Truong, V K; Webb, H K; Fadeeva, E; Chichkov, B N; Wu, A H F; Lamb, R; Wang, J Y; Crawford, R J; Ivanova, E P

    2012-01-01

    Superhydrophobic titanium surfaces fabricated by femtosecond laser ablation to mimic the structure of lotus leaves were assessed for their ability to retain coccoid bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus CIP 65.8T, S. aureus ATCC 25923, S. epidermidis ATCC 14990T and Planococcus maritimus KMM 3738 were retained by the surface, to varying degrees. However, each strain was found to preferentially attach to the crevices located between the microscale surface features. The upper regions of the microscale features remained essentially cell-free. It was hypothesised that air entrapped by the topographical features inhibited contact between the cells and the titanium substratum. Synchrotron SAXS revealed that even after immersion for 50 min, nano-sized air bubbles covered 45% of the titanium surface. After 1 h the number of cells of S. aureus CIP 65.8T attached to the lotus-like titanium increased to 1.27×10(5) mm(-2), coinciding with the replacement of trapped air by the incubation medium.

  11. Direct electrical control of IgG conformation and functional activity at surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ghisellini, Paola; Caiazzo, Marialuisa; Alessandrini, Andrea; Eggenhöffner, Roberto; Vassalli, Massimo; Facci, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We have devised a supramolecular edifice involving His-tagged protein A and antibodies to yield surface immobilized, uniformly oriented, IgG-type, antibody layers with Fab fragments exposed off an electrode surface. We demonstrate here that we can affect the conformation of IgGs, likely pushing/pulling electrostatically Fab fragments towards/from the electrode surface. A potential difference between electrode and solution acts on IgGs’ charged aminoacids modulating the accessibility of the specific recognition regions of Fab fragments by antigens in solution. Consequently, antibody-antigen affinity is affected by the sign of the applied potential: a positive potential enables an effective capture of antigens; a negative one pulls the fragments towards the electrode, where steric hindrance caused by neighboring molecules largely hampers the capture of antigens. Different experimental techniques (electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, fluorescence confocal microscopy and electrochemical atomic force spectroscopy) were used to evaluate binding kinetics, surface coverage, effect of the applied electric field on IgGs, and role of charged residues on the phenomenon described. These findings expand the concept of electrical control of biological reactions and can be used to gate electrically specific recognition reactions with impact in biosensors, bioactuators, smart biodevices, nanomedicine, and fundamental studies related to chemical reaction kinetics. PMID:27883075

  12. Direct and indirect effects of predation, herbivory and surface rugosity on mussel recruitment.

    PubMed

    Petraitis, Peter S

    1990-06-01

    The predatory gastropod Nucella lapillus, commonly preys upon the mussel, Mytilus edulis, and is thought to control the distribution and abundance of mussels on the rocky shores of New England, USA. In this study, done in Maine, USA, not only the presence of Nucella lapillus but also the roughness of the experimental surface and the presence of the herbivorous gastropod, Littorina littorea, were manipulated. Four types of surfaces were used as recruitment substrata for mussels: smooth bare granite, aggregations of the barnacle, Semibalanus balanoides, fiberglass resin castings of smooth bare granite and resin castings of aggregations of S. balanoides. To ensure that caged N. lapillus were not starving, barnacles were provided as alternative prey. Experiments showed no detectable effect of N. lapillus on the recruitment of M. edulis. Mussel recruitment was enhanced by surface rugosity and depressed by the activities of L. littorea. Analysis of covariance, using the number of algal species as the covariate, suggested that L. littorea reduced the number of newlyrecruited mussels by removing algae that provided recruitment sites, but no manipulations were done to test this conjecture. It is likely that previous reports of N. lapillus controlling mussel abundance are attributable to N. lapillus preying upon barnacles, which increase surface rugosity and enhance mussel recruitment. Review of literature on feeding preferences of N. lapillus supports this view. When handling times and prey availability are taken into account, Nucella shows a clear preference for barnacles over mussels.

  13. Directional Thermal Emission and Absorption from Surface Microstructures in Metalized Plastics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    spatial coherence of the thermal excitation, was proposed in which a grating coupler was ruled onto the surface of a slightly lossy dielectric waveguide...for 10 minutes in acetone and returned to the spinner for a defilming cleaning. A buffered oxide etch was not used, and the passivation oxide layer

  14. Modeling of Wind Direction Signals in Polarimetric Sea Surface Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, S. H.

    1995-01-01

    Sea surface brightness temperatures are the radiometric power measure of blackbody radiation from sea water. This radiation is the electromagnetic waves excited by the random thermal motion of charged particles in the sea water. The energy transmitted through the air- water interface produces a scattering of electromagnetic waves into the atmosphere. Polarimetric microwave emissions are investigated.

  15. Directed self-assembly of nematic liquid crystals on chemically patterned surfaces: morphological states and transitions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Armas-Perez, Julio C; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose A; Liu, Xiaoying; Xie, Helou; Bishop, Camille; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan P; Zhang, Rui; de Pablo, Juan J; Nealey, Paul F

    2016-10-19

    The morphology and through-film optical properties of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) confined between two surfaces may be engineered to create switches that respond to external electric fields, thereby enabling applications in optoelectronics that require fast responses and low power. Interfacial properties between the confining surfaces and the LC play a central role in device design and performance. Here we investigate the morphology of LCs confined in hybrid cells with a top surface that exhibits uniform homeotropic anchoring and a bottom surface that is chemically patterned with sub-micron and micron- wide planar anchoring stripes in a background of homeotropic anchoring. In a departure from past work, we first investigate isolated stripes, as opposed to dense periodic arrays of stripes, thereby allowing for an in-depth interpretation of the effects of patterning on LC morphology. We observe three LC morphologies and sharp transitions between them as a function of stripe width in the submicron and micron regimes. Numerical simulations and theory help explain the roles of anchoring energy, elastic deformation, entropy, pattern geometry, and coherence length of the LC in the experimentally observed behavior. The knowledge and models developed from an analysis of results generated on isolated features are then used to design dense patterned substrates for high-contrast and efficient orientational switching of LCs in response to applied fields.

  16. Direct probing of the surface ultrastructure and molecular interactions of dormant and germinating spores of Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Dufrêne, Y F; Boonaert, C J; Gerin, P A; Asther, M; Rouxhet, P G

    1999-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to probe, under physiological conditions, the surface ultrastructure and molecular interactions of spores of the filamentous fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. High-resolution images revealed that the surface of dormant spores was uniformly covered with rodlets having a periodicity of 10 +/- 1 nm, which is in agreement with earlier freeze-etching measurements. In contrast, germinating spores had a very smooth surface partially covered with rough granular structures. Force-distance curve measurements demonstrated that the changes in spore surface ultrastructure during germination are correlated with profound modifications of molecular interactions: while dormant spores showed no adhesion with the AFM probe, germinating spores exhibited strong adhesion forces, of 9 +/- 2 nN magnitude. These forces are attributed to polysaccharide binding and suggested to be responsible for spore aggregation. This study represents the first direct characterization of the surface ultrastructure and molecular interactions of living fungal spores at the nanometer scale and offers new prospects for mapping microbial cell surface properties under native conditions.

  17. Direct surface analysis of pesticides on soil, leaves, grass, and stainless steel by static secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, J.C.; Groenewold, G.S.; Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E.; Olson, J.E.; Miller, D.L.

    1997-02-01

    Direct surface analyses by static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were performed for the following pesticides adsorbed on dandelion leaves, grass, soil, and stainless steel samples: alachlor, atrazine, captan, carbofuran, chlorpyrifos, chlorosulfuron, chlorthal-dimethyl, cypermethrin, 2,4-D, diuron, glyphosate, malathion, methomyl, methyl arsonic acid, mocap, norflurazon, oxyfluorfen, paraquat, temik, and trifluralin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate static SIMS as a tool for pesticide analysis, principally for use in screening samples for pesticides. The advantage of direct surface analysis compared with conventional pesticide analysis methods is the elimination of sample pretreatment including extraction, which streamlines the analysis substantially; total analysis time for SIMS analysis was ca. 10 min/sample. Detection of 16 of the 20 pesticides on all four substrates was achieved. Of the remaining four pesticides, only one (trifluralin) was not detected on any of the samples. The minimum detectable quantity was determined for paraquat on soil in order to evaluate the efficacy of using SIMS as a screening tool. Paraquat was detected at 3 pg/mm{sup 2} (c.a. 0.005 monolayers). The results of these studies suggest that SIMS is capable of direct surface detection of a range of pesticides, with low volatility, polar pesticides being the most easily detected. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Early regenerative responses induced by monoclonal antibodies directed against a surface glycoprotein of goldfish retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, M; Eshhar, N

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed primarily against antigenic determinants associated with the goldfish optic nerve were prepared and characterized. One selected clone 23-4-C(IgG2a), detected antigenic determinants of glycoprotein nature with an apparent mol. wt. of 140 000. Following injury the level of these molecules increased with a peak at 5-7 days after the lesion (2- to 3-fold higher than the basal level). The results strongly suggest that the increase derives, at least partially, from a real increment in the level of these molecules in the retinal ganglion cells rather than from changes in accessibility. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that the retinal ganglion cells carry the antigenicity. Intraocular injection of the monoclonal antibodies, concomitantly with crush injury, resulted in an earlier and higher regenerative response, reflected by sprouting capacity, protein synthesis and accumulation of radiolabeled material in the tectum contralateral to the side of injury. This may indicate that the antibodies directly activate retinal cells via interaction with surface molecules. Alternatively, the antibodies may be directed against surface molecules which are associated with axonal growth inhibitors, and may therefore mask these surface antigens from further interaction with their native substrate. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:6204857

  19. Implementation and use of direct-flow connections in a coupled ground-water and surface-water model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric D.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's MODFLOW finite-difference ground-water flow model has been coupled with three surface-water packages - the MODBRANCH, River, and Stream packages - to simulate surface water and its interaction with ground water. Prior to the development of the coupling packages, the only interaction between these modeling packages was that leakage values could be passed between MODFLOW and the three surface-water packages. To facilitate wider and more flexible uses of the models, a computer program was developed and added to MODFLOW to allow direct flows or stages to be passed between any of the packages and MODFLOW. The flows or stages calculated in one package can be set as boundary discharges or stages to be used in another package. Several modeling packages can be used in the same simulation depending upon the level of sophistication needed in the various reaches being modeled. This computer program is especially useful when any of the River, Stream, or MODBRANCH packages are used to model a river flowing directly into or out of wetlands in direct connection with the aquifer and represented in the model as an aquifer block. A field case study is shown to illustrate an application.

  20. Directly drawn poly(3-hexylthiophene) field-effect transistors by electrohydrodynamic jet printing: improving performance with surface modification.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yong Jin; Lee, Hyungdong; Lee, Byoung-Sun; Park, Seonuk; Yudistira, Hadi Teguh; Choong, Chwee-Lin; Park, Jong-Jin; Park, Chan Eon; Byun, Doyoung

    2014-07-09

    In this study, direct micropatterning lines of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) without any polymer binder were prepared by electrohydrodynamic jet printing to form organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). We controlled the dielectric surface by introducing self-assembled monolayers and polymer thin films to investigate the effect of surface modifications on the characteristics of printed P3HT lines and electrical performances of the OFETs. The morphology of the printed P3HT lines depended on the surface energy and type of substrate. The resulting OFETs exhibited high performance on octadecyltrichlorosilane-modified substrates, which was comparable to that of other printed P3HT OFETs. In order to realize the commercialization of the OFETs, we also fabricated a large-area transistor array, including 100 OFETs and low-operating-voltage flexible OFETs.

  1. Surface plasmon excitations in metal spheres: Direct comparison of light scattering and electron energy-loss spectroscopy by modal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Sean M.; Midgley, Paul A.

    2013-06-01

    In previous publications, qualitative agreement between studies of surface plasmon excitations in nanoparticles by near-field light scattering and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) has been found for experiments and simulations. Here, we present a quantitative method for the comparison of light scattering and EELS for surface plasmons in metal spheres. Defining the Fourier transform of the modal component of the scattered electric field along the equivalent electron trajectory enables a direct evaluation of the relative weighting factor for light- and electron-excited surface plasmon modes. This common quantity for light scattering and EELS is examined for size, composition, and trajectory dependencies, facilitating the analysis of key differences between light and electron excitation. A single functional dependence on Drude model plasmon energies is identified to explain the relative modal weighting factors for light scattering and EELS. This method represents an important step toward the complete spectral and spatial reconstruction of EELS maps from near-field light scattering calculations.

  2. Flight paths of seabirds soaring over the ocean surface enable measurement of fine-scale wind speed and direction.

    PubMed

    Yonehara, Yoshinari; Goto, Yusuke; Yoda, Ken; Watanuki, Yutaka; Young, Lindsay C; Weimerskirch, Henri; Bost, Charles-André; Sato, Katsufumi

    2016-08-09

    Ocean surface winds are an essential factor in understanding the physical interactions between the atmosphere and the ocean. Surface winds measured by satellite scatterometers and buoys cover most of the global ocean; however, there are still spatial and temporal gaps and finer-scale variations of wind that may be overlooked, particularly in coastal areas. Here, we show that flight paths of soaring seabirds can be used to estimate fine-scale (every 5 min, ∼5 km) ocean surface winds. Fine-scale global positioning system (GPS) positional data revealed that soaring seabirds flew tortuously and ground speed fluctuated presumably due to tail winds and head winds. Taking advantage of the ground speed difference in relation to flight direction, we reliably estimated wind speed and direction experienced by the birds. These bird-based wind velocities were significantly correlated with wind velocities estimated by satellite-borne scatterometers. Furthermore, extensive travel distances and flight duration of the seabirds enabled a wide range of high-resolution wind observations, especially in coastal areas. Our study suggests that seabirds provide a platform from which to measure ocean surface winds, potentially complementing conventional wind measurements by covering spatial and temporal measurement gaps.

  3. Flight paths of seabirds soaring over the ocean surface enable measurement of fine-scale wind speed and direction

    PubMed Central

    Yonehara, Yoshinari; Goto, Yusuke; Yoda, Ken; Watanuki, Yutaka; Young, Lindsay C.; Weimerskirch, Henri; Bost, Charles-André; Sato, Katsufumi

    2016-01-01

    Ocean surface winds are an essential factor in understanding the physical interactions between the atmosphere and the ocean. Surface winds measured by satellite scatterometers and buoys cover most of the global ocean; however, there are still spatial and temporal gaps and finer-scale variations of wind that may be overlooked, particularly in coastal areas. Here, we show that flight paths of soaring seabirds can be used to estimate fine-scale (every 5 min, ∼5 km) ocean surface winds. Fine-scale global positioning system (GPS) positional data revealed that soaring seabirds flew tortuously and ground speed fluctuated presumably due to tail winds and head winds. Taking advantage of the ground speed difference in relation to flight direction, we reliably estimated wind speed and direction experienced by the birds. These bird-based wind velocities were significantly correlated with wind velocities estimated by satellite-borne scatterometers. Furthermore, extensive travel distances and flight duration of the seabirds enabled a wide range of high-resolution wind observations, especially in coastal areas. Our study suggests that seabirds provide a platform from which to measure ocean surface winds, potentially complementing conventional wind measurements by covering spatial and temporal measurement gaps. PMID:27457932

  4. Surface-Directed Assembly of Sequence-Defined Synthetic Polymers into Networks of Hexagonally Patterned Nanoribbons with Controlled Functionalities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Long; Zuckermann, Ronald N; DeYoreo, James J

    2016-05-24

    The exquisite self-assembly of proteins and peptides in nature into highly ordered functional materials has inspired innovative approaches to the design and synthesis of biomimetic materials. While sequence-defined polymers hold great promise to mimic proteins and peptides for functions, controlled assembly of them on surfaces still remains underdeveloped. Here, we report the assembly of 12-mer peptoids containing alternating acidic and aromatic monomers into networks of hexagonally patterned nanoribbons on mica surfaces. Ca(2+)-carboxylate coordination creates peptoid-peptoid and peptoid-mica interactions that control self-assembly. In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that peptoids first assemble into discrete nanoparticles; these particles then transform into hexagonally patterned nanoribbons on mica surfaces. AFM-based dynamic force spectroscopy studies show that peptoid-mica interactions are much stronger than peptoid-peptoid interactions, illuminating the driving forces for mica-directed peptoid assembly. We further demonstrate the display of functional domains at the N-terminus of assembling peptoids to produce extended networks with similar hierarchical structures. This research demonstrates that surface-directed peptoid assembly can be used as a robust platform to develop biomimetic coating materials for applications.

  5. Signal enhancement of surface plasmon-coupled directional emission by a conical mirror.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek S; Kostov, Yordan; Rao, Govind

    2008-10-01

    A simple strategy for increasing the collection efficiency of surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) is demonstrated. SPCE is a near-field phenomenon occurring when excited fluorophores are in close proximity to a subwavelength metal film. The energy of the fluorophores induces surface plasmons that radiate the coupled energy at highly specific angles. In an attempt to maximize the collected emission, a conical mirror was placed around the coupling prism. The result was a nearly 500 fold enhancement over the free space signal as detected from a single point from a poly(vinyl alcohol) layer doped with ruthenium. Coupling this large enhancement with LED excitation could lead to the development of inexpensive, handheld fluorescent devices with high sensitivity.

  6. Surface acoustic wave amplification by direct current-voltage supplied to graphene film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insepov, Z.; Emelin, E.; Kononenko, O.; Roshchupkin, D. V.; Tnyshtykbayev, K. B.; Baigarin, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    Using a high-resolution X-Ray diffraction measurement method, the surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of a Ca3TaGa3Si2O14 (CTGS) piezoelectric crystal was investigated, where an external current was driven across the graphene film. Here, we show that the application of the DC field leads to a significant enhancement of the SAW magnitude and, as a result, to amplification of the diffraction satellites. Amplification of 33.2 dB/cm for the satellite +1, and of 13.8 dB/cm for the satellite +2, at 471 MHz has been observed where the external DC voltage of +10 V was applied. Amplification of SAW occurs above a DC field much smaller than that of a system using bulk semiconductor. Theoretical estimates are in reasonable agreement with our measurements and analysis of experimental data for other materials.

  7. Enhancement of dynamic wetting properties by direct fabrication on robust micro-micro hierarchical polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Donghui; Nemoto, Akihiko; Ito, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    Understanding evaporation phenomena on hierarchical surfaces is of crucial importance for the design of robust superhydrophobic polymer structures for various applications. This fabrication method enables precise control of the dimensions to elucidate the dynamic wetting behavior affected by geometric parameters. That behavior exhibits three distinct evaporation modes: a constant contact line (CCL), a constant contact angle (CCA), and mixed mode during the droplet evaporation. The droplet evaporation results show that the sticky CCL mode and the Cassie-Wenzel transition can be prevented by engineering hierarchy integration. Moreover, the CCL-CCA transition point time scale exhibits remarkable dependence on surface dimensions such as the area fraction and solid-liquid contact line. Finally, the fabricated hierarchical structures indicate remarkable superhydrophobic properties, static contact angle above 160° and low sliding angle under 10°, with good durability in terms of aging effect and mechanical robustness for 2 months.

  8. Atmospheric Pressure Surface Sampling/Ionization Techniques for Direct Coupling of Planar Separations with Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pasilis, Sofie P; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2010-01-01

    Planar separations, which include thin layer chromatography and gel electrophoresis, are in widespread use as important and powerful tools for conducting separations of complex mixtures. To increase the utility of planar separations, new methods are needed that allow in-situ characterization of the individual components of the separated mixtures. A large number of atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques for use with mass spectrometry have emerged in the past several years, and several have been investigated as a means for mass spectrometric read-out of planar separations. In this article, we review the atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques that have been used for the read-out of planar separation media. For each technique, we briefly explain the operational basics and discuss the analyte type for which it is appropriate and some specific applications from the literature.

  9. High sensitivity of diamond resonant microcantilevers for direct detection in liquids as probed by molecular electrostatic surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Bongrain, Alexandre; Agnès, Charles; Rousseau, Lionel; Scorsone, Emmanuel; Arnault, Jean-Charles; Ruffinatto, Sébastien; Omnès, Franck; Mailley, Pascal; Lissorgues, Gaëlle; Bergonzo, Philippe

    2011-10-04

    millinewtons/meter, thus opening the way for diamond microcantilevers to direct sensing applications in liquids. The evolution of the diamond surface chemistry was also investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  10. Site Directed Nucleation and Growth of Ceramic Films on Metallic Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-30

    specific and occurs in three crystal types: aragonite, calcite , and vaterite; molluscan shells are composed generally of calcite and aragonite as... calcite (on the periostracal sheet at the growing margin), foliated (lath-like) calcite (on the internal surfaces of the shell), and myostracal...prismatic aragonite (site of adductor muscle attachment to shell). Prismatic calcite is the crystal form associated with the periostracum, while the

  11. Surface characterization of acidic ceria-zirconia prepared by direct sulfation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azambre, B.; Zenboury, L.; Weber, J. V.; Burg, P.

    2010-05-01

    Acidic ceria-zirconia (SCZ) solid acid catalysts with a nominal surface density of ca 2 SO 42-/nm 2 were prepared by a simple route consisting in soaking high specific surface area Ce xZr 1- xO 2 (with x = 0.21 and 0.69) mixed oxides solutions in 0.5 M sulphuric acid. Characterizations by TPD-MS, TP-DRIFTS and FT-Raman revealed that most of surface structures generated by sulfation are stable at least up to 700 °C under inert atmosphere and consist mainly as isolated sulfates located on defects or crystal planes and to a lesser extent as polysulfates. Investigations by pyridine adsorption/desorption have stated that: SCZ possess both strong Brønsted (B) and Lewis (L) acid sites, some of them being presumably superacidic; the B/L site ratio was found to be more dependent on the temperature and hydration degree than on the composition of the ceria-zirconia. By contrast, the reactivity of the parent Ce xZr 1- xO 2 materials towards pyridine is mostly driven by redox properties resulting in the formation of Py-oxide with the participation of Lewis acid sites of moderate strength ( cus Ce x+ and Zr x+ cations). Basicity studies by CO 2 adsorption/desorption reveal that SCZ surfaces are solely acidic whereas the number and strength of Lewis basic sites increases with the Ce content for the parent Ce xZr 1- xO 2 materials.

  12. Isolation of recombinant antibodies directed against surface proteins of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Shirvan, Ali Nazari; Aitken, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile has emerged as an increasingly important nosocomial pathogen and the prime causative agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis in humans. In addition to toxins A and B, immunological studies using antisera from patients infected with C. difficile have shown that a number of other bacterial factors contribute to the pathogenesis, including surface proteins, which are responsible for adhesion, motility and other interactions with the human host. In this study, various clostridial targets, including FliC, FliD and cell wall protein 66, were expressed and purified. Phage antibody display yielded a large panel of specific recombinant antibodies, which were expressed, purified and characterised. Reactions of the recombinant antibodies with their targets were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; and Western blotting suggested that linear rather than conformational epitopes were recognised. Binding of the recombinant antibodies to surface-layer proteins and their components showed strain specificity, with good recognition of proteins from C. difficile 630. However, no reaction was observed for strain R20291-a representative of the 027 ribotype. Binding of the recombinant antibodies to C. difficile M120 extracts indicated that a component of a surface-layer protein of this strain might possess immunoglobulin-binding activities. The recombinant antibodies against FliC and FliD proteins were able to inhibit bacterial motility.

  13. Evanescent wave and video microscopy methods for directly measuring interactions between surface-immobilized biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, William Neil

    Spatial and temporal tracking of passively diffusing functionalized colloids continues to be an improving and auspicious approach to measuring weak specific and non-specific biomolecular interactions. Evidence of this is given by the recent increase in published studies involving the development and implementation of these methods. The primary aim of the work presented in this dissertation was to modify and optimize video microscopy (VM) and total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) methods to permit the collection of equilibrium binding and sampling data from interaction of surface-immobilized biomolecules. Supported lipid bilayers were utilized as model systems for functionalizing colloid and wall surfaces. Preliminary results measuring calcium-specific protein-protein interactions between surface immobilized cadherin fragments demonstrate the potential utility of this experimental system and these methods. Additionally, quantum dot-modified colloids were synthesized and evanescent wave-excited luminescence from these particles was used to construct potential energy profiles. Results from this work demonstrate that colloids can be used as ultra-sensitive probes of equilibrium interactions between biomolecules, and specialized probes, such as those modified with quantum dots, could be used in a spectral multiplexing mode to simultaneously monitor multiple interactions.

  14. Directed Self-assembly of Nanoparticles at the Polymer Surface by Highly Compressible Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    M Asada; P Gin; M Endoh; S Satija; T Taniguchi; T Koga

    2011-12-31

    We report a versatile route for self-assembly of polymer-soluble nanoparticles at the polymer surface using highly compressible supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}). Polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)-based nanocomposite thin films with functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane and phenyl C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester nanoparticles were prepared on Si substrates and exposed to scCO{sub 2} at different pressures under the isothermal condition of 36 C. The resultant structures could be then preserved by the vitrification process of the glassy polymers via quick pressure quench to atmospheric pressure and subsequently characterized by using various surface sensitive experimental techniques in air. We found that the surface segregation of these nanoparticles is induced in the close vicinity of P = 8.2 MPa where the excess absorption of the fluid into the polymers maximizes. However, when the film thickness becomes less than about 4R{sub g} thick (where R{sub g} is the radius of polymer gyration), the uniform dispersion of the nanoparticles is favorable instead even at the same CO{sub 2} conditions. We clarify that the phase transition is correlated with the emergence of a concentration gradient of the fluid at the polymer/CO{sub 2} interface and is a general phenomenon for different polymer-nanoparticle interactions.

  15. Tangible display systems: direct interfaces for computer-based studies of surface appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Benjamin A.; Ferwerda, James A.

    2010-02-01

    When evaluating the surface appearance of real objects, observers engage in complex behaviors involving active manipulation and dynamic viewpoint changes that allow them to observe the changing patterns of surface reflections. We are developing a class of tangible display systems to provide these natural modes of interaction in computer-based studies of material perception. A first-generation tangible display was created from an off-the-shelf laptop computer containing an accelerometer and webcam as standard components. Using these devices, custom software estimated the orientation of the display and the user's viewing position. This information was integrated with a 3D rendering module so that rotating the display or moving in front of the screen would produce realistic changes in the appearance of virtual objects. In this paper, we consider the design of a second-generation system to improve the fidelity of the virtual surfaces rendered to the screen. With a high-quality display screen and enhanced tracking and rendering capabilities, a secondgeneration system will be better able to support a range of appearance perception applications.

  16. Direct Imaging of DNA/Lipid Complexes Interacting with Liposome Surfaces and Fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Alison J.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.; Rädler, Joachim; George, Cyril X.; Safinya, Cyrus R.; Samuel, Charles E.

    1996-03-01

    Video-enhanced light microscopy techniques (phase contrast, differential interference contrast, and fluorescence) were used for direct imaging of the structure and dynamics of nucleic acid-cationic liposome complexes both on liposomes (a model cell) and within the cytoplasm of Mouse L929 Fibroblasts. The experiments are designed to enable us to correlate the complex's structure to the transfection efficiencies (i.e. the uptake and expression of nucleic acid) in animal cells. The ultimate goal of the project is to design an optimal non-viral vector (carrier of nucleic acids). Fluorescence labeling of both the lipid and nucleic acid components is used for visualization experiments at the level of single complexes interacting with a single cell (e.g. a giant liposome or an isolated mammalian cell). This allows us to follow the temporal path of a complex. Direct motion versus random Brownian diffusion are readily distinguished. Micropipettes were used for placement of cells and microinjection into cells.

  17. Metal delocalization and surface decoration in direct-write nanolithography by electron beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Vidyut; Stach, Eric A.; Radmilovic, Velimir R.; Mowat, Ian A.

    2004-07-01

    The ability to interconnect different nanostructures is crucial to nanocircuit fabrication efforts. A simple and versatile direct-write nanolithography technique for the fabrication of interconnects is presented. Decomposition of a metalorganic precursor gas by a focused electron beam resulted in the deposition of conductive platinum nanowires. The combination of in situ secondary electron imaging with deposition allows for the simultaneous identification and interconnection of nanoscale components. However, the deposition was not entirely localized to the electron beam raster area, as shown by secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements. The electrical impact of the metallic spread was quantified by measuring the leakage current between closely spaced wires. The origins of the spread and strategies for minimizing it are discussed. These results indicate that, while this direct-write methodology is a convenient one for rapid prototyping of nanocircuits, caution must be used to avoid unwanted decoration of nanostructures by metallic species.

  18. Metal delocalization and surface decoration in direct-write nanolithography by electron beam induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Vidyut; Stach, Eric A.; Radmilovic, Velimir R.; Mowat, Ian A.

    2004-07-05

    The ability to interconnect different nanostructures is crucial to nanocircuit fabrication efforts. A simple and versatile direct-write nanolithography technique for the fabrication of interconnects is presented. Decomposition of a metalorganic precursor gas by a focused electron beam resulted in the deposition of conductive platinum nanowires. The combination of in situ secondary electron imaging with deposition allows for the simultaneous identification and interconnection of nanoscale components. However, the deposition was not entirely localized to the electron beam raster area, as shown by secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements. The electrical impact of the metallic spread was quantified by measuring the leakage current between closely spaced wires. The origins of the spread and strategies for minimizing it are discussed. These results indicate that, while this direct-write methodology is a convenient one for rapid prototyping of nanocircuits, caution must be used to avoid unwanted decoration of nanostructures by metallic species.

  19. Directionality and maneuvering effects on a surface ship underwater acoustic signature.

    PubMed

    Trevorrow, Mark V; Vasiliev, Boris; Vagle, Svein

    2008-08-01

    This work examines underwater source spectra of a small (560 tons, 40 m length), single-screw oceanographic vessel, focusing on directionality and effects of maneuvers. The measurements utilized a set of four, self-contained buoys with GPS positioning, each recording two calibrated hydrophones with effective acoustic bandwidth from 150 Hz to 5 kHz. In straight, constant-speed runs at speeds up to 6.2 m s(-1), the ship source spectra showed spectral levels in reasonable agreement with reference spectra. The broadband source level was observed to increase as approximately speed to the fourth power over the range of 2.6-6.1 m s(-1), partially biased at low speeds by nonpropulsion machinery signals. Source directionality patterns were extracted from variations in source spectra while the ship transited past the buoy field. The observed spectral source levels exhibited a broadside maximum, with bow and stern aspect reduced by approximately 12-9 dB, respectively, independent of frequency. An empirical model is proposed assuming that spectral source levels exhibit simultaneous variations in aspect angle, speed, and turn rate. After correction for source directionality and speed during turning maneuvers, an excess of up to 18 dB in one-third octave source levels was observed.

  20. Sub-Surface Microwave Imaging Using Four-Slot Vivaldi Antenna with Improved Directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Zubair; Kumar, Pankaj; Akhtar, M. Jaleel

    2017-01-01

    The conventional tapered slot Vivaldi antenna is well known for its ultra-wide band characteristics with low directivity. To improve the directivity of the conventional Vivaldi antenna, a four-slot Vivaldi antenna (FSVA) is proposed here to operate in the frequency range of 2-11 GHz. For feeding the FSVA, a binomial three-section V-shaped even mode power divider with progressing T-junctions is also designed and tested here, which is then integrated with the antenna. The proposed antenna prototype is designed and fabricated on a 1-mm thick FR-4 substrate (ɛr=4.3, tanδ=0.025), and the return loss and radiation characteristics are investigated in the anechoic environment. The measured result shows a good agreement with the numerical simulation performed using the EM Simulator i. e. CST MWS-2015. It is found that the directivity of FSVA is approximately doubled as compared to that of the conventional Vivaldi antenna having the same dimensions. From the application point of view, the fabricated antenna is used to image various metallic objects hidden inside the sand using a vector network analyzer and associated RF components. The obtained 2D microwave images of the test media successfully show that the hidden objects can effectively be located and detected using the proposed FSVA in conjunction with a simple imaging scheme.

  1. Retrieval of the Near-Surface Wind Velocity and Direction: Scat-3 Orbit-Borne Scatterometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaev, V. Yu.; Panfilova, M. A.; Titchenko, Yu. A.; Meshkov, E. M.; Balandina, G. N.; Kuznetsov, Yu. V.; Shlaferov, A. L.

    2016-09-01

    The new concept proposed during the development of the first Russian orbit-borne scatterometer SCAT-3 requires an additional study for estimating its efficiency and comparison with the current scatterometer concepts. Using the fan antenna pattern (with angular dimensions 1° × 6°), we have reduced the antenna rotation speed by about a factor of three compared with the prototype (the "SeaWinds" scatterometer) and measured the backscattering cross section for each wind cell at the horizontal and vertical polarizations. The numerical model of the scatterometer was developed with allowance for the technical characteristics of the radar, orbital parameters, and observation scheme. The scatterometer operation is simulated with the subsequent swath formation and partitioning into the wind cells. It is shown that using the fan pattern in the scatterometer, one can improve the accuracy of the wind-direction r5etrieval in a wind cell due to employing the radiometric resolution in the processing algorithm. The main error in determining the wind direction is related to the ambiguity ±180°, which is caused by the type of the azimuthal dependence of the backscattering cross section. With the help of the two-dimensional median filtering, we can significantly reduce the wind-direction retrieval error. This error can probably be smaller than that for the current scatterometers.

  2. Fabrication of spatially periodic double roughness structures by directional viscous fingering and spinodal dewetting for water-repellent surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Akihiro; Ishihara, Tsukasa; Takeshige, Hikari; Asakura, Kouichi

    2008-01-31

    Water-repellent and self-cleaning properties of lotus leaves are considered to be due to its double roughness structure, protrusion structure (approximately 20 microm) and hairy structure (0.2-1.0 microm). In this study, attempts to fabricate a spatially periodic double roughness structure by two far-from-equilibrium self-organization phenomena, a directional viscous fingering and a spinodal dewetting, were made. A mixture of an octylsilyl titanium dioxide particle having an average diameter of 35 nm suspended in volatile silicone, decamethyl cyclopentasiloxane, and octyl p-methoxycinnamate was spread on a glass plate by dragging an applicator across the top. Formation of a stripe pattern parallel to the direction of dragging, called directional viscous fingering, was sometimes observed. Influences of spreading conditions on the pattern formation were analyzed. In addition, attempts were made to apply the stripe pattern formation to the preparation of a water repellent surface. We have succeeded in preparing a highly water-repellent surface by immersing a glass plate, on which a spatially periodic stripe pattern having a characteristic wavelength of 200-700 microm was formed, in water, after the completion of evaporation of decamethyl cyclopentasiloxane. In this case, dewetting patterns having a characteristic wavelength at around 5 microm were formed at the bottom part of the stripe patterns. Neither the surface on which only the mesoscopic spatially periodic stripe pattern was formed nor the one on which only the microscopic dewetting pattern was formed showed high water-repellent properties, indicating that the coexistence of the two different scales of patterns increased the water-repellent properties of the hydrophobic surface.

  3. Direct inversion of surface wave dispersion for three-dimensional shallow crustal structure based on ray tracing: methodology and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hongjian; Yao, Huajian; Zhang, Haijiang; Huang, Yu-Chih; van der Hilst, Robert D.

    2015-06-01

    We propose a method to invert surface wave dispersion data directly for 3-D variations of shear wave speed, that is, without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps, using frequency-dependent ray tracing and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic inversion. A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. This avoids the assumption of great-circle propagation that is used in most surface wave tomographic studies, but which is not appropriate in complex media. To simplify the problem we consider quasi-stratified media with smoothly varying seismic properties. We represent the 3-D shear wave speed model by means of 1-D profiles beneath grid points, which are determined from all dispersion data simultaneously using a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic method. The wavelet coefficients of the wave speed model are estimated with an iteratively reweighted least squares algorithm, and upon iteration the surface wave ray paths and the data sensitivity matrix are updated using the newly obtained wave speed model. To demonstrate its feasibility, we apply the method to determine the 3-D shallow crustal shear wave speed variations in the Taipei basin of Taiwan using short period interstation Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion measurements extracted from the ambient noise cross-correlation method. The results are consistent with previous studies and reveal strong shallow crustal heterogeneity that correlates with surface geology.

  4. An Artificial Turf-Based Surrogate Surface Collector for the Direct Measurement of Atmospheric Mercury Dry Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Naima L.; Dvonch, Joseph Timothy; Marsik, Frank J.; Barres, James A.; Landis, Matthew S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a new artificial turf surrogate surface (ATSS) sampler for use in the measurement of mercury (Hg) dry deposition. In contrast to many existing surrogate surface designs, the ATSS utilizes a three-dimensional deposition surface that may more closely mimic the physical structure of many natural surfaces than traditional flat surrogate surface designs (water, filter, greased Mylar film). The ATSS has been designed to overcome several complicating factors that can impact the integrity of samples with other direct measurement approaches by providing a passive system which can be deployed for both short and extended periods of time (days to weeks), and is not contaminated by precipitation and/or invalidated by strong winds. Performance characteristics including collocated precision, in-field procedural and laboratory blanks were evaluated. The results of these performance evaluations included a mean collocated precision of 9%, low blanks (0.8 ng), high extraction efficiency (97%–103%), and a quantitative matrix spike recovery (100%). PMID:28208603

  5. Simultaneous Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Optical Properties from Combined Airborne- and Ground-Based Direct and Diffuse Radiometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Dubovik, O.; King, M. D.; Sinyuk, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) and AERONET data). A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34-2.30 m) and angular range (180 ) of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a) the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b) the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c) Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d) the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  6. Direct On-Surface Patterning of a Crystalline Laminar Covalent Organic Framework Synthesized at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    de la Peña Ruigómez, Alejandro; Rodríguez-San-Miguel, David; Stylianou, Kyriakos C; Cavallini, Massimiliano; Gentili, Denis; Liscio, Fabiola; Milita, Silvia; Roscioni, Otello Maria; Ruiz-González, Maria Luisa; Carbonell, Carlos; Maspoch, Daniel; Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Segura, José Luis; Zamora, Félix

    2015-07-20

    We report herein an efficient, fast, and simple synthesis of an imine-based covalent organic framework (COF) at room temperature (hereafter, RT-COF-1). RT-COF-1 shows a layered hexagonal structure exhibiting channels, is robust, and is porous to N2 and CO2 . The room-temperature synthesis has enabled us to fabricate and position low-cost micro- and submicropatterns of RT-COF-1 on several surfaces, including solid SiO2 substrates and flexible acetate paper, by using lithographically controlled wetting and conventional ink-jet printing.

  7. Myosin binding surface on actin probed by hydroxyl radical footprinting and site-directed labels.

    PubMed

    Oztug Durer, Zeynep A; Kamal, J K Amisha; Benchaar, Sabrina; Chance, Mark R; Reisler, Emil

    2011-11-25

    Actin and myosin are the two main proteins required for cell motility and muscle contraction. The structure of their strongly bound complex-rigor state-is a key for delineating the functional mechanism of actomyosin motor. Current knowledge of that complex is based on models obtained from the docking of known atomic structures of actin and myosin subfragment 1 (S1; the head and neck region of myosin) into low-resolution electron microscopy electron density maps, which precludes atomic- or side-chain-level information. Here, we use radiolytic protein footprinting for global mapping of sites across the actin molecules that are impacted directly or allosterically by myosin binding to actin filaments. Fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and cysteine actin mutants are used for independent, residue-specific probing of S1 effects on two structural elements of actin. We identify actin residue candidates involved in S1 binding and provide experimental evidence to discriminate between the regions of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Focusing on the role of the DNase I binding loop (D-loop) and the W-loop residues of actin in their interactions with S1, we found that the emission properties of acrylodan and the mobility of electron paramagnetic resonance spin labels attached to cysteine mutants of these residues change strongly and in a residue-specific manner upon S1 binding, consistent with the recently proposed direct contacts of these loops with S1. As documented in this study, the direct and indirect changes on actin induced by myosin are more extensive than known until now and attest to the importance of actin dynamics to actomyosin function.

  8. Effects of piston surface treatments on performance and emissions of a methanol-fueled, direct injection, stratified charge engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, B.; Green, J. B.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of thermal barrier coatings and/or surface treatments on the performance and emissions of a methanol-fueled, direct-injection, stratified-charge (DISC) engine. A Ricardo Hydra Mark III engine was used for this work and in previous experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary focus of the study was to examine the effects of various piston insert surface treatments on hydrocarbon (HC) and oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) emissions. Previous studies have shown that engines of this class have a tendency to perform poorly at low loads and have high unburned fuel emissions. A blank aluminum piston was modified to employ removable piston bowl inserts. Four different inserts were tested in the experiment: aluminum, stainless steel with a 1.27-mm (0.050-in.) air gap (to act as a thermal barrier), and two stainless steel/air-gap inserts with coatings. Two stainless steel inserts were dimensionally modified to account for the coating thickness (1.27-mm) and coated identically with partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ). One of the coated inserts then had an additional seal-coat applied. The coated inserts were otherwise identical to the stainless steel/air-gap insert (i.e., they employed the same 1.27-mm air gap). Thermal barrier coatings were employed in an attempt to increase combustion chamber surface temperatures, thereby reducing wall quenching and promoting more complete combustion of the fuel in the quench zone. The seal-coat was applied to the zirconia to reduce the surface porosity; previous research suggested that despite the possibly higher surface temperatures obtainable with a ceramic coating, the high surface area of a plasma-sprayed coating may actually allow fuel to adhere to the surface and increase the unburned fuel emissions and fuel consumption.

  9. Semi-direct lysis of swabs and evaluation of their efficiencies to recover human noroviruses GI and GII from surfaces.

    PubMed

    De Keuckelaere, Ann; Stals, Ambroos; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2014-06-01

    Enteric viruses such as noroviruses (NoVs) continue to be the cause of widespread viral outbreaks due to person-to-person transmission, contaminated food, and contaminated surfaces. In order to optimize swabbing methodology for the detection of viruses on (food) contact surfaces, three swab elution/extraction strategies were compared in part one of this study, out of which, one strategy was based on the recently launched ISO protocol (ISO/TS 15216-1) for the determination of hepatitis A virus and NoV in food using real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). These three swab elution/extraction strategies were tested for the detection of GI.4 and GII.4 NoV on high-density polyethylene (HD-PE) surfaces with the use of cotton swabs. For detection of GI.4 and GII.4, the sample recovery efficiency (SRE) obtained with the direct lysis strategy (based on ISO/TS 15216-1) was significantly lower than the SRE obtained with both other strategies. The semi-direct lysis strategy was chosen to assess the SRE of two common swabs (cotton swab and polyester swab) versus the biowipe (Biomérieux, Lyon, France) on three surfaces (HD-PE, neoprene rubber (NR), and nitrile gloves (GL)). For both surfaces, HD-PE and GL, no significant differences in SREs of GI.4 and GII.4 NoVs were detected between the three different swabs. For the coarser NR, biowipes turned out to be the best option for detecting both GI.4 and GII.4 NoV.

  10. Surface acoustic wave amplification by direct current-voltage supplied to graphene film

    SciTech Connect

    Insepov, Z.; Emelin, E.; Kononenko, O.; Roshchupkin, D. V.; Tnyshtykbayev, K. B.; Baigarin, K. A.

    2015-01-12

    Using a high-resolution X-Ray diffraction measurement method, the surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of a Ca{sub 3}TaGa{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 14} (CTGS) piezoelectric crystal was investigated, where an external current was driven across the graphene film. Here, we show that the application of the DC field leads to a significant enhancement of the SAW magnitude and, as a result, to amplification of the diffraction satellites. Amplification of 33.2 dB/cm for the satellite +1, and of 13.8 dB/cm for the satellite +2, at 471 MHz has been observed where the external DC voltage of +10 V was applied. Amplification of SAW occurs above a DC field much smaller than that of a system using bulk semiconductor. Theoretical estimates are in reasonable agreement with our measurements and analysis of experimental data for other materials.

  11. Direct Microbial Reduction and Subsequent Preservation of Uranium in Natural Near-Surface Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yohey; Kelly, Shelly D.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2005-01-01

    The fate of uranium in natural systems is of great environmental importance. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) revealed that U(VI) was reduced to U(IV) in shallow freshwater sediment at an open pit in an inactive uranium mine. Geochemical characterization of the sediment showed that nitrate, Fe(III), and sulfate had also been reduced in the sediment. Observations of the sediment particles and microbial cells by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, coupled with elemental analysis by energy dispersive spectroscopy, revealed that uranium was concentrated at microbial cell surfaces. U(IV) was not associated with framboidal pyrite or nanometer-scale iron sulfides, which are presumed to be of microbial origin. Uranium concentrations were not detected in association with algal cells. Phylogenetic analyses of microbial populations in the sediment by the use of 16S rRNA and dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene sequences detected organisms belonging to the families Geobacteraceae and Desulfovibrionaceae. Cultivated members of these lineages reduce U(VI) and precipitate iron sulfides. The association of uranium with cells, but not with sulfide surfaces, suggests that U(VI) is reduced by the enzymatic activities of microorganisms. Uranium was highly enriched (760 ppm) in a subsurface black layer in unsaturated sediment sampled from a pit which was exposed to seasonal fluctuations in the pond level. XANES analysis showed that the majority of uranium in this layer was U(IV), indicating that uranium is preserved in its reduced form after burial. PMID:15812002

  12. Simple Nanoimprinted Polymer Nanostructures for Uncooled Thermal Detection by Direct Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hong, Brandon; Vallini, Felipe; Fang, Cheng-Yi; Alasaad, Amr; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2017-03-08

    We experimentally demonstrate the uncooled detection of long wavelength infrared (IR) radiation by thermal surface plasmon sensing using an all optical readout format. Thermal infrared radiation absorbed by an IR-sensitive material with high thermo-optic coefficient coated on a metal grating creates a refractive index change detectable by the shift of the supported surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measured optically in the visible spectrum. The interface localization of SPR modes and optical readout allow for submicrometer thin film transducers and eliminate complex readout integrated circuits, respectively, reducing form factor, leveraging robust visible detectors, and enabling low-cost imaging cameras. We experimentally present the radiative heat induced thermo-optic action detectable by SPR shift through imaging of a thermal source onto a bulk metal grating substrate with IR-absorptive silicon nitride coating. Toward focal plane array integration, a route to facile fabrication of pixelated metal grating structures by nanoimprint lithography is developed, where a stable polymer, parylene-C, serves as an IR-absorptive layer with a high thermo-optic coefficient. Experimental detection of IR radiation from real thermal sources imaged at infinity is demonstrated by our nanoimprinted polymer-SPR pixels with an estimated noise equivalent temperature difference of 21.9 K.

  13. Direct UV/Optical Imaging of Stellar Surfaces: The Stellar Imager (SI) Vision Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Lyon, Richard G.; Schrijver, Carolus; Karovska, Margarita; Mozurkewich, David

    2007-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a UV/optical, space-based interferometer designed to enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. SI's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives, in support of the Living with a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in thc Universe. SI is a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory" in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap. We discuss herein the science goals of the SI Mission, a mission architecture that could meet those goals, and the technologies needed to enable this mission. Additional information on SI can be found at: http://hires.gsfc.nasa.gov/si/.

  14. Direct-scanning alpha spectrometer for americium and plutonium contamination on highly-enriched uranium surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.C.; Martinez, H.E.; Abeyta, C.L.; Morgan, A.N.; Nelson, T.O.

    1997-04-02

    Trace Pu{sup 239} and Am{sup 241} contamination on a surface whose alpha count is dominated by U{sup 235} and U{sup 234} decay has been successfully quantified by counting swipes in external alpha spectroscopy chambers. The swipe process, however, is labor intensive and subject to uncertainties in the swiping process as well as degraded spectral resolution due to the presence of the swipe material. A multichannel instrument for automated in situ measurements of interior and exterior contamination has been developed which incorporates a rotary table, 13 fixed ion-implanted silicon detectors, and spectroscopy electronics. Custom software was written to allow alpha spectrometer to function as a virtual instrument in the LabView environment. This system gives improved speed and resolution as well as a complete log of the location of areas of high surface contamination, a feature not practical to obtain by other methods, and one which opens the possibility of long term studies such as Pu outgrowth evaluation employing the instrument. The authors present performance data as well as system integration, calibration, control, and dynamic geometric efficiency calculations related to the design of this and next generation systems.

  15. Templating Biomineralization: Surface Directed Protein Self-assembly and External Magnetic Field Stimulation of Osteoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Xiaolan

    biomineralization is investigated by SEM, GIXRD and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). Gene expression during the exposure of SMF is also studies by RT-PCR. The results indicated that exposure to SMF induces osteoblasts to produce larger quantities of HA, with higher degree of crystalline order. The controlling and understanding of protein on the surface is of great interest in biomedical application such as implant medicine, biosensor design, food processing, and chromatographic separations. The adsorbed protein onto the surface significantly determines the performance of biomaterials in a biological environment. Recent studies have suggested that the preservation of the native secondary structure of protein adsorbed is essential for biological application. In order to manipulate protein adsorption and design biocompatible materials, the mechanisms underlying protein-surface interactions, especially how surface properties of materials induce conformational changes of adsorbed proteins, needs to be well understood. Here we demonstrated that even though SPS is a necessary condition, it is not sufficient. We show that low substrate conductivity as well as proper salt concentration are also critical in sustained protein adsorption continuously. These factors allow one to pattern regions of different conducting properties and for the first time patterns physiologically relevant protein structures. Here we show that we can achieve patterned biomineralized regimes, both with plasma proteins in a simple and robust manner without additional functionalization or application of electrochemical gradients. Since the data indicate that the patterns just need to differ in electrical conductivity, rather than surface chemistry, we propose that the creation of transient image charges, due to incomplete charge screening, may be responsible for sustain the driving force for continual protein absorption.

  16. Elucidation of direct competition and allosteric modulation of small-molecular-weight protein ligands using surface plasmon resonance methods.

    PubMed

    Huber, Walter; Sinopoli, Alessandro; Kohler, Josiane; Hug, Melanie; Ruf, Armin; Huber, Sylwia

    2015-08-01

    The present work introduces a surface plasmon resonance-based method for the discrimination of direct competition and allosteric effects that occur in ternary systems comprising a receptor protein and two small-molecular-weight ligands that bind to it. Fatty acid binding protein 4, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and human serum albumin were used as model receptor molecules to demonstrate the performance of the method. For each of the receptor molecules, pairs of ligand molecules were selected for which either direct competition or an allosteric effect had already been determined by other methods. The method of discrimination introduced here is based on the surface plasmon resonance responses observed at equilibrium when an immobilized receptor protein is brought into contact with binary mixtures of interacting ligands. These experimentally determined responses are compared with the responses calculated using a theoretical model that considers both direct competition and allosteric ligand interaction modes. This study demonstrates that the allosteric ternary complex model, which enables calculation of the fractional occupancy of the protein by each ligand in such ternary systems, is well suited for the theoretical calculation of these types of responses. For all of the ternary systems considered in this work, the experimental and calculated responses in the chosen concentration ratio range were identical within a five-σ confidence interval when the calculations considered the correct interaction mode of the ligands (direct competition or different types of allosteric regulation), and in case of allosteric modulation, also the correct strength of this effect. This study also demonstrates that the allosteric ternary complex model-based calculations are well suited to predict the ideal concentration ratio range or even single concentration ratios that can serve as hot spots for discrimination, and such hot spots can drastically reduce the numbers of measurements needed

  17. Trace element content and magnetic properties of commercial HOPG samples studied by ion beam microscopy and SQUID magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Spemann, D. Esquinazi, P. Setzer, A.; Böhlmann, W.

    2014-10-15

    In this study, the impurity concentration and magnetic response of nine highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples with different grades and from different providers were determined using ion beam microscopy and SQUID magnetometry. Apart from sideface contaminations in the as-received state, bulk contamination of the samples in most cases consists of disk-shaped micron-sized particles made of Ti and V with an additional Fe contamination around the grain perimeter. The saturation magnetization typically increases with Fe concentration, however, there is no simple correlation between Fe content and magnetic moment. The saturation magnetization of one, respectively six, out of nine samples clearly exceeds the maximum contribution from pure Fe or Fe{sub 3}C. For most samples the temperature dependence of the remanence decreases linearly with T – a dependence found previously for defect-induced magnetism (DIM) in HOPG. We conclude that apart from magnetic impurities, additional contribution to the ferromagnetic magnetization exists in pristine HOPG in agreement with previous studies. A comparative study between the results of ion beam microscopy and the commonly used EDX analysis shows clearly that EDX is not a reliable method for quantitative trace elemental analysis in graphite, clarifying weaknesses and discrepancies in the element concentrations given in the recent literature.

  18. Self-Aspirated Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Source for Direct Sampling of Analytes on Surfaces and in Liquid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Keiji G; Ford, Michael J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2005-01-01

    A self-aspirating heated nebulizer probe is described and demonstrated for use in the direct analysis of analytes on surfaces and in liquid samples by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry. Functionality and performance of the probe as a self-aspirating APCI source is demonstrated using reserpine and progesterone as test compounds. The utility of the probe to sample analytes directly from surfaces was demonstrated first by scanning development lanes of a reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography plate in which a three-component dye mixture, viz., Fat Red 7B, Solvent Green 3, and Solvent Blue 35, was spotted and the components were separated. Development lanes were scanned by the sampling probe operated under computer control (x, y plane) while full-scan mass spectra were recorded using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. In addition, the ability to sample the surface of pharmaceutical tablets (viz., Extra Strength Tylenol(reg. sign) and Evista(reg. sign) tablets) and to detect the active ingredients (acetaminophen and raloxifene, respectively) selectively was demonstrated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Finally, the capability to sample analyte solutions from the wells of a 384-well microtiter plate and to perform quantitative analyses using MS/MS detection was illustrated with cotinine standards spiked with cotinine-d{sub 3} as an internal standard.

  19. A fast direct matrix solver for surface integral equation methods for electromagnetic wave scattering from non-penetrable targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jian-Gong; Peng, Zhen; Lee, Jin-Fa

    2012-10-01

    The implementation details of a fast direct solver is described herein for solving dense matrix equations from the application of surface integral equation methods for electromagnetic field scatterings from non-penetrable targets. The proposed algorithm exploits the smoothness of the far field and computes a low rank decomposition of the off-diagonal coupling blocks of the matrices through a set of skeletonization processes. Moreover, an artificial surface (the Huygens' surface) is introduced for each clustering group to efficiently account for the couplings between well-separated groups. Furthermore, a recursive multilevel version of the algorithm is presented. Although asymptotically the algorithm would not alter the bleak outlook of the complexity of the worst case scenario,O(N3) for required CPU time where N denotes the number of unknowns, for electrically large electromagnetic (EM) problems; through numerical examples, we found that the proposed multilevel direct solver can scale as good as O(N1.3) in memory consumption and O(N1.8) in CPU time for moderate-sized EM problems. Note that our conclusions are drawn based on a few sample examples that we have conducted and should not be taken as a true complexity analysis for general electrodynamic applications. However, for the fixed frequency (h-refinement) scenario, where the discretization size decreases, the computational complexities observed agree well with the theoretical predictions. Namely, the algorithm exhibits O(N) and O(N1.5) complexities for memory consumption and CPU time, respectively.

  20. Unraveling brackish groundwater - surface water interaction in an agricultural field using direct measurements at the field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsman, Joost; Waterloo, Maarten; Groen, Michel; Groen, Koos

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the interaction between groundwater and surface water is important for a myriad of reasons, including flow forecasting, nutrient transport, and water allocation for agriculture and other water users. This understanding is especially important in deep polder areas in the Netherlands, where brackish groundwater seepage (upward flowing regional groundwater) results in a significant salt load to surface water, and may damage crops if salts reach the rootzone in dry summers. Research on groundwater - surface water interaction historically focused on relatively pristine headwater catchments, only recently shifting somewhat to agricultural catchments. The latter pose specific research challenges, as agricultural activities and active water management can have a significant influence on hydrology. A brackish seepage flux, with a different density as precipitation, may significantly influence flow paths to surface water. Research on this specific topic is, however, lacking. We therefore investigated the interaction between groundwater and surface water in an agricultural catchment with a significant brackish seepage flux. In addition, we investigated the effects of intake of fresh water during periods of precipitation deficits, a common management strategy in lowland regions. We instrumented an agricultural ditch to enable direct, 15 min interval measurements of water fluxes and salinity to both agricultural drains and the ditch separately. These measurements are supported by piezometer nests, soil moisture sensors, temperature sensors, geophysics and a meteorological tower. Measurements focused on the summer period and were taken during two measurement periods: May 2012 - November 2012, and April 2013 - October 2013. Our measurements allowed for a direct, high-frequency separation of hydrological flow routes on this agricultural field between flow to agricultural drains and the ditch. The salinity of seepage water allowed for a relatively easy separation of

  1. Effect of the surface composition of motile Escherichia coli and motile Salmonella species on the direction of galvanotaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, W; Stocker, B A; Adler, J

    1996-01-01

    We have reported that motile Escherichia coli K-12 placed in an electric field swims toward the anode but that motile Salmonella typhimurium strains swim toward the cathode, a phenomenon called galvanotaxis (J. Adler and W. Shi, Cold Spring Harbor Symp. Quant. Biol. 53:23-25, 1988). In the present study, we isolated mutants with an altered direction of galvanotaxis. By further analyses of these mutants and by examination of E. coli and Salmonella strains with altered cell surface structure, we have now established a correlation between the direction of galvanotaxis and the surface structure of the cell: motile rough bacteria (that is, those without O polysaccharide; for example, E. coli K-12 and S. typhimurium mutants of classes galE and rfa) swam toward the anode, whereas motile smooth bacteria (that is, those with O polysaccharide; for example, wild-type S. typhimurium LT2) swam toward the cathode. However, smooth bacteria with acidic polysaccharide capsules (K1 in E. coli and Vi in Salmonella typhi) swam toward the anode. Measurements of passive electrophoretic mobility of strains representative of each set were made. We propose that the different directions of galvanotaxis of rough (or capsulate) bacteria and of smooth bacteria are explicable if the negative electrophoretic mobility of flagellar filaments is less than that of rough bodies but greater than that of smooth bodies. PMID:8576046

  2. Strong surface enhanced Raman scattering from gold nanoarrays obtained by direct laser writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. G.; Todorov, N. D.; Petrov, L. S.; Ritacco, T.; Giocondo, M.; Vlakhov, E. S.

    2016-10-01

    We report for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from arrays of gold nanoparticles produced by 2-photons photo-reduction of the metallic precursor (HAuCl4) hosted in a Poly-Vinyl Alcohol (PVA) matrix, on glass substrates. Samples with the same pattern but featuring different nanoparticles size and density were obtained by varying the writing laser power and scanning speed. The Raman spectra were recorded from samples immersed in a solution of rhodamine-6G (R6G), as well as, after exposure of the samples in xylene. SERS enhancement factors of up to ∼104 were obtained for both analytes. The measurements show that the SERS enhancement is maximized on golden strips produced at higher writing laser power and lower scanning speed, where closer nanoparticles packing is obtained..

  3. Proximal surface caries detection with direct-exposure and rare earth screen/film imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lundeen, R.C.; McDavid, W.D.; Barnwell, G.M.

    1988-12-01

    This laboratory study compared five imaging systems for their diagnostic accuracy in detection of proximal surface dental caries. Ten viewers provided data on radiographic detectability of carious lesions. The diagnostic accuracy of each system was determined with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves by comparing viewer data with the true state of the teeth as determined microscopically. D-speed film marginally outperformed the other four systems, but the three screen/film systems matched the diagnostic accuracy of E-speed film. Radiation reductions between 62% and 92% were achieved with the screen/film systems when compared to the two conventional dental films. The feasibility of designing a screen/film bite-wing cassette was shown, but the poor diagnostic accuracy of the present bite-wing system indicated a need for a new technology in caries detection.

  4. Stellar systems in the direction of the Hickson Compact Group 44. I. Low surface brightness galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith Castelli, A. V.; Faifer, F. R.; Escudero, C. G.

    2016-11-01

    Context. In spite of the numerous studies of low-luminosity galaxies in different environments, there is still no consensus about their formation scenario. In particular, a large number of galaxies displaying extremely low-surface brightnesses have been detected in the last year, and the nature of these objects is under discussion. Aims: In this paper we report the detection of two extended low-surface brightness (LSB) objects (μeffg' ≃ 27 mag) found, in projection, next to NGC 3193 and in the zone of the Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 44, respectively. Methods: We analyzed deep, high-quality, GEMINI-GMOS images with ELLIPSE within IRAF in order to obtain their brightness profiles and structural parameters. We also searched for the presence of globular clusters (GC) in these fields. Results: We have found that, if these LSB galaxies were at the distances of NGC 3193 and HCG 44, they would show sizes and luminosities similar to those of the ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) found in the Coma cluster and other associations. In that case, their sizes would be rather larger than those displayed by the Local Group dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. We have detected a few unresolved sources in the sky zone occupied by these galaxies showing colors and brightnesses typical of blue globular clusters. Conclusions: From the comparison of the properties of the galaxies presented in this work with those of similar objects reported in the literature, we have found that LSB galaxies display sizes covering a quite extended continous range (reff 0.3-4.5 kpc), in contrast to "normal" early-type galaxies, which show reff 1.0 kpc with a low dispersion. This fact might point to different formation processes for both types of galaxies.

  5. Advanced leading edge thermal-structure concept. Direct bond reusable surface insulation to a composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Figueroa, H.; Coe, C. F.; Kuo, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    An advanced leading-edge concept was analyzed using the space shuttle leading edge system as a reference model. The comparison indicates that a direct-bond system utilizing a high temperature (2700 F) fibrous refractory composite insulation tile bonded to a high temperature (PI/graphite) composite structure can result in a weight savings of up to 800 lb. The concern that tile damage or loss during ascent would result in adverse entry aerodynamics if a leading edge tile system were used is addressed. It was found from experiment that missing tiles (as many as 22) on the leading edge would not significantly affect the basic force-and-moment aerodynamic coefficients. Additionally, this concept affords a degree of redundancy to a thermal protection system in that the base structure (being a composite material) ablates and neither melts nor burns through when subjected to entry heating in the event tiles are actually lost or damaged during ascent.

  6. Direct Surface Analysis of Fungal Species by Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, Nancy B. ); Wahl, Jon H. ); Kingsley, Mark T. ); Wahl, Karen L. )

    2001-12-01

    Intact spores and/or hyphae of Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus oryzae, Trichoderma reesei and Phanerochaete chrysosporium are analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). This study investigates various methods of sample preparation and matrices to determine optimum collection and analysis criteria for fungal analysis by MALDI-MS. Fungi are applied to the MALDI sample target as untreated, sonicated, acid/heat treated, or blotted directly from the fungal culture with double-stick tape. Ferulic acid or sinapinic acid matrix solution is layered over the dried samples and analyzed by MALDI-MS. Statistical analysis of the data show that simply using double stick tape to collect and transfer to a MALDI sample plate typically worked as well as the other preparation methods, but requires the least sample handling.

  7. A Study of an Optical Lunar Surface Communications Network with High Bandwidth Direct to Earth Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K.; Biswas, A.; Schoolcraft, J.

    2011-01-01

    Analyzed optical DTE (direct to earth) and lunar relay satellite link analyses, greater than 200 Mbps downlink to 1-m Earth receiver and greater than 1 Mbps uplink achieved with mobile 5-cm lunar transceiver, greater than 1Gbps downlink and greater than 10 Mpbs uplink achieved with 10-cm stationary lunar transceiver, MITLL (MIT Lincoln Laboratory) 2013 LLCD (Lunar Laser Communications Demonstration) plans to demonstrate 622 Mbps downlink with 20 Mbps uplink between lunar orbiter and ground station; Identified top five technology challenges to deploying lunar optical network, Performed preliminary experiments on two of challenges: (i) lunar dust removal and (ii)DTN over optical carrier, Exploring opportunities to evaluate DTN (delay-tolerant networking) over optical link in a multi-node network e.g. Desert RATS.

  8. An efficient assignment of drainage direction over flat surfaces in raster digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Richard; Lehman, Clarence; Mulla, David

    2014-01-01

    In processing raster digital elevation models (DEMs) it is often necessary to assign drainage directions over flats-that is, over regions with no local elevation gradient. This paper presents an approach to drainage direction assignment which is not restricted by a flat's shape, number of outlets, or surrounding topography. Flow is modeled by superimposing a gradient away from higher terrain with a gradient towards lower terrain resulting in a drainage field exhibiting flow convergence, an improvement over methods which produce regions of parallel flow. This approach builds on previous work by Garbrecht and Martz (1997), but presents several important improvements. The improved algorithm guarantees that flats are only resolved if they have outlets. The algorithm does not require iterative application; a single pass is sufficient to resolve all flats. The algorithm presents a clear strategy for identifying flats and their boundaries. The algorithm is not susceptible to loss of floating-point precision. Furthermore, the algorithm is efficient, operating in O(N) time whereas the older algorithm operates in O(N) time. In testing, the improved algorithm ran 6.5 times faster than the old for a 100×100 cell flat and 69 times faster for a 700×700 cell flat. In tests on actual DEMs, the improved algorithm finished its processing 38-110 times sooner while running on a single processor than a parallel implementation of the old algorithm did while running on 16 processors. The improved algorithm is an optimal, accurate, easy-to-implement drop-in replacement for the original. Pseudocode is provided in the paper and working source code is provided in the Supplemental Materials.

  9. Field-testing of a Passive Surface Water Flux Meter for the Direct Measurement of Water and Solute Mass Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, E. C.; Jawitz, J. W.; Annable, M. D.; Klammler, H.; Hatfield, K.

    2007-05-01

    The measurement of water and solute mass discharges in surface water flow systems is a fundamental hydrologic task for ecological and economic decision making. However, due to the extensive monetary, labor, and time costs of traditional monitoring devices and methods, many water quality monitoring programs lack the resources necessary to provide comprehensive descriptions of surface water impairments. The Passive Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM) is a recently developed passive sampling device that measures water and solute fluxes within flowing surface water bodies. Devoid of mechanical components and power supply requirements, the relatively low-maintenance, low-cost design of the PSFM gives it considerable potential as a tool for extensive, large-scale surface water quality characterization and monitoring. The novelty of the PSFM extends to its direct mass-based approach to solute flux measurement, as compared to conventional, indirect concentration-based approaches. During this field-testing campaign, the PSFM was deployed in flowing surface water bodies of north- central Florida. The device contained a dual-packed porous media cartridge that performed simultaneous ion exchange to determine phosphate mass flux and equilibrium tracer desorption to determine water flux within the stream. The PSFM demonstrated accurate measurement of steady-state water and phosphate mass fluxes to within 15% over a range of stream velocities, solute concentrations, and deployment durations. The PSFM design described here was found to perform well in steady-flow conditions. The device was also shown to be effective under transient conditions of limited variability, but full transient testing remains for future work.

  10. Direct deconvolution of electric and magnetic responses of single nanoparticles by Fourier space surface plasmon resonance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Chan, C. F.; Ong, H. C.

    2016-11-01

    We use polarization-resolved surface plasmon resonance microscopy to image single dielectric nanoparticles. In real space, the nanoparticles exhibit V-shape diffraction patterns due to the interference between the incident surface plasmon polariton wave and the evanescent scattered waves, which arise from the interplay between the electric and magnetic dipoles of the nanoparticle. By using cross-polarized Fourier space imaging to extract only the scattered waves, we find the angular far-field intensity corresponds very well to the near-field scattering distribution, as confirmed by both analytical and numerical calculations. As a result, we directly deconvolute the contributions of electric and magnetic dipoles to the scattered fields without involving near-field techniques.

  11. On-Bead Two-Color (OBTC) Cell Screen for Direct Identification of Highly Selective Cell Surface Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Udugamasooriya, D. Gomika; Kodadek, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Combinatorial library screens can identify a suitable ligand for a biological target of interest out of thousands or even millions of compounds, and can play a key role in the modern drug development process. While conventional high-throughput cell screens based on functional assays require expensive robotics, simple on-bead combinatorial assays for ligand binding to the target protein can be done far more cheaply. This article describes one such assay, developed using combinatorial peptoid libraries for targeting integral membrane receptors or other cell surface-exposed molecules. In addition to the reduced cost, a unique advantage of this assay is the direct identification of the most selective ligands for a cell surface receptor that is expressed in its natural environment. PMID:22582145

  12. Development of a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.; Seki, C.; Kashikura, K.

    1996-12-31

    We have developed and tested a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface of animals. The beta camera consists of a thin CaF{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator, a tapered fiber optics plate (taper fiber) and a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The taper fiber is the key component of the camera. We have developed two types of beta cameras. One is 20mm diameter field of view camera for imaging brain surface of cats. The other is 10mm diameter camera for that of rats. Spatial resolutions of beta camera for cats and rats were 0.8mm FWHM and 0.5mm FWHM, respectively. We confirmed that developed beta cameras may overcome the limitation of the spatial resolution of the positron emission tomography (PET).

  13. Vertical coherence and forward scattering from the sea surface and the relation to the directional wave spectrum.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Peter H; Plant, William J; Dall'Osto, David R

    2013-09-01

    Results of an experiment to measure vertical spatial coherence from acoustic paths interacting once with the sea surface but at perpendicular azimuth angles are presented. The measurements were part of the Shallow Water 2006 program that took place off the coast of New Jersey in August 2006. An acoustic source, frequency range 6-20 kHz, was deployed at depth 40 m, and signals were recorded on a 1.4 m long vertical line array centered at depth 25 m and positioned at range 200 m. The vertical array consisted of four omni-directional hydrophones and vertical coherences were computed between pairs of these hydrophones. Measurements were made over four source-receiver bearing angles separated by 90°, during which sea surface conditions remained stable and characterized by a root-mean-square wave height of 0.17 m and a mixture of swell and wind waves. Vertical coherences show a statistically significant difference depending on source-receiver bearing when the acoustic frequency is less than about 12 kHz, with results tending to fade at higher frequencies. This paper presents field observations and comparisons of these observations with two modeling approaches, one based on bistatic forward scattering and the other on a rough surface parabolic wave equation utilizing synthetic sea surfaces.

  14. Effect of space charge on surface insulation of high-voltage direct-current bushings: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zaffanella, L.E.

    1987-10-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of a method to improve the contamination flashover performance of bushings for HVDC (High Voltage Direct Current) applications. Such a method, consisting of installing intense corona producing elements at the high voltage electrode of a bushing, had given some encouraging results in a laboratory application. A series of laboratory tests was performed to verify and quantify this improvement. It was found that intense corona caused some effect in the initial development of partial discharges on the bushing surface. Improvement in flashover voltage appears significant only when the bushing surface is relatively clean and moisture deposition occurs predominantly by impingement of water particles suspended in air. Thus, the technique of using intense corona at the high voltage electrode may be advantageous in laboratory applications in which the bushing surface can be maintained clean. In practical outdoor applications, however, where significant degrees of contamination and wetting of surfaces either by condensation or by rain or mist may occur, the effect of corona is likely to be negligible. The results of flashover tests performed during this project add to the knowledge of the behavior of HVDC insulation in contaminated conditions. The poor performance of wall bushing has been ascribed to their large diameter.

  15. The Influence of Electrolytic Concentration on the Electrochemical Deposition of Calcium Phosphate Coating on a Direct Laser Metal Forming Surface

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuhui; Luo, Wenjing

    2017-01-01

    A calcium phosphate (CaP) coating on titanium surface enhances its biocompatibility, thus facilitating osteoconduction and osteoinduction with the inorganic phase of the human bone. Electrochemical deposition has been suggested as an effective means of fabricating CaP coatings on porous surface. The purpose of this study was to develop CaP coatings on a direct laser metal forming implant using electrochemical deposition and to investigate the effect of electrolytic concentration on the coating's morphology and structure by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, water contact angle analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In group 10−2, coatings were rich in dicalcium phosphate, characterized to be thick, layered, and disordered plates. In contrast, in groups 10−3 and 10−4, the relatively thin and well-ordered coatings predominantly consisted of granular hydroxyapatite. Further, the hydrophilicity and cell affinity were improved as electrolytic concentration increased. In particular, the cells cultured in group 10−3 appeared to have spindle morphology with thick pseudopodia on CaP coatings; these spindles and pseudopodia strongly adhered to the rough and porous surface. By analyzing and evaluating the surface properties, we provided further knowledge on the electrolytic concentration effect, which will be critical for improving CaP coated Ti implants in the future. PMID:28250771

  16. Possibility of direct exchange diffusion of hydrogen on the Cl/Si(100)-2×1 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Ming-Feng; Lin, Deng-Sung; Tsay, Shiow-Fon

    2009-07-01

    The diffusion behavior of hydrogen substitutional sites on the chlorine-terminated Si(100) surface was investigated at elevated temperatures using time-lapse scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). STM movies show that each hydrogen atom undergoes Brownian motion within a monochloride dimer row. The position of a hydrogen substitutional site is exchanged directly with that of an immediate neighboring chlorine atom in either the same dimer (intradimer diffusion) or in one of the two adjacent dimers in the same row (intrarow diffusion). Accordingly, conceptual direct exchange diffusion (DED) in a two-dimensional lattice was experimentally observed. Analysis of STM movies at various temperatures yielded rather low attempt frequencies and energy barriers, leading to the suggestion that the diffusion mechanism involves an intermediate low-energy molecular state. Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations were also performed and provided partial support for the proposed diffusion mechanism.

  17. Surface plasmon resonance technique for directly probing the interaction of DNA and graphene oxide and ultra-sensitive biosensing.

    PubMed

    Xue, Tianyu; Cui, Xiaoqiang; Guan, Weiming; Wang, Qiyu; Liu, Chang; Wang, Haitao; Qi, Kun; Singh, D J; Zheng, Weitao

    2014-08-15

    The binding of DNA with graphene oxide (GO) is important for applications in disease diagnosis, genetic screening, and drug discovery. The standard assay methods are mainly limited to indirect observation via fluorescence labeling. Here we report the use of surface plasmon resonance for direct sensing of DNA/GO binding. We show that this can be used for ultra-sensitive detection of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Furthermore, the results provide a more direct probe of DNA/GO binding abilities and confirm that hydrogen bonding plays a key role in the interaction between GO and ssDNA. This enables to a novel biosensor for highly sensitive and selective detection of ssDNA based on indirect competitive inhibition assay (ICIA). We report development of such a sensor with a linear dynamic range of 10(-14)-10(-6)M, a detection limit of 10fM and a high level of stability during repeated regeneration.

  18. Using direct measurements of submarine groundwater discharge to investigate the coupling between surface and pore waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapaglia, John Paul

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and its associated impact on coastal ecosystems was investigated at the sediment-water interface using diverse methods. This intercomparison of methods was the objective of a major project carried out in 5 diverse hydrogeological settings (Cockburn Sound, Australia; Donnalucata, Sicily; Shelter Island, USA; Ubatuba Bay, Brazil; and Flic-en-Flac Bay, Mauritius). Small-scale sedimentary processes were deemed very important in the control of local hydrogeological characteristics. Seepage meters were used to directly measure the flow of water across the sediment-sea interface. Coincident measurements of bulk ground conductivity (BGC) were made alongside seepage meters at four of these locations. An inverse relationship between BGC and SGD allowed for the extrapolation of point measurements of SGD to larger areas using BGC data. SGD estimates made using this method compared favorably with those obtained using other techniques. Using seepage meters to measure flow rates, along with a manual drive point piezometer to measure pore water profiles, the coupling between pore water composition and advection due to SGD was investigated. The process of dispersion was found to determine both the shape and depth of salinity, nutrient, and radium profiles in the sediment. Dispersion may be controlled by biological or physical processes including the rate of advection itself, all of which change over time. Dispersion coefficients ranging from 0.02 m2d -1 to 2.8 m2d-1 were estimated from direct measurements. This data also allowed for the investigation of anthropogenic impacts on the signature of SGD in coastal lagoons. At Shelter Island, the pilings of a pier altered the flow of groundwater into the sea by piercing a confining layer and allowing for a large influx of fresh groundwater from below. In the Venice Lagoon, the difference in water elevation between the lagoon and the sea has been investigated as a possible driver of SGD beneath the

  19. A Conceptual Study for the Autonomous Direct Forming of Lunar Regolith into Flexlock (Trademark) Geomats for Lunar Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Luke B.; Hintze, Paul; OConnor, Gregory W.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the conceptual method of an autonomously operable Direct Forming machine that would consume regolith or regolith slag to mold intimately, interlinked elements in a continuous process. The resulting product, one to three meter wide geomats, would be deployed over commonly traversed areas to isolate the astronauts and equipment from underlying dust. The porous geotextile would provide areas for dust settling, thereby mitigating dust impingement on astronaut suits or surface structures. Because of their self-supporting yet flexible structure, these geomats could be assembled into shields and buttresses to protect lunar habitants from radiation, forming a "flexoskeleton" from in situ materials.

  20. Direct observation of broken time-reversal symmetry on the surface of a magnetically doped topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yoshinori; Dhital, Chetan; Zhou, Wenwen; Huemiller, Erik D; Lin, Hsin; Basak, S; Bansil, A; Huang, Y-B; Ding, H; Wang, Z; Wilson, Stephen D; Madhavan, V

    2011-05-20

    We study interference patterns of a magnetically doped topological insulator Bi(2-x)Fe(x)Te(3+d) by using Fourier transform scanning tunneling spectroscopy and observe several new scattering channels. A comparison with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy allows us to unambiguously ascertain the momentum-space origin of distinct dispersing channels along high-symmetry directions and identify those originating from time-reversal symmetry breaking. Our analysis also reveals that the surface state survives far above the energy where angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy finds the onset of continuum bulk bands.

  1. Direct observation of a propagating, planar-waveguide surface mode in a discontinuous film of metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Soller, B J; Hall, D G

    2000-08-01

    We report the observation of p-polarized guided waves that propagate confined to the surface of a two-dimensional array of silver (Ag) nanoparticles of average particle diameter and film thickness of approximately 400 and 154 nm, respectively, and comparable interparticle spacing. We interpret resonant features in the attenuated total reflection angular spectrum as arising from the excitation of guided waves in our discontinuous samples. The excitation of these waves is a direct consequence of the interaction of the light field with the localized resonance of the conduction electrons in the individual metal nanoparticles.

  2. Characterization of anti-theft devices directly from the surface of banknotes via easy ambient sonic spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Eduardo Morgado; Franco, Marcos Fernando; Cuelbas, Claudio José; Zacca, Jorge Jardim; de Carvalho Rocha, Werickson Fortunato; Borges, Rodrigo; de Souza, Wanderley; Sawaya, Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; Correa, Deleon Nascimento

    2015-09-01

    Using Brazilian banknotes as a test case, forensic examination and identification of Rhodamine B dye anti-theft device (ATD) staining on banknotes were performed. Easy ambient sonic spray ionization mass spectrometry (EASI-MS) was used since it allows fast and simple analysis with no sample preparation providing molecular screening of the surface with direct desorption and ionization of the security dye. For a more accurate molecular characterization of the ATD dye, Q Exactive Orbitrap™ Fourier transform (tandem) mass spectrometry using eletrospray ionization (ESI-HRMS/MS) was also applied.

  3. Display of Clostridium cellulovorans xylose isomerase on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its direct application to xylose fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ota, Miki; Sakuragi, Hiroshi; Morisaka, Hironobu; Kuroda, Kouichi; Miyake, Hideo; Tamaru, Yutaka; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Xylose isomerase (XI) is a key enzyme in the conversion of D-xylose, which is a major component of lignocellulosic biomass, to D-xylulose. Genomic analysis of the bacterium Clostridium cellulovorans revealed the presence of XI-related genes. In this study, XI derived from C. cellulovorans was produced and displayed using the yeast cell-surface display system, and the xylose assimilation and fermentation properties of this XI-displaying yeast were examined. XI-displaying yeast grew well in medium containing xylose as the sole carbon source and directly produced ethanol from xylose under anaerobic conditions.

  4. Underwater imaging using a hybrid Kirchhoff migration: direction of arrival method and a sparse surface sensor array.

    PubMed

    Dord, Jean-Francois; Farhat, Charbel

    2010-08-01

    This paper considers the problem of imaging a complex object submerged in shallow waters using a sparse surface sensor array and a hybrid signal processing method. This method is constructed by refining the Kirchhoff migration technique to incorporate a zoning of the sensors and an analysis of multiple reflections, and combining it with the direction of arrival estimation method. Its performance is assessed and analyzed with the shape identification of a mockup submarine by numerical simulation. The obtained numerical results highlight the potential of this approach for identifying underwater intruders.

  5. Direct nutritional link between 600-m deep cold-water corals and surface productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soetaert, Karline; Mohn, Christian; Rengstorff, Anna; Grehan, Anthony; van Oevelen, Dick

    2016-04-01

    Cold-water corals (CWC) form deep-sea reefs that are found in all of the world's oceans, with an areal extent at par with that of tropical coral reefs, and are recognised hotspots of biodiversity and metabolic activity. Yet, it remains largely enigmatic how these rich CWC reefs can thrive in a cold and dark environment that is considered to be strongly food-limited. Here, we use a novel benthic-pelagic modeling approach, which involves coupling models of hydrodynamics, biogeochemistry and habitat suitability, to unravel organic matter delivery to reef mounds at a water depth of 600 m that are capped with a thriving CWC reef community at Rockall Bank (NE Atlantic). Model simulations show that the interaction between 300-m high reef mounds and spring tidal currents induces episodic downwelling events that establish a vertical coupling between 600-m deep CWC with surface productivity. We therefore conclude that there is a positive feedback between CWC mound growth and organic matter supply. This episodic downwelling strongly enhances carbon sequestration to the deep ocean and the ubiquitous occurrence of topographic rises along the ocean margins suggests that a topographically-induced benthic-pelagic carbon pump could be of global importance.

  6. Analysis of Antibodies Directed against Merozoite Surface Protein 1 of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Woehlbier, Ute; Epp, Christian; Kauth, Christian W.; Lutz, Rolf; Long, Carole A.; Coulibaly, Boubacar; Kouyaté, Bocar; Arevalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates; Bujard, Hermann

    2006-01-01

    The 190-kDa merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) of Plasmodium falciparum, an essential component in the parasite's life cycle, is a primary candidate for a malaria vaccine. Rabbit antibodies elicited by the heterologously produced MSP-1 processing products p83, p30, p38, and p42, derived from strain 3D7, were analyzed for the potential to inhibit in vitro erythrocyte invasion by the parasite and parasite growth. Our data show that (i) epitopes recognized by antibodies, which inhibit parasite replication, are distributed throughout the entire MSP-1 molecule; (ii) when combined, antibodies specific for different regions of MSP-1 inhibit in a strictly additive manner; (iii) anti-MSP-1 antibodies interfere with erythrocyte invasion as well as with the intraerythrocytic growth of the parasite; and (iv) antibodies raised against MSP-1 of strain 3D7 strongly cross-inhibit replication of the heterologous strain FCB-1. Accordingly, anti-MSP-1 antibodies appear to be capable of interfering with parasite multiplication at more than one level. Since the overall immunogenicity profile of MSP-1 in rabbits closely resembles that found in sera of Aotus monkeys immunized with parasite-derived MSP-1 and of humans semi-immune to malaria from whom highly inhibiting antigen-specific antibodies were recovered, we consider the findings reported here to be relevant for the development of MSP-1-based vaccines against malaria. PMID:16428781

  7. DIRECT IMAGE PROCESSING OF CORRODING SURFACES APPLIED TO FRICTION STIR WELDING.

    SciTech Connect

    ISAACS,H.S.ET AL.

    2003-10-12

    An in situ process for visually locating corrosion is presented. The process visually displays image differences obtained by subtracting one digitized image from another. The difference image shows only where changes have taken place during period between the recording of the two images. Changes are due to both corrosion attack of the surface and concentration changes of dissolved corrosion products in solution. Indicators added to the solution assist by decorating sites of corrosion as diffusion and convection of the dissolved products increase the size of the affected region. A study of the initial stages of corrosion of a friction stir welded Al alloy 7075 has been performed using this imaging technique. Pitting potential measurements suggest that there was an initial increased sensitivity to corrosion. The difference image technique demonstrated that it was due to a reformation of the passive film that occurs with Zn containing Al alloys which occurs preferentially along flow protected regions. The most susceptible region of the weld was found to be where both limited deformation and thermal transients are produced during welding.

  8. Creating Anti-icing Surfaces via the Direct Immobilization of Antifreeze Proteins on Aluminum.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Yunho; Park, Ji-in; Kim, Minjae; Kim, Hong Suk; Kwon, Myong Jong; Oh, Seung Jin; Kim, Young-Pil; Jin, EonSeon

    2015-07-08

    Cryoprotectants such as antifreeze proteins (AFPs) and sugar molecules may provide a solution for icing problems. These anti-icing substances protect cells and tissues from freezing by inhibiting ice formation. In this study, we developed a method for coating an industrial metal material (aluminum, Al) with AFP from the Antarctic marine diatom, Chaetoceros neogracile (Cn-AFP), to prevent or delay ice formation. To coat Al with Cn-AFP, we used an Al-binding peptide (ABP) as a conjugator and fused it with Cn-AFP. The ABP bound well to the Al and did not considerably change the functional properties of AFP. Cn-AFP-coated Al (Cn-AFP-Al) showed a sufficiently low supercooling point. Additional trehalose coating of Cn-AFP-Al considerably delayed AFP denaturation on the Al without affecting its antifreeze activity. This metal surface-coating method using trehalose-fortified AFP can be applied to other metals important in the aircraft and cold storage fields where anti-icing materials are critical.

  9. Direct and high throughput (HT) interactions on the ribosomal surface by iRIA.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Elisa; Minici, Claudia; Baβler, Jochen; Hurt, Ed; Degano, Massimo; Calamita, Piera; Biffo, Stefano

    2015-10-21

    Ribosomes function as platforms for binding of other molecules, but technologies for studying this process are lacking. Therefore we developed iRIA (in vitro Ribosomes Interaction Assay). In approach I, Artemia salina ribosomes spotted on solid phase are used for binding picomoles of analytes; in approach II, cellular extracts allow the measurement of ribosome activity in different conditions. We apply the method to analyze several features of eIF6 binding to 60S subunits. By approach I, we show that the off-rate of eIF6 from preribosomes is slower than from mature ribosomes and that its binding to mature 60S occurs in the nM affinity range. By approach II we show that eIF6 binding sites on 60S are increased with mild eIF6 depletion and decreased in cells that are devoid of SBDS, a ribosomal factor necessary for 60S maturation and involved in Swachman Diamond syndrome. We show binding conditions to immobilized ribosomes adaptable to HT and quantify free ribosomes in cell extracts. In conclusion, we suggest that iRIA will greatly facilitate the study of interactions on the ribosomal surface.

  10. Direct measurement of sub-surface mass change using the variable-baseline gravity gradient method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Jeffrey; Ferré, Ty P. A.; Güntner, Andreas; Abe, Maiko; Creutzfeldt, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Time-lapse gravity data provide a direct, non-destructive method to monitor mass changes at scales from cm to km. But, the effectively infinite spatial sensitivity of gravity measurements can make it difficult to isolate the signal of interest. The variable-baseline gravity gradient method, based on the difference of measurements between two gravimeters, is an alternative to the conventional approach of individually modeling all sources of mass and elevation change. This approach can improve the signal-to-noise ratio for many applications by removing the contributions of Earth tides, loading, and other signals that have the same effect on both gravimeters. At the same time, this approach can focus the support volume within a relatively small user-defined region of the subsurface. The method is demonstrated using paired superconducting gravimeters to make for the first time a large-scale, non-invasive measurement of infiltration wetting front velocity and change in water content above the wetting front.

  11. THE MAGNETIC STRUCTURE OF SOLAR PROMINENCE CAVITIES: NEW OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURE REVEALED BY CORONAL MAGNETOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Bak-Steslicka, Urszula; Gibson, Sarah E.; Fan Yuhong; Bethge, Christian; Forland, Blake; Rachmeler, Laurel A.

    2013-06-20

    The Coronal Multi-Channel Polarimeter (CoMP) obtains daily full-Sun above-the-limb coronal observations in linear polarization, allowing, for the first time, a diagnostic of the coronal magnetic field direction in quiescent prominence cavities. We find that these cavities consistently possess a characteristic 'lagomorphic' signature in linear polarization indicating twist or shear extending up into the cavity above the neutral line. We demonstrate that such a signature may be explained by a magnetic flux-rope model, a topology with implications for solar eruptions. We find corroborating evidence for a flux-rope structure in the pattern of concentric rings within cavities seen in CoMP line-of-sight velocity.

  12. Enhanced Direct Ethanol Production by Cofactor Optimization of Cell Surface-Displayed Xylose Isomerase in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yusuke; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Motone, Keisuke; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-04-10

    Xylose isomerase (XylC) from Clostridium cellulovorans can simultaneously perform isomerization and fermentation of d-xylose, the main component of lignocellulosic biomass, and is an attractive candidate enzyme. In this study, we optimized a specified metal cation in a previously established Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain displaying XylC. We investigated the effect of each metal cation on the catalytic function of the XylC-displaying S. cerevisiae. Results showed that the divalent cobalt cations (Co(2+) ), especially enhanced the activity by 46-fold. Co(2+) also contributed to d-xylose fermentation, and ethanol yields and xylose consumption rates were improved by 6.0- and 2.7-fold, respectively. Utility of the extracellular xylose isomerization system was exhibited in the presence of mixed sugar. XylC-displaying yeast showed the faster d-xylose uptake than the yeast producing XI intracellularly. Furthermore, direct xylan saccharification and fermentation was performed by unique yeast co-culture system. A xylan-degrading yeast strain was established by displaying two kinds of xylanases; endo-1,4-β-xylanase (Xyn11B) from Saccharophagus degradans, and β-xylosidase (XlnD) from Aspergillus niger. The yeast co-culture system enabled fine-tuning of the initial ratios of the displayed enzymes (Xyn11B:XlnD:XylC) by adjusting the inoculation ratios of Xylanases (Xyn11B and XlnD)-displaying yeast and XylC-displaying yeast. When the enzymes were inoculated at the ratio of 1:1:2 (1.39 × 10(13) : 1.39 × 10(13) : 2.78 × 10(13) molecules), 6.0 g/L ethanol was produced from xylan. Thus, the cofactor optimization and the yeast co-culture system developed in this study could expand the prospect of biofuels production from lignocellulosic biomass. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Direct Observations of Magnetic Anomalies on the Lunar Surface under Varying Solar Wind Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorburger, A.; Wurz, P.; Barabash, S.; Wieser, M.; Futaana, Y.; Holmström, M.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dhanya, M. B.; Sridharan, R.; Asamura, K.

    2012-04-01

    In contrast to Earth, the Moon does not have a global dipolar magnetic field. Since the first lunar landing with Apollo 11, we know, though, that localised magnetic fields exist on the lunar surface. Measurements conducted by the Lunar Prospector magnetometer and electron reflectometer suggested that these localised magnetic fields are able to deflect the impinging solar wind in favourable cases (Lin et al., Science 1998). Magnetohydrodynamic simulations support the implication that mini-magnetospheres are formed above the locations of strong localised magnetic fields and can hold off the impinging solar wind (Harnett and Winglee, JGR 2002). Analysis of magnetic field data from Lunar Prospector of the Reiner Gamma anomaly region showed that the distortion of the magnetic field of this anomaly strongly depends on the impinging solar wind parameters, which was interpreted that the size and shape of the mini-magnetosphere changed with the solar wind parametes (Kurata et al., GRL 2005). Wieser et al., GRL 2010 showed that SARA, the Sub-KeV Atom Analyzer on board Chandrayaan-1, is able to detect an ENA image of the mini-magnetosphere in the measured energetic neutral atom flux. Here we analysed all orbits where CENA, the Chandrayaan-1 Energetic Neutral Analyzer, recorded data when a magnetic anomaly was in CENA's field-of-view. Our goal was to determine if 1) a signature of the magnetic anomaly is always visible in the ENA signal and if 2) there is a correlation between the solar wind dynamic pressure, the solar wind magnetic field, the local magnetic field strength and the reduction in the reflected ENA flux. Our results show that for the simplest case, i.e., the Gerasimovich anomaly, there is indeed a clear correlation between the shielding efficiency, the magnetic field strength and the solar wind dynamic pressure. For the other observed magnetic anomalies, for which the magnetic fields are not only weaker but also spatially more variable than that of the

  14. Presence or absence of ocular surface inflammation directs clinical and therapeutic management of dry eye

    PubMed Central

    Sambursky, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background The presence of clinically significant inflammation has been confirmed in the tears of 40%–65% of patients with symptoms of dry eye. Ocular surface inflammation may lead to tear film instability, epithelial cell irregularities, and permeability, resulting in chronic symptomatic pain and fluctuating vision as well as negative surgical outcomes. Patients and methods A retrospective single center medical chart review of 100 patients was conducted. All patients were tested with the InflammaDry test to determine if patients exhibited elevated levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). InflammaDry-positive patients were started on a combination of cyclosporine 0.05% twice daily, 2,000–4,000 mg oral omega-3 fatty acids, and frequent artificial tear replacement. InflammaDry-negative patients were started on 2,000–4,000 mg of oral omega-3 fatty acids and frequent artificial tear replacement. Each patient was retested at ~90 days. A symptom questionnaire was performed at the initial visit and at 90 days. Results 60% of the patients with dry eye symptoms tested positive for elevated MMP-9 at the initial visit. 78% of all patients returned for follow-up at ~90 days including 80% (48/60) of the previously InflammaDry-positive patients and 75% (30/40) of the previously InflammaDry-negative patients. A follow-up symptom questionnaire reported at least 75% symptomatic improvement in 65% (31/48) of the originally InflammaDry-positive patients and in 70% (21/30) of the initially InflammaDry-negative patients. Symptomatic improvement of at least 50% was reported in 85% (41/48) of previously InflammaDry-positive patients and 86% (26/30) of previously InflammaDry-negative patients. Following treatment, 54% (26/48) of previously InflammaDry-positive patients converted to a negative InflammaDry result. Conclusion Identifying which symptomatic dry eye patients have underlying inflammation may predict patient responses to treatment and influence clinical management

  15. Surface invasive cleavage assay on a maskless light-directed diamond DNA microarray for genome-wide human SNP mapping.

    PubMed

    Nie, Bei; Yang, Min; Fu, Weiling; Liang, Zhiqing

    2015-07-07

    The surface invasive cleavage assay, because of its innate accuracy and ability for self-signal amplification, provides a potential route for the mapping of hundreds of thousands of human SNP sites. However, its performance on a high density DNA array has not yet been established, due to the unusual "hairpin" probe design on the microarray and the lack of chemical stability of commercially available substrates. Here we present an applicable method to implement a nanocrystalline diamond thin film as an alternative substrate for fabricating an addressable DNA array using maskless light-directed photochemistry, producing the most chemically stable and biocompatible system for genetic analysis and enzymatic reactions. The surface invasive cleavage reaction, followed by degenerated primer ligation and post-rolling circle amplification is consecutively performed on the addressable diamond DNA array, accurately mapping SNP sites from PCR-amplified human genomic target DNA. Furthermore, a specially-designed DNA array containing dual probes in the same pixel is fabricated by following a reverse light-directed DNA synthesis protocol. This essentially enables us to decipher thousands of SNP alleles in a single-pot reaction by the simple addition of enzyme, target and reaction buffers.

  16. Microfiber-directed boundary flow in press-fit microdevices fabricated from self-adhesive hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tom T; Taylor, David G; Sedlak, Miroslav; Mosier, Nathan S; Ladisch, Michael R

    2005-06-01

    We report a rapid microfluidic device construction technique which does not employ lithography or stamping methods. Device assembly physically combines a silicon wafer, an elastomer (poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)), and microfibers to form patterns of hydrophobic channels, wells, elbows, or orifices that direct fluid flow into controlled boundary layers. Tweezers are used to place glass microfibers in a defined pattern onto an elastomeric (PDMS) hydrophobic film. The film is then manually pressed onto a hydrophobic silicon wafer, causing it to adhere to the silicon wafer and form a liquid-tight seal around the fibers. Completed in 15 min, the technique results in an operable microdevice with micrometer-scale features of nanoliter volume. Microfiber-directed boundary flow is achieved by use of the surface wetting properties of the hydrophilic glass fiber and the hydrophobicity of surrounding surfaces. The simplicity of this technique allows quick prototyping of microfluidic components, as well as complete biosensor systems, such as we describe for the detection of pathogenic bacteria.

  17. Direct in vivo inflammatory cell-induced corrosion of CoCrMo alloy orthopedic implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jeremy L; Sivan, Shiril; Liu, Yangping; Kocagöz, Sevi B; Arnholt, Christina M; Kurtz, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloy, used for over five decades in orthopedic implants, may corrode and release wear debris into the body during use. These degradation products may stimulate immune and inflammatory responses in vivo. We report here on evidence of direct inflammatory cell-induced corrosion of human implanted and retrieved CoCrMo implant surfaces. Corrosion morphology on CoCrMo implant surfaces, in unique and characteristic patterns, and the presence of cellular remnants and biological materials intimately entwined with the corrosion indicates direct cellular attack under the cell membrane region of adhered and/or migrating inflammatory cells. Evidence supports a Fenton-like reaction mechanism driving corrosion in which reactive oxygen species are the major driver of corrosion. Using in vitro tests, large increases in corrosion susceptibility of CoCrMo were seen (40-100 fold) when immersed in phosphate buffered saline solutions modified with hydrogen peroxide and hydrochloric acid to represent the chemistry under inflammatory cells. This discovery raises significant new questions about the clinical consequences of such corrosion interactions, the role of patient inflammatory reactions, and the detailed mechanisms at play.

  18. Direct In Vivo Inflammatory Cell-Induced Corrosion of CoCrMo Alloy Orthopedic Implant Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Jeremy L.; Sivan, Shiril; Liu, Yangping; Kocagöz, Sevi; Arnholt, Christina; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy, used for over four decades in orthopedic implants, may corrode and release wear debris into the body during use. These degradation products may stimulate immune and inflammatory responses in vivo. We report here on evidence of direct inflammatory cell-induced corrosion of human implanted and retrieved CoCrMo implant surfaces. Corrosion morphology on CoCrMo implant surfaces, in unique and characteristic patterns, and the presence of cellular remnants and biological materials intimately entwined with the corrosion indicates direct cellular attack under the cell membrane region of adhered and/or migrating inflammatory cells. Evidence supports a Fenton-like reaction mechanism driving corrosion in which reactive oxygen species are the major driver of corrosion. Using in vitro tests, large increases in corrosion susceptibility of CoCrMo were seen (40 to 100 fold) when immersed in phosphate buffered saline solutions modified with hydrogen peroxide and HCl to represent the chemistry under inflammatory cells. This discovery raises significant new questions about the clinical consequences of such corrosion interactions, the role of patient inflammatory reactions, and the detailed mechanisms at play. PMID:24619511

  19. Analysis of waveguide-coupled directional emission for efficient collection of Fluorescence/Raman light from surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Lu, Dan-Feng; Gao, Ran; Qi, Zhi-Mei

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical method based on the optical reciprocity theorem combined with the Fresnel theory has been developed for the analysis of waveguide-coupled directional emission technique, which is useful for the surface Fluorescence/Raman spectroscopy. The Kretschmann-type waveguide with a molecular dipole located above or inside the core layer serves as the simulation model. The two-dimensional (2D) pattern of power density for the waveguide-coupled emission from the molecular dipole was calculated using the theoretical method. According to the results, with a given waveguide the 2D pattern of power density is highly dependent on both the orientation and position of the dipole. The maximum fraction of power occupied by the waveguide-coupled emission is 87% with the plasmon waveguide and 95% with the resonant mirror. Compared with the dipole emission in free space, the waveguide-coupled directional emission possesses easy collection, which is benefit for the detection of weak Fluorescence and Raman signals. From this point, the theoretical method used here is helpful for design and optimization of Kretschmann-type waveguide structures for high-sensitivity surface monitoring by Fluorescence/Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Transparent and electrically conductive GaSb/Si direct wafer bonding at low temperatures by argon-beam surface activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predan, F.; Reinwand, D.; Klinger, V.; Dimroth, F.

    2015-10-01

    Direct wafer bonds of the material system n-GaSb/n-Si have been achieved by means of a low-temperature direct wafer bonding process, enabling an optical transparency of the bonds along with a high electrical conductivity of the boundary layer. In the used technique, the surfaces are activated by sputter-etching with an argon fast-atom-beam (FAB) and bonded in ultra-high vacuum. The bonds were annealed at temperatures between 300 and 400 °C, followed by an optical, mechanical and electrical characterization of the interface. Additionally, the influence of the sputtering on the surface topography of the GaSb was explicitly investigated. Fully bonded wafer pairs with high bonding strengths were found, as no blade could be inserted into the bonds without destroying the samples. The interfacial resistivities of the bonded wafers were significantly reduced by optimizing the process parameters, by which Ohmic interfacial resistivities of less than 5 mΩ cm2 were reached reproducibly. These promising results make the monolithic integration of GaSb on Si attractive for various applications.

  1. High-efficiency resonant amplification of weak magnetic fields for single spin magnetometry at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifunovic, Luka; Pedrocchi, Fabio L.; Hoffman, Silas; Maletinsky, Patrick; Yacoby, Amir; Loss, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques not only provide powerful imaging tools that have revolutionized medicine, but they have a wide spectrum of applications in other fields of science such as biology, chemistry, neuroscience and physics. However, current state-of-the-art magnetometers are unable to detect a single nuclear spin unless the tip-to-sample separation is made sufficiently small. Here, we demonstrate theoretically that by placing a ferromagnetic particle between a nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer and a target spin, the magnetometer sensitivity is improved dramatically. Using materials and techniques that are already experimentally available, our proposed set-up is sensitive enough to detect a single nuclear spin within ten milliseconds of data acquisition at room temperature. The sensitivity is practically unchanged when the ferromagnet surface to the target spin separation is smaller than the ferromagnet lateral dimensions; typically about a tenth of a micrometre. This scheme further benefits when used for nitrogen-vacancy ensemble measurements, enhancing sensitivity by an additional three orders of magnitude.

  2. Direct Determination of the Dependence of the Surface Shear and Dilatational Viscosities on the Thermodynamic State of the Interface: Theoretical Foundations.

    PubMed

    Lopez; Hirsa

    1998-10-01

    Recent developments in nonlinear optical techniques for noninvasive probing of a surfactant influenced gas/liquid interface allow for the measurement of the surfactant surface concentration, c, and thus provide new opportunities for the direct determination of its intrinsic viscosities. Here, we present the theoretical foundations, based on the Boussinesq-Scriven surface model without the usual simplification of constant viscosities, for an experimental technique to directly measure the surface shear (µs) and dilatational (kappas) viscosities of a Newtonian interface as functions of the surfactant surface concentration. This ability to directly measure the surfactant concentration permits the use of a simple surface flow for the measurement of the surface viscosities. The requirements are that the interface must be nearly flat, and the flow steady, axisymmetric, and swirling; these flow conditions can be achieved in the deep-channel viscometer driven at relatively fast rates. The tangential stress balance on such an interface leads to two equations; the balance in the azimuthal direction involves only µs and its gradients, and the balance in the radial direction involves both µs and kappas and their gradients. By further exploiting recent developments in laser-based flow measuring techniques, the surface velocities and their gradients which appear in the two equations can be measured directly. The surface tension gradient, which appears in the radial balance equation, is incorporated from the equation of state for the surfactant system and direct measurements of the surfactant surface concentration distribution. The stress balance equations are then ordinary differential equations in the surface viscosities as functions of radial position, which can be readily integrated. Since c is measured as a function of radial position, we then have a direct measurement of µs and kappas as functions of c. Numerical computations of the Navier-Stokes equations are performed

  3. An Assessment of the Surface Longwave Direct Radiative Effect of Airborne Saharan Dust During the NAMMA Field Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansell, R. A.; Tsay, S. C.; Ji, Q.; Hsu, N. C.; Jeong, M. J.; Wang, S. H.; Reid, J. S.; Liou, K. N.; Ou, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    In September 2006, NASA Goddard s mobile ground-based laboratories were deployed to Sal Island in Cape Verde (16.73degN, 22.93degW) to support the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (NAMMA) field study. The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI), a key instrument for spectrally characterizing the thermal IR, was used to retrieve the dust IR aerosol optical depths (AOTs) in order to examine the diurnal variability of airborne dust with emphasis on three separate dust events. AERI retrievals of dust AOT are compared with those from the coincident/collocated multifilter rotating shadow-band radiometer (MFRSR), micropulse lidar (MPL), and NASA Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) sensors. The retrieved AOTs are then inputted into the Fu-Liou 1D radiative transfer model to evaluate local instantaneous direct longwave radiative effects (DRE(sub LW)) of dust at the surface in cloud-free atmospheres and its sensitivity to dust microphysical parameters. The top-of-atmosphere DRE(sub LW) and longwave heating rate profiles are also evaluated. Instantaneous surface DRE(sub LW) ranges from 2 to 10 W/sq m and exhibits a strong linear dependence with dust AOT yielding a DRE(sub LW) of 16 W/sq m per unit dust AOT. The DRE(sub LW) is estimated to be approx.42% of the diurnally averaged direct shortwave radiative effect at the surface but of opposite sign, partly compensating for the shortwave losses. Certainly nonnegligible, the authors conclude that DRE(sub LW) can significantly impact the atmospheric energetics, representing an important component in the study of regional climate variation.

  4. Iterative and direct methods employing distributed approximating functionals for the reconstruction of a potential energy surface from its sampled values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalay, Viktor

    1999-11-01

    The reconstruction of a function from knowing only its values on a finite set of grid points, that is the construction of an analytical approximation reproducing the function with good accuracy everywhere within the sampled volume, is an important problem in all branches of sciences. One such problem in chemical physics is the determination of an analytical representation of Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surfaces by ab initio calculations which give the value of the potential at a finite set of grid points in configuration space. This article describes the rudiments of iterative and direct methods of potential surface reconstruction. The major new results are the derivation, numerical demonstration, and interpretation of a reconstruction formula. The reconstruction formula derived approximates the unknown function, say V, by linear combination of functions obtained by discretizing the continuous distributed approximating functional (DAF) approximation of V over the grid of sampling. The simplest of contracted and ordinary Hermite-DAFs are shown to be sufficient for reconstruction. The linear combination coefficients can be obtained either iteratively or directly by finding the minimal norm least-squares solution of a linear system of equations. Several numerical examples of reconstructing functions of one and two variables, and very different shape are given. The examples demonstrate the robustness, high accuracy, as well as the caveats of the proposed method. As to the mathematical foundation of the method, it is shown that the reconstruction formula can be interpreted as, and in fact is, frame expansion. By recognizing the relevance of frames in determining analytical approximation to potential energy surfaces, an extremely rich and beautiful toolbox of mathematics has come to our disposal. Thus, the simple reconstruction method derived in this paper can be refined, extended, and improved in numerous ways.

  5. [Correlation between shape and direction of small articular surface in lower lumbar vertebrae and degeneration of intervertebral disc].

    PubMed

    Tan, L; Bai, X; Li, D

    1997-01-01

    To assess the possible correlation between the shape and the direction of the small articular surface in the lower lumbar vertebrae and the degeneration of the intervertebral disc, we investigated with computed tomography (CT) and evaluated with statistics the small articular surface and the transverse interface-joint angle (TIFA) of the L4-5 and the L5-S1 in 152 cases who had normal or degenerative discs verified through CT, MRI or operation. The small articular surface was found arc in 69.1% of the L4-5 and in 23.0% of the L5-S1. The TIFA of the L4-5 was less than that of the L5-S1. There was no correlation between the ratio of degeneration of the intervertebral disc at the L4-5 and the TIFA of the L4-5 and the L5-S1, but the ratio of degeneration of the intervertebral disc at the L5-S1 had postive correlation with the TIFA of the L4-5, negative correlation with the TIFA of the L5-S1, and particular correlation with the TIFA of the L5-S1 and L4-5. These results suggest that the shape and direction of the lower lumbar facet joint are related to the lumbar degeneration of intervertebral disc and the causes of degeneration at the L4-5 disc differ from those at the L5-S1 disc in biomechanics.

  6. Airborne hyperspectral surface and cloud bi-directional reflectivity observations in the Arctic using a commercial, digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, A.; Bierwirth, E.; Wendisch, M.; Herber, A.; Gayet, J.-F.

    2011-09-01

    Spectral radiance measurements by a digital single-lens reflex camera were used to derive the bi-directional reflectivity of clouds and different surfaces in the Arctic. The camera has been calibrated radiometrically and spectrally to provide accurate radiance measurements with high angular resolution. A comparison with spectral radiance measurements with the SMART-Albedometer showed an agreement within the uncertainties of both instruments. The bi-directional reflectivity in terms of the hemispherical directional reflectance factor HDRF was obtained for sea ice, ice free ocean and clouds. The sea ice, with an albedo of ρ = 0.96, showed an almost isotropic HDRF, while sun glint was observed for the ocean HDRF (ρ = 0.12). For the cloud observations with ρ = 0.62, the fog bow - a backscatter feature typically for scattering by liquid water droplets - was covered by the camera. For measurements above a heterogeneous stratocumulus clouds, the required number of images to obtain a mean HDRF which clearly exhibits the fog bow has been estimated with about 50 images (10 min flight time). A representation of the HDRF as function of the scattering angle only reduces the image number to about 10 (2 min flight time). The measured cloud and ocean HDRF have been compared to radiative transfer simulations. The ocean HDRF simulated with the observed surface wind speed of 9 m s-1 agreed best with the measurements. For the cloud HDRF, the best agreement was obtained by a broad and weak fog bow simulated with a cloud droplet effective radius of Reff = 4 μm. This value agrees with the particle sizes from in situ measurements and retrieved from the spectral radiance of the SMART-Albedometer.

  7. On-chip integration of high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and Hall-effect magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Quddusi, H M; Ramsey, C M; Gonzalez-Pons, J C; Henderson, J J; del Barco, E; de Loubens, G; Kent, A D

    2008-07-01

    A sensor that integrates high-sensitivity micro-Hall effect magnetometry and high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy capabilities on a single semiconductor chip is presented. The Hall-effect magnetometer (HEM) was fabricated from a two-dimensional electron gas GaAsAlGaAs heterostructure in the form of a cross, with a 50 x 50 microm2 sensing area. A high-frequency microstrip resonator is coupled with two small gaps to a transmission line with a 50 Omega impedance. Different resonator lengths are used to obtain quasi-TEM fundamental resonant modes in the frequency range 10-30 GHz. The resonator is positioned on top of the active area of the HEM, where the magnetic field of the fundamental mode is largest, thus optimizing the conversion of microwave power into magnetic field at the sample position. The two gaps coupling the resonator and transmission lines are engineered differently--the gap to the microwave source is designed to optimize the loaded quality factor of the resonator (Q

  8. Direct reconstruction of glacier bedrock from known free surface data using the one-dimensional shallow ice approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessese, A.; Heining, C.; Sellier, M.; Mc Nish, R.; Rack, W.

    2015-01-01

    Glaciers are an important component of the climate system that respond sensitively to climate change. Small glaciers respond more quickly to changing weather patterns compared to large polar ice sheets and ice caps that make them ideal to study climate variability. This study relates to the numerical reconstruction of the glacier bed in order to generate basal boundary data for ice flow models. Bedrock elevation is a paramount input parameter in glacier flow modeling to accurately capture its flow dynamics but is difficult to measure. We present an easy to implement direct numerical and analytical methodology to infer the bedrock geometry under glacial ice from the knowledge of the free surface elevation or the free surface velocity in one space dimension. The numerical and analytical methods are both based on the shallow ice approximation and require the time series of the surface mass balance distribution. Moreover, the analytical method requires the knowledge of the glacier thickness at one arbitrary location. Numerical benchmark test cases are used to verify the suitability and applicability of the algorithms, and a sensitivity analysis demonstrates the robustness of the method.

  9. Direct production of organic acids from starch by cell surface-engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum in anaerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We produced organic acids, including lactate and succinate, directly from soluble starch under anaerobic conditions using high cell-density cultures of Corynebacterium glutamicum displaying α-amylase (AmyA) from Streptococcus bovis 148 on the cell surface. Notably, reactions performed under anaerobic conditions at 35 and 40°C, which are higher than the optimal growth temperature of 30°C, showed 32% and 19%, respectively, higher productivity of the organic acids lactate, succinate, and acetate compared to that at 30°C. However, α-amylase was not stably anchored and released into the medium from the cell surface during reactions at these higher temperatures, as demonstrated by the 61% and 85% decreases in activity, respectively, from baseline, compared to the only 8% decrease at 30°C. The AmyA-displaying C. glutamicum cells retained their starch-degrading capacity during five 10 h reaction cycles at 30°C, producing 107.8 g/l of total organic acids, including 88.9 g/l lactate and 14.0 g/l succinate. The applicability of cell surface-engineering technology for the production of organic acids from biomass by high cell-density cultures of C. glutamicum under anaerobic conditions was demonstrated. PMID:24342107

  10. Inelastic processes in ion/surface collisions: Direct recoil ion fractions as a function of kinetic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabalais, J. Wayne; Chen, Jie-Nan

    1986-09-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of the scattered and recoiled particles resulting from 1-10 keV Ar+ ions impingent on surfaces of MgO, Mg(OH)2, graphite, Si, and SiO2 have been obtained. Measurements of directly recoiled (DR) neutrals plus ions and neutrals only are used to calculate positive and negative ion fractions Y+,- from DR events. These positive and negative ion yields observed for DR of H, C, O, and Si have distinctly different behavior as a function of ion kinetic energy. The Y+ values exhibit a ``threshold-type'' behavior with a steep rise followed by a slowly rising or plateau region at higher energy. The Y- values exhibit a maximum in the low energy region followed by a decreasing yield as energy increases. The Y-/Y+ ratio for C and O is very sensitive to the amount of hydrogen present, with the Y+ yields dropping as hydrogen concentration increases. The recently developed model for electronic transitions in keV ion/surface collisions which considers Auger and resonant transitions along the ion trajectory and electron promotions in the quasidiatomic molecule of the close atomic encounter is extended to include DR events. Analytical expressions for Y+,- are derived for the case of surface atoms in positive, neutral, and negative bonding environments. These model expressions are fitted to the experimental data, allowing determination of the probabilities of ionization in the close atomic encounter and of electron capture along the outgoing trajectory.

  11. Surface-Directed Assembly of Sequence-Defined Synthetic Polymers into Networks of Hexagonally Patterned Nanoribbons with Controlled Functionalities

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chun-Long; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; DeYoreo, James J.

    2016-05-24

    The exquisite self-assembly of proteins and peptides in nature into highly ordered functional materials has inspired innovative approaches to biomimetic materials design and synthesis. Here we report the assembly of peptoids—a class of highly stable sequence-defined synthetic polymers—into biomimetic materials on mica surfaces. The assembling 12-mer peptoid contains alternating acidic and aromatic residues, and the presence of Ca2+ cations creates peptoid-peptoid and peptoid-mica interactions that drive assembly. In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that peptoids first assemble into discrete nanoparticles, these particles then transform into hexagonally-patterned nanoribbons on mica surfaces. AFM-based dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) studies show that peptoid-mica interactions are much stronger than peptoidpeptoid interactions in the presence of Ca2+, illuminating the physical parameters that drive peptoid assembly. We further demonstrate the display of functional groups at the N-terminus of assembling peptoid sequence to produce biomimetic materials with similar hierarchical structures. This research demonstrates that surface-directed peptoid assembly can be used as a robust platform to develop biomimetic coating materials for applications.

  12. Direct Sampling and Analysis from Solid Phase Extraction Cards using an Automated Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry System

    SciTech Connect

    Walworth, Matthew J; ElNaggar, Mariam S; Stankovich, Joseph J; WitkowskiII, Charles E.; Norris, Jeremy L; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2011-01-01

    Direct liquid extraction based surface sampling, a technique previously demonstrated with continuous flow and autonomous pipette liquid microjunction surface sampling probes, has recently been implemented as the Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis (LESA) mode on the commercially available Advion NanoMate chip-based infusion nanoelectrospray ionization system. In the present paper, the LESA mode was applied to the analysis of 96-well format custom solid phase extraction (SPE) cards, with each well consisting of either a 1 or 2 mm diameter monolithic hydrophobic stationary phase. These substrate wells were conditioned, loaded with either single or multi-component aqueous mixtures, and read out using the LESA mode of a TriVersa NanoMate or a Nanomate 100 coupled to an ABI/Sciex 4000QTRAPTM hybrid triple quadrupole/linear ion trap mass spectrometer and a Thermo LTQ XL linear ion trap mass spectrometer. Extraction conditions, including extraction/nanoESI solvent composition, volume, and dwell times, were optimized in the analysis of targeted compounds. Limit of detection and quantitation as well as analysis reproducibility figures of merit were measured. Calibration data was obtained for propranolol using a deuterated internal standard which demonstrated linearity and reproducibility. A 10x increase in signal and cleanup of micromolar Angiotensin II from a concentrated salt solution was demonstrated. Additionally, a multicomponent herbicide mixture at ppb concentration levels was analyzed using MS3 spectra for compound identification in the presence of isobaric interferences.

  13. Nanoscale surface chemistry directs the tunable assembly of silver octahedra into three two-dimensional plasmonic superlattices

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yih Hong; Shi, Wenxiong; Lee, Hiang Kwee; Jiang, Ruibin; Phang, In Yee; Cui, Yan; Isa, Lucio; Yang, Yijie; Wang, Jianfang; Li, Shuzhou; Ling, Xing Yi

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in nanoparticle self-assembly is programming the large-area organization of a single type of anisotropic nanoparticle into distinct superlattices with tunable packing efficiencies. Here we utilize nanoscale surface chemistry to direct the self-assembly of silver octahedra into three distinct two-dimensional plasmonic superlattices at a liquid/liquid interface. Systematically tuning the surface wettability of silver octahedra leads to a continuous superlattice structural evolution, from close-packed to progressively open structures. Notably, silver octahedra standing on vertices arranged in a square lattice is observed using hydrophobic particles. Simulations reveal that this structural evolution arises from competing interfacial forces between the particles and both liquid phases. Structure-to-function characterizations reveal that the standing octahedra array generates plasmonic ‘hotstrips', leading to nearly 10-fold more efficient surface-enhanced Raman scattering compared with the other more densely packed configurations. The ability to assemble these superlattices on the wafer scale over various platforms further widens their potential applications. PMID:25923409

  14. Directed surfaces structures and interfaces for enhanced electrocatalyst activity, selectivity, and stability for energy conversion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2016-04-20

    IrO3/IrOx catalyst significantly outperforms rutile IrO2 and RuO2, the only other OER catalysts to have reasonable stability and activity in acidic electrolyte, and in fact demonstrates the best activity for any known OER catalyst measured in either acidic or in alkaline electrolyte. For alkaline conditions we have demonstrated that the combined effect of cerium as a dopant and gold as a metal support, significantly enhances the OER activity of electrodeposited NiOx films. This NiCeOx-Au catalyst delivers high OER activity in alkaline media, and is among the most active OER electrocatalysts reported to date (Nature Energy, accepted 2016). These studies of new catalysts for the OER, both in acid and in base, are fundamental to enabling new technologies of interest for the DOE, including the production of sustainable fuels and chemicals. ORR: One method to significantly reduce the Pt loading in fuel cell devices is to increase the ORR activity of Pt based systems. To this end we have synthesized a high surface area supported meso-structured PtxNi alloy thin film with a double gyroid morphology that both exhibits high activity and stability for the ORR (submitted, 2016). We have furthermore developed a Ru-core, Pt-shell system that improves the per Pt site activity by more than a factor of 2 (ChemElectroChem, 2014). Further refinement, optimizing Pt-shell thickness and reducing particle sintering during processing, enabled us to obtain a mass activity that is 2 times higher than commercial Pt/C from TKK. These are important contributions to the DOE goal of reducing Pt loading since an improved understanding of how to increase mass activity and stability helps enable low Pt content fuel cells.

  15. Codeine-binding RNA aptamers and rapid determination of their binding constants using a direct coupling surface plasmon resonance assay

    PubMed Central

    Win, Maung Nyan; Klein, Joshua S.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2006-01-01

    RNA aptamers that bind the opium alkaloid codeine were generated using an iterative in vitro selection process. The binding properties of these aptamers, including equilibrium and kinetic rate constants, were determined through a rapid, high-throughput approach using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis to measure real-time binding. The approach involves direct coupling of the target small molecule onto a sensor chip without utilization of a carrier protein. Two highest binding aptamer sequences, FC5 and FC45 with Kd values of 2.50 and 4.00 μM, respectively, were extensively studied. Corresponding mini-aptamers for FC5 and FC45 were subsequently identified through the described direct coupling Biacore assays. These assays were also employed to confirm the proposed secondary structures of the mini-aptamers. Both aptamers exhibit high specificity to codeine over morphine, which differs from codeine by a methyl group. Finally, the direct coupling method was demonstrated to eliminate potential non-specific interactions that may be associated with indirect coupling methods in which protein linkers are commonly employed. Therefore, in addition to presenting the first RNA aptamers to a subclass of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid molecules, this work highlights a method for characterizing small molecule aptamers that is more robust, precise, rapid and high-throughput than other commonly employed techniques. PMID:17038331

  16. Radial vibration measurements directly from rotors using laser vibrometry: The effects of surface roughness, instrument misalignments and pseudo-vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothberg, Steve J.; Halkon, Ben J.; Tirabassi, Mario; Pusey, Chris

    2012-11-01

    Laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) offers an attractive solution when radial vibration measurement directly from a rotor surface is required. Research to date has demonstrated application on polished-circular rotors and rotors coated with retro-reflective tape. In the latter case, however, a significant cross-sensitivity to the orthogonal radial vibration component occurs and post-processing is required to resolve individual radial vibration components. Until now, the fundamentally different behaviour observed between these cases has stood as an inconsistency in the published literature, symptomatic of the need to understand the effect of surface roughness. This paper offers the first consistent mathematical description of the polished-circular and rough rotor behaviours, combined with an experimental investigation of the relationship between surface roughness and cross-sensitivity. Rotors with surface roughness up to 10 nm satisfy the polished-circular rotor definition if vibration displacement is below 100% beam diameter, for a 90 μm beam, and below 40% beam diameter, for a 520 μm beam. On rotors with roughness between 10 nm and 50 nm, the polished-circular rotor definition is satisfied for vibration displacements up to 25% beam diameter, for a 90 μm beam, and up to 10% beam diameter, for a 520 μm beam. As roughness increases, cross-sensitivity increases but only rotors coated in retro-reflective tape satisfied the rough rotor definition fully. Consequently, when polished-circular surfaces are not available, rotor surfaces must be treated with retro-reflective tape and measurements post-processed to resolve individual vibration components. Through simulations, the value of the resolution and correction algorithms that form the post-processor has been demonstrated quantitatively. Simulations incorporating representative instrument misalignments and measurement noise have enabled quantification of likely error levels in radial vibration measurements. On a polished

  17. Direct measurements of the tile drain and groundwater contributions to surface water contamination: from field-scale concentration patterns in groundwater to catchment-scale surface water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozemeijer, J.; Van der Velde, Y.; Van Geer, F.; Broers, H.

    2011-12-01

    Enhanced knowledge of water and nutrient pathways in catchments improves the understanding of dynamics in water quality and supports the selection of appropriate water pollution mitigation options. For this study, we physically separated tile drain effluent and groundwater discharge from an agricultural field before it entered a 43.5 meter ditch transect. Through continuous discharge measurements and weekly water quality sampling, we directly quantified the flow route contributions to surface water discharge and solute loading. Our multi-scale experimental approach allowed us to relate these measurements to field-scale NO3 concentration patterns in shallow groundwater and to continuous NO3 records at the catchment outlet. Our mapping of shallow groundwater quality at the experimental field revealed a highly variable spatial pattern, with NO3 concentrations ranging from 0 to 219 mg/l. Our measurement results allowed us to relate NO3 concentrations of the individual tile drains to the spatial NO3 concentration pattern in shallow groundwater. These results show that tile drain effluent sampling is an efficient way to obtain information on shallow groundwater composition. The catchment-scale monitoring revealed a large spatial heterogeneity in tile drain effluent NO3 concentrations, which ranged from 0 mg/l up to 390 mg/l. A distinct similarity was found between the temporal patterns in NO3 concentrations in tile drain effluent at the field-scale, in tile drain effluent throughout the catchment, and in stream water at the catchment outlet. They all showed a seasonal pattern with higher concentrations in winter, which is related to the increased contribution of near-surface flow routes to the tile drain and stream discharge in winter. Our measurements indicated that tile drains play a major role in lateral water and solute transport from the agricultural field towards the surface water system. On average, the tile drains contributed 80% of the discharge and 90-92% of

  18. Direct evidence of visible surface plasmon excitation in ITO film coated on LiNbO3 slabs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua; Wang, Yince; Xue, Tingyu; Su, Hang; Zhang, Jingwen

    2017-03-20

    An iron-doped Y-cut lithium niobate (Fe:LN) slab was coated with indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films by magnetron sputtering. The electron confinement in a sub-nanometer region at ITO/LN interfaces is resulted from electric screening effect. Consequently, the local plasma frequency in the sub-nanometer metallic-like layer is shifted to the UV regime. This makes it possible to excite surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in the visible region with photorefractive phase gratings in the LN slab and to transport SPPs much energy-efficiently. Direct evidence of the excitation of SPPs was demonstrated by the presence of deep transmission spectral valleys in the transmission spectra and striking dark bands in the 2D diffraction patterns while using a white reading beam. Theoretical arguments and confirmation experiments are presented to elucidate all the related findings.

  19. Inferring hemispherical reflectance of the earth's surface for global energy budgets from remotely sensed nadir or directional radiance values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Sellers, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between directional reflectances spanning the entire reflecting hemisphere and hemispherical reflectance (albedo) and the effect of solar zenith angle and cover type on these relationships were investigated, using the results obtained from NOAA's 7/8 AVHRR ground-level reflectance measurements. Bands 1 (0.58-0.6B microns) and 2 (0.73-1. 1 microns) were used for reflectance measurements of 11 natural vegetation surfaces ranging from bare soils to dense vegetation canopies. The results show that errors in inferring hemispherical reflectance from nadir reflectance can be between 11 and 45 percent for all cover types and solar angles, depending on the viewing angles. A technique is described in which a choice of two specific view angles reduces this error to less than 6 percent for both bands and for all sun angles and cover types.

  20. 29 GHz directly modulated 980 nm vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers with bow-tie shape transverse coupled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalir, Hamed; Koyama, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    A concept for the bandwidth enhancement of directly modulated vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) using a transverse-coupled-cavity (TCC) scheme is proposed, which enables us to tailor the modulation-transfer function. A bow-tie shaped oxide aperture forms the transverse-coupled cavity resulting in optical feedback to boost the modulation speed. While the bandwidth of conventional VCSELs is 9-10 GHz, the 3 dB-bandwidth of the TCC VCSEL is increased by a factor of 3 far beyond the relaxation-oscillation frequency. The maximum bandwidth is currently limited by the photo-detector used in the experiment. Clear 36 Gbps eye opening was attained with an extinction ratio of 4 dB.

  1. Hemoglobin Variant Analysis via Direct Surface Sampling of Dried Blood Spots Coupled with High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies are the most common inherited disorders. Newborn blood screening for clinically significant hemoglobin variants, including sickle (HbS), HbC, and HbD, has been adopted in many countries as it is widely acknowledged that early detection improves the outcome. We present a method for determination of Hb variants by direct surface sampling of dried blood spots by use of an Advion Triversa Nanomate automated electrospray system coupled to a high-resolution mass spectrometer. The method involves no sample preparation. It is possible to unambiguously identify homozygous and heterozygous HbS, HbC, and HbD variants in <10 min without the need for additional confirmation. The method allows for repeated analysis of a single blood spot over a prolonged time period and is tolerant of blood spot storage conditions. PMID:21341716

  2. Direct measurement of the Einstein relation in a macroscopic, non-equilibrium system of chaotic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Kyle; Liebman-Pelaez, Alexander; Corwin, Eric

    Equilibrium statistical mechanics is traditionally limited to thermal systems. Can it be applied to athermal, non-equilibrium systems that nonetheless satisfy the basic criteria of steady-state chaos and isotropy? We answer this question using a macroscopic system of chaotic surface waves which is, by all measures, non-equilibrium. The waves are generated in a dish of water that is vertically oscillated above a critical amplitude. We have constructed a rheometer that actively measures the drag imparted by the waves on a buoyant particle, a quantity entirely divorced in origin from the drag imparted by the fluid in which the particle floats. We also perform a separate, passive measurement, extracting a diffusion constant and effective temperature. Having directly measured all three properties (temperature, diffusion constant, and drag coefficient) we go on to show that our macroscopic, non-equilibrium case is wholly consistent with the Einstein relation, a classic result for equilibrium thermal systems.

  3. Methods for observing microbial biofilms directly on leaf surfaces and recovering them for isolation of culturable microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Morris, C E; Monier, J; Jacques, M

    1997-04-01

    Epifluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to observe microbial biofilms directly on leaf surfaces. Biofilms were observed on leaves of all species sampled (spinach, lettuce, Chinese cabbage, celery, leeks, basil, parsley, and broad-leaved endive), although the epifluorescent images were clearest when pale green tissue or cuticle pieces were used. With these techniques, biofilms were observed that were about 20 (mu)m in depth and up to 1 mm in length and that contained copious exopolymeric matrices, diverse morphotypes of microorganisms, and debris. The epifluorescence techniques described here can be used to rapidly determine the abundance and localization of biofilms on leaves. An additional technique was developed to recover individual biofilms or portions of single biofilms from leaves and to disintegrate them for isolation of the culturable microorganisms they contained. Nineteen biofilms from broad-leaved endive, spinach, parsley, and olive leaves were thus isolated and characterized to illustrate the applications of this technique.

  4. Response surface methodology for optimization of medium for decolorization of textile dye Direct Black 22 by a novel bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Mohana, Sarayu; Shrivastava, Shalini; Divecha, Jyoti; Madamwar, Datta

    2008-02-01

    Decolorization and degradation of polyazo dye Direct Black 22 was carried out by distillery spent wash degrading mixed bacterial consortium, DMC. Response surface methodology (RSM) involving a central composite design (CCD) in four factors was successfully employed for the study and optimization of decolorization process. The hyper activities and interactions between glucose concentration, yeast extract concentration, dye concentration and inoculum size on dye decolorization were investigated and modeled. Under optimized conditions the bacterial consortium was able to decolorize the dye almost completely (>91%) within 12h. Bacterial consortium was able to decolorize 10 different azo dyes. The optimum combination of the four variables predicted through RSM was confirmed through confirmatory experiments and hence this bacterial consortium holds potential for the treatment of industrial waste water. Dye degradation products obtained during the course of decolorization were analyzed by HPTLC.

  5. Immobilization of Chlorosulfonyl-Calix[4]arene onto the surface of silica gel through the directly estrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghvaei-Ganjali, Saeed; Zadmard, Reza; Saber-Tehrani, Mandana

    2012-06-01

    For the first time Chlorosulfonyl-Calix[4]arene has been chemically bonded to silica gel through the directly estrification without silane coupling agent to prepare Chlorosulfonyl-Calix[4]arene-bonded silica gel. Sample characterization was performed by various techniques such as elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), 29Si CP/MAS spectroscopy and acid-base titration. All data approve the successful incorporation of organic group via covalent bond. From the comparison between sulfur content determined by elemental analysis and the number of H+ determined by acid-base titration, it was shown that two ester units took place onto the new synthesized sample and two acidic sites exist on the surface.

  6. Bioprofiling of Surface/Wastewater and Bioquantitation of Discovered Endocrine-Active Compounds by Streamlined Direct Bioautography.

    PubMed

    Klingelhöfer, Ines; Morlock, Gertrud E

    2015-11-03

    A direct bioautography has been used for the simultaneous determination of four estrogens [estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2)] and two xenoestrogens [bisphenol A (BPA) and 4-n-nonyl-phenol (NP)] in surface water and wastewater samples from a sewage treatment plant. After either direct application or a liquid-liquid extraction of the water samples, the qualitative and quantitative detection of estrogen-effective compounds was performed with a planar yeast estrogen screen. The limits of detection were different for each compound, due to the specific receptor binding of individual (xeno)estrogens (1 ng/L to 15 μg/L). The mean recovery rate for all six substances at this ultratrace level was 88% [mean percent relative standard deviation (%RSD) of 17%, n = 3]. Over the whole procedure, precisions of three estrogens discovered in a wastewater sample were below 17%, n = 3. The identification of the detected bioactive compounds was performed by high-performance thin-layer chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPTLC-ESI-MS) via the elution-head-based TLC-MS Interface. Whereas the estrogens E1 and E2 could always be detected in the influent of the treatment plant, E3 was detected occasionally. The concentrations of E1 and E2 ranged from 3 to 50 ng/L, and for E3 from 98 to 210 ng/L. EE2, BPA, and NP could not be detected at the given LOD. In every second surface water sample, E1 and E2 were detected, but not E3, EE2, BPA, and NP.

  7. Integration of adsorption and direct bio-reduction of perchlorate on surface of cotton stalk based resin.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhongfei; Xu, Xing; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Song, Wen

    2015-12-01

    In this work, perchlorate was first adsorbed by the cotton stalk based resin (CS-resin) and then the laden perchlorate was directly reduced by mixed perchlorate reduction bacteria (PRB) on surface of CS-resin. The characteristics of cotton stalk, clean CS-resin, perchlorate-laden CS-resin and bio-regenerated CS-resin were evaluated by XPS, FT-IR, SEM, zeta potential measurements. All characteristics showed clearly that (i) adsorption mechanism of perchlorate onto CS-resin was based on electrostatic attraction; (ii) biological destruction of laden perchlorate was effective for bio-regenerating the saturated CS-resin. The experimental adsorption capacities (Qexp) of perchlorate by CS-resin achieved at equilibrium condition was about 138.9 mg/g. Reduction rate of laden perchlorate on surface of CS-resin were about 2.12, 1.67, 0.032 and 0.009 mg/g(CS-resin)/d for initial redox potentials poised at -193, -70, +169, and +363 mV, respectively. This indicated that the rapid reduction of laden perchlorate may occur only when conditions were present to cause a low Eh.

  8. Temporal and spatial distributions of directional counterface motion at the acetabular bearing surface in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, D. R.; Brown, T. D.; Maxian, T. A.; Callaghan, J. J.

    1998-01-01

    The motions of counterface articulation against the bearing surface of the acetabular liner strongly influence polyethylene wear debris production in contemporary total hip arthroplasty. However, the available body of relevant articular force and motion information is largely confined to resultant load excursions measured relative to instrumented femoral components, and/or to global angular motions (flexion, adduction, endorotation) of the joint. Analytical frameworks are here developed to transform such information into temporal and spatial variations of the resultant load and of the local counterface sliding velocity relative to an ordered set of discrete locations (e.g., finite element nodes) on the acetabular bearing surface. Whole-duty-cycle time histories of acetabular resultant load and counterface velocity distributions are presented for two important practical situations: human level walking gait, and a 23 degrees biaxial rocking hip simulation machine. The local counterface motions occurring in the simulator are characterized by higher velocities, smoother motion patterns, and wider directional variation than those occurring in human gait. PMID:9807707

  9. The Scope of Direct Alkylation of Gold Surface with Solutions of C1–C4n-Alkylstannanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of cleaned gold surfaces with dilute tetrahydrofuran or chloroform solutions of tetraalkylstannanes (alkyl = methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, n-butyl) or di-n-butylmethylstannyl tosylate under ambient conditions causes a self-limited growth of disordered monolayers consisting of alkyls and tin oxide. Extensive use of deuterium labeling showed that the alkyls originate from the stannane and not from ambient impurities, and that trialkylstannyl groups are absent in the monolayers, contrary to previous proposals. Methyl groups attached to the Sn atom are not transferred to the surface. Ethyl groups are transferred slowly, and propyl and butyl rapidly. In all cases, tin oxide is codeposited in submonolayer amounts. The monolayers were characterized by ellipsometry, contact angle goniometry, polarization modulated IR reflection absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy with ferrocyanide/ferricyanide, which revealed a very low charge-transfer resistance. The thermal stability of the monolayers and their resistance to solvents are comparable with those of an n-octadecanethiol monolayer. A preliminary examination of the kinetics of monolayer deposition from a THF solution of tetra-n-butylstannane revealed an approximately half-order dependence on the bulk solution concentration of the stannane, hinting that more than one alkyl can be transferred from a single stannane molecule. A detailed structure of the attachment of the alkyl groups is not known, and it is proposed that it involves direct single or multiple bonding of one or more C atoms to one or more Au atoms. PMID:26327466

  10. Top-Down Proteomics and Direct Surface Sampling of Neonatal Dried Blood Spots: Diagnosis of Unknown Hemoglobin Variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Rebecca L.; Griffiths, Paul; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J.

    2012-11-01

    We have previously shown that liquid microjunction surface sampling of dried blood spots coupled with high resolution top-down mass spectrometry may be used for screening of common hemoglobin variants HbS, HbC, and HbD. In order to test the robustness of the approach, we have applied the approach to unknown hemoglobin variants. Six neonatal dried blood spot samples that had been identified as variants, but which could not be diagnosed by current screening methods, were analyzed by direct surface sampling top-down mass spectrometry. Both collision-induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry were employed. Four of the samples were identified as β-chain variants: two were heterozygous Hb D-Iran, one was heterozygous Hb Headington, and one was heterozygous Hb J-Baltimore. The fifth sample was identified as the α-chain variant heterozygous Hb Phnom Penh. Analysis of the sixth sample suggested that it did not in fact contain a variant. Adoption of the approach in the clinic would require speed in both data collection and interpretation. To address that issue, we have compared manual data analysis with freely available data analysis software (ProsightPTM). The results demonstrate the power of top-down proteomics for hemoglobin variant analysis in newborn samples.

  11. Direct angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (DARPES) on high-Tc films: doping, strains, Fermi surface topology and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuna, D.; Ariosa, D.; Cancellieri, C.; Cloetta, D.; Abrecht, M.

    2008-03-01

    Since 1997 we systematically perform Direct ARPES ( = DARPES) on in-situ grown, non-cleaved, ultra-thin (<25nm) cuprate films. Specifically, we probe low energy electronic structure and properties of high-Tc films under different degree of epitaxial (compressive vs tensile) strain. In overdoped in-plane compressed La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) thin films we double Tc from 20K to 40K, yet the Fermi surface (FS) remains essentially 2-dimensional (2D). In contrast, tensile strained films show 3-dimensional (3D) dispersion, while Tc is drastically reduced. It seems that the in-plane compressive strain tends to push the apical oxygen far away from the CuO2 plane, enhances the 2D character of the dispersion and increases Tc, while the tensile strain seems to act exactly in the opposite direction and the resulting dispersion is 3D. We have the FS topology for both cases. As the actual lattice of cuprates is 'Napoleon-cake' -like i.e. rigid CuO2 planes alternate with softer 'reservoir' (that strains distort differently) our results tend to rule out 2D rigid lattice mean field models. Finally, we briefly discuss recent successful determination of the FS topology from the observed wavevector quantization by DARPES in cuprate films thinner than 18 units cells (<24nm). Such an approach is of broader interest as it can be extended to other similar confined (ultra-thin) functional oxide systems.

  12. Detection and direct readout of drugs in human urine using dynamic surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ronglu; Weng, Shizhuang; Yang, Liangbao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2015-03-03

    A new, novel, rapid method to detect and direct readout of drugs in human urine has been developed using dynamic surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (D-SERS) with portable Raman spectrometer on gold nanorods (GNRs) and a classification algorithm called support vector machines (SVM). The high-performance GNRs can generate gigantic enhancement and the SERS signals obtained using D-SERS on it have high reproducibility. On the basis of this feature of D-SERS, we have obtained SERS spectra of urine and urine containing methamphetamine (MAMP). SVM model was built using these data for fast identified and visual results. This general method was successfully applied to the detection of 3, 4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine (MDMA) in human urine. To verify the accuracy of the model, drug addicts' urine containing MAMP were detected and identified correctly and rapidly with accuracy more than 90%. The detection results were displayed directly without analysis of their SERS spectra manually. Compared with the conventional method in lab, the method only needs a 2 μL sample volume and takes no more than 2 min on the portable Raman spectrometer. It is anticipated that this method will enable rapid, convenient detection of drugs on site for the police.

  13. Microbial surface displayed enzymes based biofuel cell utilizing degradation products of lignocellulosic biomass for direct electrical energy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shuqin; Hou, Chuantao; Liang, Bo; Feng, Ruirui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a bacterial surface displaying enzyme based two-compartment biofuel cell for the direct electrical energy conversion from degradation products of lignocellulosic biomass is reported. Considering that the main degradation products of the lignocellulose are glucose and xylose, xylose dehydrogenase (XDH) displayed bacteria (XDH-bacteria) and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) displayed bacteria (GDH-bacteria) were used as anode catalysts in anode chamber with methylene blue as electron transfer mediator. While the cathode chamber was constructed with laccase/multi-walled-carbon nanotube/glassy-carbon-electrode. XDH-bacteria exhibited 1.75 times higher catalytic efficiency than GDH-bacteria. This assembled enzymatic fuel cell exhibited a high open-circuit potential of 0.80 V, acceptable stability and energy conversion efficiency. Moreover, the maximum power density of the cell could reach 53 μW cm(-2) when fueled with degradation products of corn stalk. Thus, this finding holds great potential to directly convert degradation products of biomass into electrical energy.

  14. Direct fabrication of compound-eye microlens array on curved surfaces by a facile femtosecond laser enhanced wet etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Hao; Wei, Yang; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Fan; Du, Guangqing; Yong, Jiale; Hou, Xun

    2016-11-01

    We report a direct fabrication of an omnidirectional negative microlens array on a curved substrate by a femtosecond laser enhanced chemical etching process, which is utilized as a molding template for duplicating bioinspired compound eyes. The femtosecond laser treatment of the curved glass substrate employs a common x-y-z stage without rotating the sample surface perpendicular to the laser beam, and uniform, omnidirectional-aligned negative microlenses are generated after a hydrofluoric acid etching. Using the negative microlens array on the concave glass substrate as a molding template, we fabricate an artificial compound eye with 3000 positive microlenses of 95-μm diameter close-packed on a 5-mm polymer hemisphere. Compared to the transferring process, the negative microlenses directly fabricated on the curved mold by our method are distortion-free, and the duplicated artificial eye presents clear and uniform imaging capabilities. This work provides a facile and efficient route to the fabrication of microlenses on any curved substrates without complicated alignment and motion control processes, which has the potential for the development of new microlens-based devices and systems.

  15. Laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass analysis of perfluoropolyether monolayer directly from hard disk medium surface.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Toshiji; Macht, Marcus; Kuroda, Masami

    2011-07-15

    Modern life is dependent on computer technology, and because the volume of digital data in the world is increasing rapidly, the importance of data storage devices is also increasing rapidly. Among them, demands for magnetic disk drive well-known as hard disk drives is quite huge and information recording density on the disk media is continuing to grow dramatically. For the research and development of the magnetic disk media, it is critical to investigate and characterize the lubricant layer formed on the disk media surface. However, it is difficult because the layer is only a monolayer which has only approximately 1 nm thickness in many cases. Although matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) measurements of monolayers have already been reported (Su, J.; Mrksich, M. Langmuir, 2003, 19, 4867-4870), lubricants used here are (co)polymers which have molecular weight distributions and are mixtures of various degrees of polymerization. This can reduce the sensitivity of MS measurement because the number (or density) of distinct single molecular species is lower than for homogeneous samples. In this report, direct measurement and characterization of lubricant monolayers using the LDI-TOF-MS instrument is performed to gain insight into detailed information like average molecular weight, polymer distribution, and two-dimensional mapping directly from magnetic disk monolayers. To our knowledge, this is the first time such information was acquired directly from hard disk media. The technique reported here might open up new possibilities also for investigations of various electronic devices other than magnetic hard disks.

  16. An Immunoassay for Dibutyl Phthalate Based on Direct Hapten Linkage to the Polystyrene Surface of Microtiter Plates

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chenxi; Ding, Shumao; You, Huihui; Zhang, Yaran; Wang, Yao; Yang, Xu; Yuan, Junlin

    2011-01-01

    Background Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) is predominantly used as a plasticizer inplastics to make them flexible. Extensive use of phthalates in both industrial processes and other consumer products has resulted in the ubiquitous presence of phthalates in the environment. In order to better determine the level of pollution in the environment and evaluate the potential adverse effects of exposure to DBP, immunoassay for DBP was developed. Methodology/Principal Findings A monoclonal antibody specific to DBP was produced from a stable hybridoma cell line generated by lymphocyte hybridoma technique. An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) employing direct coating of hapten on polystyrene microtiter plates was established for the detection of DBP. Polystyrene surface was first oxidized by permanganate in dilute sulfuric acid to generate carboxyl groups. Then dibutyl 4-aminophthalate, which is an analogue of DBP, was covalently linked to the carboxyl groups of polystyrene surface with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC). Compared with conjugate coated format (IC50 = 106 ng/mL), the direct hapten coated format (IC50 = 14.6 ng/mL) improved assay sensitivity after careful optimization of assay conditions. The average recovery of DBP from spiked water sample was 104.4% and the average coefficient of variation was 9.95%. Good agreement of the results obtained by the hapten coated icELISA and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry further confirmed the reliability and accuracy of the icELISA for the detection of DBP in certain plastic and cosmetic samples. Conclusions/Significance The stable and efficient hybridoma cell line obtained is an unlimited source of sensitive and specific antibody to DBP. The hapten coated format is proposed as generally applicable because the carboxyl groups on modified microtiter plate surface enables stable immobilization of aminated or hydroxylated hapten with EDC. The developed hapten

  17. NFLUX PRE: Validation of New Specific Humidity, Surface Air Temperature, and Wind Speed Algorithms for Ascending/Descending Directions and Clear or Cloudy Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-18

    Validation of New Specific Humidity, Surface Air Temperature , and Wind Speed Algorithms for Ascending/ Descending Directions and Clear or Cloudy...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT NFLUX PRE: Validation of New Specific Humidity, Surface Air Temperature , and Wind Speed Algorithms for Ascending/Descending...satellite retrieval algorithms. In addition to data from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) and the Advanced Microwave Sounding

  18. Magnetometry with mesospheric sodium

    PubMed Central

    Higbie, James M.; Rochester, Simon M.; Patton, Brian; Holzlöhner, Ronald; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of magnetic fields on the few 100-km length scale is significant for many geophysical applications including mapping of crustal magnetism and ocean circulation measurements, yet available techniques for such measurements are very expensive or of limited accuracy. We propose a method for remote detection of magnetic fields using the naturally occurring atomic sodium-rich layer in the mesosphere and existing high-power lasers developed for laser guide star applications. The proposed method offers a dramatic reduction in cost and opens the way to large-scale, parallel magnetic mapping and monitoring for atmospheric science, navigation, and geophysics. PMID:21321235

  19. Laser threshold magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeske, Jan; Cole, Jared H.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of sensor, which uses diamond containing the optically active nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centres as a laser medium. The magnetometer can be operated at room-temperature and generates light that can be readily fibre coupled, thereby permitting use in industrial applications and remote sensing. By combining laser pumping with a radio-frequency Rabi-drive field, an external magnetic field changes the fluorescence of the NV- centres. We use this change in fluorescence level to push the laser above threshold, turning it on with an intensity controlled by the external magnetic field, which provides a coherent amplification of the readout signal with very high contrast. This mechanism is qualitatively different from conventional NV--based magnetometers which use fluorescence measurements, based on incoherent photon emission. We term our approach laser threshold magnetometer (LTM). We predict that an NV--based LTM with a volume of 1 mm3 can achieve shot-noise limited dc sensitivity of 1.86 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}} and ac sensitivity of 3.97 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}}.

  20. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-20

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  1. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    PubMed Central

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  2. Direct imaging of the magnetization reversal in microwires using all-MOKE microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupakiewicz, A.; Chizhik, A.; Tekielak, M.; Zhukov, A.; Gonzalez, J.; Maziewski, A.

    2014-10-01

    We report a method of imaging of the magnetization reversal process using analysis of real-time images of magnetic domain structures in cylindrically shaped microwires. This method uses wide-field polarizing optical microscopy and is based on the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). The aperture diaphragm in MOKE microscope was used to control the incident angles of the light rays that reached the non-planar surface of the microwire and also determined the MOKE geometries. The movement of the non-central position of the hole in this diaphragm leads to a change in the orientation of the plane of incidence of the light along the perpendicular or the parallel direction to the axial direction of the wire. The visualization of the surface magnetic domain structures is obtained using polar and longitudinal MOKE geometries. The hysteresis loops were obtained by plotting the averaged image contrast as a function of the external magnetic field. The separation of the all-magnetization components is performed using different MOKE geometries in a microscope. We demonstrate the use of vector magnetometry to analyze the orientation of the magnetization in a cylindrically shaped microwire under the influence of an external magnetic field.

  3. The study of droplet-laden turbulent air-flow over waved water surface by direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, Oleg A.; Troitskaya, Yuliya I.; Zilitinkevich, Sergej S.

    2016-04-01

    The detailed knowledge of the interaction of wind with surface water waves is necessary for correct parameterization of turbulent exchange at the air-sea interface in prognostic models. At sufficiently strong winds, sea-spray-generated droplets interfere with the wind-waves interaction. The results of field experiments and laboratory measurements (Andreas et al., JGR 2010) show that mass fraction of air-borne spume water droplets increases with the wind speed and their impact on the carrier air-flow may become significant. Phenomenological models of droplet-laden marine atmospheric boundary layer (Kudryavtsev & Makin, Bound.-Layer Met. 2011) predict that droplets significantly increase the wind velocity and suppress the turbulent air stress. The results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a turbulent particle-laden Couette flow over a flat surface show that inertial particles may significantly reduce the carrier flow vertical momentum flux (Richter & Sullivan, GRL 2013). The results also show that in the range of droplet sizes typically found near the air-sea interface, particle inertial effects are significant and dominate any particle-induced stratification effects. However, so far there has been no attempt to perform DNS of a droplet-laden air-flow over waved water surface. In this report, we present results of DNS of droplet-laden, turbulent Couette air-flow over waved water surface. The carrier, turbulent Couette-flow configuration in DNS is similar to that used in previous numerical studies (Sullivan et al., JFM 2000, Shen et al., JFM 2010, Druzhinin et al., JGR 2012). Discrete droplets are considered as non-deformable solid spheres and tracked in a Lagrangian framework, and their impact on the carrier flow is modeled with the use of a point-force approximation. The droplets parameters in DNS are matched to the typical known spume-droplets parameters in laboratory and field experiments. The DNS results show that both gravitational settling of droplets and

  4. Dynamic sea surface topography, gravity and improved orbit accuracies from the direct evaluation of SEASAT altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, J. G.; Lerch, F.; Koblinsky, C. J.; Klosko, S. M.; Robbins, J. W.; Williamson, R. G.; Patel, G. B.

    1989-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous solution of dynamic ocean topography, gravity and orbits using satellite altimeter data is described. A GEM-T1 based gravitational model called PGS-3337 that incorporates Seasat altimetry, surface gravimetry and satellite tracking data has been determined complete to degree and order 50. The altimeter data is utilized as a dynamic observation of the satellite's height above the sea surface with a degree 10 model of dynamic topography being recovered simultaneously with the orbit parameters, gravity and tidal terms in this model. PGS-3337 has a geoid uncertainty of 60 cm root-mean-square (RMS) globally, with the uncertainty over the altimeter tracked ocean being in the 25 cm range. Doppler determined orbits for Seasat, show large improvements, with the sub-30 cm radial accuracies being achieved. When altimeter data is used in orbit determination, radial orbital accuracies of 20 cm are achieved. The RMS of fit to the altimeter data directly gives 30 cm fits for Seasat when using PGS-3337 and its geoid and dynamic topography model. This performance level is two to three times better than that achieved with earlier Goddard earth models (GEM) using the dynamic topography from long-term oceanographic averages. The recovered dynamic topography reveals the global long wavelength circulation of the oceans with a resolution of 1500 km. The power in the dynamic topography recovery is now found to be closer to that of oceanographic studies than for previous satellite solutions. This is attributed primarily to the improved modeling of the geoid which has occurred. Study of the altimeter residuals reveals regions where tidal models are poor and sea state effects are major limitations.

  5. Sum Frequency Vibrational Spectroscopy (SFVS) of Water and Hydroxyls on the Corundum (1-102) surface: Acid-base properties from direct observation of protonation states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waychunas, G.; Sung, J.; Shen, R.

    2010-12-01

    SFVS is a powerful tool for quantitative measurement of protonated functional groups on mineral surfaces. We demonstrate this for the Corundum (1-102) interface where the orientation and nature of surface hydroxyls on the dry neutral surface can be obtained and compared with Crystal Truncation Rod (CTR) models for the surface termination and most likely functional groups, effectively allowing testing of such models. A scheme for describing the hydrogen bonding among these protonated groups is found to be consistent with surface symmetry and the particular vibrational frequencies observed. The addition of water to the interface alters the hydrogen bonding of the hydroxyls and introduces water-functional group hydrogen bonding. Direct measurement of the SFVS hydroxyl and water band amplitudes can be used to test expected pKa values, and hence link acid-base properties to precise molecular surface entities. The analysis methodology can be applied to analogous nanoparticle surfaces, though with some limitations.

  6. Assessment of the accuracy of snow surface direct beam spectral albedo under a variety of overcast skies derived by a reciprocal approach through radiative transfer simulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Shusun; Zhou, Xiaobing

    2003-09-20

    With radiative transfer simulations it is suggested that stable estimates of the highly anisotropic direct beam spectral albedo of snow surface can be derived reciprocally under a variety of overcast skies. An accuracy of +/- 0.008 is achieved over a solar zenith angle range of theta0 < or = 74 degrees for visible wavelengths and up to theta0 < or = 63 degrees at the near-infrared wavelength lambda = 862 nm. This new method helps expand the database of snow surface albedo for the polar regions where direct measurement of clear-sky surface albedo is limited to large theta0's only. The enhancement will assist in the validation of snow surface albedo models and improve the representation of polar surface albedo in global circulation models.

  7. The Saga of Light-Matter Interaction and Magneto-optical Effects Applications to Atomic Magnetometry, Laser-cooled Atoms, Atomic Clocks, Geomagnetism, and Plant Bio-magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, Eric P.

    The quest to expand the limited sensorial domain, in particular to bridge the inability to gauge magnetic fields near and far, has driven the fabrication of remedial tools. The interaction of ferromagnetic material with a magnetic field had been the only available technique to gauge that field for several millennium. The advent of electricity and associated classical phenomena captured in the four Maxwell equations, were a step forward. In the early 1900s, the model of quantum mechanics provided a two-way leap forward. One came from the newly understood interaction of light and matter, and more specifically the three-way coupling of photons, atoms' angular momenta, and magnetic field, which are the foundations of atomic magnetometry. The other came from magnetically sensitive quantum effects in a fabricated energy-ladder form of matter cooled to a temperature below that of the energy steps; these quantum effects gave rise to the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Research using atomic magnetometers and SQUIDs has resulted in thousands of publications, text books, and conferences. The current status in each field is well described in Refs. [48,49,38,42] and all references therein. In this work we develop and investigate techniques and applications pertaining to atomic magnetometry. [Full text: eric.corsini gmail.com].

  8. Effect of Spectrally Varying Albedo of Vegetation Surfaces on Shortwave Radiation Fluxes and Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L.; Martins, J. V.; Yu, H.

    2012-01-01

    This study develops an algorithm for representing detailed spectral features of vegetation albedo based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) observations at 7 discrete channels, referred to as the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Albedo (MEVA) algorithm. The MEVA algorithm empirically fills spectral gaps around the vegetation red edge near 0.7 micrometers and vegetation water absorption features at 1.48 and 1.92 micrometers which cannot be adequately captured by the MODIS 7 channels. We then assess the effects of applying MEVA in comparison to four other traditional approaches to calculate solar fluxes and aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) at the top of atmosphere (TOA) based on the MODIS discrete reflectance bands. By comparing the DRF results obtained through the MEVA method with the results obtained through the other four traditional approaches, we show that filling the spectral gap of the MODIS measurements around 0.7 micrometers based on the general spectral behavior of healthy green vegetation leads to significant improvement in the instantaneous aerosol DRF at TOA (up to 3.02Wm(exp -2) difference or 48% fraction of the aerosol DRF, .6.28Wm(exp -2), calculated for high spectral resolution surface reflectance from 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers for deciduous vegetation surface). The corrections of the spectral gaps in the vegetation spectrum in the near infrared, again missed by the MODIS reflectances, also contributes to improving TOA DRF calculations but to a much lower extent (less than 0.27Wm(exp -2), or about 4% of the instantaneous DRF). Compared to traditional approaches, MEVA also improves the accuracy of the outgoing solar flux between 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at TOA by over 60Wm(exp -2) (for aspen 3 surface) and aerosol DRF by over 10Wm(exp -2) (for dry grass). Specifically, for Amazon vegetation types, MEVA can improve the accuracy of daily averaged aerosol radiative forcing in the spectral range of 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at equator at the

  9. Selective surface activation of a functional monolayer for the fabrication of nanometer scale thiol patterns and directed self-assembly of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fresco, Zachary M; Fréchet, Jean M J

    2005-06-15

    Application of a voltage bias between the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) and a silicon substrate causes the localized modification of a specially designed self-assembled monolayer (SAM), transforming a surface-bound thiocarbonate into a surface-bound thiol. The resulting surface-bound thiols are used to direct the patternwise self-assembly of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). This methodology is applied to deposit individual AuNPs onto a surface with nanometer precision and to produce 10 nm lines of closely spaced AuNPs that are a single nanoparticle in width.

  10. Use of effect-directed analysis for the identification of organic toxicants in surface flow constructed wetland sediments.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Jorge; Matamoros, Víctor; Thibaut, Rémi; Porte, Cinta; Bayona, Josep M

    2013-05-01

    Wetlands constitute one of the most efficient ecosystems with a great capacity to recycle the organic matter and able to attenuate or mitigate the chemical pollution. However, limited information exists on the ecotoxicological effects that may be caused due to the presence of these pollutants in wetland sediments. In this work, a bioassay-directed approach was used to identify toxicologically active compounds retained in sediments from a surface flow constructed wetland located in the North-Eastern of Spain. Sediment fractionation was accomplished by pressurized-liquid extraction (PLE) followed by semipreparative normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (NP-HPLC). During the extraction procedure, different solvents were sequentially applied in order to selectively extract the compounds as a function of their polarity. The cytotoxicity of the resulting fractions was assessed on the fish hepatoma cell line PLHC-1 by using the thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, while the presence of CYP1A inducing agents was determined by measuring the activity 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) in exposed cells. Identification of the compounds was performed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), polycyclic musk fragrances and pesticides were identified in the most toxic fractions.

  11. Methods for Observing Microbial Biofilms Directly on Leaf Surfaces and Recovering Them for Isolation of Culturable Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Morris, C. E.; Monier, J.; Jacques, M.

    1997-01-01

    Epifluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to observe microbial biofilms directly on leaf surfaces. Biofilms were observed on leaves of all species sampled (spinach, lettuce, Chinese cabbage, celery, leeks, basil, parsley, and broad-leaved endive), although the epifluorescent images were clearest when pale green tissue or cuticle pieces were used. With these techniques, biofilms were observed that were about 20 (mu)m in depth and up to 1 mm in length and that contained copious exopolymeric matrices, diverse morphotypes of microorganisms, and debris. The epifluorescence techniques described here can be used to rapidly determine the abundance and localization of biofilms on leaves. An additional technique was developed to recover individual biofilms or portions of single biofilms from leaves and to disintegrate them for isolation of the culturable microorganisms they contained. Nineteen biofilms from broad-leaved endive, spinach, parsley, and olive leaves were thus isolated and characterized to illustrate the applications of this technique. PMID:16535579

  12. Vector magnetometry and lightwave defect imaging sensor technologies for internal pipe inspection systems. Phase 1 and 2 feasibility study, conceptual design, and prototype development. Final report, March 1991-July 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S.; Fowler, T.; Peters, E.; Power, W.; Reed, M.

    1994-01-05

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) has been sponsoring the development of a vehicle and sensors for an integrated nondestructive internal inspection system for natural gas distribution pipes. Arthur D. Little has developed two sensor technologies, Vector Magnetometry (VM) and Lightwave Defect Imaging (LDI) for the system. The Vector Magnetometry sensor utilizes multiple arrays of miniature detection coils (fluxgate magnetometer elements); a three-axis array measures both the amplitude and phase of the magnetic leakage field that occurs in the vicinity of pipe wall defects. This technology is applicable to both cast iron and steel pipe.

  13. Infrared, spectral, directional-hemispherical reflectance of fused silica, Teflon polytetrafluoroethylene polymer, chrome oxide ceramic particle surface, Pyromark 2500 paint, Krylon 1602 paint, and Duraflect coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persky, Merle J.; Szczesniak, Martin

    2008-04-01

    Infrared, spectral, directional-hemispherical reflectivity measurements of polished fused silica, Teflon polytetrafluoroethylene polymer, chrome oxide ceramic particle surface, Pyromark 2500 paint, Krylon 1602 paint, and Duraflect coating are provided. The reflectance was measured with an estimated accuracy of 0.01 to 0.02 units and a precision of 0.005 units. All the surfaces were measured at ambient temperatures. Additionally, the chrome oxide ceramic particle surface was measured at 486 K and the Pyromark 2500 at four temperatures to 877 K. Polarization measurements are also provided for fused silica, Duraflect, chrome oxide ceramic particle surface, and Pyromark 2500 paint. Separate diffuse and specular reflectance components for the Duraflect and chrome oxide ceramic surfaces are included. Fresnel-based predictions for fused silica parallel and perpendicular polarized reflections are compared to measurements. It is notable that the Pyromark 2500 and chrome oxide ceramic particle surfaces exhibit a significant lack of manufacturing repeatability.

  14. Metal-free phthalocyanine (H2Pc) molecule adsorbed on the Au(111) surface: formation of a wide domain along a single lattice direction

    PubMed Central

    Komeda, Tadahiro; Isshiki, Hironari; Liu, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we observed the bonding configuration of the metal-free phthalocyanine (H2Pc) molecule adsorbed on the Au(111) surface. A local lattice formation started from a quasi-square lattice aligned to the close-packed directions of the Au(111) surface. Although we expected the lattice alignment to be equally distributed along the three crystallographically equivalent directions, the domain aligned normal to the ridge of the herringbone structure was missing in the STM images. We attribute this effect to the uniaxial contraction of the reconstructed Au(111) surface that can account for the formation of a large lattice domain along a single crystallographical direction. PMID:27877365

  15. Toward three-dimensional microelectronic systems: directed self-assembly of silicon microcubes via DNA surface functionalization.

    PubMed

    Lämmerhardt, Nico; Merzsch, Stephan; Ledig, Johannes; Bora, Achyut; Waag, Andreas; Tornow, Marc; Mischnick, Petra

    2013-07-02

    The huge and intelligent processing power of three-dimensional (3D) biological "processors" like the human brain with clock speeds of only 0.1 kHz is an extremely fascinating property, which is based on a massively parallel interconnect strategy. Artificial silicon microprocessors are 7 orders of magnitude faster. Nevertheless, they do not show any indication of intelligent processing power, mostly due to their very limited interconnectivity. Massively parallel interconnectivity can only be realized in three dimensions. Three-dimensional artificial processors would therefore be at the root of fabricating artificially intelligent systems. A first step in this direction would be the self-assembly of silicon based building blocks into 3D structures. We report on the self-assembly of such building blocks by molecular recognition, and on the electrical characterization of the formed assemblies. First, planar silicon substrates were functionalized with self-assembling monolayers of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane for coupling of oligonucleotides (single stranded DNA) with glutaric aldehyde. The oligonucleotide immobilization was confirmed and quantified by hybridization with fluorescence-labeled complementary oligonucleotides. After the individual processing steps, the samples were analyzed by contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. Patterned DNA-functionalized layers were fabricated by microcontact printing (μCP) and photolithography. Silicon microcubes of 3 μm edge length as model objects for first 3D self-assembly experiments were fabricated out of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers by a combination of reactive ion etching (RIE) and selective wet etching. The microcubes were then surface-functionalized using the same protocol as on planar substrates, and their self-assembly was demonstrated both on patterned silicon surfaces (88% correctly placed cubes), and to cube aggregates by complementary DNA

  16. An Artificial Turf-Based Surrogate Surface Collector for the Direct Measurement of Atmospheric Mercury Dry Deposition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the development of a new artificial turf surrogate surface (ATSS) sampler for use in the measurement of mercury (Hg) dry deposition. In contrast to many existing surrogate surface designs, the ATSS utilizes a three-dimensional deposition surface that may more...

  17. Direct Epoxidation of Propylene over Stabilized Cu+ Surface Sites on Ti Modified Cu2O

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Kattel, S.; Xiong, K.; Mudiyanselage, K.; Rykov, S.; Senanayake, S. D.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Liu, P.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Chen, J. G.

    2015-07-17

    Direct propylene epoxidation by O2 is a challenging reaction because of the strong tendency for complete combustion. Results from the current study demonstrate the feasibility to tune the epoxidation selectivity by generating highly dispersed and stabilized Cu+ active sites in a TiCuOx mixed oxide. The TiCuOx surface anchors the key surface intermediate, oxametallacycle, leading to higher selectivity for epoxidation of propylene.

  18. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: The effect of anisotropic surface tension on the morphological stability of planar interface during directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming-Wen; Lan, Man; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Yu-Yan; Wang, Zi-Dong; Xu, Jian-Jun

    2009-04-01

    This paper considers the effect of the anisotropic surface tension on the morphological stability of the planar interface during directional solidification. When the expression exhibiting the four-fold symmetry is included, the modified absolute stability criterion is obtained by employing the multi-variable expansion method. The linear stability analysis reveals that for the given temperature gradient, as the anisotropic surface tension parameter increases, the stability zone tends to decrease.

  19. Direct Measurement of the Effect of Surface Roughness on the Colloidal Forces between a Particle and Flat Plate.

    PubMed

    Suresh; Walz

    1997-12-15

    The van der Waals and electrostatic interaction energies between a single particle and a flat plate were measured using the optical technique of total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM). The particles used were 15-µm-diameter polystyrene latex spheres and the flat plate was a polished BK-7 glass slide. The measurements were performed in aqueous solutions of ionic strength ranging from 3 to 7 mM, and the particle-plate separation distances ranged from approximately 25 to 300 nm. During measurement, the particle was trapped in a secondary energy well formed by the repulsive electrostatic and attractive van der Waals forces; however, the particle was free to undergo Brownian motion at all times. These measurements, which capitalize on the extreme sensitivity of the TIRM technique, are believed to be the first direct measurement of the van der Waals interaction energy in aqueous solutions at separation distances where retardation effects are substantial. Comparison of the measured energy wells with predictions made with traditional energy equations produced only fair agreement; specifically, the measured well depths were consistently lower than predicted. However, when the measured results were compared with predictions made using the recent model of L. Suresh and J. Y. Walz ([J. Colloid Interface Sci. 183, 199 (1996)] for rough surfaces, very good agreement was obtained. The asperity heights yielding the best agreement ranged between 14 and 33 nm, with an average height of 26 nm. This value is consistent with previous estimates of the roughness height obtained by measuring the particle sedimentation velocity [J. Y. Walz and L. Suresh, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 10714 (1995)]. Copyright 1997 Academic Press.

  20. Conservation of somatic tissue derived from collared peccaries (Pecari tajacu Linnaeus, 1758) using direct or solid-surface vitrification techniques.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alana Azevedo; Lima, Gabriela Liberalino; de Queiroz Neta, Luiza Bento; Santos, Maria Valéria de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Moacir Franco; Silva, Alexandre Rodrigues; Pereira, Alexsandra Fernandes

    2017-03-04

    Cryopreservation of somatic tissue can be applied in biodiversity conservation, especially for wild species as collared peccary. We aimed to evaluate the effect of vitrification techniques of ear tissue of collared peccary [direct vitrification in cryovials (DVC) or solid-surface vitrification (SSV)] on the layers of epidermis and dermis by conventional histology and cell ability during the in vitro culture. Thus, both the vitrification methods were able to maintain normal patterns of the epidermis as the cornea and granular layers, furthermore the intercellular space and dermal-epidermal junction of the spinous layer when compared to fresh control. Nevertheless, DVC and SSV percentage of normality decreased in the morphological integrity of cytoplasm (37.5 and 25.0%) of spinous layer, respectively, as compared to the fresh fragments (100%, p < 0.05). Moreover, other differences between the fresh control (100%) and DVC tissues were verified in the intra-epidermal cleavage of the spinous (37.5%) and basal (37.5%) layers. In general, DVC and SSV techniques were efficient for the recovery of the somatic cells according to most of the evaluated parameters for the in vitro culture (p > 0.05). In addition, only at time of 72 h (D3), in the growth curve, DVC fragments showed a reduced cell concentration than fresh control. In conclusion, SSV was found to be a more efficient method for vitrifying collared peccary skin tissue when compared to DVC. These results are relevant for the tissue cryopreservation from collared peccary and could also be useful for mammals with phylogenetic relationships.