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Sample records for direct surface magnetometry

  1. Direct surface magnetometry with photoemission magnetic x-ray dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Goodman, K.W.; Schumann, F.O.

    1997-04-01

    Element specific surface magnetometry remains a central goal of synchrotron radiation based studies of nanomagnetic structures. One appealing possibility is the combination of x-ray absorption dichroism measurements and the theoretical framework provided by the {open_quotes}sum rules.{close_quotes} Unfortunately, sum rule analysis are hampered by several limitations including delocalization of the final state, multi-electronic phenomena and the presence of surface dipoles. An alternative experiment, Magnetic X-Ray Dichroism in Photoelectron Spectroscopy, holds out promise based upon its elemental specificity, surface sensitivity and high resolution. Computational simulations by Tamura et al. demonstrated the relationship between exchange and spin orbit splittings and experimental data of linear and circular dichroisms. Now the authors have developed an analytical framework which allows for the direct extraction of core level exchange splittings from circular and linear dichroic photoemission data. By extending a model initially proposed by Venus, it is possible to show a linear relation between normalized dichroism peaks in the experimental data and the underlying exchange splitting. Since it is reasonable to expect that exchange splittings and magnetic moments track together, this measurement thus becomes a powerful new tool for direct surface magnetometry, without recourse to time consuming and difficult spectral simulations. The theoretical derivation will be supported by high resolution linear and circular dichroism data collected at the Spectromicroscopy Facility of the Advanced Light Source.

  2. X-Ray Dichroism in Photoelectron Spectroscopy for Direct Element Specific Surface Magnetometry of Nanomagnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, James G.

    1997-03-01

    Element specific surface magnetometry remains a central goal of synchrotron radiation based studies of nanomagnetic structures. One appealing possibility is the combination of xray absorption dichroism measurements and the theoretical framework provided by the "sum rules."[1] Unfortunately, sum rule analyses are hampered by several limitations [2], including delocalization of the final state, multi-electronic phenomena and the presence of surface dipoles. An alternative experiment, Magnetic Xray Dichroism in Photoelectron Spectroscopy, holds out promise based upon its elemental specificity, surface sensitivity and high resolution. Computational simulations by Tamura et al [3] demonstrated the relationship between exchange and spin orbit splittings and experimental data of linear and circular dichroisms. Now we [4] have developed an analytical framework which allows for the direct extraction of core level exchange splittings from circular and linear dichroic photoemission data. By extending a model initially proposed by Venus [5], it is possible to show a linear relation between normalized dichroism peaks in the experimental data and the underlying exchange splitting. Since it is reasonable to expect that exchange splittings and magnetic moments track together [6], this measurement thus becomes a powerful new tool for direct surface magnetometry, without recourse to time consuming and difficult spectral simulations. The theoretical derivation will be supported by high resolution linear and circular dichroism data collected at the Spectromicroscopy Facility of the Advanced Light Source. [7,8] This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under contract No. W-7405-ENG-48. 1. B.T. Thole et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 68,1943 (1992); P. Carra et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 694 (1993). 2. J.G. Tobin et al Phys. Rev. B 52, 6530 (1995). 3. E. Tamura et al, Phys. Rev. Lett 73, 1533 (1994) 4. J.G. Tobin, K.W. Goodman, F.O. Schumann, R.F. Willis, J

  3. Mercury's Surface Magnetic Field Determined from Proton-Reflection Magnetometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winslow, Reka M.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Anderson, Brian J.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Lillis, Robert J.; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2014-01-01

    Solar wind protons observed by the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit about Mercury exhibit signatures of precipitation loss to Mercury's surface. We apply proton-reflection magnetometry to sense Mercury's surface magnetic field intensity in the planet's northern and southern hemispheres. The results are consistent with a dipole field offset to the north and show that the technique may be used to resolve regional-scale fields at the surface. The proton loss cones indicate persistent ion precipitation to the surface in the northern magnetospheric cusp region and in the southern hemisphere at low nightside latitudes. The latter observation implies that most of the surface in Mercury's southern hemisphere is continuously bombarded by plasma, in contrast with the premise that the global magnetic field largely protects the planetary surface from the solar wind.

  4. Optical Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, Dmitry; Kimball, Derek F. Jackson

    2013-03-01

    Part I. Principles and Techniques: 1. General principles and characteristics of optical magnetometers D. F. Jackson Kimball, E. B. Alexandrov and D. Budker; 2. Quantum noise in atomic magnetometers M. V. Romalis; 3. Quantum noise, squeezing, and entanglement in radio-frequency optical magnetometers K. Jensen and E. S. Polzik; 4. Mx and Mz magnetometers E. B. Alexandrov and A. K. Vershovskiy; 5. Spin-exchange-relaxation-free (serf) magnetometers I. Savukov and S. J. Seltzer; 6. Optical magnetometry with modulated light D. F. Jackson Kimball, S. Pustelny, V. V. Yashchuk and D. Budker; 7. Microfabricated atomic magnetometers S. Knappe and J. Kitching; 8. Optical magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond V. M. Acosta, D. Budker, P. R. Hemmer, J. R. Maze and R. L. Walsworth; 9. Magnetometry with cold atoms W. Gawlik and J. M. Higbie; 10. Helium magnetometers R. E. Slocum, D. D. McGregor and A. W. Brown; 11. Surface coatings for atomic magnetometry S. J. Seltzer, M.-A. Bouchiat and M. V. Balabas; 12. Magnetic shielding V. V. Yashchuk, S.-K. Lee and E. Paperno; Part II. Applications: 13. Remote detection magnetometry S. M. Rochester, J. M. Higbie, B. Patton, D. Budker, R. Holzlöhner and D. Bonaccini Calia; 14. Detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with atomic magnetometers M. P. Ledbetter, I. Savukov, S. J. Seltzer and D. Budker; 15. Space magnetometry B. Patton, A. W. Brown, R. E. Slocum and E. J. Smith; 16. Detection of biomagnetic fields A. Ben-Amar Baranga, T. G. Walker and R. T. Wakai; 17. Geophysical applications M. D. Prouty, R. Johnson, I. Hrvoic and A. K. Vershovskiy; Part III. Broader Impact: 18. Tests of fundamental physics with optical magnetometers D. F. Jackson Kimball, S. K. Lamoreaux and T. E. Chupp; 19. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscopes E. A. Donley and J. Kitching; 20. Commercial magnetometers and their application D. C. Hovde, M. D. Prouty, I. Hrvoic and R. E. Slocum; Index.

  5. Fault location in SF/sub 6/ insulated conductors using direct fluxgate magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Itani, A.M.; Houston, J.M.; Perry, M.P.

    1983-02-01

    Gas insulated substations (GIS) are becoming more popular for substation design largely due to reduced space requirements as well as environmental benefits. Isolated phase designs generally consist of a single cylindrical conductor enclosed in a coaxial aluminum tank (or sheath). Pressurized SF/sub 6/ is usually used for electrical insulation. For increased reliability, instrumentation methods have been developed to detect the location of power arcs which occur within the enclosed containers. The authors have developed a new technique in which the location of a fault is detected by directly measuring the axial component of the 60 Hz magnetic field which appears outside the sheath during the flashover. The instrument is a specialized form of ''fluxgate'' magnetometer modified to allow long life using inexpensive batteries. The magnetometer output is coupled directly to a switching circuit which operates a ''magnetic disc'' indicator. When a fault is registered, the disc indicator exhibits a bright color which can be easily read from a distance of 10-15m. The instrument is proposed for use at areas within the substation which are more prone to flashovers, especially near dielectric spacers which support the inner conductor every few meters. Flashover measurements indicate that the sensor reliably detects a fault current of 4 kA or larger under typical substation conditions. This sensor is attractive for retrofitting existing gas-insulated systems in that installation does not require shutting down the system. Since no penetrations or alterations of an existing system are required, there is no way that sensor installation can compromise system operation.

  6. Magnetometry 101

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA satellites use very sensitive devices called magnetometers to measure the magnetic fields of planets. Like very sensitive compasses, these devices can measure both direction and strength of pl...

  7. Direct heating surface combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beremand, D. G.; Shire, L. I.; Mroz, T. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The combustor utilizes a non-adiabatic flame to provide low-emission combustion for gas turbines. A fuel-air mixture is directed through a porous wall, the other side of which serves as a combustion surface. A radiant heat sink disposed adjacent to and spaced from the combustion surface controls the combustor flame temperature in order to prevent the formation of oxides of nitrogen. A secondary air flow cools the heat sink. Additionally, up to 100% of secondary air flow is mixed with the combustion products at the direct heating surface combustor to dilute such products thereby reducing exit temperature. However, if less than 100% secondary air is mixed to the combustor, the remainder may be added to the combustion products further downstream.

  8. Environment Assisted Precision Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellaro, P.; Goldstein, G.; Maze, J. R.; Jiang, L.; Hodges, J. S.; Sorensen, A. S.; Lukin, M. D.

    2010-03-01

    We describe a method to enhance the sensitivity of magnetometry and achieve nearly Heisenberg-limited precision measurement using a novel class of entangled states. An individual qubit is used to sense the dynamics of surrounding ancillary qubits, which are in turn affected by the external field to be measured. The resulting sensitivity enhancement is determined by the number of ancillas strongly coupled to the sensor qubit, it does not depend on the exact values of the couplings (allowing to use disordered systems), and is resilient to decoherence. As a specific example we consider electronic spins in the solid-state, where the ancillary system is associated with the surrounding spin bath. The conventional approach has been to consider these spins only as a source of decoherence and to adopt decoupling scheme to mitigate their effects. Here we describe novel control techniques that transform the environment spins into a resource used to amplify the sensor spin response to weak external perturbations, while maintaining the beneficial effects of dynamical decoupling sequences. We discuss specific applications to improve magnetic sensing with diamond nano-crystals, using one Nitrogen-Vacancy center spin coupled to Nitrogen electronic spins.

  9. Angular-resolved magnetometry beyond triclinic crystals part II: torque magnetometry of Cp*ErCOT single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, Mauro; Cucinotta, Giuseppe; Boulon, Marie-Emmanuelle; El Hallak, Fadi; Gao, Song; Sessoli, Roberta

    2014-10-20

    The experimental investigation of the molecular magnetic anisotropy in crystals in which the magnetic centers are symmetry related, but do not have a parallel orientation has been approached by using torque magnetometry. A single crystal of the orthorhombic organometallic Cp*ErCOT [Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadiene anion (C5Me5(-)); COT=cyclooctatetraenedianion (C8H8(2-))] single-molecule magnet, characterized by the presence of two nonparallel families of molecules in the crystal, has been investigated above its blocking temperature. The results confirm an Ising-type anisotropy with the easy direction pointing along the pseudosymmetry axis of the complex, as previously suggested by out-of-equilibrium angular-resolved magnetometry. The use of torque magnetometry, not requiring the presence of magnetic hysteresis, proves to be even more powerful for these purposes than standard single-crystal magnetometry. Furthermore, exploiting the sensitivity and versatility of this technique, magnetic anisotropy has been investigated up to 150 K, providing additional information on the crystal-field splitting of the ground J multiplet of the Er(III) ion.

  10. Torque Magnetometry and Susceptometry using Split-Beam Optomechanical Nanocavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdous, Tayyaba; Wu, Nathanael; Wu, Marcelo; Fani Sani, Fatemeh; Losby, Joseph; Barclay, Paul; Freeman, Mark

    A large number of sensitive magnetometry methods are limited to cryogenic operation. We present a highly sensitive torque magnetometer using a photonic crystal optomechanical split-beam nanocavity operating in air at room temperature. The chip-based magnetometer is proficient for probing both the net magnetization and AC susceptibility of individual magnetic microstructures. This is demonstrated through the observation of nanoscale Barkhausen transitions in the magnetic hysteresis of a permalloy thin-film element. Control of the vector direction of the radio frequency drive allows detection of accompanying AC susceptibility terms.

  11. Directional emittance surface measurement system and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puram, Chith K. (Inventor); Daryabeigi, Kamran (Inventor); Wright, Robert (Inventor); Alderfer, David W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and process for measuring the variation of directional emittance of surfaces at various temperatures using a radiometric infrared imaging system. A surface test sample is coated onto a copper target plate provided with selective heating within the desired incremental temperature range to be tested and positioned onto a precision rotator to present selected inclination angles of the sample relative to the fixed positioned and optically aligned infrared imager. A thermal insulator holder maintains the target plate on the precision rotator. A screen display of the temperature obtained by the infrared imager, and inclination readings are provided with computer calculations of directional emittance being performed automatically according to equations provided to convert selected incremental target temperatures and inclination angles to relative target directional emittance values. The directional emittance of flat black lacquer and an epoxy resin measurements obtained are in agreement with the predictions of the electromagnetic theory and with directional emittance data inferred from directional reflectance measurements made on a spectrophotometer.

  12. Optimizing phase-estimation algorithms for diamond spin magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusran, N. M.; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev

    2014-07-01

    We present a detailed theoretical and numerical study discussing the application and optimization of phase-estimation algorithms (PEAs) to diamond spin magnetometry. We compare standard Ramsey magnetometry, the nonadaptive PEA (NAPEA), and quantum PEA (QPEA) incorporating error checking. Our results show that the NAPEA requires lower measurement fidelity, has better dynamic range, and greater consistency in sensitivity. We elucidate the importance of dynamic range to Ramsey magnetic imaging with diamond spins, and introduce the application of PEAs to time-dependent magnetometry.

  13. High sensitivity ancilla assisted nanoscale DC magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yixiang; Ajoy, Ashok; Marseglia, Luca; Saha, Kasturi; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Sensing slowly varying magnetic fields are particularly relevant to many real world scenarios, where the signals of interest are DC or close to static. Nitrogen Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond are a versatile platform for such DC magnetometry on nanometer length scales. Using NV centers, the standard technique for measuring DC magnetic fields is via the Ramsey protocol, where sensitivities can approach better than 1 μ T/vHz, but are limited by the sensor fast dephasing time T2*. In this work we instead present a method of sensing DC magnetic fields that is intrinsically limited by the much longer T2 coherence time. The method exploits a strongly-coupled ancillary nuclear spin to achieve high DC field sensitivities potentially exceeding that of the Ramsey method. In addition, through this method we sense the perpendicular component of the DC magnetic field, which in conjunction with the parallel component sensed by the Ramsey method provides a valuable tool for vector DC magnetometry at the nanoscale.

  14. Scanning Cryogenic Magnetometry with a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Benjamin; Straquadine, Joshua; Yang, Fan

    2016-05-01

    Microscopy techniques co-opted from nonlinear optics and high energy physics have complemented solid-state probes in elucidating exotic order manifest in condensed matter systems. We present a novel scanning magnetometer which adds the techniques of ultracold atomic physics to the condensed matter toolbox. Our device, the Scanning Quantum CRyogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) uses a one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate of 87 Rb to image magnetic and electric fields near surfaces between room and cryogenic temperatures, and allows for rapid sample changes while retaining UHV compatibility for atomic experiments. We present our characterization of the spatial resolution and magnetic field sensitivity of the device, and discuss the advantages and applications of this magnetometry technique. In particular, we will discuss our plans for performing local transport measurements in technologically relevant materials such as Fe-based superconductors and topological insulators.

  15. Modification of Surface Energy via Direct Laser Ablative Surface Patterning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J., Jr. (Inventor); Belcher, Marcus A. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hopkins, John W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Surface energy of a substrate is changed without the need for any template, mask, or additional coating medium applied to the substrate. At least one beam of energy directly ablates a substrate surface to form a predefined topographical pattern at the surface. Each beam of energy has a width of approximately 25 micrometers and an energy of approximately 1-500 microJoules. Features in the topographical pattern have a width of approximately 1-500 micrometers and a height of approximately 1.4-100 micrometers.

  16. Directional self-cleaning superoleophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Law, Kock-Yee

    2012-08-14

    In this work, we report the creation of a grooved surface comprising 3 μm grooves (height ~4 μm) separated by 3 μm from each other on a silicon wafer by photolithography. The grooved surface was then modified chemically with a fluorosilane layer (FOTS). The surface property was studied by both static and dynamic contact angle measurements using water, hexadecane, and a polyethylene wax ink as the probing liquids. Results show that the grooved surface is both superhydrophobic and superoleophobic. Its observed contact angles agree well with the calculated Cassie-Baxter angles. More importantly, we are able to make a replica of the composite wax ink-air interface and study it by SEM. Microscopy results not only show that the droplet of the wax ink "sits" on air in the composite interface but also further reveal that the ink drop actually pins underneath the re-entrant structure in the side wall of the grooved structure. Contact angle measurement results indicate that wetting on the grooved surface is anisotropic. Although liquid drops are found to have lower static and advancing contact angles in the parallel direction, the drops are found to be more mobile, showing smaller hysteresis and lower sliding angles (as compared to the FOTS wafer surface and a comparable 3-μm-diameter pillar array FOTS surface). The enhanced mobility is attributable to the lowering of the resistance against an advancing liquid because 50% of the advancing area is made of a solid strip where the liquid likes to wet. This also implies that the contact line for advancing is no longer smooth but rather is ragged, having the solid strip area leading the wetting and the air strip area trailing behind. This interpretation is supported by imaging the geometry of the contact lines using molten ink drops recovered from the sliding angle experiments in both the parallel and orthogonal directions. Because the grooved surface is mechanically stronger against mechanical abrasion, the self

  17. Single spin magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, Nicholas Edward Kennedy

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a solid-state point defect with an electronic spin that has accessible quantum mechanical properties. At room temperature, the electronic ground state sub-levels of the NV center can be initialized and read out using optical pumping, as well as coherently controlled using microwave frequency fields. This thesis focuses on using the spin state of the NV center for highly-sensitive magnetometry under ambient conditions. In particular, when the diamond surface is properly prepared, we demonstrate that NV centers can be used to measure the magnetic fluctuations stemming from individual molecules and ions attached or adsorbed to the surface. This thesis begins by introducing the physical and electronic structure of the NV center at room temperature, followed by the fundamental measurements that allow us to use the NV center as a sensitive magnetometer. Combining our sensitive NV center magnetometer with techniques from chemistry and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we demonstrate the all-optical detection of a single-molecule electron spin at room temperature. Finally, we discuss the time-resolved detection of individual electron spins adsorbing onto the surface of nano-diamonds. By extending our techniques to nano-diamonds, we move closer towards textit{in vitro} magnetic field sensing that could be pivotal for better disease diagnosis and drug development.

  18. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Sarah; Kucera, Therese; White, Stephen; Dove, James; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake; Rachmeler, Laurel; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine

    2016-03-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  19. High dynamic range diamond magnetometry for time dependent magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummal Momeen, M.; Nusran, N. M.; Gurudev Dutt, M. V.

    2012-02-01

    Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have become a topic of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in high resolution nanoscale magnetometry and quantum information processing devices at ambient conditions. We will present our recent progress on implementing novel phase estimation algorithms with a single electron spin qubit associated with the NV center, in combination with dynamical decoupling techniques, to improve the dynamic range and sensitivity of magnetometry with time-varying magnetic fields.

  20. Quantitative magnetometry of ferromagnetic nanorods by microfluidic analytical magnetophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balk, A. L.; Mair, L. O.; Guo, F.; Hangarter, C.; Mathai, P. P.; McMichael, R. D.; Stavis, S. M.; Unguris, J.

    2015-09-01

    We introduce an implementation of magnetophoresis to measure the absolute magnetization of ferromagnetic nanorods dispersed in fluids, by analyzing the velocity of single nanorods under an applied magnetic field gradient. A microfluidic guideway prevents aggregation of nanorods, isolates them, and confines their motion for analysis. We use a three-dimensional imaging system to precisely track nanorod velocity and particle-surface proximity. We test the effect of the guideway on nanorod velocity under field gradient application, finding that it guides magnetophoresis, but imposes insignificant drag beyond that of a planar surface. This result provides insight into the transport of magnetic nanorods at microstructured interfaces and allows the use of an analytical model to accurately determine the reacted viscous drag in the force balance needed for quantitative magnetometry. We also estimate the confining potential of the guideway with Brownian motion measurements and Boltzmann statistics. We use our technique to measure the magnetization of ferromagnetic nanorods with a noise floor of 8.5 × 10-20 A.m2.Hz-½. Our technique is quantitative, rapid, and scalable for determining the absolute magnetization of ferromagnetic nanoparticles with high throughput.

  1. Target parameter and error estimation using magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, S. J.; Witten, A. J.; Won, I. J.; Taylor, D.

    The problem of locating and identifying buried unexploded ordnance from magnetometry measurements is addressed within the context of maximum likelihood estimation. In this approach, the magnetostatic theory is used to develop data templates, which represent the modeled magnetic response of a buried ferrous object of arbitrary location, iron content, size, shape, and orientation. It is assumed that these objects are characterized both by a magnetic susceptibility representing their passive response to the earth's magnetic field and by a three-dimensional magnetization vector representing a permanent dipole magnetization. Analytical models were derived for four types of targets: spheres, spherical shells, ellipsoids, and ellipsoidal shells. The models can be used to quantify the Cramer-Rao (error) bounds on the parameter estimates. These bounds give the minimum variance in the estimated parameters as a function of measurement signal-to-noise ratio, spatial sampling, and target characteristics. For cases where analytic expressions for the Cramer-Rao bounds can be derived, these expressions prove quite useful in establishing optimal sampling strategies. Analytic expressions for various Cramer-Rao bounds have been developed for spherical- and spherical shell-type objects. An maximum likelihood estimation algorithm has been developed and tested on data acquired at the Magnetic Test Range at the Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Tech Center in Indian Head, Maryland. This algorithm estimates seven target parameters. These parameters are the three Cartesian coordinates (x, y, z) identifying the buried ordnance's location, the three Cartesian components of the permanent dipole magnetization vector, and the equivalent radius of the ordnance assuming it is a passive solid iron sphere.

  2. He I Vector Magnetometry of Field-aligned Superpenumbral Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, T. A.; Penn, M. J.; Lin, H.

    2013-05-01

    Atomic-level polarization and Zeeman effect diagnostics in the neutral helium triplet at 10830 Å in principle allow full vector magnetometry of fine-scaled chromospheric fibrils. We present high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of superpenumbral fibrils in the He I triplet with sufficient polarimetric sensitivity to infer their full magnetic field geometry. He I observations from the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter are paired with high-resolution observations of the Hα 6563 Å and Ca II 8542 Å spectral lines from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer from the Dunn Solar Telescope in New Mexico. Linear and circular polarization signatures in the He I triplet are measured and described, as well as analyzed with the advanced inversion capability of the "Hanle and Zeeman Light" modeling code. Our analysis provides direct evidence for the often assumed field alignment of fibril structures. The projected angle of the fibrils and the inferred magnetic field geometry align within an error of ±10°. We describe changes in the inclination angle of these features that reflect their connectivity with the photospheric magnetic field. Evidence for an accelerated flow (~40 m s-2) along an individual fibril anchored at its endpoints in the strong sunspot and weaker plage in part supports the magnetic siphon flow mechanism's role in the inverse Evershed effect. However, the connectivity of the outer endpoint of many of the fibrils cannot be established.

  3. Spin precession by pulsed inductive magnetometry in thin amorphous plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magni, Alessandro; Bottauscio, Oriano; Caprile, Ambra; Celegato, Federica; Ferrara, Enzo; Fiorillo, Fausto

    2014-05-01

    Broadband magnetic loss and damping behavior of Co-based amorphous ribbons and thin films have been investigated. The permeability and loss response of the transverse anisotropy ribbon samples in the frequency range DC to 1 GHz is interpreted in terms of combined and distinguishable contributions to the magnetization process by domain wall displacements and magnetization rotations. The latter alone are shown to survive at the highest frequencies, where the losses are calculated via coupled Maxwell and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equations. Remarkably high values of the LLG damping coefficient α = 0.1-0.2 are invoked in this theoretical prediction. Direct measurements of α by pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry are thus performed, both in these laminae and in amorphous films of identical composition, obtaining about one order of magnitude increase of the α value upon the 100 nm÷10 μm thickness range. This confirms that dissipation by eddy currents enters the LLG equation via large increase of the damping coefficient.

  4. Spin precession by pulsed inductive magnetometry in thin amorphous plates

    SciTech Connect

    Magni, Alessandro; Bottauscio, Oriano; Caprile, Ambra Celegato, Federica; Ferrara, Enzo; Fiorillo, Fausto

    2014-05-07

    Broadband magnetic loss and damping behavior of Co-based amorphous ribbons and thin films have been investigated. The permeability and loss response of the transverse anisotropy ribbon samples in the frequency range DC to 1 GHz is interpreted in terms of combined and distinguishable contributions to the magnetization process by domain wall displacements and magnetization rotations. The latter alone are shown to survive at the highest frequencies, where the losses are calculated via coupled Maxwell and Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert (LLG) equations. Remarkably high values of the LLG damping coefficient α = 0.1–0.2 are invoked in this theoretical prediction. Direct measurements of α by pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry are thus performed, both in these laminae and in amorphous films of identical composition, obtaining about one order of magnitude increase of the α value upon the 100 nm÷10 μm thickness range. This confirms that dissipation by eddy currents enters the LLG equation via large increase of the damping coefficient.

  5. He I VECTOR MAGNETOMETRY OF FIELD-ALIGNED SUPERPENUMBRAL FIBRILS

    SciTech Connect

    Schad, T. A.; Penn, M. J.; Lin, H.

    2013-05-10

    Atomic-level polarization and Zeeman effect diagnostics in the neutral helium triplet at 10830 A in principle allow full vector magnetometry of fine-scaled chromospheric fibrils. We present high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of superpenumbral fibrils in the He I triplet with sufficient polarimetric sensitivity to infer their full magnetic field geometry. He I observations from the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter are paired with high-resolution observations of the H{alpha} 6563 A and Ca II 8542 A spectral lines from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer from the Dunn Solar Telescope in New Mexico. Linear and circular polarization signatures in the He I triplet are measured and described, as well as analyzed with the advanced inversion capability of the ''Hanle and Zeeman Light'' modeling code. Our analysis provides direct evidence for the often assumed field alignment of fibril structures. The projected angle of the fibrils and the inferred magnetic field geometry align within an error of {+-}10 Degree-Sign . We describe changes in the inclination angle of these features that reflect their connectivity with the photospheric magnetic field. Evidence for an accelerated flow ({approx}40 m s{sup -2}) along an individual fibril anchored at its endpoints in the strong sunspot and weaker plage in part supports the magnetic siphon flow mechanism's role in the inverse Evershed effect. However, the connectivity of the outer endpoint of many of the fibrils cannot be established.

  6. Single-spin magnetometry with multipulse sensing sequences.

    PubMed

    de Lange, G; Ristè, D; Dobrovitski, V V; Hanson, R

    2011-02-25

    We experimentally demonstrate single-spin magnetometry with multipulse sensing sequences. The use of multipulse sequences can greatly increase the sensing time per measurement shot, resulting in enhanced ac magnetic field sensitivity. We theoretically derive and experimentally verify the optimal number of sensing cycles, for which the effects of decoherence and increased sensing time are balanced. We perform these experiments for oscillating magnetic fields with fixed phase as well as for fields with random phase. Finally, by varying the phase and frequency of the ac magnetic field, we measure the full frequency-filtering characteristics of different multipulse schemes and discuss their use in magnetometry applications.

  7. An airborne magnetometry study across Zagros collision zone along Ahvaz-Isfahan route in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskooi, Behrooz; Abedi, Maysam

    2015-12-01

    Convergence between the Eurasian and Arabian plates formed the Zagros orogenic belt between Late Cretaceous and Pliocene as a relatively young and active fold-thrust belt in Iran. The structural geology along Ahvaz to Isfahan route across Zagros is investigated employing magnetic data in order to determine the crustal structure in the collision zone of the two Palaeo-continents. Airborne magnetometry data with a line space of survey of 7.5 km have been used to image the variations of the apparent magnetic susceptibility along this route. At first the airborne data were stably 500-m downward continued to the ground surface in order to enhance subtle changes of the Earth's magnetic field. Then 3D inverse modeling of magnetic data was implemented, while the cross section of the magnetic susceptibility variations along the route was mapped down to a depth of 100 km. The acquired magnetic susceptibility model could appropriately predict the observed magnetic data as well. In addition, the analytic signal filter was applied to the reduced-to-pole magnetic data leading to the determination of active faults in Zagros fold-thrust belt (ZFTB) structural zone based upon the generated peaks. Some probable locations of fault events were also suggested in Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ). The locations of faults correspond well to the magnetic susceptibility variations on the inverted section. Probable direction, slope and depth extension of these faults were also plotted on the magnetic susceptibility model, showing an intensively tectonized zone of the SSZ. The main difference between two domains is that the Eurasian plate seems to contain high magnetic susceptible materials compared to the Arabian plate. The recovered model of the apparent magnetic susceptibility values indicated that the average thickness of the non-magnetic sedimentary units is about 11 km and the Curie depth locates approximately at depth of 24 km for the whole studied area.

  8. Directional variations in thermal emission from geologic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Finiol, Gary W.; Henderson, Bradley G.

    1990-01-01

    The directional emission properties of geologic surfaces were investigated using a ground-based, hand-held infrared radiometer and thermistor probe. Field sites involved surfaces ranging from smooth playa and sand surfaces to a very rough aa lava flow. Large directional variations in thermal emission were found; they result from the presence of surface roughness at large scales producing spatial variations in kinetic temperature and at small scales producing emissivity variations. These variations are important in remotely determining surface structure and understanding surface energy balance and emission spectra.

  9. Magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy defects in diamond.

    PubMed

    Rondin, L; Tetienne, J-P; Hingant, T; Roch, J-F; Maletinsky, P; Jacques, V

    2014-05-01

    The isolated electronic spin system of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre in diamond offers unique possibilities to be employed as a nanoscale sensor for detection and imaging of weak magnetic fields. Magnetic imaging with nanometric resolution and field detection capabilities in the nanotesla range are enabled by the atomic-size and exceptionally long spin-coherence times of this naturally occurring defect. The exciting perspectives that ensue from these characteristics have triggered vivid experimental activities in the emerging field of 'NV magnetometry'. It is the purpose of this article to review the recent progress in high-sensitivity nanoscale NV magnetometry, generate an overview of the most pertinent results of the last years and highlight perspectives for future developments. We will present the physical principles that allow for magnetic field detection with NV centres and discuss first applications of NV magnetometers that have been demonstrated in the context of nano magnetism, mesoscopic physics and the life sciences.

  10. Composite-pulse magnetometry in the solid-state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Clarice; Hirose, Masashi; Cappellaro, Paola

    2012-02-01

    The sensitivity yielded by magnetometry schemes at the quantum level is limited by experimental imperfections in the interrogation pulses and, especially in the solid-state, by relatively short dephasing times. We investigate the use of composite-pulse magnetometry sequences as a means of addressing both limitations. We perform proof-of-principle experiments on magnetometry and noise characterization through a continuous sequence of rotary echoes applied to a single qubit in the nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond. The rotary echo is the simplest unit of a composite pulse sequence, consisting of two consecutive pulses of identical nominal rotation angle applied with opposite excitation phases. Unlike other composite sequences, the rotary echo corrects for excitation field, but not for static field, inhomogeneities. The presented scheme is flexible in that a suitable choice of rotation angle compensates for different scenarios of noise strength and origin (dephasing or fluctuations in excitation intensity). Obtained sensitivities are in the range between those obtained with the widely used Ramsey spectroscopy sequence and the recently implemented method relying on frequency beats in Rabi oscillations.

  11. Optimizing the Growth of (111) Diamond for Diamond Based Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamp, Eric; Godwin, Patrick; Samarth, Nitin; Snyder, David; de Las Casas, Charles; Awschalom, David D.

    Magnetometers based on nitrogen vacancy (NV) ensembles have recently achieved sub-picotesla sensitivities [Phys. Rev. X 5, 041001(2015)], putting the technique on par with SQUID and MFM magnetometry.Typically these sensors use (100) oriented diamond with NV centers forming along all four (111) crystal orientations.This allows for vector magnetometry, but is a hindrance to the absolute sensitivity. Diamond grown on (111) oriented substrates through microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition(MP-CVD) provides a promising route in this context since such films can exhibit preferential orientation greater than 99% [Appl. Phys. Lett.104, 102407 (2014)]. An important challenge though is to achieve sufficiently high NV center densities required for enhancing the sensitivity of an NV ensemble magnetometer.We report systematic studies of the MP-CVD growth and characterization of (111) oriented diamond, where we vary growth temperature, methane concentration, and nitrogen doping. For each film we study the Nitrogen to NV ratio, the NV- to NV0 ratio, and alignment percentage to minimize sources of decoherence and ensure preferential alignment. From these measurements we determine the optimal growth parameters for high sensitivity, NV center ensemble scalar magnetometry. Funded by NSF-DMR.

  12. Object silhouettes and surface directions through stereo matching image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Akira; Kumagai, Hideo

    2015-09-01

    We have studied the object silhouettes and surface direction through the stereo matching image processing to recognize the position, size and surface direction of the object. For this study we construct the pixel number change distribution of the HSI color component level, the binary component level image by the standard deviation threshold, the 4 directional pixels connectivity filter, the surface elements correspondence by the stereo matching and the projection rule relation. We note that the HSI color component level change tendency of the object image near the focus position is more stable than the HSI color component level change tendency of the object image over the unfocused range. We use the HSI color component level images near the fine focused position to extract the object silhouette. We extract the object silhouette properly. We find the surface direction of the object by the pixel numbers of the correspondence surface areas and the projection cosine rule after the stereo matching image processing by the characteristic areas and the synthesized colors. The epipolar geometry is used in this study because a pair of imager is arranged on the same epipolar plane. The surface direction detection results in the proper angle calculation. The construction of the object silhouettes and the surface direction detection of the object are realized.

  13. Bioinspired Directional Surfaces for Adhesion, Wetting and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Matthew J.; Sekeroglu, Koray

    2013-01-01

    In Nature, directional surfaces on insect cuticle, animal fur, bird feathers, and plant leaves are comprised of dual micro-nanoscale features that tune roughness and surface energy. This feature article summarizes experimental and theoretical approaches for the design, synthesis and characterization of new bioinspired surfaces demonstrating unidirectional surface properties. The experimental approaches focus on bottom-up and top-down synthesis methods of unidirectional micro- and nanoscale films to explore and characterize their anomalous features. The theoretical component of the review focuses on computational tools to predict the physicochemical properties of unidirectional surfaces. PMID:23526120

  14. Plasmon Surface Polariton Dispersion by Direct Optical Observation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swalen, J. D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes several simple experiments that can be used to observe directly the dispersion curve of plasmon surface polaritons (PSP) on flat metal surfaces. A method is described of observing the increonental change in the wave vector of the PSP due to coatings that differ in thickness by a few nanometers. (Author/CS)

  15. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E.; Spiliotis, Alexandros K.; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T. Peter

    2015-09-01

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces.

  16. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals

    SciTech Connect

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E.; Spiliotis, Alexandros K.; Rakitzis, T. Peter; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit

    2015-09-14

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces.

  17. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals.

    PubMed

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E; Spiliotis, Alexandros K; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2015-09-14

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces. PMID:26374026

  18. Surface-directed modulation of supramolecular gel properties.

    PubMed

    Angelerou, Maria Galini Faidra; Sabri, Akmal; Creasey, Rhiannon; Angelerou, Polyxeni; Marlow, Maria; Zelzer, Mischa

    2016-03-21

    Supramolecular materials are widely studied and used for a variety of applications; in most applications, these materials are in contact with surfaces of other materials. Whilst much focus has been placed on elucidating factors that affect supramolecular material properties, the influence of the material surface on gel formation is poorly characterised. Here, we demonstrate that surface properties directly affect the fibre architecture and mechanical properties of self-assembled cytidine based gel films. PMID:26960905

  19. The analysis of directionality of honed cylinder liners surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pawlus, P; Reizer, R; Wieczorowski, M

    2014-01-01

    Various methods describing the directionality of honed cylinder liner surface topography are compared. The procedure of deep valleys recognition and determination of angular spectra on the basis of ratio of valleys widths in perpendicular directions is described in detail. The applications of deep valleys analysis, power spectral density, and cross-correlation functions for measured plateau-honed cylinder surface topographies were studied. It was found that method based on the deep valleys study assured correct values of honing angle estimation. Procedure of sampling interval selection for this method application was developed. Usefulness of deep valleys analysis for obtaining parameters characterizing other features specific for cylinder liner surfaces is described. PMID:23784941

  20. Directional excitation of the designer surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiuyang; Qiu, Chunyin; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-05-01

    We propose an efficient design route to realize directional excitation of the structure-induced surface waves for airborne sound. The whole system consists of a periodically corrugated rigid plate combining with a pair of asymmetric narrow slits. The directional excitation of the mimicked surface waves stems from the destructive interference between the evanescent waves emitted from the double slits. The directionality can be switched conveniently by tuning the external frequency. The theoretical prediction is validated well by simulations and experiments. Promising applications can be anticipated such as in designing compact devices for airborne sound.

  1. Direct Mapping of Hippocampal Surfaces with Intrinsic Shape Context

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yonggang; Thompson, Paul M.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Rose, Stephen E.; Tu, Zhuowen; Dinov, Ivo; Toga, Arthur W.

    2007-01-01

    We propose in this paper a new method for the mapping of hippocampal (HC) surfaces to establish correspondences between points on HC surfaces and enable localized HC shape analysis. A novel geometric feature, the intrinsic shape context, is defined to capture the global characteristics of the HC shapes. Based on this intrinsic feature, an automatic algorithm is developed to detect a set of landmark curves that are stable across population. The direct map between a source and target HC surface is then solved as the minimizer of a harmonic energy function defined on the source surface with landmark constraints. For numerical solutions, we compute the map with the approach of solving partial differential equations on implicit surfaces. The direct mapping method has the following properties: 1) it has the advantage of being automatic; 2) it is invariant to the pose of HC shapes. In our experiments, we apply the direct mapping method to study temporal changes of HC asymmetry in Alzheimer disease (AD) using HC surfaces from 12 AD patients and 14 normal controls. Our results show that the AD group has a different trend in temporal changes of HC asymmetry than the group of normal controls. We also demonstrate the flexibility of the direct mapping method by applying it to construct spherical maps of HC surfaces. Spherical harmonics (SPHARM) analysis is then applied and it confirms our results about temporal changes of HC asymmetry in AD. PMID:17625918

  2. Nonlinear optical magnetometry with accessible in situ optical squeezing

    SciTech Connect

    Otterstrom, N.; Pooser, R. C.; Lawrie, B. J.

    2014-11-14

    In this paper, we demonstrate compact and accessible squeezed-light magnetometry using four-wave mixing in a single hot rubidium vapor cell. The strong intrinsic coherence of the four-wave mixing process results in nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) on each mode of a two-mode relative-intensity squeezed state. Finally, this framework enables 4.7 dB of quantum noise reduction while the opposing polarization rotation signals of the probe and conjugate fields add to increase the total signal to noise ratio.

  3. Direct observation of negative-index microwave surface waves.

    PubMed

    Dockrey, J A; Horsley, S A R; Hooper, I R; Sambles, J R; Hibbins, A P

    2016-01-01

    Waves propagating in a negative-index material have wave-front propagation (wavevector, k) opposite in direction to that of energy flow (Poynting vector, S). Here we present an experimental realisation at microwave frequencies of an analogous surface wave phenomenon whereby a metasurface supports a surface mode that has two possible wavevector eigenstates within a narrow band of frequencies: one that supports surface waves with positive mode index, and another that supports surface waves with negative mode index. Phase sensitive measurements of the near-field of surface waves across the metasurface show the contrasting spatial evolution of the two eigenstates, providing a unique opportunity to directly observe the negative-index phenomenon. PMID:26903284

  4. Direct observation of negative-index microwave surface waves

    PubMed Central

    Dockrey, J. A.; Horsley, S. A. R.; Hooper, I. R.; Sambles, J. R.; Hibbins, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Waves propagating in a negative-index material have wave-front propagation (wavevector, k) opposite in direction to that of energy flow (Poynting vector, S). Here we present an experimental realisation at microwave frequencies of an analogous surface wave phenomenon whereby a metasurface supports a surface mode that has two possible wavevector eigenstates within a narrow band of frequencies: one that supports surface waves with positive mode index, and another that supports surface waves with negative mode index. Phase sensitive measurements of the near-field of surface waves across the metasurface show the contrasting spatial evolution of the two eigenstates, providing a unique opportunity to directly observe the negative-index phenomenon. PMID:26903284

  5. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication. PMID:27562634

  6. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-08-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication.

  7. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication. PMID:27562634

  8. Uni-directional liquid spreading on asymmetric nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Kuang-Han; Xiao, Rong; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2010-05-01

    Controlling surface wettability and liquid spreading on patterned surfaces is of significant interest for a broad range of applications, including DNA microarrays, digital lab-on-a-chip, anti-fogging and fog-harvesting, inkjet printing and thin-film lubrication. Advancements in surface engineering, with the fabrication of various micro/nanoscale topographic features, and selective chemical patterning on surfaces, have enhanced surface wettability and enabled control of the liquid film thickness and final wetted shape. In addition, groove geometries and patterned surface chemistries have produced anisotropic wetting, where contact-angle variations in different directions resulted in elongated droplet shapes. In all of these studies, however, the wetting behaviour preserves left-right symmetry. Here, we demonstrate that we can harness the design of asymmetric nanostructured surfaces to achieve uni-directional liquid spreading, where the liquid propagates in a single preferred direction and pins in all others. Through experiments and modelling, we determined that the spreading characteristic is dependent on the degree of nanostructure asymmetry, the height-to-spacing ratio of the nanostructures and the intrinsic contact angle. The theory, based on an energy argument, provides excellent agreement with experimental data. The insights gained from this work offer new opportunities to tailor advanced nanostructures to achieve active control of complex flow patterns and wetting on demand.

  9. Magnetometry at Uruk (Iraq): The city of King Gilgamesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbinder, J.; Becker, H.; van Ess, M.

    2003-04-01

    Uruk (Tell Warka) is one of the most famous sites for the early cultural development at Mesopotamia. The Sumerian city state was also important for the origin of writing and Uruk was the scene of action of mans oldest epic, the famous Epic of Gilgamesh (2600 B.C). During the time of the Sassanides, 400 A.D. the city was given up completely. Today the ruin is dominated by shallow hills and wadis, covered by pottery, mudbricks and slags. The area is totally free of modern buildings and far away from the modern village of Warka. Therefore it is an ideal place for uncompensated cesium magnetometry. The most sensational find was the discovery of a canal system inside the city. Furthermore the magnetogram shows the remains of buildings of the Babylonian type as well as garden structures, a middle Babylonian graveyard and the so called "New Years Temple" of the God Anu or Godess Ischtar. The city wall, which we prospected in a length of more than one kilometer, includes a water gate and is nearly 40 meters broad. From magnetometry it is evident that it was build by burned mudbricks as it was described by the Epic. In the west of the "New Years Temple" in the middle of the former Euphrates river we detected the remains of a building which may be interpreted as a burial. But if this building is the grave of the famous King Gilgamesh as it was described by the Epic of Gilgamesh it must remain speculative.

  10. Ultrasensitive magnetometry and magnetic resonance imaging using cantilever detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugar, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    Micromachined cantilevers make remarkable magnetometers for nanoscale measurements of magnetic materials and for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We present various applications of cantilever magnetometry at low temperature using cantilevers capable of attonewton force sensitivity. Small, unexpected magnetic effects can be seen, such as anomalous damping in magnetic field. A key application is magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) of both electron and nuclear spins. In recent experiments with MRFM-based NMR imaging, 3D spatial resolution better than 10 nm was achieved for protons in individual virus particles. The achieved volumetric resolution represents an improvement of 100 million compared to the best conventional MRI. The microscope is sensitive enough to detect NMR signals from adsorbed layers of hydrocarbon contamination, hydrogen in multiwall carbon nanotubes and the phosphorus in DNA. Operating with a force noise on the order of 6 aN per root hertz with a magnetic tip that produces a field gradient in excess of 30 gauss per nanometer, the magnetic moment sensitivity is ˜0.2 Bohr magnetons. The corresponding field sensitivity is ˜3 nT per root hertz. To our knowledge, this combination of high field sensitivity and nanometer spatial resolution is unsurpassed by any other form of nanometer-scale magnetometry.

  11. Magnetometry and Ground-Penetrating Radar Studies in the Sihuas Valley, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisnicki, E.; Papadimitrios, K.; Bank, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Quillcapampa la Antigua site in Peru's Sihuas Valley is a settlement from Peru's Middle Horizon (600-100 A.D.). Archaeological interest in the area stems from the question of whether ancient civilizations were able to have extensive state control of distant groups, or whether state influence occurred through less direct ties (e.g., marriage, religion, or trade). Our geophysical surveys are preliminary to archaeological digging in the area. Ground-penetrating radar and magnetometry attempt to locate areas of interest for focused archaeological excavation, characterize the design of architectural remains and burial mounds in the area, and allow archaeologists to interpret the amount of influence the Wari civilization had on the local residents.

  12. Anomalous Surface Diffusion in Nanoscale Direct Deposition Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manandhar, P.; Jang, J.; Schatz, G. C.; Ratner, M. A.; Hong, S.

    2003-03-01

    We report the first observation of anomalous diffusion in nanometer scale direct deposition processes utilizing dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). DPN permits quite general nanostructure patterns to be drawn on flat surfaces. Here we demonstrate experimentally, and discuss theoretically, the situation in which the molecular ink in DPN binds weakly to the surface. We observe, for the weak-binding case of 1-dodecylamine on mica, that anomalous diffusion occurs, leading to nearly fractal deposition patterns.

  13. Surface-directed boundary flow in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tom T; Taylor, David G; Lim, Kwan Seop; Sedlak, Miroslav; Bashir, Rashid; Mosier, Nathan S; Ladisch, Michael R

    2006-07-01

    Channel geometry combined with surface chemistry enables a stable liquid boundary flow to be attained along the surfaces of a 12 microm diameter hydrophilic glass fiber in a closed semi-elliptical channel. Surface free energies and triangular corners formed by PDMS/glass fiber or OTS/glass fiber surfaces are shown to be responsible for the experimentally observed wetting phenomena and formation of liquid boundary layers that are 20-50 microm wide and 12 microm high. Viewing this stream through a 20 microm slit results in a virtual optical window with a 5 pL liquid volume suitable for cell counting and pathogen detection. The geometry that leads to the boundary layer is a closed channel that forms triangular corners where glass fiber and the OTS coated glass slide or PDMS touch. The contact angles and surfaces direct positioning of the fluid next to the fiber. Preferential wetting of corner regions initiates the boundary flow, while the elliptical cross-section of the channel stabilizes the microfluidic flow. The Young-Laplace equation, solved using fluid dynamic simulation software, shows contact angles that exceed 105 degrees will direct the aqueous fluid to a boundary layer next to a hydrophilic fiber with a contact angle of 5 degrees. We believe this is the first time that an explanation has been offered for the case of a boundary layer formation in a closed channel directed by a triangular geometry with two hydrophobic wetting edges adjacent to a hydrophilic surface. PMID:16800710

  14. Directional motion of impacting drops on dual-textured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Vaikuntanathan, V; Sivakumar, D

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we analyze the directional movement of impacting liquid drops on dual-textured solid surfaces comprising two different surface morphologies: a textured surface and a smooth surface. The dynamics of liquid drops impacting onto the junction line between the two parts of the dual-textured surfaces is studied experimentally for varying drop impact velocity. The dual-textured surfaces used here featured a variation in their textures' geometrical parameters as well as their surface chemistry. Two types of liquid drop differing in their surface tension were used. The impact process develops a net horizontal drop velocity towards the higher-wettability surface portion and results in a bulk movement of the impacting drop liquid. The final distance moved by the impacting drop from the junction line decreases with increasing impacting drop Weber number We. A fully theoretical model, employing a balance of forces acting at the drop contact line as well as energy conservation, is formulated to determine the variation, with We, of net horizontal drop velocity and subsequent movement of the impacting drop on the dual-textured surfaces.

  15. Tunable directive radiation of surface-plasmon diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngkyu; Hoshino, Kazunori; Alù, Andrea; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2013-02-11

    We experimentally demonstrate tunable radiation from a periodic array of plasmonic nanoscatterers, tailored to convert surface plasmon polaritons into directive leaky modes. Extending our previous studies on efficient directional beaming based on leaky-wave radiation from periodic gratings driven by a subwavelength slit, we experimentally show dynamic beam sweeping by tuning the directional leaky-wave mechanism in real-time. Two alternative tuning mechanisms, wavelength- and index-mediated beam sweeping, are employed to modify the relative phase of scattered light at each grating edge and provide the required modification of the radiation angle.

  16. Liquid Crystals Indicate Directions Of Surface Shear Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.

    1996-01-01

    Report consisting of main text of U.S. Patent 5,394,752 presents detailed information on one aspect of method of using changes in colors of liquid-crystal coatings to indicate instantaneous directions of flow-induced shear stresses (skin friction) on aerodynamic surfaces.

  17. Direct attachment of DNA to semiconducting surfaces for biosensor applications.

    PubMed

    Fahrenkopf, Nicholas M; Shahedipour-Sandvik, Fatemeh; Tokranova, Natalya; Bergkvist, Magnus; Cady, Nathaniel C

    2010-11-01

    In this work we propose a novel method of immobilizing nucleic acids for field effect or high electron mobility transistor-based biosensors. The naturally occurring 5' terminal phosphate group on nucleic acids was used to coordinate with semiconductor and metal oxide surfaces. We demonstrate that DNA can be directly immobilized onto ZrO(2), AlGaN, GaN, and HfO(2) while retaining its ability to hybridize to target sequences with high specificity. By directly immobilizing the probe molecule to the sensor surface, as opposed to conventional crosslinking strategies, the number of steps in device fabrication is reduced. Furthermore, hybridization to target strands occurs closer to the sensor surface, which has the potential to increase device sensitivity by reducing the impact of the Debye screening length.

  18. Direct attachment of DNA to semiconducting surfaces for biosensor applications.

    PubMed

    Fahrenkopf, Nicholas M; Shahedipour-Sandvik, Fatemeh; Tokranova, Natalya; Bergkvist, Magnus; Cady, Nathaniel C

    2010-11-01

    In this work we propose a novel method of immobilizing nucleic acids for field effect or high electron mobility transistor-based biosensors. The naturally occurring 5' terminal phosphate group on nucleic acids was used to coordinate with semiconductor and metal oxide surfaces. We demonstrate that DNA can be directly immobilized onto ZrO(2), AlGaN, GaN, and HfO(2) while retaining its ability to hybridize to target sequences with high specificity. By directly immobilizing the probe molecule to the sensor surface, as opposed to conventional crosslinking strategies, the number of steps in device fabrication is reduced. Furthermore, hybridization to target strands occurs closer to the sensor surface, which has the potential to increase device sensitivity by reducing the impact of the Debye screening length. PMID:20869405

  19. Directional transport of impinging capillary jet on wettability engineered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aritra; Chatterjee, Souvick; Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine

    2015-11-01

    Impingement of capillary jet on a surface is important for applications like heat transfer, or for liquid manipulation in bio-microfluidic devices. Using wettability engineered surfaces, we demonstrate pump-less and directional transport of capillary jet on a flat surface. Spatial contrast of surface energy and a wedge-shape geometry of the wettability confined track on the substrate facilitate formation of instantaneous spherical bulges upon jet impingement; these bulges are further transported along the superhydrophilic tracks due to Laplace pressure gradient. Critical condition warranted for formation of liquid bulge along the varying width of the superhydrophilic track is calculated analytically and verified experimentally. The work throws light on novel fluid phenomena of unidirectional jet impingement on wettability confined surfaces and provides a platform for innovative liquid manipulation technique for further application. By varying the geometry and wettability contrast on the surface, one can achieve volume flow rates of ~ O(100 μL/sec) and directionally guided transport of the jet liquid, pumplessly at speeds of ~ O(10cm/sec).

  20. Multi-channel Chip-Scale Atomic Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alem, Orang; Sander, Tilmann; Le Blanc, John; Mhaskar, Rahul; Kitching, John; Trahms, Lutz; Knappe, Svenja

    2013-05-01

    We characterize a 25-channel microfabricated atomic magnetometry system. Each fiber-coupled sensor head contains a (1 . 5 mm) 3 Rb vapor cell and is pumped and probed with a single light beam from a diode laser. The magnetic sensitivities of all sensors range between 15 and 35 fT /√{ Hz} at 10-100 Hz. The sensors require around 70 mW of power and are optically heated through the absorption of light on the windows of the cells. The small size (< 1 cm3) of the fiber coupled, uncooled sensor heads provides great flexibility in the placement of these sensors in conformal configurations for various imaging applications. As one example, we will present measurements of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) with this system that were taken on healthy human subjects.

  1. Scanning Cryogenic Magnetometry with a 1D Bose Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straquadine, Joshua; Yang, Fan; Lev, Benjamin

    We present a novel scanning probe magnetometer suitable for cryogenic studies, in which the probe is a Bose-Einstein condensate of 87Rb. The system is designed for rapid sample changes and operation between 35 K and room temperature while remaining compatible with the UHV requirements of ultracold atom experiments. We demonstrate a spatial resolution (FWHM) of 2.6 μm and a repeatability of 1.9 +/- 1.0 nT. We also show that the system is operating close to the fundamental measurement limits set by photon shot noise and atom shot noise. Our scanning quantum cryogenic atom microscope is suitable for fundamental studies of transport and magnetism in condensed matter systems such as high-temperature superconductors and topological insulators. We discuss the advantages and applications of this magnetometry technique.

  2. Ultra-high sensitivity moment magnetometry of geological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade Lima, E.; Weiss, B. P.

    2012-12-01

    Scanning SQUID microscopy offers a unique combination of high spatial resolution and magnetic field sensitivity that allows for the detection of magnetic moments as weak as 10^-16 Am2. This opens the possibility of extending paleomagnetic analyses to samples that have not been accessible to standard moment magnetometry, for which the detection limit is 10^-12 Am2. Of particular interest are individual terrestrial and extraterrestrial particles of small size (< 500 μm) that may preserve records of planetary dynamos and early nebular magnetic fields. Example targets include impact melt spherules, zircon and other silicate crystals, micrometeorites, cosmic dust, chondrules and refractory inclusions. These grains may be adequately modeled as small uniformly magnetized volumes, such that retrieving their magnetic moments from measured magnetic field maps does not require solving non-unique inverse problems. As a consequence, SQUID microscopes can be utilized as ultra-high sensitivity moment magnetometers. We show alternating field and thermal demagnetization data for several grains that demonstrate the performance of this technique. In addition, we compare scanning SQUID microscopy data with net moment measurements of the same samples performed by a commercial superconducting rock magnetometer. The results agree for stronger moments, as expected, but rapidly diverge as net moments fall below the lower 10^-10 Am2 range. These studies underscore the inability of conventional instruments not only to detect very weak moments but also to isolate contamination originating from background sources such as sample holders and mounts. We expect ultra-high sensitivity moment magnetometry using scanning SQUID microscopy will be a powerful tool in helping elucidate the formation of the solar system and planetary history.

  3. Direct Measurements of the Surface-Atmosphere Exchange of Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tevlin, A.; Murphy, J. G.; Wentworth, G.; Gregoire, P.

    2012-12-01

    As the dominant atmospheric base, ammonia plays an important role in the formation and growth of inorganic aerosols. Surface-atmosphere exchange of ammonia has been observed to occur as a bidirectional flux governed by the relative magnitudes of atmospheric gas phase concentration and a temperature-dependent surface compensation point. In order to better characterise the links between gas-particle and surface-atmosphere exchanges, more direct measurements of these exchanges are necessary. Eddy Covariance (EC) can provide the most direct surface-atmosphere flux measurements, but its requirement for high frequency data combined with the reactive nature of ammonia have limited its application for this species. In order to address this lack, an investigation into the instrumental sensitivity and time response requirements for EC ammonia flux measurements was carried out using a Quantum Cascade-Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS) capable of measuring ammonia concentration at 10 Hz. Time response was additionally improved through the use of a heated sample line and custom glass inlet, and the system was deployed over a short grass field in rural Ontario. The ammonia measurements were used along with three dimensional sonic anemometer wind speed data to calculate EC ammonia fluxes. When combined with simultaneous measurements of the inorganic composition of gas and particle phases made by Ambient Ion Monitor - Ion Chromatography (AIM-IC), these flux measurements can provide insight into the links between gas-particle and surface-atmosphere exchange.

  4. Influence of engineered surface on cell directionality and motility.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qing Yuan; Tong, Wing Yin; Shi, Jue; Shi, Peng; Lam, Yun Wah; Pang, Stella W

    2014-03-01

    Control of cell migration is important in numerous key biological processes, and is implicated in pathological conditions such as cancer metastasis and inflammatory diseases. Many previous studies indicated that cell migration could be guided by micropatterns fabricated on cell culture surfaces. In this study, we designed a polydimethylsiloxane cell culture substrate with gratings punctuated by corners and ends, and studied its effects on the behavior of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. MC3T3-E1 cells elongated and aligned with the gratings, and the migration paths of the cells appeared to be guided by the grating pattern. Interestingly, more than 88% of the cells cultured on these patterns were observed to reverse their migration directions at least once during the 16 h examination period. Most of the reversal events occurred at the corners and the ends of the pattern, suggesting these localized topographical features induce an abrupt loss in directional persistence. Moreover, the cell speed was observed to increase temporarily right after each directional reversal. Focal adhesion complexes were more well-established in cells on the angular gratings than on flat surfaces, but the formation of filipodia appeared to be imbalanced at the corners and the ends, possibly leading to the loss of directional persistence. This study describes the first engineered cell culture surface that consistently induces changes in the directional persistence of adherent cells. This will provide an experimental model for the study of this phenomenon and a valuable platform to control the cell motility and directionality, which can be used for cell screening and selection. PMID:24589941

  5. Radiative decay engineering 3. Surface plasmon-coupled directional emission

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    A new method of fluorescence detection that promises to increase sensitivity by 20- to 1000-fold is described. This method will also decrease the contribution of sample autofluorescence to the detected signal. The method depends on the coupling of excited fluorophores with the surface plasmon resonance present in thin metal films, typically silver and gold. The phenomenon of surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) occurs for fluorophores 20–250 nm from the metal surface, allowing detection of fluorophores over substantial distances beyond the metal–sample interface. SPCE depends on interactions of the excited fluorophore with the metal surface. This interaction is independent of the mode of excitation; that is, it does not require evanescent wave or surface-plasmon excitation. In a sense, SPCE is the inverse process of the surface plasmon resonance absorption of thin metal films. Importantly, SPCE occurs over a narrow angular distribution, converting normally isotropic emission into easily collected directional emission. Up to 50% of the emission from unoriented samples can be collected, much larger than typical fluorescence collection efficiencies near 1% or less. SPCE is due only to fluorophores near the metal surface and may be regarded as emission from the induced surface plasmons. Autofluorescence from more distal parts of the sample is decreased due to decreased coupling. SPCE is highly polarized and autofluorescence can be further decreased by collecting only the polarized component or only the light propagating with the appropriate angle. Examples showing how simple optical configurations can be used in diagnostics, sensing, or biotechnology applications are presented. Surface plasmon-coupled emission is likely to find widespread applications throughout the biosciences. PMID:14690679

  6. Waveguide-coupled directional Raman radiation for surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Li, Jin-Yang; Wang, Li; Lu, Dan-Feng; Qi, Zhi-Mei

    2015-09-01

    Kretschmann-type waveguide structures, including Plasmon Waveguide (PW) and Resonant Mirror (RM), have been applied in interfacial Raman spectroscopy due to the following unique features: (1) unlike the classic surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates made of either gold or silver, both PW and RM can be prepared using a large variety of inexpensive materials; (2) the field enhancement factors using these structures can be theoretically predicted and experimentally controlled, which enables us to manipulate the surface Raman sensitivity with high repeatability; (3) the use of transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) modes for Raman excitation allows us to evaluate the orientation of target molecules immobilized on the waveguide surface; (4) the unwanted impact of noble metals on the Raman fingerprints of target molecules, which is often observed for conventional SERS substrates, can be avoided upon the use of dielectric waveguides. In this paper, guided-mode-coupled directional Raman emission, which is an additional important feature of the waveguide Raman technique, was theoretically investigated based on the optical reciprocity theorem combined with the Fresnel equations. The simulation results indicate that the directional Raman emission from a dipole located within the field confinement and penetration depth of a guided mode depends on both the orientation of the dipole and its distance from the waveguide surface. Raman light from the TE-oriented dipoles is launched into the prism coupler at the TE-mode resonance angle and that from the non-TE-oriented dipoles propagates at the TM-mode resonance angle. The intensity of the guided-mode-excited Raman signal propagating at the mode resonance angle is proportional to the fourth power of the mode field (E(4)) at the depth of the dipole from the waveguide surface. This means that the guided-mode-excited and guided-mode-coupled directional Raman spectroscopy has a detection depth that is as

  7. Engineered microtopographies and surface chemistries direct cell attachment and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Chelsea Marie

    topographically modified surface (R2=0.82). Functionalized PEGDMA hydrogels significantly reduced attachment and attachment strength of Navicula and C. marina. These hydrogels also reduced attachment of zoospores of Ulva compared to PDMSe. Attachment of Ulva to microtopographies in PDMSe and PEGDMA-co-HEMA negatively correlated with ERIII*Re (R2 = 0.94 and R2 = 0.99, respectively). Incorporating a surface energy term into this equation created a correlation between the attachment densities of cells from two evolutionarily diverse groups on substrates of two surface chemistries with an equation that describes the various microtopographies and surface chemistries in terms of surface energy (R2 = 0.80). The current Attachment Model can now be used to design engineered antifouling surface microtopographies and chemistries that inhibit the attachment of organisms from three evoluntionarily diverse groups. Hydrogels based on PEGDMA were also chosen as a substratum material for mammalian cell culture. Capturing endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and inducing differentiation into the endothelial cell (EC) phenotype is the ideal way to re-endothelialize a small-diameter vascular graft. Substratum elasticity has been reported to direct stem cell differentiation into specific lineages. Functionalized PEGDMA hydrogels provided good compliance, high fidelity of topographic features and sites for surface modification with biomolecules. Fibronectin grafting and topography both increased EC attachment. This combination of adjustable elasticity, surface chemistry and topography has the potential to promote the capture and differentiation of EPCs into a confluent EC monolayer. Engineered microtopographies replicated in PDMSe directed elongation and alignment of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) and human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) compared to smooth surfaces. Engineered cellular micro-environments were created with specific surface energies defined by chemistry

  8. Site-directed, on-surface assembly of DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Rebecca; Saccà, Barbara; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional DNA lattices have been assembled from DNA double-crossover (DX) motifs on DNA-encoded surfaces in a site-specific manner. The lattices contained two types of single-stranded protruding arms pointing into opposite directions of the plane. One type of these protruding arms served to anchor the DNA lattice on the solid support through specific hybridization with surface-bound, complementary capture oligomers. The other type of arms allowed for further attachment of DNA-tethered probe molecules on the opposite side of the lattices exposed to the solution. Site-specific lattice assembly and attachment of fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotides and DNA-protein conjugates was demonstrated using DNA microarrays on flat, transparent mica substrates. Owing to their programmable orientation and addressability over a broad dynamic range from the nanometer to the millimeter length scale, such supramolecular architecture might be used for presenting biomolecules on surfaces, for instance, in biosensor applications. PMID:26306556

  9. Direct modification of silicon surface by nanosecond laser interference lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dapeng; Wang, Zuobin; Zhang, Ziang; Yue, Yong; Li, Dayou; Maple, Carsten

    2013-10-01

    Periodic and quasi-periodic structures on silicon surface have numerous significant applications in photoelectronics and surface engineering. A number of technologies have been developed to fabricate the structures in various research fields. In this work, we take the strategy of direct nanosecond laser interference lithography technology, and focus on the silicon material to create different well-defined surface structures based on theoretical analysis of the formation of laser interference patterns. Two, three and four-beam laser interference systems were set up to fabricate the grating, regular triangle and square structures on silicon surfaces, respectively. From the AFM micrographs, the critical features of structures have a dependence on laser fluences. For a relative low laser fluence, grating and dot structures formed with bumps due to the Marangoni Effect. With the increase of laser fluences, melt and evaporation behaviors can be responsible for the laser modification. By properly selecting the process parameters, well-defined grating and dot structures can been achieved. It can be demonstrated that direct laser interference lithography is a facile and efficient technology with the advantage of a single process procedure over macroscale areas for the fabrication of micro and nano structures.

  10. Vertical directivities of seismic arrays on the ground surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, H.; Asanuma, H.

    2012-12-01

    Microtremor survey method (MSM) is a technique to estimate subsurface velocity structures by inverting phase velocities of the surface waves in the microtremors. We can explorer the S-wave velocity structures at significantly lower expenses by the MSM than the conventional geophysical techniques because of its passive nature. Coherent waves across an array are identified in the MSM, and, therefore, all the existing velocity inversion methods have been deduced under an implicit assumption of horizontal velocity structure. However, it is expected that the development of the 3D inversion theory would drastically enhance applicability and reliability of the MSM. We, hence, investigated the characteristics of vertical directivities of the arrays deployed on the ground surface as an initial step for deriving the 3D MSM. We have firstly examined the response of an elemental two sensor array to which plane waves propagates from the deep crust with a certain angle of incident, and then examined the characteristics of several types of arrays, including triangular and circular arrays to clarify the characteristics of practical arrays. Real part of the complex coherence function, which has been derived to evaluate coherence of the Rayleigh wave between sensors for plane waves (Shiraishi et al., 2006), has been applied for this investigation. Our results showed that the directivity varies according to a parameter kr ( k : wave number, r : separation of the sensors ). A vertical directivity of two sensor array at kr = π shows a rotationally-symmetrical shape (Figure (a)). In contrast, an equilateral triangle array has a conspicuous directivity toward the vertical direction (cf. Figure (b)). This divergence suggests that the shape of the vertical directivity significantly depend on the geometry, and a sharp directivity toward just beneath the array can be realized by designing the vertical directivity. We concluded from this study that 3D MSM is feasible and further study to

  11. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatridge, Michael Jonathan

    Information stored in magnetic fields plays an important role in everyday life. This information exists over a remarkably wide range of sizes, so that magnetometry at a variety of length scales can extract useful information. Examples at centimeter to millimeter length scales include measurement of spatial and temporal character of fields generated in the human brain and heart, and active manipulation of spins in the human body for non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). At micron length scales, magnetometry can be used to measure magnetic objects such as flux qubits; at nanometer length scales it can be used to study individual magnetic domains, and even individual spins. The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) based magnetometer for two such applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nanoscale magnetometry, are the focus of this thesis. Conventional MRI has developed into a powerful clinical tool for imaging the human body. This technique is based on nuclear magnetic resonance of protons with the addition application of three-dimensional magnetic field gradients to encode spatial information. Most clinical MRI systems involve magnetic fields generated by superconducting magnets, and the current trend is to higher magnetic fields than the widely used 1.5-T systems. Nonetheless, there is ongoing interest in the development of less expensive imagers operating at lower fields. The prepolarized, SQUID detected ultra-low field MRI (ULF MRI) developed by the Clarke group allows imaging in very weak fields (typically 132 muT, corresponding to a resonant frequency of 5.6 kHz). At these low field strengths, there is enhanced contrast in the longitudinal relaxation time of various tissue types, enabling imaging of objects which are not visible to conventional MRI, for instance prostate cancer. We are currently investigating the contrast between normal and cancerous

  12. Smoothing and roughening of slip surfaces in direct shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagy, Amir; Badt, Nir; Hatzor, Yossef H.

    2015-04-01

    Faults in the upper crust contain discrete slip surfaces which have absorbed a significant part of the shear displacement along them. Field measurements demonstrate that these surfaces are rough at all measurable scales and indicate that surfaces of relatively large-slip faults are statistically smoother than those of small-slip faults. However, post faulting and surface erosion process that might affect the geometry of outcrops cannot be discounted in such measurements. Here we present experimental results for the evolution of shear surface topography as function of slip distance and normal stress in direct shear experiments. A single prismatic fine grain limestone block is first fractured in tension mode using the four-point bending test methodology and then the fracture surface topography is scanned using a laser profilometer. We then shear the obtained tensile fracture surfaces in direct shear, ensuring the original fracture surfaces are in a perfectly matching configuration at the beginning of the shear test. First, shearing is conducted to distances varying from 5 to 15 mm under constant normal stress of 2MPa and a constant displacement rate of 0.05 mm/s using two closed-loop servo controlled hydraulic pistons, supplying normal and shear forces (Davidesko et al., 2014). In the tested configuration peak shear stress is typically attained after a shear displacement of about 2-3 mm, beyond which lower shear stress is required to continue shearing at the preset displacement rate of 0.05 mm/s as is typical for initially rough joints. Following some initial compression the interface begins to dilate and continues to do so until the end of the test. The sheared tensile fracture surface is then scanned again and the geometrical evolution, in term of RMS roughness and power spectral density (PSD) is analyzed. We show that shearing smooth the surface along all our measurements scales. The roughness ratio, measured by initial PSD / final PSD for each wavelength

  13. Land-surface studies with a directional neutron detector.

    SciTech Connect

    Desilets, Darin; Brennan, James S.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Marleau, Peter

    2009-09-01

    Direct measurements of cosmic-ray neutron intensity were recorded with a neutron scatter camera developed at SNL. The instrument used in this work is a prototype originally designed for nuclear non-proliferation work, but in this project it was used to characterize the response of ambient neutrons in the 0.5-10 MeV range to water located on or above the land surface. Ambient neutron intensity near the land surface responds strongly to the presence of water, suggesting the possibility of an indirect method for monitoring soil water content, snow water equivalent depth, or canopy intercepted water. For environmental measurements the major advantage of measuring neutrons with the scatter camera is the limited (60{sup o}) field of view that can be obtained, which allows observations to be conducted at a previously unattainable spatial scales. This work is intended to provide new measurements of directional fluxes which can be used in the design of new instruments for passively and noninvasively observing land-surface water. Through measurements and neutron transport modeling we have demonstrated that such a technique is feasible.

  14. Progress towards magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy ensembles in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Victor; Bauch, Erik; Ledbetter, Micah; Budker, Dmitry

    2009-05-01

    Optical magnetometers based on spin-precession in alkali-vapor cells can measure magnetic felds with great precision and without cryogenics, however spin-altering collisions limit the sensitivity of small sensors [1]. Paramagnetic impurities in diamond, on the other hand, are a promising system for mm- and μm-scale magnetometers, because diamond has a high Debye temperature (TD =2230 K) and ^12C has zero nuclear spin, which translates into long spin coherence times (approaching 1 ms [2]) at room temperature. Diamond is also optically transparent over a wide range of wavelengths and is chemically inert. Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers have a spin-triplet ground state and convenient optical transitions, allowing for efficient optical pumping and magnetic detection. Recently, single NV-centers were used for nm-scale magnetometry. Here we discuss progress towards the development of a high-density NV-ensemble magnetometer. The spin-projection noise-limited sensitivity is estimated to be at or below the fT/Hz level for mm-scale devices [3]. [1] D. Budker and M. Romalis, Nat. Phys. 3, 227 (2007). [2] T. Gaebel et. al., Nat. Phys. 2, 408 (2006). [3] J. M. Taylor et. al., Nat. Phys. 4, 810 (2008).

  15. Improved Quantum Magnetometry beyond the Standard Quantum Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brask, J. B.; Chaves, R.; Kołodyński, J.

    2015-07-01

    Under ideal conditions, quantum metrology promises a precision gain over classical techniques scaling quadratically with the number of probe particles. At the same time, no-go results have shown that generic, uncorrelated noise limits the quantum advantage to a constant factor. In frequency estimation scenarios, however, there are exceptions to this rule and, in particular, it has been found that transversal dephasing does allow for a scaling quantum advantage. Yet, it has remained unclear whether such exemptions can be exploited in practical scenarios. Here, we argue that the transversal-noise model applies to the setting of recent magnetometry experiments and show that a scaling advantage can be maintained with one-axis-twisted spin-squeezed states and Ramsey-interferometry-like measurements. This is achieved by exploiting the geometry of the setup that, as we demonstrate, has a strong influence on the achievable quantum enhancement for experimentally feasible parameter settings. When, in addition to the dominant transversal noise, other sources of decoherence are present, the quantum advantage is asymptotically bounded by a constant, but this constant may be significantly improved by exploring the geometry.

  16. Direct visualization of molecule deprotonation on an insulating surface.

    PubMed

    Kittelmann, Markus; Rahe, Philipp; Gourdon, André; Kühnle, Angelika

    2012-08-28

    Elucidating molecular-scale details of basic reaction steps on surfaces is decisive for a fundamental understanding of molecular reactivity within many fields, including catalysis and on-surface synthesis. Here, the deprotonation of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) deposited onto calcite (101;4) held at room temperature is followed in situ by noncontact atomic force microscopy. After deposition, the molecules form two coexisting phases, a transient striped phase and a stable dense phase. A detailed analysis of high-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy images indicates the transient striped phase being a bulk-like phase, which requires hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic acid moieties to be formed. With time, the striped phase transforms into the dense phase, which is explained by the deprotonation of the molecules. In the deprotonated state, the molecules can no longer form hydrogen bonds, but anchor to the surface calcium cations with their negatively charged carboxylate group. The deprotonation step is directly confirmed by Kelvin probe force microscopy images that unravel the change in the molecular charge. PMID:22838491

  17. Surface Chemistry of Nanocellulose Fibers Directs Monocyte/Macrophage Response.

    PubMed

    Hua, Kai; Ålander, Eva; Lindström, Tom; Mihranyan, Albert; Strømme, Maria; Ferraz, Natalia

    2015-09-14

    The effect of surface functionalization of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) on monocyte/macrophage (MM) behavior is investigated to understand how the physicochemical properties of nanocelluloses influence the interactions of such materials with biological systems. Films of anionic (a-), cationic (c-), and unmodified (u-) NFC were synthesized and characterized in terms of surface charge. THP-1 monocytes were cultured on the surface of the films for 24 h in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide, and the cell response was evaluated in terms of cell adhesion, morphology, and secretion of TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-1ra. The results show that MMs cultured on carboxymethylated-NFC films (a-NFC) are activated toward a proinflammatory phenotype, whereas u-NFC promotes a mild activation of the studied cells. The presence of hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium groups on c-NFC, however, does not promote the activation of MMs, indicating that c-NFC closely behaves as an inert material in terms of MM activation. None of the materials is able to directly activate the MMs toward an anti-inflammatory response. These results may provide a foundation for the design of future NFC-based materials with the ability to control MM activation and may expand the use of NFC in biomedical applications.

  18. Direct measurement of dispersion relation for directional random surface gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnus Arnesen Taklo, Tore; Trulsen, Karsten; Krogstad, Harald; Nieto Borge, José Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Linear wave theory is widely used to model for instance response of ocean structures and ships to water surface gravity waves and assumes that the water surface can be modeled as a linear superposition of regular waves satisfying the linear dispersion relation. The linear dispersion relation is often taken for granted for the interpretation of wave measurements. The interpretation of nautical radar images currently depends on the linear dispersion relation as a prerequisite, Nieto Borge et al. (J. Atmos. Ocean Tech., 2004, vol. 21, pp. 1291-1300). Krogstad & Trulsen (Ocean Dynamics, 2010, vol. 60, pp. 973-991) carried out numerical simulations in one horizontal dimension with the nonlinear Schrödinger equation NLS and the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation MNLS. From wavenumber-frequency spectra obtained from the simulated unidirectional surfaces they found that nonlinear evolution of unidirectional wave fields may cause deviation from the linear dispersion relation. Extending the work by Krogstad & Trulsen (2010) we carried out experiments with unidirectional waves with fixed wave steepness and various bandwidths in a narrow wave tank. These experiments verified the results obtained from the simulations with the (M)NLS models and showed that the directly measured dispersion relation deviated from the linear dispersion relation for sufficiently narrow bandwidths. For broad bandwidths, however, the linear dispersion relation was satisfied, suggesting validity of linear wave theory. By further analysis of the experimental data we suggest that the occurence of the deviation depends on steepness and spectral bandwidth. Recently we have extended the work by Krogstad & Trulsen (2010) to two horizontal dimensions using the MNLS equation and simulated directional random surface gravity waves with bandwidths ranging from narrow to relatively broad. The wavenumber-frequency spectra obtained from these simulated directional surfaces also show deviation from the linear

  19. Thermal management of VECSELs by front surface direct liquid cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Conor J. C.; Mirkhanov, Shamil; Quarterman, Adrian H.; Wilcox, Keith G.

    2016-03-01

    Efficient thermal management is vital for VECSELs, affecting the output power and several aspects of performance of the device. Presently there exist two distinct methods of effective thermal management which both possess their merits and disadvantages. Substrate removal of the VECSEL gain chip has proved a successful method in devices emitting at a wavelength near 1μm. However for other wavelengths the substrate removal technique has proved less effective primarily due to the thermal impedance of the distributed Bragg reflectors. The second method of thermal management involves the use of crystalline heat spreaders bonded to the gain chip surface. Although this is an effective thermal management scheme, the disadvantages are additional loss and the etalon effect that filters the gain spectrum, making mode locking more difficult and normally resulting in multiple peaks in the spectrum. There are considerable disadvantages associated with both methods attributed to heatspreader cost and sample processing. It is for these reasons that a proposed alternative, front surface liquid cooling, has been investigated in this project. Direct liquid cooling involves flowing a temperature-controlled liquid over the sample's surface. In this project COMSOL was used to model surface liquid cooling of a VECSEL sample in order to investigate and compare its potential thermal management with current standard thermal management techniques. Based on modelling, experiments were carried out in order to evaluate the performance of the technique. While modelling suggests that this is potentially a mid-performance low cost alternative to existing techniques, experimental measurements to date do not reflect the performance predicted from modelling.

  20. Atomic Magnetometry in the Lab, in the Field, and in the Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Versolato, O.; Hovde, C.; Rochester, S.; Higbie, J.; Budker, D.

    2012-12-01

    Atomic magnetometers [1] have played an important role in geophysical research ever since their advent more than fifty years ago. They have been used in near-surface magnetic surveys, aboard ionospheric sounding rockets, and have been critical in satellite missions dedicated to precise geophysical field mapping [2]. Over the past decade, renewed interest in atomic magnetometers has led to dramatically improved sensitivity in laboratory devices. The best alkali-vapor magnetometers, operating in magnetically shielded low-field environments, can now achieve sensitivities better than 1 femtotesla in a one-second measurement [3]. The precision of atomic magnetometers operating at Earth's field, on the other hand, has lagged in comparison. We will review recent efforts to achieve better sensitivity and accuracy in all-optical alkali-vapor magnetometers operating in geophysical field ranges. Advances in laser technology, antirelaxation vapor-cell coatings [4], and optical pumping techniques have resulted in better fundamental precision and dramatically reduced systematic error in these devices. The result is a new generation of compact, low-cost, and low-power sensors which are well suited for geophysical research. In addition to these developments, we will also discuss the potential for fully remote atom-based magnetic measurements [5]. This includes a proposed scheme to measure the magnetic field within the mesospheric sodium layer using existing laser guide star technology [6]. This technique would allow magnetic surveying at length and time scales heretofore inaccessible, and would yield data relevant to magnetic anomaly mapping, ionospheric physics, ocean circulation models, and lithospheric magnetization studies. [1] Budker, D., and M. Romalis (2007), Optical magnetometry, Nat. Phys., 3(4), 227-234. [2] Ravat, D., et al. (1995), Global vector and scalar Magsat magnetic anomaly maps, J. Geophys. Res.-Solid Earth, 100(B10), 20111-20136. [3] Dang, H. B., et al. (2010

  1. Direct versus hydrogen assisted CO dissociation on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, Dominic

    2012-02-01

    We present investigations of the formation of precursor hydrocarbon species relevant to production of liquid hydrocarbons on low index surfaces of various important noble and transition metals. The formation could occur via the so-called carbide mechanism where direct CO dissociation takes place, followed by stepwise hydrogenation of C yielding CHx species. Formation of precursor CHx species could also potentially take place through hydrogenated CO intermediates. First-principles calculations of energetics and barriers of CO conversion to hydrocarbons species were performed using plane-wave periodic density functional theory. Our calculations indicate that the two pathways are generally competitive on transition metals. A microkinetic model, with input thermodynamics and kinetic parameters estimated from electronic structure calculations, has been developed. The two pathways will be further examined using microkinetic approach to determine whether the aforementioned finding holds at realistic conditions.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonial antibodies (MAbs) directed against surface molecules of tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues which are not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. In brief, MCS combine the relevance or organized tissues with in vitro methodology making the MCS a good model system to study the interactions of mammalian cells, and thereby provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. This project also involves investigations of cell-cell interactions in a gravity-based environment. It will provide an important base of scientific information for future comparative studies on the effects of hypergravity and simulated microgravity environments on cell-cell interactions. This project also has the potential to yield important materials (e.g. cellular products) which may be useful for the diagnosis and/or treatment of certain human diseases. Moreover, this project supports the training of one undergraduate and one graduate student; thus, it will also assist in developing a pool of future scientists with research experience in gravitational biology research.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against surface molecules of tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. Therefore MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells, and provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. This project also involves investigations of cell-cell interactions in a gravity-based environment. It will provide a base of scientific information necessary to expand the focus of the project in future years to microgravity and hypergravity-based environments. This project also has the potential to yield important materials (e.g., cellular products) which may prove useful in the diagnosis and/or treatment of certain human diseases. Moreover, this project supports the training of both undergraduate and graduate students; thus, it will assist in developing a pool of future scientists with research experience in an area (gravitational biology) of interest to NASA.

  4. Interior Characterization of Europa using Magnetometry (ICEMAG): Probing the Europan Ocean and Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, C. A.; Jia, X.; Joy, S. P.; Khurana, K. K.; Murphy, N.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Weiss, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic induction is a powerful tool for probing the subsurface. The magnetometer on the Galileo mission to Jupiter found compelling evidence for subsurface oceans on Europa, Ganymede and Callisto; however, the single induction frequency measured did not allow characteristics of the ocean to be discerned. The Interior Characterization of Europa using MAGnetometry (ICEMAG) instrument, selected for NASA's Europa mission payload in May 2015, is designed to measure Europa's induction response at multiple frequencies with high accuracy. ICEMAG definitively assesses the ice shell thickness, and the conductivity and thickness of the subsurface ocean. This knowledge informs models of Europa's thermal evolution and allows evaluation of processes that have cycled material between the depths and the surface. Magnetic field measurements also determine the electrical currents associated with coupling of plumes to the corotating magnetospheric plasma and coupling of Europa to the Jovian ionosphere. ICEMAG utilizes UCLA fluxgate magnetic field sensors as well as JPL helium sensors in an integrated magnetic measurement system. The advent of laser-pumped helium sensors and advances in digital signal sampling enables an innovative multi-sensor magnetometer to be flown that is able to monitor spacecraft fields and maintain absolute accuracy of the measurement at a level of ~1 nT over time scales of years, without special maneuvers such as spacecraft rolls.

  5. Multi-terminal multi-junction dc SQUID for nanoscale magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltzer, Alexander Y.; Uri, Aviram; Zeldov, Eli

    2016-11-01

    Miniaturization of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) is of major importance for the development of sensitive scanning nanoscale magnetometry tools. The high sensitivity of nanoSQUIDs is restricted, however, to only particular periodic values of the applied magnetic field, making accurate measurements at intermediate values of the field impossible. We present a theoretical investigation of a multi-terminal, multi-junction SQUID (mSQUID) that lifts this limitation by providing electrical means for a continuous shift of the quantum interference pattern with respect to the applied field. Analysis of 4-terminal, 4-junction and 3-terminal, 3-junction mSQUIDs shows that operation at maximum sensitivity can be obtained at any value of the magnetic field by applying control current to the extra terminals. The model describes the variation and the shift of the interference pattern as a function of the control currents, junction asymmetries, and the mSQUID inductance. The mSQUID is also shown to provide a direct measurement of the current-phase relations of superconducting junctions. The derived model provides a quantitative description of the recently developed multi-terminal nanoSQUID-on-tip.

  6. Simulating narrow nonlinear resonance features for magnetometry in compact cold atom systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, David; Robinson, Jenn; Kunz, Paul; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2015-05-01

    We are investigating cold atom magnetometry applications and have developed a numeric model of Electromagnetically Induced Absorption (EIA) and Nonlinear Magneto-Optical Rotation (NMOR) for degenerate two-level systems. While most EIA and NMOR research is done in warm vapors, cold atoms avoid Doppler broadening and better isolate the various optical pumping mechanisms involved. Our model focuses on the effect of transverse magnetic fields on both EIA and NMOR features and shows that critical points of both yield quantitative measures of the magnitude and direction of the transverse field. This dependence reveals the underlying optical pumping mechanisms and makes possible a single, in-situ measurement of the background magnetic field zero to the sub-milligauss level, reducing background fields to enhance sub-Doppler cooling and collectively-enhanced neutral-atom quantum memory lifetimes. Separately, we are pursuing experimental measurements on the relationship between EIA and NMOR in a compact cold atom apparatus. To improve the system's capabilities we are designing our next-generation atom chip to reduce system size and employ versatile geometries enabling multi-site trapping.

  7. Water transport mechanism through open capillaries analyzed by direct surface modifications on biological surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hirai, Yuji; Yabu, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Tsujii, Kaoru; Shimozawa, Tateo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2013-01-01

    Some small animals only use water transport mechanisms passively driven by surface energies. However, little is known about passive water transport mechanisms because it is difficult to measure the wettability of microstructures in small areas and determine the chemistry of biological surfaces. Herein, we developed to directly analyse the structural effects of wettability of chemically modified biological surfaces by using a nanoliter volume water droplet and a hi-speed video system. The wharf roach Ligia exotica transports water only by using open capillaries in its legs containing hair- and paddle-like microstructures. The structural effects of legs chemically modified with a self-assembled monolayer were analysed, so that the wharf roach has a smart water transport system passively driven by differences of wettability between the microstructures. We anticipate that this passive water transport mechanism may inspire novel biomimetic fluid manipulations with or without a gravitational field. PMID:24149467

  8. Water transport mechanism through open capillaries analyzed by direct surface modifications on biological surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hirai, Yuji; Yabu, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Tsujii, Kaoru; Shimozawa, Tateo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2013-10-01

    Some small animals only use water transport mechanisms passively driven by surface energies. However, little is known about passive water transport mechanisms because it is difficult to measure the wettability of microstructures in small areas and determine the chemistry of biological surfaces. Herein, we developed to directly analyse the structural effects of wettability of chemically modified biological surfaces by using a nanoliter volume water droplet and a hi-speed video system. The wharf roach Ligia exotica transports water only by using open capillaries in its legs containing hair- and paddle-like microstructures. The structural effects of legs chemically modified with a self-assembled monolayer were analysed, so that the wharf roach has a smart water transport system passively driven by differences of wettability between the microstructures. We anticipate that this passive water transport mechanism may inspire novel biomimetic fluid manipulations with or without a gravitational field.

  9. Direct measurements of World Ocean tidal currents with surface drifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulain, Pierre-Marie; Centurioni, Luca

    2015-10-01

    Velocities of surface drifters are analyzed to study tidal currents throughout the World Ocean. The global drifter data set spanning the period 1979-2013 is used to describe the geographical structure of the surface tidal currents at global scale with a resolution of 2°. Harmonic analysis is performed with two semidiurnal, two diurnal, and four inferred tidal constituents. Tidal current characteristics (amplitude of semimajor axis, rotary coefficient, tidal ellipse inclination, and Greenwich phase) are mapped over the World Ocean from direct observations. The M2 currents dominate on all the shallow continental shelves with magnitude exceeding 60 cm/s. They are also substantial (4-5 cm/s) over the main deep topographic features such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the Southwest Indian Ridge, and the Mariana Ridge. The S2 currents have amplitudes typically half the size of the M2 currents, with a maximum of about 30 cm/s. The K1 and O1 currents are important in many shallow seas. They are large in the vicinity of the turning latitudes near 30°N/S where they merge with inertial motions of the same frequency. They are also substantial in the South China Sea and Philippine Sea. Maps of rotary coefficients indicate that all tidal motions are essentially clockwise (anticlockwise) in the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere. The rotary coefficient of the tidal currents is compared with the theory of freely and meridionally propagating baroclinic inertia-gravity waves. The Greenwich phase of the M2 constituent has large-scale coherent propagation patterns which could be interpreted as the propagation of the barotropic tide.

  10. Holographic LEED: A direct method for surface crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vamvakas, John Athanasios

    Since 1960's Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) has been one of the most reliable methods for surface crystallography. It has solved hundreds of structures over the past 20-25 years and continues to be a powerful tool in the hands of crystallographers. Yet, the main disadvantage of the method is the fact that it is very time consuming. The programs that do the multiple scattering calculations can run literally for days! The key part of the method is the initial "guess" of a structure that will be close the one being seeked. A wrong guess would lead to huge amounts of wasted time and effort. We suggest a direct method that can give us a pretty good idea of the structure under determination. We call this method of ours: Holographic LEED (h-LEED) because it is based on the ideas of Dennis Gabor, the inventor of holography. The 3D images h-LEED reconstructs from LEED diffraction patterns can be reliably used to initialize LEED thus reducing the annoying computation time as well as the effort required by the crystallographer. We show that h-LEED produces good images for p(2× 2) reconstruction of adsorbed atoms by testing it on two adsorption systems: O/Ni(001) and K/Ni(001). The images were reconstructed from both diffuse LEED patterns from disordered adsorbates and superstructure Bragg spots from ordered adsorbates.

  11. Gravitational spectra from direct measurements. [of surface field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. A.; Colombo, O. L.

    1979-01-01

    A simple rapid method is described for determining the spectrum of a surface field (in spherical harmonics) from harmonic analysis of direct (in situ) measurements along great circle arcs. The method is shown to give excellent overall trends (smoothed spectra) to very high degree from even a few short arcs of satellite data. Three examples are taken with perfect measurements of satellite tracking over a planet made up of hundreds of point masses using (1) altimetric heights from a low-orbiting spacecraft, (2) velocity (range rate) residuals between a low and a high satellite in circular orbits, and (3) range rate data between a station at infinity and a satellite in a highly eccentric orbit. In particular, the smoothed spectrum of the earth's gravitational field is determined to about degree 400(50-km half wavelength) from 1 x 1 deg gravimetry and the equivalent of 11 revolutions of GEOS 3 and Skylab altimetry. This measurement shows that there is about 46 cm of geoid height (rms worldwide) remaining in the field beyond degree 180.

  12. Bi-directional reflectance studies of prepared compact particulate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao

    Controlled laboratory BRDF and transmission measurements on layers of polymer and glass spheres have been carried out to investigate the connection between single particle optics and the optics of a packed surface. The measurements show that despite being closely packed, significant features of single scattering, such as the rainbow peaks, are preserved even in aggregated sphere layers. The measurements have been compared to 5 radiative transfer model predictions: the Hapke's model and its improved version, the Lumme-Bowell model, Mishchenko et al.'s BRF algorithm and DISORT. It has been found that strict numerical RTE models predict the measurements well in some regions, but have errors in both forward and backward scattering directions. The discrepancies have been attributed to the non-ideal factors such as internal inhomogeneity and surface roughness and may be corrected using Lumme-Bowell's roughness correction factor for oblique incident light. The inadequacy of the semi-empirical models can be partly attributed to the exclusion of a diffraction contribution in the models. In-situ BRDF measurements on submerged sediments with grain sizes ranging from 300 mum to over 1000 mum have been carried out. For normally illuminated small grain size samples the BRDF was nearly Lambertian, but samples with larger grain sizes are less Lambertian, with the BRDF decreasing with increasing view angles. Under oblique incident angles the samples become increasingly non-Lambertian; the dominant feature in the BRDF is enhanced backscattering. An empirical model is presented for each sediment type which represents the data within the standard deviation of the sample variation. This model is well behaved at angles out to 90°, and thus can be incorporated into the radiative transfer models to improve the light field predictions in shallow water. The BRDF of both dry and wet ooid sand layers with different particle size distributions and layer thicknesses on a reflecting mirror have

  13. A direct evidence of vibrationally delocalized response at ice surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro

    2014-11-14

    Surface-specific vibrational spectroscopic responses at isotope diluted ice and amorphous ice are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The intense response specific to the ordinary crystal ice surface is predicted to be significantly suppressed in the isotopically diluted and amorphous ices, demonstrating the vibrational delocalization at the ordinary ice surface. The collective vibration at the ice surface is also analyzed with varying temperature by the MD simulation.

  14. Direct chemical vapor deposition of graphene on dielectric surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Yuegang; Ismach, Ariel

    2014-04-29

    A substrate is provided that has a metallic layer on a substrate surface of a substrate. A film made of a two dimensional (2-D) material, such as graphene, is deposited on a metallic surface of the metallic layer. The metallic layer is dewet and/or removed to provide the film on the substrate surface.

  15. Direct measurement of surface carbon concentrations for lunar soil breccias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filleux, C.; Spear, R. H.; Tombrello, T. A.; Burnett, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear reaction depth profiling technique previously described by Filleux et al. (1977) has been used to measure the depth distribution of C on grain surfaces for Apollo 11, 15, 16 and 17 soil breccias. The surface C concentration of all samples studied lies between 2 and 8 times 10 to the 15th atoms per sq cm, showing no correlation with the volume C, which varies over an order of magnitude. If the observed variation represents the presence of unexposed grains on the surfaces studied, these results indicate a steady state surface C concentration of 5 to 10 times 10 to the 15th atoms per sq cm, accumulated over a time scale short compared with that required for the formation of volume-related C and with the mean lifetime of grains at the lunar surface. About one-third to one-half of the total C in lunar soil seems to be surface-correlated.

  16. Method for measuring surface shear stress magnitude and direction using liquid crystal coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method is provided for determining surface shear magnitude and direction at every point on a surface. The surface is covered with a shear stress sensitive liquid crystal coating and illuminated by white light from a normal direction. A video camera is positioned at an oblique angle above the surface to observe the color of the liquid crystal at that angle. The shear magnitude and direction are derived from the color information. A method of calibrating the device is also provided.

  17. Land Surface Albedo from MERIS Reflectances Using MODIS Directional Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaaf, Crystal L. B.; Gao, Feng; Strahler, Alan H.

    2004-01-01

    MERIS Level 2 surface reflectance products are now available to the scientific community. This paper demonstrates the production of MERIS-derived surface albedo and Nadir Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) adjusted reflectances by coupling the MERIS data with MODIS BRDF products. Initial efforts rely on the specification of surface anisotropy as provided by the global MODIS BRDF product for a first guess of the shape of the BRDF and then make use all of the coincidently available, partially atmospherically corrected, cloud cleared, MERIS observations to generate MERIS-derived BRDF and surface albedo quantities for each location. Comparisons between MODIS (aerosol-corrected) and MERIS (not-yet aerosol-corrected) surface values from April and May 2003 are also presented for case studies in Spain and California as well as preliminary comparisons with field data from the Devil's Rock Surfrad/BSRN site.

  18. Signal enhancement in cantilever magnetometry based on a co-resonantly coupled sensor.

    PubMed

    Körner, Julia; Reiche, Christopher F; Gemming, Thomas; Büchner, Bernd; Gerlach, Gerald; Mühl, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cantilever magnetometry is a measurement technique used to study magnetic nanoparticles. With decreasing sample size, the signal strength is significantly reduced, requiring advances of the technique. Ultrathin and slender cantilevers can address this challenge but lead to increased complexity of detection. We present an approach based on the co-resonant coupling of a micro- and a nanometer-sized cantilever. Via matching of the resonance frequencies of the two subsystems we induce a strong interplay between the oscillations of the two cantilevers, allowing for a detection of interactions between the sensitive nanocantilever and external influences in the amplitude response curve of the microcantilever. In our magnetometry experiment we used an iron-filled carbon nanotube acting simultaneously as nanocantilever and magnetic sample. Measurements revealed an enhancement of the commonly used frequency shift signal by five orders of magnitude compared to conventional cantilever magnetometry experiments with similar nanomagnets. With this experiment we do not only demonstrate the functionality of our sensor design but also its potential for very sensitive magnetometry measurements while maintaining a facile oscillation detection with a conventional microcantilever setup. PMID:27547621

  19. Signal enhancement in cantilever magnetometry based on a co-resonantly coupled sensor

    PubMed Central

    Körner, Julia; Reiche, Christopher F; Gemming, Thomas; Büchner, Bernd; Gerlach, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cantilever magnetometry is a measurement technique used to study magnetic nanoparticles. With decreasing sample size, the signal strength is significantly reduced, requiring advances of the technique. Ultrathin and slender cantilevers can address this challenge but lead to increased complexity of detection. We present an approach based on the co-resonant coupling of a micro- and a nanometer-sized cantilever. Via matching of the resonance frequencies of the two subsystems we induce a strong interplay between the oscillations of the two cantilevers, allowing for a detection of interactions between the sensitive nanocantilever and external influences in the amplitude response curve of the microcantilever. In our magnetometry experiment we used an iron-filled carbon nanotube acting simultaneously as nanocantilever and magnetic sample. Measurements revealed an enhancement of the commonly used frequency shift signal by five orders of magnitude compared to conventional cantilever magnetometry experiments with similar nanomagnets. With this experiment we do not only demonstrate the functionality of our sensor design but also its potential for very sensitive magnetometry measurements while maintaining a facile oscillation detection with a conventional microcantilever setup. PMID:27547621

  20. Directional BMP-2 for functionalization of titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Kenji; Tsuji, Toru; Shiba, Kiyotaka

    2009-02-01

    Efficient immobilization of biomacromolecules on material surfaces is a key to development in areas of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. However, strong and irreversible immobilization of cytokines on surfaces often diminishes their biological functionality. A destructive hydrophobic interaction between the material surface and the biomolecule may underlie this inactivation. Alternatively, dissociation of the cytokine from the material may be necessary for signal transduction. Here we propose a new method for immobilizing cytokines on material surfaces: a material-binding artificial peptide is used to mediate reversible interaction between the cytokine and the material surface. We created artificial proteins that contained three copies of a Ti-binding motif, and fused them to the N-terminal of BMP-2. The engineered BMP-2 showed reversible binding to Ti surfaces and induced BMP signaling activity. When a hydrophobic protein devoid of the Ti-binding motif was fused to BMP-2, the protein tightly bound to Ti surfaces but showed little BMP activity, confirming the importance of the mode of immobilization. PMID:19022501

  1. Direct measurement of surface carbon concentrations. [in lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filleux, C.; Tombrello, T. A.; Burnett, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of surface concentrations of carbon in lunar soils and soil breccias provide information on the origin of carbon in the regolith. The reaction C-12 (d, p sub zero) is used to measure 'surface' and 'volume' concentrations in lunar samples. This method has a depth resolution of 1 micron, which permits only a 'surface' and a 'volume' component to be measured. Three of four Apollo 16 double drive tube samples show a surface carbon concentration of about 8 by 10 to the 14th power/sq cm, whereas the fourth sample gave 4 by 10 to the 14th power/sq cm. It can be convincingly shown that the measured concentration does not originate from fluorocarbon or hydrocarbon contaminants. Surface adsorbed layers of CO or CO2 are removed by a sputter cleaning procedure using a 2-MeV F beam. It is shown that the residual C concentration of 8 by 10 to the 14th power/sq cm cannot be further reduced by increased F fluence, and it is therefore concluded that it is truly lunar. If one assumes that the measured surface C concentration is a steady-state concentration determined only by a balance between solar-wind implantation and sputtering, a sputter erosion rate of 0.1 A/yr is obtained. However, it would be more profitable to use an independently derived sputter erosion rate to test the hypothesis of a solar-wind origin of the surface carbon.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to surface molecules of mammalian tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, three dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture; therefore, MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells. Additionally, they provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules.

  3. Roughness-Based Superhydrophobic Surfaces: Fundamentals and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patankar, Neelesh

    2011-11-01

    Superhydrophobicity of rough surfaces has attracted global interest through the past decade. There are naturally occurring instances of such surfaces, e.g., lotus leaves, which led to the popular term ``lotus effect.'' Numerous applications in wide ranging areas such as drag reduction, self-cleaning, heat exchangers, energy conversion, condensation, anti-icing, textile, desalination, etc., are being explored by researchers worldwide. The signature configuration for superhydrophobicity has been ``bead-like'' drops on rough surfaces that roll-off easily. This becomes possible if the liquid does not impale the roughness grooves, and if the contact angle hysteresis is low. Finding appropriate surface roughness is therefore necessary. A thermodynamic framework to enable analysis of this problem will be presented. It will be noted that the success of rough superhydrophobic substrates relies on the presence of gas pockets in the roughness grooves underneath the liquid. These gas pockets could be those of air from the surrounding environment. Current design strategies rely on the availability of air. However, if the rough substrates are fully submerged in the liquid then the trapped air in the roughness grooves may not be sustained. A design approach based on sustaining a vapor phase of the liquid itself in the roughness grooves, instead of relying on the presence of air, will be presented. The resulting surfaces, referred to as vapor stabilizing substrates, are deemed to be robust against wetting transition even if no air is present. Applications of this approach include low drag surfaces, nucleate boiling at dramatically low superheats, among others. The concept can be generalized to other transitions on the phase diagram, thus enabling the design of rough surfaces for phase manipulation in general.

  4. Status and directions of modified tribological surfaces by ion processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1988-01-01

    An overview is presented of recent advances in modifying contacting surfaces in motion by the various ion assisted surface coating/modification processes to reduce and control tribological failures. The ion assisted coating processes and the surface modification processes offer the greatest potential to custom tailor and optimize the tribological performance. Hard, wear resistant and low shear coatings deposited by the ion assisted processes are discussed. Primarily the recent advances of sputtered MoS2 ion plated Au, Ag, Pb lubricating films and sputtered and ion plated hard, wear resistant TiN, HfN, TiC films are described in terms of structural property performance interrelationships which lead to improved adhesion, cohesion, nucleation, morphological growth, density, film thickness as determined by structural and chemical characterization and frictional and wear behavior. Also, the recent tribological advances using the surface modification processes such as ion implantation, ion beam mixing is discussed with emphasis on the development of lubricous high temperature ceramic surfaces.

  5. Surface-directed capillary system; theory, experiments and applications.

    PubMed

    Bouaidat, Salim; Hansen, Ole; Bruus, Henrik; Berendsen, Christian; Bau-Madsen, Niels Kristian; Thomsen, Peter; Wolff, Anders; Jonsmann, Jacques

    2005-08-01

    We present a capillary flow system for liquid transport in microsystems. Our simple microfluidic system consists of two planar parallel surfaces, separated by spacers. One of the surfaces is entirely hydrophobic, the other mainly hydrophobic, but with hydrophilic pathways defined on it by photolithographic means. By controlling the wetting properties of the surfaces in this manner, the liquid can be confined to certain areas defined by the hydrophilic pathways. This technique eliminates the need for alignment of the two surfaces. Patterned plasma-polymerized hexafluoropropene constitutes the hydrophobic areas, whereas the untreated glass surface constitutes the hydrophilic pathways. We developed a theoretical model of the capillary flow and obtained analytical solutions which are in good agreement with the experimental results. The capillarity-driven microflow system was also used to pattern and immobilize biological material on planar substrates: well-defined 200 microm wide strips of human cells (HeLa) and fluorescence labelled proteins (fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled bovine serum albumin, i.e., FITC-BSA) were fabricated using the capillary flow system presented here.

  6. Surface-directed assembly of cell-laden microgels.

    PubMed

    Du, Yanan; Ghodousi, Majid; Lo, Edward; Vidula, Mahesh K; Emiroglu, Onur; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-02-15

    Cell-laden microscale hydrogels (microgels) can be used as tissue building blocks and assembled to create 3D tissue constructs with well-defined microarchitecture. In this article, we present a bottom-up approach to achieve microgel assembly on a patterned surface. Driven by surface tension, the hydrophilic microgels can be assembled into well-defined shapes on a glass surface patterned with hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions. We found that the cuboidic microgels ( approximately 100-200 microm in width) could self-assemble into defined shapes with high fidelity to the surface patterns. The microgel assembly process was improved by increasing the hydrophilicity of the microgels and reducing the surface tension of the surrounding solution. The assembled microgels were stabilized by a secondary crosslinking step. Assembled microgels containing cells stained with different dyes were fabricated to demonstrate the application of this approach for engineering microscale tissue constructs containing multiple cell types. This bottom-up approach enables rapid fabrication of cell-laden microgel assemblies with pre-defined geometrical and biological features, which is easily scalable and can be potentially used in microscale tissue engineering applications.

  7. Direct observation of PMMA removal from graphene surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohan; Chou, Harry; Tao, Li; Dick, Andrew; Dolocan, Andrei; Akinwande, Deji; Willson, C. Grant

    PMMA is often used as a carrier layer for transfer of CVD graphene from copper to other substrates. After transfer, the PMMA is removed by chemical or thermal treatment. However, regardless of the method used, polymer residues are left on the graphene surface, which degrade the performance of graphene-based devices. Here, we present a systematic study of PMMA removal after graphene transfer. Raman and FET measurements were applied to monitor the polymer dissolution in an acetone bath. Isotope labeling and in-situ TOF-SIMS, XPS, Raman and AFM all show chemical changes in surface residues upon vacuum annealing. These data along with strategies to clean the graphene surface will be presented.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAb's) to surface molecules involved in the cell-cell interactions of mammalian cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). MCS are highly organized 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics in vivo tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. They also provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. In brief, MCS combine the relevance of organized tissues with the accuracy of in vitro methodology. Further, one can manipulate these MCS experimentally to discern important information about their biology.

  9. Direct Observations of Surface Thermal Fluctuations Below Shot Noise Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Kenichiro; Mitsui, Takahisa

    Surface thermal fluctuation spectra are measured to previously unachieved precision, down to three orders of magnitude below the shot noise level. Such precision is achieved through statistical reduction of extraneous noise, including shot noise, using the averaged correlation of measurements. Both height and inclination fluctuations of surface fluctuations are measured for various materials and in the case of liquids, their hydrodynamical understanding is compared to the experimental results at unprecedented levels. They agree well for water, but for oil, deviations are seen at high frequencies, perhaps indicating its more complex underlying physics. Surface thermal fluctuation spectra of complex fluids (such as epoxy), rubber and biological materials have also been measured and have qualitatively diverse behavior. We discuss the physics underlying the various spectra and explain the experimental methods used to obtain them. The measurement is simple, requiring relatively a weak power light source, a short time and a small surface area, so that it should be useful for fluctuation measurements in various fields requiring precision, both within and outside physics.

  10. Surface control bent sub for directional drilling of petroleum wells

    DOEpatents

    Russell, Larry R.

    1986-01-01

    Directional drilling apparatus for incorporation in a drill string, wherein a lower apparatus section is angularly deviated from vertical by cam action and wherein rotational displacement of the angularly deviated apparatus section is overcome by additional cam action, the apparatus being operated by successive increases and decreases of internal drill string pressure.

  11. Solution of magnetometry problems related to monitoring remote pipeline systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Andrey V.; Denisov, Alexey Y.; Narkhov, Eugene D.; Sapunov, Vladimir A.

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to solve two fundamental tasks, i.e., to design the pipeline model with sufficient adequacy and reproducibility, and to solve the inverse problem for the transition from the experimental data on the magnetic field in the measurement area directly to the pipeline characteristics, which are necessary for mapping pipes location and finding coordinates of welds. The paper presents a mathematical ideal pipeline model in the geomagnetic field without considering the pipe material. The solution of the direct and inverse problems are described, and the directions of the model development and methods of data interpretation are presented.

  12. Directly thiolated modification onto the surface of detonation nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ming-Hua; Chuang, Hong; Cheng, Fong-Yu; Huang, Ying-Pei; Han, Chien-Chung; Chen, Jiun-Yu; Huang, Su-Chin; Chen, Jen-Kun; Wu, Dian-Syue; Chu, Hsueh-Liang; Chang, Chia-Ching

    2014-05-28

    An efficient method for modifying the surface of detonation nanodiamonds (5 and 100 nm) with thiol groups (-SH) by using an organic chemistry strategy is presented herein. Thiolated nanodiamonds were characterized by spectroscopic techniques, and the atomic percentage of sulfur was analyzed by elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The conjugation between thiolated nanodiamonds and gold nanoparticles was elucidated by transmission electron microscopy and UV-vis spectrometry. Moreover, the material did not show significant cytotoxicity to the human lung carcinoma cell line and may prospectively be applied in bioconjugated technology. The new method that we elucidated may significantly improve the approach to surface modification of detonation nanodiamonds and build up a new platform for the application of nanodiamonds. PMID:24766528

  13. Direct determination of surface albedos from satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mekler, Y.; Joseph, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    An empirical method to measure the spectral surface albedo of surfaces from Landsat imagery is presented and analyzed. The empiricism in the method is due only to the fact that three parameters of the solution must be determined for each spectral photograph of an image on the basis of independently known albedos at three points. The approach is otherwise based on exact solutions of the radiative transfer equation for upwelling intensity. Application of the method allows the routine construction of spectral albedo maps from satelite imagery, without requiring detailed knowledge of the atmospheric aerosol content, as long as the optical depth is less than 0.75, and of the calibration of the satellite sensor.

  14. Direct laser fabrication of nanowires on semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghizadeh, Anahita; Yang, Haeyeon

    2016-03-01

    Periodic nanowires are observed from (001) orientation of Si and GaAs when the surfaces are irradiated interferentially by high power laser pulses. These nanowires are self-assembled and can be strain-free while their period is consistent with interference period. The nanowire morphologies are studied by atomic force microscopy. The observed period between nanowires depends on the wavelengths used and interference angle. The nanowire width increases with laser intensity. The narrowest nanowires observed have the width smaller than 20 nm, which is more than 10 times smaller than the interference period.

  15. Assessment of groundwater under direct influence of surface water.

    PubMed

    Nnadi, Fidelia N; Fulkerson, Mark

    2002-08-01

    Waterborne pathogens are known to reside in surface water systems throughout the U.S. Cryptosporidium outbreaks over recent years are the result of drinking water supplied from such sources. Contamination of aquifers has also led to several reported cases from drinking water wells. With high resistance to typical groundwater treatment procedures, aquifer infiltration by Cryptosporidium poses a serious threat. As groundwater wells are the main source of drinking water supply in the State of Florida, understanding factors that affect the presence of Cryptosporidium would prevent future outbreaks. This study examines karst geology, land use, and hydrogeology in the State of Florida as they influence the risk of groundwater contamination. Microscopic Particulate Analysis (MPA) sampling was performed on 719 wells distributed across Florida. The results of the sampling described each well as having high, moderate, or low risk to surface water influence. The results of this study indicated that the hydrogeology of an area tends to influence the MPA Risk Index (RI) of a well. Certain geologic formations were present for the majority of the high risk wells. Residential land use contained nearly half of the wells sampled. The results also suggested that areas more prone to sinkhole development are likely to contain wells with a positive RI. PMID:15328687

  16. Assessment of groundwater under direct influence of surface water.

    PubMed

    Nnadi, Fidelia N; Fulkerson, Mark

    2002-08-01

    Waterborne pathogens are known to reside in surface water systems throughout the U.S. Cryptosporidium outbreaks over recent years are the result of drinking water supplied from such sources. Contamination of aquifers has also led to several reported cases from drinking water wells. With high resistance to typical groundwater treatment procedures, aquifer infiltration by Cryptosporidium poses a serious threat. As groundwater wells are the main source of drinking water supply in the State of Florida, understanding factors that affect the presence of Cryptosporidium would prevent future outbreaks. This study examines karst geology, land use, and hydrogeology in the State of Florida as they influence the risk of groundwater contamination. Microscopic Particulate Analysis (MPA) sampling was performed on 719 wells distributed across Florida. The results of the sampling described each well as having high, moderate, or low risk to surface water influence. The results of this study indicated that the hydrogeology of an area tends to influence the MPA Risk Index (RI) of a well. Certain geologic formations were present for the majority of the high risk wells. Residential land use contained nearly half of the wells sampled. The results also suggested that areas more prone to sinkhole development are likely to contain wells with a positive RI.

  17. Directed Growth of Virus Nanofilaments on a Superhydrophobic Surface.

    PubMed

    Marinaro, Giovanni; Burghammer, Manfred; Costa, Luca; Dane, Thomas; De Angelis, Francesco; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Riekel, Christian

    2015-06-17

    The evaporation of single droplets of colloidal tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) nanoparticles on a superhydrophobic surface with a hexagonal pillar-pattern results in the formation of coffee-ring type residues. We imaged surface features by optical, scanning electron, and atomic force microscopies. Bulk features were probed by raster-scan X-ray nanodiffraction. At ∼100 pg/μL nanoparticle concentration, the rim of the residue connects to neighboring pillars via fibrous extensions containing flow-aligned crystalline domains. At ∼1 pg/μL nanoparticle concentration, nanofilaments of ≥80 nm diameter and ∼20 μm length are formed, extending normal to the residue-rim across a range of pillars. X-ray scattering is dominated by the nanofilament form-factor but some evidence for crystallinity has been obtained. The observation of sheets composed of stacks of self-assembled nanoparticles deposited on pillars suggests that the nanofilaments are drawn from a structured droplet interface.

  18. A direct immunoassay for detecting diatoms in groundwater as an indicator of the direct influence of surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, C.E.; Schrock, R.M.; Reilly, T.J.; Baehr, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    Groundwater under the direct influence of surface water (GWUDISW) is of concern in communities where growing public demand on groundwater resources has resulted in increased withdrawals and hydraulic stress near surface water bodies. Under these conditions, contaminants such as methyl-tert butyl ether (MTBE) and biological materials have been detected in domestic wells. Other contaminants and pathogens associated with surface water are not routinely tested for in groundwater-supplied systems. To address the need for methods to easily identify potentially vulnerable supplies, a direct immunoassay for the quantitative detection of diatoms in raw water samples was developed as a measure of surface water influence on groundwater. Cell wall preparations from Nitzschia palea Ku??tzing, a freshwater diatom found throughout North America, were used to produce a polyclonal antibody that was applied in a direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) developed to detect the presence of N. palea cell wall components. The direct immunoassay allows detection at 500 cells L-1, a level similar to diatom concentrations observed in samples of groundwater collected near the test site. This investigation was the first attempt to utilize an ELISA as an indicator of surface water influence on groundwater. Further research is needed to develop more specific diatom-based monoclonal antibodies, determine cross-reactivity, and optimize sample processing and ELISA procedures for development of a standardized method. ?? Springer 2005.

  19. A spiral plasmonic lens with directional excitation of surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qingrui; Zhang, Chi; Hu, Xinhua

    2016-08-01

    Conventional plasmonic lenses are composed of curved slits carved through metallic films. Here, we propose a new plasmonic lens based on a metallic slit with an auxiliary groove. When the lens is illumined normally, only inward surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can be generated and then focused into a hot spot at the center of the lens. The focusing effect is theoretically investigated by varying the groove parameters and incident polarizations. It is found that this phenomenon exists for both the circular and linear polarizations of incidence. Under optimal groove parameters, the intensity of the focal spot in our lens can be 2.5 times of that in one without grooves for both linearly and circularly polarized illuminations.

  20. Chemical template directed iodine patterns on the octadecyltrichlorosilane surface.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuguang

    2008-01-01

    A carboxylic-terminated nanometer-scale chemical pattern on an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) surface can guide the deposition and crystallization of iodine, forming an iodine pattern on the chemical pattern. The iodine in the pattern is gel-like when fabricated by the solution-deposit method. In contrast, a dendritic, snowflake-shaped polycrystalline iodine sheet is formed by the vapor-phase condensation method. The data demonstrate that iodine is a good tracing and visualizing agent for studying liquid behavior at the nano scale. The topography of the iodine stain reveals that the "coffee ring" effect can be suppressed by reducing the pattern size and increasing the evaporation rate. The chemical template-bound iodine pattern has an unusually low vapor pressure and it can withstand prolonged baking at elevated temperature, which differs significantly from bulk iodine crystals.

  1. Electrocatalysis: A direct alcohol fuel cell and surface science perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Braunchweig, B; Neurock, Matthew; Wieckowski, A.; Hibbitts, David D

    2012-01-01

    In this report, we discuss some of the advances in surface science and theory that have ena bled a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms that govern the electrocatalysis.More specifically, we examine in detail the electrooxidation ofC1 and Cz alcohol molecules in both acidic and basic media. A combination of detailed in situ spectroscopic measurements along with density functional theory calculations have helped to establish the mechanisms that control the reaction paths and the innuence of acidic and alkaline media. We discuss some of the synergies and differences between electrocatalysis and aqueous phase heterogeneous catalysis.Such analyses begin to establish a common language and framework by which to compare as well as advance both fields.

  2. Electrocatalysis: A Direct Alcohol Fuel Cell and Surface Science Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Braunchweig, B; Hibbitts, David D; Neurock, Matthew; Wieckowski, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we discuss some of the advances in surface science and theory that have enabled a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms that govern the electrocatalysis. More specifically, we examine in detail the electrooxidation of C-1 and C-2 alcohol molecules in both acidic and basic media. A combination of detailed in situ spectroscopic measurements along with density functional theory calculations have helped to establish the mechanisms that control the reaction paths and the influence of acidic and alkaline media. We discuss some of the synergies and differences between electrocatalysis and aqueous phase heterogeneous catalysis. Such analyses begin to establish a common language and framework by which to compare as well as advance both fields. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A spiral plasmonic lens with directional excitation of surface plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qingrui; Zhang, Chi; Hu, Xinhua

    2016-01-01

    Conventional plasmonic lenses are composed of curved slits carved through metallic films. Here, we propose a new plasmonic lens based on a metallic slit with an auxiliary groove. When the lens is illumined normally, only inward surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can be generated and then focused into a hot spot at the center of the lens. The focusing effect is theoretically investigated by varying the groove parameters and incident polarizations. It is found that this phenomenon exists for both the circular and linear polarizations of incidence. Under optimal groove parameters, the intensity of the focal spot in our lens can be 2.5 times of that in one without grooves for both linearly and circularly polarized illuminations. PMID:27562227

  4. Amorphous chalcogenide layers and nanocomposites for direct surface patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Sandor; Bohdan, Roland; Csarnovics, Istvan; Burunkova, Iulia; Kokenyesi, Sandor

    2015-03-01

    Homogeneous, 200 - 3000 nm thick layers of chalcogenide glasses, 1 - 2 mm thick plane-parallel plates as well as nanocomposite structures, containing gold nanoparticles have been produced and used for in situ surface optical and geometrical relief fabrication by optical- or electron-, ion-beam recording. Investigations were focused on the formation of giant (height modulation from nanometers up to micrometers) geometrical reliefs and elements (dots, lines and diffractive elements) applicable in the 0.5 - 10 micrometer spectral range. Recording parameters were compared with available data on acrylic polymer nanocomposites. The mechanism of the recording processes, which include thermal, electron and mass-transport components were explained and the selection of the materials from As(Ge)-S(Se) binary systems with best recording parameters was done.

  5. Novel surface markers directed against adult human gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Galivo, Feorillo H; Dorrell, Craig; Grompe, Maria T; Zhong, YongPing; Streeter, Philip R; Grompe, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Novel cell surface-reactive monoclonal antibodies generated against extrahepatic biliary cells were developed for the isolation and characterization of different cell subsets from normal adult human gallbladder. Eleven antigenically distinct gallbladder subpopulations were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. They were classified into epithelial, mesenchymal, and pancreatobiliary (PDX1(+)SOX9(+)) subsets based on gene expression profiling. These antigenically distinct human gallbladder cell subsets could potentially also reflect different functional properties in regards to bile physiology, cell renewal and plasticity. Three of the novel monoclonal antibodies differentially labeled archival sections of primary carcinoma of human gallbladder relative to normal tissue. The novel monoclonal antibodies described herein enable the identification and characterization of antigenically diverse cell subsets within adult human gallbladder and are putative tumor biomarkers.

  6. A spiral plasmonic lens with directional excitation of surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingrui; Zhang, Chi; Hu, Xinhua

    2016-01-01

    Conventional plasmonic lenses are composed of curved slits carved through metallic films. Here, we propose a new plasmonic lens based on a metallic slit with an auxiliary groove. When the lens is illumined normally, only inward surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can be generated and then focused into a hot spot at the center of the lens. The focusing effect is theoretically investigated by varying the groove parameters and incident polarizations. It is found that this phenomenon exists for both the circular and linear polarizations of incidence. Under optimal groove parameters, the intensity of the focal spot in our lens can be 2.5 times of that in one without grooves for both linearly and circularly polarized illuminations. PMID:27562227

  7. Vector Magnetometry Using Silicon Vacancies in 4 H -SiC Under Ambient Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niethammer, Matthias; Widmann, Matthias; Lee, Sang-Yun; Stenberg, Pontus; Kordina, Olof; Ohshima, Takeshi; Son, Nguyen Tien; Janzén, Erik; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2016-09-01

    Point defects in solids promise precise measurements of various quantities. Especially magnetic field sensing using the spin of point defects has been of great interest recently. When optical readout of spin states is used, point defects achieve optical magnetic imaging with high spatial resolution at ambient conditions. Here, we demonstrate that genuine optical vector magnetometry can be realized using the silicon vacancy in SiC, which has an uncommon S =3 /2 spin. To this end, we develop and experimentally test sensing protocols based on a reference field approach combined with multifrequency spin excitation. Our work suggests that the silicon vacancy in an industry-friendly platform, SiC, has the potential for various magnetometry applications under ambient conditions.

  8. Theoretical model for torque differential magnetometry of single-domain magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamra, Akashdeep; Schreier, Michael; Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2014-05-01

    We present a generic theoretical model for torque differential magnetometry (TDM)—an experimental method for determining the magnetic properties of a magnetic specimen by recording the resonance frequency of a mechanical oscillator, on which the magnetic specimen has been mounted, as a function of the applied magnetic field. The effective stiffness change, and hence the resonance frequency shift, of the oscillator due to the magnetic torque on the specimen is calculated, treating the magnetic specimen as a single magnetic domain. Our model can deal with an arbitrary magnetic free-energy density characterizing the specimen, as well as any relative orientation of the applied magnetic field, the specimen, and the oscillator. Our calculations agree well with published experimental data. The theoretical model presented here allows one to take full advantage of TDM as an efficient magnetometry method.

  9. Magneto-optical magnetometry of individual 30 nm cobalt nanowires grown by electron beam induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Nikulina, E.; Idigoras, O.; Berger, A.; Vavassori, P.; Chuvilin, A.

    2012-04-02

    We show that magnetometry measurements based upon the magneto-optical Kerr effect and high resolution optical microscopy can be used as a noninvasive probe of magnetization reversal for individual nano-structures. Our measurements demonstrate single pass hysteresis loop measurements for sample sizes down to 30 nm width. A quantitative signal-to-noise ratio evaluation shows that our approach achieves an at least 3-fold improvement in sensitivity if compared to focused laser based nano-magnetometry. An analysis of the physical limits of our detection scheme enables us to estimate that measurements for structures with single digit nm widths and magnetic moments of 10{sup -16} Am{sup 2} are feasible.

  10. High-resolution vector microwave magnetometry based on solid-state spins in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengfei; Yuan, Zhenheng; Huang, Pu; Rong, Xing; Wang, Mengqi; Xu, Xiangkun; Duan, Changkui; Ju, Chenyong; Shi, Fazhan; Du, Jiangfeng

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of the microwave field is crucial for many developments in microwave technology and related applications. However, measuring microwave fields with high sensitivity and spatial resolution under ambient conditions remains elusive. In this work, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a scheme to measure both the strength and orientation of the microwave magnetic field by utilizing the quantum coherent dynamics of nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond. An angular resolution of 5.7 mrad and a sensitivity of 1.0 μT Hz−1/2 are achieved at a microwave frequency of 2.6000 GHz, and the microwave magnetic field vectors generated by a copper wire are precisely reconstructed. The solid-state microwave magnetometry with high resolution and wide frequency range that can work under ambient conditions proposed here enables unique potential applications over other state-of-art microwave magnetometry. PMID:25799155

  11. Broadband magnetometry by infrared-absorption detection of diamond NV centers and associated temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Victor M.; Jarmola, Andrey; Zipp, Lucas J.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Bauch, E.; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate magnetometry by detection of the spin state of high-density nitrogen-vacancy (NV) ensembles in diamond using optical absorption at 1042 nm. With this technique, measurement contrast and collection efficiency can approach unity, leading to an increase in magnetic sensitivity compared to the more common method of collecting red fluorescence. Working at 75 K with a sensor with effective volume 50x50x300 μm3, we project photon shot-noise limited sensitivity of 5 pT in one second of acquisition and bandwidth from DC to a few MHz. Operation in a gradiometer configuration yields a noise floor of 7 nTrms at ~110 Hz in one second of acquisition. We also present measurements of the zero-field splitting parameters as a function of temperature, a calibration which is essential for ultra-sensitive magnetometry at low frequencies.

  12. Determining eyeball surface area directly exposed to the effects of external factors.

    PubMed

    Juliszewski, Tadeusz; Kadłuczka, Filip; Kiełbasa, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses determining the surface area of eyeballs of men and women exposed to the direct effects of external factors in the working environment. For one eye, the mean surface is 172-182 mm(2). The determined surface area can be used in formulas for calculating the exposure of eyeballs to harmful chemical substances in workplace air. PMID:26758027

  13. Single-proton spin detection by diamond magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Loretz, M; Rosskopf, T; Boss, J M; Pezzagna, S; Meijer, J; Degen, C L

    2014-10-16

    Extending magnetic resonance imaging to the atomic scale has been a long-standing aspiration, driven by the prospect of directly mapping atomic positions in molecules with three-dimensional spatial resolution. We report detection of individual, isolated proton spins by a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in a diamond chip covered by an inorganic salt. The single-proton identity was confirmed by the Zeeman effect and by a quantum coherent rotation of the weakly coupled nuclear spin. Using the hyperfine field of the NV center as an imaging gradient, we determined proton-NV distances of less than 1 nm. PMID:25323696

  14. Chemically directing d-block heterometallics to nanocrystal surfaces as molecular beacons of surface structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Evelyn L.; Gilmore, Keith; Sawvel, April M.; Hammack, Aaron T.; Doris, Sean E.; Aloni, Shaul; Altoe, Virginia; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Cohen, Bruce E.; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Milliron, Delia J.; Prendergast, David; Helms, Brett A.

    2015-07-28

    Our understanding of structure and bonding in nanoscale materials is incomplete without knowledge of their surface structure. Needed are better surveying capabilities responsive not only to different atoms at the surface, but also their respective coordination environments. We report here that d-block organometallics, when placed at nanocrystal surfaces through heterometallic bonds, serve as molecular beacons broadcasting local surface structure in atomic detail. This unique ability stems from their elemental specificity and the sensitivity of their d-orbital level alignment to local coordination environment, which can be assessed spectroscopically. Re-surfacing cadmium and lead chalcogenide nanocrystals with iron- or ruthenium-based molecular beacons is readily accomplished with trimethylsilylated cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyls. For PbSe nanocrystals with iron-based beacons, we show how core-level X-ray spectroscopies and DFT calculations enrich our understanding of both charge and atomic reorganization at the surface when beacons are bound.

  15. Chemically directing d-block heterometallics to nanocrystal surfaces as molecular beacons of surface structure

    DOE PAGES

    Rosen, Evelyn L.; Gilmore, Keith; Sawvel, April M.; Hammack, Aaron T.; Doris, Sean E.; Aloni, Shaul; Altoe, Virginia; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; et al

    2015-07-28

    Our understanding of structure and bonding in nanoscale materials is incomplete without knowledge of their surface structure. Needed are better surveying capabilities responsive not only to different atoms at the surface, but also their respective coordination environments. We report here that d-block organometallics, when placed at nanocrystal surfaces through heterometallic bonds, serve as molecular beacons broadcasting local surface structure in atomic detail. This unique ability stems from their elemental specificity and the sensitivity of their d-orbital level alignment to local coordination environment, which can be assessed spectroscopically. Re-surfacing cadmium and lead chalcogenide nanocrystals with iron- or ruthenium-based molecular beacons ismore » readily accomplished with trimethylsilylated cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyls. For PbSe nanocrystals with iron-based beacons, we show how core-level X-ray spectroscopies and DFT calculations enrich our understanding of both charge and atomic reorganization at the surface when beacons are bound.« less

  16. Investigation and development of magnetooptical methods of ellipsometry and vector magnetometry of structures with one and two magnetic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pufall, Matthew Read

    2000-07-01

    Magneto-optical methods of vector magnetometry and ellipsometry were developed to study magnetic thin film structures consisting of one or two magnetic layers and several nonmagnetic layers. The method of Generalized Magneto-Optical Ellipsometry was developed to determine both the magnetization vector of the magnetic layer, and the optical and magneto-optical constants. High- resolution DC vector hysteresis loop measurements were made of Co thin films using the method. The technique was able to determine both the magnitude and direction of M throughout the reversal of the magnetization. The method was also used to examine the ripple-state of a NiFe thin film. By making such measurements at multiple angles of incidence, the thickness and optical constant of a non-magnetic overlayer on a magnetic layer were determined, with reasonable accuracy. Measurements at multiple angles of incidence also allowed the resolution of the individual layer magnetizations in a magnetic bilayer structure. By changing the angle of incidence, the magneto-optical sensitivity to each layer changed dramatically, enabling discrimination of the signal from each layer. Both the magnitude and direction of the magnetization of each layer was determined throughout a hysteresis cycle.

  17. Fabrication of all diamond scanning probes for nanoscale magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Patrick; Neu, Elke; Ganzhorn, Marc; Barfuss, Arne; Batzer, Marietta; Gratz, Micha; Tschöpe, Andreas; Maletinsky, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    The electronic spin of the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond forms an atomically sized, highly sensitive sensor for magnetic fields. To harness the full potential of individual NV centers for sensing with high sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution, NV centers have to be incorporated into scanning probe structures enabling controlled scanning in close proximity to the sample surface. Here, we present an optimized procedure to fabricate single-crystal, all-diamond scanning probes starting from commercially available diamond and show a highly efficient and robust approach for integrating these devices in a generic atomic force microscope. Our scanning probes consisting of a scanning nanopillar (200 nm diameter, 1-2 μm length) on a thin (<1 μm) cantilever structure enable efficient light extraction from diamond in combination with a high magnetic field sensitivity ( η AC ≈ 50 ± 20 nT / √{ Hz } ). As a first application of our scanning probes, we image the magnetic stray field of a single Ni nanorod. We show that this stray field can be approximated by a single dipole and estimate the NV-to-sample distance to a few tens of nanometer, which sets the achievable resolution of our scanning probes.

  18. Fabrication of all diamond scanning probes for nanoscale magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Appel, Patrick; Neu, Elke; Ganzhorn, Marc; Barfuss, Arne; Batzer, Marietta; Gratz, Micha; Tschöpe, Andreas; Maletinsky, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    The electronic spin of the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond forms an atomically sized, highly sensitive sensor for magnetic fields. To harness the full potential of individual NV centers for sensing with high sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution, NV centers have to be incorporated into scanning probe structures enabling controlled scanning in close proximity to the sample surface. Here, we present an optimized procedure to fabricate single-crystal, all-diamond scanning probes starting from commercially available diamond and show a highly efficient and robust approach for integrating these devices in a generic atomic force microscope. Our scanning probes consisting of a scanning nanopillar (200 nm diameter, 1-2 μm length) on a thin (<1 μm) cantilever structure enable efficient light extraction from diamond in combination with a high magnetic field sensitivity (ηAC≈50±20nT/Hz). As a first application of our scanning probes, we image the magnetic stray field of a single Ni nanorod. We show that this stray field can be approximated by a single dipole and estimate the NV-to-sample distance to a few tens of nanometer, which sets the achievable resolution of our scanning probes. PMID:27370455

  19. Magnetometry of micro-magnets with electrostatically defined Hall bars

    SciTech Connect

    Lachance-Quirion, Dany; Camirand Lemyre, Julien; Bergeron, Laurent; Sarra-Bournet, Christian; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel

    2015-11-30

    Micro-magnets are key components for quantum information processing with individual spins, enabling arbitrary rotations and addressability. In this work, characterization of sub-micrometer sized CoFe ferromagnets is performed with Hall bars electrostatically defined in a two-dimensional electron gas. Due to the ballistic nature of electron transport in the cross junction of the Hall bar, anomalies such as the quenched Hall effect appear near zero external magnetic field, thus hindering the sensitivity of the magnetometer to small magnetic fields. However, it is shown that the sensitivity of the diffusive limit can be almost completely restored at low temperatures using a large current density in the Hall bar of about 10 A/m. Overcoming the size limitation of conventional etched Hall bars with electrostatic gating enables the measurement of magnetization curves of 440 nm wide micro-magnets with a signal-to-noise ratio above 10{sup 3}. Furthermore, the inhomogeneity of the stray magnetic field created by the micro-magnets is directly measured using the gate-voltage-dependent width of the sensitive area of the Hall bar.

  20. Magnetometry of micro-magnets with electrostatically defined Hall bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachance-Quirion, Dany; Camirand Lemyre, Julien; Bergeron, Laurent; Sarra-Bournet, Christian; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel

    2015-11-01

    Micro-magnets are key components for quantum information processing with individual spins, enabling arbitrary rotations and addressability. In this work, characterization of sub-micrometer sized CoFe ferromagnets is performed with Hall bars electrostatically defined in a two-dimensional electron gas. Due to the ballistic nature of electron transport in the cross junction of the Hall bar, anomalies such as the quenched Hall effect appear near zero external magnetic field, thus hindering the sensitivity of the magnetometer to small magnetic fields. However, it is shown that the sensitivity of the diffusive limit can be almost completely restored at low temperatures using a large current density in the Hall bar of about 10 A/m. Overcoming the size limitation of conventional etched Hall bars with electrostatic gating enables the measurement of magnetization curves of 440 nm wide micro-magnets with a signal-to-noise ratio above 103. Furthermore, the inhomogeneity of the stray magnetic field created by the micro-magnets is directly measured using the gate-voltage-dependent width of the sensitive area of the Hall bar.

  1. Role of boric acid in nickel nanotube electrodeposition: a surface-directed growth mechanism.

    PubMed

    Graham, Lauren M; Cho, Seungil; Kim, Sung Kyoung; Noked, Malachi; Lee, Sang Bok

    2014-01-18

    Nickel nanotubes have been synthesized by the popular and versatile method of template-assisted electrodeposition, and a surface-directed growth mechanism based on the adsorption of the nickel-borate complex has been proposed.

  2. Extending the direct statistical approach to include particle bifurcation between the splitting surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, K.W.

    1995-01-01

    The Direct Statistical Approach (DSA) to surface splitting and Russian Roulette (RR) is one of the current routes toward automatism in Monte Carlo and is currently applied to fixed source particle transport problems. A general volumetric particle bifurcation capability has been inserted into the Direct Statistical Approach (DSA) surface parameter and cell models. The resulting extended DSA describes the second moment and time functions in terms of phase-space surface splitting/Russian roulette parameters (surface parameter model) or phase-space cell importances (cell model) in the presence of volumetric particle bifurcations including both natural events [such as (n,xn) or gamma production from neutron collisions] and artificial events (such as DXTRAN). At the same time, other limitations in the DSA models (concerning tally scores direct from the source and tracks surviving an event at which a tally score occurs) are removed. Given the second moment and time functions, the foregoing surface or cell parameters may then be optimized.

  3. Visualization of Bloch surface waves and directional propagation effects on one-dimensional photonic crystal substrate.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Ju; Lin, I-Sheng

    2016-07-11

    This paper reports a novel approach to the direct observation of Bloch surface waves, wherein a layer of fluorescent material is deposited directly on the surface of a semi-infinite periodic layered cell. A set of surface nano-gratings is used to couple pumping light to Bloch surface waves, while the sample is rotated until the pumping light meets the quasi-phase matching conditions. This study investigated the directional propagation of waves on stripe and circular one-dimensional grating structures by analyzing the dispersion relationship of the first two eigen modes. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed scheme in visualizing Bloch surface waves, which could be extended to a variety of other devices. PMID:27410869

  4. Direct Measurement of Sub-Debye-Length Attraction between Oppositely Charged Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, Nir; Ben-Yaakov, Dan; Andelman, David; Safran, S. A.; Klein, Jacob

    2009-09-01

    Using a surface force balance with fast video analysis, we have measured directly the attractive forces between oppositely charged solid surfaces (charge densities σ+, σ-) across water over the entire range of interaction, in particular, at surface separations D below the Debye screening length λS. At very low salt concentration we find a long-ranged attraction between the surfaces (onset ca. 100 nm), whose variation at D<λS agrees well with predictions based on solving the Poisson-Boltzmann theory, when due account is taken of the independently-determined surface charge asymmetry (σ+≠|σ-|).

  5. Surface-Charge-Based Micro-Models--A Solid Foundation for Learning about Direct Current Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirvonen, P. E.

    2007-01-01

    This study explores how the use of a surface-charge-based instructional approach affects introductory university level students' understanding of direct current (dc) circuits. The introduced teaching intervention includes electrostatics, surface-charge-based micro-models that explain the existence of an electric field inside the current-carrying…

  6. Laboratory measurements of direct ozone loss on ice and doped-ice surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory measurements were carried out to test for the possible direct loss of ozone on ice surfaces and solid solutions of nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and sodium sulfite over the temperature range 195 to 262 K. Experiments were performed in a vertical flow tube where the reactor wall was coated with the desired surface. Results indicate that loss of ozone on an ice surface is insignificant. A discussion of the possible importance of these results in the stratosphere is given.

  7. Smooth Optimal Quantum Control for Robust Solid-State Spin Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nöbauer, Tobias; Angerer, Andreas; Bartels, Björn; Trupke, Michael; Rotter, Stefan; Schmiedmayer, Jörg; Mintert, Florian; Majer, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a simple yet versatile optimal quantum control technique that achieves tailored robustness against qubit inhomogeneities and control errors while requiring minimal bandwidth. We apply the technique to nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond and verify its performance using quantum process tomography. In a wide-field NV center magnetometry scenario, we achieve a homogeneous sensitivity across a 33% drop in control amplitude, and we improve the sensitivity by up to 2 orders of magnitude for a normalized detuning as large as 40%, achieving a value of 20 nT Hz-1 /2 μ m3 /2 in sensitivity times square root volume.

  8. In-flight scalar calibration and characterisation of the Swarm magnetometry package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Lesur, Vincent; Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Christopher C.

    2016-07-01

    We present the in-flight scalar calibration and characterisation of the Swarm magnetometry package consisting of the absolute scalar magnetometer, the vector magnetometer, and the spacecraft structure supporting the instruments. A significant improvement in the scalar residuals between the pairs of magnetometers is demonstrated, confirming the high performance of these instruments. The results presented here, including the characterisation of a Sun-driven disturbance field, form the basis of the correction of the magnetic vector measurements from Swarm which is applied to the Swarm Level 1b magnetic data.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. The effect of microscopic texture on the direct plasma surface passivation of Si solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrabian, S.; Xu, S.; Qaemi, A. A.; Shokri, B.; Chan, C. S.; Ostrikov, K.

    2013-04-15

    Textured silicon surfaces are widely used in manufacturing of solar cells due to increasing the light absorption probability and also the antireflection properties. However, these Si surfaces have a high density of surface defects that need to be passivated. In this study, the effect of the microscopic surface texture on the plasma surface passivation of solar cells is investigated. The movement of 10{sup 5} H{sup +} ions in the texture-modified plasma sheath is studied by Monte Carlo numerical simulation. The hydrogen ions are driven by the combined electric field of the plasma sheath and the textured surface. The ion dynamics is simulated, and the relative ion distribution over the textured substrate is presented. This distribution can be used to interpret the quality of the Si dangling bonds saturation and consequently, the direct plasma surface passivation.

  10. Surface roughness analysis after machining of direct laser deposited tungsten carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, S.; Twardowski, P.; Chwalczuk, T.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, an experimental surface roughness analysis in machining of tungsten carbide is presented. The tungsten carbide was received using direct laser deposition technology (DLD). Experiments carried out included milling of tungsten carbide samples using monolithic torus cubic boron nitride (CBN) tool and grinding with the diamond cup wheel. The effect of machining method on the generated surface topography was analysed. The 3D surface topographies were measured using optical surface profiler. The research revealed, that surface roughness generated after the machining of tungsten carbide is affected by feed per tooth (fz) value related to kinematic-geometric projection only in a minor extent. The main factor affecting machined surface roughness is the occurrence of micro grooves and protuberances on the machined surface, as well as other phenomena connected, inter alia, with the mechanism for material removal.

  11. Onset of initial planar instability with surface-tension anisotropy during directional solidification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijun; Wang, Jincheng; Yang, Gencang

    2009-11-01

    A simple model is presented to describe the variation of the onset of the initial planar instability with surface tension anisotropy during directional solidification. The effect of surface-tension anisotropy on the incubation time and the initial average wavelength of planar instability are predicted by the simple model quantitatively, which are also verified by phase field simulation. Investigation results reveal that surface-tension anisotropy is one of important factors in the dynamic process of planar instability. The contribution of surface-tension anisotropy to the tilting modulation is also analyzed by comparing the results from the present simple model with those from phase field simulation.

  12. Directional motion of water drop on ratchet-like superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Xianliang; Zhang, Jihua

    2011-05-01

    In this article, directional movements of drops on the ratchet-like superhydrophobic surfaces were observed. High-speed CCD images showed the caterpillar-like crawl of a drop on the inclined superhydrophobic surfaces as it rolled along the ridge of ratchet. In contrast, along the opposite direction, the movement of the drop only depended on the end of triple phase contact line while the front of contact line was pinned. The sliding angle (SA) measurements indicated that the ratchet-like superhydrophobic surfaces had directional drop retention traits. Moreover, the reduction of the rise angle ω1, the height d of the ratchet's ridge and the volume V of the drop can greatly enhance the directional difference of drop retention on the ratchet-like superhydrophobic surfaces. Therefore, it was concluded that the superhydrophobicity and the periodic ratchet-like microstructures were the keys to the directional drop sliding at one-dimensional level. We believe that these findings would be helpful to better understand the ratchet-like effect on the superhydrophobic surfaces and guide some novel engineering applications.

  13. Direct Femtosecond Laser Surface Structuring with Optical Vortex Beams Generated by a q-plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jj Nivas, Jijil; He, Shutong; Rubano, Andrea; Vecchione, Antonio; Paparo, Domenico; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Bruzzese, Riccardo; Amoruso, Salvatore

    2015-12-01

    Creation of patterns and structures on surfaces at the micro- and nano-scale is a field of growing interest. Direct femtosecond laser surface structuring with a Gaussian-like beam intensity profile has already distinguished itself as a versatile method to fabricate surface structures on metals and semiconductors. Here we present an approach for direct femtosecond laser surface structuring based on optical vortex beams with different spatial distributions of the state of polarization, which are easily generated by means of a q-plate. The different states of an optical vortex beam carrying an orbital angular momentum ℓ = ±1 are used to demonstrate the fabrication of various regular surface patterns on silicon. The spatial features of the regular rippled and grooved surface structures are correlated with the state of polarization of the optical vortex beam. Moreover, scattered surface wave theory approach is used to rationalize the dependence of the surface structures on the local state of the laser beam characteristics (polarization and fluence). The present approach can be further extended to fabricate even more complex and unconventional surface structures by exploiting the possibilities offered by femtosecond optical vector fields.

  14. Direct Femtosecond Laser Surface Structuring with Optical Vortex Beams Generated by a q-plate

    PubMed Central

    JJ Nivas, Jijil; He, Shutong; Rubano, Andrea; Vecchione, Antonio; Paparo, Domenico; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Bruzzese, Riccardo; Amoruso, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Creation of patterns and structures on surfaces at the micro- and nano-scale is a field of growing interest. Direct femtosecond laser surface structuring with a Gaussian-like beam intensity profile has already distinguished itself as a versatile method to fabricate surface structures on metals and semiconductors. Here we present an approach for direct femtosecond laser surface structuring based on optical vortex beams with different spatial distributions of the state of polarization, which are easily generated by means of a q-plate. The different states of an optical vortex beam carrying an orbital angular momentum ℓ = ±1 are used to demonstrate the fabrication of various regular surface patterns on silicon. The spatial features of the regular rippled and grooved surface structures are correlated with the state of polarization of the optical vortex beam. Moreover, scattered surface wave theory approach is used to rationalize the dependence of the surface structures on the local state of the laser beam characteristics (polarization and fluence). The present approach can be further extended to fabricate even more complex and unconventional surface structures by exploiting the possibilities offered by femtosecond optical vector fields. PMID:26658307

  15. Magnetometry and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of phosphine- and thiol-capped gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, E.; Muñoz-Márquez, M. A.; Fernández, A.; Crespo, P.; Hernando, A.; Lucena, R.; Conesa, J. C.

    2010-03-01

    In the last years, the number of studies performed by wholly independent research groups that confirm the permanent magnetism, first observed in our research lab, for thiol-capped Au nanoparticles (NPs) has rapidly increased. Throughout the years, the initial magnetometry studies have been completed with element-specific magnetization measurements based on, for example, the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism technique that have allowed the identification of gold as the magnetic moment carrier. In the research work here presented, we have focused our efforts in the evaluation of the magnetic behavior and iron impurities content in the synthesized samples by means of superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry and electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry, respectively. As a result, hysteresis cycles typical of a ferromagnetic material have been measured from nominally iron-free gold NPs protected with thiol, phosphine, and chlorine ligands. It is also observed that for samples containing both, capped gold NPs and highly diluted iron concentrations, the magnetic behavior of the NPs is not affected by the presence of paramagnetic iron impurities. The hysteresis cycles reported for phosphine-chlorine-capped gold NPs confirm that the magnetic behavior is not exclusively for the metal-thiol system.

  16. Illustrating Surface Shape in Volume Data via Principal Direction-Driven 3D Line Integral Convolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria

    1997-01-01

    The three-dimensional shape and relative depth of a smoothly curving layered transparent surface may be communicated particularly effectively when the surface is artistically enhanced with sparsely distributed opaque detail. This paper describes how the set of principal directions and principal curvatures specified by local geometric operators can be understood to define a natural 'flow' over the surface of an object, and can be used to guide the placement of the lines of a stroke texture that seeks to represent 3D shape information in a perceptually intuitive way. The driving application for this work is the visualization of layered isovalue surfaces in volume data, where the particular identity of an individual surface is not generally known a priori and observers will typically wish to view a variety of different level surfaces from the same distribution, superimposed over underlying opaque structures. By advecting an evenly distributed set of tiny opaque particles, and the empty space between them, via 3D line integral convolution through the vector field defined by the principal directions and principal curvatures of the level surfaces passing through each gridpoint of a 3D volume, it is possible to generate a single scan-converted solid stroke texture that may intuitively represent the essential shape information of any level surface in the volume. To generate longer strokes over more highly curved areas, where the directional information is both most stable and most relevant, and to simultaneously downplay the visual impact of directional information in the flatter regions, one may dynamically redefine the length of the filter kernel according to the magnitude of the maximum principal curvature of the level surface at the point around which it is applied.

  17. Physical Sensing of Surface Properties by Microswimmers – Directing Bacterial Motion via Wall Slip

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinglei; Wysocki, Adam; Winkler, Roland G.; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli swim along circular trajectories adjacent to surfaces. Thereby, the orientation (clockwise, counterclockwise) and the curvature depend on the surface properties. We employ mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations of a mechano-elastic model of E. coli, with a spherocylindrical body propelled by a bundle of rotating helical flagella, to study quantitatively the curvature of the appearing circular trajectories. We demonstrate that the cell is sensitive to nanoscale changes in the surface slip length. The results are employed to propose a novel approach to directing bacterial motion on striped surfaces with different slip lengths, which implies a transformation of the circular motion into a snaking motion along the stripe boundaries. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated by a simulation of active Brownian rods, which also reveals a dependence of directional motion on the stripe width. PMID:25993019

  18. Surface entropy of liquids via a direct Monte Carlo approach - Application to liquid Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Z. Q.; Stroud, D.

    1990-01-01

    Two methods are presented for a direct Monte Carlo evaluation of the surface entropy S(s) of a liquid interacting by specified, volume-independent potentials. The first method is based on an application of the approach of Ferrenberg and Swendsen (1988, 1989) to Monte Carlo simulations at two different temperatures; it gives much more reliable results for S(s) in liquid Si than previous calculations based on numerical differentiation. The second method expresses the surface entropy directly as a canonical average at fixed temperature.

  19. Increased efficiency of direct nanoimprinting on planar and curved bulk titanium through surface modification☆

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Andrew I.M.; Seunarine, Krishna; Khokhar, Ali Z.; MacLaren, Ian; Brydone, Alistair S.; Moran, David A.J.; Gadegaard, Nikolaj

    2013-01-01

    In this work the direct transfer of nanopatterns into titanium is demonstrated. The nanofeatures are imprinted at room temperature using diamond stamps in a single step. We also show that the imprint properties of the titanium surface can be altered by anodisation yielding a significant reduction in the required imprint force for pattern transfer. The anodisation process is also utilised for curved titanium surfaces where a reduced imprint force is preferable to avoid sample deformation and damage. We finally demonstrate that our process can be applied directly to titanium rods. PMID:24748699

  20. Non-linear dynamical analysis of crack surface perturbations and their dependence on velocity and direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Dov; Be'ery, Ilan

    2004-04-01

    The fracture surfaces of single crystal [1 0 0] silicon specimens, fractured under three-point bending (3PB) and subjected to a high strain energy upon cracking, revealed exceptional surface perturbations, generated during the unstable propagation. While macroscopically the crack is propagating on the (1 1 1) low energy cleavage plane, microscopic examination revealed small angled deviations from and fluctuations along that plane. Furthermore, while the crack is propagating at a velocity of nearly 3000 m/s in the [1 1¯ 0] direction, its velocity in the [1 1 2¯] direction is two orders of magnitude lower, with distinctive surface perturbations. The amplitude and complexity of the perturbations increase as the normal velocity vector changes its direction and magnitude. These perturbations were recorded with a profilometer and analyzed using non-linear dynamical analysis tools. This study provides an opportunity to interpret surface phenomena of one of the most general cases of fracture and to study the effect of major variables on the nature of the perturbations involved, such as the local crack tip velocity and the crystallographic orientations. It is shown that the surface perturbations are chaotic deterministic in nature and can be described by high order non-linear differential equations; the order of the equation varying with the variations of the local velocity and direction.

  1. Direct synthesis of sp-bonded carbon chains on graphite surface by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, A.; Rybachuk, M.; Lu, Q.-B.; Duley, W. W.

    2007-09-24

    Microscopic phase transformation from graphite to sp-bonded carbon chains (carbyne) and nanodiamond has been induced by femtosecond laser pulses on graphite surface. UV/surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectra displayed the local synthesis of carbyne in the melt zone while nanocrystalline diamond and trans-polyacetylene chains form in the edge area of gentle ablation. These results evidence possible direct 'writing' of variable chemical bonded carbons by femtosecond laser pulses for carbon-based applications.

  2. Direct Epoxidation of Propylene over Stabilized Cu+ Surface Sites on Ti Modified Cu2O

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, X.; Kattel, S.; Xiong, K.; Mudiyanselage, K.; Rykov, S.; Senanayake, S. D.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Liu, P.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Chen, J. G.

    2015-07-17

    Direct propylene epoxidation by O2 is a challenging reaction because of the strong tendency for complete combustion. Results from the current study demonstrate the feasibility to tune the epoxidation selectivity by generating highly dispersed and stabilized Cu+ active sites in a TiCuOx mixed oxide. The TiCuOx surface anchors the key surface intermediate, oxametallacycle, leading to higher selectivity for epoxidation of propylene.

  3. Surface formation in direct chill (DC) casting of 6082 aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, N.; Carlberg, T.

    2016-03-01

    Surface defects in aluminium billet production are a real problem for the subsequent extrusion procedure. Extrusion productivity can be influenced by the surface properties, which is defined as surface appearance, surface segregation zone depth and large Mg2Si and β-particles (Al5FeSi). In this research the surface formation during DC casting of 6082 aluminium billets produced by the air slip technology is studied. The surface microstructures of 6082 aluminium alloys with smooth and wavy surface appearances were investigated, including segregation zone depths and phase formation. The results were discussed based on the exudation of liquid metal through the mushy zone. The specific appearance of the wavy surface of 6082 alloys was correlated to how the oxide skin adheres to the underlying mushy zone and coupled to the dendritic coherency and surface tension of the skin. The occurrence of different phases at the very surface and in the layer just below was explained by variations in solidification directions and subsequent segregation patterns.

  4. Determination of anisotropic surface characteristics of different phyllosilicates by direct force measurements.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lujie; Englert, Alexandre H; Masliyah, Jacob H; Xu, Zhenghe

    2011-11-01

    To fundamentally understand the electrokinetic behavior of clay minerals, it is necessary to study the anisotropic surface charge properties of clay surfaces. In this study, two 2:1 layer natural minerals, talc and muscovite, were chosen as representatives of magnesium and aluminum phyllosilicate minerals, respectively. The molecularly smooth basal planes of both platy minerals were obtained by cleavage along the basal planes, while suitable edge surfaces were prepared by an ultramicrotome cutting technique. Silicon nitride atomic force microscopy tip was used as a probe to study the interaction forces between the tip and clay basal/edge surfaces in aqueous solutions of various pH values. The measured interaction force profiles between the tip and clay basal/edge surfaces were fitted with the classical DLVO (Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek) theory, which allows direct determination of electrical surface potential of talc and muscovite surfaces. The surface potential of muscovite basal planes was found to be significantly more negative than the basal plane of talc, both being pH insensitive. In contrast, the surface potential of edge surfaces was highly pH-dependent, exhibiting a point of zero charge (PZC) at pH 7.5 and 8.1 for edges of muscovite and talc, respectively. The observed differences in surface potential of basal planes and edge surfaces for both talc and muscovite are closely related to their crystal structure and ionization characteristics. The protonation reactivity and the contribution of each surface group to the surface charging behavior are modeled using their protonation constants.

  5. Direct Cortical Mapping via Solving Partial Differential Equations on Implicit Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yonggang; Thompson, Paul M.; Dinov, Ivo; Osher, Stanley; Toga, Arthur W.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for cortical mapping that computes a direct map between two cortical surfaces while satisfying constraints on sulcal landmark curves. By computing the map directly, we can avoid conventional intermediate parameterizations and help simplify the cortical mapping process. The direct map in our method is formulated as the minimizer of a flexible variational energy under landmark constraints. The energy can include both a harmonic term to ensure smoothness of the map and general data terms for the matching of geometric features. Starting from a properly designed initial map, we compute the map iteratively by solving a partial differential equation (PDE) defined on the source cortical surface. For numerical implementation, a set of adaptive numerical schemes are developed to extend the technique of solving PDEs on implicit surfaces such that landmark constraints are enforced. In our experiments, we show the flexibility of the direct mapping approach by computing smooth maps following landmark constraints from two different energies. We also quantitatively compare the metric preserving property of the direct mapping method with a parametric mapping method on a group of 30 subjects. Finally, we demonstrate the direct mapping method in the brain mapping applications of atlas construction and variability analysis. PMID:17379568

  6. Direct visualization of surface-plasmon bandgaps in the diffuse background of metallic gratings.

    PubMed

    Depine, Ricardo A; Ledesma, Silvia

    2004-10-01

    When a surface plasmon propagates along a microrough grating, it interacts with the periodic plus the random roughness and emits light into the diffuse background, which can present intensity maxima called diffuse light bands. We reexamine previous studies on these bands within the framework of recent studies on photonic surfaces and show that the phenomenon of diffuse light provides an experimental technique for directly imaging the dispersion relation of surface plasmons, including the gap that, under appropriate circumstances, opens in the reciprocal grating space.

  7. Amplification and directional emission of surface acoustic waves by a two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Lei; Pipe, Kevin P.

    2015-01-12

    Amplification of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by electron drift in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is analyzed analytically and confirmed experimentally. Calculations suggest that peak power gain per SAW radian occurs at a more practical carrier density for a 2DEG than for a bulk material. It is also shown that SAW emission with tunable directionality can be achieved by modulating a 2DEG's carrier density (to effect SAW generation) in the presence of an applied DC field that amplifies SAWs propagating in a particular direction while attenuating those propagating in the opposite direction.

  8. New directions in lubrication, materials, wear, and surface interactions - Tribology in the 80's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, W. R. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    New directions in tribology are described. A range of topics is addressed, extending from fundamental research on tribological materials of all kinds and their surface effects, to final technological applications in mechanical components such as bearings, gears, and seals. The general topics addressed include: importance and definition of materials in tribology; future directions of research in adhesion and friction, wear and wear-resistant materials, and liquid lubricants and additives; status and new directions in elastohydrodynamic lubrication and solid lubricants; and tribological materials for mechanical components of the future.

  9. Effect of direct electric current on the cell surface properties of phenol-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qishi; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Xihui; Qian, Yi

    2005-01-01

    The change in cell surface properties in the presence of electric currents is of critical concern when the potential to manipulate bacterial movement with electric fields is evaluated. In this study, the effects of different direct electric currents on the cell surface properties involved in bacterial adhesion were investigated by using a mixed phenol-degrading bacterial culture in the exponential growth phase. The traits investigated were surface hydrophobicity (measured by adherence to n-octane), net surface electrostatic charge (determined by measurement of the zeta potential), and the cell surface shape and polymers (determined by scanning electron microscope analysis). The results showed that a lower current (less than 20 mA) induced no significant changes in the surface properties of phenol-degrading bacteria, that an electric current of 20 mA could increase the surface hydrophobicity and flatten the cell shape, and that a higher current (40 mA) could increase the surface extracellular substances and the net negative surface electrostatic charge. The results also revealed that the electric current effects on cell hydrophobicity varied with the suspending medium. We suggest that an electric current greater than 20 mA is not suitable for use in manipulation of the movement of the phenol-degrading bacteria, although such a current might favor the electrophoretic movement of the bacterial species.

  10. Direct fabrication of superhydrophobic ceramic surfaces with ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jihoon; Lee, Sukyung; Yong, Hyungseok; Lee, Sangmin; Park, Yong Tae

    2016-02-01

    Super-hydrophobic surfaces having contact angles > 150° for water are of great interest due to their potential use in a wide variety of applications. Although many reports on the wettability of different surfaces have been published, few or no studies have been done on the formation of a super-hydrophobic surface on a ceramic substrate. In this paper, we demonstrate the creation of a super-hydrophobic surface on a ceramic substrate by using zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO NWs) prepared by using a direct hydrothermal method. A self-assembled monolayer of heptadecafluoro- 1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl trichlorosilane (HDFS) lowered the surface energy between the water droplet and the nano-textured surface. The length of the ZnO NWs was found to play a key role in the formation of a nanostructure that increased the surface roughness of the substrate. Furthermore, the length of the ZnO NWs could be controlled by changing the growth time, and HDFS-coated ZnO NWs were found to be super-hydrophobic after a growth time of 3 h. We have demonstrated the potential application of this nanostructure for ceramic tableware by introducing a ZnO-NW-textured surface on a ceramic cup, which resulted in water and alcohol repellency. This method is a simple and practical way to achieve a super-hydrophobic surface; hence, our method is expected to be widely used in various ceramic applications.

  11. Effect of Direct Electric Current on the Cell Surface Properties of Phenol-Degrading Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qishi; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Xihui; Qian, Yi

    2005-01-01

    The change in cell surface properties in the presence of electric currents is of critical concern when the potential to manipulate bacterial movement with electric fields is evaluated. In this study, the effects of different direct electric currents on the cell surface properties involved in bacterial adhesion were investigated by using a mixed phenol-degrading bacterial culture in the exponential growth phase. The traits investigated were surface hydrophobicity (measured by adherence to n-octane), net surface electrostatic charge (determined by measurement of the zeta potential), and the cell surface shape and polymers (determined by scanning electron microscope analysis). The results showed that a lower current (less than 20 mA) induced no significant changes in the surface properties of phenol-degrading bacteria, that an electric current of 20 mA could increase the surface hydrophobicity and flatten the cell shape, and that a higher current (40 mA) could increase the surface extracellular substances and the net negative surface electrostatic charge. The results also revealed that the electric current effects on cell hydrophobicity varied with the suspending medium. We suggest that an electric current greater than 20 mA is not suitable for use in manipulation of the movement of the phenol-degrading bacteria, although such a current might favor the electrophoretic movement of the bacterial species. PMID:15640217

  12. Is Agency Skin Deep? Surface Attributes Influence Infants' Sensitivity to Goal-Directed Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guajardo, Jose J.; Woodward, Amanda L.

    2004-01-01

    Three studies investigated the role of surface attributes in infants' identification of agents, using a habituation paradigm designed to tap infants' interpretation of grasping as goal directed (Woodward, 1998). When they viewed a bare human hand grasping objects, 7- and 12-month-old infants focused on the relation between the hand and its goal.…

  13. Continuous directional water transport on the peristome surface of Nepenthes alata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Liwen; Liu, Hongliang; Jiang, Ying; Zhang, Deyuan; Han, Zhiwu; Jiang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Numerous natural systems contain surfaces or threads that enable directional water transport. This behaviour is usually ascribed to hierarchical structural features at the microscale and nanoscale, with gradients in surface energy and gradients in Laplace pressure thought to be the main driving forces. Here we study the prey-trapping pitcher organs of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata. We find that continuous, directional water transport occurs on the surface of the ‘peristome’—the rim of the pitcher—because of its multiscale structure, which optimizes and enhances capillary rise in the transport direction, and prevents backflow by pinning in place any water front that is moving in the reverse direction. This results not only in unidirectional flow despite the absence of any surface-energy gradient, but also in a transport speed that is much higher than previously thought. We anticipate that the basic ‘design’ principles underlying this behaviour could be used to develop artificial fluid-transport systems with practical applications.

  14. DETECTION OF A GROUND-WATER/SURFACE-WATER INTERFACE WITH DIRECT-PUSH EQUIPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground-water/surface-water interface (GSI) was documented at the Thermo Chem CERCLA Site in Muskegon, MI via direct-push (DP) sampling. At that time, contaminated ground water flowed from the upland area of the site into the Black Creek floodplain. DP rods equipped with a 1.5...

  15. Continuous directional water transport on the peristome surface of Nepenthes alata.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Liwen; Liu, Hongliang; Jiang, Ying; Zhang, Deyuan; Han, Zhiwu; Jiang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Numerous natural systems contain surfaces or threads that enable directional water transport. This behaviour is usually ascribed to hierarchical structural features at the microscale and nanoscale, with gradients in surface energy and gradients in Laplace pressure thought to be the main driving forces. Here we study the prey-trapping pitcher organs of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata. We find that continuous, directional water transport occurs on the surface of the 'peristome'--the rim of the pitcher--because of its multiscale structure, which optimizes and enhances capillary rise in the transport direction, and prevents backflow by pinning in place any water front that is moving in the reverse direction. This results not only in unidirectional flow despite the absence of any surface-energy gradient, but also in a transport speed that is much higher than previously thought. We anticipate that the basic 'design' principles underlying this behaviour could be used to develop artificial fluid-transport systems with practical applications. PMID:27078568

  16. Electric field-directed fibroblast locomotion involves cell surface molecular reorganization and is calcium independent

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Directional cellular locomotion is thought to involve localized intracellular calcium changes and the lateral transport of cell surface molecules. We have examined the roles of both calcium and cell surface glycoprotein redistribution in the directional migration of two murine fibroblastic cell lines, NIH 3T3 and SV101. These cell types exhibit persistent, cathode directed motility when exposed to direct current electric fields. Using time lapse phase contrast microscopy and image analysis, we have determined that electric field-directed locomotion in each cell type is a calcium independent process. Both exhibit cathode directed motility in the absence of extracellular calcium, and electric fields cause no detectable elevations or gradients of cytosolic free calcium. We find evidence suggesting that galvanotaxis in these cells involves the lateral redistribution of plasma membrane glycoproteins. Electric fields cause the lateral migration of plasma membrane concanavalin A receptors toward the cathode in both NIH 3T3 and SV101 fibroblasts. Exposure of directionally migrating cells to Con A inhibits the normal change of cell direction following a reversal of electric field polarity. Additionally, when cells are plated on Con A- coated substrata so that Con A receptors mediate cell-substratum adhesion, cathode-directed locomotion and a cathodal accumulation of Con A receptors are observed. Immunofluorescent labeling of the fibronectin receptor in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts suggests the recruitment of integrins from large clusters to form a more diffuse distribution toward the cathode in field-treated cells. Our results indicate that the mechanism of electric field directed locomotion in NIH 3T3 and SV101 fibroblasts involves the lateral redistribution of plasma membrane glycoproteins involved in cell-substratum adhesion. PMID:7929557

  17. Electrically driven directional motion of a four-wheeled molecule on a metal surface.

    PubMed

    Kudernac, Tibor; Ruangsupapichat, Nopporn; Parschau, Manfred; Maciá, Beatriz; Katsonis, Nathalie; Harutyunyan, Syuzanna R; Ernst, Karl-Heinz; Feringa, Ben L

    2011-11-09

    Propelling single molecules in a controlled manner along an unmodified surface remains extremely challenging because it requires molecules that can use light, chemical or electrical energy to modulate their interaction with the surface in a way that generates motion. Nature's motor proteins have mastered the art of converting conformational changes into directed motion, and have inspired the design of artificial systems such as DNA walkers and light- and redox-driven molecular motors. But although controlled movement of single molecules along a surface has been reported, the molecules in these examples act as passive elements that either diffuse along a preferential direction with equal probability for forward and backward movement or are dragged by an STM tip. Here we present a molecule with four functional units--our previously reported rotary motors--that undergo continuous and defined conformational changes upon sequential electronic and vibrational excitation. Scanning tunnelling microscopy confirms that activation of the conformational changes of the rotors through inelastic electron tunnelling propels the molecule unidirectionally across a Cu(111) surface. The system can be adapted to follow either linear or random surface trajectories or to remain stationary, by tuning the chirality of the individual motor units. Our design provides a starting point for the exploration of more sophisticated molecular mechanical systems with directionally controlled motion.

  18. A direct measurement of the energy flux density in plasma surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussart, Remi; Thomann, Anne-Lise; Semmar, Nadjib; Pichon, Laurianne; Bedra, Larbi; Mathias, Jacky; Tessier, Yves; Lefaucheux, Philippe

    2008-10-01

    The energy flux transferred from a plasma to a surface is a key issue for materials processing (sputtering, etching). We present direct measurements made with a Heat Flux Microsensor (HFM) in an Ar plasma interacting with the surface of the sensor. The HFM is a thermopile of about one thousand metal couples mounted in parallel. An Inductively Coupled Plasma in Argon was used to make the experiments. Langmuir probe and tuneable laser diode absorption measurements were carried out to estimate the contribution of ions, neutrals (conduction) and metastables. In order to evaluate the ability of the HFM to measure the part due to chemical reactions, a Si surface in contact with the HFM was submitted to an SF6 plasma. The direct measurements are in good agreement with the estimation we made knowing the etch rate and the enthalpy of the reaction. Finally, tests were performed on a sputtering reactor. Additional energy flux provided by condensing atoms (Pt) was also measured.

  19. Multisensor satellite data integration for sea surface wind speed and direction determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glackin, D. L.; Pihos, G. G.; Wheelock, S. L.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques to integrate meteorological data from various satellite sensors to yield a global measure of sea surface wind speed and direction for input to the Navy's operational weather forecast models were investigated. The sensors were launched or will be launched, specifically the GOES visible and infrared imaging sensor, the Nimbus-7 SMMR, and the DMSP SSM/I instrument. An algorithm for the extrapolation to the sea surface of wind directions as derived from successive GOES cloud images was developed. This wind veering algorithm is relatively simple, accounts for the major physical variables, and seems to represent the best solution that can be found with existing data. An algorithm for the interpolation of the scattered observed data to a common geographical grid was implemented. The algorithm is based on a combination of inverse distance weighting and trend surface fitting, and is suited to combing wind data from disparate sources.

  20. Characterising soil surface condition and carbon vulnerability using spatial statistics and directional reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, H.; Anderson, K.

    2008-12-01

    Soils can experience rapid structural degradation in response to land cover changes, resulting in reduced soil productivity, increased erodibility and a loss of Soil Organic Matter (SOM). The breakdown of soil aggregates through slaking and raindrop impact is linked to soil organic matter turnover, with subsequently eroded material often displaying proportionally more SOM. A reduction in aggregate stability is reflected in a decline in soil surface roughness, indicating that a physical soil structural change can be used to highlight soil vulnerability to SOM loss through mineralisation or erosion. Remotely sensed data can provide a cost- effective means of monitoring changes in soil surface condition over broad spatial extents. Growing recognition of the importance of the directional reflectance domain has highlighted their potential application for monitoring changes in soil surface roughness, associated with the breakdown of macro-aggregates and therefore SOM release. This is particularly relevant for soil condition monitoring because during soil structural degradation, changes in the self-shadowing effects of soil aggregates has a measurable effect on directional reflectance factors measured by proximal remote sensing devices. Field and laboratory data are therefore required for an empirical understanding of soil directional reflectance, underpinning subsequent model development. This experiment details the use of hyperspectral multiple view angle, proximal reflectance data (400-2500 nm) for describing changes in soil surface structure. Five different soil crusting states were produced, simulating a progressive decline in soil surface structure using artificial rainfall. Each stage was characterised using a close-range laser scanning device with a 2 mm spatial sampling methodology. Data were analysed within a geostatistical framework, where variogram analysis quantitatively confirmed the change in soil surface structure during crusting (sill variance = 0

  1. Oblique projection approach to generating trajectory along arbitrary direction on NURBS surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xubing; Hu, Guofan; Xiong, Youlun

    2013-03-01

    Aiming at geometric rules of trajectory generation, the oblique projection approach is proposed to generating trajectories along arbitrary direction to improve reach-ability and provide more choices for 5-axis machining. First of all, a middle plane is constructed with the normal direction at the center point and passing through the center point of the encapsulating box. Secondly, a set of parallel and equidistant lines in the middle plane is constructed as the source object of oblique projection, and the inclination angles of the line set are uniformed as any value in the range of 0 to 2π. Thirdly, oblique projections are employed to produce projection trajectories on the machined surface. Finally, a user function APathGenerator V1.0 is developed in UG NX. The algorithm is robust and provides a feasible way to control direction angle and trajectory gap for the 5-axis machining of any smooth surfaces whether concave, convex or mixed.

  2. Directly mapping the surface charge density of lipid bilayers under physiological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhs, Thomas; Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Besenbacher, Flemming; Dong, Mingdong

    2015-03-01

    The surface charge density of lipid bilayers governs the cellular uptake of charged particles and guides cell-cell and cell-surface interactions. Direct probing of the potential requires sub nanometer distances as the electrostatic potential is screened by high physiological salt concentrations. This prevented direct measurement of the SCD under physiological conditions. In this study we investigate supported bilayers of lipid mixtures that form domains of distinct surface charges, submerged in 150mM NaCl. We use a scanning ion-conductance microscope (SICM) setup to measure the ionic current through a nanopipette as the pipette is scanned several nanometers above the sample. The charged headgroups of the lipids attract counter ions leading to a charge dependent enhancement of the ion concentration near the surface. This creates a measurable change of conductivity in the vicinity of the surface. As the dependency of the current on the SCD and pipette potential is non-trivial we characterized it using numerical solutions to Poisson and Nernst-Planck equations. Based on the simulation results we propose an imaging method. We confirm feasibility of the proposed method by experimentally mapping the local surface charge density of phase separated lipid bilayers.

  3. Direct imaging of Pt single atoms adsorbed on TiO2 (110) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chang, Teng-Yuan; Tanaka, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Ryo; Toyoura, Kazuaki; Matsunaga, Katsuyuki; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Shibata, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles (e.g., gold and platinum) supported on TiO2 surfaces are utilized in many technological applications such as heterogeneous catalysts. To fully understand their enhanced catalytic activity, it is essential to unravel the interfacial interaction between the metal atoms and TiO2 surfaces at the level of atomic dimensions. However, it has been extremely difficult to directly characterize the atomic-scale structures that result when individual metal atoms are adsorbed on the TiO2 surfaces. Here, we show direct atomic-resolution images of individual Pt atoms adsorbed on TiO2 (110) surfaces using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Subangstrom spatial resolution enables us to identify five different Pt atom adsorption sites on the TiO2 (110) surface. Combining this with systematic density functional theory calculations reveals that the most favorable Pt adsorption sites are on vacancy sites of basal oxygen atoms that are located in subsurface positions relative to the top surface bridging oxygen atoms.

  4. Investigation of surface termination by directional elastic peak electron spectroscopy: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jurczyszyn, M.; Miszczuk, A.; Morawski, I.; Zasada, I.

    2014-07-01

    Experimental and theoretical details concerning the directional elastic peak electron spectroscopy are presented. The application of this experimental method to the identification of a crystalline structure of surface layers is shown for Cu(111) and Ru(0001), which enables the analysis of different surface terminations associated with different sequences of atoms along the surface normal. Theoretical data are obtained by applying the multiple scattering theory and different sources of phase shifts. The quantitative analysis performed by an R-factor reveals almost the same populations of A and B terminated (0001) terraces and proves explicitly the presence of steps of atomic height on the clean Ru(0001) surface. This is not the case for the Cu(111) surface, where the terrace termination does not affect the distribution of atomic directions within the first few atomic layers. The averaging of theoretical data versus scattering volume defined by the sphere radius R{sub max} around the emitter site is discussed in view of the computation time optimization. - Highlights: • We examined the structure and surface termination of fcc and hcp monocrystals. • Crystalline structure within the first few atomic layers was determined by DEPES. • Multiple scattering formalism was used to obtain theoretical results. • Populations of terraces with different terminations were determined. • Scattering parameters are discussed in the context of computation time optimization.

  5. Surface preparation for high purity alumina ceramics enabling direct brazing in hydrogen atmospheres

    DOEpatents

    Cadden, Charles H.; Yang, Nancy Yuan Chi; Hosking, Floyd M.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for preparing the surface of a high purity alumina ceramic or sapphire specimen that enables direct brazing in a hydrogen atmosphere using an active braze alloy. The present invention also relates to a method for directly brazing a high purity alumina ceramic or sapphire specimen to a ceramic or metal member using this method of surface preparation, and to articles produced by this brazing method. The presence of silicon, in the form of a SiO.sub.2 -containing surface layer, can more than double the tensile bond strength in alumina ceramic joints brazed in a hydrogen atmosphere using an active Au-16Ni-0.75 Mo-1.75V filler metal. A thin silicon coating applied by PVD processing can, after air firing, produce a semi-continuous coverage of the alumina surface with a SiO.sub.2 film. Room temperature tensile strength was found to be proportional to the fraction of air fired surface covered by silicon-containing films. Similarly, the ratio of substrate fracture versus interface separation was also related to the amount of surface silicon present prior to brazing. This process can replace the need to perform a "moly-manganese" metallization step.

  6. Nanometer-scale scanning magnetometry of spin structures and excitations using Nitrogen-vacancy centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovzhenko, Yuliya

    The development of increasingly sensitive scanning techniques has led to new insights into the physics of interacting condensed matter systems. Recently, Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond emerged as a promising scanning magnetic imaging platform capable of operating in a broad range of temperatures and magnetic fields, with sensitivity and resolution capable of imaging a single electron spin with sub-nanometer resolution under ambient conditions. In this talk we will review some of the recent developments in this new scanning platform. We will describe our recent progress in using a single NV center in a scanning diamond nano-pillar to study condensed matter magnetism at both room and low temperatures. In particular, we demonstrate the use of scanning NV magnetometry to image stray fields originating from static chiral spin structures, as well as to detect resonant and off-resonant low-energy spin excitations.

  7. Broadband magnetometry by infrared-absorption detection of nitrogen-vacancy ensembles in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, V. M.; Bauch, E.; Jarmola, A.; Zipp, L. J.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Budker, D.

    2010-10-01

    We demonstrate magnetometry by detection of the spin state of high-density nitrogen-vacancy ensembles in diamond using optical absorption at 1042 nm. With this technique, measurement contrast, and collection efficiency can approach unity, leading to an increase in magnetic sensitivity compared to the more common method of collecting red fluorescence. Working at 75 K with a sensor with effective volume 50×50×300 μm3, we project photon shot-noise limited sensitivity of 5 pT in one second of acquisition and bandwidth from dc to a few megahertz. Operation in a gradiometer configuration yields a noise floor of 7 nTrms at ˜110 Hz in one second of acquisition.

  8. Statistical magnetometry on isolated NiCo nanowires and nanowire arrays: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergelius, Philip; Garcia Fernandez, Javier; Martens, Stefan; Zocher, Michael; Böhnert, Tim; Vega Martinez, Victor; de la Prida, Victor Manuel; Görlitz, Detlef; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2016-04-01

    The first-order reversal curve (FORC) method can be used to extract information about the interaction and switching field distribution of ferromagnetic nanowire arrays, yet it remains challenging to acquire reliable values. Within ordered pores of anodic alumina templates we electrochemically synthesize eight different Ni x Co1-x samples with x varying between 0.05 and 1. FORC diagrams are acquired using vibrating sample magnetometry. By dissolving the template and using the magneto-optical Kerr effect, we measure the hysteresis loops of up to 100 different and isolated nanowires for each sample to gain precise information about the intrinsic switching field distribution. Values of the interaction field are extracted from a deshearing of the major hysteresis loop. We present a comparative study between all methods in order to evaluate and reinforce current FORC theory with experimental findings.

  9. High-sensitivity single NV magnetometry by spin-to-charge state mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskula, Jean-Christophe; Shields, Brendan; Bauch, Erik; Lukin, Mikhail; Walsworth, Ronald; Trifonov, Alexei

    2015-05-01

    Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond are atom-like quantum system in a solid state matrix whom its structure allows optical readout of the electronic spin. However, the optimal duration of optical readout is limited by a singlet state lifetime making single shot spin readout out of reach. On the other side, the NV center charge state readout can be extremely efficient (up to 99% fidelity) by using excitation at 594 nm. We will present a new method of spin readout utilizing a spin-depending photoionization process to map the electronic spin state of the NV onto the its charge state. Moreover, pre-selection on the charged state allows to minimize data acquisition time. This scheme improves single NV AC magnetometry by a factor of 5 and will benefit other single NV center experiments as well.

  10. Broadband magnetometry by infrared-absorption detection of nitrogen-vacancy ensembles in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, V. M.; Bauch, E.; Jarmola, A.; Zipp, L. J.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Budker, D.

    2010-10-25

    We demonstrate magnetometry by detection of the spin state of high-density nitrogen-vacancy ensembles in diamond using optical absorption at 1042 nm. With this technique, measurement contrast, and collection efficiency can approach unity, leading to an increase in magnetic sensitivity compared to the more common method of collecting red fluorescence. Working at 75 K with a sensor with effective volume 50x50x300 {mu}m{sup 3}, we project photon shot-noise limited sensitivity of 5 pT in one second of acquisition and bandwidth from dc to a few megahertz. Operation in a gradiometer configuration yields a noise floor of 7 nT{sub rms} at {approx}110 Hz in one second of acquisition.

  11. Exchange coupling in hybrid anisotropy magnetic multilayers quantified by vector magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, C. Miles, J. J.; Thomson, T.; Anh Nguyen, T. N.; Fang, Y.; Dumas, R. K.; Åkerman, J.

    2015-05-07

    Hybrid anisotropy thin film heterostructures, where layers with perpendicular and in-plane anisotropy are separated by a thin spacer, are novel materials for zero/low field spin torque oscillators and bit patterned media. Here, we report on magnetization reversal and exchange coupling in a archetypal Co/Pd (perpendicular)-NiFe (in-plane) hybrid anisotropy system studied using vector vibrating sample magnetometry. This technique allows us to quantify the magnetization reversal in each individual magnetic layer, and measure of the interlayer exchange as a function of non-magnetic spacer thickness. At large (>1 nm) spacer thicknesses Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida-like exchange dominates, with orange-peel coupling providing a significant contribution only for sub-nm spacer thickness.

  12. Exchange coupling in hybrid anisotropy magnetic multilayers quantified by vector magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, C.; Miles, J. J.; Anh Nguyen, T. N.; Fang, Y.; Dumas, R. K.; Åkerman, J.; Thomson, T.

    2015-05-01

    Hybrid anisotropy thin film heterostructures, where layers with perpendicular and in-plane anisotropy are separated by a thin spacer, are novel materials for zero/low field spin torque oscillators and bit patterned media. Here, we report on magnetization reversal and exchange coupling in a archetypal Co/Pd (perpendicular)-NiFe (in-plane) hybrid anisotropy system studied using vector vibrating sample magnetometry. This technique allows us to quantify the magnetization reversal in each individual magnetic layer, and measure of the interlayer exchange as a function of non-magnetic spacer thickness. At large (>1 nm) spacer thicknesses Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida-like exchange dominates, with orange-peel coupling providing a significant contribution only for sub-nm spacer thickness.

  13. Vector magnetometry based on electromagnetically induced transparency in linearly polarized light

    SciTech Connect

    Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Dudin, Y. O.; Velichansky, V. L.; Zibrov, A. S.; Zibrov, S. A.

    2010-09-15

    We develop a generalized principle of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) vector magnetometry based on high-contrast EIT resonances and the symmetry of atom-light interaction in the linearly polarized bichromatic fields. Operation of such vector magnetometer on the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb has been demonstrated. The proposed compass-magnetometer has an increased immunity to shifts produced by quadratic Zeeman and ac-Stark effects, as well as by atom-buffer gas and atom-atom collisions. In our proof-of-principle experiment the detected angular sensitivity to magnetic field orientation is 10{sup -3} deg/Hz{sup 1/2}, which is limited by laser intensity fluctuations, light polarization quality, and magnitude of the magnetic field.

  14. Magnetometry of injury currents from human nerve and muscle specimens using superconducting quantum interferences devices.

    PubMed

    Mackert, B M; Mackert, J; Wübbeler, G; Armbrust, F; Wolff, K D; Burghoff, M; Trahms, L; Curio, G

    1999-03-12

    Acute lesions of polarized membranes lead to slowly decaying ('near-DC') injury currents driven by the transmembrane resting potential gradient. Here we report the first recordings of injury-related near-DC magnetic fields from human nerve and muscle specimens in vitro using Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) operated in a conventional magnetically shielded room in a clinical environment. The specimen position was modulated sinusoidally beneath the sensor array by a non-magnetically fabricated scissors lift to improve the signal-to-noise ratio for near-DC fields. Depending on the specimen geometry the field patterns showed dipolar or quadrupolar aspects. The slow decay of human nerve and muscle injury currents was monitored for several hours from a distance of a few centimeters. Thus DC-magnetometry provides a sensitivity which might allow the remote detection of injury currents also in vivo.

  15. Probing surface charge potentials of clay basal planes and edges by direct force measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongying; Bhattacharjee, Subir; Chow, Ross; Wallace, Dean; Masliyah, Jacob H; Xu, Zhenghe

    2008-11-18

    The dispersion and gelation of clay suspensions have major impact on a number of industries, such as ceramic and composite materials processing, paper making, cement production, and consumer product formulation. To fundamentally understand controlling mechanisms of clay dispersion and gelation, it is necessary to study anisotropic surface charge properties and colloidal interactions of clay particles. In this study, a colloidal probe technique was employed to study the interaction forces between a silica probe and clay basal plane/edge surfaces. A muscovite mica was used as a representative of 2:1 phyllosilicate clay minerals. The muscovite basal plane was prepared by cleavage, while the edge surface was obtained by a microtome cutting technique. Direct force measurements demonstrated the anisotropic surface charge properties of the basal plane and edge surface. For the basal plane, the long-range forces were monotonically repulsive within pH 6-10 and the measured forces were pH-independent, thereby confirming that clay basal planes have permanent surface charge from isomorphic substitution of lattice elements. The measured interaction forces were fitted well with the classical DLVO theory. The surface potentials of muscovite basal plane derived from the measured force profiles were in good agreement with those reported in the literature. In the case of edge surfaces, the measured forces were monotonically repulsive at pH 10, decreasing with pH, and changed to be attractive at pH 5.6, strongly suggesting that the charge on the clay edge surfaces is pH-dependent. The measured force profiles could not be reasonably fitted with the classical DLVO theory, even with very small surface potential values, unless the surface roughness was considered. The surface element integration (SEI) method was used to calculate the DLVO forces to account for the surface roughness. The surface potentials of the muscovite edges were derived by fitting the measured force profiles with the

  16. Radial Wettable Gradient of Hot Surface to Control Droplets Movement in Directions

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shile; Wang, Sijie; Tao, Yuanhao; Shang, Weifeng; Deng, Siyan; Zheng, Yongmei; Hou, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    A radial wettable gradient was fabricated on the surface of graphite plate by a simple one-step anodic oxidation process. It was found that the direction and value of the wettable gradient could be easily controlled by adjusting current and oxidation time gradient. With the increase of surface temperature, droplets on surface not only exhibited the transition of boiling mode, but also showed the controlled radial spreading, evaporation and movement behaviors. These phenomena could be attributed to the cooperation of wettability force, hysteresis force and vapor pressure (Leidenfrost effect). Especially, the controlled radial convergence or divergence of droplets with high velocity were realized on the surfaces with either inside or outside radial gradient, which would have crucial applications in the design of microfluidic devices and the exploration of the biotechnology. PMID:25975722

  17. NOx Direct Decomposition: Potentially Enhanced Thermodynamics and Kinetics on Chemically Modified Ferroelectric Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakekhani, Arvin; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2014-03-01

    NOx are regulated pollutants produced during automotive combustion. As part of an effort to design catalysts for NOx decomposition that operate in oxygen rich environment and permit greater fuel efficiency, we study chemistry of NOx on (001) ferroelectric surfaces. Changing the polarization at such surfaces modifies electronic properties and leads to switchable surface chemistry. Using first principles theory, our previous work has shown that addition of catalytic RuO2 monolayer on ferroelectric PbTiO3 surface makes direct decomposition of NO thermodynamically favorable for one polarization. Furthermore, the usual problem of blockage of catalytic sites by strong oxygen binding is overcome by flipping polarization that helps desorb the oxygen. We describe a thermodynamic cycle for direct NO decomposition followed by desorption of N2 and O2. We provide energy barriers and transition states for key steps of the cycle as well as describing their dependence on polarization direction. We end by pointing out how a switchable order parameter of substrate,in this case ferroelectric polarization, allows us to break away from some standard compromises for catalyst design(e.g. the Sabatier principle). This enlarges the set of potentially catalytic metals. Primary support from Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing, North America, Inc.

  18. Directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons by VO2-gold hybrid antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun-Je; Lee, Kyookeun; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Lee, Byoungho

    2016-03-01

    We propose a novel type of dual surface plasmon polariton (SPP) gap nano-antennas which can excite SPPs directionally and switch the direction according to the device temperature. The device consists of a vanadium dioxide (VO2)- insulator-metal resonator and a metal-insulator-metal resonator with slightly different antenna width. Phase of SPPs generated by the VO2 gap antenna changes as the temperature increases, so that interference between SPPs generated from two separated gap antennas makes its launching direction switched. In case of 624 nm wavelength, directional intensity distinction ratios of coupled SPPs are about 1:5 and 7:1 when VO2 is in insulator phase and metallic phase, respectively.

  19. Oriented collagen as a potential cochlear implant electrode surface coating to achieve directed neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Kirkwood, John E; Lai, Edwina; Dazert, Stefan; Fuller, Gerald G; Heller, Stefan

    2012-04-01

    In patients with severe to profound hearing loss, cochlear implants (CIs) are currently the only therapeutic option when the amplification with conventional hearing aids does no longer lead to a useful hearing experience. Despite its great success, there are patients in which benefit from these devices is rather limited. One reason may be a poor neuron-device interaction, where the electric fields generated by the electrode array excite a wide range of tonotopically organized spiral ganglion neurons at the cost of spatial resolution. Coating of CI electrodes to provide a welcoming environment combined with suitable surface chemistry (e.g. with neurotrophic factors) has been suggested to create a closer bioelectrical interface between the electrode array and the target tissue, which might lead to better spatial resolution, better frequency discrimination, and ultimately may improve speech perception in patients. Here we investigate the use of a collagen surface with a cholesteric banding structure, whose orientation can be systemically controlled as a guiding structure for neurite outgrowth. We demonstrate that spiral ganglion neurons survive on collagen-coated surfaces and display a directed neurite growth influenced by the direction of collagen fibril deposition. The majority of neurites grow parallel to the orientation direction of the collagen. We suggest collagen coating as a possible future option in CI technology to direct neurite outgrowth and improve hearing results for affected patients.

  20. Development of a directly patterned low-surface-energy polymer brush in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Abhinav; Paik, Marvin Y; Ober, Christopher K

    2009-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a sustainable solvent because it is nonflammable, exhibits a relatively low toxicity, and is naturally abundant. As a selective, nonpolar solvent, supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is an ideal fit for the development of low-surface-energy polymers. The development of directly patterned poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate) (PTFEMA) brushes in scCO2 was investigated. PTFEMA, in particular, was selected over other fluorinated polymers because of its very high electron-beam (e-beam) sensitivity. PTFEMA brushes were grown on silicon substrates via controlled surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization of TFEMA. Surface analysis techniques including ellipsometry, contact-angle goniometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the thickness, hydrophilicity, roughness, and chemical composition of the polymer brushes. PTFEMA brushes were directly patterned in a single step using e-beam lithography and were processed in an environmentally benign scCO2 solvent. Tapping-mode AFM imaging confirmed the successful e-beam patterning and development of these brushes. The sensitivity of PTFEMA brushes toward direct patterning with the e-beam, followed by scCO2 development, was studied and compared to development in tetrahydrofuran solvent. Using this direct-patterning method, followed by dry development in scCO2, highly resolved nanostructured polymer brush lines down to 78 nm could be prepared. This method can be generalized to prepare fluorinated low-surface-energy polymer brush surfaces in a single step for various applications. PMID:20355827

  1. Surface Structure Formation in Direct Chill (DC) Casting of Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Nazlin; Carlberg, Torbjörn

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to increase the understanding of the surface zone formation during direct chill (DC) casting of aluminum billets produced by the air slip technology. The depth of the shell zone, with compositions deviating from the bulk, is of large importance for the subsequent extrusion productivity and quality of final products. The surface microstructures of 6060 and 6005 aluminum alloys in three different surface appearances—defect free, wavy surface, and spot defects—were studied. The surface microstructures and outer appearance, segregation depth, and phase formation were investigated for the mentioned cases. The results were discussed and explained based on the exudation of liquid metal through the mushy zone and the fact that the exudated liquid is contained within a surface oxide skin. Outward solidification in the surface layer was quantitatively analyzed, and the oxide skin movements explained meniscus line formation. Phases forming at different positions in the segregation zone were analyzed and coupled to a cellular solidification in the exudated layer.

  2. Generating grids directly on CAD database surfaces using a parametric evaluator approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatzhe, Timothy D.; Melson, Thomas G.

    1995-01-01

    A very important, but often overlooked step in grid generation is acquiring a suitable geometry definition of the vehicle to be analyzed. In the past, geometry was usually obtained by generating a number of cross-sections of each component. A number of recent efforts have focussed on non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces (NURBS) to provide as single type of analytic surface to deal with inside the grid generator. This approach has required the development of tools to read other types of surfaces and convert them, either exactly or by approximation, into a NURBS surface. This paper describes a more generic parametric evaluator approach, which does not rely on a particular surface type internal to the grid generation system and is less restrictive in the number of surface types that can be represented exactly. This approach has been implemented in the McDonnell Douglas grid generation system, MACGS, and offers direct access to all types of surfaces from a Unigraphics part file.

  3. Constructive, collaborative, contextual, and self-directed learning in surface anatomy education.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Esther M; Sieben, Judith M; Smailbegovic, Ida; de Bruin, Anique B H; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy education often consists of a combination of lectures and laboratory sessions, the latter frequently including surface anatomy. Studying surface anatomy enables students to elaborate on their knowledge of the cadaver's static anatomy by enabling the visualization of structures, especially those of the musculoskeletal system, move and function in a living human being. A recent development in teaching methods for surface anatomy is body painting, which several studies suggest increases both student motivation and knowledge acquisition. This article focuses on a teaching approach and is a translational contribution to existing literature. In line with best evidence medical education, the aim of this article is twofold: to briefly inform teachers about constructivist learning theory and elaborate on the principles of constructive, collaborative, contextual, and self-directed learning; and to provide teachers with an example of how to implement these learning principles to change the approach to teaching surface anatomy. Student evaluations of this new approach demonstrate that the application of these learning principles leads to higher student satisfaction. However, research suggests that even better results could be achieved by further adjustments in the application of contextual and self-directed learning principles. Successful implementation and guidance of peer physical examination is crucial for the described approach, but research shows that other options, like using life models, seem to work equally well. Future research on surface anatomy should focus on increasing the students' ability to apply anatomical knowledge and defining the setting in which certain teaching methods and approaches have a positive effect.

  4. Direct investigation of (sub-) surface preparation artifacts in GaAs based materials by FIB sectioning.

    PubMed

    Belz, Jürgen; Beyer, Andreas; Torunski, Torsten; Stolz, Wolfgang; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    The introduction of preparation artifacts is almost inevitable when producing samples for (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM). These artifacts can be divided in extrinsic artifacts like damage processes and intrinsic artifacts caused by the deviations from the volume strain state in thin elastically strained material systems. The reduction and estimation of those effects is of great importance for the quantitative analysis of (S)TEM images. Thus, optimized ion beam preparation conditions are investigated for high quality samples. Therefore, the surface topology is investigated directly with atomic force microscopy (AFM) on the actual TEM samples. Additionally, the sectioning of those samples by a focused ion beam (FIB) is used to investigate the damage depth profile directly in the TEM. The AFM measurements show good quantitative agreement of sample height modulation due to strain relaxation to finite elements simulations. Strong indications of (sub-) surface damage by ion beams are observed. Their influence on high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging is estimated with focus on thickness determination by absolute intensity methods. Data consolidation of AFM and TEM measurements reveals a 3.5nm surface amorphization, negligible surface roughness on the scale of angstroms and a sub-surface damage profile in the range of up to 8.0nm in crystalline gallium arsenide (GaAs) and GaAs-based ternary alloys. A correction scheme for thickness evaluation of absolute HAADF intensities is proposed and applied for GaAs based materials.

  5. Directional surface plasmon-coupled emission: a new method for high sensitivity detection

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Malicka, Joanna; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence emission is nearly isotropic in space. With typical optical components the collection efficiency is 1% or less. In this preliminary report, we describe a novel approach to transforming the normally isotropic emission into directional emission with a collection efficiency near 50%. This can be accomplished for fluorophores located near a semi-transparent silver film on a glass substrate. The emission couples with the surface plasmon resonance on the silver surface and enters the transparent substrate at a sharply defined angle, the surface plasmon angle for the emission wavelength. We estimate that 40–70% of the total emission enters the substrate at the plasmon angle and can thus be directed towards a detector. Background emission from fluorophores distant from the silver does not couple with the plasmon and is not detected. Different emission wavelengths couple at different angles allowing spectral discrimination without additional optics. Surface plasmon-coupled emission represents a new technology which can be used for high detection efficiency with microfluidic and/or surface-bound assay formats. PMID:12893239

  6. Surface hopping dynamics of direct trans --> cis photoswitching of an azobenzene derivative in constrained adsorbate geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floß, Gereon; Granucci, Giovanni; Saalfrank, Peter

    2012-12-01

    With ongoing miniaturization of electronic devices, the need for individually addressable, switchable molecules arises. An example are azobenzenes on surfaces which have been shown to be switchable between trans and cis forms. Here, we examine the "direct" (rather than substrate-mediated) channel of the trans → cis photoisomerization after ππ* excitation of tetra-tert-butyl-azobenzene physisorbed on surfaces mimicking Au(111) and Bi(111), respectively. In spirit of the direct channel, the electronic structure of the surface is neglected, the latter merely acting as a rigid platform which weakly interacts with the molecule via Van-der-Waals forces. Starting from thermal ensembles which represent the trans-form, sudden excitations promote the molecules to ππ*-excited states which are non-adiabatically coupled among themselves and to a nπ*-excited and the ground state, respectively. After excitation, relaxation to the ground state by internal conversion takes place, possibly accompanied by isomerization. The process is described here by "on the fly" semiclassical surface hopping dynamics in conjunction with a semiempirical Hamiltonian (AM1) and configuration-interaction type methods. It is found that steric constraints imposed by the substrate lead to reduced but non-vanishing, trans → cis reaction yields and longer internal conversion times than for the isolated molecule. Implications for recent experiments for azobenzenes on surfaces are discussed.

  7. Directional-sensitive differential laser Doppler vibrometry for in-plane motion measurement of specular surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agusanto, Kusuma; Lau, Gih-Keong; Wu, Kun; Liu, Ting; Zhu, Chuangui; Yuan, Ling

    2015-03-01

    A new method for measuring in-plane vibration velocity of glossy and specular surface using differential laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is proposed in this work. A standard tangential LDV using similar differential configuration is only able to measure in-plane velocity of objects with rough surface, due to its inherent on-axis optical design that collects backscatter light along its optical axis. The proposed method adopts an off-axis detection scheme, in which the photodetector is decoupled from LDV, and placed along the dominant direction of the scattered light. For optimal placement, the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of the sample must be considered ideally, but in our measurement tests, the off-axis detection along the direction of specular reflection is sufficient to obtain good measurement results. Another advantage with this setup is that it also works with the objects with rough surface. Experimental works using the standard tangential LDV and a prototype of this method were conducted to measure the in-plane motion of four different samples representing rough, glossy and mirror-like surface. An electrodynamic shaker was used to provide the in-plane motion of the samples at three different frequencies. A single point axial vibrometer was used to validate the in-plane velocity of the measurement from both in-plane LDVs. Some preliminary results showed that the in-plane motion of the object with glossy and specular surface can be measured using the proposed method.

  8. Surface wind direction influence on spatial patterns of urban heat island in Zaragoza (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadrat, J. M.; Saz, M. A.; Vicente, S. M.

    2003-04-01

    We analyse the effects of surface wind direction on the spatial urban heat island in Zaragoza (Spain). The general spatial patterns are determined using a sample of 29 daily thermal maps of the city at a resolution of 30 m. Principal Component Analysis (VARIMAX rotation) is used to determine the main thermal spatial patterns in the city. Three components have been extracted. The first represents the most general spatial patterns of urban heat island in Zaragoza. The second one indicates a displacement of the warmest areas to the Southwest of the city, and the third shows another displacement to the Northeast. Rotated component matrix is used to identify the similarities between the daily maps and the general spatial patterns represented by the three components. The dominant direction of surface winds is daily classified according to the dominant direction flows in the city. Winds from 45o to 225o were classified as SE, and the others as NW. Analysis of Variance was used to determine wether there have been significant differences in component matrix values for the three principal components related to the wind direction (SE and NW). No significant differences in the spatial configuration of component 1 are obtained by dominant direction of winds. Nevertheless, the analysis indicates that the matrix values of the second and third components show significant differences in relation to the surface wind direction. Displacement of urban heat island to the Southeast (Component 2) is greater during NW winds, while the displacement to the Northwest (Component 3) is produced mainly by Southeast winds.

  9. Surface Rebound of Relativistic Dislocations Directly and Efficiently Initiates Deformation Twinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing-Jie; Li, Ju; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Ma, Evan

    2016-10-01

    Under ultrahigh stresses (e.g., under high strain rates or in small-volume metals) deformation twinning (DT) initiates on a very short time scale, indicating strong spatial-temporal correlations in dislocation dynamics. Using atomistic simulations, here we demonstrate that surface rebound of relativistic dislocations directly and efficiently triggers DT under a wide range of laboratory experimental conditions. Because of its stronger temporal correlation, surface rebound sustained relay of partial dislocations is shown to be dominant over the conventional mechanism of thermally activated nucleation of twinning dislocations.

  10. Surface-relief gratings with high spatial frequency fabricated using direct glass imprinting process.

    PubMed

    Mori, T; Hasegawa, K; Hatano, T; Kasa, H; Kintaka, K; Nishii, J

    2008-03-01

    Surface-relief gratings with high spatial frequencies were first fabricated using a direct imprinting process with a glassy carbon mold at the softening temperature of phosphate glass. A grating with maximum height of 730 nm and 500 nm period was formed on the glass surface by the pressing at the softening temperature of glass under constant pressure of 0.4 kN/cm(2). Phase retardation of 0.1 lambda was observed between TE-polarized and TM-polarized light at 600 nm wavelength. PMID:18311281

  11. Directional surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence from nickel thin films: Fixed angle observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenberg, Micah; Aslan, Kadir; Hortle, Elinor; Geddes, Chris D.

    2009-04-01

    Directional surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence (SPCC) from nickel thin films is demonstrated. Free-space and angular-dependent SPCC emission from blue, green and turquoise chemiluminescent solutions placed onto nickel thin films attached to a hemispherical prism were measured. SPCC emission was found to be highly directional and preferentially p-polarized, in contrast to the unpolarized and isotropic chemiluminescence emission. The largest SPCC emission for all chemiluminescence solutions was observed at a fixed observation angle of 60°, which was also predicted by theoretical Fresnel calculations. It was found that nickel thin films did not have a catalytic effect on chemiluminescence emission.

  12. Five-vertex Archimedean surface tessellation by lanthanide-directed molecular self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Écija, David; Urgel, José I.; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C.; Joshi, Sushobhan; Auwärter, Willi; Seitsonen, Ari P.; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Fischer, Sybille; Vijayaraghavan, Saranyan; Reichert, Joachim; Barth, Johannes V.

    2013-01-01

    The tessellation of the Euclidean plane by regular polygons has been contemplated since ancient times and presents intriguing aspects embracing mathematics, art, and crystallography. Significant efforts were devoted to engineer specific 2D interfacial tessellations at the molecular level, but periodic patterns with distinct five-vertex motifs remained elusive. Here, we report a direct scanning tunneling microscopy investigation on the cerium-directed assembly of linear polyphenyl molecular linkers with terminal carbonitrile groups on a smooth Ag(111) noble-metal surface. We demonstrate the spontaneous formation of fivefold Ce–ligand coordination motifs, which are planar and flexible, such that vertices connecting simultaneously trigonal and square polygons can be expressed. By tuning the concentration and the stoichiometric ratio of rare-earth metal centers to ligands, a hierarchic assembly with dodecameric units and a surface-confined metal–organic coordination network yielding the semiregular Archimedean snub square tiling could be fabricated. PMID:23576764

  13. Direct measurements of chemical bonding at solid surfaces using a unique calorimetric method: Towards understanding surface chemistry in energy technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Jason A.

    Measuring the heat released when gas phase species adsorb onto surfaces provides essential information about the energies of surface species and the reactions they undergo. Here, heats of adsorption of technologically-interesting surface species were measured using a unique microcalorimetric technique in ultrahigh vacuum. Specifically, systems were studied which are relevant to understanding and improving transition metal catalysts and organic electronics. Metal adsorption energies were measured which elucidate metal-to-oxide and metal-to-polymer interfacial binding, and molecule adsorption energies were measured to understand how catalyst structure influences the energies of adsorbed reaction intermediates. Oxide-supported metal nanoparticles form the basis for many industrial catalysts. Nanoparticle activity, selectivity and resistance to sintering can depend strongly on particle size, oxide support, and defects on the oxide. To investigate the dependence of catalytic properties on oxide surface defects, defects were introduced on MgO(100) and CeO2(111), and their affect on the adsorption energy of metal atoms and the energy of supported nanoparticles was measured. These measurements help to explain why transition metal catalysts sinter more slowly and maintain smaller particles when supported on CeO 2 compared to other oxides, and how surface defects influence nanoparticle formation and film growth on oxides. The effect of nanoparticle size on the adsorption energy of CO on different-sized Pd nanoparticles on Fe3O 4(111) was measured, providing the first direct evidence that the heat of adsorption of CO decreases with decreasing Pd nanoparticle size. Knowledge of the direction and magnitude of particle size effects is necessary for improving existing catalysts and designing new ones. The metal/polymer interface is important because it impacts charge injection, extraction, and transport in organic electronics. Large-scale energy production using polymer

  14. Computationally Efficient Numerical Model for the Evolution of Directional Ocean Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malej, M.; Choi, W.; Goullet, A.

    2011-12-01

    The main focus of this work has been the asymptotic and numerical modeling of weakly nonlinear ocean surface wave fields. In particular, a development of an efficient numerical model for the evolution of nonlinear ocean waves, including extreme waves known as Rogue/Freak waves, is of direct interest. Due to their elusive and destructive nature, the media often portrays Rogue waves as unimaginatively huge and unpredictable monsters of the sea. To address some of these concerns, derivations of reduced phase-resolving numerical models, based on the small wave steepness assumption, are presented and their corresponding numerical simulations via Fourier pseudo-spectral methods are discussed. The simulations are initialized with a well-known JONSWAP wave spectrum and different angular distributions are employed. Both deterministic and Monte-Carlo ensemble average simulations were carried out. Furthermore, this work concerns the development of a new computationally efficient numerical model for the short term prediction of evolving weakly nonlinear ocean surface waves. The derivations are originally based on the work of West et al. (1987) and since the waves in the ocean tend to travel primarily in one direction, the aforementioned new numerical model is derived with an additional assumption of a weak transverse dependence. In turn, comparisons of the ensemble averaged randomly initialized spectra, as well as deterministic surface-to-surface correlations are presented. The new model is shown to behave well in various directional wave fields and can potentially be a candidate for computationally efficient prediction and propagation of extreme ocean surface waves - Rogue/Freak waves.

  15. Direct evidence of active surface reconstruction during oxidative dehydrogenation of propane over VMgO catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pantazidis, A.; Mirodatos, C.; Burrows, A.; Kiely, C.J.

    1998-07-25

    This paper presents a thorough investigation of an optimized VMgO catalyst (14 wt% V) for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane, carried out in order to elucidate the nature and behavior of the active surface. The catalyst morphology and the surface composition are studied by means of HREM, XPS, UV-vis, XRD, and in-situ electrical conductivity techniques, as a function of the gaseous environments of the catalyst. The active surface is shown to be essentially a monolayer of amorphous VO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}} units scattered over the magnesia as isolated and polymeric species. These surface vanadia units are found to stabilize an unusual polar (111) orientation of MgO up to temperatures of 800 C. A direct and outstanding evidence of a totally reversible phenomenon of order/disorder restructuration of this V overlayer is provided in conjunction with the redox state of the surface depending on the properties of the surrounding atmosphere (reductive or oxidative). These fast surface phenomena are assumed to determine the elementary steps of propane activation within the overall oxidative dehydrogenation of propane (ODHP) process.

  16. Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent stably stratified air flow above a wavy water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, O. A.; Troitskaya, Yu. I.; Zilitinkevich, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the roughness of the underlaying water surface on turbulence is studied in a stably stratified boundary layer (SSBL). Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is conducted at various Reynolds (Re) and Richardson (Ri) numbers and the wave steepness ka. It is shown that, at constant Re, the stationary turbulent regime is set in at Ri below the threshold value Ri c depending on Re. At Ri > Ri c , in the absence of turbulent fluctuations near the wave water surface, three-dimensional quasiperiodical structures are identified and their threshold of origin depends on the steepness of the surface wave on the water surface. This regime is called a wave pumping regime. The formation of three-dimensional structures is explained by the development of parametric instability of the disturbances induced by the surface water in the air flow. The DNS results are quite consistent with prediction of the theoretical model of the SSBL flow, in which solutions for the disturbances of the fields of velocity and temperature in the wave pumping regime are found to be a solution of a two-dimensional linearized system with the heterogeneous boundary condition, which is caused by the presence of the surface wave. In addition to the turbulent fluctuations, the three-dimensional structures in the wave pumping regime provide for the transfer of impulse and heat, i.e., the increase in the roughness of the water-air boundary caused by the presence of waves intensifies the exchange in the SSBL.

  17. Direct visualization of surface acoustic waves along substrates using smoke particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ming K.; Friend, James R.; Yeo, Leslie Y.

    2007-11-01

    Smoke particles (SPs) are used to directly visualize surface acoustic waves (SAWs) propagating on a 128°-rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate. By electrically exciting a SAW device in a compartment filled with SP, the SP were found to collect along the regions where the SAW propagates on the substrate. The results of the experiments show that SPs are deposited adjacent to regions of large vibration amplitude and form a clear pattern corresponding to the surface wave profile on the substrate. Through an analysis of the SAW-induced acoustic streaming in the air adjacent to the substrate and the surface acceleration measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer, we postulate that the large transverse surface accelerations due to the SAW ejects SP from the surface and carries them aloft to relatively quiescent regions nearby via acoustic streaming. Offering finer detail than fine powders common in Chladni figures [E. Chladni, Entdeckungen über die Theorie des Klanges (Weidmanns, Erben und Reich, Leipzig, Germany, 1787)] the approach is an inexpensive and a quick counterpart to laser interferometric techniques, presenting a means to explore the controversial phenomena of particle agglomeration on surfaces.

  18. Direct transfer of multilayer graphene grown on a rough metal surface using PDMS adhesion engineering.

    PubMed

    Jang, Heejun; Kang, Il-Suk; Lee, Youngbok; Cha, Yun Jeong; Yoon, Dong Ki; Ahn, Chi Won; Lee, Wonhee

    2016-09-01

    The direct transfer of graphene using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamping has advantages such as a 'pick-and-place' capability and no chemical residue problems. However, it is not easy to apply direct PDMS stamping to graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition on rough, grainy metal surfaces due to poor contact between the PDMS and graphene. In this study, graphene consisting of a mixture of monolayers and multiple layers grown on a rough Ni surface was directly transferred without the use of an adhesive layer. Liquid PDMS was cured on graphene to effect a conformal contact with the graphene. A fast release of graphene from substrate was achieved by carrying out wet-etching-assisted mechanical peeling. We also carried out a thermal post-curing of PDMS to control the level of adhesion between PDMS and graphene and hence facilitate a damage-free release of the graphene. Characterization of the transferred graphene by micro-Raman spectroscopy, SEM/EDS and optical microscopy showed neither cracks nor contamination from the transfer. This technique allows a fast and simple transfer of graphene, even for multilayer graphene grown on a rough surface.

  19. Spin-controlled directional launching of surface plasmons at the subwavelength scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Wang, Jia-jian; Li, Zi-wei; Liu, Wei; Lin, Feng; Fang, Zhe-yu; Zhu, Xing

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a spin-controlled directional launching of surface plasmons at the subwavelength scale. Based on the principle of optical spin’s effect for the geometric phase of light, the nanostructures were designed. The inclination of the structures decides the spin-related geometric phase and their relative positions decide the distance-related phase. Hence, the propagation direction of the generated surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can be controlled by the spin of photons. Numerical simulations by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method have verified our theoretical prediction. Our structure is fabricated on the Au film by using a focused ion beam etching technique. The total size of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) launcher is 320 nm by 180 nm. The observation of the SPP launching by using scanning near-field optical microscopy is in agreement with our theory and simulations. This result may provide a new way of spin-controlled directional launching of SPP. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61176120, 61378059, 60977015, 61422501, and 11374023), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB933004 and 2015CB932403), and Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. L140007).

  20. Direct transfer of multilayer graphene grown on a rough metal surface using PDMS adhesion engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Heejun; Kang, Il-Suk; Lee, Youngbok; Cha, Yun Jeong; Yoon, Dong Ki; Ahn, Chi Won; Lee, Wonhee

    2016-09-01

    The direct transfer of graphene using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamping has advantages such as a ‘pick-and-place’ capability and no chemical residue problems. However, it is not easy to apply direct PDMS stamping to graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition on rough, grainy metal surfaces due to poor contact between the PDMS and graphene. In this study, graphene consisting of a mixture of monolayers and multiple layers grown on a rough Ni surface was directly transferred without the use of an adhesive layer. Liquid PDMS was cured on graphene to effect a conformal contact with the graphene. A fast release of graphene from substrate was achieved by carrying out wet-etching-assisted mechanical peeling. We also carried out a thermal post-curing of PDMS to control the level of adhesion between PDMS and graphene and hence facilitate a damage-free release of the graphene. Characterization of the transferred graphene by micro-Raman spectroscopy, SEM/EDS and optical microscopy showed neither cracks nor contamination from the transfer. This technique allows a fast and simple transfer of graphene, even for multilayer graphene grown on a rough surface.

  1. Spin-controlled directional launching of surface plasmons at the subwavelength scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Wang, Jia-jian; Li, Zi-wei; Liu, Wei; Lin, Feng; Fang, Zhe-yu; Zhu, Xing

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a spin-controlled directional launching of surface plasmons at the subwavelength scale. Based on the principle of optical spin’s effect for the geometric phase of light, the nanostructures were designed. The inclination of the structures decides the spin-related geometric phase and their relative positions decide the distance-related phase. Hence, the propagation direction of the generated surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can be controlled by the spin of photons. Numerical simulations by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method have verified our theoretical prediction. Our structure is fabricated on the Au film by using a focused ion beam etching technique. The total size of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) launcher is 320 nm by 180 nm. The observation of the SPP launching by using scanning near-field optical microscopy is in agreement with our theory and simulations. This result may provide a new way of spin-controlled directional launching of SPP. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61176120, 61378059, 60977015, 61422501, and 11374023), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB933004 and 2015CB932403), and Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. L140007).

  2. Direct transfer of multilayer graphene grown on a rough metal surface using PDMS adhesion engineering.

    PubMed

    Jang, Heejun; Kang, Il-Suk; Lee, Youngbok; Cha, Yun Jeong; Yoon, Dong Ki; Ahn, Chi Won; Lee, Wonhee

    2016-09-01

    The direct transfer of graphene using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamping has advantages such as a 'pick-and-place' capability and no chemical residue problems. However, it is not easy to apply direct PDMS stamping to graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition on rough, grainy metal surfaces due to poor contact between the PDMS and graphene. In this study, graphene consisting of a mixture of monolayers and multiple layers grown on a rough Ni surface was directly transferred without the use of an adhesive layer. Liquid PDMS was cured on graphene to effect a conformal contact with the graphene. A fast release of graphene from substrate was achieved by carrying out wet-etching-assisted mechanical peeling. We also carried out a thermal post-curing of PDMS to control the level of adhesion between PDMS and graphene and hence facilitate a damage-free release of the graphene. Characterization of the transferred graphene by micro-Raman spectroscopy, SEM/EDS and optical microscopy showed neither cracks nor contamination from the transfer. This technique allows a fast and simple transfer of graphene, even for multilayer graphene grown on a rough surface. PMID:27482811

  3. Feature, design intention and constraint preservation for direct modeling of 3D freeform surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Luoting; Kara, Levent Burak; Shimada, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    Direct modeling has recently emerged as a suitable approach for 3D free-form shape modeling in industrial design. It has several advantages over the conventional, parametric modeling techniques, including natural user interactions, as well as the underlying, automatic feature-preserving shape deformation algorithms. However, current direct modeling packages still lack several capabilities critical for product design, such as managing aesthetic design intentions, and enforcing dimensional, geometric constraints. In this paper, we describe a novel 3D surface editing system capable of jointly accommodating aesthetic design intentions expressed in the form of surface painting and color-coded annotations, as well as engineering constraints expressed as dimensions. The proposed system is built upon differential coordinates and constrained least squares, and is intended for conceptual design that involves frequent shape tuning and explorations. We also provide an extensive review of the state-of-the-art direct modeling approaches for 3D mesh-based, freeform surfaces, with an emphasis on the two broad categories of shape deformation algorithms developed in the relevant field of geometric modeling. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Direct coupling of photonic modes and surface plasmon polaritons observed in 2-photon PEEM.

    PubMed

    Word, Robert C; Fitzgerald, Joseph P S; Könenkamp, Rolf

    2013-12-16

    We report the direct microscopic observation of optical energy transfer from guided photonic modes in an indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film to surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) at the surfaces of a single crystalline gold platelet. The photonic and SPP modes appear as an interference pattern in the photoelectron emission yield across the surface of the specimen. We explore the momentum match between the photonic and SPP modes in terms of simple waveguide theory and the three-layer slab model for bound SPP modes of thin metal films. We show that because the gold is thin (30-40 nm), two SPP modes exist and that momentum of the spatially confined asymmetric field mode coincides with the dominant mode of the ITO waveguide. The results demonstrate that photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) can be an important tool for the observation of photonic to SPP interactions in the study of integrated photonic circuits. PMID:24514628

  5. Synergistic cytotoxic effects of antibodies directed against different cell surface determinants.

    PubMed

    Elliott, E V; Pindar, A; Stevenson, F K; Stevenson, G T

    1978-03-01

    Three antibody populations were raised in rabbits against surface antigens on guinea-pig L2C leukaemic lymphocytes: against idiotypic determinants on the lambda chain of the surface immunoglobulin, against C region determinants on the lambda chain, and against the surface antigens recognized by conventional anti-lymphocyte sera. Complement and K-cell cytotoxicities effected by the antibodies on L2C cells were studied in vitro. In both cytotoxic systems mixtures of the antibodies revealed synergy, in that the titres of the mixtures exceeded predicted additive titres of their components. The synergy was greater when the mixed antibodies were directed to determinants on the same molecule rather than to determinants on different molecules.

  6. Synergistic cytotoxic effects of antibodies directed against different cell surface determinants.

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, E V; Pindar, A; Stevenson, F K; Stevenson, G T

    1978-01-01

    Three antibody populations were raised in rabbits against surface antigens on guinea-pig L2C leukaemic lymphocytes: against idiotypic determinants on the lambda chain of the surface immunoglobulin, against C region determinants on the lambda chain, and against the surface antigens recognized by conventional anti-lymphocyte sera. Complement and K-cell cytotoxicities effected by the antibodies on L2C cells were studied in vitro. In both cytotoxic systems mixtures of the antibodies revealed synergy, in that the titres of the mixtures exceeded predicted additive titres of their components. The synergy was greater when the mixed antibodies were directed to determinants on the same molecule rather than to determinants on different molecules. PMID:76604

  7. NASA Workshop on future directions in surface modeling and grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandalsem, W. R.; Smith, R. E.; Choo, Y. K.; Birckelbaw, L. D.; Vogel, A. A.

    1992-01-01

    Given here is a summary of the paper sessions and panel discussions of the NASA Workshop on Future Directions in Surface Modeling and Grid Generation held a NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, December 5-7, 1989. The purpose was to assess U.S. capabilities in surface modeling and grid generation and take steps to improve the focus and pace of these disciplines within NASA. The organization of the workshop centered around overviews from NASA centers and expert presentations from U.S. corporations and universities. Small discussion groups were held and summarized by group leaders. Brief overviews and a panel discussion by representatives from the DoD were held, and a NASA-only session concluded the meeting. In the NASA Program Planning Session summary there are five recommended steps for NASA to take to improve the development and application of surface modeling and grid generation.

  8. Cu-Cu direct bonding achieved by surface method at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Jun; Ichiyanagi, Yuko

    2014-02-20

    The metal bonding is a key technology in the processes for the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and the semiconductor devices to improve functionality and higher density integration. Strong adhesion between surfaces at the atomic level is crucial; however, it is difficult to achieve close bonding in such a system. Cu films were deposited on Si substrates by vacuum deposition, and then, two Cu films were bonded directly by means of surface activated bonding (SAB) at room temperature. The two Cu films, with the surface roughness Ra about 1.3nm, were bonded by using SAB at room temperature, however, the bonding strength was very weak in this method. In order to improve the bonding strength between the Cu films, samples were annealed at low temperatures, between 323 and 473 K, in air. As the result, the Cu-Cu bonding strength was 10 times higher than that of the original samples without annealing.

  9. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Wirth, B. D.

    2014-12-03

    In our work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1–2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. Moreover, the H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, we find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. Then, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.

  10. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Wirth, B. D.

    2014-12-03

    In our work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1–2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. Moreover, the H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, wemore » find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. Then, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.« less

  11. Signal peptides direct surface proteins to two distinct envelope locations of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    DeDent, Andrea; Bae, Taeok; Missiakas, Dominique M; Schneewind, Olaf

    2008-01-01

    Surface proteins of Gram-positive bacteria are covalently linked to the cell wall envelope by a mechanism requiring an N-terminal signal peptide and a C-terminal LPXTG motif sorting signal. We show here that surface proteins of Staphylococcus aureus arrive at two distinct destinations in the bacterial envelope, either distributed as a ring surrounding each cell or as discrete assembly sites. Proteins with ring-like distribution (clumping factor A (ClfA), Spa, fibronectin-binding protein B (FnbpB), serine-aspartate repeat protein C (SdrC) and SdrD) harbour signal peptides with a YSIRK/GS motif, whereas proteins directed to discrete assembly sites (S. aureus surface protein A (SasA), SasD, SasF and SasK) do not. Reciprocal exchange of signal peptides between surface proteins with (ClfA) or without the YSIRK/GS motif (SasF) directed recombinant products to the alternate destination, whereas mutations that altered only the YSIRK sequence had no effect. Our observations suggest that S. aureus distinguishes between signal peptides to address proteins to either the cell pole (signal peptides without YSIRK/GS) or the cross wall, the peptidoglycan layer that forms during cell division to separate new daughter cells (signal peptides with YISRK/GS motif). PMID:18800056

  12. Surface electromyogram analysis of the direction of isometric torque generation by the first dorsal interosseous muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Suresh, Nina L.; Zev Rymer, William

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a novel technique using high density surface electromyogram (EMG) recordings can be used to detect the directional dependence of muscle activity in a multifunctional muscle, the first dorsal interosseous (FDI). We used surface EMG recordings with a two-dimensional electrode array to search for inhomogeneous FDI activation patterns with changing torque direction at the metacarpophalangeal joint, the locus of action of the FDI muscle. The interference EMG distribution across the whole FDI muscle was recorded during isometric contraction at the same force magnitude in five different directions in the index finger abduction-flexion plane. The electrode array EMG activity was characterized by contour plots, interpolating the EMG amplitude between electrode sites. Across all subjects the amplitude of the flexion EMG was consistently lower than that of the abduction EMG at the given force. Pattern recognition methods were used to discriminate the isometric muscle contraction tasks with a linear discriminant analysis classifier, based on the extraction of two different feature sets of the surface EMG signal: the time domain (TD) feature set and a combination of autoregressive coefficients and the root mean square amplitude (AR+RMS) as a feature set. We found that high accuracies were obtained in the classification of different directions of the FDI muscle isometric contraction. With a monopolar electrode configuration, the average overall classification accuracy from nine subjects was 94.1 ± 2.3% for the TD feature set and 95.8 ± 1.5% for the AR+RMS feature set. Spatial filtering of the signal with bipolar electrode configuration improved the average overall classification accuracy to 96.7 ± 2.7% for the TD feature set and 98.1 ± 1.6% for the AR+RMS feature set. The distinct EMG contour plots and the high classification accuracies obtained from this study confirm distinct interference EMG pattern distributions as a

  13. Surface electromyogram analysis of the direction of isometric torque generation by the first dorsal interosseous muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping; Suresh, Nina L; Rymer, William Zev

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a novel technique using high density surface electromyogram (EMG) recordings can be used to detect the directional dependence of muscle activity in a multifunctional muscle, the first dorsal interosseous (FDI). We used surface EMG recordings with a two-dimensional electrode array to search for inhomogeneous FDI activation patterns with changing torque direction at the metacarpophalangeal joint, the locus of action of the FDI muscle. The interference EMG distribution across the whole FDI muscle was recorded during isometric contraction at the same force magnitude in five different directions in the index finger abduction-flexion plane. The electrode array EMG activity was characterized by contour plots, interpolating the EMG amplitude between electrode sites. Across all subjects the amplitude of the flexion EMG was consistently lower than that of the abduction EMG at the given force. Pattern recognition methods were used to discriminate the isometric muscle contraction tasks with a linear discriminant analysis classifier, based on the extraction of two different feature sets of the surface EMG signal: the time domain (TD) feature set and a combination of autoregressive coefficients and the root mean square amplitude (AR+RMS) as a feature set. We found that high accuracies were obtained in the classification of different directions of the FDI muscle isometric contraction. With a monopolar electrode configuration, the average overall classification accuracy from nine subjects was 94.1 ± 2.3% for the TD feature set and 95.8 ± 1.5% for the AR+RMS feature set. Spatial filtering of the signal with bipolar electrode configuration improved the average overall classification accuracy to 96.7 ± 2.7% for the TD feature set and 98.1 ± 1.6% for the AR+RMS feature set. The distinct EMG contour plots and the high classification accuracies obtained from this study confirm distinct interference EMG pattern distributions as a

  14. Surface-directed synthesis of erbium-doped yttrium oxide nanoparticles within organosilane zeptoliter containers.

    PubMed

    Englade-Franklin, Lauren E; Morrison, Gregory; Verberne-Sutton, Susan D; Francis, Asenath L; Chan, Julia Y; Garno, Jayne C

    2014-09-24

    We introduce an approach to synthesize rare earth oxide nanoparticles using high temperature without aggregation of the nanoparticles. The dispersity of the nanoparticles is controlled at the nanoscale by using small organosilane molds as reaction containers. Zeptoliter reaction vessels prepared from organosilane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used for the surface-directed synthesis of rare earth oxide (REO) nanoparticles. Nanopores of octadecyltrichlorosilane were prepared on Si(111) using particle lithography with immersion steps. The nanopores were filled with a precursor solution of erbium and yttrium salts to confine the crystallization step to occur within individual zeptoliter-sized organosilane reaction vessels. Areas between the nanopores were separated by a matrix film of octadecyltrichlorosilane. With heating, the organosilane template was removed by calcination to generate a surface array of erbium-doped yttria nanoparticles. Nanoparticles synthesized by the surface-directed approach retain the periodic arrangement of the nanopores formed from mesoparticle masks. While bulk rare earth oxides can be readily prepared by solid state methods at high temperature (>900 °C), approaches for preparing REO nanoparticles are limited. Conventional wet chemistry methods are limited to low temperatures according to the boiling points of the solvents used for synthesis. To achieve crystallinity of REO nanoparticles requires steps for high-temperature processing of samples, which can cause self-aggregation and dispersity in sample diameters. The facile steps for particle lithography address the problems of aggregation and the requirement for high-temperature synthesis.

  15. Surface-directed synthesis of erbium-doped yttrium oxide nanoparticles within organosilane zeptoliter containers.

    PubMed

    Englade-Franklin, Lauren E; Morrison, Gregory; Verberne-Sutton, Susan D; Francis, Asenath L; Chan, Julia Y; Garno, Jayne C

    2014-09-24

    We introduce an approach to synthesize rare earth oxide nanoparticles using high temperature without aggregation of the nanoparticles. The dispersity of the nanoparticles is controlled at the nanoscale by using small organosilane molds as reaction containers. Zeptoliter reaction vessels prepared from organosilane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used for the surface-directed synthesis of rare earth oxide (REO) nanoparticles. Nanopores of octadecyltrichlorosilane were prepared on Si(111) using particle lithography with immersion steps. The nanopores were filled with a precursor solution of erbium and yttrium salts to confine the crystallization step to occur within individual zeptoliter-sized organosilane reaction vessels. Areas between the nanopores were separated by a matrix film of octadecyltrichlorosilane. With heating, the organosilane template was removed by calcination to generate a surface array of erbium-doped yttria nanoparticles. Nanoparticles synthesized by the surface-directed approach retain the periodic arrangement of the nanopores formed from mesoparticle masks. While bulk rare earth oxides can be readily prepared by solid state methods at high temperature (>900 °C), approaches for preparing REO nanoparticles are limited. Conventional wet chemistry methods are limited to low temperatures according to the boiling points of the solvents used for synthesis. To achieve crystallinity of REO nanoparticles requires steps for high-temperature processing of samples, which can cause self-aggregation and dispersity in sample diameters. The facile steps for particle lithography address the problems of aggregation and the requirement for high-temperature synthesis. PMID:25163977

  16. Direct determination of the local Hamaker constant of inorganic surfaces based on scanning force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Krajina, Brad A.; Kocherlakota, Lakshmi S.; Overney, René M.

    2014-10-28

    The energetics involved in the bonding fluctuations between nanometer-sized silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) probes and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) could be quantified directly and locally on the submicron scale via a time-temperature superposition analysis of the lateral forces between scanning force microscopy silicon dioxide probes and inorganic sample surfaces. The so-called “intrinsic friction analysis” (IFA) provided direct access to the Hamaker constants for HOPG and MoS{sub 2}, as well as the control sample, calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}). The use of scanning probe enables nanoscopic analysis of bonding fluctuations, thereby overcoming challenges associated with larger scale inhomogeneity and surface roughness common to conventional techniques used to determine surface free energies and dielectric properties. A complementary numerical analysis based on optical and electron energy loss spectroscopy and the Lifshitz quantum electrodynamic theory of van der Waals interactions is provided and confirms quantitatively the IFA results.

  17. Surface-Directed Synthesis of Erbium-Doped Yttrium Oxide Nanoparticles within Organosilane Zeptoliter Containers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an approach to synthesize rare earth oxide nanoparticles using high temperature without aggregation of the nanoparticles. The dispersity of the nanoparticles is controlled at the nanoscale by using small organosilane molds as reaction containers. Zeptoliter reaction vessels prepared from organosilane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used for the surface-directed synthesis of rare earth oxide (REO) nanoparticles. Nanopores of octadecyltrichlorosilane were prepared on Si(111) using particle lithography with immersion steps. The nanopores were filled with a precursor solution of erbium and yttrium salts to confine the crystallization step to occur within individual zeptoliter-sized organosilane reaction vessels. Areas between the nanopores were separated by a matrix film of octadecyltrichlorosilane. With heating, the organosilane template was removed by calcination to generate a surface array of erbium-doped yttria nanoparticles. Nanoparticles synthesized by the surface-directed approach retain the periodic arrangement of the nanopores formed from mesoparticle masks. While bulk rare earth oxides can be readily prepared by solid state methods at high temperature (>900 °C), approaches for preparing REO nanoparticles are limited. Conventional wet chemistry methods are limited to low temperatures according to the boiling points of the solvents used for synthesis. To achieve crystallinity of REO nanoparticles requires steps for high-temperature processing of samples, which can cause self-aggregation and dispersity in sample diameters. The facile steps for particle lithography address the problems of aggregation and the requirement for high-temperature synthesis. PMID:25163977

  18. Molecular Order in Buried Layers of TbPc2 Single-Molecule Magnets Detected by Torque Magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, Mauro; Serri, Michele; Poggini, Lorenzo; Mannini, Matteo; Rovai, Donella; Sainctavit, Philippe; Heutz, Sandrine; Sessoli, Roberta

    2016-08-01

    Cantilever torque magnetometry is used to elucidate the orientation of magnetic molecules in thin films. The technique allows depth-resolved investigations by intercalating a layer of anisotropic magnetic molecules in a film of its isotropic analogues. The proof-of-concept is here demonstrated with the single-molecule magnet TbPc2 evidencing also an exceptional long-range templating effect on substrates coated by the organic molecule perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride. PMID:27232580

  19. In vitro toxicity of gallium arsenide in alveolar macrophages evaluated by magnetometry, cytochemistry and morphology.

    PubMed

    Okada, M; Karube, H; Niitsuya, M; Aizawa, Y; Okayasu, I; Kotani, M

    1999-12-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), a chemical compound of gallium and arsenic, causes various toxic effects including pulmonary diseases in animals. Since the toxicity is not completely investigated, GaAs has been used in workplaces as the material of various semiconductor products. The present study was conducted to clarify the toxicity of GaAs particles in the alveolar macrophages of hamsters using magnetometry, enzyme release assays and morphological examinations. Alveolar macrophages obtained from hamsters by tracheobronchial lavage and adhered to the disks in the bottom of wells were exposed to ferrosoferric oxide and GaAs particles. Ferrosoferric oxide particles were magnetized externally and the remanent magnetic field was measured. Relaxation, a fast decline of the remanent magnetic fields radiated from the alveolar macrophages, was delayed and decay constants were decreased dose-dependently due to exposure to GaAs. Because the relaxation is thought to be associated with cytoskeleton, the exposure of GaAs may have impaired the motor function of them. Enzyme release assay and morphological findings indicated the damage to the macrophages. Thus the cytotoxicity causes cytostructural changes and cell death. According to DNA electrophoresis and the TUNEL method, necrotic changes occur more frequently than apoptotic changes.

  20. Laterally patterned spin-valve superlattice: Magnetometry and polarized neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Brüssing, F.; Devishvili, A.; Zabel, H.; Toperverg, B. P.; Badini Confalonieri, G. A.; Theis-Bröhl, K.

    2015-04-07

    The magnetization reversal of magnetic multilayers with spin-valve like characteristics, patterned into an array of parallel stripes, was structurally and magnetically analyzed, in detail, via x-ray scattering, magnetometry, and polarized neutron reflectivity. Each stripe contains a multiple repetition of the layer sequence [Fe/Cr/Co/Cr]. X-ray and neutron scattering maps of the patterned multilayer show rich details resulting from the superposition of Bragg peaks representing the lateral in-plane periodicity and the out-of-plane multilayer period. Detailed analysis of specular and off-specular polarized neutron intensity was used to ascertain the antiparallel alignment of the Co and Fe magnetization within the kink region of their combined hysteresis loop between the coercive fields of Fe and Co layers. This includes also an examination of domain formation and inter- as well as intra-stripe correlation effects upon magnetization reversal. Our combined study shows that the shape induced anisotropy via patterning is capable of overriding the four-fold crystal anisotropy but is unable to eliminate the ripple domain state of the Co layers, already present in the continuous multilayer.

  1. Efficient route to high-bandwidth nanoscale magnetometry using single spins in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Puentes, Graciana; Waldherr, Gerald; Neumann, Philipp; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrishnan; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a promising quantum metrology tool finding applications across disciplines. The spin sensor measures magnetic fields, electric fields and temperature with nano-scale precision and is fully operable under ambient conditions. Moreover, it achieves precision scaling inversely with total measurement time σB ∝ 1/T (Heisenberg scaling) rather than as the inverse of the square root of T, with the Shot-Noise limit. This scaling can be achieved by means of phase estimation algorithms (PEAs), in combination with single-shot read-out. Despite their accuracy, the range of applicability of PEAs is limited to sensing single frequencies with negligible temporal fluctuations. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) signals from molecules often contain multifrequency components and sensing them using PEA is ruled out. Here we propose an alternative method for precision magnetometry in frequency multiplexed signals via compressive sensing (CS) techniques focusing on nanoscale NMR. We show that CS can provide for precision scaling approximately as σB ≈ 1/T, as well as for a 5-fold increase in sensitivity over dynamic-range gain, in addition to reducing the total number of resources required. We illustrate our method by taking model solid-state spectra of Glycine acquired under Magic Angle Spinning conditions. PMID:24728454

  2. Efficient route to high-bandwidth nanoscale magnetometry using single spins in diamond.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Graciana; Waldherr, Gerald; Neumann, Philipp; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrishnan; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2014-04-14

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a promising quantum metrology tool finding applications across disciplines. The spin sensor measures magnetic fields, electric fields and temperature with nano-scale precision and is fully operable under ambient conditions. Moreover, it achieves precision scaling inversely with total measurement time σB ∝ 1/T (Heisenberg scaling) rather than as the inverse of the square root of T, with σB = √T the Shot-Noise limit. This scaling can be achieved by means of phase estimation algorithms (PEAs), in combination with single-shot read-out. Despite their accuracy, the range of applicability of PEAs is limited to sensing single frequencies with negligible temporal fluctuations. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) signals from molecules often contain multifrequency components and sensing them using PEA is ruled out. Here we propose an alternative method for precision magnetometry in frequency multiplexed signals via compressive sensing (CS) techniques focusing on nanoscale NMR. We show that CS can provide for precision scaling approximately as σB ≈ 1/T, as well as for a 5-fold increase in sensitivity over dynamic-range gain, in addition to reducing the total number of resources required. We illustrate our method by taking model solid-state spectra of Glycine acquired under Magic Angle Spinning conditions.

  3. Nanoscale magnetometry through quantum control of nitrogen-vacancy centres in rotationally diffusing nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclaurin, D.; Hall, L. T.; Martin, A. M.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.

    2013-01-01

    The confluence of quantum physics and biology is driving a new generation of quantum-based sensing and imaging technology capable of harnessing the power of quantum effects to provide tools to understand the fundamental processes of life. One of the most promising systems in this area is the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond—a natural spin qubit which remarkably has all the right attributes for nanoscale sensing in ambient biological conditions. Typically the nitrogen-vacancy qubits are fixed in tightly controlled/isolated experimental conditions. In this work quantum control principles of nitrogen-vacancy magnetometry are developed for a randomly diffusing diamond nanocrystal. We find that the accumulation of geometric phases, due to the rotation of the nanodiamond plays a crucial role in the application of a diffusing nanodiamond as a bio-label and magnetometer. Specifically, we show that a freely diffusing nanodiamond can offer real-time information about local magnetic fields and its own rotational behaviour, beyond continuous optically detected magnetic resonance monitoring, in parallel with operation as a fluorescent biomarker.

  4. Ferromagnetic nanocylinders electrodeposited into nanoporous alumina template: A magnetometry and Brillouin light scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Cherif, S. M.; Roussigne, Y.; Stashkevich, A. A.; Darques, M.; Bouziane, K.; Piraux, L.

    2011-05-15

    The static magnetization experimental behavior of cobalt (Co), Permalloy (Py), and nickel (Ni) nanocylinders is obtained from vibrating sample magnetometry while the dynamic behavior for the Co and Py ones is analyzed by means of Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy. Assuming the presence at remanence of two populations of cylinders with up and down magnetizations and including the dipolar coupling between the cylinders, a single analytical model based on a mean-field approach allowed us to satisfactorily analyze both series of experimental results. The model requires three physical parameters, allowing us to derive the in-plane saturation field, the eigenfrequency in the absence of applied field, and the eigenfrequency at the in-plane saturation field; these parameters enable us to adjust the whole variation of the eigenfrequency versus the applied field. Moreover, the effect of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy on the softening of the frequency in the nonsaturated state is clearly evidenced: it is more pronounced when the magnetocrystalline anisotropy is not vanishing and adds to the shape anisotropy (Co c-axis parallel to the cylinder axis); the softening being weak in the other cases (Co c-axis perpendicular to the cylinder axis or Permalloy).

  5. Laterally patterned spin-valve superlattice: Magnetometry and polarized neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüssing, F.; Toperverg, B. P.; Devishvili, A.; Badini Confalonieri, G. A.; Theis-Bröhl, K.; Zabel, H.

    2015-04-01

    The magnetization reversal of magnetic multilayers with spin-valve like characteristics, patterned into an array of parallel stripes, was structurally and magnetically analyzed, in detail, via x-ray scattering, magnetometry, and polarized neutron reflectivity. Each stripe contains a multiple repetition of the layer sequence [Fe/Cr/Co/Cr]. X-ray and neutron scattering maps of the patterned multilayer show rich details resulting from the superposition of Bragg peaks representing the lateral in-plane periodicity and the out-of-plane multilayer period. Detailed analysis of specular and off-specular polarized neutron intensity was used to ascertain the antiparallel alignment of the Co and Fe magnetization within the kink region of their combined hysteresis loop between the coercive fields of Fe and Co layers. This includes also an examination of domain formation and inter- as well as intra-stripe correlation effects upon magnetization reversal. Our combined study shows that the shape induced anisotropy via patterning is capable of overriding the four-fold crystal anisotropy but is unable to eliminate the ripple domain state of the Co layers, already present in the continuous multilayer.

  6. Torque magnetometry study of Fe and Ni doped SmB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsman, Colin; Li, Gang; Lawson, Benjamin; Yu, Fan; Asaba, Tomoya; Wang, Xiangfeng; Paglione, Johnpierre; Li, Lu

    2015-03-01

    There has been renewed interest in the past few years regarding Samarium Hexaboride, a promising candidate to be a topological Kondo insulator. Work on this material represents an extension of the categorization of materials by the topology of their electronic band structure into systems with strong correlation effects. It is known that by introducing magnetic impurities, such as Iron, Nickel, and Europium, the magnetic ground state of SmB6 could be greatly altered. In this study we will present our torque magnetometry data of Fe and Ni doped SmB6, down to 20 mK, and up to 45 Tesla. It is found that the overall symmetry of the angular dependence of torque with respect to magnetic field changed for both Fe-doped SmB6 and Ni-doped SmB6. For pure SmB6, the angular dependence is proportional to sin (2 θ) , as expected for a paramagnetic material. By contrast, for Fe-doped SmB6 and Ni-doped SmB6, the torque vs. tilt angle profile becomes sin (4 θ) . Furthermore, for FexSmB6 the field dependence of torque shows a sharp bend feature around 9 Tesla, which softens with elevating temperature, and could be related to magnetic moment re-alignment.

  7. Magnetometry in the Munich Neutron Electric Dipole Moment (nEDM) Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenkolb, Skyler

    2013-05-01

    Neutron EDM measurements rely on sensitive magnetometry to decouple signal from systematic errors. State-of-the-art co-magnetometers use hyperpolarized diamagnetic atoms, chosen for small spin-flip cross-sections and long coherence times. In particular, the 254 nm 199Hg line is used to polarize and detect via Hg lamps or lasers. We present a comprehensive scheme of Hg co-magnetometers, external magnetometers and gradiometers inside passive and active shields. Hg gas is pumped and probed by a diode laser with two doubling stages whose UV output is locked to the 254 nm line at the point of vanishing light shift; adjacent cells containing Hg and/or other species are used to extract systematics correlated with material properties of Hg (e.g., center-of-mass displacements or georotational shifts). Vapor cell magnetometers of Hg or Cs are used for comparison, and to guide apparatus installation. The vibration-isolated experiment takes place within passive mu-metal and aluminum shields, inside a non-magnetic experimental hall. A magnetically shielded room, monitored by 180 fluxgate magnetometers which generate error signals for 24 independent external compensation coils, contains the passive shield. Design and performance of the composite system will be discussed. (for the Munich nEDM Collaboration: nedm.ph.tum.de)

  8. Efficient route to high-bandwidth nanoscale magnetometry using single spins in diamond.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Graciana; Waldherr, Gerald; Neumann, Philipp; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrishnan; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a promising quantum metrology tool finding applications across disciplines. The spin sensor measures magnetic fields, electric fields and temperature with nano-scale precision and is fully operable under ambient conditions. Moreover, it achieves precision scaling inversely with total measurement time σB ∝ 1/T (Heisenberg scaling) rather than as the inverse of the square root of T, with σB = √T the Shot-Noise limit. This scaling can be achieved by means of phase estimation algorithms (PEAs), in combination with single-shot read-out. Despite their accuracy, the range of applicability of PEAs is limited to sensing single frequencies with negligible temporal fluctuations. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) signals from molecules often contain multifrequency components and sensing them using PEA is ruled out. Here we propose an alternative method for precision magnetometry in frequency multiplexed signals via compressive sensing (CS) techniques focusing on nanoscale NMR. We show that CS can provide for precision scaling approximately as σB ≈ 1/T, as well as for a 5-fold increase in sensitivity over dynamic-range gain, in addition to reducing the total number of resources required. We illustrate our method by taking model solid-state spectra of Glycine acquired under Magic Angle Spinning conditions. PMID:24728454

  9. In vitro toxicity of gallium arsenide in alveolar macrophages evaluated by magnetometry, cytochemistry and morphology.

    PubMed

    Okada, M; Karube, H; Niitsuya, M; Aizawa, Y; Okayasu, I; Kotani, M

    1999-12-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), a chemical compound of gallium and arsenic, causes various toxic effects including pulmonary diseases in animals. Since the toxicity is not completely investigated, GaAs has been used in workplaces as the material of various semiconductor products. The present study was conducted to clarify the toxicity of GaAs particles in the alveolar macrophages of hamsters using magnetometry, enzyme release assays and morphological examinations. Alveolar macrophages obtained from hamsters by tracheobronchial lavage and adhered to the disks in the bottom of wells were exposed to ferrosoferric oxide and GaAs particles. Ferrosoferric oxide particles were magnetized externally and the remanent magnetic field was measured. Relaxation, a fast decline of the remanent magnetic fields radiated from the alveolar macrophages, was delayed and decay constants were decreased dose-dependently due to exposure to GaAs. Because the relaxation is thought to be associated with cytoskeleton, the exposure of GaAs may have impaired the motor function of them. Enzyme release assay and morphological findings indicated the damage to the macrophages. Thus the cytotoxicity causes cytostructural changes and cell death. According to DNA electrophoresis and the TUNEL method, necrotic changes occur more frequently than apoptotic changes. PMID:10739163

  10. Transport and torque magnetometry measurements on CeAuSb2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lishan; Yelland, Edward; Bruin, Jan; Sakai, Hide; Sheikin, Ilya; MacKenzie, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    The tetragonal crystal CeAuSb2 has a layered structure and orders antiferromagnetically at T ~ 6K. Under a c-axis magnetic field, the Neel temperature is gradually suppressed to zero at a possible field-tuned quantum critical point at about 6 T. Within this antiferromagnetic phase, between the QCP and about 2.8 T, there is an additional, novel phase. We report transport measurements on pure single crystals of CeAuSb2, in fields of up to 35 T and from room temperature down to 100 mK. We also report torque magnetometry measurements. Unlike a recent report, we find single, sharp transitions into the novel phase. We discuss the nature of the novel phase. The work presented is supported by TOPNES(Topological Protection and Non-Equilibrium States in Strongly Correlated Electron Systems research programme), the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC, UK) and Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids(Dresden, Germany) etc.

  11. Efficient route to high-bandwidth nanoscale magnetometry using single spins in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puentes, Graciana; Waldherr, Gerald; Neumann, Philipp; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrishnan; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2014-04-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a promising quantum metrology tool finding applications across disciplines. The spin sensor measures magnetic fields, electric fields and temperature with nano-scale precision and is fully operable under ambient conditions. Moreover, it achieves precision scaling inversely with total measurement time σB ~ 1/T (Heisenberg scaling) rather than as the inverse of the square root of T, with the Shot-Noise limit. This scaling can be achieved by means of phase estimation algorithms (PEAs), in combination with single-shot read-out. Despite their accuracy, the range of applicability of PEAs is limited to sensing single frequencies with negligible temporal fluctuations. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) signals from molecules often contain multifrequency components and sensing them using PEA is ruled out. Here we propose an alternative method for precision magnetometry in frequency multiplexed signals via compressive sensing (CS) techniques focusing on nanoscale NMR. We show that CS can provide for precision scaling approximately as σB ~ 1/T, as well as for a 5-fold increase in sensitivity over dynamic-range gain, in addition to reducing the total number of resources required. We illustrate our method by taking model solid-state spectra of Glycine acquired under Magic Angle Spinning conditions.

  12. Direct Observation of Single DNA Structural Alterations at Low Forces with Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Satish; Raj, Saurabh; Cossins, Benjamin; Marro, Monica; Guallar, Victor; Petrov, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    DNA experiences numerous mechanical events, necessitating single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques to provide insight into DNA mechanics as a whole system. Inherent Brownian motion limits current force spectroscopy methods from observing possible bond level structural changes. We combine optical trapping and surface-enhanced Raman scattering to establish a direct relationship between DNA’s extension and structure in the low force, entropic regime. A DNA molecule is trapped close to a surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate to facilitate a detectable Raman signal. DNA Raman modes shift in response to applied force, indicating phosphodiester mechanical alterations. Molecular dynamic simulations confirm the local structural alterations and the Raman sensitive band identified experimentally. The combined Raman and force spectroscopy technique, to our knowledge, is a novel methodology that can be generalized to all single-molecule studies. PMID:23332068

  13. An Optical Sensor for Measuring the Position and Slanting Direction of Flat Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Ta; Huang, Yen-Sheng; Liu, Chien-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Automated optical inspection is a very important technique. For this reason, this study proposes an optical non-contact slanting surface measuring system. The essential features of the measurement system are obtained through simulations using the optical design software Zemax. The actual propagation of laser beams within the measurement system is traced by using a homogeneous transformation matrix (HTM), the skew-ray tracing method, and a first-order Taylor series expansion. Additionally, a complete mathematical model that describes the variations in light spots on photoelectric sensors and the corresponding changes in the sample orientation and distance was established. Finally, a laboratory prototype system was constructed on an optical bench to verify experimentally the proposed system. This measurement system can simultaneously detect the slanting angles (x, z) in the x and z directions of the sample and the distance (y) between the biconvex lens and the flat sample surface. PMID:27409619

  14. An Optical Sensor for Measuring the Position and Slanting Direction of Flat Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Ta; Huang, Yen-Sheng; Liu, Chien-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Automated optical inspection is a very important technique. For this reason, this study proposes an optical non-contact slanting surface measuring system. The essential features of the measurement system are obtained through simulations using the optical design software Zemax. The actual propagation of laser beams within the measurement system is traced by using a homogeneous transformation matrix (HTM), the skew-ray tracing method, and a first-order Taylor series expansion. Additionally, a complete mathematical model that describes the variations in light spots on photoelectric sensors and the corresponding changes in the sample orientation and distance was established. Finally, a laboratory prototype system was constructed on an optical bench to verify experimentally the proposed system. This measurement system can simultaneously detect the slanting angles (x, z) in the x and z directions of the sample and the distance (y) between the biconvex lens and the flat sample surface. PMID:27409619

  15. Surface chain cleavage behavior of PBIA fiber induced by direct fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zheng; Wu, Peng; Li, Baoyin; Chen, Teng; Liu, Yang; Ren, Mengmeng; Wang, Zaoming; Lai, Wenchuan; Wang, Xu; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-10-01

    The surface chain cleavage behavior of PBIA fiber induced by direct fluorination was reported based on the analysis of physical and chemical changes on the fiber surface. The chain cleavage product was obtained to evaluate the chemical reaction during the fluorination process, and its impact on composites performance was also involved. DSC, FTIR spectra, UV-vis absorption spectra and H1NMR were utilized to analyze the chemical structure and composition of the chain cleavage product. The results show gaseous fluorine is most likely to attack the benzimidazole and amide bond in PBIA unit, which was also demonstrated by molecular simulation. Owing to the polar groups contained in chain cleavage products, the wettability of epoxy resin to fiber has been improved, leading to an 11.5% increase of adhesive strength of fiber-epoxy composite.

  16. An Optical Sensor for Measuring the Position and Slanting Direction of Flat Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Ta; Huang, Yen-Sheng; Liu, Chien-Sheng

    2016-07-09

    Automated optical inspection is a very important technique. For this reason, this study proposes an optical non-contact slanting surface measuring system. The essential features of the measurement system are obtained through simulations using the optical design software Zemax. The actual propagation of laser beams within the measurement system is traced by using a homogeneous transformation matrix (HTM), the skew-ray tracing method, and a first-order Taylor series expansion. Additionally, a complete mathematical model that describes the variations in light spots on photoelectric sensors and the corresponding changes in the sample orientation and distance was established. Finally, a laboratory prototype system was constructed on an optical bench to verify experimentally the proposed system. This measurement system can simultaneously detect the slanting angles (x, z) in the x and z directions of the sample and the distance (y) between the biconvex lens and the flat sample surface.

  17. DIRECT COMPARISON OF KINETIC AND LOCAL EQUILIBRIUM FORMULATIONS FOR SOLUTE TRANSPORT AFFECTED BY SURFACE REACTIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, Jean M.; Rubin, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    Modeling transport of reacting solutes in porous media often requires a choice between models based on the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) and models involving reaction kinetics. Direct comparison of the mathematical formulations for these two types of transport models can aid in this choice. For cases of transport affected by surface reaction, such a comparison is made possible by a new derivation procedure. This procedure yields a kinetics-based formulation that is the sum of the LEA formulation and one or more kinetically influenced terms. The dimensionless form of the new kinetics-based formulation facilitates identification of critical parameter groupings which control the approach to transport behavior consistent with LEA model predictions. Results of numerical experiments demonstrate that criteria for LEA applicability can be expressed conveniently in terms of these parameter groupings. The derivation procedure is demonstrated for examples of surface reactions including first-order reversible sorption, Langmuir-type kinetics and binary, homovalent ion exchange.

  18. Liquid Phase Exfoliation of Two-Dimensional Materials by Directly Probing and Matching Surface Tension Components.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianfeng; He, Yongmin; Wu, Jingjie; Gao, Caitian; Keyshar, Kunttal; Zhang, Xiang; Yang, Yingchao; Ye, Mingxin; Vajtai, Robert; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2015-08-12

    Exfoliation of two-dimensional (2D) materials into mono- or few layers is of significance for both fundamental studies and potential applications. In this report, for the first time surface tension components were directly probed and matched to predict solvents with effective liquid phase exfoliation (LPE) capability for 2D materials such as graphene, h-BN, WS2, MoS2, MoSe2, Bi2Se3, TaS2, and SnS2. Exfoliation efficiency is enhanced when the ratios of the surface tension components of the applied solvent is close to that of the 2D material in question. We enlarged the library of low-toxic and common solvents for LPE. Our study provides distinctive insight into LPE and has pioneered a rational strategy for LPE of 2D materials with high yield.

  19. Performance improvement of passive direct methanol fuel cells with surface-patterned Nafion® membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Longjuan; Jiang, Jingjing; Yuan, Ting; Chai, Jieshi; Zhang, Haifeng; Zou, Zhiqing; Li, Xue-Mei; Yang, Hui

    2015-02-01

    Nafion® 115 membrane, patterned by thermal imprint lithography on the anode side, is used for passive direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The membrane roughness factor, defined as the ratio between the actual and projected membrane surface area, was investigated for its effects on the performance of the DMFCs. When the anode Pt-Ru (1:1) catalyst loading is 1.0 mg cm-2, the maximum power density of the DMFC with a surface-patterned membrane (roughness factor: 5.4) using 3.0 M methanol as the fuel at 25 ± 1 °C reaches 27.2 ± 0.3 mW cm-2, an increase of ∼57.2% in comparison to DMFC using the pristine membrane (roughness factor: ∼1.0). Further, electrochemical characterization indicates that increased roughness factor of the membrane results in increased electrochemically active surface area and reduced charge transfer resistance in the cell. These performance improvements are ascribed to the increased surface roughness which enlarges the membrane/catalyst interface, possibly facilitating mass transport of the fuel and improving anode catalyst utilization. Thus, patterned membranes have great potential in improving the performance of fuel cells and reducing catalyst loading.

  20. Direct Numerical Simulation of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces: capillary waves on gas-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jongmin; García-Mayoral, Ricardo; Mani, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces under liquid flow can produce significant slip, and thus drag reduction, when they entrap gas bubbles within their roughness elements. Our work aims to explore the onset mechanism to the failure of drag reduction by superhydrophobic surfaces when they are exposed to turbulent boundary layers. We focus on the effect of finite surface tension to the dynamic response of deformable interfaces between overlying water flow and the gas pockets. To this end, we conduct direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces allowing deformable gas-liquid interface. DNS results show that spanwise-coherent, upstream-traveling waves develop on the gas-liquid interface as a result of its interactions with turbulence. We study the nature and scaling of the upstream-traveling waves through semi-analytical modeling. We will show that the traveling waves are well described by a Weber number based on the slip velocity at the interface. In higher Weber number, the stability of gas pocket decreases as the amplitude of interface deformation and the magnitude of pressure fluctuations are augmented. Supported by Office of Naval Research and the Kwanjeong Educational Scholarship Foundation.

  1. Direct velocity measurement and enhanced mixing in laminar flows over ultrahydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jia

    2005-11-01

    A series of experiment are presented studying the kinematics of water flowing over drag-reducing ultrahydrophobic surfaces. The surfaces are fabricated from silicon wafers using photolithography and are designed to incorporate patterns of microridges with precise spacing and alignment. These surfaces are reacted with an organosilane to achieve high hydrophobicity. Microridges with different widths, spacing and alignments are tested in a microchannel flow cell with rectangular cross-section. The velocity profile across the microchannel is measured with micro particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) capable of resolving the flow down to length scales well below the size of the surface features. A maximum slip velocity of >60% of the average velocity in the flow is observed at the center of the air-water interface supported between these hydrophobic microridges, and the no-slip boundary condition is found at the hydrophobic microridges. The μ-PIV measurements demonstrate that slip along the shear-free air-water interface supported between the hydrophobic micron-sized ridges is the primary mechanism responsible for the drag reduction. The experiment velocity and pressure drop measurement are compared with the prediction of numerical simulation and an analytical model. By aligning the hydrophobic microridges at an acute angle to the flow direction a secondary flow is produced which can significantly enhance mixing in this laminar flow.

  2. UV Direct Laser Interference Patterning of polyurethane substrates as tool for tuning its surface wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estevam-Alves, Regina; Günther, Denise; Dani, Sophie; Eckhardt, Sebastian; Roch, Teja; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Cestari, Ismar N.; Lasagni, Andrés F.

    2016-06-01

    Direct Laser Interference Patterning (DLIP) is a versatile tool for the fabrication of micro and sub-micropatterns on different materials. In this work, DLIP was used to produce periodic surface structures on polyurethane (PU) substrates with spatial periods ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 μm. The influence of the laser energy density on the quality and topographical characteristics of the produced micropatterns was investigated. To characterize the surface topography of the produced structures, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Confocal Microscopy (CFM) were utilized. It was found that high quality and defect free periodic line-like patterns with spatial periods down to 500 nm could be fabricated, with structure depths between 0.88 up to 1.25 μm for spatial periods larger than 2.0 μm and up to 270 nm for spatial periods between 500 nm and 1.0 μm. Measurements of the contact angle of water on the treated surface allowed to identify an anisotropic wetting behavior depending mainly on the spatial period and filling factor of the structured surfaces.

  3. Direct electron density modulation of surface plasmons with a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yuika; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) were modulated by direct electron injection using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The predictions of electromagnetic theory for LSPR on charged metal nanoparticles were experimentally verified using a novel microscopic system. Extinction spectra were obtained for gold nanostructures that were under intense electron irradiation using an SEM system equipped with an optical microscope. High-frequency shifts of LSPR were observed for a single gold nanosphere, nanodimer, and nanorod, and the amount of the shifts was explained with respect to their symmetry.

  4. Analysis on vertical directional couplers with long range surface plasmons for multilayer optical routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, B.; Veroli, A.; Benedetti, A.

    2016-08-01

    A structure featuring vertical directional coupling of long-range surface plasmon polaritons between strip waveguides at λ = 1.55 μm is investigated with the aim of producing efficient elements that enable optical multilayer routing for 3D photonics. We have introduced a practical computational method to calculate the interaction on the bent part. This method allows us both to assess the importance of the interaction in the bent part and to control it by a suitable choice of the fabrication parameters that helps also to restrain effects due to fabrication issues. The scheme adopted here allows to reduce the insertion losses compared with other planar and multilayer devices.

  5. Highly directive Fabry-Perot leaky-wave nanoantennas based on optical partially reflective surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lorente-Crespo, M.; Mateo-Segura, C.

    2015-05-04

    Nanoantennas enhance the conversion between highly localized electromagnetic fields and far-field radiation. Here, we investigate the response of a nano-patch partially reflective surface backed with a silver mirror to an optical source embedded at the centre of the structure. Using full wave simulations, we demonstrate a two orders of magnitude increased directivity compared to the isotropic radiator, 50% power confinement to a 13.8° width beam and a ±16 nm bandwidth. Our antenna does not rely on plasmonic phenomena thus reducing non-radiative losses and conserving source coherence.

  6. Direct observation of surface plasmons in YBCO by attenuated total reflection of light in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walmsley, D. G.; Smyth, C. C.; Sellai, A.; McCafferty, P. G.; Dawson, P.; Morrow, T.; Graham, W. G.

    1994-02-01

    Surface plasmons have been observed directly in YBCO films in an Otto-geometry attenuated total reflection measurement at a wavelength of 3.392 μm. The laser deposited films are c-axis oriented on an MgO substrate. This observation confirms theoretical deductions from complex dielectric function data. Measured data have been fitted to a theoretical model and are compared with the optical constants determined by Bozovic [1]. The investigations have been extended to films with other orientations to investigate whether material anisotropy is reflected in the results and non-metallic behaviour is found.

  7. Direct CO(2) laser-based generation of holographic structures on the surface of glass.

    PubMed

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L; Weston, Nicholas J; Ardron, Marcus; Hand, Duncan P

    2016-01-25

    A customized CO(2) laser micromachining system was used for the generation of phase holographic structures directly on the surface of fused silica (HPFS(®)7980 Corning) and Borofloat(®)33 (Schott AG) glass. This process used pulses of duration 10µs and nominal wavelength 10.59µm. The pulse energy delivered to the glass workpiece was controlled by an acousto-optic modulator. The laser-generated structures were optically smooth and crack free. We demonstrated their use as diffractive optical elements (DOEs), which could be exploited as anti-counterfeiting markings embedded into valuable glass-made components and products. PMID:26832525

  8. Electroporation mediated DNA vaccination directly to a mucosal surface results in improved immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kichaev, Gleb; Mendoza, Janess M; Amante, Dinah; Smith, Trevor R F; McCoy, Jay R; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2013-10-01

    In vivo electroporation (EP) has been shown to be a highly efficient non-viral method for enhancing DNA vaccine delivery and immunogenicity, when the site of immunization is the skin or muscle of animals and humans. However, the route of entry for many microbial pathogens is via the mucosal surfaces of the human body. We have previously reported on minimally invasive, surface and contactless EP devices for enhanced DNA delivery to dermal tissue. Robust antibody responses were induced following vaccine delivery in several tested animal models using these devices. Here, we investigated extending the modality of the surface device to efficiently deliver DNA vaccines to mucosal tissue. Initially, we demonstrated reporter gene expression in the epithelial layer of buccal mucosa in a guinea pig model. There was minimal tissue damage in guinea pig mucosal tissue resulting from EP. Delivery of a DNA vaccine encoding influenza virus nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza H1N1 elicited robust and sustained systemic IgG antibody responses following EP-enhanced delivery in the mucosa. Upon further analysis, IgA antibody responses were detected in vaginal washes and sustained cellular immune responses were detected in animals immunized at the oral mucosa with the surface EP device. This data confirms that DNA delivery and EP targeting mucosal tissue directly results in both robust and sustainable humoral as well as cellular immune responses without tissue damage. These responses are seen both in the mucosa and systemically in the blood. Direct DNA vaccine delivery enhanced by EP in mucosa may have important clinical applications for delivery of prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccines against diseases such as HIV, HPV and pneumonia that enter at mucosal sites and require both cellular and humoral immune responses for protection. PMID:23954979

  9. Radiative decay engineering 4. Experimental studies of surface plasmon-coupled directional emission

    PubMed Central

    Gryczynski, Ignacy; Malicka, Joanna; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence is typically isotropic in space and collected with low efficiency. In this paper we describe surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE), which displays unique optical properties and can be collected with an efficiency near 50%. SPCE occurs for fluorophores within about 200 nm of a thin metallic film, in our case a 50-nm-thick silver film on a glass substrate. We show that fluorophore proximity to this film converts the normally isotropic emission into highly directional emission through the glass substrate at a well-defined angle from the normal axis. Depending on the thickness of the polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) film on the silver, the coupling efficiency of sulforhodamine 101 in PVA ranged from 30 to 49%. Directional SPCE was observed whether the fluorophore was excited directly or by the evanescent field due to the surface plasmon resonance. The emission is always polarized perpendicular to the plane of incidence, irrespective of the polarization of the incident light. The lifetimes are not substantially changed, indicating a mechanism somewhat different from that observed previously for the effects of silver particles on fluorophores. Remarkably, the directional emission shows intrinsic spectral resolution because the coupling angles depend on wavelength. The distances over which SPCE occurs, 10 to 200 nm, are useful because a large number of fluorophores can be localized within this volume. The emission of more distant fluorophores does not couple into the glass, allowing background suppression from biological samples. SPCE can be expected to become rapidly useful in a variety of analytical and medical sensing applications. PMID:14690680

  10. Direct design of a two-surface lens including an entrance pupil for imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yunfeng; Duerr, Fabian; Thienpont, Hugo

    2015-09-01

    A multi-fields optical design method aiming to calculate two high-order aspheric lens profiles simultaneously with an embedded entrance pupil is proposed in this paper. The Simultaneous Multiple Surfaces design method in two dimensions (SMS2D) is used to provide a better understanding of how N surfaces allow perfect coupling of N ray-bundles. In contract to this perfect coupling, our multi-fields design approach is based on the partial coupling of multiple ray-bundles. This method allows calculating the Optical Path Lengths (OPL) during the process, directly building connections between different fields of view. Both infinite and finite conjugate objectives can be designed with this approach. Additional constraints like surface continuity and smoothness are taken into account to calculate two smooth and accurate surface contours. Sub-aperture sampling factor is introduced as a weighting function for different fields which allows for a very flexible performance control over a wide field of view. A RMS 2D spot size function is used to optimize the weighting factor to achieve a very well-balanced imaging performance. A wide-field objective and a moderate aperture lens are designed and analyzed to demonstrate the potential of this design method. The impact of different weighting functions for the sub-aperture sampling is evaluated accordingly. It's shown that this design method provides an excellent starting point for further optimization of the surfaces coefficients and initial design parameters: resulting in a very good and well-balanced imaging performance over the entire field of view.

  11. Exploiting Differential Surface Display of Chondroitin Sulfate Variants for Directing Neuronal Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Swarup, Vimal P.; Hsiao, Tony W.; Zhang, Jianxing; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan; Hlady, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) proteoglycans (CSPGs) are known to be primary inhibitors of neuronal regeneration at scar sites. However, a variety of CSPGs are also involved in neuronal growth and guidance during other physiological stages. Sulfation patterns of CS chains influence their interactions with various growth factors in the central nervous system (CNS), thus influencing neuronal growth, inhibition, and pathfinding. This report demonstrates the use of differentially sulfated CS chains for neuronal navigation. Surface-immobilized patterns of CS glycosaminoglycan chains were used to determine neuronal preference toward specific sulfations of five CS variants: CS-A, CS-B (dermatan sulfate), CS-C, CS-D, and CS-E. Neurons preferred CS-A, CS-B, and CS-E and avoided CS-C containing lanes. In addition, significant alignment of neurites was observed using underlying lanes containing CS-A, CS-B, and CS-E chains. To utilize differential preference of neurons toward the CS variants, a binary combinations of CS chains were created by backfilling a neuro-preferred CS variant between the microcontact printed lanes of CS-C stripes, which are avoided by neurons. The neuronal outgrowth results demonstrate for the first time that a combination of sulfation variants of CS chains without any protein component of CSPG is sufficient for directing neuronal outgrowth. Biomaterials with surface immobilized GAG chains could find numerous applications as bridging devices for tackling CNS injuries where directional growth of neurons is critical for recovery. PMID:23947484

  12. Exploiting imperfections in the bulk to direct assembly of surface colloids

    PubMed Central

    Cavallaro, Marcello; Gharbi, Mohamed A.; Beller, Daniel A.; Čopar, Simon; Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias; Yang, Shu; Kamien, Randall D.; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    2013-01-01

    We exploit the long-ranged elastic fields inherent to confined nematic liquid crystals (LCs) to assemble colloidal particles trapped at the LC interface into reconfigurable structures with complex symmetries and packings. Spherical colloids with homeotropic anchoring trapped at the interface between air and the nematic LC 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl create quadrupolar distortions in the director field causing particles to repel and consequently form close-packed assemblies with a triangular habit. Here, we report on complex open structures organized via interactions with defects in the bulk. Specifically, by confining the nematic LC in an array of microposts with homeotropic anchoring conditions, we cause defect rings to form at well-defined locations in the bulk of the sample. These defects source elastic deformations that direct the assembly of the interfacially trapped colloids into ring-like assemblies, which recapitulate the defect geometry even when the microposts are completely immersed in the nematic. When the surface density of the colloids is high, they form a ring near the defect and a hexagonal lattice far from it. Because topographically complex substrates are easily fabricated and LC defects are readily reconfigured, this work lays the foundation for a versatile, robust mechanism to direct assembly dynamically over large areas by controlling surface anchoring and associated bulk defect structure. PMID:24191037

  13. Near-surface hydrogen depletion of diamond-like carbon films produced by direct ion deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwitz, Andreas; Gupta, Prasanth; Mohr, Berit; Hübner, René; Leveneur, Jerome; Zondervan, Albert; Becker, Hans-Werner

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous atomically flat diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were produced by direct ion deposition using a system based on a Penning ion source, butane precursor gas and post acceleration. Hydrogen depth profiles of the DLC coatings were measured with the 15N R-NRA method using the resonant nuclear reaction 1H(15N, αγ)12C (Eres = 6.385 MeV). The films produced at 3.0-10.5 kV acceleration voltage show two main effects. First, compared to average elemental composition of the film, the near-surface region is hydrogen depleted. The increase of the hydrogen concentration by 3% from the near-surface region towards the bulk is attributed to a growth model which favours the formation of sp2 hybridised carbon rich films in the film formation zone. Secondly, the depth at which the maximum hydrogen concentration is measured increases with acceleration voltage and is proportional to the penetration depth of protons produced by the ion source from the precursor gas. The observed effects are explained by a deposition process that takes into account the contributions of ion species, hydrogen effusion and preferential displacement of atoms during direct ion deposition.

  14. Remote sensing of directional wave spectra using the surface contour radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Hancock, D. W., III; Hines, D. E.; Kenney, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    A unique radio-oceanographic remote sensing instrument was developed. The 36 GHz airborne Surface Contour Radar (SCR) remotely produces a real-time topographical map of the sea surface beneath the aircraft. It can routinely produce ocean directional wave spectra with off-line data processing. The transmitter is a coherent dual-frequency device that uses pulse compression to compensate for the limited available power at Ka band. The radar has selectable pulse widths of 1, 2, 4, and 10 nanoseconds. The transmitting antenna is a 58 lambda horn fed dielectric lens whose axis is parallel to the longitudinal axis of the aircraft. It illuminates an elliptical mirror which is oriented 45 deg to the lens' longitudinal axis to deflect the beam towards the region beneath the aircraft. The mirror is oscillated in a sinusoidal fashion through mechanical linkages driven to a variable speed motor to scan the transmitter beam (1.2 deg X 1.2 deg) with + or - 16 deg of the perpendicular to the aircraft wings in the plane perpendicular to the aircraft flight direction.

  15. Surface-directed spinodal decomposition of solvent-quenched organic transistor blends.

    PubMed

    Michels, Jasper J

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes the first example of the application of a combination of the Flory-Huggins and Cahn-Hilliard theories to model and simulate microstructure evolution in solution-processed functional blend layers of organic semiconductors, as used in organic electronics devices. Specifically, the work considers phase separation of the active blend components of organic transistors based on triisopropylsilylpentacene (TIPS-pentacene) and poly(α-methylstyrene) (PαMS). By calculation and estimation of relevant physical parameters, it is shown that the vertically phase-separated structure observed in as-cast blend layers containing PαMS of a sufficiently high molecular weight (of the order of 10(2) kDa) evolves via surface-directed spinodal decomposition. The surface-directed effect can already be triggered by small differences in substrate- and/or air-interface interaction energies of the separating phases. During phase separation, which commences at the interfaces, bulk features of the TIPS-enriched phase formed by thermal noise collapse to give the experimentally observed trilayer structure of TIPS-PαMS-TIPS. The reported near absence of solution-state phase separation of as-cast blend layers containing a low molecular weight PαMS (of the order of 1 kDa) is also reproduced. PMID:21275026

  16. A rigid surface boundary element for soil-structure interaction analysis in the direct time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizos, D. C.

    Many soil-structure interaction problems involve studies of single or multiple rigid bodies of arbitrary shape and soil media. The commonly used boundary element methods implement the equations of the rigid body in a form that depends on the particulars of the geometry and requires partitioning and condensation of the associated algebraic system of equations. The present work employs the direct time domain B-Spline BEM for 3D elastodynamic analysis and presents an efficient implementation of rigid bodies of arbitrary shape in contact with, or embedded in, elastic media. The formulation of a rigid surface boundary element introduced herein is suitable for direct superposition in the BEM system of algebraic equations. Consequently, solutions are computed in a single analysis step, eliminating, thus, the need for partitioning of the system of equations. Computational efficiency is also achieved due to the extremely sparse form of the associated coefficient matrices. The proposed element can be used for the modeling of single or multiple rigid bodies of arbitrary shape within the framework of the BEM method. The efficiency and general nature of the proposed element is demonstrated through applications related to the dynamic analysis of rigid surface and embedded foundations and their interaction with embedded rigid bodies of arbitrary shape.

  17. Exploiting imperfections in the bulk to direct assembly of surface colloids.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, Marcello; Gharbi, Mohamed A; Beller, Daniel A; Čopar, Simon; Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias; Yang, Shu; Kamien, Randall D; Stebe, Kathleen J

    2013-11-19

    We exploit the long-ranged elastic fields inherent to confined nematic liquid crystals (LCs) to assemble colloidal particles trapped at the LC interface into reconfigurable structures with complex symmetries and packings. Spherical colloids with homeotropic anchoring trapped at the interface between air and the nematic LC 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl create quadrupolar distortions in the director field causing particles to repel and consequently form close-packed assemblies with a triangular habit. Here, we report on complex open structures organized via interactions with defects in the bulk. Specifically, by confining the nematic LC in an array of microposts with homeotropic anchoring conditions, we cause defect rings to form at well-defined locations in the bulk of the sample. These defects source elastic deformations that direct the assembly of the interfacially trapped colloids into ring-like assemblies, which recapitulate the defect geometry even when the microposts are completely immersed in the nematic. When the surface density of the colloids is high, they form a ring near the defect and a hexagonal lattice far from it. Because topographically complex substrates are easily fabricated and LC defects are readily reconfigured, this work lays the foundation for a versatile, robust mechanism to direct assembly dynamically over large areas by controlling surface anchoring and associated bulk defect structure.

  18. Direct Measurement of Surface Dissolution Rates in Potential Nuclear Waste Forms: The Example of Pyrochlore.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Cornelius; Finkeldei, Sarah; Brandt, Felix; Bosbach, Dirk; Luttge, Andreas

    2015-08-19

    The long-term stability of ceramic materials that are considered as potential nuclear waste forms is governed by heterogeneous surface reactivity. Thus, instead of a mean rate, the identification of one or more dominant contributors to the overall dissolution rate is the key to predict the stability of waste forms quantitatively. Direct surface measurements by vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) and their analysis via material flux maps and resulting dissolution rate spectra provide data about dominant rate contributors and their variability over time. Using pyrochlore (Nd2Zr2O7) pellet dissolution under acidic conditions as an example, we demonstrate the identification and quantification of dissolution rate contributors, based on VSI data and rate spectrum analysis. Heterogeneous surface alteration of pyrochlore varies by a factor of about 5 and additional material loss by chemo-mechanical grain pull-out within the uppermost grain layer. We identified four different rate contributors that are responsible for the observed dissolution rate range of single grains. Our new concept offers the opportunity to increase our mechanistic understanding and to predict quantitatively the alteration of ceramic waste forms.

  19. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces: gas-liquid interface dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jongmin; García-Mayoral, Ricardo; Mani, Ali

    2013-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces can induce large slip velocities for liquid flows, reducing the skin friction on walls, by entrapping gas pockets within the surface roughness. This work explores the onset mechanism leading to gas depletion through interface breakage under turbulent conditions. We conduct direct numerical simulations of flows over superhydrophobic walls. The superhydrophobic texture is conventionally modeled as a pattern of slip/no-slip boundary conditions for the wall-parallel velocities but, to take into account the dynamic deformation of the gas-liquid interface, we also introduce non-zero boundary conditions for the wall-normal velocity. These conditions are derived from the deformation of the interface in response to the overlying turbulent pressure fluctuations, following the Young-Laplace equation. Surface protrusions in the form of posts and streamwise-aligned ridges are studied, and results are presented as a function of the ``deformability'' of the gas-liquid interfaces, expressed as a Weber number. We will also discuss results for misaligned ridges. Supported by the Office of Naval Research and the Kwanjeong Educational Scholarship Foundation.

  20. Hybrid optical (freeform) components--functionalization of nonplanar optical surfaces by direct picosecond laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Kleindienst, Roman; Kampmann, Ronald; Stoebenau, Sebastian; Sinzinger, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    The performance of optical systems is typically improved by increasing the number of conventionally fabricated optical components (spheres, aspheres, and gratings). This approach is automatically connected to a system enlargement, as well as potentially higher assembly and maintenance costs. Hybrid optical freeform components can help to overcome this trade-off. They merge several optical functions within fewer but more complex optical surfaces, e.g., elements comprising shallow refractive/reflective and high-frequency diffractive structures. However, providing the flexibility and precision essential for their realization is one of the major challenges in the field of optical component fabrication. In this article we present tailored integrated machining techniques suitable for rapid prototyping as well as the fabrication of molding tools for low-cost mass replication of hybrid optical freeform components. To produce the different feature sizes with optical surface quality, we successively combine mechanical machining modes (ultraprecision micromilling and fly cutting) with precisely aligned direct picosecond laser ablation in an integrated fabrication approach. The fabrication accuracy and surface quality achieved by our integrated fabrication approach are demonstrated with profilometric measurements and experimental investigations of the optical performance. PMID:21743521

  1. Inbound waves in the solar corona: A direct indicator of Alfvén surface location

    SciTech Connect

    DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2014-06-01

    The tenuous supersonic solar wind that streams from the top of the corona passes through a natural boundary—the Alfvén surface—that marks the causal disconnection of individual packets of plasma and magnetic flux from the Sun itself. The Alfvén surface is the locus where the radial motion of the accelerating solar wind passes the radial Alfvén speed, and therefore any displacement of material cannot carry information back down into the corona. It is thus the natural outer boundary of the solar corona and the inner boundary of interplanetary space. Using a new and unique motion analysis to separate inbound and outbound motions in synoptic visible-light image sequences from the COR2 coronagraph on board the STEREO-A spacecraft, we have identified inbound wave motion in the outer corona beyond 6 solar radii for the first time and used it to determine that the Alfvén surface is at least 12 solar radii from the Sun over the polar coronal holes and 15 solar radii in the streamer belt, well beyond the distance planned for NASA's upcoming Solar Probe Plus mission. To our knowledge, this is the first measurement of inbound waves in the outer solar corona and the first direct measurement of lower bounds for the Alfvén surface.

  2. Tailored frictional properties by Penrose inspired surfaces produced by direct laser interference patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gachot, Carsten; Rosenkranz, Andreas; Buchheit, Roman; Souza, Nicolas; Mücklich, Frank

    2016-03-01

    In this work, periodic line-like and quasi-periodic Penrose-like patterns were produced on polyimide samples by direct laser inference patterning. The homogeneity and symmetry of the produced patterns were characterised with white light interferometry, light microscopy and. Fourier-transformation of the acquired images thus confirmed good quality of the Penrose-like pattern. Infrared spectroscopy was used to study the chemical changes after the laser treatment. No significant influences could be detected after irradiating the polyimide surfaces. Tribological experiments (polyimide substrate versus steel ball) under dry sliding conditions were performed using ball-on-disk tribometer in linear reciprocating sliding mode as a function of the relative alignment of the sliding direction with respect to the pattern orientation. The measured coefficient of friction strongly depends on the patterning. The periodic line-patterns with an orientation parallel to the sliding direction showed the highest COF of all samples. After a running-in of approximately 50 sliding cycles the Penrose-like patterns with a 0° orientation showed the lowest coefficient of friction.

  3. Near-Field and Far-Field Directional Conversion of Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Heng-He; Tan, Yunhua; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2016-01-01

    A compact metallic meta-structure is proposed to realize directional conversion between spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) and propagating waves at millimeter wave and THz frequencies. The structure is constructed by embedding two slits or multi-slits array into a subwavelength metallic reflection grating. When the back-side of the structure is illuminated by an oblique beam with a fixed incident angle, the propagating wave will be unidirectionally converted into SSPPs with a considerable efficiency. Both the simulations and experiments demonstrate that the excitation ratio of the SSPPs between the two possible propagating directions (left and right) reaches up to about 340. Furthermore, assisted by the structure, near-field SSPPs can be also converted into far-field narrow beams with particular directions. Through frequency sweeping, wide-angle beam scanning is verified by theory and experiments. The work paves a new way for SSPPs launching and also provides fresh ideas for super-resolution imaging in the longer wavelength range. PMID:27629825

  4. Near-Field and Far-Field Directional Conversion of Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons.

    PubMed

    Tang, Heng-He; Tan, Yunhua; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2016-01-01

    A compact metallic meta-structure is proposed to realize directional conversion between spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) and propagating waves at millimeter wave and THz frequencies. The structure is constructed by embedding two slits or multi-slits array into a subwavelength metallic reflection grating. When the back-side of the structure is illuminated by an oblique beam with a fixed incident angle, the propagating wave will be unidirectionally converted into SSPPs with a considerable efficiency. Both the simulations and experiments demonstrate that the excitation ratio of the SSPPs between the two possible propagating directions (left and right) reaches up to about 340. Furthermore, assisted by the structure, near-field SSPPs can be also converted into far-field narrow beams with particular directions. Through frequency sweeping, wide-angle beam scanning is verified by theory and experiments. The work paves a new way for SSPPs launching and also provides fresh ideas for super-resolution imaging in the longer wavelength range. PMID:27629825

  5. Near-Field and Far-Field Directional Conversion of Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Heng-He; Tan, Yunhua; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2016-09-01

    A compact metallic meta-structure is proposed to realize directional conversion between spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) and propagating waves at millimeter wave and THz frequencies. The structure is constructed by embedding two slits or multi-slits array into a subwavelength metallic reflection grating. When the back-side of the structure is illuminated by an oblique beam with a fixed incident angle, the propagating wave will be unidirectionally converted into SSPPs with a considerable efficiency. Both the simulations and experiments demonstrate that the excitation ratio of the SSPPs between the two possible propagating directions (left and right) reaches up to about 340. Furthermore, assisted by the structure, near-field SSPPs can be also converted into far-field narrow beams with particular directions. Through frequency sweeping, wide-angle beam scanning is verified by theory and experiments. The work paves a new way for SSPPs launching and also provides fresh ideas for super-resolution imaging in the longer wavelength range.

  6. Near-Field and Far-Field Directional Conversion of Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons.

    PubMed

    Tang, Heng-He; Tan, Yunhua; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2016-01-01

    A compact metallic meta-structure is proposed to realize directional conversion between spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) and propagating waves at millimeter wave and THz frequencies. The structure is constructed by embedding two slits or multi-slits array into a subwavelength metallic reflection grating. When the back-side of the structure is illuminated by an oblique beam with a fixed incident angle, the propagating wave will be unidirectionally converted into SSPPs with a considerable efficiency. Both the simulations and experiments demonstrate that the excitation ratio of the SSPPs between the two possible propagating directions (left and right) reaches up to about 340. Furthermore, assisted by the structure, near-field SSPPs can be also converted into far-field narrow beams with particular directions. Through frequency sweeping, wide-angle beam scanning is verified by theory and experiments. The work paves a new way for SSPPs launching and also provides fresh ideas for super-resolution imaging in the longer wavelength range.

  7. Method and means of directing an ion beam onto an insulating surface for ion implantation or sputtering

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; Siskind, Barry

    1981-01-01

    A beam of ions is directed under control onto an insulating surface by supplying simultaneously a stream of electrons directed at the same surface in a quantity sufficient to neutralize the overall electric charge of the ion beam and result in a net zero current flow to the insulating surface. The ion beam is adapted particularly both to the implantation of ions in a uniform areal disposition over the insulating surface and to the sputtering of atoms or molecules of the insulator onto a substrate.

  8. Label-free direct surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of nucleic acids (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrini, Luca; Morla-Folch, Judit; Gisbert-Quilis, Patricia; Xie, Hainan; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon

    2016-03-01

    Recently, plasmonic-based biosensing has experienced an unprecedented level of attention, with a particular focus on the nucleic acid detection, offering efficient solutions to engineer simple, fast, highly sensitive sensing platforms while overcoming important limitations of PCR and microarray techniques. In the broad field of plasmonics, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy has arisen as a powerful analytical tool for detection and structural characterization of biomolecules. Today applications of SERS to nucleic acid analysis largely rely on indirect strategies, which have been demonstrated very effective for pure sensing purposes but completely dismiss the exquisite structural information provided by the direct acquisition of the biomolecular vibrational fingerprint. Contrarily, direct label-free SERS of nucleic acid shows an outstanding potential in terms of chemical-specific information which, however, remained largely unexpressed mainly because of the inherent poor spectral reproducibility and/or limited sensitivity. To address these limitations, we developed a fast and affordable high-throughput screening direct SERS method for gaining detailed genomic information on nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and for the characterization and quantitative recognition of DNA interactions with exogenous agents. The simple strategy relies on the electrostatic adhesion of DNA/RNA onto positively-charged silver colloids that promotes the nanoparticle aggregation into stable clusters yielding intense and reproducible SERS spectra at picogram level (i.e. the analysis can be performed without the necessity of amplification steps thus providing realistic direct information of the nucleic acid in its native state). We anticipate this method to gain a vast impact and set of applications in different fields, including medical diagnostics, genomic screening, drug discovery, forensic science and even molecular electronics.

  9. Direct analysis of solids by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using a second surface atomizer

    SciTech Connect

    Rettberg, T.M.; Holcombe, J.A.

    1986-06-01

    The direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of solids using the second surface atomizer has been investigated. The atomizer features a gas-cooled Ta insert within the graphite furnace onto which the analyte can be condensed, after which atomization is performed by raising the furnace to a higher temperature and shutting off the coolant gas. The analyses were conducted on standard reference material fly ash, river sediment, and citrus leaves, in addition to filter paper samples. All analyses were conducted without sample pretreatment or use of matrix modifiers. Quantitation was done by using simple aqueous standards. By use of peak heights, the recoveries varied from 81% to 127%, although several determinations were within the certified concentration range. The procedures typically gave low background absorbances and peak shapes that were relatively independent of the original sample matrix.

  10. Similarities and Distinctions in Actions of Surface-Directed and Classic Androgen Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Suh, Ji Ho; Chattopadhyay, Arundhati; Sieglaff, Douglas H; Storer Samaniego, Cheryl; Cox, Marc B; Webb, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) surface-directed antagonist MJC13 inhibits AR function and proliferation of prostate cancer (PC) cells. These effects are related to arrest of an AR/chaperone complex in the cytoplasm. Here, we compared MJC13 and classic AR antagonists such as flutamide and bicalutamide. Microarray analysis and confirmatory qRT-PCR reveals that MJC13 and flutamide inhibit dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-dependent genes in LNCaP PC cells. Both compounds are equally effective on a genome wide basis and as effective as second generation AR antagonists (MDV3100, ARN-509) at selected genes. MJC13 inhibits AR binding to the prostate specific antigen (PSA) promoter more strongly than flutamide, consistent with different mechanisms of action. Examination of efficacy of MJC13 in conditions that reflect aspects castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) reveals that it inhibits flutamide activation of an AR mutant (ART877A) that emerges during flutamide withdrawal syndrome, but displays greatly restricted gene-specific activity in 22Rv1 cells that express a constitutively active truncated AR and is inactive against glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which can co-opt androgen-dependent signaling networks in CRPC. Importantly, MJC13 inhibits AR interactions with SRC2 and β-catenin in the nucleus and, unlike flutamide, strongly inhibits amplification of AR activity obtained with transfected SRC2 and β-catenin. MJC13 also inhibits DHT and β-catenin-enhanced cell division in LNCaP cells. Thus, a surface-directed antagonist can block AR activity in some conditions in which a classic antagonist fails and may display utility in particular forms of CRPC.

  11. Preparation and characterization of human monoclonal antibodies directed against the hepatitis B virus surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Colucci, G; Kohtz, D S; Waksal, S D

    1986-06-01

    The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is highly immunogenic and induces an antibody response which is protective in vivo against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Human monoclonal antibodies specific for HBsAg were produced, which could have potential therapeutic applications. Lymphocytes obtained from a vaccinated donor were stimulated in vitro and fused with the human myeloma cell line GM 4672, and eight hybridomas were obtained. Three of these clones, which reacted in an ELISA against the HBsAg vaccine, were expanded, subcloned and further analyzed. The subclones E7C2, C4C10, and D5B2 were able to bind to different HBsAg preparations, which express various subtypes, and recognized the major HBsAg peptides in Western blot analysis. Cross-inhibition experiments showed that E7C2, C4C10 and D5B2 are directed against the same epitope and have an affinity constant ranging from 5 X 10(7) to 3.3 X 10(9) M. Furthermore, these antibodies stained the surface and cytoplasm of the HBsAg-secreting cell lines PLC/PRF/5 and 4.10. The production of immunoglobulins varies from 0.3 to 1.3 micrograms/ml/10(6) and has remained stable over a period of 8 months. These human monoclonal antibodies, which appear to be directed against an antigenic determinant common to all HBsAg subtypes, could be useful in the study of HBV-related liver diseases as well as in their diagnosis and experimental therapy.

  12. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Mach 2.25 Turbulent Boundary Layer Over A Compliant Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostoich, Christopher; Bodony, Daniel; Geubelle, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Future high-speed air vehicles will be lightweight, flexible, and reusable, and thus susceptible to dynamic coupling between the boundary layer and vehicle surface. Current analysis techniques of boundary layer properties based on rigid surface assumptions may be invalid in this flight regime, and experimental approaches are difficult and expensive. Analyses involving accurate numerical predictions are therefore needed to provide data in this high-speed, coupled environment. Results of a Mach 2.25 turbulent boundary layer evolving over a thin, compliant panel are investigated using direct numerical simulation in the fluid coupled to a geometrically non-linear, thermomechanical finite element solver for the solid. The coupled response of the boundary layer-panel system are presented and compared to the rigid panel case. Panel deformation and fluid flow modification due to the presence of the compliant panel are analyzed, with a particular interest in the influence of panel motion on turbulence statistics. The maximum panel deformation extends through the viscous sublayer while space-time data show that the solid supports waves that may be useful for sensing and control. Supported by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory Air Vehicles Directorate under contract number FA8650-06-2-3620.

  13. Quantifying surface albedo and other direct biogeophysical climate forcings of forestry activities.

    PubMed

    Bright, Ryan M; Zhao, Kaiguang; Jackson, Robert B; Cherubini, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    By altering fluxes of heat, momentum, and moisture exchanges between the land surface and atmosphere, forestry and other land-use activities affect climate. Although long recognized scientifically as being important, these so-called biogeophysical forcings are rarely included in climate policies for forestry and other land management projects due to the many challenges associated with their quantification. Here, we review the scientific literature in the fields of atmospheric science and terrestrial ecology in light of three main objectives: (i) to elucidate the challenges associated with quantifying biogeophysical climate forcings connected to land use and land management, with a focus on the forestry sector; (ii) to identify and describe scientific approaches and/or metrics facilitating the quantification and interpretation of direct biogeophysical climate forcings; and (iii) to identify and recommend research priorities that can help overcome the challenges of their attribution to specific land-use activities, bridging the knowledge gap between the climate modeling, forest ecology, and resource management communities. We find that ignoring surface biogeophysics may mislead climate mitigation policies, yet existing metrics are unlikely to be sufficient. Successful metrics ought to (i) include both radiative and nonradiative climate forcings; (ii) reconcile disparities between biogeophysical and biogeochemical forcings, and (iii) acknowledge trade-offs between global and local climate benefits. We call for more coordinated research among terrestrial ecologists, resource managers, and coupled climate modelers to harmonize datasets, refine analytical techniques, and corroborate and validate metrics that are more amenable to analyses at the scale of an individual site or region.

  14. Error analysis of a direct current electromagnetic tracking system in digitizing 3-dimensional surface geometries.

    PubMed

    Milne, A D; Lee, J M

    1999-01-01

    The direct current electromagnetic tracking device has seen increasing use in biomechanics studies of joint kinematics and anatomical surface geometry. In these applications, a stylus is attached to a sensor to measure the spatial location of three-dimensional landmarks. Stylus calibration is performed by rotating the stylus about a fixed point in space and using regression analysis to determine the tip offset vector. Measurement errors can be induced via several pathways, including; intrinsic system errors in sensor position or angle and tip offset calibration errors. A detailed study was performed to determine the errors introduced in digitizing small surfaces with different stylus lengths (35, 55, and 65 mm) and approach angles (30 and 45 degrees) using a plastic calibration board and hemispherical models. Two-point discrimination errors increased to an average of 1.93 mm for a 254 mm step size. Rotation about a single point produced mean errors of 0.44 to 1.18 mm. Statistically significant differences in error were observed with increasing approach angles (p < 0.001). Errors of less than 6% were observed in determining the curvature of a 19 mm hemisphere. This study demonstrates that the "Flock of Birds" can be used as a digitizing tool with accuracy better than 0.76% over 254 mm step sizes. PMID:11143353

  15. Data fusion analysis of a surface direct-current resistivity and well pick data set

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.A.; Lewis, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked with testing, debugging, and refining the Hanford Site data fusion workstation (DFW), with the assistance of Coleman Research Corporation (CRC), before delivering the DFW to the environmental restoration client at the Hanford Site. Data fusion is the mathematical combination (or fusion) of disparate data sets into a single interpretation. The data fusion software used in this study was developed by CRC. This report discusses the results of evaluating a surface direct-current (dc) resistivity and well-pick data set using two methods: data fusion technology and commercially available software (i.e., RESIX Plus from Interpex Ltd., Golden, Colorado), the conventional method of analysis. The report compares the two technologies; describes the survey, procedures, and results; and includes conclusions and recommendations. The surface dc resistivity and well-pick data set had been acquired by PNL from a study performed in May 1993 at Eielson Air Force Base near Fairbanks, Alaska. The resistivity survey data were acquired to map the top of permafrost in support of a hydrogeologic study. This data set provided an excellent opportunity to test and refine the dc resistivity capabilities of the DFW; previously, the data fusion software was untested on dc resistivity data. The DFW was used to evaluate the dc resistivity survey data and to produce a 3-dimensional earth model of the study area.

  16. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: a direct method to identify colorants in various artist media.

    PubMed

    Brosseau, Christa L; Rayner, Kari S; Casadio, Francesca; Grzywacz, Cecily M; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2009-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been developed as a direct, extractionless, nonhydrolysis tool to detect lake pigments and colorants of various classes used in a variety of artist materials. Presented first is the SERS analysis of the natural colorant turmeric (Curcuma longa L.), main component curcumin, as present in dry lake pigment grains, dyed textile yarns, and reference paint layers containing the lake pigment bound in animal glue painted on glass. This experiment demonstrated that it is possible to detect the chromophore in various matrixes of increasing complexity, allowing its unambiguous identification in a wide range of artists' materials, even at very low concentration and in the presence of binders such as glue. In addition, removal of the colorant from the complex with the inorganic substrate or mordanted yarn was not necessary for identification. This proof-of-concept study was then extended to include analysis of several pastel sticks from a historical pastel box and two samples from a pastel artwork, both attributed to American painter Mary Cassatt (1844-1926). This study represents the first extractionless, nonhydrolysis direct SERS study of multiple artist materials, including identification of natural and synthetic colorants and organic pigments contained in historic artists' pastels spanning a broad range of chemical classes: polyphenols, rhodamines, azo pigments, and anthraquinones. Successful identification is demonstrated on samples as small as a single grain of pigment.

  17. Surface roughness directed self-assembly of patchy particles into colloidal micelles

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Daniela J.; Ni, Ran; Smallenburg, Frank; Hermes, Michiel; Yoon, Kisun; Weitz, David A.; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Groenewold, Jan; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Kegel, Willem K.

    2012-01-01

    Colloidal particles with site-specific directional interactions, so called “patchy particles”, are promising candidates for bottom-up assembly routes towards complex structures with rationally designed properties. Here we present an experimental realization of patchy colloidal particles based on material independent depletion interaction and surface roughness. Curved, smooth patches on rough colloids are shown to be exclusively attractive due to their different overlap volumes. We discuss in detail the case of colloids with one patch that serves as a model for molecular surfactants both with respect to their geometry and their interactions. These one-patch particles assemble into clusters that resemble surfactant micelles with the smooth and attractive sides of the colloids located at the interior. We term these clusters “colloidal micelles”. Direct Monte Carlo simulations starting from a homogeneous state give rise to cluster size distributions that are in good agreement with those found in experiments. Important differences with surfactant micelles originate from the colloidal character of our model system and are investigated by simulations and addressed theoretically. Our new “patchy” model system opens up the possibility for self-assembly studies into finite-sized superstructures as well as crystals with as of yet inaccessible structures. PMID:22715288

  18. Direct Observation of Photoinduced Tautomerization in Single Molecules at a Metal Surface.

    PubMed

    Böckmann, H; Liu, S; Mielke, J; Gawinkowski, S; Waluk, J; Grill, L; Wolf, M; Kumagai, T

    2016-02-10

    Molecular switches are of fundamental importance in nature, and light is an important stimulus to selectively drive the switching process. However, the local dynamics of a conformational change in these molecules remain far from being completely understood at the single-molecule level. Here, we report the direct observation of photoinduced tautomerization in single porphycene molecules on a Cu(111) surface by using a combination of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and laser excitation in the near-infrared to ultraviolet regime. It is found that the thermodynamically stable trans configuration of porphycene can be converted to the metastable cis configuration in a unidirectional fashion by photoirradiation. The wavelength dependence of the tautomerization cross section exhibits a steep increase around 2 eV and demonstrates that excitation of the Cu d-band electrons and the resulting hot carriers play a dominant role in the photochemical process. Additionally, a pronounced isotope effect in the cross section (∼100) is observed when the transferred hydrogen atoms are substituted with deuterium, indicating a significant contribution of zero-point energy in the reaction. Combined with the study of inelastic tunneling electron-induced tautomerization with the STM, we propose that tautomerization occurs via excitation of molecular vibrations after photoexcitation. Interestingly, the observed cross section of ∼10(-19) cm(2) in the visible-ultraviolet region is much higher than that of previously studied molecular switches on a metal surface, for example, azobenzene derivatives (10(-23)-10(-22) cm(2)). Furthermore, we examined a local environmental impact on the photoinduced tautomerization by varying molecular density on the surface and find substantial changes in the cross section and quenching of the process due to the intermolecular interaction at high density. PMID:26796945

  19. Copper foils with gradient structure in thickness direction and different roughnesses on two surfaces fabricated by double rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi-yong; Liu, Xue-feng; Zou, Wen-jiang; Xie, Jian-xin

    2013-12-01

    Copper foils with gradient structure in thickness direction and different roughnesses on two surfaces were fabricated by double rolling. The two surface morphologies of double-rolled copper foils are quite different, and the surface roughness values are 61 and 1095 nm, respectively. The roughness value of matt surface can meet the requirement for bonding the resin matrix with copper foils used for flexible printed circuit boards, thus may omit traditional roughening treatment; the microstructure of double-rolled copper foils demonstrates an obviously asymmetric gradient feature. From bright surface to matt surface in thickness direction, the average grain size first increases from 2.3 to 7.4 μm and then decreases to 3.6 μm; compared with conventional rolled copper foils, the double-rolled copper foils exhibit a remarkably increased bending fatigue life, and the increased range is about 16.2%.

  20. Giardia Flagellar Motility Is Not Directly Required to Maintain Attachment to Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    House, Susan A.; Richter, David J.; Pham, Jonathan K.; Dawson, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia trophozoites attach to the intestinal microvilli (or inert surfaces) using an undefined “suction-based” mechanism, and remain attached during cell division to avoid peristalsis. Flagellar motility is a key factor in Giardia's pathogenesis and colonization of the host small intestine. Specifically, the beating of the ventral flagella, one of four pairs of motile flagella, has been proposed to generate a hydrodynamic force that results in suction-based attachment via the adjacent ventral disc. We aimed to test this prevailing “hydrodynamic model” of attachment mediated by flagellar motility. We defined four distinct stages of attachment by assessing surface contacts of the trophozoite with the substrate during attachment using TIRF microscopy (TIRFM). The lateral crest of the ventral disc forms a continuous perimeter seal with the substrate, a cytological indication that trophozoites are fully attached. Using trophozoites with two types of molecularly engineered defects in flagellar beating, we determined that neither ventral flagellar beating, nor any flagellar beating, is necessary for the maintenance of attachment. Following a morpholino-based knockdown of PF16, a central pair protein, both the beating and morphology of flagella were defective, but trophozoites could still initiate proper surface contacts as seen using TIRFM and could maintain attachment in several biophysical assays. Trophozoites with impaired motility were able to attach as well as motile cells. We also generated a strain with defects in the ventral flagellar waveform by overexpressing a dominant negative form of alpha2-annexin::GFP (D122A, D275A). This dominant negative alpha2-annexin strain could initiate attachment and had only a slight decrease in the ability to withstand normal and shear forces. The time needed for attachment did increase in trophozoites with overall defective flagellar beating, however. Thus while not directly required for attachment, flagellar motility is

  1. Application of soil magnetometry on urban and industrial areas affected by different sources of pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magiera, T.; Szuszkiewicz, M.; Rachwał, M.

    2012-04-01

    Soil magnetometry as a proxy screening method has proven to be a suitable method for outlining soil pollution, connected with industrial and urban dust deposition as well as qualitative and semi-quantitative evaluation of potentially contaminated areas with considerably high concentration of technogenic iron particles and related heavy metals. In combination with geochemical method it could be also used for better targeting the geochemical sampling and reducing the number of chemical analysis. During this study the method was applied on areas dominated by 3 different sources of pollution: urban (mostly related to coal combustion), metallurgical and coke production. The three analyzed forest complexes were artificially planted and grow on anthroposols with different stage of transformation. During the study analysis of vertical distribution of magnetic susceptibility (κ) in 40 topsoil profiles taken in 3 above mentioned forest areas were performed. Additionally, soil samples taken from horizons with increased magnetic susceptibility (mostly organic horizon) and from mineral horizons (considered as a background) were selected to chemical analysis of 9 heavy metal content (Fe, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb). X-ray fluorescence method was applied for geochemical study. The highest κ values up to 1200 × 10-5 SI units were measured in the vicinity of metallurgical plant but the correlation between κ values and heavy metal content was there very low and statistically not significant. The considerably high correlation between magnetic susceptibility and some heavy metals (Pb, Zn, Cd, Cu, As) were observed on 2 other areas of study. On the base of these study in combination with former mineralogical study of industrial dusts and topsoils, the following conclusions have been drown: Steelworks - emit strongly magnetic technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs) including metallic iron (α-Fe) that is strong ferromagnetic (giving high κ values) but do not contain heavy

  2. Direct Measurements of Fermi Level Pinning at the Surface of Intrinsically n-Type InGaAs Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Speckbacher, Maximilian; Treu, Julian; Whittles, Thomas J; Linhart, Wojciech M; Xu, Xiaomo; Saller, Kai; Dhanak, Vinod R; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Finley, Jonathan J; Veal, Tim D; Koblmüller, Gregor

    2016-08-10

    Surface effects strongly dominate the intrinsic properties of semiconductor nanowires (NWs), an observation that is commonly attributed to the presence of surface states and their modification of the electronic band structure. Although the effects of the exposed, bare NW surface have been widely studied with respect to charge carrier transport and optical properties, the underlying electronic band structure, Fermi level pinning, and surface band bending profiles are not well explored. Here, we directly and quantitatively assess the Fermi level pinning at the surfaces of composition-tunable, intrinsically n-type InGaAs NWs, as one of the prominent, technologically most relevant NW systems, by using correlated photoluminescence (PL) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). From the PL spectral response, we reveal two dominant radiative recombination pathways, that is, direct near-band edge transitions and red-shifted, spatially indirect transitions induced by surface band bending. The separation of their relative transition energies changes with alloy composition by up to more than ∼40 meV and represent a direct measure for the amount of surface band bending. We further extract quantitatively the Fermi level to surface valence band maximum separation using XPS, and directly verify a composition-dependent transition from downward to upward band bending (surface electron accumulation to depletion) with increasing Ga-content x(Ga) at a crossover near x(Ga) ∼ 0.2. Core level spectra further demonstrate the nature of extrinsic surface states being caused by In-rich suboxides arising from the native oxide layer at the InGaAs NW surface. PMID:27458736

  3. Direct Measurements of Fermi Level Pinning at the Surface of Intrinsically n-Type InGaAs Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Speckbacher, Maximilian; Treu, Julian; Whittles, Thomas J; Linhart, Wojciech M; Xu, Xiaomo; Saller, Kai; Dhanak, Vinod R; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Finley, Jonathan J; Veal, Tim D; Koblmüller, Gregor

    2016-08-10

    Surface effects strongly dominate the intrinsic properties of semiconductor nanowires (NWs), an observation that is commonly attributed to the presence of surface states and their modification of the electronic band structure. Although the effects of the exposed, bare NW surface have been widely studied with respect to charge carrier transport and optical properties, the underlying electronic band structure, Fermi level pinning, and surface band bending profiles are not well explored. Here, we directly and quantitatively assess the Fermi level pinning at the surfaces of composition-tunable, intrinsically n-type InGaAs NWs, as one of the prominent, technologically most relevant NW systems, by using correlated photoluminescence (PL) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). From the PL spectral response, we reveal two dominant radiative recombination pathways, that is, direct near-band edge transitions and red-shifted, spatially indirect transitions induced by surface band bending. The separation of their relative transition energies changes with alloy composition by up to more than ∼40 meV and represent a direct measure for the amount of surface band bending. We further extract quantitatively the Fermi level to surface valence band maximum separation using XPS, and directly verify a composition-dependent transition from downward to upward band bending (surface electron accumulation to depletion) with increasing Ga-content x(Ga) at a crossover near x(Ga) ∼ 0.2. Core level spectra further demonstrate the nature of extrinsic surface states being caused by In-rich suboxides arising from the native oxide layer at the InGaAs NW surface.

  4. Evaluating a direct swabbing method for screening pesticides on fruit and vegetable surfaces using Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART) coupled to an Exactive benchtop orbitrap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Elizabeth; Musselman, Brian

    2012-07-01

    Rapid screening of pesticides present on the surfaces of fruits and vegetables has been facilitated by using a Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART(®)) open air surface desorption ionization source coupled to an Exactive(®) high-resolution accurate mass benchtop orbitrap mass spectrometer. The use of cotton and polyester cleaning swabs to collect and retain pesticides for subsequent open air desorption ionization is demonstrated by sampling the surface of various produce to which solutions of pesticides have been applied at levels 10 and 100 times below the tolerance levels established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). Samples analyzed include cherry tomatoes, oranges, peaches and carrots each chosen for their surface characteristics which include: smooth, pitted, fuzzy, and rough respectively. Results from the direct analysis of fungicides on store-bought oranges are also described. In all cases, the swabs were introduced directly into the heated ionizing gas of the DART source resulting in production of protonated pesticide molecules within seconds of sampling. Operation of the orbitrap mass spectrometer at 25,000 full-width half maximum resolution was sufficient to generate high-quality accurate mass data. Stable external mass calibration eliminated the need for addition of standards typically required for mass calibration, thus allowing multiple analyses to be completed without instrument recalibration. PMID:22362280

  5. Direct silica encapsulation of self-assembled-monolayer-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering labels with complete surface coverage of Raman reporters by noncovalently bound silane precursors.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Max; Salehi, Mohammad; Schlücker, Sebastian

    2014-08-01

    Silica-coated surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) labels with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on the entire surface of the metal colloid combine high chemical and mechanical stability with bright and reproducible Raman signals due to the complete surface coverage and uniform molecular orientation within the SAM. Currently available chemical syntheses are either based on the direct encapsulation of covalently bound silane precursors or comprise several steps, such as the sequential addition of noncovalently bound polyelectrolytes to render the surface vitreophilic. Here, a generic approach for the direct and fast silica encapsulation of commercially available Raman reporter molecules with polar head groups by noncovalently bound silane precursors is reported. The formation of highly SERS-active silica-coated clusters during silica encapsulation is determined by several parameters, in particular the type of Raman reporter molecule, the solvent, and the type and amount of the silane precursor.

  6. Direct observation of surface-mediated thioacetyl deprotection: covalent tethering of a thiol-terminated porphyrin to the Ag(100) surface.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Owain P H; Turner, Mark; Williams, Federico J; Hille, Andreas; Sanders, Jeremy K M; Lambert, Richard M

    2006-08-01

    Covalent tethering of macromolecules such as porphyrins to metal surfaces underpins bottom-up fabrication of systems intended for a variety of applications. Thiol linkages are especially useful but often need protection during macromolecule synthesis. By means of scanning tunneling microscopy, we directly observe the spontaneous deprotection of an acetyl-protected thioporphyrin upon contact with a silver surface, without the intervention of any solution-mediated chemistry.

  7. Facile surface glycosylation of PVDF microporous membrane via direct surface-initiated AGET ATRP and improvement of antifouling property and biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jing; Meng, Jian-qiang; Kang, Yin-lin; Du, Qi-yun; Zhang, Yu-feng

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a facile and novel approach for the surface glycosylation of poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) microporous membrane. A glycopolymer poly(D-gluconamidoethyl methacrylate) (PGAMA) was tethered onto the membrane surface via activators generated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP) directly initiated from the PVDF surface. Chemical changes of membrane surface were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was revealed that PGAMA was successfully grafted onto the membrane surface and its grafting density can be modulated in a wide range up to 2.4 μmol/cm2. The effects of glycosylation on membrane morphology, flux and surface hydrophilicity were investigated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) results indicated shrinkage of the surface pore diameters and the growth of the glycopolymer layer on the membrane surface. The static water contact angle (WCA) of the membrane surface decreased from 110° to 30.4° with the increase of grafting density, indicating that the PGAMA grafts dramatically improved the surface hydrophilicity. The protein adsorption and platelets adhesion experiments indicated that the grafted PGAMA could effectively improve the membrane antifouling property and biocompatibility.

  8. Direct formation of gold nanorods on surfaces using polymer-immobilised gold seeds.

    PubMed

    Abyaneh, Majid K; Parisse, Pietro; Casalis, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we present the formation of gold nanorods (GNRs) on novel gold-poly(methyl methacrylate) (Au-PMMA) nanocomposite substrates with unprecedented growth control through the polymer molecular weight (M w) and gold-salt-to-polymer weight ratio. For the first time, GNRs have been produced by seed-mediated direct growth on surfaces that were pre-coated with polymer-immobilised gold seeds. A Au-PMMA nanocomposite formed by UV photoreduction has been used as the gold seed. The influence of polymer M w and gold concentration on the formation of GNRs has been investigated and discussed. The polymer nanocomposite formed with a lower M w PMMA and 20 wt % gold salt provides a suitable medium for growing well-dispersed GNRs. In this sample, the average dimension of produced GNRs is 200 nm in length with aspect ratios up to 10 and a distribution of GNRs to nanoparticles of nearly 22%. Suitable characterization techniques such as AFM and SEM have been used to support concept of the proposed growth method. PMID:27547597

  9. Direct measurement of energy barriers on rough and heterogeneous solid surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, T.B.; LaGow, J.; Connelly, G.M.

    1996-12-31

    This paper will deal with the phenomenon of energy barriers to the spread of liquids on solids. These barriers often manifest themselves as a {open_quotes}pinning{close_quotes} of a sessile drop as liquid is added to it. That is, the volume of the drop increases, but the diameter does not. Thus the advancing contact angle ({theta}{sub a}) increases to a maximum. At the point where the hydrostatic pressure in the drop overcomes the {open_quotes}pinning{close_quotes} force the diameter suddenly increases and the drop relaxes to a metastable configuration which has a lower {theta}{sub a}. Energy barriers should be considered in many applications such as the spreading of liquid adhesives where thorough wetting is the goal. The interfacial forces involved are both long-range Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) forces and short-range acid-base (AB) forces. The authors will describe how they measure the energy barriers on real surfaces directly and resolve them into their LW and AB components.

  10. Mixing of two co-directional Rayleigh surface waves in a nonlinear elastic material.

    PubMed

    Morlock, Merlin B; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J; Qu, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    The mixing of two co-directional, initially monochromatic Rayleigh surface waves in an isotropic, homogeneous, and nonlinear elastic solid is investigated using analytical, finite element method, and experimental approaches. The analytical investigations show that while the horizontal velocity component can form a shock wave, the vertical velocity component can form a pulse independent of the specific ratios of the fundamental frequencies and amplitudes that are mixed. This analytical model is then used to simulate the development of the fundamentals, second harmonics, and the sum and difference frequency components over the propagation distance. The analytical model is further extended to include diffraction effects in the parabolic approximation. Finally, the frequency and amplitude ratios of the fundamentals are identified which provide maximum amplitudes of the second harmonics as well as of the sum and difference frequency components, to help guide effective material characterization; this approach should make it possible to measure the acoustic nonlinearity of a solid not only with the second harmonics, but also with the sum and difference frequency components. Results of the analytical investigations are then confirmed using the finite element method and the experimental feasibility of the proposed technique is validated for an aluminum specimen. PMID:25618059

  11. HFE and transferrin directly compete for transferrin receptor in solution and at the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Giannetti, Anthony M; Björkman, Pamela J

    2004-06-11

    Transferrin receptor (TfR) is a dimeric cell surface protein that binds both the serum iron transport protein transferrin (Fe-Tf) and HFE, the protein mutated in patients with the iron overload disorder hereditary hemochromatosis. HFE and Fe-Tf can bind simultaneously to TfR to form a ternary complex, but HFE binding to TfR lowers the apparent affinity of the Fe-Tf/TfR interaction. This apparent affinity reduction could result from direct competition between HFE and Fe-Tf for their overlapping binding sites on each TfR polypeptide chain, from negative cooperativity, or from a combination of both. To explore the mechanism of the affinity reduction, we constructed a heterodimeric TfR that contains mutations such that one TfR chain binds only HFE and the other binds only Fe-Tf. Binding studies using a heterodimeric form of soluble TfR demonstrate that TfR does not exhibit cooperativity in heterotropic ligand binding, suggesting that some or all of the effects of HFE on iron homeostasis result from competition with Fe-Tf for TfR binding. Experiments using transfected cell lines demonstrate a physiological role for this competition in altering HFE trafficking patterns. PMID:15056661

  12. Surface Patterning of Silica Nanostructures Using Bio-Inspired Templates and Directed Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Coffman, Elizabeth A; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Allison, David P; Simpson, Michael L; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2004-01-01

    Natural systems excel in directing the synthesis of inorganic materials for various functional purposes. One of the best-studied systems is silica synthesis, as occurs in diatoms and marine sponges. Various biological and synthetic polymers have been shown to template and catalyze silica formation from silicic acid precursors. Here, we describe the use of poly-l-lysine to promote the synthesis of silica in neutral, aqueous solution and when immobilized onto a silicon support structure under similar conditions. Either reagent jetting or conventional photolithography techniques can be used to pattern the templating polymer. Spots created by reagent jetting led to the creation of silica structures in the shape of a ring that may be a result of the spotting process. Photolithographically defined poly-l-lysine spots led to thin laminate structures after exposure to a dilute aqueous silicic acid solution. The laminate structures were nanostructured and highly interconnected. Photolithographic patterning of (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane, a reagent that mimics the lysine functional group, led to similar silica coatings even though low-molecular-weight materials do not rapidly promote silica synthesis in solution. This result highlights the importance of functional-group arrangement for templating and promoting the synthesis of inorganic materials. The described surface-patterning techniques offer a route to integrate conventional silicon-patterning technologies with biologically based material synthesis. Such combined fabrication techniques enable controlled assembly over multiple length scales and an approach to understanding interfacial silica synthesis, as occurs in natural systems.

  13. First report of a direct surface plasmon resonance immunosensor for a small molecule seafood toxin.

    PubMed

    Yakes, Betsy Jean; Kanyuck, Kelsey M; DeGrasse, Stacey L

    2014-09-16

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX), a small molecular weight neurotoxin, is responsible for poisoning events that traditionally occur from consumption of contaminated puffer fish. Recent studies have shown a growing number of foods contaminated with TTX and a larger number of waters and associated countries where the toxin may occur. The apparent expanding prevalence of TTX supports a growing need for screening assays that can be used to detect potentially harmful food. In the past few years, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors have been developed for rapid, robust detection of TTX; however, these assays focus on detection of unbound antibody from an inhibition reaction with the toxin. This manuscript introduces the first direct immunoassay for a seafood toxin, specifically TTX. Major advantages of this assay compared to indirect assays include increased speed of analysis, decreased use of biological reagents, and improved confidence in the detection of the toxin, along with the ability to characterize the antibody/toxin interaction. The analytical method introduced in this paper could be applied to other seafood toxins, as well as to a wide range of low molecular weight targets.

  14. Elucidation of Peptide-Directed Palladium Surface Structure for Biologically Tunable Nanocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, Nicholas M.; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Slocik, Joseph M.; Briggs, Beverly D.; Ren, Yang; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Petkov, Valeri; Heinz, Hendrik; Naik, Rajesh R.; Knecht, Mark R.

    2015-05-01

    Peptide-enabled synthesis of inorganic nanostructures represents an avenue to access catalytic materials with tunable and optimized properties. This is achieved via peptide complexity and programmability that is missing in traditional ligands for catalytic nanomaterials. Unfortunately, there is limited information available to correlate peptide sequence to particle structure and catalytic activity to date. As such, the application of peptide-enabled nanocatalysts remains limited to trial and error approaches. In this paper, a hybrid experimental and computational approach is introduced to systematically elucidate biomolecule-dependent structure/function relationships for peptide-capped Pd nanocatalysts. Synchrotron X-ray techniques were used to uncover substantial particle surface structural disorder, which was dependent upon the amino acid sequence of the peptide capping ligand. Nanocatalyst configurations were then determined directly from experimental data using reverse Monte Carlo methods and further refined using molecular dynamics simulation, obtaining thermodynamically stable peptide-Pd nanoparticle configurations. Sequence-dependent catalytic property differences for C-C coupling and olefin hydrogenation were then eluddated by identification of the catalytic active sites at the atomic level and quantitative prediction of relative reaction rates. This hybrid methodology provides a clear route to determine peptide-dependent structure/function relationships, enabling the generation of guidelines for catalyst design through rational tailoring of peptide sequences

  15. Terahertz surface plasmons propagation through periodically tilted pillars and control on directional properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Maidul; Kumar, Gagan

    2016-11-01

    We investigate a terahertz (THz) plasmonic waveguide using periodically arranged tilted pillars and control the propagation properties of the guided modes with the bending of pillars. A metal surface approximated as a perfect electrical conductor at terahertz frequencies is periodically corrugated with sub-wavelength scale tilted pillars thereby forming a plasmonic waveguide. The tilted pillars plasmonic waveguide supports highly confined guided terahertz modes at specific frequencies depending upon the pillar dimensions. We confirm the propagation of terahertz modes through a semi-analytical model that we employ specifically for our geometry. We observe that the propagation properties of the terahertz modes can be controlled by changing the bending of the pillars. We have examined in detail, the propagation properties of the guided modes for different angles and direction through which the pillars are tilted. We further examine terahertz waveguides comprising of pillars with increasing height and investigate their ability in confining terahertz waves at a certain position where the resonant frequency of a pillar matches with the incident frequency.

  16. Direct design of two freeform optical surfaces for wide field of view line imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yunfeng; Thienpont, Hugo; Duerr, Fabian

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-fields direct design method aiming to calculate two freeform surfaces with an entrance pupil incorporated for wide field of view on-axis line imaging applications. Both infinite and finite conjugate objectives can be designed with this approach. Since a wide angle imaging system requires more than few discrete perfect imaging points, the multi-fields design approach is based on partial coupling of multiple fields, which guarantees a much more balanced imaging performance over the full field of view. The optical path lengths (OPLs) and image points of numerous off-axis fields are calculated during the procedure, thus very few initial parameters are needed. The procedure to calculate such a freeform lens is explained in detail. We have designed an exemplary monochromatic single lens to demonstrate the functionality of the design method. A rotationally symmetric counterpart following the same specifications is compared in terms of RMS spot radius to demonstrate the clear benefit that freeform lens brings to on-axis line imaging systems. In addition, a practical achromatic wide angle objective is designed by combining our multi-fields design method with classic optical design strategies, serving as a very good starting point for further optimization in a commercial optical design program. The results from the perspective of aberrations plots and MTF values show a very good and well balanced performance over the full field of view.

  17. Direct molecular simulation of nitrogen dissociation based on an ab initio potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Paolo Schwartzentruber, Thomas E. Bender, Jason D. Nompelis, Ioannis Candler, Graham V.

    2015-08-15

    The direct molecular simulation (DMS) approach is used to predict the internal energy relaxation and dissociation dynamics of high-temperature nitrogen. An ab initio potential energy surface (PES) is used to calculate the dynamics of two interacting nitrogen molecules by providing forces between the four atoms. In the near-equilibrium limit, it is shown that DMS reproduces the results obtained from well-established quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) analysis, verifying the validity of the approach. DMS is used to predict the vibrational relaxation time constant for N{sub 2}–N{sub 2} collisions and its temperature dependence, which are in close agreement with existing experiments and theory. Using both QCT and DMS with the same PES, we find that dissociation significantly depletes the upper vibrational energy levels. As a result, across a wide temperature range, the dissociation rate is found to be approximately 4–5 times lower compared to the rates computed using QCT with Boltzmann energy distributions. DMS calculations predict a quasi-steady-state distribution of rotational and vibrational energies in which the rate of depletion of high-energy states due to dissociation is balanced by their rate of repopulation due to collisional processes. The DMS approach simulates the evolution of internal energy distributions and their coupling to dissociation without the need to precompute rates or cross sections for all possible energy transitions. These benchmark results could be used to develop new computational fluid dynamics models for high-enthalpy flow applications.

  18. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flow in a channel with different types of surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnov, Igor A.

    2011-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) was performed for turbulent channel flow (Reτ = 400) for two types of wall surface roughness and well as smooth walls. The roughness elements of first type were assumed to be two-dimensional, transverse square rods positioned on both walls in a non-staggered arrangement. The height of the rods corresponds to y+ = 13.6 and thus extends in the buffer layer. The second type of roughness was represented by a set of hemispherical obstacles (height of y+ = 10) located on both channel walls and arranged on a square lattice. The presented simulations are part of benchmark problems defined by thermal-hydraulics focus area of the Consortium for Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL). This problem simulates the effect of the presence of growing bubbles on the walls of nuclear reactor fuel rods and aimed on evaluating CFD capabilities of various codes before applying them to more advanced problems. Mean turbulent quantities were computed and compared with available analytical and experimental results. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the performance of other LES and RANS codes on this benchmark problem. Supported by Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL).

  19. Direct formation of gold nanorods on surfaces using polymer-immobilised gold seeds

    PubMed Central

    Parisse, Pietro; Casalis, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    Summary Herein, we present the formation of gold nanorods (GNRs) on novel gold–poly(methyl methacrylate) (Au–PMMA) nanocomposite substrates with unprecedented growth control through the polymer molecular weight (M w) and gold-salt-to-polymer weight ratio. For the first time, GNRs have been produced by seed-mediated direct growth on surfaces that were pre-coated with polymer-immobilised gold seeds. A Au–PMMA nanocomposite formed by UV photoreduction has been used as the gold seed. The influence of polymer M w and gold concentration on the formation of GNRs has been investigated and discussed. The polymer nanocomposite formed with a lower M w PMMA and 20 wt % gold salt provides a suitable medium for growing well-dispersed GNRs. In this sample, the average dimension of produced GNRs is 200 nm in length with aspect ratios up to 10 and a distribution of GNRs to nanoparticles of nearly 22%. Suitable characterization techniques such as AFM and SEM have been used to support concept of the proposed growth method. PMID:27547597

  20. A computational study of multiple surface-directed phase separation in polymer blends under a temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaieyazdi, Mohammad; Chan, Philip K.; Wu, Jiangning

    2015-10-01

    The surface-directed phase separation (SDPS) phenomena of a model binary polymer blend quenched into the unstable region of its binary symmetric upper critical solution temperature phase diagram is numerically investigated using a mathematical model composed of the nonlinear Cahn-Hilliard (CH) theory for phase separation along with the Flory-Huggins-de Gennes (FHdG) free energy functional. The SDPS occurs in a square domain with a linear temperature gradient along the horizontal direction and with all sides having short range surface potential h 1. The effects of different quench depth, diffusion coefficient, surface potential, and temperature gradient were studied numerically. The numerical results indicate that there is a simultaneous competition between the four surfaces in attracting the preferred polymer. The side with a higher surface potential would win the competition against the side with a lower surface attraction in the case of a uniform quench. The numerical results also indicated a later transition time for higher values of h 1. As surface potential increased, the transition time from complete wetting to partial wetting occurred at a later time on the surface. The impact of different temperature gradient ΔT*/Δx* values on the surface enrichment rate with fixed temperature {{T}1}* at one surface and higher temperature {{T}2}* at the opposite surface was studied for the first time within a multiple surface potential set up. The results showed that higher values of ΔT*/Δx* increased the growth rate of the preferred polymer on the surface adding to the thickness of the wetting layer. The transition time from complete wetting to partial wetting occurred slightly later at the lower temperature side.

  1. Direct Patterning of Organic Self-Assembled Monolayer (SAM) on GaAs Surfaces via Dip-Pen Nanolithography (DPN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Peng; Keiper, Timothy; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Jianhua

    2015-03-01

    Hybrid structures of functional molecules and solid-state (SS) materials have attracted extensive interest in surface nanoscience and molecular electronics. The formation and micro/nano patterning of organic SAMs on SS surfaces are a key step in fabricating such devices. Here we report realization of high quality MHA SAMs on GaAs and direct formation of micro/nanoscale patterns of MHA SAM on the surface by micro-contact printing (μ CP) and DPN. The process begins with the preparation of an oxide-free surface of GaAs, for which we employed treatment by an ammonium polysulfide ((NH4)2 Sx) solution. The treatment strips native oxides from GaAs creating an atomic layer of sulfur covalently bonded to the fresh surface. Formation of high-quality SAMs of thiol molecules on GaAs then proceeds through exchange of the sulfur and the thiol terminal of the molecules. The effects of the sulfur-passivation and formation of MHA SAM on the treated surface were confirmed by XPS, HRTEM, and DPN. To the best of our knowledge, this is a first realization of direct DPN of nanoscale organic SAM on a semiconductor free of surface oxide. We further evidence the utility of the hybrid platform by demonstrating directed self-assembly of Au nanoparticles onto MHA/ODT SAM templates on GaAs.

  2. Vector magnetometry and lightwave defect imaging sensor technologies for internal pipe inspection systems: Phase 1 and 2 feasibility study, conceptual design, and prototype development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Steven; Fowler, Thomas; Peters, Edward; Power, Wendy; Reed, Michael

    1994-01-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) has been sponsoring the development of a vehicle and sensors for an integrated nondestructive internal inspection system for natural gas distribution pipes. Arthur D. Little has developed two sensor technologies; Vector Magnetometry (VM) and Lightwave Defect Imaging (LDI) for the system.The Vector Magnetometry sensor utilizes multiple arrays of miniature detection coils (fluxgate magnetometer elements): a three-axis array measures both the amplitude and phase of the magnetic leakage field that occurs in the vicinity of pipe wall defects. This technology is applicable to both cast iron and steel pipe.

  3. Direct releases to the surface and associated complementary cumulative distribution functions in the 1996 performance assessments for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Direct brine release

    SciTech Connect

    STOELZEL,D.M.; O'BRIEN,D.G.; GARNER,J.W.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; JOHNSON,J.D.; SCOTT,L.N.

    2000-05-19

    The following topics related to the treatment of direct brine releases to the surface environment in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are presented (1) mathematical description of models, (2) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results arising from subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty for individual releases, (3) construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) arising from stochastic (i.e., aleatory) uncertainty, and (4) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for CCDFs. The presented analyses indicate that direct brine releases do not constitute a serious threat to the effectiveness of the WIPP as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. Even when the effects of uncertain analysis inputs are taken into account, the CCDFs for direct brine releases fall substantially to the left of the boundary line specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (4O CFR 191.40 CFR 194).

  4. Low-temperature direct copper-to-copper bonding enabled by creep on (111) surfaces of nanotwinned Cu

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chien-Min; Lin, Han-Wen; Huang, Yi-Sa; Chu, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Chih; Lyu, Dian-Rong; Chen, Kuan-Neng; Tu, King-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Direct Cu-to-Cu bonding was achieved at temperatures of 150–250 °C using a compressive stress of 100 psi (0.69 MPa) held for 10–60 min at 10−3 torr. The key controlling parameter for direct bonding is rapid surface diffusion on (111) surface of Cu. Instead of using (111) oriented single crystal of Cu, oriented (111) texture of extremely high degree, exceeding 90%, was fabricated using the oriented nano-twin Cu. The bonded interface between two (111) surfaces forms a twist-type grain boundary. If the grain boundary has a low angle, it has a hexagonal network of screw dislocations. Such network image was obtained by plan-view transmission electron microscopy. A simple kinetic model of surface creep is presented; and the calculated and measured time of bonding is in reasonable agreement. PMID:25962757

  5. World record in high speed laser surface microstructuring of polymer and steel using direct laser interference patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Valentin; Roch, Teja; Lasagni, Andrés. F.

    2016-03-01

    Periodic surfaces structures with micrometer or submicrometer resolution produced on the surface of components can be used to improve their mechanical, biological or optical properties. In particular, these surfaces can control the tribological performance of parts, for instance in the automotive industry. In the last years, substantial efforts have been made to develop new technologies capable to produce functionalized surfaces. One of these technologies is the Direct Laser Interference Patterning (DLIP) technology, which permits to combine high fabrication speed with high resolution even in the sub-micrometer range. In DLIP, a laser beam is split into two or more coherent beams which are guided to interfere on the work piece surface. This causes modulated laser intensities over the component's surface, enabling the direct fabrication of a periodic pattern based on selective laser ablation or melting. Depending on the angle between the laser beams and the wavelength of the laser, the pattern's spatial period can be perfectly controlled. In this study, we introduce new modular DLIP optical heads, developed at the Fraunhofer IWS and the Technische Universität Dresden for high-speed surface laser patterning of polymers and metals. For the first time it is shown that effective patterning speeds of up to 0.90 m2/min and 0.36 m2/min are possible on polymer and metals, respectively. Line- and dot-like surface architectures with spatial periods between 7 μm and 22 μm are shown.

  6. Studies of selected voids. Surface photometry of faint galaxies in the direction of 1600+18 in Hercules void.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Georgi

    Surface photometry, coordinates, magnitudes m(B), diameters, position angles and some morphological parameters are presented for ca. 1850 faint galaxies in a field of one square degree centered at 1600+18 (1950) (Hercules void). The distribution of the magnitudes of the galaxies in this direction is compared with ''Log Normal'' and ''Gauss'' ones and with similar results from SDDS studies of galaxies. Some candidates for primeval galaxies -- 38 large Low surface brightness galaxies were detected in the direction of the void. Major axes luminosity profiles are analyzed. Comparison between two different methods for automatic selection and classification -- a new package, based on MIDAS INVENTORY and SExtractor packages have been made.

  7. Direct vs. indirect pathway for nitrobenzene reduction reaction on a Ni catalyst surface: a density functional study.

    PubMed

    Mahata, Arup; Rai, Rohit K; Choudhuri, Indrani; Singh, Sanjay K; Pathak, Biswarup

    2014-12-21

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to understand and address the previous experimental results that showed the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline prefers direct over indirect reaction pathways irrespective of the catalyst surface. Nitrobenzene to aniline conversion occurs via the hydroxyl amine intermediate (direct pathway) or via the azoxybenzene intermediate (indirect pathway). Through our computational study we calculated the spin polarized and dispersion corrected reaction energies and activation barriers corresponding to various reaction pathways for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline over a Ni catalyst surface. The adsorption behaviour of the substrate, nitrobenzene, on the catalyst surface was also considered and the energetically most preferable structural orientation was elucidated. Our study indicates that the parallel adsorption behaviour of the molecules over a catalyst surface is preferable over vertical adsorption behaviour. Based on the reaction energies and activation barrier of the various elementary steps involved in direct or indirect reaction pathways, we find that the direct reduction pathway of nitrobenzene over the Ni(111) catalyst surface is more favourable than the indirect reaction pathway. PMID:25367892

  8. Novel GaAs surface phases via direct control of chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, C. X.; Tersoff, J.; Tang, W. X.; Morreau, A.; Jesson, D. E.

    2016-05-01

    Using in situ surface electron microscopy, we show that the surface chemical potential of GaAs (001), and hence the surface phase, can be systematically controlled by varying temperature with liquid Ga droplets present as Ga reservoirs. With decreasing temperature, the surface approaches equilibrium with liquid Ga. This provides access to a regime where we find phases ultrarich in Ga, extending the range of surface phases available in this technologically important system. The same behavior is expected to occur for similar binary or multicomponent semiconductors such as InGaAs.

  9. Nanofiber-modified surface directed cell migration and orientation in microsystem

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Gao, Xinghua; Jiang, Lei; Zhang, Xulang; Qin, Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    Cell-microscale pattern surface interactions are crucial to understand many fundamental biological questions and develop regenerative medicine and tissue engineering approaches. In this work, we demonstrated a simple method to pattern PDMS surface by sacrificing poly vinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) electrospinning nanofibers and investigated the growth profile of cells on the modified patterned surfaces using stroma cells. The stromal cells were observed to exhibit good viability on this modified surface and the patterned surface with alignment nanofibers could promote cell migration. Furthermore, the modified PDMS surface was integrated with microfluidic channels to create the microscale spatial factor and was used to explore the cell migration and orientation under this microsystem. Both spatial factor and patterned surfaces were found to contribute to the complex cell orientation under the combined dual effects. This established method is simple, fast, and easy for use, demonstrating the potential of this microsystem for applications in addressing biological questions in complex environment. PMID:22662030

  10. Laboratory investigation and direct numerical simulation of wind effect on steep surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Druzhinin, Oleg; Ermakova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    particles 20 μm in diameter were injected into the airflow. The images of the illuminated particles were photographed with a digital CCD video camera at a rate of 1000 frames per second. For the each given parameters of wind and waves, a statistical ensemble of 30 movies with duration from 200 to 600 ms was obtained. Individual flow realizations manifested the typical features of flow separation, while the average vector velocity fields obtained by the phase averaging of the individual vector fields were smooth and slightly asymmetrical, with the minimum of the horizontal velocity near the water surface shifted to the leeward side of the wave profile, but do not demonstrate the features of flow separation. The wave-induced pressure perturbations, averaged over the turbulent fluctuations, were retrieved from the measured velocity fields, using the Reynolds equations. It ensures sufficient accuracy for study of the dependence of the wave increment on the wave amplitude. The dependences of the wave growth rate on the wave steepness are weakly decreasing, serving as indirect proof of the non-separated character of flow over waves. Also direct numerical simulation of the airflow over finite amplitude periodic surface wave was performed. In the experiments the primitive 3-dimensional fluid mechanics equations were solved in the airflow over curved water boundary for the following parameters: the Reynolds number Re=15000, the wave steepness ka=0-0.2, the parameter c/u*=0-10 (where u* is the friction velocity and c is the wave celerity). Similar to the physical experiment the instant realizations of the velocity field demonstrate flow separation at the crests of the waves, but the ensemble averaged velocity fields had typical structures similar to those excising in shear flows near critical levels, where the phase velocity of the disturbance coincides with the flow velocity. The wind growth rate determined by the ensemble averaged wave-induced pressure component in phase of the

  11. Correlation between surface morphology and electrical properties of VO2 films grown by direct thermal oxidation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Joonseok; Park, Changwoo; Park, Sungkyun; Mun, Bongjin Simon; Ju, Honglyoul

    2015-10-01

    We investigate surface morphology and electrical properties of VO2 films fabricated by direct thermal oxidation method. The VO2 film prepared with oxidation temperature at 580 °C exhibits excellent qualities of VO2 characteristics, e.g. a metal-insulator transition (MIT) near 67 °C, a resistivity ratio of ∼2.3 × 104, and a bandgap of 0.7 eV. The analysis of surface morphology with electrical resistivity of VO2 films reveals that the transport properties of VO2 films are closely related to the grain size and surface roughness that vary with oxidation annealing temperatures.

  12. Laboratory investigation and direct numerical simulation of wind effect on steep surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Druzhinin, Oleg; Ermakova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    particles 20 μm in diameter were injected into the airflow. The images of the illuminated particles were photographed with a digital CCD video camera at a rate of 1000 frames per second. For the each given parameters of wind and waves, a statistical ensemble of 30 movies with duration from 200 to 600 ms was obtained. Individual flow realizations manifested the typical features of flow separation, while the average vector velocity fields obtained by the phase averaging of the individual vector fields were smooth and slightly asymmetrical, with the minimum of the horizontal velocity near the water surface shifted to the leeward side of the wave profile, but do not demonstrate the features of flow separation. The wave-induced pressure perturbations, averaged over the turbulent fluctuations, were retrieved from the measured velocity fields, using the Reynolds equations. It ensures sufficient accuracy for study of the dependence of the wave increment on the wave amplitude. The dependences of the wave growth rate on the wave steepness are weakly decreasing, serving as indirect proof of the non-separated character of flow over waves. Also direct numerical simulation of the airflow over finite amplitude periodic surface wave was performed. In the experiments the primitive 3-dimensional fluid mechanics equations were solved in the airflow over curved water boundary for the following parameters: the Reynolds number Re=15000, the wave steepness ka=0-0.2, the parameter c/u*=0-10 (where u* is the friction velocity and c is the wave celerity). Similar to the physical experiment the instant realizations of the velocity field demonstrate flow separation at the crests of the waves, but the ensemble averaged velocity fields had typical structures similar to those excising in shear flows near critical levels, where the phase velocity of the disturbance coincides with the flow velocity. The wind growth rate determined by the ensemble averaged wave-induced pressure component in phase of the

  13. ZnO nanostructures directly grown on paper and bacterial cellulose substrates without any surface modification layer.

    PubMed

    Costa, Saionara V; Gonçalves, Agnaldo S; Zaguete, Maria A; Mazon, Talita; Nogueira, Ana F

    2013-09-21

    In this report, hierarchical ZnO nano- and microstructures were directly grown for the first time on a bacterial cellulose substrate and on two additional different papers by hydrothermal synthesis without any surface modification layer. Compactness and smoothness of the substrates are two important parameters that allow the growth of oriented structures. PMID:23912253

  14. Length-scale mediated adhesion and directed growth of neural cells by surface-patterned poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Krsko, Peter; McCann, Thomas E; Thach, Thu-Trang; Laabs, Tracy L; Geller, Herbert M; Libera, Matthew R

    2009-02-01

    We engineered surfaces that permit the adhesion and directed growth of neuronal cell processes but that prevent the adhesion of astrocytes. This effect was achieved based on the spatial distribution of sub-micron-sized cell-repulsive poly(ethylene glycol) [PEG] hydrogels patterned on an otherwise cell-adhesive substrate. Patterns were identified that promoted cellular responses ranging from complete non-attachment, selective attachment, and directed growth at both cellular and subcellular length scales. At the highest patterning density where the individual hydrogels almost overlapped, there was no cellular adhesion. As the spacing between individual hydrogels was increased, patterns were identified where neurites could grow on the adhesive surface between hydrogels while astrocytes were unable to adhere. Patterns such as lines or arrays were identified that could direct the growth of these subcellular neuronal processes. At higher hydrogel spacings, both neurons and astrocytes adhered and grew in a manner approaching that of unpatterned control surfaces. Patterned lines could once again direct growth at cellular length scales. Significantly, we have demonstrated that the patterning of sub-micron/nano scale cell-repulsive features at microscale lengths on an otherwise cell-adhesive surface can differently control the adhesion and growth of cells and cell processes based on the difference in their characteristic sizes. This concept could potentially be applied to an implantable nerve-guidance device that would selectively enable regrowing axons to bridge a spinal-cord injury without interference from the glial scar.

  15. Length-Scale Mediated Adhesion and Directed Growth of Neural Cells by Surface-Patterned Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Krsko, Peter; McCann, Thomas; Thach, Thu-Trang; Laabs, Tracy; Geller, Herbert M.; Libera, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    We engineered surfaces that permit the adhesion and directed growth of neuronal cell processes – axons – but that prevent the adhesion of astrocytes. This effect was achieved based on the spatial distribution of cell-repulsive poly(ethylene glycol) [PEG] nanohydrogels patterned on an otherwise cell-adhesive substrate. Patterns were identified that promoted cellular responses ranging from complete non-attachment, selective attachment, and directed growth at both cellular and subcellular length scales. At the highest patterning density where the individual nanohydrogels almost overlapped, there was no cellular adhesion. As the spacing between individual nanohydrogels was increased, patterns were identified where axons could grow on the adhesive surface between nanohydrogels while astrocytes were unable to adhere. Patterns such as lines or arrays were identified that could direct the growth of these subcellular neuronal processes. At higher nanohydrogel spacings, both neurons and astrocytes adhered and grew in a manner approaching that of unpatterned control surfaces. Patterned lines could once again direct growth at cellular length scales. Significantly, we have demonstrated that the patterning of nanoscale cell-repulsive features at microscale lengths on an otherwise cell-adhesive surface can differently control the adhesion and growth of cells and cell processes based on the difference in their characteristic sizes. This concept could potentially be applied to an implantable nerve-guidance device that would selectively enable regrowing axons to bridge a spinal-cord injury without interference from the glial scar. PMID:19026443

  16. Solvent Separating Secondary Metabolites Directly from Biosynthetic Tissue for Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, David; Benkendorff, Kirsten; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2015-01-01

    Marine bioactive metabolites are often heterogeneously expressed in tissues both spatially and over time. Therefore, traditional solvent extraction methods benefit from an understanding of the in situ sites of biosynthesis and storage to deal with heterogeneity and maximize yield. Recently, surface-assisted mass spectrometry (MS) methods namely nanostructure-assisted laser desorption ionisation (NALDI) and desorption ionisation on porous silicon (DIOS) surfaces have been developed to enable the direct detection of low molecular weight metabolites. Since direct tissue NALDI-MS or DIOS-MS produce complex spectra due to the wide variety of other metabolites and fragments present in the low mass range, we report here the use of “on surface” solvent separation directly from mollusc tissue onto nanostructured surfaces for MS analysis, as a mechanism for simplifying data annotation and detecting possible artefacts from compound delocalization during the preparative steps. Water, ethanol, chloroform and hexane selectively extracted a range of choline esters, brominated indoles and lipids from Dicathais orbita hypobranchial tissue imprints. These compounds could be quantified on the nanostructured surfaces by comparison to standard curves generated from the pure compounds. Surface-assisted MS could have broad utility for detecting a broad range of secondary metabolites in complex marine tissue samples. PMID:25786067

  17. Constructive, Collaborative, Contextual, and Self-Directed Learning in Surface Anatomy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Esther M.; Sieben, Judith M.; Smailbegovic, Ida; de Bruin, Anique B. H.; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy education often consists of a combination of lectures and laboratory sessions, the latter frequently including surface anatomy. Studying surface anatomy enables students to elaborate on their knowledge of the cadaver's static anatomy by enabling the visualization of structures, especially those of the musculoskeletal system, move and…

  18. Direct Observation of Strain-Induced Change in Surface Electronic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiba, Daiichiro; Nakatsuji, Kan; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Komori, Fumio

    2005-01-01

    We have observed a novel modification of a surface state due to a local strain field induced by a nanopattern formation. N adsorption on the Cu(100) surface induces a nanoscale grid pattern, where the clean Cu regions remain periodically. The lattice is contracted on the clean region by adjacent c(2×2)N domains, which have a larger lattice constant. On this patterned surface, we have investigated the Tamm-type surface state at M¯ by means of angle-resolved ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The binding energy of the Tamm state shifts toward the Fermi level continuously with increasing N coverage, i.e., the intensity of the strain field. This behavior due to the strain field is completely different from that caused by electron confinement observed on vicinal surfaces. The Brillouin zone extension corresponding to the lattice contraction was also detected.

  19. Quantitative surface topography assessment of directly compressed and roller compacted tablet cores using photometric stereo image analysis.

    PubMed

    Allesø, Morten; Holm, Per; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Holm, René

    2016-05-25

    Surface topography, in the context of surface smoothness/roughness, was investigated by the use of an image analysis technique, MultiRay™, related to photometric stereo, on different tablet batches manufactured either by direct compression or roller compaction. In the present study, oblique illumination of the tablet (darkfield) was considered and the area of cracks and pores in the surface was used as a measure of tablet surface topography; the higher a value, the rougher the surface. The investigations demonstrated a high precision of the proposed technique, which was able to rapidly (within milliseconds) and quantitatively measure the obtained surface topography of the produced tablets. Compaction history, in the form of applied roll force and tablet punch pressure, was also reflected in the measured smoothness of the tablet surfaces. Generally it was found that a higher degree of plastic deformation of the microcrystalline cellulose resulted in a smoother tablet surface. This altogether demonstrated that the technique provides the pharmaceutical developer with a reliable, quantitative response parameter for visual appearance of solid dosage forms, which may be used for process and ultimately product optimization.

  20. Mathematical Modeling of Surface Roughness of Castings Produced Using ZCast Direct Metal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabra, M.; Singh, R.

    2015-04-01

    Aim of this investigation is to develop a mathematical model for predicting surface roughness of castings produced using ZCast process by employing Buckingham's π-theorem. A relationship has been proposed between surface roughness of castings and shell wall thickness of the shell moulds fabricated using 3D printer. Based on model, experiments were performed to obtain the surface roughness of aluminium, brass and copper castings produced using ZCast process based on 3D printing technique. Based on experimental data, three best fitted third-degree polynomial equations have been established for predicting the surface roughness of castings. The predicted surface roughness values were then calculated using established best fitted equations. An error analysis was performed to compare the experimental and predicted data. The average prediction errors obtained for aluminium, brass and copper castings are 10.6, 2.43 and 3.12 % respectively. The obtained average surface roughness (experimental and predicted) values of castings produced are acceptable with the sand cast surface roughness values range (6.25-25 µm).

  1. Direct monophasic replacement of fatty acid by DMSA on SPION surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, M.; Deb, P.; Vasan, G.; Keil, P.; Kostka, A.; Erbe, A.

    2012-10-01

    Tailoring the surface and understanding the surface characteristics is necessary for biomedical applications of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. In this paper, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were prepared by thermal decomposition of iron nitrate in presence of stearic acid as surfactant. Due to the multilayer organization of surfactant molecules over the nanoparticle surface, the surface potential can be tuned by pH changes and hence the nanoparticles can be made dispersible in nonpolar as well as in polar solvents. We have presented a simple, facile procedure for controlled replacement of stearic acid from maghemite surface and subsequent derivatization by biocompatible dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) to obtain ultrastable hydrophilic nanoparticles with unaltered morphology, phase and properties. The surface chemistry of the functionalized SPIONs was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealing the presence of bound and unbound thiol groups and disulfides, leading to its prolonged stability in aqueous medium. The consequence of spatially selective functionalization on the stability and solubility of surface hydrophilic SPION has also been realized.

  2. The influence of laser and powder defocusing characteristics on the surface quality in laser direct metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Gangxian; Li, Dichen; Zhang, Anfeng; Pi, Gang; Tang, Yiping

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the influencing rules of the variations of powder and laser defocusing distance on surface quality and obtain the smooth surface of parts in laser direct metal deposition, the thin-walled metal parts were fabricated under three different powder defocusing distances and three different laser defocusing distances conditions. The experimental results show that a high surface quality can be obtained with the powder focussed below the substrate and laser focussed above the substrate process, and the variation in which the powder focus moves from above to below the melt pool plays a leading role and the variation in which the laser focus moves from above to below the melt pool plays a supplementary role in the influence on the surface quality. To explain the experimental results, a simple model of the track height is established.

  3. Direct first-principles simulation of a high-performance electron emitter: Lithium-oxide-coated diamond surface

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki Miyazaki, Takehide; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2014-09-28

    We examined the field emission properties of lithium(Li)/oxygen(O)-co-terminated diamond (001) surface [C(001)-LiO] through real-time electron dynamics simulation under an applied field. The current emitted from this surface was found to be more than four-fold that emitted by an H-terminated (001) surface, the latter being a typical negative electron affinity system. This high performance is attributed to the Li layer, which bends the potential wall of O-induced electron pockets down in the direction of vacuum, thus facilitating electron emission. Detailed analysis of the emitted electrons and the profile of the self-consistent potential elucidated that the role of O atoms changes from an electron barrier on OH-terminated diamond surfaces to an outlet for electron emission on C(001)-LiO.

  4. Native Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Mass Spectrometry: Analysis of Noncovalent Protein Complexes Directly from Dried Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicholas J.; Griffiths, Rian L.; Edwards, Rebecca L.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2015-08-01

    Liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) mass spectrometry is a promising tool for the analysis of intact proteins from biological substrates. Here, we demonstrate native LESA mass spectrometry of noncovalent protein complexes of myoglobin and hemoglobin from a range of surfaces. Holomyoglobin, in which apomyoglobin is noncovalently bound to the prosthetic heme group, was observed following LESA mass spectrometry of myoglobin dried onto glass and polyvinylidene fluoride surfaces. Tetrameric hemoglobin [(αβ)2 4H] was observed following LESA mass spectrometry of hemoglobin dried onto glass and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) surfaces, and from dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper. Heme-bound dimers and monomers were also observed. The `contact' LESA approach was particularly suitable for the analysis of hemoglobin tetramers from DBS.

  5. Direct observation of ultrafast surface transport of laser-driven fast electrons in a solid target

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Chatterjee, Gourab; Adak, Amitava; Ahmed, Saima; Lad, Amit D.; Ravindra Kumar, G.; Cui, Y. Q.; Wang, W. M.; Sheng, Z. M.

    2013-11-15

    We demonstrate rapid spread of surface ionization on a glass target excited by an intense, ultrashort laser pulse at an intensity of 3 × 10{sup 17} W cm{sup −2}. Time- and space-resolved reflectivity of the target surface indicates that the initial plasma region created by the pump pulse expands at c/7. The measured quasi-static megagauss magnetic field is found to expand in a manner very similar to that of surface ionization. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reproduce measurements of surface ionization and magnetic fields. Both the experiment and simulation convincingly demonstrate the role of self-induced electric and magnetic fields in confining fast electrons along the target-vacuum interface.

  6. Direct ambient noise tomography for 3-D near surface shear velocity structure: methodology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H.; Fang, H.; Li, C.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Huang, Y. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography has provided essential constraints on crustal and uppermost mantle shear velocity structure in global seismology. Recent studies demonstrate that high frequency (e.g., ~ 1 Hz) surface waves between receivers at short distances can be successfully retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation and then be used for imaging near surface or shallow crustal shear velocity structures. This approach provides important information for strong ground motion prediction in seismically active area and overburden structure characterization in oil and gas fields. Here we propose a new tomographic method to invert all surface wave dispersion data for 3-D variations of shear wavespeed without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps.The method uses frequency-dependent propagation paths and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic inversion. A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. This avoids the assumption of great-circle propagation that is used in most surface wave tomographic studies, but which is not appropriate in complex media. The wavelet coefficients of the velocity model are estimated with an iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) algorithm, and upon iterations the surface wave ray paths and the data sensitivity matrix are updated from the newly obtained velocity model. We apply this new method to determine the 3-D near surface wavespeed variations in the Taipei basin of Taiwan, Hefei urban area and a shale and gas production field in China using the high-frequency interstation Rayleigh wave dispersion data extracted from ambient noisecross-correlation. The results reveal strong effects of off-great-circle propagation of high-frequency surface waves in these regions with above 30% shear wavespeed variations. The proposed approach is more efficient and robust than the traditional two-step surface wave tomography for imaging complex

  7. Surface contour radar observations of the directional wave spectrum during Fasinex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Hancock, D. W., III; Hines, D. E.; Swift, R. N.; Scott, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    The surface control radar (SCR), a 36-GHz computer-controlled airborne radar which generates a false-color coded elevation map of the sea surface below the aircraft in real time, is described. The SCR turned out to be ideal for documenting the wave spectra during Fasinex (the Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment) due to its high spatial resolution and rapid mapping capability over extensive areas. Synoptic weather maps for February 15-18, 1986 are presented.

  8. Direct Adsorption of Anti-CD34 Antibodies on the Nano-Porous Stent Surface to Enhance Endothelialization

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guowei; Yu, Zhanjiang; Chen, Yongqiang; Chen, Yundai; Tian, Feng; Yang, Xiaoda

    2016-01-01

    Background In-stent restenosis following the insertion of conventional drug-eluting stent has become an extremely serious problem due to coating techniques, with polymer matrices used to bind biological ingredients to the stent surface. However, several studies have indicated that new pro-healing technique could prevent stent thrombosis that can be caused by conventional drug-eluting stents. Methods A novel method of attaching anti-CD34 antibodies directly on the porous surface of a 316L stainless steel bare metal stent was developed in this study, which achieved both high stability of attached anti-CD34 antibodies on the metal stent surface and high antibody activity for stem cell capture. Results The in vitro and in vivo experimental results indicated that the new stent with directly coupled anti-CD34 antibodies can efficiently enhance stent endothelialization. Conclusions This study indicates that we have developed a unique method of attaching anti-CD34 antibodies directly on the porous surface of a 316L stainless steel bare metal stent, which provides a novel polymer-free approach for developing pro-healing stents. PMID:27274167

  9. Direct retrieval of ocean surface evaporation and latent heat flux from the spacebased observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.; Tang, W.

    2000-01-01

    The Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) provides the opportunity to improve the spacebased estimation of evaporation. An algorithm for retrieving evaporation directly from the radiances observed by the TRMM Microwave Imager and its validation results are described.

  10. A novel optical biosensor for direct and selective determination of serotonin in serum by Solid Surface-Room Temperature Phosphorescence.

    PubMed

    Ramon-Marquez, Teresa; Medina-Castillo, Antonio L; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Alberto; Fernandez-Sanchez, Jorge F

    2016-08-15

    This paper describes a novel biosensor which combines the use of nanotechnology (non-woven nanofibre mat) with Solid Surface-Room Temperature Phosphorescence (SS-RTP) measurement for the determination of serotonin in human serum. The developed biosensor is simple and can be directly applied in serum; only requires a simple clean-up protocol. Therefore it is the first time that serotonin is analysed directly in serum with a non-enzymatic technique. This new approach is based on the covalent immobilization of serotonin directly from serum on a functional nanofibre material (Tiss®-Link) with a preactivated surface for direct covalent immobilization of primary and secondary amines, and the subsequent measurement of serotonin phosphorescent emission from the solid surface. The phosphorescent detection allows avoiding the interference from any fluorescence emission or scattering light from any molecule present in the serum sample which can be also immobilised on the nanofibre material. The determination of serotonin with this SS-RTP sensor overcomes some limitations, such as large interference from the matrix and high cost and complexity of many of the methods widely used for serotonin analysis. The potential applicability of the sensor in the clinical diagnosis was demonstrated by analysing serum samples from seven healthy volunteers. The method was validated with an external reference laboratory, obtaining a correlation coefficient of 0.997 which indicates excellent correlation between the two methods.

  11. A novel optical biosensor for direct and selective determination of serotonin in serum by Solid Surface-Room Temperature Phosphorescence.

    PubMed

    Ramon-Marquez, Teresa; Medina-Castillo, Antonio L; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Alberto; Fernandez-Sanchez, Jorge F

    2016-08-15

    This paper describes a novel biosensor which combines the use of nanotechnology (non-woven nanofibre mat) with Solid Surface-Room Temperature Phosphorescence (SS-RTP) measurement for the determination of serotonin in human serum. The developed biosensor is simple and can be directly applied in serum; only requires a simple clean-up protocol. Therefore it is the first time that serotonin is analysed directly in serum with a non-enzymatic technique. This new approach is based on the covalent immobilization of serotonin directly from serum on a functional nanofibre material (Tiss®-Link) with a preactivated surface for direct covalent immobilization of primary and secondary amines, and the subsequent measurement of serotonin phosphorescent emission from the solid surface. The phosphorescent detection allows avoiding the interference from any fluorescence emission or scattering light from any molecule present in the serum sample which can be also immobilised on the nanofibre material. The determination of serotonin with this SS-RTP sensor overcomes some limitations, such as large interference from the matrix and high cost and complexity of many of the methods widely used for serotonin analysis. The potential applicability of the sensor in the clinical diagnosis was demonstrated by analysing serum samples from seven healthy volunteers. The method was validated with an external reference laboratory, obtaining a correlation coefficient of 0.997 which indicates excellent correlation between the two methods. PMID:27085954

  12. A method for the direct measurement of surface tension of collected atmospherically relevant aerosol particles using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hritz, Andrew D.; Raymond, Timothy M.; Dutcher, Dabrina D.

    2016-08-01

    Accurate estimates of particle surface tension are required for models concerning atmospheric aerosol nucleation and activation. However, it is difficult to collect the volumes of atmospheric aerosol required by typical instruments that measure surface tension, such as goniometers or Wilhelmy plates. In this work, a method that measures, ex situ, the surface tension of collected liquid nanoparticles using atomic force microscopy is presented. A film of particles is collected via impaction and is probed using nanoneedle tips with the atomic force microscope. This micro-Wilhelmy method allows for direct measurements of the surface tension of small amounts of sample. This method was verified using liquids, whose surface tensions were known. Particles of ozone oxidized α-pinene, a well-characterized system, were then produced, collected, and analyzed using this method to demonstrate its applicability for liquid aerosol samples. It was determined that oxidized α-pinene particles formed in dry conditions have a surface tension similar to that of pure α-pinene, and oxidized α-pinene particles formed in more humid conditions have a surface tension that is significantly higher.

  13. Direct surface analysis coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry reveals heterogeneous composition of the cuticle of Hibiscus trionum petals.

    PubMed

    Giorio, Chiara; Moyroud, Edwige; Glover, Beverley J; Skelton, Paul C; Kalberer, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Plant cuticle, which is the outermost layer covering the aerial parts of all plants including petals and leaves, can present a wide range of patterns that, combined with cell shape, can generate unique physical, mechanical, or optical properties. For example, arrays of regularly spaced nanoridges have been found on the dark (anthocyanin-rich) portion at the base of the petals of Hibiscus trionum. Those ridges act as a diffraction grating, producing an iridescent effect. Because the surface of the distal white region of the petals is smooth and noniridescent, a selective chemical characterization of the surface of the petals on different portions (i.e., ridged vs smooth) is needed to understand whether distinct cuticular patterns correlate with distinct chemical compositions of the cuticle. In the present study, a rapid screening method has been developed for the direct surface analysis of Hibiscus trionum petals using liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry. The optimized method was used to characterize a wide range of plant metabolites and cuticle monomers on the upper (adaxial) surface of the petals on both the white/smooth and anthocyanic/ridged regions, and on the lower (abaxial) surface, which is entirely smooth. The main components detected on the surface of the petals are low-molecular-weight organic acids, sugars, and flavonoids. The ridged portion on the upper surface of the petal is enriched in long-chain fatty acids, which are constituents of the wax fraction of the cuticle. These compounds were not detected on the white/smooth region of the upper petal surface or on the smooth lower surface. PMID:26335385

  14. Surface hopping dynamics of direct trans → cis photoswitching of an azobenzene derivative in constrained adsorbate geometries.

    PubMed

    Floß, Gereon; Granucci, Giovanni; Saalfrank, Peter

    2012-12-21

    With ongoing miniaturization of electronic devices, the need for individually addressable, switchable molecules arises. An example are azobenzenes on surfaces which have been shown to be switchable between trans and cis forms. Here, we examine the "direct" (rather than substrate-mediated) channel of the trans → cis photoisomerization after ππ∗ excitation of tetra-tert-butyl-azobenzene physisorbed on surfaces mimicking Au(111) and Bi(111), respectively. In spirit of the direct channel, the electronic structure of the surface is neglected, the latter merely acting as a rigid platform which weakly interacts with the molecule via Van-der-Waals forces. Starting from thermal ensembles which represent the trans-form, sudden excitations promote the molecules to ππ∗-excited states which are non-adiabatically coupled among themselves and to a nπ∗-excited and the ground state, respectively. After excitation, relaxation to the ground state by internal conversion takes place, possibly accompanied by isomerization. The process is described here by "on the fly" semiclassical surface hopping dynamics in conjunction with a semiempirical Hamiltonian (AM1) and configuration-interaction type methods. It is found that steric constraints imposed by the substrate lead to reduced but non-vanishing, trans → cis reaction yields and longer internal conversion times than for the isolated molecule. Implications for recent experiments for azobenzenes on surfaces are discussed.

  15. The direct and precursor mediated dissociation rates of H2 on a Ni(111) surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenji; Zhao, Yi

    2015-02-28

    The dissociation and recombination rates of physisorbed H2, and the direct and steady state dissociation (i.e., the precursor mediated dissociation) rates of gas phase H2 on Ni(111), as well as the corresponding kinetic isotope effects, are calculated using the quantum instanton method, together with path integral Monte Carlo and adaptive umbrella sampling techniques. All these rates except the recombination one first decrease and then increase with the increasing temperature, and their minimum values appear at about 250, 300 and 250 K, respectively. These non-monotonic behaviors reveal that the quantum effect of H2 should be very remarkable at low temperatures. The steady state rates are smaller than the direct rates at low temperatures, however, they become larger than the direct ones at high temperatures, these two kinds of rates become equal at about 400 and 300 K on the rigid and quantum lattices, respectively. The quantum motion of the lattice can enhance the direct and steady state rates, and it increases the steady state rate much more than the direct one, for instance, the direct and steady state rates on the quantum lattice are 1.30 and 2.08 times larger than that on the rigid one at 300 K. The calculated kinetic isotope effects are much larger than 1, which reveals that H2 always has a larger rate than that of D2, and the direct process predicts much larger kinetic isotope effects than the steady state process at low temperatures. In addition, the kinetic isotope effects are not affected by the lattice motion.

  16. Direct imaging of electron recombination and transport on a semiconductor surface by femtosecond time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Keiki Yamada, Yuki; Koshihara, Shin-ya; Onda, Ken

    2014-02-03

    Much effort has been devoted to the development of techniques to probe carrier dynamics, which govern many semiconductor device characteristics. We report direct imaging of electron dynamics on semiconductor surfaces by time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy using femtosecond laser pulses. The experiments utilized a variable-repetition-rate femtosecond laser system to suppress sample charging problems. The recombination of photogenerated electrons and the lateral motion of the electrons driven by an external electric field on a GaAs surface were visualized. The mobility was estimated from a linear relationship between the drift velocity and the potential gradient.

  17. Femtosecond laser direct writing of large-area two-dimensional metallic photonic crystal structures on tungsten surfaces.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Hongzhen; Yang, Jianjun; Wang, Fei; Yang, Yang; Sun, Julong

    2015-10-01

    Metallic photonic crystals (MPCs) and metamaterials operating in the visible spectrum are required for high-temperature nanophotonics, but they are often difficult to construct. This study demonstrates a new approach to directly write two-dimensional (2D) MPCs on tungsten surfaces through the cylindrical focusing of two collinear femtosecond laser beams with certain temporal delays and orthogonal linear polarizations. Results are physically attributed to the laser-induced transient crossed temperature grating patterns and tempo-spatial thermal correlations. Optical properties of the fabricated MPCs are characterized. Such a simple and efficient technique can be used to fabricate large-area, 2D microstructures on metal surfaces for potential applications.

  18. The effect of nanoscratching direction on the plastic deformation and surface morphology of InP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J. Y.; Ponce, F. A.; Caldas, P. G.; Prioli, R.; Almeida, C. M.

    2013-11-28

    The microstructure of (001) InP crystals scratched with a sharp diamond tip depends strongly on the scratching direction. The scratch surface is found to conform to the radius of curvature of the tip (∼60 nm) by the formation of atomic crystal steps produced by dislocation glide along (111) planes. 〈110〉 scratches lead to coherent local crystal lattice movement and rotation causing deep dislocation propagation into the crystal and irregular pileups at the sides of the scratch surface. 〈100〉 scratches lead to incoherent lattice movement causing dislocation locking that inhibits their propagation and results in regular pileups.

  19. Estimation of directional surface wave spectra from a towed research catamaran

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, K.A.; Hara, T.; Bock, E.J.; Karachintsev, A.B.

    1997-01-01

    During the High-Resolution Remote Sensing Main Experiment (1993), wave height was estimated from a moving catamaran using pitch-rate and roll-rate sensors, a three-axis accelerometer, and a capacitive wave wire. The wave spectrum in the frequency band ranging roughly from 0.08 to 0.3 Hz was verified by independent buoy measurements. To estimate the directional frequency spectrum from a wave-wire array, the Data-Adaptive Spectral Estimator is extended to include the Doppler shifting effects of a moving platform. The method is applied to data obtained from a fixed platform during the Ris?? Air-Sea Experiment (1994) and to data obtained from a moving platform during the Coastal Ocean Processes Experiment (1995). Both results show that the propagation direction of the peak wind waves compares well with the measured wind direction. When swells and local wind waves are not aligned, the method can resolve the difference of propagation directions. Using the fixed platform data a numerical test is conducted that shows that the method is able to distinguish two wave systems propagating at the same frequency but in two different directions.

  20. Direct observation and temperature control of the surface Dirac gap in a topological crystalline insulator.

    PubMed

    Wojek, B M; Berntsen, M H; Jonsson, V; Szczerbakow, A; Dziawa, P; Kowalski, B J; Story, T; Tjernberg, O

    2015-10-13

    Since the advent of topological insulators hosting Dirac surface states, efforts have been made to gap these states in a controllable way. A new route to accomplish this was opened up by the discovery of topological crystalline insulators where the topological states are protected by crystal symmetries and thus prone to gap formation by structural changes of the lattice. Here we show a temperature-driven gap opening in Dirac surface states within the topological crystalline insulator phase in (Pb,Sn)Se. By using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, the gap formation and mass acquisition is studied as a function of composition and temperature. The resulting observations lead to the addition of a temperature- and composition-dependent boundary between massless and massive Dirac states in the topological phase diagram for (Pb,Sn)Se (001). Overall, our results experimentally establish the possibility to tune between massless and massive topological states on the surface of a topological system.

  1. Lattice-Directed Formation of Covalent and Organometallic Molecular Wires by Terminal Alkynes on Ag Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Qiwei; Xiao, Lianghong; Shang, Jian; Zhou, Xiong; Zhang, Yajie; Wang, Yongfeng; Shao, Xiang; Li, Jianlong; Chen, Wei; Xu, Guo Qin; Tang, Hao; Zhao, Dahui; Wu, Kai

    2015-06-23

    Surface reactions of 2,5-diethynyl-1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene on Ag(111), Ag(110), and Ag(100) were systematically explored and scrutinized by scanning tunneling microscopy, molecular mechanics simulations, and density functional theory calculations. On Ag(111), Glaser coupling reaction became dominant, yielding one-dimensional molecular wires formed by covalent bonds. On Ag(110) and Ag(100), however, the terminal alkynes reacted with surface metal atoms, leading to one-dimensional organometallic nanostructures. Detailed experimental and theoretical analyses revealed that such a lattice dependence of the terminal alkyne reaction at surfaces originated from the matching degree between the periodicities of the produced molecular wires and the substrate lattice structures.

  2. 3D Micropatterned Surface Inspired by Salvinia molesta via Direct Laser Lithography.

    PubMed

    Tricinci, Omar; Terencio, Tercio; Mazzolai, Barbara; Pugno, Nicola M; Greco, Francesco; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2015-11-25

    Biomimetic functional surfaces are attracting increasing attention for their relevant technological applications. Despite these efforts, inherent limitations of microfabrication techniques prevent the replication of complex hierarchical microstructures. Using a 3D laser lithography technique, we fabricated a 3D patterned surface bioinspired to Salvinia molesta leaves. The artificial hairs, with crownlike heads, were reproduced by scaling down (ca. 100 times smaller) the dimensions of natural features, so that microscale hairs with submicrometric resolution were attained. The micropatterned surface, in analogy with the natural model, shows interesting properties in terms of hydrophobicity and air retention when submerged by water, even if realized with a hydrophilic material. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated the capability to promote localized condensation of water droplets from moisture in the atmosphere. PMID:26558410

  3. Direct observation of molecular preorganization for chirality transfer on a catalyst surface.

    PubMed

    Demers-Carpentier, Vincent; Goubert, Guillaume; Masini, Federico; Lafleur-Lambert, Raphael; Dong, Yi; Lavoie, Stéphane; Mahieu, Gautier; Boukouvalas, John; Gao, Haili; Rasmussen, Anton M H; Ferrighi, Lara; Pan, Yunxiang; Hammer, Bjørk; McBreen, Peter H

    2011-11-11

    The chemisorption of specific optically active compounds on metal surfaces can create catalytically active chirality transfer sites. However, the mechanism through which these sites bias the stereoselectivity of reactions (typically hydrogenations) is generally assumed to be so complex that continued progress in the area is uncertain. We show that the investigation of heterogeneous asymmetric induction with single-site resolution sufficient to distinguish stereochemical conformations at the submolecular level is finally accessible. A combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations reveals the stereodirecting forces governing preorganization into precise chiral modifier-substrate bimolecular surface complexes. The study shows that the chiral modifier induces prochiral switching on the surface and that different prochiral ratios prevail at different submolecular binding sites on the modifier at the reaction temperature.

  4. A Study of an Optical Lunar Surface Communications Network with High Bandwidth Direct to Earth Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K.; Biswas, A.; Schoolcraft, J.

    2011-01-01

    A lunar surface systems study explores the application of optical communications to support a high bandwidth data link from a lunar relay satellite and from fixed lunar assets. The results show that existing 1-m ground stations could provide more than 99% coverage of the lunar terminal at 100Mb/s data rates from a lunar relay satellite and in excess of 200Mb/s from a fixed terminal on the lunar surface. We have looked at the effects of the lunar regolith and its removal on optical samples. Our results indicate that under repeated dust removal episodes sapphire rather than fused silica would be a more durable material for optical surfaces. Disruption tolerant network protocols can minimize the data loss due to link dropouts. We report on the preliminary results of the DTN protocol implemented over the optical carrier.

  5. 3D Micropatterned Surface Inspired by Salvinia molesta via Direct Laser Lithography

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetic functional surfaces are attracting increasing attention for their relevant technological applications. Despite these efforts, inherent limitations of microfabrication techniques prevent the replication of complex hierarchical microstructures. Using a 3D laser lithography technique, we fabricated a 3D patterned surface bioinspired to Salvinia molesta leaves. The artificial hairs, with crownlike heads, were reproduced by scaling down (ca. 100 times smaller) the dimensions of natural features, so that microscale hairs with submicrometric resolution were attained. The micropatterned surface, in analogy with the natural model, shows interesting properties in terms of hydrophobicity and air retention when submerged by water, even if realized with a hydrophilic material. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated the capability to promote localized condensation of water droplets from moisture in the atmosphere. PMID:26558410

  6. Lattice-Directed Formation of Covalent and Organometallic Molecular Wires by Terminal Alkynes on Ag Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Qiwei; Xiao, Lianghong; Shang, Jian; Zhou, Xiong; Zhang, Yajie; Wang, Yongfeng; Shao, Xiang; Li, Jianlong; Chen, Wei; Xu, Guo Qin; Tang, Hao; Zhao, Dahui; Wu, Kai

    2015-06-23

    Surface reactions of 2,5-diethynyl-1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene on Ag(111), Ag(110), and Ag(100) were systematically explored and scrutinized by scanning tunneling microscopy, molecular mechanics simulations, and density functional theory calculations. On Ag(111), Glaser coupling reaction became dominant, yielding one-dimensional molecular wires formed by covalent bonds. On Ag(110) and Ag(100), however, the terminal alkynes reacted with surface metal atoms, leading to one-dimensional organometallic nanostructures. Detailed experimental and theoretical analyses revealed that such a lattice dependence of the terminal alkyne reaction at surfaces originated from the matching degree between the periodicities of the produced molecular wires and the substrate lattice structures. PMID:25990647

  7. Direct observation of spin-resolved full and empty electron states in ferromagnetic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Berti, G. Calloni, A.; Brambilla, A.; Bussetti, G.; Duò, L.; Ciccacci, F.

    2014-07-15

    We present a versatile apparatus for the study of ferromagnetic surfaces, which combines spin-polarized photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopies. Samples can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy and analyzed in situ. Spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy analysis is done with a hemispherical electron analyzer coupled to a 25 kV-Mott detector. Inverse photoemission spectroscopy experiments are performed with GaAs crystals as spin-polarized electron sources and a UV bandpass photon detector. As an example, measurements on the oxygen passivated Fe(100)-p(1×1)O surface are presented.

  8. Direct observation of spin-resolved full and empty electron states in ferromagnetic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Berti, G; Calloni, A; Brambilla, A; Bussetti, G; Duò, L; Ciccacci, F

    2014-07-01

    We present a versatile apparatus for the study of ferromagnetic surfaces, which combines spin-polarized photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopies. Samples can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy and analyzed in situ. Spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy analysis is done with a hemispherical electron analyzer coupled to a 25 kV-Mott detector. Inverse photoemission spectroscopy experiments are performed with GaAs crystals as spin-polarized electron sources and a UV bandpass photon detector. As an example, measurements on the oxygen passivated Fe(100)-p(1×1)O surface are presented. PMID:25085146

  9. Direct surface force measurements of polyelectrolyte multilayer films containing nanocrystalline cellulose.

    PubMed

    Cranston, Emily D; Gray, Derek G; Rutland, Mark W

    2010-11-16

    Polyelectrolyte multilayer films containing nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) make up a new class of nanostructured composite with applications ranging from coatings to biomedical devices. Moreover, these materials are amenable to surface force studies using colloid-probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). For electrostatically assembled films with either NCC or PAH as the outermost layer, surface morphology was investigated by AFM and wettability was examined by contact angle measurements. By varying the surrounding ionic strength and pH, the relative contributions from electrostatic, van der Waals, steric, and polymer bridging interactions were evaluated. The ionic cross-linking in these films rendered them stable under all solution conditions studied although swelling at low pH and high ionic strength was inferred. The underlying polymer layer in the multilayered film was found to dictate the dominant surface forces when polymer migration and chain extension were facilitated. The precontact normal forces between a silica probe and an NCC-capped multilayer film were monotonically repulsive at pH values where the material surfaces were similarly and fully charged. In contrast, at pH 3.5, the anionic surfaces were weakly charged but the underlying layer of cationic PAH was fully charged and attractive forces dominated due to polymer bridging from extended PAH chains. The interaction with an anionic carboxylic acid probe showed similar behavior to the silica probe; however, for a cationic amine probe with an anionic NCC-capped film, electrostatic double-layer attraction at low pH, and electrostatic double-layer repulsion at high pH, were observed. Finally, the effect of the capping layer was studied with an anionic probe, which indicated that NCC-capped films exhibited purely repulsive forces which were larger in magnitude than the combination of electrostatic double-layer attraction and steric repulsion, measured for PAH

  10. Direct writing of continuous and discontinuous sub-wavelength periodic surface structures on single-crystalline silicon using femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kuladeep, Rajamudili; Sahoo, Chakradhar; Narayana Rao, Desai E-mail: dnr-laserlab@yahoo.com

    2014-06-02

    Laser-induced ripples or uniform arrays of continuous near sub-wavelength or discontinuous deep sub-wavelength structures are formed on single-crystalline silicon (Si) by femtosecond (fs) laser direct writing technique. Laser irradiation was performed on Si wafers at normal incidence in air and by immersing them in dimethyl sulfoxide using linearly polarized Ti:sapphire fs laser pulses of ∼110 fs pulse duration and ∼800 nm wavelength. Morphology studies of laser written surfaces reveal that sub-wavelength features are oriented perpendicular to laser polarization, while their morphology and spatial periodicity depend on the surrounding dielectric medium. The formation mechanism of the sub-wavelength features is explained by interference of incident laser with surface plasmon polaritons. This work proves the feasibility of fs laser direct writing technique for the fabrication of sub-wavelength features, which could help in fabrication of advanced electro-optic devices.

  11. SERS optrode as a "fishing rod" to direct pre-concentrate analytes from superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fan, Meikun; Cheng, Fansheng; Wang, Cong; Gong, Zhengjun; Tang, Changyu; Man, Changzhen; Brolo, Alexandre G

    2015-02-01

    SERS optrodes were used to "fish" aqueous drops from superhydrophobic surfaces. The technique led to an improvement of 2-3 orders of magnitude in the lowest detectable amount of the Raman probe nile blue A, reaching 25 fg (34 attomoles). Further tests run on samples containing pesticide revealed that 20 pg of triazophos could be clearly detected from a single drop. PMID:25531897

  12. Toward Understanding Whether Interactive Surface Area Could Direct Ordered Macroscopic Supramolecular Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Akram, Raheel; Cheng, Mengjiao; Guo, Fengli; Iqbal, Saleem; Shi, Feng

    2016-04-19

    The mismatching phenomena are ubiquitous in complex and advanced self-assembly, such as hierarchical assembly, macroscopic supramolecular assembly, and so on. Recently, for macroscopic supramolecular assembly, the strategy of maximizing the interactive surface area was used and supposed to handle this problem; however, now there is little understanding of whether interactive surface area is the dominant factor to guide the assembly patterns. Herein by taking millimeter cylinder building blocks with different diameter/height (d/h) ratios as model systems, we have investigated the interactive-surface-area-dependent assembling behaviors in macroscopic supramolecular assembly. The results showed that the increasing d/h ratio of cylinders contributed to selectivity of face-to-face assembled pattern over face-to-side or side-to-side geometries, thus having improved the ordering degree of the assembled structures; however, the mismatching phenomena could not be totally avoided due to high colliding chances in kinetics and the thermally favorable stability of these structures. We further confirmed the above hypothesis by in situ measurements of interactive forces of building blocks with different assembled patterns. This work of macroscopic supramolecular assembly provides an in situ visible platform, which is significant to clarify the influences of interactive surface area on the assembly behaviors.

  13. Hydrogel-mediated direct patterning of conducting polymer films with multiple surface chemistries.

    PubMed

    Park, SooHyun; Yang, Guang; Madduri, Nrutya; Abidian, Mohammad Reza; Majd, Sheereen

    2014-05-01

    A new methodology for selective electropolymerization of conducting polymer films using wet hydrogel stamps is presented. The ability of this simple method to generate patterned films of conducting polymers with multiple surface chemistries in a one-step process and to incorporate fragile biomolecules in these films is demonstrated.

  14. Directed assembly of nanodiamond nitrogen-vacancy centers on a chemically modified patterned surface.

    PubMed

    Rao, Saleem G; Karim, Altaf; Schwartz, Julian; Antler, Natania; Schenkel, Thomas; Siddiqi, Irfan

    2014-08-13

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in nanodiamond (ND) particles are an attractive material for photonic, quantum information, and biological sensing technologies due to their optical properties-bright single photon emission and long spin coherence time. To harness these features in practical devices, it is essential to realize efficient methods to assemble and pattern NDs at the micro-/nanoscale. In this work, we report the large scale patterned assembly of NDs on a Au surface by creating hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions using self-assembled monolayer (SAM). Hydrophobic regions are created using a methyl (-CH3) terminated SAM of octadecanethiol molecules. Evaporating a water droplet suspension of NDs on the SAM patterned surface assembles the NDs in the bare Au, hydrophilic regions. Using this procedure, we successfully produced a ND structures in the shape of dots, lines, and rectangles. Subsequent photoluminescence imaging of the patterned NDs confirmed the presence of optically active NV centers. Experimental evidence in conjunction with computational analysis indicates that the surface wettability of the SAM modified Au surface plays a dominant role in the assembly of NDs as compared to van der Waals and other substrate-ND interactions. PMID:25029262

  15. Stimulated Raman signals at conical intersections: Ab initio surface hopping simulation protocol with direct propagation of the nuclear wave function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-07-01

    Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy (FSRS) signals that monitor the excited state conical intersections dynamics of acrolein are simulated. An effective time dependent Hamiltonian for two C—H vibrational marker bands is constructed on the fly using a local mode expansion combined with a semi-classical surface hopping simulation protocol. The signals are obtained by a direct forward and backward propagation of the vibrational wave function on a numerical grid. Earlier work is extended to fully incorporate the anharmonicities and intermode couplings.

  16. Stimulated Raman signals at conical intersections: Ab initio surface hopping simulation protocol with direct propagation of the nuclear wave function

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalewski, Markus Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-07-28

    Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy (FSRS) signals that monitor the excited state conical intersections dynamics of acrolein are simulated. An effective time dependent Hamiltonian for two C—H vibrational marker bands is constructed on the fly using a local mode expansion combined with a semi-classical surface hopping simulation protocol. The signals are obtained by a direct forward and backward propagation of the vibrational wave function on a numerical grid. Earlier work is extended to fully incorporate the anharmonicities and intermode couplings.

  17. Determination of unit normal vectors of aspherical surfaces given unit directional vectors of incoming and outgoing rays: comment.

    PubMed

    Mikš, Antonín; Novák, Pavel

    2012-07-01

    In a recent paper by Lin and Tsai [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 29, 174 (2012)] there is presented a rather complicated method for derivation of the unit normal vectors of an aspherical surface given the knowledge of the unit directional vectors of the incoming and outgoing rays. In our comment we present a much simpler method that leads to compact equations suitable for practical implementation. PMID:22751399

  18. Multilayers at the surface of solutions of exogenous lung surfactant: direct observation by neutron reflection.

    PubMed

    Follows, D; Tiberg, F; Thomas, R K; Larsson, M

    2007-02-01

    Pharmacy-grade exogenous lung surfactant preparations of bovine and porcine origin, dispersed in physiological electrolyte solution have been studied. The organization and dynamics at the air/water interface at physiological temperature was analysed by neutron reflection. The results show that a well-defined surface phase is formed, consisting of a multilayer structure of lipid/protein bilayers alternating with aqueous layers, with a repetition period of about 70 A and correlation depths of 3 to >25 bilayers, depending on electrolyte composition and time. The experimental surfactant concentration of 0.15% (w/w) is far below that used in therapeutic application of exogenous surfactants and it is therefore likely that similar multilayer structures are also formed at the alveolar surface in the clinical situation during surfactant substitution therapy. Lung surfactant preparations in dry form swell in aqueous solution towards a limit of about 60% (w/w) of water, forming a lamellar liquid-crystalline phase above about 34 degrees C, which disperses into lamellar bodies at higher water concentrations. The lamellar spacings in the surface multilayers at the air/water interface are smaller than those in the saturated limit even though they are in contact with much greater water concentrations. The surface multilayers are laterally disordered in a way that is consistent with fragments of Lalpha-phase lamellae. The near surface layers of the multilayer structure have a significant protein content (only SP-B and SP-C are present in the preparations). The results demonstrate that a multilayer structure can be formed in exogenous surfactant even at very low concentrations and indicate that multilayers need to be incorporated into present interpretations of in vitro studies of similar lung surfactant preparations, which are largely based on monolayer models.

  19. Peptide-Directed PdAu Nanoscale Surface Segregation: Toward Controlled Bimetallic Architecture for Catalytic Materials.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Nicholas M; Showalter, Allison R; Woehl, Taylor J; Hughes, Zak E; Lee, Sungsik; Reinhart, Benjamin; Ertem, S Piril; Coughlin, E Bryan; Ren, Yang; Walsh, Tiffany R; Bunker, Bruce A

    2016-09-27

    Bimetallic nanoparticles are of immense scientific and technological interest given the synergistic properties observed when two different metallic species are mixed at the nanoscale. This is particularly prevalent in catalysis, where bimetallic nanoparticles often exhibit improved catalytic activity and durability over their monometallic counterparts. Yet despite intense research efforts, little is understood regarding how to optimize bimetallic surface composition and structure synthetically using rational design principles. Recently, it has been demonstrated that peptide-enabled routes for nanoparticle synthesis result in materials with sequence-dependent catalytic properties, providing an opportunity for rational design through sequence manipulation. In this study, bimetallic PdAu nanoparticles are synthesized with a small set of peptides containing known Pd and Au binding motifs. The resulting nanoparticles were extensively characterized using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and high-energy X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis. Structural information obtained from synchrotron radiation methods was then used to generate model nanoparticle configurations using reverse Monte Carlo simulations, which illustrate sequence dependence in both surface structure and surface composition. Replica exchange with solute tempering molecular dynamics simulations were also used to predict the modes of peptide binding on monometallic surfaces, indicating that different sequences bind to the metal interfaces via different mechanisms. As a testbed reaction, electrocatalytic methanol oxidation experiments were performed, wherein differences in catalytic activity are clearly observed in materials with identical bimetallic composition. Taken together, this study indicates that peptides could be used to arrive at bimetallic surfaces with enhanced catalytic properties, which could be leveraged

  20. Early regenerative responses induced by monoclonal antibodies directed against a surface glycoprotein of goldfish retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, M; Eshhar, N

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed primarily against antigenic determinants associated with the goldfish optic nerve were prepared and characterized. One selected clone 23-4-C(IgG2a), detected antigenic determinants of glycoprotein nature with an apparent mol. wt. of 140 000. Following injury the level of these molecules increased with a peak at 5-7 days after the lesion (2- to 3-fold higher than the basal level). The results strongly suggest that the increase derives, at least partially, from a real increment in the level of these molecules in the retinal ganglion cells rather than from changes in accessibility. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that the retinal ganglion cells carry the antigenicity. Intraocular injection of the monoclonal antibodies, concomitantly with crush injury, resulted in an earlier and higher regenerative response, reflected by sprouting capacity, protein synthesis and accumulation of radiolabeled material in the tectum contralateral to the side of injury. This may indicate that the antibodies directly activate retinal cells via interaction with surface molecules. Alternatively, the antibodies may be directed against surface molecules which are associated with axonal growth inhibitors, and may therefore mask these surface antigens from further interaction with their native substrate. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:6204857

  1. Direct surface analysis of pesticides on soil, leaves, grass, and stainless steel by static secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, J.C.; Groenewold, G.S.; Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E.; Olson, J.E.; Miller, D.L.

    1997-02-01

    Direct surface analyses by static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were performed for the following pesticides adsorbed on dandelion leaves, grass, soil, and stainless steel samples: alachlor, atrazine, captan, carbofuran, chlorpyrifos, chlorosulfuron, chlorthal-dimethyl, cypermethrin, 2,4-D, diuron, glyphosate, malathion, methomyl, methyl arsonic acid, mocap, norflurazon, oxyfluorfen, paraquat, temik, and trifluralin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate static SIMS as a tool for pesticide analysis, principally for use in screening samples for pesticides. The advantage of direct surface analysis compared with conventional pesticide analysis methods is the elimination of sample pretreatment including extraction, which streamlines the analysis substantially; total analysis time for SIMS analysis was ca. 10 min/sample. Detection of 16 of the 20 pesticides on all four substrates was achieved. Of the remaining four pesticides, only one (trifluralin) was not detected on any of the samples. The minimum detectable quantity was determined for paraquat on soil in order to evaluate the efficacy of using SIMS as a screening tool. Paraquat was detected at 3 pg/mm{sup 2} (c.a. 0.005 monolayers). The results of these studies suggest that SIMS is capable of direct surface detection of a range of pesticides, with low volatility, polar pesticides being the most easily detected. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Fabrication of hydrophobic structures on coronary stent surface based on direct three-beam laser interference lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Long-yue; Zhou, Wei-qi; Wang, Yuan-bo; Wang, Si-qi; Bai, Chong; Li, Shi-ming; Liu, Bin; Wang, Jun-nan; Cui, Cheng-kun; Li, Yong-liang

    2016-05-01

    To solve the problems with coronary stent implantation, coronary artery stent surface was directly modified by three-beam laser interference lithography through imitating the water-repellent surface of lotus leaf, and uniform micro-nano structures with the controllable period were fabricated. The morphological properties and contact angle (CA) of the microstructure were measured by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and CA system. The water repellency of stent was also evaluated by the contact and then separation between the water drop and the stent. The results show that the close-packed concave structure with the period of about 12 μm can be fabricated on the stent surface with special parameters (incident angle of 3°, laser energy density of 2.2 J·cm-2 and exposure time of 80 s) by using the three-beam laser at 1 064 nm, and the structure has good water repellency with CA of 120°.

  3. Flight paths of seabirds soaring over the ocean surface enable measurement of fine-scale wind speed and direction.

    PubMed

    Yonehara, Yoshinari; Goto, Yusuke; Yoda, Ken; Watanuki, Yutaka; Young, Lindsay C; Weimerskirch, Henri; Bost, Charles-André; Sato, Katsufumi

    2016-08-01

    Ocean surface winds are an essential factor in understanding the physical interactions between the atmosphere and the ocean. Surface winds measured by satellite scatterometers and buoys cover most of the global ocean; however, there are still spatial and temporal gaps and finer-scale variations of wind that may be overlooked, particularly in coastal areas. Here, we show that flight paths of soaring seabirds can be used to estimate fine-scale (every 5 min, ∼5 km) ocean surface winds. Fine-scale global positioning system (GPS) positional data revealed that soaring seabirds flew tortuously and ground speed fluctuated presumably due to tail winds and head winds. Taking advantage of the ground speed difference in relation to flight direction, we reliably estimated wind speed and direction experienced by the birds. These bird-based wind velocities were significantly correlated with wind velocities estimated by satellite-borne scatterometers. Furthermore, extensive travel distances and flight duration of the seabirds enabled a wide range of high-resolution wind observations, especially in coastal areas. Our study suggests that seabirds provide a platform from which to measure ocean surface winds, potentially complementing conventional wind measurements by covering spatial and temporal measurement gaps. PMID:27457932

  4. Flight paths of seabirds soaring over the ocean surface enable measurement of fine-scale wind speed and direction.

    PubMed

    Yonehara, Yoshinari; Goto, Yusuke; Yoda, Ken; Watanuki, Yutaka; Young, Lindsay C; Weimerskirch, Henri; Bost, Charles-André; Sato, Katsufumi

    2016-08-01

    Ocean surface winds are an essential factor in understanding the physical interactions between the atmosphere and the ocean. Surface winds measured by satellite scatterometers and buoys cover most of the global ocean; however, there are still spatial and temporal gaps and finer-scale variations of wind that may be overlooked, particularly in coastal areas. Here, we show that flight paths of soaring seabirds can be used to estimate fine-scale (every 5 min, ∼5 km) ocean surface winds. Fine-scale global positioning system (GPS) positional data revealed that soaring seabirds flew tortuously and ground speed fluctuated presumably due to tail winds and head winds. Taking advantage of the ground speed difference in relation to flight direction, we reliably estimated wind speed and direction experienced by the birds. These bird-based wind velocities were significantly correlated with wind velocities estimated by satellite-borne scatterometers. Furthermore, extensive travel distances and flight duration of the seabirds enabled a wide range of high-resolution wind observations, especially in coastal areas. Our study suggests that seabirds provide a platform from which to measure ocean surface winds, potentially complementing conventional wind measurements by covering spatial and temporal measurement gaps.

  5. Flight paths of seabirds soaring over the ocean surface enable measurement of fine-scale wind speed and direction

    PubMed Central

    Yonehara, Yoshinari; Goto, Yusuke; Yoda, Ken; Watanuki, Yutaka; Young, Lindsay C.; Weimerskirch, Henri; Bost, Charles-André; Sato, Katsufumi

    2016-01-01

    Ocean surface winds are an essential factor in understanding the physical interactions between the atmosphere and the ocean. Surface winds measured by satellite scatterometers and buoys cover most of the global ocean; however, there are still spatial and temporal gaps and finer-scale variations of wind that may be overlooked, particularly in coastal areas. Here, we show that flight paths of soaring seabirds can be used to estimate fine-scale (every 5 min, ∼5 km) ocean surface winds. Fine-scale global positioning system (GPS) positional data revealed that soaring seabirds flew tortuously and ground speed fluctuated presumably due to tail winds and head winds. Taking advantage of the ground speed difference in relation to flight direction, we reliably estimated wind speed and direction experienced by the birds. These bird-based wind velocities were significantly correlated with wind velocities estimated by satellite-borne scatterometers. Furthermore, extensive travel distances and flight duration of the seabirds enabled a wide range of high-resolution wind observations, especially in coastal areas. Our study suggests that seabirds provide a platform from which to measure ocean surface winds, potentially complementing conventional wind measurements by covering spatial and temporal measurement gaps. PMID:27457932

  6. Surface-Directed Assembly of Sequence-Defined Synthetic Polymers into Networks of Hexagonally Patterned Nanoribbons with Controlled Functionalities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Long; Zuckermann, Ronald N; DeYoreo, James J

    2016-05-24

    The exquisite self-assembly of proteins and peptides in nature into highly ordered functional materials has inspired innovative approaches to the design and synthesis of biomimetic materials. While sequence-defined polymers hold great promise to mimic proteins and peptides for functions, controlled assembly of them on surfaces still remains underdeveloped. Here, we report the assembly of 12-mer peptoids containing alternating acidic and aromatic monomers into networks of hexagonally patterned nanoribbons on mica surfaces. Ca(2+)-carboxylate coordination creates peptoid-peptoid and peptoid-mica interactions that control self-assembly. In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that peptoids first assemble into discrete nanoparticles; these particles then transform into hexagonally patterned nanoribbons on mica surfaces. AFM-based dynamic force spectroscopy studies show that peptoid-mica interactions are much stronger than peptoid-peptoid interactions, illuminating the driving forces for mica-directed peptoid assembly. We further demonstrate the display of functional domains at the N-terminus of assembling peptoids to produce extended networks with similar hierarchical structures. This research demonstrates that surface-directed peptoid assembly can be used as a robust platform to develop biomimetic coating materials for applications. PMID:27136277

  7. Alumina/aluminum composites formed by the directed oxidation of aluminum using magnesia as a surface dopant

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, P.; Derby, B. . Dept. of Materials)

    1994-07-01

    Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]/Al composites have been formed by the directed oxidation of pure Al doped with MgO powder. Thermal gravimetric analysis was used to characterize reaction kinetics. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and SEM coupled with microanalysis were used to characterize the microstructure of product. Directed oxidation is initiated without an incubation period. The particle size of the MgO powder determines the initial microstructure. Mg is retained in some form at the growth surface after the disappearance of the original MgO; however, there is a continuous loss of Mg from the system. The presence and distribution of the Mg compounds play a key role in the directed oxidation.

  8. Hole Surface Trapping Dynamics Directly Monitored by Electron Spin Manipulation in CdS Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Feng, Donghai; Tong, Haifang; Jia, Tianqing; Deng, Li; Sun, Zhenrong; Xu, Zhizhan

    2014-12-18

    A new detection technique, pump-spin orientation-probe ultrafast spectroscopy, is developed to study the hole trapping dynamics in colloidal CdS nanocrystals. The hole surface trapping process spatially separates the electron-hole pairs excited by the pump pulse, leaves the core negatively charged, and thus enhances the electron spin signal generated by the orientation pulse. The spin enhancement transients as a function of the pump-orientation delay reveal a fast and a slow hole trapping process with respective time constants of sub-10 ps and sub-100 ps, orders of magnitude faster than that of carrier recombination. The power dependence of hole trapping dynamics elucidates the saturation process and relative number of traps, and suggests that there are three subpopulations of nanoparticles related to hole surface trapping, one with the fast trapping pathway only, another with the slow trapping pathway only, and the third with both pathways together. PMID:26273979

  9. Direct Measurement of Surface Defect Level Distribution Associated with GaAs Antiphase Boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q.; Hsu, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Using an electrostatic force microscope, we measure surface contact potential (SCP) variations across antiphase boundaries (APBs) on GaAs films grown on Ge substrates. The SCP at the APBs is consistently and reproducibly measured to be 30 mV higher than that at GaAs domains. This is due to Fermi levels being pinned at different surface states. The identical electrical behavior observed for all APBs indicates that they are the lowest energy {l_brace}110{r_brace} orientation. The sign of observed Fermi level shift is consistent with a prevalence of Ga-Ga bonds at real {l_brace}110{r_brace} APBs. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Direct optical measurements of far- and deep-ultraviolet surface plasmon resonance with different refractive indices.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Ichiro; Tanaka, Yoshito Y; Ryoki, Takayuki; Watari, Koji; Goto, Takeyoshi; Kikawada, Masakazu; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimawa; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2016-09-19

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Al thin films was investigated by varying the refractive index of the environment near the films in the far-ultraviolet (FUV, 120-200 nm) and deep-ultraviolet (DUV, 200-300 nm) regions. An original FUV-DUV spectrometer that adopts an attenuated total reflectance (ATR) system was used. The measurable wavelength range was down to the 180 nm, and the environment near the Al surface could be controlled. The resultant spectra enabled the dispersion relationship of Al-SPR in the FUV and DUV regions to be obtained. In the presence of 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) on the Al film, the angle and wavelength of the SPR became larger and longer, respectively, compared to those in air. These shifts correspond well with the results of simulations performed using Fresnel equations.

  11. Direct optical measurements of far- and deep-ultraviolet surface plasmon resonance with different refractive indices.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Ichiro; Tanaka, Yoshito Y; Ryoki, Takayuki; Watari, Koji; Goto, Takeyoshi; Kikawada, Masakazu; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimawa; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2016-09-19

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Al thin films was investigated by varying the refractive index of the environment near the films in the far-ultraviolet (FUV, 120-200 nm) and deep-ultraviolet (DUV, 200-300 nm) regions. An original FUV-DUV spectrometer that adopts an attenuated total reflectance (ATR) system was used. The measurable wavelength range was down to the 180 nm, and the environment near the Al surface could be controlled. The resultant spectra enabled the dispersion relationship of Al-SPR in the FUV and DUV regions to be obtained. In the presence of 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) on the Al film, the angle and wavelength of the SPR became larger and longer, respectively, compared to those in air. These shifts correspond well with the results of simulations performed using Fresnel equations. PMID:27661924

  12. Directed Self-assembly of Nanoparticles at the Polymer Surface by Highly Compressible Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    M Asada; P Gin; M Endoh; S Satija; T Taniguchi; T Koga

    2011-12-31

    We report a versatile route for self-assembly of polymer-soluble nanoparticles at the polymer surface using highly compressible supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}). Polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)-based nanocomposite thin films with functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane and phenyl C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester nanoparticles were prepared on Si substrates and exposed to scCO{sub 2} at different pressures under the isothermal condition of 36 C. The resultant structures could be then preserved by the vitrification process of the glassy polymers via quick pressure quench to atmospheric pressure and subsequently characterized by using various surface sensitive experimental techniques in air. We found that the surface segregation of these nanoparticles is induced in the close vicinity of P = 8.2 MPa where the excess absorption of the fluid into the polymers maximizes. However, when the film thickness becomes less than about 4R{sub g} thick (where R{sub g} is the radius of polymer gyration), the uniform dispersion of the nanoparticles is favorable instead even at the same CO{sub 2} conditions. We clarify that the phase transition is correlated with the emergence of a concentration gradient of the fluid at the polymer/CO{sub 2} interface and is a general phenomenon for different polymer-nanoparticle interactions.

  13. Direct observation of DNA motions into solid state nanopore under applied electrical potentials on conductive surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Ando, Genki; Idutsu, Ichiro; Mitsui, Toshiyuki

    2011-03-01

    Solid state nanopore is one of emerging methods for rapid single DNA molecule detection because the translocation of the DNA though nanopore produces ionic current changes. One of issues in this method is clogging long DNA molecules. Once DNA molecules clogged, the molecules are rarely removed by varying or switching the polarity of applied bias voltages across the nanopore. We develop a modified nanopore by 50nm Au coating on top of the nanopore surface to be able to remove the clogged DNA molecules during the DNA translocation experiment. Fluorescence microscopy was implemented for observation of stained DNA molecules. The nanopores with diameters near 100 nm can be used initially. DNA translocation rates changes dramatically by tuning the applied electrical potentials on surface higher or lower than the potentials across the nanopore. Furthermore, the Au potentials modifies IV characteristic of the ionic current across the nanopore which is similar to the gate voltages controlling the SD current in FET. We will discuss the influence of surface potential on DNA motion and translocation and clogged DNA molecules. Finally, we will present the recent results of DNA translocation into the SiN-Au-SiO2 nanopore and discuss the effect of applied voltages on Au.

  14. Directed self-assembly of nanogold using a chemically modified nanopatterned surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nidetz, Robert; Kim, Jinsang

    2012-02-01

    Electron-beam lithography (EBL) was used to define an aminosilane nanopatterned surface in order to electrostatically self-assemble gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The chemically modified nanopatterned surfaces were immersed into a Au NP solution to allow the Au NPs to self-assemble. Equilibrium self-assembly was achieved in only 20 min. The number of Au NPs that self-assembled on an aminosilane dot was controlled by manipulating the diameters of both the Au NPs and the dots. Adding salt to the Au NP solution enabled the Au NPs to self-assemble in greater numbers on the same sized dot. However, the preparation of the Au NP solution containing salt was sensitive to spikes in the salt concentration. These spikes led to aggregation of the Au NPs and non-specific deposition of Au NPs on the substrate. The Au NP patterned surfaces were immersed in a sodium hydroxide solution in order to lift-off the patterned Au NPs, but no lift-off was observed without adequate physical agitation. The van der Waals forces are too strong to allow for lift-off despite the absence of electrostatic forces.

  15. Direct Imaging of DNA/Lipid Complexes Interacting with Liposome Surfaces and Fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Alison J.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.; Rädler, Joachim; George, Cyril X.; Safinya, Cyrus R.; Samuel, Charles E.

    1996-03-01

    Video-enhanced light microscopy techniques (phase contrast, differential interference contrast, and fluorescence) were used for direct imaging of the structure and dynamics of nucleic acid-cationic liposome complexes both on liposomes (a model cell) and within the cytoplasm of Mouse L929 Fibroblasts. The experiments are designed to enable us to correlate the complex's structure to the transfection efficiencies (i.e. the uptake and expression of nucleic acid) in animal cells. The ultimate goal of the project is to design an optimal non-viral vector (carrier of nucleic acids). Fluorescence labeling of both the lipid and nucleic acid components is used for visualization experiments at the level of single complexes interacting with a single cell (e.g. a giant liposome or an isolated mammalian cell). This allows us to follow the temporal path of a complex. Direct motion versus random Brownian diffusion are readily distinguished. Micropipettes were used for placement of cells and microinjection into cells.

  16. High sensitivity of diamond resonant microcantilevers for direct detection in liquids as probed by molecular electrostatic surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Bongrain, Alexandre; Agnès, Charles; Rousseau, Lionel; Scorsone, Emmanuel; Arnault, Jean-Charles; Ruffinatto, Sébastien; Omnès, Franck; Mailley, Pascal; Lissorgues, Gaëlle; Bergonzo, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    millinewtons/meter, thus opening the way for diamond microcantilevers to direct sensing applications in liquids. The evolution of the diamond surface chemistry was also investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  17. The role of direct photolysis and indirect photochemistry in the environmental fate of ethylhexyl methoxy cinnamate (EHMC) in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Vione, D; Calza, P; Galli, F; Fabbri, D; Santoro, V; Medana, C

    2015-12-15

    The aquatic environmental fate of ethylhexyl methoxy cinnamate (EHMC), one of the most used UVB filters worldwide, was studied by assessing its environmental persistence and photoinduced transformations. The role of direct and indirect photolysis was evaluated. Direct photolysis was shown to play a key role, and this process is expected to be the main attenuation route of EHMC in sunlit surface waters. In contrast, the reaction with OH radicals would be negligible and that with (3)CDOM* would at most be a secondary process. The measurement of the quantum yield of direct photolysis and of the rate constants of reaction with photogenerated transient species (or, sometimes, the use of reasonable values for the latter) allowed the prediction of the EHMC half-life time in surface waters, by means of a validated photochemical model. The predicted EHMC lifetime is of the order of hours to a few days in fair-weather summertime, and the main factors controlling the EHMC phototransformation in sunlit surface waters would be the water depth and the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content. The formation of transformation products (TPs) was followed as well via HPLC/HRMS. Three TPs were detected in the samples exposed to UVA radiation, while one additional TP was detected in the samples exposed to UVB radiation. The detected TPs comprised 4-methoxybenzaldehyde, a hydroxylated derivative and dimeric species. Through the use of heterogeneous photocatalysis with TiO2, seven additional TPs were identified, most of them resulting from the further degradation of primary TPs formed through direct photolysis and that might be detected in aquatic systems as well. The photodegradation of EHMC in the presence of TiO2 yielded more toxic TPs than the parent compound (as determined with the Vibrio fischeri Microtox assay). The increased toxicity is partially accounted for by the formation of 4-methoxybenzaldehyde.

  18. Direct On-Surface Patterning of a Crystalline Laminar Covalent Organic Framework Synthesized at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    de la Peña Ruigómez, Alejandro; Rodríguez-San-Miguel, David; Stylianou, Kyriakos C; Cavallini, Massimiliano; Gentili, Denis; Liscio, Fabiola; Milita, Silvia; Roscioni, Otello Maria; Ruiz-González, Maria Luisa; Carbonell, Carlos; Maspoch, Daniel; Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Segura, José Luis; Zamora, Félix

    2015-07-20

    We report herein an efficient, fast, and simple synthesis of an imine-based covalent organic framework (COF) at room temperature (hereafter, RT-COF-1). RT-COF-1 shows a layered hexagonal structure exhibiting channels, is robust, and is porous to N2 and CO2 . The room-temperature synthesis has enabled us to fabricate and position low-cost micro- and submicropatterns of RT-COF-1 on several surfaces, including solid SiO2 substrates and flexible acetate paper, by using lithographically controlled wetting and conventional ink-jet printing.

  19. Direct monitoring of plasmon resonances in a tip-surface gap of varying width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettinger, Bruno; Domke, Katrin F.; Zhang, Dai; Schuster, Rolf; Ertl, Gerhard

    2007-09-01

    We have studied the dependence of tip-enhanced Raman (TER) spectra composed of discrete Raman lines and an intense Lorentzian-shaped background on varying interparticle distance. For increasing tip-sample separation, we observe a remarkable blueshift of the background maximum that is ascribed to an energy shift of the localized surface plasmon resonance. In addition, we report on a steep background and Raman band intensity decrease within 5-10nm tip retraction that highlights the underlying near-field enhancement mechanism of TER spectroscopy.

  20. Direct mapping of ion diffusion times on LiCoO2 surfaces with nanometer resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Senli; Jesse, Stephen; Kalnaus, Sergiy; Balke, Nina; Daniel, Claus; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2011-01-01

    The strong coupling between the molar volume and mobile ion concentration in ionically-conductive solids is used for spatially-resolved studies of ionic transport on the polycrystalline LiCoO2 surface by time-resolved spectroscopy. Strong variability between ionic transport at the grain boundaries and within the grains is observed, and the relationship between relaxation and hysteresis loop formation is established. The use of the strain measurements allows ionic transport be probed on the nanoscale, and suggests enormous potential for probing ionic materials and devices.

  1. Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol and surface optical properties from combined airborne- and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Dubovik, O.; King, M. D.; Sinyuk, A.

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer, CAR, and AERONET data). A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34-2.30 μm) and angular range (180°) of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a) the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b) the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c) Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d) the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  2. Simultaneous Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Optical Properties from Combined Airborne- and Ground-Based Direct and Diffuse Radiometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Dubovik, O.; King, M. D.; Sinyuk, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) and AERONET data). A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34-2.30 m) and angular range (180 ) of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a) the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b) the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c) Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d) the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  3. Myosin binding surface on actin probed by hydroxyl radical footprinting and site-directed labels.

    PubMed

    Oztug Durer, Zeynep A; Kamal, J K Amisha; Benchaar, Sabrina; Chance, Mark R; Reisler, Emil

    2011-11-25

    Actin and myosin are the two main proteins required for cell motility and muscle contraction. The structure of their strongly bound complex-rigor state-is a key for delineating the functional mechanism of actomyosin motor. Current knowledge of that complex is based on models obtained from the docking of known atomic structures of actin and myosin subfragment 1 (S1; the head and neck region of myosin) into low-resolution electron microscopy electron density maps, which precludes atomic- or side-chain-level information. Here, we use radiolytic protein footprinting for global mapping of sites across the actin molecules that are impacted directly or allosterically by myosin binding to actin filaments. Fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and cysteine actin mutants are used for independent, residue-specific probing of S1 effects on two structural elements of actin. We identify actin residue candidates involved in S1 binding and provide experimental evidence to discriminate between the regions of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Focusing on the role of the DNase I binding loop (D-loop) and the W-loop residues of actin in their interactions with S1, we found that the emission properties of acrylodan and the mobility of electron paramagnetic resonance spin labels attached to cysteine mutants of these residues change strongly and in a residue-specific manner upon S1 binding, consistent with the recently proposed direct contacts of these loops with S1. As documented in this study, the direct and indirect changes on actin induced by myosin are more extensive than known until now and attest to the importance of actin dynamics to actomyosin function. PMID:21986200

  4. Direct UV/Optical Imaging of Stellar Surfaces: The Stellar Imager (SI) Vision Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Lyon, Richard G.; Schrijver, Carolus; Karovska, Margarita; Mozurkewich, David

    2007-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a UV/optical, space-based interferometer designed to enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. SI's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives, in support of the Living with a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in thc Universe. SI is a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory" in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap. We discuss herein the science goals of the SI Mission, a mission architecture that could meet those goals, and the technologies needed to enable this mission. Additional information on SI can be found at: http://hires.gsfc.nasa.gov/si/.

  5. Surface acoustic wave amplification by direct current-voltage supplied to graphene film

    SciTech Connect

    Insepov, Z.; Emelin, E.; Kononenko, O.; Roshchupkin, D. V.; Tnyshtykbayev, K. B.; Baigarin, K. A.

    2015-01-12

    Using a high-resolution X-Ray diffraction measurement method, the surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of a Ca{sub 3}TaGa{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 14} (CTGS) piezoelectric crystal was investigated, where an external current was driven across the graphene film. Here, we show that the application of the DC field leads to a significant enhancement of the SAW magnitude and, as a result, to amplification of the diffraction satellites. Amplification of 33.2 dB/cm for the satellite +1, and of 13.8 dB/cm for the satellite +2, at 471 MHz has been observed where the external DC voltage of +10 V was applied. Amplification of SAW occurs above a DC field much smaller than that of a system using bulk semiconductor. Theoretical estimates are in reasonable agreement with our measurements and analysis of experimental data for other materials.

  6. Improving operational land surface model canopy evapotranspiration in Africa using a direct remote sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, M.; Tu, K.; Funk, C.; Michaelsen, J.; Williams, P.; Williams, C.; Ardö, J.; Boucher, M.; Cappelaere, B.; de Grandcourt, A.; Nickless, A.; Nouvellon, Y.; Scholes, R.; Kutsch, W.

    2013-03-01

    Climate change is expected to have the greatest impact on the world's economically poor. In the Sahel, a climatically sensitive region where rain-fed agriculture is the primary livelihood, expected decreases in water supply will increase food insecurity. Studies on climate change and the intensification of the water cycle in sub-Saharan Africa are few. This is due in part to poor calibration of modeled evapotranspiration (ET), a key input in continental-scale hydrologic models. In this study, a remote sensing model of transpiration (the primary component of ET), driven by a time series of vegetation indices, was used to substitute transpiration from the Global Land Data Assimilation System realization of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, Oregon State University, Air Force, and Hydrology Research Laboratory at National Weather Service Land Surface Model (GNOAH) to improve total ET model estimates for monitoring purposes in sub-Saharan Africa. The performance of the hybrid model was compared against GNOAH ET and the remote sensing method using eight eddy flux towers representing major biomes of sub-Saharan Africa. The greatest improvements in model performance were at humid sites with dense vegetation, while performance at semi-arid sites was poor, but better than the models before hybridization. The reduction in errors using the hybrid model can be attributed to the integration of a simple canopy scheme that depends primarily on low bias surface climate reanalysis data and is driven primarily by a time series of vegetation indices.

  7. Enzyme directed formation of un-natural side-chains for covalent surface attachment of proteins.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hwayoung; Jaworski, Justyn

    2014-10-01

    The covalent immobilization of proteins onto surfaces is an essential aspect of several fields of research, including proteomics, sensing, heterogeneous biocatalysis, and more broadly biotechnology. Site-specific, covalent attachment of proteins has been achieved in recent years by the use of expanded genetic codes to produce proteins with controlled placement of un-natural amino acids bearing bio-orthogonal functional groups. Unfortunately, the complexity of developing such systems is impractical for most laboratories; hence, a less complicated approach to generating un-natural amino acid side-chains has been employed. Utilizing a straightforward reaction with formylglycine generating enzyme, we use the site-specific modification of engineered proteins to yield un-natural amino acid side-chains for protein immobilization. Using this approach, we demonstrate the controlled immobilization of various enzymes onto a variety of amine coated surfaces. Our results reveal reusability of the immobilized enzymes via this strategy, and furthermore, we find the activity of the immobilized enzymes to remain even after a month of use indicating significant stability of the linkage.

  8. Direct Imaging of Stellar Surfaces: Results from the Stellar Imager (SI) Vision Mission Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth; Schrijver, Carolus; Karovska, Margarita

    2006-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a UV-Optical, Space-Based Interferometer designed to enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and stellar interiors (via asteroseismology) and of the Universe in general. SI is identified as a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission'' in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and as a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory'' in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap (May, 2005). The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes: The 0.1 mas resolution of this deep-space telescope will transform point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. SI's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. In this paper we will discuss the results of the SI Vision Mission Study, elaborating on the science goals of the SI Mission and a mission architecture that could meet those goals.

  9. Effects of piston surface treatments on performance and emissions of a methanol-fueled, direct injection, stratified charge engine

    SciTech Connect

    West, B.; Green, J.B.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of thermal barrier coatings and/or surface treatments on the performance and emissions of a methanol-fueled, direct-injection, stratified-charge (DISC) engine. A Ricardo Hydra Mark III engine was used for this work and in previous experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary focus of the study was to examine the effects of various piston insert surface treatments on hydrocarbon (HC) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions. Previous studies have shown that engines of this class have a tendency to perform poorly at low loads and have high unburned fuel emissions. A blank aluminum piston was modified to employ removable piston bowl inserts. Four different inserts were tested in the experiment: aluminum, stainless steel with a 1.27-mm (0.050-in.) air gap (to act as a thermal barrier), and two stainless steel/air-gap inserts with coatings. Two stainless steel inserts were dimensionally modified to account for the coating thickness (1.27-mm) and coated identically with partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ). One of the coated inserts then had an additional seal-coat applied. The coated inserts were otherwise identical to the stainless steel/air-gap insert (i.e., they employed the same 1.27-mm air gap). Thermal barrier coatings were employed in an attempt to increase combustion chamber surface temperatures, thereby reducing wall quenching and promoting more complete combustion of the fuel in the quench zone. The seal-coat was applied to the zirconia to reduce the surface porosity; previous research suggested that despite the possibly higher surface temperatures obtainable with a ceramic coating, the high surface area of a plasma-sprayed coating may actually allow fuel to adhere to the surface and increase the unburned fuel emissions and fuel consumption.

  10. Templating Biomineralization: Surface Directed Protein Self-assembly and External Magnetic Field Stimulation of Osteoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Xiaolan

    biomineralization is investigated by SEM, GIXRD and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). Gene expression during the exposure of SMF is also studies by RT-PCR. The results indicated that exposure to SMF induces osteoblasts to produce larger quantities of HA, with higher degree of crystalline order. The controlling and understanding of protein on the surface is of great interest in biomedical application such as implant medicine, biosensor design, food processing, and chromatographic separations. The adsorbed protein onto the surface significantly determines the performance of biomaterials in a biological environment. Recent studies have suggested that the preservation of the native secondary structure of protein adsorbed is essential for biological application. In order to manipulate protein adsorption and design biocompatible materials, the mechanisms underlying protein-surface interactions, especially how surface properties of materials induce conformational changes of adsorbed proteins, needs to be well understood. Here we demonstrated that even though SPS is a necessary condition, it is not sufficient. We show that low substrate conductivity as well as proper salt concentration are also critical in sustained protein adsorption continuously. These factors allow one to pattern regions of different conducting properties and for the first time patterns physiologically relevant protein structures. Here we show that we can achieve patterned biomineralized regimes, both with plasma proteins in a simple and robust manner without additional functionalization or application of electrochemical gradients. Since the data indicate that the patterns just need to differ in electrical conductivity, rather than surface chemistry, we propose that the creation of transient image charges, due to incomplete charge screening, may be responsible for sustain the driving force for continual protein absorption.

  11. A Novel Approach for Direct Measurement of Cumulative Water and Solute Mass Fluxes using a Passive Surface Water Flux Meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padowski, J. C.; Jawitz, J. W.; Hatfield, K.; Annable, M. D.; Cho, J.; Klammler, H.

    2005-12-01

    This work describes the development of a novel technique for passive measurement of pollutant loads in flowing surface water systems. Recent changes to the Clean Water Act have prompted a major initiative for the development of a national list of impaired surface waters. According to the law, every state is now responsible for defining the use of each water body and creating a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) to regulate all pollutant loads entering these systems. Current methods for determining pollutant loads typically involve collecting separate instantaneous measurements of water velocities and solute concentrations at discrete points in space and time. The data must be combined, interpolated and integrated after collection to arrive at estimates of local cumulative solute flux and discharge. The frequency with which these parameters are measured typically rely upon the availability of resources (time, money, manpower, etc.) and are often undersampled. A method is presented here for direct measurement of cumulative surface water flux (discharge) and solute flux using a Passive Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM). The PSFM is designed to directly measure local cumulative water and solute mass fluxes in surface water flow without any active components transmitting or logging data over time. This passive integration of water and solute mass fluxes eliminates the need for independent water flux and concentration measurements and any additional computations. Laboratory trials under steady state and transient conditions were used to test the appropriateness of the PSFM as a device for collecting water quality data. Results from steady state experiments verified the ability of PSFM to accurately measure cumulative water and solute mass flux. Preliminary results from investigations under transient flow conditions also showed promise for measuring pollutant loads in natural systems with this device.

  12. Semi-direct lysis of swabs and evaluation of their efficiencies to recover human noroviruses GI and GII from surfaces.

    PubMed

    De Keuckelaere, Ann; Stals, Ambroos; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2014-06-01

    Enteric viruses such as noroviruses (NoVs) continue to be the cause of widespread viral outbreaks due to person-to-person transmission, contaminated food, and contaminated surfaces. In order to optimize swabbing methodology for the detection of viruses on (food) contact surfaces, three swab elution/extraction strategies were compared in part one of this study, out of which, one strategy was based on the recently launched ISO protocol (ISO/TS 15216-1) for the determination of hepatitis A virus and NoV in food using real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). These three swab elution/extraction strategies were tested for the detection of GI.4 and GII.4 NoV on high-density polyethylene (HD-PE) surfaces with the use of cotton swabs. For detection of GI.4 and GII.4, the sample recovery efficiency (SRE) obtained with the direct lysis strategy (based on ISO/TS 15216-1) was significantly lower than the SRE obtained with both other strategies. The semi-direct lysis strategy was chosen to assess the SRE of two common swabs (cotton swab and polyester swab) versus the biowipe (Biomérieux, Lyon, France) on three surfaces (HD-PE, neoprene rubber (NR), and nitrile gloves (GL)). For both surfaces, HD-PE and GL, no significant differences in SREs of GI.4 and GII.4 NoVs were detected between the three different swabs. For the coarser NR, biowipes turned out to be the best option for detecting both GI.4 and GII.4 NoV. PMID:24832038

  13. Self-Aspirated Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Source for Direct Sampling of Analytes on Surfaces and in Liquid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Keiji G; Ford, Michael J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2005-01-01

    A self-aspirating heated nebulizer probe is described and demonstrated for use in the direct analysis of analytes on surfaces and in liquid samples by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry. Functionality and performance of the probe as a self-aspirating APCI source is demonstrated using reserpine and progesterone as test compounds. The utility of the probe to sample analytes directly from surfaces was demonstrated first by scanning development lanes of a reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography plate in which a three-component dye mixture, viz., Fat Red 7B, Solvent Green 3, and Solvent Blue 35, was spotted and the components were separated. Development lanes were scanned by the sampling probe operated under computer control (x, y plane) while full-scan mass spectra were recorded using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. In addition, the ability to sample the surface of pharmaceutical tablets (viz., Extra Strength Tylenol(reg. sign) and Evista(reg. sign) tablets) and to detect the active ingredients (acetaminophen and raloxifene, respectively) selectively was demonstrated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Finally, the capability to sample analyte solutions from the wells of a 384-well microtiter plate and to perform quantitative analyses using MS/MS detection was illustrated with cotinine standards spiked with cotinine-d{sub 3} as an internal standard.

  14. Self-aspirating atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source for direct sampling of analytes on surfaces and in liquid solutions.

    PubMed

    Asano, Keiji G; Ford, Michael J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2005-01-01

    A self-aspirating heated nebulizer probe is described and demonstrated for use in the direct analysis of analytes on surfaces and in liquid samples by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry. Functionality and performance of the probe as a self-aspirating APCI source is demonstrated using reserpine and progesterone as test compounds. The utility of the probe to sample analytes directly from surfaces was demonstrated first by scanning development lanes of a reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography plate in which a three-component dye mixture, viz., Fat Red 7B, Solvent Green 3, and Solvent Blue 35, was spotted and the components were separated. Development lanes were scanned by the sampling probe operated under computer control (x, y plane) while full-scan mass spectra were recorded using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. In addition, the ability to sample the surface of pharmaceutical tablets (viz., Extra Strength Tylenol and Evista tablets) and to detect the active ingredients (acetaminophen and raloxifene, respectively) selectively was demonstrated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Finally, the capability to sample analyte solutions from the wells of a 384-well microtiter plate and to perform quantitative analyses using MS/MS detection was illustrated with cotinine standards spiked with cotinine-d3 as an internal standard.

  15. Directed self-assembly of colloidal particles onto the chemically anchoring patterned surface in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Armas-Pérez, Julio; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan; de Pablo, Juan; Nealey, Paul

    The defects assisted assembly of colloidal particles works are more focused on the defects created in the bulk or the interface of nematic liquid crystal, which usually observe a group of particles spontaneously forming a chain or aggregating over the defects. The confining surface with specific 3D sculptured structures, such as pyramid or zig-zag grooves, offers the opportunity to isolate the trapped particles into certain position. Here, we explore a new method to direct self-assemble the colloidal particles through manipulating defects on the 2D geometry confined anchoring surface. Since the director of the preferred planar orientation of LCs could be manipulated by the pattern geometry and dimension, the topological defects could be engineered based on multi-stable orientation by designed 2D geometry pattern of different controllable direction at sub-micrometer dimension. We demonstrate that the designed one single middle straight stripe with disjoint two groups of straight stripe array on both side of the middle stripe as 45 angle of different orientation director could control the distortion of the disjoint gap space thus acting as defects template to trap the colloidal particles directed self-assembly at the designed positions. Through anchoring distribution on the pattern areas, geometry design of pattern, and also the external electric field applied on the system, those defects areas could be generate, erase, resume or even correct.

  16. Proximal surface caries detection with direct-exposure and rare earth screen/film imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lundeen, R.C.; McDavid, W.D.; Barnwell, G.M.

    1988-12-01

    This laboratory study compared five imaging systems for their diagnostic accuracy in detection of proximal surface dental caries. Ten viewers provided data on radiographic detectability of carious lesions. The diagnostic accuracy of each system was determined with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves by comparing viewer data with the true state of the teeth as determined microscopically. D-speed film marginally outperformed the other four systems, but the three screen/film systems matched the diagnostic accuracy of E-speed film. Radiation reductions between 62% and 92% were achieved with the screen/film systems when compared to the two conventional dental films. The feasibility of designing a screen/film bite-wing cassette was shown, but the poor diagnostic accuracy of the present bite-wing system indicated a need for a new technology in caries detection.

  17. Effect of spectrally varying albedo of vegetation surfaces on shortwave radiation fluxes and direct aerosol forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Martins, J. V.; Yu, H.

    2012-06-01

    This study develops an algorithm for the representation of large spectral variations of albedo over vegetation surfaces based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) observations at 7 discrete channels centered at 0.47, 0.55, 0.67, 0.86, 1.24, 1.63, and 2.11 μm. The MODIS 7-channel observations miss several major features of vegetation albedo including the vegetation red edge near 0.7 μm and vegetation absorption features at 1.48 and 1.92 μm. We characterize these features by investigating aerosol forcing in different spectral ranges. We show that the correction at 0.7 μm is the most sensitive and important due to the presence of the red edge and strong solar radiation; the other two corrections are less sensitive due to the weaker solar radiation and strong atmospheric water absorption. Four traditional approaches for estimating the reflectance spectrum and the MODIS enhanced vegetation albedo (MEVA) are tested against various vegetation types: dry grass, green grass, conifer, and deciduous from the John Hopkins University (JHU) spectral library; aspens from the US Geological Survey (USGS) digital spectral library; and Amazon vegetation types. Compared to traditional approaches, MEVA improves the accuracy of the outgoing flux at the top of the atmosphere by over 60 W m-2 and aerosol forcing by over 10 W m-2. Specifically, for Amazon vegetation types, MEVA can improve the accuracy of daily averaged aerosol forcing at equator at equinox by 3.7 W m-2 (about 70% of the aerosol forcing calculated with high spectral resolution surface reflectance). These improvements indicate that MEVA can contribute to vegetation covered regional climate studies, and help to improve understanding of climate processes and climate change.

  18. Direct Surface Analysis of Fungal Species by Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, Nancy B. ); Wahl, Jon H. ); Kingsley, Mark T. ); Wahl, Karen L. )

    2001-12-01

    Intact spores and/or hyphae of Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus oryzae, Trichoderma reesei and Phanerochaete chrysosporium are analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). This study investigates various methods of sample preparation and matrices to determine optimum collection and analysis criteria for fungal analysis by MALDI-MS. Fungi are applied to the MALDI sample target as untreated, sonicated, acid/heat treated, or blotted directly from the fungal culture with double-stick tape. Ferulic acid or sinapinic acid matrix solution is layered over the dried samples and analyzed by MALDI-MS. Statistical analysis of the data show that simply using double stick tape to collect and transfer to a MALDI sample plate typically worked as well as the other preparation methods, but requires the least sample handling.

  19. A Study of an Optical Lunar Surface Communications Network with High Bandwidth Direct to Earth Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K.; Biswas, A.; Schoolcraft, J.

    2011-01-01

    Analyzed optical DTE (direct to earth) and lunar relay satellite link analyses, greater than 200 Mbps downlink to 1-m Earth receiver and greater than 1 Mbps uplink achieved with mobile 5-cm lunar transceiver, greater than 1Gbps downlink and greater than 10 Mpbs uplink achieved with 10-cm stationary lunar transceiver, MITLL (MIT Lincoln Laboratory) 2013 LLCD (Lunar Laser Communications Demonstration) plans to demonstrate 622 Mbps downlink with 20 Mbps uplink between lunar orbiter and ground station; Identified top five technology challenges to deploying lunar optical network, Performed preliminary experiments on two of challenges: (i) lunar dust removal and (ii)DTN over optical carrier, Exploring opportunities to evaluate DTN (delay-tolerant networking) over optical link in a multi-node network e.g. Desert RATS.

  20. Direct growth of single-layer graphene on Ni surface manipulated by Si barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Li, Jinhua; Chen, Da; Zheng, Li; Zheng, Xiaohu; Guo, Qinglei; Wei, Xing; Ding, Guqiao; Zhang, Miao; Di, Zengfeng; Liu, Su

    2014-05-01

    Pure Ni film is the first metal catalyst that can generate graphene with small domains and variable thickness across the film. The lack of control over layer number is attributed to the high carbon solubility of Ni. We designed a combinatorial Ni/Si system, which enables the direct growth of monolayer graphene via chemical vapor deposition method. In this system, Si was introduced as the carbon diffusion barriers to prevent carbon diffusing into Ni film. The designed system fully overcomes the fundamental limitations of Ni and provides a facile and effective strategy to yield homogenous monolayer graphene over large area. The field effect transistors were fabricated and characterized to determine the electrical properties of the synthesized graphene film. Furthermore, this technique can utilize standard equipments available in semiconductor technology.

  1. Trace element content and magnetic properties of commercial HOPG samples studied by ion beam microscopy and SQUID magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Spemann, D. Esquinazi, P. Setzer, A.; Böhlmann, W.

    2014-10-15

    In this study, the impurity concentration and magnetic response of nine highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples with different grades and from different providers were determined using ion beam microscopy and SQUID magnetometry. Apart from sideface contaminations in the as-received state, bulk contamination of the samples in most cases consists of disk-shaped micron-sized particles made of Ti and V with an additional Fe contamination around the grain perimeter. The saturation magnetization typically increases with Fe concentration, however, there is no simple correlation between Fe content and magnetic moment. The saturation magnetization of one, respectively six, out of nine samples clearly exceeds the maximum contribution from pure Fe or Fe{sub 3}C. For most samples the temperature dependence of the remanence decreases linearly with T – a dependence found previously for defect-induced magnetism (DIM) in HOPG. We conclude that apart from magnetic impurities, additional contribution to the ferromagnetic magnetization exists in pristine HOPG in agreement with previous studies. A comparative study between the results of ion beam microscopy and the commonly used EDX analysis shows clearly that EDX is not a reliable method for quantitative trace elemental analysis in graphite, clarifying weaknesses and discrepancies in the element concentrations given in the recent literature.

  2. Localization of Interictal Epileptiform Activity Using Magnetoencephalography with Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry in Patients with a Vagus Nerve Stimulator

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton-Kotloski, Jennifer R.; Kotloski, Robert J.; Boggs, Jane A.; Popli, Gautam; O’Donovan, Cormac A.; Couture, Daniel E.; Cornell, Cassandra; Godwin, Dwayne W.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) provides useful and non-redundant information in the evaluation of patients with epilepsy, and in particular, during the pre-surgical evaluation of pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a common treatment for pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. However, interpretation of MEG recordings from patients with a VNS is challenging due to the severe magnetic artifacts produced by the VNS. We used synthetic aperture magnetometry (g2) [SAM(g2)], an adaptive beamformer that maps the excessive kurtosis, to map interictal spikes to the coregistered MRI image, despite the presence of contaminating VNS artifact. We present a series of eight patients with a VNS who underwent MEG recording. Localization of interictal epileptiform activity by SAM(g2) is compared to invasive electrophysiologic monitoring and other localizing approaches. While the raw MEG recordings were uninterpretable, analysis of the recordings with SAM(g2) identified foci of peak kurtosis and source signal activity that was unaffected by the VNS artifact. SAM(g2) analysis of MEG recordings in patients with a VNS produces interpretable results and expands the use of MEG for the pre-surgical evaluation of epilepsy. PMID:25505894

  3. Direct measurement of colloidal interactions between polyaniline surfaces in a UV-curable coating formulation: the effect of surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity and resin composition.

    PubMed

    Jafarzadeh, Shadi; Claesson, Per M; Pan, Jinshan; Thormann, Esben

    2014-02-01

    The interactions between polyaniline particles and polyaniline surfaces in polyester acrylate resin mixed with 1,6-hexanediol diacrylate monomer have been investigated using contact angle measurements and the atomic force microscopy colloidal probe technique. Polyaniline with different characteristics (hydrophilic and hydrophobic) were synthesized directly on spherical polystyrene particles of 10 μm in diameter. Surface forces were measured between core/shell structured polystyrene/polyaniline particles (and a pure polystyrene particle as reference) mounted on an atomic force microscope cantilever and a pressed pellet of either hydrophilic or hydrophobic polyaniline powders, in resins of various polymer:monomer ratios. A short-range purely repulsive interaction was observed between hydrophilic polyaniline (doped with phosphoric acid) surfaces in polyester acrylate resin. In contrast, interactions between hydrophobic polyaniline (doped with n-decyl phosphonic acid) were dominated by attractive forces, suggesting less compatibility and higher tendency for aggregation of these particles in liquid polyester acrylate compared to hydrophilic polyaniline. Both observations are in agreement with the conclusions from the interfacial energy studies performed by contact angle measurements. PMID:24400981

  4. Direct measurement instrument for lattice spacing on regular crystalline surfaces using a scanning tunneling microscope and laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rerkkumsup, Pongpun; Aketagawa, Masato; Takada, Koji; Watanabe, Tomonori; Sadakata, Shin

    2003-03-01

    An instrument for direct measurement of the lattice spacing on regular crystalline surfaces, which incorporates a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and a phase modulation homodyne interferometer (PMHI), was developed. Our aim was to verify the applicability of the length measurement method in which the lattice spacing on the crystalline surface obtained with the STM is used as a fine scale and the optical interference fringe, i.e., wavelength λ, of the PMHI is used as a coarse scale. The instrument consists of a STM head with a YZ axes tip scanner, a precise X-axis sample stage with flexure springs, and the PMHI with a four-path differential configuration. Combining the movements of the YZ-axes tip scanner and the X-axis sample stage, the instrument can perform long atomic STM imaging of the crystalline surface along the X axis, which is also the fast scanning axis for eliminating thermal drift. The relative displacement of the X-axis sample stage between optical interference dark fringes (=null points) of the PMHI, which is λ/16 times the integer value in the design, can be measured with a resolution of 10 pm or less using the phase modulation technique. The lattice spacing on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) crystalline surface was measured by comparing the number of atoms in the atomic STM image of 100 nm length with the optical fringes of the PMHI. The mean and expanded uncertainty (k=2) of the lattice spacing between α sites of the HOPG surface were 0.246 nm and 7 pm, respectively. The mean value was very close to that reported by Park and Quate [Sang-II Park and C. F. Quate, Appl. Phys. Lett. 48, 112 (1986)]. The experimental results also show the feasibility of realizing length measurement using the lattice spacing on the crystalline surface and the PMHI.

  5. Development of a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.; Seki, C.; Kashikura, K.

    1996-12-31

    We have developed and tested a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface of animals. The beta camera consists of a thin CaF{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator, a tapered fiber optics plate (taper fiber) and a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The taper fiber is the key component of the camera. We have developed two types of beta cameras. One is 20mm diameter field of view camera for imaging brain surface of cats. The other is 10mm diameter camera for that of rats. Spatial resolutions of beta camera for cats and rats were 0.8mm FWHM and 0.5mm FWHM, respectively. We confirmed that developed beta cameras may overcome the limitation of the spatial resolution of the positron emission tomography (PET).

  6. Direct deconvolution of electric and magnetic responses of single nanoparticles by Fourier space surface plasmon resonance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Chan, C. F.; Ong, H. C.

    2016-11-01

    We use polarization-resolved surface plasmon resonance microscopy to image single dielectric nanoparticles. In real space, the nanoparticles exhibit V-shape diffraction patterns due to the interference between the incident surface plasmon polariton wave and the evanescent scattered waves, which arise from the interplay between the electric and magnetic dipoles of the nanoparticle. By using cross-polarized Fourier space imaging to extract only the scattered waves, we find the angular far-field intensity corresponds very well to the near-field scattering distribution, as confirmed by both analytical and numerical calculations. As a result, we directly deconvolute the contributions of electric and magnetic dipoles to the scattered fields without involving near-field techniques.

  7. Analysis of Direct Recordings from the Surface of the Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towle, Vernon L.

    2006-03-01

    Recording electrophysiologic signals directly from the cortex of patients with chronically implanted subdural electrodes provides an opportunity to map the functional organization of human cortex. In addition to using direct cortical stimulation, sensory evoked potentials, and electrocorticography (ECoG) can also be used. The analysis of ECoG power spectrums and inter-electrode lateral coherence patterns may be helpful in identifying important eloquent cortical areas and epileptogenic regions in cortical multifocal epilepsy. Analysis of interictal ECoG coherence can reveal pathological cortical areas that are functionally distinct from patent cortex. Subdural ECoGs have been analyzed from 50 medically refractive pediatric epileptic patients as part of their routine surgical work-up. Recording arrays were implanted over the frontal, parietal, occipital or temporal lobes for 4-10 days, depending on the patient's seizure semiology and imaging studies. Segments of interictal ECoG ranging in duration from 5 sec to 45 min were examined to identify areas of increased local coherence. Ictal records were examined to identify the stages and spread of the seizures. Immediately before a seizure began, lateral coherence values decreased, reorganized, and then increased during the late ictal and post-ictal periods. When computed over relatively long interictal periods (45 min) coherence patterns were found to be highly stable (r = 0.97, p < .001), and only changed gradually over days. On the other hand, when calculated over short periods of time (5 sec) coherence patterns were highly dynamic. Coherence patterns revealed a rich topography, with reduced coherence across sulci and major fissures. Areas that participate in receptive and expressive speech can be mapped through event-related potentials and analysis of task-specific changes in power spectrums. Information processing is associated with local increases in high frequency activity, with concomitant changes in coherence

  8. The effect of surface contact activation and temperature on plasma coagulation with an RNA aptamer directed against factor IXa.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Anandi; Vogler, Erwin A; Sullenger, Bruce A; Becker, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    The anticoagulant properties of a novel RNA aptamer that binds FIXa depend collectively on the intensity of surface contact activation of human blood plasma, aptamer concentration, and its binding affinity for FIXa. Accordingly, anticoagulation efficiency of plasma containing any particular aptamer concentration is low when coagulation is strongly activated by hydrophilic surfaces compared to the anticoagulation efficiency in plasma that is weakly activated by hydrophobic surfaces. Anticoagulation efficiency is lower at hypothermic temperatures possibly because aptamer-FIXa binding decreases with decreasing temperatures. Experimental results demonstrating these trends are qualitatively interpreted in the context of a previously established model of anticoagulation efficiency of thrombin-binding DNA aptamers that exhibit anticoagulation properties similar to the FIXa aptamer. In principle, FIXa aptamer anticoagulants should be more efficient and therefore more clinically useful than thrombin-binding aptamers because aptamer binding to FIXa competes only with FX that is at much lower blood concentration than fibrinogen (FI) that competes with thrombin-binding aptamers. Our findings may have translatable relevance in the application of aptamer anticoagulants for clinical conditions in which blood is in direct contact with non-biological surfaces such as those encountered in cardiopulmonary bypass circuits. PMID:23054460

  9. Reorganisation of the large-scale structures in turbulent boundary layers using highly ordered and directional surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevin, -; Nugroho, Bagus; Pathikonda, Gokul; Barros, Julio; Christensen, Kenneth; Monty, Jason; Hutchins, Nicholas; UoM-UIUC riblets study Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    The potential of riblet-type surface roughness with converging-diverging (herring-bone type) arrangements to reorganise the large-scale coherent structures that populate the logarithmic region of turbulent boundary layers is investigated at moderate Reynolds number. The ability of this transitionally rough surface to generate large-scale counter rotating roll-modes suggests that a preferential arrangement of the naturally occurring large-scale structures may have been introduced. Prior analysis of the pre-multiplied energy spectra of streamwise velocity fluctuation indicates an increase (or decrease) in the large-scale streamwise turbulence energy over the converging region (or diverging) of the riblets. In this study we examine this possible spanwise redistribution of the coherent structures using instantaneous planar Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in the wall-parallel plane (within the logarithmic region) as well as cross-plane Stereoscopic PIV. The characteristics of the large-scale structure over the converging-diverging surface are compared with those of the corresponding smooth-wall case, revealing pronounced modification of the size, strength and alignment of these features over the directional surface. Collaboration between University of Melbourne and University of Illinois on converging-diverging riblets study.

  10. Validation of Direct Analysis Real Time source/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for organophosphate quantitation on wafer surface.

    PubMed

    Hayeck, Nathalie; Ravier, Sylvain; Gemayel, Rachel; Gligorovski, Sasho; Poulet, Irène; Maalouly, Jacqueline; Wortham, Henri

    2015-11-01

    Microelectronic wafers are exposed to airborne molecular contamination (AMC) during the fabrication process of microelectronic components. The organophosphate compounds belonging to the dopant group are one of the most harmful groups. Once adsorbed on the wafer surface these compounds hardly desorb and could diffuse in the bulk of the wafer and invert the wafer from p-type to n-type. The presence of these compounds on wafer surface could have electrical effect on the microelectronic components. For these reasons, it is of importance to control the amount of these compounds on the surface of the wafer. As a result, a fast quantitative and qualitative analytical method, nondestructive for the wafers, is needed to be able to adjust the process and avoid the loss of an important quantity of processed wafers due to the contamination by organophosphate compounds. Here we developed and validated an analytical method for the determination of organic compounds adsorbed on the surface of microelectronic wafers using the Direct Analysis in Real Time-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (DART-ToF-MS) system. Specifically, the developed methodology concerns the organophosphate group.

  11. Grafting Poly(3-hexylthiophene) from Silicon Nanocrystal Surfaces: Synthesis and Properties of a Functional Hybrid Material with Direct Interfacial Contact.

    PubMed

    Islam, Muhammad Amirul; Purkait, Tapas K; Mobarok, Md Hosnay; Hoehlein, Ignaz M D; Sinelnikov, Regina; Iqbal, Muhammad; Azulay, Doron; Balberg, Isaac; Millo, Oded; Rieger, Bernhard; Veinot, Jonathan G C

    2016-06-20

    Hybrid functional materials (HFMs) comprised of semiconductor nanoparticles and conjugated polymers offer the potential of synergetic photophysical properties. We have developed HFMs based upon silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) and the conductive polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (SiNC@P3HT) by applying surface-initiated Kumada catalyst transfer polycondensation (SI-KCTP). One unique characteristic of the developed SiNC@P3HT is the formation of a direct covalent bonding between SiNCs and P3HT. The presented method for obtaining direct interfacial attachment, which is not accessible using other methods, may allow for the development of materials with efficient electronic communication at the donor-acceptor interfaces. Systematic characterization provides evidence of a core-shell structure, enhanced interfacial electron and/or energy transfer between the P3HT and SiNC components, as well as formation of a type-II heterostructure.

  12. Analysis of Antibodies Directed against Merozoite Surface Protein 1 of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Woehlbier, Ute; Epp, Christian; Kauth, Christian W.; Lutz, Rolf; Long, Carole A.; Coulibaly, Boubacar; Kouyaté, Bocar; Arevalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates; Bujard, Hermann

    2006-01-01

    The 190-kDa merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) of Plasmodium falciparum, an essential component in the parasite's life cycle, is a primary candidate for a malaria vaccine. Rabbit antibodies elicited by the heterologously produced MSP-1 processing products p83, p30, p38, and p42, derived from strain 3D7, were analyzed for the potential to inhibit in vitro erythrocyte invasion by the parasite and parasite growth. Our data show that (i) epitopes recognized by antibodies, which inhibit parasite replication, are distributed throughout the entire MSP-1 molecule; (ii) when combined, antibodies specific for different regions of MSP-1 inhibit in a strictly additive manner; (iii) anti-MSP-1 antibodies interfere with erythrocyte invasion as well as with the intraerythrocytic growth of the parasite; and (iv) antibodies raised against MSP-1 of strain 3D7 strongly cross-inhibit replication of the heterologous strain FCB-1. Accordingly, anti-MSP-1 antibodies appear to be capable of interfering with parasite multiplication at more than one level. Since the overall immunogenicity profile of MSP-1 in rabbits closely resembles that found in sera of Aotus monkeys immunized with parasite-derived MSP-1 and of humans semi-immune to malaria from whom highly inhibiting antigen-specific antibodies were recovered, we consider the findings reported here to be relevant for the development of MSP-1-based vaccines against malaria. PMID:16428781

  13. Direct nutritional link between 600-m deep cold-water corals and surface productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soetaert, Karline; Mohn, Christian; Rengstorff, Anna; Grehan, Anthony; van Oevelen, Dick

    2016-04-01

    Cold-water corals (CWC) form deep-sea reefs that are found in all of the world's oceans, with an areal extent at par with that of tropical coral reefs, and are recognised hotspots of biodiversity and metabolic activity. Yet, it remains largely enigmatic how these rich CWC reefs can thrive in a cold and dark environment that is considered to be strongly food-limited. Here, we use a novel benthic-pelagic modeling approach, which involves coupling models of hydrodynamics, biogeochemistry and habitat suitability, to unravel organic matter delivery to reef mounds at a water depth of 600 m that are capped with a thriving CWC reef community at Rockall Bank (NE Atlantic). Model simulations show that the interaction between 300-m high reef mounds and spring tidal currents induces episodic downwelling events that establish a vertical coupling between 600-m deep CWC with surface productivity. We therefore conclude that there is a positive feedback between CWC mound growth and organic matter supply. This episodic downwelling strongly enhances carbon sequestration to the deep ocean and the ubiquitous occurrence of topographic rises along the ocean margins suggests that a topographically-induced benthic-pelagic carbon pump could be of global importance.

  14. DIRECT IMAGE PROCESSING OF CORRODING SURFACES APPLIED TO FRICTION STIR WELDING.

    SciTech Connect

    ISAACS,H.S.ET AL.

    2003-10-12

    An in situ process for visually locating corrosion is presented. The process visually displays image differences obtained by subtracting one digitized image from another. The difference image shows only where changes have taken place during period between the recording of the two images. Changes are due to both corrosion attack of the surface and concentration changes of dissolved corrosion products in solution. Indicators added to the solution assist by decorating sites of corrosion as diffusion and convection of the dissolved products increase the size of the affected region. A study of the initial stages of corrosion of a friction stir welded Al alloy 7075 has been performed using this imaging technique. Pitting potential measurements suggest that there was an initial increased sensitivity to corrosion. The difference image technique demonstrated that it was due to a reformation of the passive film that occurs with Zn containing Al alloys which occurs preferentially along flow protected regions. The most susceptible region of the weld was found to be where both limited deformation and thermal transients are produced during welding.

  15. Direct and high throughput (HT) interactions on the ribosomal surface by iRIA

    PubMed Central

    Pesce, Elisa; Minici, Claudia; Baβler, Jochen; Hurt, Ed; Degano, Massimo; Calamita, Piera; Biffo, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes function as platforms for binding of other molecules, but technologies for studying this process are lacking. Therefore we developed iRIA (in vitro Ribosomes Interaction Assay). In approach I, Artemia salina ribosomes spotted on solid phase are used for binding picomoles of analytes; in approach II, cellular extracts allow the measurement of ribosome activity in different conditions. We apply the method to analyze several features of eIF6 binding to 60S subunits. By approach I, we show that the off-rate of eIF6 from preribosomes is slower than from mature ribosomes and that its binding to mature 60S occurs in the nM affinity range. By approach II we show that eIF6 binding sites on 60S are increased with mild eIF6 depletion and decreased in cells that are devoid of SBDS, a ribosomal factor necessary for 60S maturation and involved in Swachman Diamond syndrome. We show binding conditions to immobilized ribosomes adaptable to HT and quantify free ribosomes in cell extracts. In conclusion, we suggest that iRIA will greatly facilitate the study of interactions on the ribosomal surface. PMID:26486184

  16. Analysis of antibodies directed against merozoite surface protein 1 of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Woehlbier, Ute; Epp, Christian; Kauth, Christian W; Lutz, Rolf; Long, Carole A; Coulibaly, Boubacar; Kouyaté, Bocar; Arevalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates; Bujard, Hermann

    2006-02-01

    The 190-kDa merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) of Plasmodium falciparum, an essential component in the parasite's life cycle, is a primary candidate for a malaria vaccine. Rabbit antibodies elicited by the heterologously produced MSP-1 processing products p83, p30, p38, and p42, derived from strain 3D7, were analyzed for the potential to inhibit in vitro erythrocyte invasion by the parasite and parasite growth. Our data show that (i) epitopes recognized by antibodies, which inhibit parasite replication, are distributed throughout the entire MSP-1 molecule; (ii) when combined, antibodies specific for different regions of MSP-1 inhibit in a strictly additive manner; (iii) anti-MSP-1 antibodies interfere with erythrocyte invasion as well as with the intraerythrocytic growth of the parasite; and (iv) antibodies raised against MSP-1 of strain 3D7 strongly cross-inhibit replication of the heterologous strain FCB-1. Accordingly, anti-MSP-1 antibodies appear to be capable of interfering with parasite multiplication at more than one level. Since the overall immunogenicity profile of MSP-1 in rabbits closely resembles that found in sera of Aotus monkeys immunized with parasite-derived MSP-1 and of humans semi-immune to malaria from whom highly inhibiting antigen-specific antibodies were recovered, we consider the findings reported here to be relevant for the development of MSP-1-based vaccines against malaria.

  17. A Conceptual Study for the Autonomous Direct Forming of Lunar Regolith into Flexlock (Trademark) Geomats for Lunar Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Luke B.; Hintze, Paul; OConnor, Gregory W.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the conceptual method of an autonomously operable Direct Forming machine that would consume regolith or regolith slag to mold intimately, interlinked elements in a continuous process. The resulting product, one to three meter wide geomats, would be deployed over commonly traversed areas to isolate the astronauts and equipment from underlying dust. The porous geotextile would provide areas for dust settling, thereby mitigating dust impingement on astronaut suits or surface structures. Because of their self-supporting yet flexible structure, these geomats could be assembled into shields and buttresses to protect lunar habitants from radiation, forming a "flexoskeleton" from in situ materials.

  18. Underwater imaging using a hybrid Kirchhoff migration: direction of arrival method and a sparse surface sensor array.

    PubMed

    Dord, Jean-Francois; Farhat, Charbel

    2010-08-01

    This paper considers the problem of imaging a complex object submerged in shallow waters using a sparse surface sensor array and a hybrid signal processing method. This method is constructed by refining the Kirchhoff migration technique to incorporate a zoning of the sensors and an analysis of multiple reflections, and combining it with the direction of arrival estimation method. Its performance is assessed and analyzed with the shape identification of a mockup submarine by numerical simulation. The obtained numerical results highlight the potential of this approach for identifying underwater intruders.

  19. Direct measurement of sub-surface mass change using the variable-baseline gravity gradient method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Jeffrey; Ferré, Ty P. A.; Güntner, Andreas; Abe, Maiko; Creutzfeldt, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Time-lapse gravity data provide a direct, non-destructive method to monitor mass changes at scales from cm to km. But, the effectively infinite spatial sensitivity of gravity measurements can make it difficult to isolate the signal of interest. The variable-baseline gravity gradient method, based on the difference of measurements between two gravimeters, is an alternative to the conventional approach of individually modeling all sources of mass and elevation change. This approach can improve the signal-to-noise ratio for many applications by removing the contributions of Earth tides, loading, and other signals that have the same effect on both gravimeters. At the same time, this approach can focus the support volume within a relatively small user-defined region of the subsurface. The method is demonstrated using paired superconducting gravimeters to make for the first time a large-scale, non-invasive measurement of infiltration wetting front velocity and change in water content above the wetting front.

  20. Laminar flow in a microchannel with hydrophobic surface patterned microribs oriented parallel to the flow direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynes, D.; Jeffs, K.; Woolford, B.; Webb, B. W.

    2007-09-01

    This paper reports results of an analytical and experimental investigation of the laminar flow in a parallel-plate microchannel with ultrahydrophobic top and bottom walls. The walls are fabricated with microribs and cavities that are oriented parallel to the flow direction. The channel walls are modeled in an idealized fashion, with the shape of the liquid-vapor meniscus approximated as flat. An analytical model of the vapor cavity flow is employed and coupled with a numerical model of the liquid flow by matching the local liquid and vapor phase velocity and shear stress at the interface. The numerical predictions show that the effective slip length and the reduction in the classical friction factor-Reynolds number product increase with increasing relative cavity width, increasing relative cavity depth, and decreasing relative microrib/cavity module length. Comparisons were also made between the zero shear interface model and the liquid-vapor cavity coupled model. The results illustrate that the zero shear interface model underpredicts the overall flow resistance. Further, the deviation between the two models was found to be significantly larger for increasing values of both the relative rib/cavity module width and the cavity fraction. The trends in the frictional pressure drop predictions are in good agreement with experimental measurements made at similar conditions, with greater deviation observed at increasing size of the cavity fraction. Based on the numerical predictions, an expression is proposed in which the friction factor-Reynolds number product may be estimated in terms of the important variables.

  1. Estimation of land surface directional emissivity in mid-infrared channel around 4.0 microm from MODIS data.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bo-Hui; Li, Zhao-Liang; Bi, Yuyun

    2009-03-01

    This work addressed the estimate of the directional emissivity in the mid-infrared (MIR) channel around 4.0 microm from MODIS data. A series of bidirectional reflectances in MODIS channel 22 (3.97 mum) were retrieved using the method developed by Tang and Li (Int. J. Remote Sens. 29, 4907, 2008) and then were used to estimate the directional emissivity in this channel with the aid of the BRDF model modified by Jiang and Li (Opt. Express 16, 19310, 2008). To validate the estimated directional emissivity, a cross-comparison of MODIS derived emissivities in channel 22 using the proposed method were performed with those provided by the MODIS land surface temperature/emissivity product MYD11B1 data. The results show that the proposed method for estimating the directional emissivity in MIR channel gives results comparable to those of MYD11B1 product with a Mean Error of -0.007 and a Root Mean Square Error of 0.024.

  2. Estimation of land surface directional emissivity in mid-infrared channel around 4.0 microm from MODIS data.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bo-Hui; Li, Zhao-Liang; Bi, Yuyun

    2009-03-01

    This work addressed the estimate of the directional emissivity in the mid-infrared (MIR) channel around 4.0 microm from MODIS data. A series of bidirectional reflectances in MODIS channel 22 (3.97 mum) were retrieved using the method developed by Tang and Li (Int. J. Remote Sens. 29, 4907, 2008) and then were used to estimate the directional emissivity in this channel with the aid of the BRDF model modified by Jiang and Li (Opt. Express 16, 19310, 2008). To validate the estimated directional emissivity, a cross-comparison of MODIS derived emissivities in channel 22 using the proposed method were performed with those provided by the MODIS land surface temperature/emissivity product MYD11B1 data. The results show that the proposed method for estimating the directional emissivity in MIR channel gives results comparable to those of MYD11B1 product with a Mean Error of -0.007 and a Root Mean Square Error of 0.024. PMID:19259154

  3. Probing the RNA binding surface of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Wei; Okaine, Stephen; McPike, Mark P; Lin, Yong; Borer, Philip N

    2013-05-14

    The highly conserved nucleocapsid protein domain in HIV-1 recognizes and binds SL3 in genomic RNA. In this work, we used the structure of the NCp7-SL3 RNA complex to guide the construction of 16 NCp7 mutants to probe the RNA binding surface of the protein [De Guzman, R. N., et al. (1998) Science 279, 384-388]. Thirteen residues with functional or structural significance were mutated individually to Ala (Asn(5), Phe(6), Val(13), Phe(16), Asn(17), Gly(19), Glu(21), Ile(24), Gln(45), Met(46), Gly(22), Pro(31), and Gly(40)), and three salt bridge switch mutants exchanged Lys and Glu (Lys(14)-Glu(21), Lys(33)-Glu(42), and Lys(38)-Glu(51)). Dissociation constants (Kd) determined by fluorescence titration and isothermal titration calorimetry were used to compare affinities of SL3 for the variant proteins to that for the wild type. The F16A (Phe(16) to Ala) variant showed a 25-fold reduction in affinity, consistent with a loss of organized structure in f1, the protein's first zinc finger. I24A, Q45A, and M46A reduced affinity by 2-5-fold; these residues occupy nearly equivalent positions in f1 and f2. E21A increased affinity by 3-fold, perhaps because of the mutant's increased net positive charge. Among the salt bridge switch mutants, only K14E/E21K in f1 caused a substantial change in affinity (5-fold reduction), binding SL3 with a biphasic binding isotherm. Aside from these six variants, most of the mutations studied have relatively minor effects on the stability of the complex. We conclude that many side chain interactions in the wild-type complex contribute little to stability or can be compensated by new contacts in the mutants.

  4. Direct Observations of Magnetic Anomalies on the Lunar Surface under Varying Solar Wind Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorburger, A.; Wurz, P.; Barabash, S.; Wieser, M.; Futaana, Y.; Holmström, M.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dhanya, M. B.; Sridharan, R.; Asamura, K.

    2012-04-01

    In contrast to Earth, the Moon does not have a global dipolar magnetic field. Since the first lunar landing with Apollo 11, we know, though, that localised magnetic fields exist on the lunar surface. Measurements conducted by the Lunar Prospector magnetometer and electron reflectometer suggested that these localised magnetic fields are able to deflect the impinging solar wind in favourable cases (Lin et al., Science 1998). Magnetohydrodynamic simulations support the implication that mini-magnetospheres are formed above the locations of strong localised magnetic fields and can hold off the impinging solar wind (Harnett and Winglee, JGR 2002). Analysis of magnetic field data from Lunar Prospector of the Reiner Gamma anomaly region showed that the distortion of the magnetic field of this anomaly strongly depends on the impinging solar wind parameters, which was interpreted that the size and shape of the mini-magnetosphere changed with the solar wind parametes (Kurata et al., GRL 2005). Wieser et al., GRL 2010 showed that SARA, the Sub-KeV Atom Analyzer on board Chandrayaan-1, is able to detect an ENA image of the mini-magnetosphere in the measured energetic neutral atom flux. Here we analysed all orbits where CENA, the Chandrayaan-1 Energetic Neutral Analyzer, recorded data when a magnetic anomaly was in CENA's field-of-view. Our goal was to determine if 1) a signature of the magnetic anomaly is always visible in the ENA signal and if 2) there is a correlation between the solar wind dynamic pressure, the solar wind magnetic field, the local magnetic field strength and the reduction in the reflected ENA flux. Our results show that for the simplest case, i.e., the Gerasimovich anomaly, there is indeed a clear correlation between the shielding efficiency, the magnetic field strength and the solar wind dynamic pressure. For the other observed magnetic anomalies, for which the magnetic fields are not only weaker but also spatially more variable than that of the

  5. Analysis of waveguide-coupled directional emission for efficient collection of Fluorescence/Raman light from surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Lu, Dan-Feng; Gao, Ran; Qi, Zhi-Mei

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical method based on the optical reciprocity theorem combined with the Fresnel theory has been developed for the analysis of waveguide-coupled directional emission technique, which is useful for the surface Fluorescence/Raman spectroscopy. The Kretschmann-type waveguide with a molecular dipole located above or inside the core layer serves as the simulation model. The two-dimensional (2D) pattern of power density for the waveguide-coupled emission from the molecular dipole was calculated using the theoretical method. According to the results, with a given waveguide the 2D pattern of power density is highly dependent on both the orientation and position of the dipole. The maximum fraction of power occupied by the waveguide-coupled emission is 87% with the plasmon waveguide and 95% with the resonant mirror. Compared with the dipole emission in free space, the waveguide-coupled directional emission possesses easy collection, which is benefit for the detection of weak Fluorescence and Raman signals. From this point, the theoretical method used here is helpful for design and optimization of Kretschmann-type waveguide structures for high-sensitivity surface monitoring by Fluorescence/Raman spectroscopy.

  6. Silver colloids as plasmonic substrates for direct label-free surface-enhanced Raman scattering analysis of DNA.

    PubMed

    Torres-Nuñez, A; Faulds, K; Graham, D; Alvarez-Puebla, R A; Guerrini, L

    2016-08-15

    Ultrasensitive direct SERS analysis offers a powerful analytical tool for the structural characterization and classification of nucleic acids. However, acquisition of reliable spectral fingerprints of such complex biomolecules poses important challenges. In recent years, many efforts have been devoted to overcome these limitations, mainly implementing silver colloids as plasmonic substrates. However, a reliable cross-comparison of results reported in the recent literature is extremely hard to achieve, mostly due to the broad set of different surface properties of the plasmonic nanoparticles. Herein, we perform a thorough investigation of the role played by the metal/liquid interface composition of silver colloids in the direct label-free SERS analysis of DNA. Target molecules of increasing complexity, from short homopolymeric strands to long genomic duplexes, were used as probes. We demonstrate how apparently subtle changes in the colloidal surface chemistry can dramatically modify the affinity and the final SERS spectral profile of DNA. This has significant implications for the future design of new analytical strategies for the detection of DNA using SERS without labels. PMID:27213770

  7. Surface invasive cleavage assay on a maskless light-directed diamond DNA microarray for genome-wide human SNP mapping.

    PubMed

    Nie, Bei; Yang, Min; Fu, Weiling; Liang, Zhiqing

    2015-07-01

    The surface invasive cleavage assay, because of its innate accuracy and ability for self-signal amplification, provides a potential route for the mapping of hundreds of thousands of human SNP sites. However, its performance on a high density DNA array has not yet been established, due to the unusual "hairpin" probe design on the microarray and the lack of chemical stability of commercially available substrates. Here we present an applicable method to implement a nanocrystalline diamond thin film as an alternative substrate for fabricating an addressable DNA array using maskless light-directed photochemistry, producing the most chemically stable and biocompatible system for genetic analysis and enzymatic reactions. The surface invasive cleavage reaction, followed by degenerated primer ligation and post-rolling circle amplification is consecutively performed on the addressable diamond DNA array, accurately mapping SNP sites from PCR-amplified human genomic target DNA. Furthermore, a specially-designed DNA array containing dual probes in the same pixel is fabricated by following a reverse light-directed DNA synthesis protocol. This essentially enables us to decipher thousands of SNP alleles in a single-pot reaction by the simple addition of enzyme, target and reaction buffers.

  8. Direct In Vivo Inflammatory Cell-Induced Corrosion of CoCrMo Alloy Orthopedic Implant Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Jeremy L.; Sivan, Shiril; Liu, Yangping; Kocagöz, Sevi; Arnholt, Christina; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy, used for over four decades in orthopedic implants, may corrode and release wear debris into the body during use. These degradation products may stimulate immune and inflammatory responses in vivo. We report here on evidence of direct inflammatory cell-induced corrosion of human implanted and retrieved CoCrMo implant surfaces. Corrosion morphology on CoCrMo implant surfaces, in unique and characteristic patterns, and the presence of cellular remnants and biological materials intimately entwined with the corrosion indicates direct cellular attack under the cell membrane region of adhered and/or migrating inflammatory cells. Evidence supports a Fenton-like reaction mechanism driving corrosion in which reactive oxygen species are the major driver of corrosion. Using in vitro tests, large increases in corrosion susceptibility of CoCrMo were seen (40 to 100 fold) when immersed in phosphate buffered saline solutions modified with hydrogen peroxide and HCl to represent the chemistry under inflammatory cells. This discovery raises significant new questions about the clinical consequences of such corrosion interactions, the role of patient inflammatory reactions, and the detailed mechanisms at play. PMID:24619511

  9. Transparent and electrically conductive GaSb/Si direct wafer bonding at low temperatures by argon-beam surface activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predan, F.; Reinwand, D.; Klinger, V.; Dimroth, F.

    2015-10-01

    Direct wafer bonds of the material system n-GaSb/n-Si have been achieved by means of a low-temperature direct wafer bonding process, enabling an optical transparency of the bonds along with a high electrical conductivity of the boundary layer. In the used technique, the surfaces are activated by sputter-etching with an argon fast-atom-beam (FAB) and bonded in ultra-high vacuum. The bonds were annealed at temperatures between 300 and 400 °C, followed by an optical, mechanical and electrical characterization of the interface. Additionally, the influence of the sputtering on the surface topography of the GaSb was explicitly investigated. Fully bonded wafer pairs with high bonding strengths were found, as no blade could be inserted into the bonds without destroying the samples. The interfacial resistivities of the bonded wafers were significantly reduced by optimizing the process parameters, by which Ohmic interfacial resistivities of less than 5 mΩ cm2 were reached reproducibly. These promising results make the monolithic integration of GaSb on Si attractive for various applications.

  10. Direct in vivo inflammatory cell-induced corrosion of CoCrMo alloy orthopedic implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jeremy L; Sivan, Shiril; Liu, Yangping; Kocagöz, Sevi B; Arnholt, Christina M; Kurtz, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloy, used for over five decades in orthopedic implants, may corrode and release wear debris into the body during use. These degradation products may stimulate immune and inflammatory responses in vivo. We report here on evidence of direct inflammatory cell-induced corrosion of human implanted and retrieved CoCrMo implant surfaces. Corrosion morphology on CoCrMo implant surfaces, in unique and characteristic patterns, and the presence of cellular remnants and biological materials intimately entwined with the corrosion indicates direct cellular attack under the cell membrane region of adhered and/or migrating inflammatory cells. Evidence supports a Fenton-like reaction mechanism driving corrosion in which reactive oxygen species are the major driver of corrosion. Using in vitro tests, large increases in corrosion susceptibility of CoCrMo were seen (40-100 fold) when immersed in phosphate buffered saline solutions modified with hydrogen peroxide and hydrochloric acid to represent the chemistry under inflammatory cells. This discovery raises significant new questions about the clinical consequences of such corrosion interactions, the role of patient inflammatory reactions, and the detailed mechanisms at play.

  11. An Assessment of the Surface Longwave Direct Radiative Effect of Airborne Saharan Dust During the NAMMA Field Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansell, R. A.; Tsay, S. C.; Ji, Q.; Hsu, N. C.; Jeong, M. J.; Wang, S. H.; Reid, J. S.; Liou, K. N.; Ou, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    In September 2006, NASA Goddard s mobile ground-based laboratories were deployed to Sal Island in Cape Verde (16.73degN, 22.93degW) to support the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (NAMMA) field study. The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI), a key instrument for spectrally characterizing the thermal IR, was used to retrieve the dust IR aerosol optical depths (AOTs) in order to examine the diurnal variability of airborne dust with emphasis on three separate dust events. AERI retrievals of dust AOT are compared with those from the coincident/collocated multifilter rotating shadow-band radiometer (MFRSR), micropulse lidar (MPL), and NASA Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) sensors. The retrieved AOTs are then inputted into the Fu-Liou 1D radiative transfer model to evaluate local instantaneous direct longwave radiative effects (DRE(sub LW)) of dust at the surface in cloud-free atmospheres and its sensitivity to dust microphysical parameters. The top-of-atmosphere DRE(sub LW) and longwave heating rate profiles are also evaluated. Instantaneous surface DRE(sub LW) ranges from 2 to 10 W/sq m and exhibits a strong linear dependence with dust AOT yielding a DRE(sub LW) of 16 W/sq m per unit dust AOT. The DRE(sub LW) is estimated to be approx.42% of the diurnally averaged direct shortwave radiative effect at the surface but of opposite sign, partly compensating for the shortwave losses. Certainly nonnegligible, the authors conclude that DRE(sub LW) can significantly impact the atmospheric energetics, representing an important component in the study of regional climate variation.

  12. High-efficiency resonant amplification of weak magnetic fields for single spin magnetometry at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Trifunovic, Luka; Pedrocchi, Fabio L; Hoffman, Silas; Maletinsky, Patrick; Yacoby, Amir; Loss, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques not only provide powerful imaging tools that have revolutionized medicine, but they have a wide spectrum of applications in other fields of science such as biology, chemistry, neuroscience and physics. However, current state-of-the-art magnetometers are unable to detect a single nuclear spin unless the tip-to-sample separation is made sufficiently small. Here, we demonstrate theoretically that by placing a ferromagnetic particle between a nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer and a target spin, the magnetometer sensitivity is improved dramatically. Using materials and techniques that are already experimentally available, our proposed set-up is sensitive enough to detect a single nuclear spin within ten milliseconds of data acquisition at room temperature. The sensitivity is practically unchanged when the ferromagnet surface to the target spin separation is smaller than the ferromagnet lateral dimensions; typically about a tenth of a micrometre. This scheme further benefits when used for nitrogen-vacancy ensemble measurements, enhancing sensitivity by an additional three orders of magnitude.

  13. High-efficiency resonant amplification of weak magnetic fields for single spin magnetometry at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifunovic, Luka; Pedrocchi, Fabio L.; Hoffman, Silas; Maletinsky, Patrick; Yacoby, Amir; Loss, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques not only provide powerful imaging tools that have revolutionized medicine, but they have a wide spectrum of applications in other fields of science such as biology, chemistry, neuroscience and physics. However, current state-of-the-art magnetometers are unable to detect a single nuclear spin unless the tip-to-sample separation is made sufficiently small. Here, we demonstrate theoretically that by placing a ferromagnetic particle between a nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer and a target spin, the magnetometer sensitivity is improved dramatically. Using materials and techniques that are already experimentally available, our proposed set-up is sensitive enough to detect a single nuclear spin within ten milliseconds of data acquisition at room temperature. The sensitivity is practically unchanged when the ferromagnet surface to the target spin separation is smaller than the ferromagnet lateral dimensions; typically about a tenth of a micrometre. This scheme further benefits when used for nitrogen-vacancy ensemble measurements, enhancing sensitivity by an additional three orders of magnitude.

  14. Direct Sampling and Analysis from Solid Phase Extraction Cards using an Automated Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry System

    SciTech Connect

    Walworth, Matthew J; ElNaggar, Mariam S; Stankovich, Joseph J; WitkowskiII, Charles E.; Norris, Jeremy L; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2011-01-01

    Direct liquid extraction based surface sampling, a technique previously demonstrated with continuous flow and autonomous pipette liquid microjunction surface sampling probes, has recently been implemented as the Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis (LESA) mode on the commercially available Advion NanoMate chip-based infusion nanoelectrospray ionization system. In the present paper, the LESA mode was applied to the analysis of 96-well format custom solid phase extraction (SPE) cards, with each well consisting of either a 1 or 2 mm diameter monolithic hydrophobic stationary phase. These substrate wells were conditioned, loaded with either single or multi-component aqueous mixtures, and read out using the LESA mode of a TriVersa NanoMate or a Nanomate 100 coupled to an ABI/Sciex 4000QTRAPTM hybrid triple quadrupole/linear ion trap mass spectrometer and a Thermo LTQ XL linear ion trap mass spectrometer. Extraction conditions, including extraction/nanoESI solvent composition, volume, and dwell times, were optimized in the analysis of targeted compounds. Limit of detection and quantitation as well as analysis reproducibility figures of merit were measured. Calibration data was obtained for propranolol using a deuterated internal standard which demonstrated linearity and reproducibility. A 10x increase in signal and cleanup of micromolar Angiotensin II from a concentrated salt solution was demonstrated. Additionally, a multicomponent herbicide mixture at ppb concentration levels was analyzed using MS3 spectra for compound identification in the presence of isobaric interferences.

  15. Direct production of organic acids from starch by cell surface-engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum in anaerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We produced organic acids, including lactate and succinate, directly from soluble starch under anaerobic conditions using high cell-density cultures of Corynebacterium glutamicum displaying α-amylase (AmyA) from Streptococcus bovis 148 on the cell surface. Notably, reactions performed under anaerobic conditions at 35 and 40°C, which are higher than the optimal growth temperature of 30°C, showed 32% and 19%, respectively, higher productivity of the organic acids lactate, succinate, and acetate compared to that at 30°C. However, α-amylase was not stably anchored and released into the medium from the cell surface during reactions at these higher temperatures, as demonstrated by the 61% and 85% decreases in activity, respectively, from baseline, compared to the only 8% decrease at 30°C. The AmyA-displaying C. glutamicum cells retained their starch-degrading capacity during five 10 h reaction cycles at 30°C, producing 107.8 g/l of total organic acids, including 88.9 g/l lactate and 14.0 g/l succinate. The applicability of cell surface-engineering technology for the production of organic acids from biomass by high cell-density cultures of C. glutamicum under anaerobic conditions was demonstrated. PMID:24342107

  16. Surface-directed phase separation via a two-step quench process in binary polymer mixture films with asymmetry compositions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li-Tang; Li, Jialin; Zhang, Fengbo; Xie, Xu-Ming

    2008-07-24

    Surface-directed phase separation via a two-step quench process in asymmetry polymer mixtures is numerically investigated by coupling the Flory-Huggins-de Gennes equation with the Cahn-Hilliard-Cook equation. Two distinct situations, i.e., the minority component is preferred by the surface and the majority component is preferred by the surface, are discussed, respectively. The morphology and evolution dynamics of the phase structure, especially the secondary domain structure, are analyzed. The wetting layer formation mechanisms during the two-step quench process are examined. The simulated results demonstrate that different secondary domain structures in these two situations can be induced by the second quench with deeper quench depth, which can be used to tailor phase morphology. It is also found that, in the second quench process, the evolution of the wetting layer thickness can cross over to a faster growth when the preferential component is the minority component. In this situation, the formation mechanism of the wetting layer will change and is eventually determined by the second quench depth. However, when the preferential component is the majority component, a deeper second quench depth corresponds to a slower growth of the wetting layer thickness. The chemical potential is calculated to explain the difference regarding the growth dynamics of the wetting layer thickness between these both situations. PMID:18582100

  17. Nanoscale surface chemistry directs the tunable assembly of silver octahedra into three two-dimensional plasmonic superlattices

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yih Hong; Shi, Wenxiong; Lee, Hiang Kwee; Jiang, Ruibin; Phang, In Yee; Cui, Yan; Isa, Lucio; Yang, Yijie; Wang, Jianfang; Li, Shuzhou; Ling, Xing Yi

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in nanoparticle self-assembly is programming the large-area organization of a single type of anisotropic nanoparticle into distinct superlattices with tunable packing efficiencies. Here we utilize nanoscale surface chemistry to direct the self-assembly of silver octahedra into three distinct two-dimensional plasmonic superlattices at a liquid/liquid interface. Systematically tuning the surface wettability of silver octahedra leads to a continuous superlattice structural evolution, from close-packed to progressively open structures. Notably, silver octahedra standing on vertices arranged in a square lattice is observed using hydrophobic particles. Simulations reveal that this structural evolution arises from competing interfacial forces between the particles and both liquid phases. Structure-to-function characterizations reveal that the standing octahedra array generates plasmonic ‘hotstrips', leading to nearly 10-fold more efficient surface-enhanced Raman scattering compared with the other more densely packed configurations. The ability to assemble these superlattices on the wafer scale over various platforms further widens their potential applications. PMID:25923409

  18. Directional reflectance factors for monitoring spatial changes in soil surface structure and soil organic matter erosion in agricultural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, H.; Anderson, K.

    2012-04-01

    Soils can experience rapid structural degradation in response to land cover changes, resulting in reduced soil productivity, increased erodibility and a loss of soil organic matter (SOM). The breakdown of soil aggregates through slaking and raindrop impact is linked to organic matter turnover, with subsequently eroded material often displaying proportionally more SOM. A reduction in aggregate stability is reflected in a decline in soil surface roughness (SSR), indicating that a soil structural change can be used to highlight soil vulnerability to SOM loss through mineralisation or erosion. Accurate, spatially-continuous measurements of SSR are therefore needed at a variety of spatial and temporal scales to understand the spatial nature of SOM erosion and deposition. Remotely-sensed data can provide a cost-effective means of monitoring changes in soil surface condition over broad spatial extents. Previous work has demonstrated the ability of directional reflectance factors to monitor soil crusting within a controlled laboratory experiment, due to changes in the levels of self-shadowing effects by soil aggregates. However, further research is needed to test this approach in situ, where other soil variables may affect measured reflectance factors and to investigate the use of directional reflectance factors for monitoring soil erosion processes. This experiment assesses the potential of using directional reflectance factors to monitor changes in SSR, aggregate stability and soil organic carbon (SOC) content for two agricultural conditions. Five soil plots representing tilled and seedbed soils were subjected to different durations of natural rainfall, producing a range of different levels of SSR. Directional reflectance factors were measured concomitantly with sampling for soil structural and biochemical tests at each soil plot. Soil samples were taken to measure aggregate stability (wet sieving), SOC (loss on ignition) and soil moisture (gravimetric method). SSM

  19. Search for a Permanent Electric Dipole Moment in XENON-129 Using Simultaneous HELIUM-3 Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oteiza, Eduardo Rafael

    This dissertation presents the first results of a new technique designed to search for a permanent electric dipole moment (PEDM) in ^{129} Xe. An observed non-zero PEDM in ^ {129}Xe would be direct evidence of time -reversal and parity symmetry violation. Unlike previous experiments which search for a PEDM, this one has used a second atomic species, ^3He, as an in situ magnetometer to reduce the possibility of observing a false PEDM caused by an artifact of the experiment. The measurement described in this work searches for a change in the ^{129}Xe precession frequency when ^{129}Xe spins are allowed to freely precess in an applied magnetic field and are subjected to an applied electric field which is alternately parallel or anti-parallel to the applied magnetic field. The ^3He spins also freely precess in the same test cell; they thus are used to detect any changes in the total magnetic field. The detected ^3He and ^ {129}Xe free precession signals were simultaneously processed by two different detection schemes. The null results of d_{129} = ( -2.51 +/- 11.1) cdot 10^{-26} e-cm and d_{129} = ( -4.81 +/- 11.0) cdot 10^{-26} e-cm were found for a PEDM in ^{129} Xe using the data collected by these two schemes. These values were derived from data collected during 33 hours out of a total of 132 hours of operation of the experiment; 99 hours were spent preparing the ^3He and ^{129}Xe spins. The precision of this measurement was chiefly limited by interactions between the ^3He and ^ {129}Xe atoms. The nature of these interactions is explained and ideas for improving this precision are presented.

  20. Radial vibration measurements directly from rotors using laser vibrometry: The effects of surface roughness, instrument misalignments and pseudo-vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothberg, Steve J.; Halkon, Ben J.; Tirabassi, Mario; Pusey, Chris

    2012-11-01

    Laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) offers an attractive solution when radial vibration measurement directly from a rotor surface is required. Research to date has demonstrated application on polished-circular rotors and rotors coated with retro-reflective tape. In the latter case, however, a significant cross-sensitivity to the orthogonal radial vibration component occurs and post-processing is required to resolve individual radial vibration components. Until now, the fundamentally different behaviour observed between these cases has stood as an inconsistency in the published literature, symptomatic of the need to understand the effect of surface roughness. This paper offers the first consistent mathematical description of the polished-circular and rough rotor behaviours, combined with an experimental investigation of the relationship between surface roughness and cross-sensitivity. Rotors with surface roughness up to 10 nm satisfy the polished-circular rotor definition if vibration displacement is below 100% beam diameter, for a 90 μm beam, and below 40% beam diameter, for a 520 μm beam. On rotors with roughness between 10 nm and 50 nm, the polished-circular rotor definition is satisfied for vibration displacements up to 25% beam diameter, for a 90 μm beam, and up to 10% beam diameter, for a 520 μm beam. As roughness increases, cross-sensitivity increases but only rotors coated in retro-reflective tape satisfied the rough rotor definition fully. Consequently, when polished-circular surfaces are not available, rotor surfaces must be treated with retro-reflective tape and measurements post-processed to resolve individual vibration components. Through simulations, the value of the resolution and correction algorithms that form the post-processor has been demonstrated quantitatively. Simulations incorporating representative instrument misalignments and measurement noise have enabled quantification of likely error levels in radial vibration measurements. On a polished

  1. Emplacement of Zebín Hill, Jičín Volcanic Field, Bohemian Paradise, Czech Republic: Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility, Ground Magnetometry, Electric Resistivity Tomography, and Paleomagnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petronis, M. S.; Rapprich, , V.; Valenta, J.; Leman, J.; Brister, A. R.; van Wyk de Vries, B.

    2014-12-01

    A well-preserved set of mid-Miocene tuff-cones and their feeders outcrop in the Jičín Volcanic Field, Czech Republic. Zebín Hill is a tuff cone that has been quarried to reveal the volcanoes feeder system. This edifice offers the opportunity to understand how magma is transported through a monogenetic pyroclastic cone. Rock types include a coarse-grained basal phreatomagmatic layer and a stratified upper wall facies both of which are penetrated by feeder dikes. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and paleomagnetic data were collected at twenty-one sites from feeder dikes and the main conduit of the volcano. A high-resolution ground magnetometry survey, electric resistivity tomography and seismic tomography were also conducted. Magnetic susceptibility intensity indicates that the dominant magnetic mineral is a ferromagnetic phase with little contribution from paramagnetic minerals. AMS ellipsoids shapes are both oblate and prolate and inferred magma flow directions indicate magma flow away from the central vent area and subhorizontal flow towards and away from the axial conduit; both upward and downward magma flow is evident at some sites. Curie point estimates yield a spectrum of results indicating a mixture of high-Ti titanomagnetite, iron sulfide, and low-Ti titanomagnetite. Ground magnetometry data indicate that both normal and reverse polarity rocks are present at Zebín Hill. Paleomagnetic data confirm the ground magnetic data in that both normal and reverse polarity rocks are present. Most sites yield a single component magnetization that is well grouped at the site level and carried by pseudosingle domain titanomagnetite. The presence of both normal and reverse polarity magnetizations from the volcano indicate that significant time passed during the growth of this monogenic system. Complex system of branching dikes has been also observed from electric resistivity tomography. The simple external structure of monogenetic volcanoes hides a rather

  2. Response surface methodology for optimization of medium for decolorization of textile dye Direct Black 22 by a novel bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Mohana, Sarayu; Shrivastava, Shalini; Divecha, Jyoti; Madamwar, Datta

    2008-02-01

    Decolorization and degradation of polyazo dye Direct Black 22 was carried out by distillery spent wash degrading mixed bacterial consortium, DMC. Response surface methodology (RSM) involving a central composite design (CCD) in four factors was successfully employed for the study and optimization of decolorization process. The hyper activities and interactions between glucose concentration, yeast extract concentration, dye concentration and inoculum size on dye decolorization were investigated and modeled. Under optimized conditions the bacterial consortium was able to decolorize the dye almost completely (>91%) within 12h. Bacterial consortium was able to decolorize 10 different azo dyes. The optimum combination of the four variables predicted through RSM was confirmed through confirmatory experiments and hence this bacterial consortium holds potential for the treatment of industrial waste water. Dye degradation products obtained during the course of decolorization were analyzed by HPTLC.

  3. Direct measurement of the Einstein relation in a macroscopic, non-equilibrium system of chaotic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Kyle; Liebman-Pelaez, Alexander; Corwin, Eric

    Equilibrium statistical mechanics is traditionally limited to thermal systems. Can it be applied to athermal, non-equilibrium systems that nonetheless satisfy the basic criteria of steady-state chaos and isotropy? We answer this question using a macroscopic system of chaotic surface waves which is, by all measures, non-equilibrium. The waves are generated in a dish of water that is vertically oscillated above a critical amplitude. We have constructed a rheometer that actively measures the drag imparted by the waves on a buoyant particle, a quantity entirely divorced in origin from the drag imparted by the fluid in which the particle floats. We also perform a separate, passive measurement, extracting a diffusion constant and effective temperature. Having directly measured all three properties (temperature, diffusion constant, and drag coefficient) we go on to show that our macroscopic, non-equilibrium case is wholly consistent with the Einstein relation, a classic result for equilibrium thermal systems.

  4. An analytical solution to obtain the optimum source location using multiple direction finders on a spherical surface. [for lightning detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orville, Richard E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical solution is presented for determining the optimum location of a radiating source on the surface of a sphere, given multiple bearings. The bearings are assumed to have small errors of the order of 0-10 deg. The optimum location is found by minimizing the sum of the squares of the perpendicular great-circle distances from the source to the bearing lines. This is achieved analytically through an eigenvalue approach, rather than the usual iterative, numerical approach. Bearings of different weight are taken into account by approximating the distance from each direction finder to the source. The result is general and may have wide application. Since it is simple and nearly as fast as the triangulation technique for source location, it is now used in the SUNY-Albany East Coast Lightning Detection Network to compute the optimum location for lightning in real time.

  5. Inferring hemispherical reflectance of the earth's surface for global energy budgets from remotely sensed nadir or directional radiance values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Sellers, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between directional reflectances spanning the entire reflecting hemisphere and hemispherical reflectance (albedo) and the effect of solar zenith angle and cover type on these relationships were investigated, using the results obtained from NOAA's 7/8 AVHRR ground-level reflectance measurements. Bands 1 (0.58-0.6B microns) and 2 (0.73-1. 1 microns) were used for reflectance measurements of 11 natural vegetation surfaces ranging from bare soils to dense vegetation canopies. The results show that errors in inferring hemispherical reflectance from nadir reflectance can be between 11 and 45 percent for all cover types and solar angles, depending on the viewing angles. A technique is described in which a choice of two specific view angles reduces this error to less than 6 percent for both bands and for all sun angles and cover types.

  6. 29 GHz directly modulated 980 nm vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers with bow-tie shape transverse coupled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalir, Hamed; Koyama, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    A concept for the bandwidth enhancement of directly modulated vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) using a transverse-coupled-cavity (TCC) scheme is proposed, which enables us to tailor the modulation-transfer function. A bow-tie shaped oxide aperture forms the transverse-coupled cavity resulting in optical feedback to boost the modulation speed. While the bandwidth of conventional VCSELs is 9-10 GHz, the 3 dB-bandwidth of the TCC VCSEL is increased by a factor of 3 far beyond the relaxation-oscillation frequency. The maximum bandwidth is currently limited by the photo-detector used in the experiment. Clear 36 Gbps eye opening was attained with an extinction ratio of 4 dB.

  7. Receptor-independent, direct membrane binding leads to cell surface lipid sorting and Syk kinase activation in dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Gilbert; Sharma, Karan; Ward, Sandra M.; Desrosiers, Melanie D.; Stephens, Leslie A.; Schoel, W. Michael; Li, Tonglei; Lowell, Clifford A.; Ling, Chang-Chun; Amrein, Matthias W.; Shi, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Summary Binding of particulate antigens by antigen presenting cells (APC) is a critical step in immune activation. Previously, we demonstrated that uric acid crystals are potent adjuvants, initiating a robust adaptive immune response. However, the mechanisms of activation are unknown. Using atomic force microscopy as a tool for real time single cell activation analysis, we report that uric acid crystals can directly engage cellular membranes, particularly the cholesterol components, with a force substantially stronger than protein based cellular contacts. Binding of particulate substances activates Syk kinase-dependent signaling in dendritic cells (DCs). These observations suggest a mechanism whereby immune cell activation can be triggered by solid structures via membrane lipid alteration without the requirement for specific cell surface receptors, and a testable hypothesis for crystal-associated arthropathies, inflammation and adjuvanticity. PMID:18993083

  8. Immobilization of Chlorosulfonyl-Calix[4]arene onto the surface of silica gel through the directly estrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghvaei-Ganjali, Saeed; Zadmard, Reza; Saber-Tehrani, Mandana

    2012-06-01

    For the first time Chlorosulfonyl-Calix[4]arene has been chemically bonded to silica gel through the directly estrification without silane coupling agent to prepare Chlorosulfonyl-Calix[4]arene-bonded silica gel. Sample characterization was performed by various techniques such as elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), 29Si CP/MAS spectroscopy and acid-base titration. All data approve the successful incorporation of organic group via covalent bond. From the comparison between sulfur content determined by elemental analysis and the number of H+ determined by acid-base titration, it was shown that two ester units took place onto the new synthesized sample and two acidic sites exist on the surface.

  9. The study of the properties of turbulent stably stratified air flow over water surface by direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, Oleg; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2014-05-01

    Parameterization of turbulent momentum and heat fluxes in a turbulent, stably stratified boundary layer flow over water surface is important for numerical climate modeling and weather prediction. In this work, the detailed structure and statistical characteristics of a turbulent, stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer flow over water surface is studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS). The most difficult case for modeling is that of flows at high Reynolds numbers and sufficiently steep surface waves, when strongly non-linear effects (e.g. sheltering, boundary layer separation, vortex formation etc.) are encountered. Of special interest is the influence of the wind flow stratification on the properties of boundary-layer turbulence and the turbulent momentum and heat fluxes. In DNS a two-dimensional water wave with different wave age parameters (c/u*, where u* is the friction velocity and c is the wave celerity), wave slope ka varying from 0 to 0.2 and bulk Reynolds number Re (from 15000 to 80000) and different Richardson numbers are considered. The shape of the water wave is prescribed and does not evolve under the action of the wind. The full, 3D Navier-Stokes equations under the Boussinesq approximation are solved in curvilinear coordinates in a frame of reference moving the phase velocity of the wave. The shear driving the flow is created by an upper plane boundary moving horizontally with a bulk velocity in the x-direction. Periodic boundary conditions are considered in the horizontal (x) and lateral (y) directions, and no-slip boundary condition is considered in the vertical z-direction. The grid of 360 x 240 x 360 nodes in the x, y, and z directions is used. The Adams-Bashforth method is employed to advance the integration in time and the equation for the pressure is solved iteratively. Ensemble-averaged velocity and pressure fields are evaluated by averaging over time and the spanwise coordinate. Profiles of the mean velocity and turbulent stresses

  10. The Scope of Direct Alkylation of Gold Surface with Solutions of C1–C4n-Alkylstannanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of cleaned gold surfaces with dilute tetrahydrofuran or chloroform solutions of tetraalkylstannanes (alkyl = methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, n-butyl) or di-n-butylmethylstannyl tosylate under ambient conditions causes a self-limited growth of disordered monolayers consisting of alkyls and tin oxide. Extensive use of deuterium labeling showed that the alkyls originate from the stannane and not from ambient impurities, and that trialkylstannyl groups are absent in the monolayers, contrary to previous proposals. Methyl groups attached to the Sn atom are not transferred to the surface. Ethyl groups are transferred slowly, and propyl and butyl rapidly. In all cases, tin oxide is codeposited in submonolayer amounts. The monolayers were characterized by ellipsometry, contact angle goniometry, polarization modulated IR reflection absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy with ferrocyanide/ferricyanide, which revealed a very low charge-transfer resistance. The thermal stability of the monolayers and their resistance to solvents are comparable with those of an n-octadecanethiol monolayer. A preliminary examination of the kinetics of monolayer deposition from a THF solution of tetra-n-butylstannane revealed an approximately half-order dependence on the bulk solution concentration of the stannane, hinting that more than one alkyl can be transferred from a single stannane molecule. A detailed structure of the attachment of the alkyl groups is not known, and it is proposed that it involves direct single or multiple bonding of one or more C atoms to one or more Au atoms. PMID:26327466

  11. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Based on Controllable-Layer Graphene Shells Directly Synthesized on Cu Nanoparticles for Molecular Detection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hengwei; Huo, Yanyan; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Peixi; Jiang, Shouzhen; Xu, Shicai; Ma, Yong; Wang, Shuyun; Li, Hongsheng

    2015-10-01

    Graphene shells with a controllable number of layers were directly synthesized on Cu nanoparticles (CuNPs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to fabricate a graphene-encapsulated CuNPs (G/CuNPs) hybrid system for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The enhanced Raman spectra of adenosine and rhodamine 6G (R6G) showed that the G/CuNPs hybrid system can strongly suppress background fluorescence and increase signal-to-noise ratio. In four different types of SERS systems, the G/CuNPs hybrid system exhibits more efficient SERS than a transferred graphene/CuNPs hybrid system and pure CuNPs and graphene substrates. The minimum detectable concentrations of adenosine and R6G by the G/CuNPs hybrid system can be as low as 10(-8) and 10(-10)  M, respectively. The excellent linear relationship between Raman intensity and analyte concentration can be used for molecular detection. The graphene shell can also effectively prevent surface oxidation of Cu nanoparticles after exposure to ambient air and thus endow the hybrid system with a long lifetime. This work provides a basis for the fabrication of novel SERS substrates. PMID:26266687

  12. Temporal and spatial distributions of directional counterface motion at the acetabular bearing surface in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, D. R.; Brown, T. D.; Maxian, T. A.; Callaghan, J. J.

    1998-01-01

    The motions of counterface articulation against the bearing surface of the acetabular liner strongly influence polyethylene wear debris production in contemporary total hip arthroplasty. However, the available body of relevant articular force and motion information is largely confined to resultant load excursions measured relative to instrumented femoral components, and/or to global angular motions (flexion, adduction, endorotation) of the joint. Analytical frameworks are here developed to transform such information into temporal and spatial variations of the resultant load and of the local counterface sliding velocity relative to an ordered set of discrete locations (e.g., finite element nodes) on the acetabular bearing surface. Whole-duty-cycle time histories of acetabular resultant load and counterface velocity distributions are presented for two important practical situations: human level walking gait, and a 23 degrees biaxial rocking hip simulation machine. The local counterface motions occurring in the simulator are characterized by higher velocities, smoother motion patterns, and wider directional variation than those occurring in human gait. PMID:9807707

  13. Top-Down Proteomics and Direct Surface Sampling of Neonatal Dried Blood Spots: Diagnosis of Unknown Hemoglobin Variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Rebecca L.; Griffiths, Paul; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J.

    2012-11-01

    We have previously shown that liquid microjunction surface sampling of dried blood spots coupled with high resolution top-down mass spectrometry may be used for screening of common hemoglobin variants HbS, HbC, and HbD. In order to test the robustness of the approach, we have applied the approach to unknown hemoglobin variants. Six neonatal dried blood spot samples that had been identified as variants, but which could not be diagnosed by current screening methods, were analyzed by direct surface sampling top-down mass spectrometry. Both collision-induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry were employed. Four of the samples were identified as β-chain variants: two were heterozygous Hb D-Iran, one was heterozygous Hb Headington, and one was heterozygous Hb J-Baltimore. The fifth sample was identified as the α-chain variant heterozygous Hb Phnom Penh. Analysis of the sixth sample suggested that it did not in fact contain a variant. Adoption of the approach in the clinic would require speed in both data collection and interpretation. To address that issue, we have compared manual data analysis with freely available data analysis software (ProsightPTM). The results demonstrate the power of top-down proteomics for hemoglobin variant analysis in newborn samples.

  14. Surface studies on benzophenone doped PDMS microstructures fabricated using KrF excimer laser direct write lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant, Madhushree Bute; Shinde, Shashikant D.; Bodas, Dhananjay; Patil, K. R.; Sathe, V. G.; Adhi, K. P.; Gosavi, S. W.

    2014-09-01

    This paper discusses microfabrication process for benzophenone doped polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using laser lithography. KrF excimer laser of 248 nm with 20 ns pulse width at repetition rate of 1 Hz was used for microfabrication of undoped and benzophenone doped PDMS. The doped-PDMS shows sensitivity below 365 nm, permitting processing under ambient light. The analysis of etch depth revealed that doped PDMS shows self developable sensitivity at lower fluence of ∼250 mJ/cm2. The unexposed and exposed surface was studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Spectrocopic analysis indicated increase in Csbnd O, Cdbnd O, Sisbnd O3 and Sisbnd O4 bonding at the expense of Sisbnd C and Sisbnd O2 bonds of PDMS. In case of laser exposed doped-PDMS, removal of benzophenone from probe depth of spectroscopy was observed. Whereas the surface morphology of exposed and unexposed doped-PDMS was observed to be same, indicating clean development of PDMS micropatterns. The present study indicates that addition of 3.0 wt.% benzophenone in PDMS enhance self development sensitivity of PDMS. The self developable results on doped-PDMS are quite encouraging for its potential use in point of care Lab-On-Chip applications, for fabricating micropatterns using direct write laser lithography technology.

  15. Direct Chemical Synthesis of MnO2 Nanowhiskers on Transition-Metal Carbide Surfaces for Supercapacitor Applications.

    PubMed

    Rakhi, Raghavan Baby; Ahmed, Bilal; Anjum, Dalaver; Alshareef, Husam N

    2016-07-27

    Transition-metal carbides (MXenes) are an emerging class of two-dimensional materials with promising electrochemical energy storage performance. Herein, for the first time, by direct chemical synthesis, nanocrystalline ε-MnO2 whiskers were formed on MXene nanosheet surfaces (ε-MnO2/Ti2CTx and ε-MnO2/Ti3C2Tx) to make nanocomposite electrodes for aqueous pseudocapacitors. The ε-MnO2 nanowhiskers increase the surface area of the composite electrode and enhance the specific capacitance by nearly 3 orders of magnitude compared to that of pure MXene-based symmetric supercapacitors. Combined with enhanced pseudocapacitance, the fabricated ε-MnO2/MXene supercapacitors exhibited excellent cycling stability with ∼88% of the initial specific capacitance retained after 10000 cycles which is much higher than pure ε-MnO2-based supercapacitors (∼74%). The proposed electrode structure capitalizes on the high specific capacitance of MnO2 and the ability of MXenes to improve conductivity and cycling stability. PMID:27377125

  16. A FT-NIR spectroscopy methodology to estimate firing distance based on the direct analysis of the bullet impact surface.

    PubMed

    Sarraguça, Jorge M G; Lima, Catarina; Machado, Filipe; Lopes, João A; Almeida, Agostinho; Fernandes, Luís; Magalhães, Teresa; Santos, Agostinho

    2016-07-01

    A new methodology to estimate firing distance based on the direct analysis of organic components of gunshot residues (GSRs) on the bullet impact surface using Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy is proposed. Mathematical models relating firing distance with spectral information were developed using data obtained from a series of shots performed with a Glock model 17C (114 mm barrel length and 9 × 19 mm cartridges) at different distances, from 20 to 90 cm, against a white 40 × 40 cm square cloth (70% polyester/30% cotton) target. The study was repeated with two different types of ammunition. Spectra were obtained around the bullet entrance hole at 4 perpendicular directions and at 5 radial distances in diffuse reflectance mode with the assistance of a fiber optic probe. Principal component analysis showed that FT-NIRS displayed sensitivity in the recognition of the differences between the GSRs from the two different types of ammunition. Partial least squares regression models allowed the estimation of firing distance for both types of ammunition. Prediction errors lower than 11 cm were obtained for shots up to 90 cm.

  17. Microbial surface displayed enzymes based biofuel cell utilizing degradation products of lignocellulosic biomass for direct electrical energy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shuqin; Hou, Chuantao; Liang, Bo; Feng, Ruirui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a bacterial surface displaying enzyme based two-compartment biofuel cell for the direct electrical energy conversion from degradation products of lignocellulosic biomass is reported. Considering that the main degradation products of the lignocellulose are glucose and xylose, xylose dehydrogenase (XDH) displayed bacteria (XDH-bacteria) and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) displayed bacteria (GDH-bacteria) were used as anode catalysts in anode chamber with methylene blue as electron transfer mediator. While the cathode chamber was constructed with laccase/multi-walled-carbon nanotube/glassy-carbon-electrode. XDH-bacteria exhibited 1.75 times higher catalytic efficiency than GDH-bacteria. This assembled enzymatic fuel cell exhibited a high open-circuit potential of 0.80 V, acceptable stability and energy conversion efficiency. Moreover, the maximum power density of the cell could reach 53 μW cm(-2) when fueled with degradation products of corn stalk. Thus, this finding holds great potential to directly convert degradation products of biomass into electrical energy. PMID:26051524

  18. Direct angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (DARPES) on high-Tc films: doping, strains, Fermi surface topology and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuna, D.; Ariosa, D.; Cancellieri, C.; Cloetta, D.; Abrecht, M.

    2008-03-01

    Since 1997 we systematically perform Direct ARPES ( = DARPES) on in-situ grown, non-cleaved, ultra-thin (<25nm) cuprate films. Specifically, we probe low energy electronic structure and properties of high-Tc films under different degree of epitaxial (compressive vs tensile) strain. In overdoped in-plane compressed La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) thin films we double Tc from 20K to 40K, yet the Fermi surface (FS) remains essentially 2-dimensional (2D). In contrast, tensile strained films show 3-dimensional (3D) dispersion, while Tc is drastically reduced. It seems that the in-plane compressive strain tends to push the apical oxygen far away from the CuO2 plane, enhances the 2D character of the dispersion and increases Tc, while the tensile strain seems to act exactly in the opposite direction and the resulting dispersion is 3D. We have the FS topology for both cases. As the actual lattice of cuprates is 'Napoleon-cake' -like i.e. rigid CuO2 planes alternate with softer 'reservoir' (that strains distort differently) our results tend to rule out 2D rigid lattice mean field models. Finally, we briefly discuss recent successful determination of the FS topology from the observed wavevector quantization by DARPES in cuprate films thinner than 18 units cells (<24nm). Such an approach is of broader interest as it can be extended to other similar confined (ultra-thin) functional oxide systems.

  19. Microbial surface displayed enzymes based biofuel cell utilizing degradation products of lignocellulosic biomass for direct electrical energy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shuqin; Hou, Chuantao; Liang, Bo; Feng, Ruirui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a bacterial surface displaying enzyme based two-compartment biofuel cell for the direct electrical energy conversion from degradation products of lignocellulosic biomass is reported. Considering that the main degradation products of the lignocellulose are glucose and xylose, xylose dehydrogenase (XDH) displayed bacteria (XDH-bacteria) and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) displayed bacteria (GDH-bacteria) were used as anode catalysts in anode chamber with methylene blue as electron transfer mediator. While the cathode chamber was constructed with laccase/multi-walled-carbon nanotube/glassy-carbon-electrode. XDH-bacteria exhibited 1.75 times higher catalytic efficiency than GDH-bacteria. This assembled enzymatic fuel cell exhibited a high open-circuit potential of 0.80 V, acceptable stability and energy conversion efficiency. Moreover, the maximum power density of the cell could reach 53 μW cm(-2) when fueled with degradation products of corn stalk. Thus, this finding holds great potential to directly convert degradation products of biomass into electrical energy.

  20. Direct growth of patterned graphene on SiC(0001) surfaces by KrF excimer-laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Masakazu; Furukawa, Kazuaki; Takamura, Makoto; Hibino, Hiroki; Ikenoue, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    A novel method of direct growth of patterned graphene on SiC(0001) surfaces using KrF excimer-laser irradiation is proposed. It relies on the local sublimation of Si atoms within the irradiated area to induce graphene growth through a rearrangement of surplus carbon. A laser with a wavelength of 248 nm was pulsed with a duration of 55 ns and a repetition rate of 100 Hz that was used to graphene forming. Following laser irradiation of 1.2 J/cm2 (5000 shots) under an Ar atmosphere (500 Pa), characteristic graphene peaks were observed in the Raman spectra of the irradiated area, thereby confirming the formation of graphene. The ratio between the graphene bands in the Raman spectra was used to estimate the grain size at 61.3 nm. Through high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, it was confirmed that two layers of graphene were indeed formed in the laser irradiated region. Using this knowledge, we also demonstrate that line-and-space (LandS) graphene patterns with a pitch of 8 μm can be directly formed using our method.

  1. A FT-NIR spectroscopy methodology to estimate firing distance based on the direct analysis of the bullet impact surface.

    PubMed

    Sarraguça, Jorge M G; Lima, Catarina; Machado, Filipe; Lopes, João A; Almeida, Agostinho; Fernandes, Luís; Magalhães, Teresa; Santos, Agostinho

    2016-07-01

    A new methodology to estimate firing distance based on the direct analysis of organic components of gunshot residues (GSRs) on the bullet impact surface using Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy is proposed. Mathematical models relating firing distance with spectral information were developed using data obtained from a series of shots performed with a Glock model 17C (114 mm barrel length and 9 × 19 mm cartridges) at different distances, from 20 to 90 cm, against a white 40 × 40 cm square cloth (70% polyester/30% cotton) target. The study was repeated with two different types of ammunition. Spectra were obtained around the bullet entrance hole at 4 perpendicular directions and at 5 radial distances in diffuse reflectance mode with the assistance of a fiber optic probe. Principal component analysis showed that FT-NIRS displayed sensitivity in the recognition of the differences between the GSRs from the two different types of ammunition. Partial least squares regression models allowed the estimation of firing distance for both types of ammunition. Prediction errors lower than 11 cm were obtained for shots up to 90 cm. PMID:27214352

  2. An Immunoassay for Dibutyl Phthalate Based on Direct Hapten Linkage to the Polystyrene Surface of Microtiter Plates

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chenxi; Ding, Shumao; You, Huihui; Zhang, Yaran; Wang, Yao; Yang, Xu; Yuan, Junlin

    2011-01-01

    Background Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) is predominantly used as a plasticizer inplastics to make them flexible. Extensive use of phthalates in both industrial processes and other consumer products has resulted in the ubiquitous presence of phthalates in the environment. In order to better determine the level of pollution in the environment and evaluate the potential adverse effects of exposure to DBP, immunoassay for DBP was developed. Methodology/Principal Findings A monoclonal antibody specific to DBP was produced from a stable hybridoma cell line generated by lymphocyte hybridoma technique. An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) employing direct coating of hapten on polystyrene microtiter plates was established for the detection of DBP. Polystyrene surface was first oxidized by permanganate in dilute sulfuric acid to generate carboxyl groups. Then dibutyl 4-aminophthalate, which is an analogue of DBP, was covalently linked to the carboxyl groups of polystyrene surface with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC). Compared with conjugate coated format (IC50 = 106 ng/mL), the direct hapten coated format (IC50 = 14.6 ng/mL) improved assay sensitivity after careful optimization of assay conditions. The average recovery of DBP from spiked water sample was 104.4% and the average coefficient of variation was 9.95%. Good agreement of the results obtained by the hapten coated icELISA and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry further confirmed the reliability and accuracy of the icELISA for the detection of DBP in certain plastic and cosmetic samples. Conclusions/Significance The stable and efficient hybridoma cell line obtained is an unlimited source of sensitive and specific antibody to DBP. The hapten coated format is proposed as generally applicable because the carboxyl groups on modified microtiter plate surface enables stable immobilization of aminated or hydroxylated hapten with EDC. The developed hapten

  3. Detection of surface immunoglobulins of human lymphoid cells: a comparative study of live and fixed cells using a direct immunoperoxidase procedure.

    PubMed

    Laurent, G; Gourdin, M F; Reyes, F

    1982-02-01

    Surface immunoglobulins (Ig) of normal and malignant lymphoid cells were detected on prefixed, smeared (method A) and live (method B) cell suspensions; the results were compared with regard to staining patterns, specificity and sensitivity. In both methods surface Ig were detected by a direct immunoperoxidase procedure using conjugated purified antibody. Although method A has practical advantages, method B is more sensitive. The reasons for this discrepancy are discussed in relation to surface Ig denaturation and redistribution. PMID:7040480

  4. Detection of surface immunoglobulins of human lymphoid cells: a comparative study of live and fixed cells using a direct immunoperoxidase procedure.

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, G; Gourdin, M F; Reyes, F

    1982-01-01

    Surface immunoglobulins (Ig) of normal and malignant lymphoid cells were detected on prefixed, smeared (method A) and live (method B) cell suspensions; the results were compared with regard to staining patterns, specificity and sensitivity. In both methods surface Ig were detected by a direct immunoperoxidase procedure using conjugated purified antibody. Although method A has practical advantages, method B is more sensitive. The reasons for this discrepancy are discussed in relation to surface Ig denaturation and redistribution. PMID:7040480

  5. Directly grown Si nanowire arrays on Cu foam with a coral-like surface for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Shilong; Jiang, Hao; Hu, Yanjie; Li, Chunzhong

    2014-11-01

    In order to mitigate the drastic volumetric expansion (>300%) of silicon (Si) during the lithiation process, we demonstrate the synthesis of novel Si nanowire arrays (n-SNWAs) with a coral-like surface on Cu foam via a one-step CVD method, in which the Cu foam can simultaneously act as a catalyst and current collector. The unique coral-like surface endows n-SNWAs with a high structural integrity, which is beneficial for enhancing their electrochemical performance. In addition, the as-prepared n-SNWAs on Cu foam can be directly applied as the anode for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), exhibiting a very high reversible discharge capacity (2745 mA h g-1 at 200 mA g-1) and a fast charge and discharge capability (884 mA h g-1 at 3200 mA g-1), which is much higher than the conventional SNWAs (c-SNWAs, only 127 mA h g-1 at 3200 mA g-1). Meanwhile, they deliver an improved cycling stability (2178 mA h g-1 at 400 mA g-1 after 50 cycles). More significantly, the as-synthesized n-SNWAs on Cu foam also possess a superior specific areal capacity of 4.1 mA h cm-2 at 0.6 mA cm-2. Such excellent electrochemical performance is superior, or at least comparable, to the best report for Si anode materials. Combining the cost-effective and facile preparation method, the present n-SNWAs on Cu foam can serve as a promising anode for LIBs.In order to mitigate the drastic volumetric expansion (>300%) of silicon (Si) during the lithiation process, we demonstrate the synthesis of novel Si nanowire arrays (n-SNWAs) with a coral-like surface on Cu foam via a one-step CVD method, in which the Cu foam can simultaneously act as a catalyst and current collector. The unique coral-like surface endows n-SNWAs with a high structural integrity, which is beneficial for enhancing their electrochemical performance. In addition, the as-prepared n-SNWAs on Cu foam can be directly applied as the anode for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), exhibiting a very high reversible discharge capacity (2745 mA h g-1 at 200 m

  6. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    PubMed Central

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  7. Magnetometry with mesospheric sodium

    PubMed Central

    Higbie, James M.; Rochester, Simon M.; Patton, Brian; Holzlöhner, Ronald; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of magnetic fields on the few 100-km length scale is significant for many geophysical applications including mapping of crustal magnetism and ocean circulation measurements, yet available techniques for such measurements are very expensive or of limited accuracy. We propose a method for remote detection of magnetic fields using the naturally occurring atomic sodium-rich layer in the mesosphere and existing high-power lasers developed for laser guide star applications. The proposed method offers a dramatic reduction in cost and opens the way to large-scale, parallel magnetic mapping and monitoring for atmospheric science, navigation, and geophysics. PMID:21321235

  8. Laser threshold magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeske, Jan; Cole, Jared H.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of sensor, which uses diamond containing the optically active nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centres as a laser medium. The magnetometer can be operated at room-temperature and generates light that can be readily fibre coupled, thereby permitting use in industrial applications and remote sensing. By combining laser pumping with a radio-frequency Rabi-drive field, an external magnetic field changes the fluorescence of the NV- centres. We use this change in fluorescence level to push the laser above threshold, turning it on with an intensity controlled by the external magnetic field, which provides a coherent amplification of the readout signal with very high contrast. This mechanism is qualitatively different from conventional NV--based magnetometers which use fluorescence measurements, based on incoherent photon emission. We term our approach laser threshold magnetometer (LTM). We predict that an NV--based LTM with a volume of 1 mm3 can achieve shot-noise limited dc sensitivity of 1.86 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}} and ac sensitivity of 3.97 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}}.

  9. The study of droplet-laden turbulent air-flow over waved water surface by direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, Oleg A.; Troitskaya, Yuliya I.; Zilitinkevich, Sergej S.

    2016-04-01

    The detailed knowledge of the interaction of wind with surface water waves is necessary for correct parameterization of turbulent exchange at the air-sea interface in prognostic models. At sufficiently strong winds, sea-spray-generated droplets interfere with the wind-waves interaction. The results of field experiments and laboratory measurements (Andreas et al., JGR 2010) show that mass fraction of air-borne spume water droplets increases with the wind speed and their impact on the carrier air-flow may become significant. Phenomenological models of droplet-laden marine atmospheric boundary layer (Kudryavtsev & Makin, Bound.-Layer Met. 2011) predict that droplets significantly increase the wind velocity and suppress the turbulent air stress. The results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a turbulent particle-laden Couette flow over a flat surface show that inertial particles may significantly reduce the carrier flow vertical momentum flux (Richter & Sullivan, GRL 2013). The results also show that in the range of droplet sizes typically found near the air-sea interface, particle inertial effects are significant and dominate any particle-induced stratification effects. However, so far there has been no attempt to perform DNS of a droplet-laden air-flow over waved water surface. In this report, we present results of DNS of droplet-laden, turbulent Couette air-flow over waved water surface. The carrier, turbulent Couette-flow configuration in DNS is similar to that used in previous numerical studies (Sullivan et al., JFM 2000, Shen et al., JFM 2010, Druzhinin et al., JGR 2012). Discrete droplets are considered as non-deformable solid spheres and tracked in a Lagrangian framework, and their impact on the carrier flow is modeled with the use of a point-force approximation. The droplets parameters in DNS are matched to the typical known spume-droplets parameters in laboratory and field experiments. The DNS results show that both gravitational settling of droplets and

  10. Dynamic sea surface topography, gravity and improved orbit accuracies from the direct evaluation of SEASAT altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, J. G.; Lerch, F.; Koblinsky, C. J.; Klosko, S. M.; Robbins, J. W.; Williamson, R. G.; Patel, G. B.

    1989-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous solution of dynamic ocean topography, gravity and orbits using satellite altimeter data is described. A GEM-T1 based gravitational model called PGS-3337 that incorporates Seasat altimetry, surface gravimetry and satellite tracking data has been determined complete to degree and order 50. The altimeter data is utilized as a dynamic observation of the satellite's height above the sea surface with a degree 10 model of dynamic topography being recovered simultaneously with the orbit parameters, gravity and tidal terms in this model. PGS-3337 has a geoid uncertainty of 60 cm root-mean-square (RMS) globally, with the uncertainty over the altimeter tracked ocean being in the 25 cm range. Doppler determined orbits for Seasat, show large improvements, with the sub-30 cm radial accuracies being achieved. When altimeter data is used in orbit determination, radial orbital accuracies of 20 cm are achieved. The RMS of fit to the altimeter data directly gives 30 cm fits for Seasat when using PGS-3337 and its geoid and dynamic topography model. This performance level is two to three times better than that achieved with earlier Goddard earth models (GEM) using the dynamic topography from long-term oceanographic averages. The recovered dynamic topography reveals the global long wavelength circulation of the oceans with a resolution of 1500 km. The power in the dynamic topography recovery is now found to be closer to that of oceanographic studies than for previous satellite solutions. This is attributed primarily to the improved modeling of the geoid which has occurred. Study of the altimeter residuals reveals regions where tidal models are poor and sea state effects are major limitations.

  11. Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing and Forcing Efficiencies at Surface from the shortwave Irradiance Measurements in Abu Dhabi, UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beegum S, N.; Ben Romdhane, H.; Ghedira, H.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are known to affect the radiation balance of the Earth-Atmospheric system directly by scattering and absorbing the solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly by affecting the lifetime and albedo of the clouds. Continuous and simultaneous measurements of short wave global irradiance in combination with synchronous spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements (from 340 nm to 1640 nm in 8 channels), for a period of 1 year from June 2012 to May 2013, were used for the determination of the surface direct aerosol radiative forcing and forcing efficiencies under cloud free conditions in Abu Dhabi (24.42°N, 54.61o E, 7m MSL), a coastal location in United Arab Emirates (UAE) in the Arabian Peninsula. The Rotating Shadow band Pyranometer (RSP, LI-COR) was used for the irradiance measurements (in the spectral region 400-1100 nm), whereas the AOD measurements were carried out using CIMEL Sunphotometer (CE 318-2, under AERONET program). The differential method, which is neither sensitive to calibration uncertainties nor model assumptions, has been employed for estimating forcing efficiencies from the changes in the measured fluxes. The forcing efficiency, which quantifies the net change in irradiance per unit change in AOD, is an appropriate parameter for the characterization of the aerosol radiative effects even if the microphysical and optical properties of the aerosols are not completely understood. The corresponding forcing values were estimated from the forcing efficiencies. The estimated radiative forcing and forcing efficiencies exhibited strong monthly variations. The forcing efficiencies (absolute magnitudes) were highest during March, and showed continuous decrease thereafter to reach the lowest value during September. In contrast, the forcing followed a slightly different pattern of variability, with the highest solar dimming during April ( -60 W m-2) and the minimum during February ( -20 W m-2). The results indicate that the aerosol

  12. A Novel Method making direct use of AIRS and IASI Calibrated Radiances for Measuring Trends in Surface Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumann, H. H.; Ruzmaikin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Making unbiased measurements of trends in the surface temperatures, particularly on a gobal scale, is challenging: While the non-frozen oceans temperature measurements are plentiful and accurate, land and polar areas are much less accurately or fairly sampled. Surface temperature deduced from infrared radiometers on polar orbiting satellites (e.g. the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) at 1:30PM, the Interferometer Atmosphere Sounding Interferometer (IASI) at 9:30 AM and the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) at 1:30PM), can produce what appear to be well sampled data, but dealing with clouds either by cloud filtering (MODIS, IASI) or cloud-clearing (AIRS) can create sampling bias. We use a novel method: Random Nadir Sampling (RNS) combined with Probability Density Function (PDF) analysis. We analyze the trend in the PDF of st1231, the water vapor absorption corrected brightness temperatures measured in the 1231 cm-1 atmospheric window channel. The advantage of this method is that trends can be directly traced to the known, less than 3 mK/yr trend for AIRS, in st1231. For this study we created PDFs from 22,000 daily RNS from the AIRS and IASI data. We characterized the PDFs by its daily 90%tile value, st1231p90, and analysed the statistical properties of the this time series between 2002 and 2014. The method was validated using the daily NOAA SST (RTGSST) from the non-frozen oceans: The mean, seasonal variability and anomaly trend of st1231p90 agree with the corrsponding values from the RTGSST and the anomaly correlation is larger than 0.9. Preliminary results (August 2014) confirm the global hiatus in the increase of the globally averaged surface temperatures between 2002 and 2014, with a change of less than 10 mK/yr. This uncertainty is dominated by the large interannual variability related to El Niño events. Further insite is gained by analyzing land/ocean, day/night, artic and antarctic trends. We observe a massive warming trend in the

  13. Effect of Spectrally Varying Albedo of Vegetation Surfaces on Shortwave Radiation Fluxes and Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L.; Martins, J. V.; Yu, H.

    2012-01-01

    This study develops an algorithm for representing detailed spectral features of vegetation albedo based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) observations at 7 discrete channels, referred to as the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Albedo (MEVA) algorithm. The MEVA algorithm empirically fills spectral gaps around the vegetation red edge near 0.7 micrometers and vegetation water absorption features at 1.48 and 1.92 micrometers which cannot be adequately captured by the MODIS 7 channels. We then assess the effects of applying MEVA in comparison to four other traditional approaches to calculate solar fluxes and aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) at the top of atmosphere (TOA) based on the MODIS discrete reflectance bands. By comparing the DRF results obtained through the MEVA method with the results obtained through the other four traditional approaches, we show that filling the spectral gap of the MODIS measurements around 0.7 micrometers based on the general spectral behavior of healthy green vegetation leads to significant improvement in the instantaneous aerosol DRF at TOA (up to 3.02Wm(exp -2) difference or 48% fraction of the aerosol DRF, .6.28Wm(exp -2), calculated for high spectral resolution surface reflectance from 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers for deciduous vegetation surface). The corrections of the spectral gaps in the vegetation spectrum in the near infrared, again missed by the MODIS reflectances, also contributes to improving TOA DRF calculations but to a much lower extent (less than 0.27Wm(exp -2), or about 4% of the instantaneous DRF). Compared to traditional approaches, MEVA also improves the accuracy of the outgoing solar flux between 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at TOA by over 60Wm(exp -2) (for aspen 3 surface) and aerosol DRF by over 10Wm(exp -2) (for dry grass). Specifically, for Amazon vegetation types, MEVA can improve the accuracy of daily averaged aerosol radiative forcing in the spectral range of 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at equator at the

  14. Selective surface activation of a functional monolayer for the fabrication of nanometer scale thiol patterns and directed self-assembly of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fresco, Zachary M; Fréchet, Jean M J

    2005-06-15

    Application of a voltage bias between the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) and a silicon substrate causes the localized modification of a specially designed self-assembled monolayer (SAM), transforming a surface-bound thiocarbonate into a surface-bound thiol. The resulting surface-bound thiols are used to direct the patternwise self-assembly of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). This methodology is applied to deposit individual AuNPs onto a surface with nanometer precision and to produce 10 nm lines of closely spaced AuNPs that are a single nanoparticle in width.

  15. Band edge emission enhancement by quadrupole surface plasmon-exciton coupling using direct-contact Ag/ZnO nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yashu; He, Xu; Li, Jing; Yin, Jun; Li, Kongyi; Yue, Chuang; Wu, Zhiming; Wu, Suntao; Kang, Junyong

    2013-01-21

    Periodic Ag nanoball (NB) arrays on ZnO hollow nanosphere (HNS) supporting structures were fabricated in a large area by a laser irradiation method. The optimized laser power and spherical supporting structure of ZnO with a certain size and separation were employed to aggregate a sputtering-deposited Ag nano-film into an ordered, large-area, and two dimensional Ag NB array. A significant band edge (BE) emission enhancement of ZnO HNSs was achieved on this Ag NB/ZnO HNS hybrid structure and the mechanism was revealed by further experimental and theoretical analyses. With successfully fabricating the direct-contact structure of a Ag NB on the top of each ZnO HNS, the highly localized quadrupole mode surface plasmon resonance (SPR), realized on the metal NBs in the ultraviolet region, can effectively improve the BE emission of ZnO through strong coupling with the excitons of ZnO. Compared with the dipole mode SPR, the quadrupole mode SPR is insensitive to the metal nanoparticle's size and has a resonance frequency in the BE region of the wide band gap materials, hence, it can be potentially applied in related optoelectronic devices. PMID:23196786

  16. Directed self-assembly of block copolymers in thin films on surfaces patterned by electro-oxidation nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ji

    We have studied the wetting and self-assembly behavior of block copolymer thin films on chemical patterns in various geometries. Carboxylic-terminated, mesh-like patterns were generated on OTS modified silicon wafers by AFM electro-oxidation lithography. The films were pinned on the carboxylic regions due to the strong interaction of the minor component block with the surface which was also found to suppress film dewetting over the unpatterned methyl regions. We have found that the cylindrical microdomains orient normal to the methyl-terminated patterns and remain laterally confined within them. Defect-free, hexagonally packed cylindrical microdomains could be obtained thanks to the "corralling" action of the patterns. Domain deformation or point defects arose when the dimensions or shapes of the patterns were not commensurate with the natural packing of the copolymers. Tetragonal packing of microdomains was observed when a square-shaped confinement geometry, with dimension comparable to 2L 0 (natural period), was used. The stretching or compression of polymer chains was found to accomendate the incommensurable confinement imposed by chemical patterns, and a free energy model was applied for interpretation. Solvent annealing was conbined with chemical dot patterns to direct the self-assembly of block copolymers in thin films, and silicon oxide nanodots were fabricated through a tone-reversal process.

  17. The Saga of Light-Matter Interaction and Magneto-optical Effects Applications to Atomic Magnetometry, Laser-cooled Atoms, Atomic Clocks, Geomagnetism, and Plant Bio-magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, Eric P.

    The quest to expand the limited sensorial domain, in particular to bridge the inability to gauge magnetic fields near and far, has driven the fabrication of remedial tools. The interaction of ferromagnetic material with a magnetic field had been the only available technique to gauge that field for several millennium. The advent of electricity and associated classical phenomena captured in the four Maxwell equations, were a step forward. In the early 1900s, the model of quantum mechanics provided a two-way leap forward. One came from the newly understood interaction of light and matter, and more specifically the three-way coupling of photons, atoms' angular momenta, and magnetic field, which are the foundations of atomic magnetometry. The other came from magnetically sensitive quantum effects in a fabricated energy-ladder form of matter cooled to a temperature below that of the energy steps; these quantum effects gave rise to the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Research using atomic magnetometers and SQUIDs has resulted in thousands of publications, text books, and conferences. The current status in each field is well described in Refs. [48,49,38,42] and all references therein. In this work we develop and investigate techniques and applications pertaining to atomic magnetometry. [Full text: eric.corsini gmail.com].

  18. A simple atomic force microscopy calibration method for direct measurement of surface energy on nanostructured surfaces covered with molecularly thin liquid films.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Ralf; Etsion, Izhak; Talke, Frank E

    2009-05-01

    A simple calibration method is described for the determination of surface energy by atomic force microscopy (AFM) pull-off force measurements on nanostructured surfaces covered with molecularly thin liquid films. The method is based on correlating pull-off forces measured in arbitrary units on a nanostructured surface with pull-off forces measured on macroscopically smooth dip-coated gauge surfaces with known surface energy. The method avoids the need for complex calibration of the AFM cantilever stiffness and the determination of the radius of curvature of the AFM tip. Both of the latter measurements are associated with indirect and less accurate measurements of surface energy based on various contact mechanics adhesion models.

  19. Vector magnetometry and lightwave defect imaging sensor technologies for internal pipe inspection systems. Phase 1 and 2 feasibility study, conceptual design, and prototype development. Final report, March 1991-July 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S.; Fowler, T.; Peters, E.; Power, W.; Reed, M.

    1994-01-05

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) has been sponsoring the development of a vehicle and sensors for an integrated nondestructive internal inspection system for natural gas distribution pipes. Arthur D. Little has developed two sensor technologies, Vector Magnetometry (VM) and Lightwave Defect Imaging (LDI) for the system. The Vector Magnetometry sensor utilizes multiple arrays of miniature detection coils (fluxgate magnetometer elements); a three-axis array measures both the amplitude and phase of the magnetic leakage field that occurs in the vicinity of pipe wall defects. This technology is applicable to both cast iron and steel pipe.

  20. Infrared, spectral, directional-hemispherical reflectance of fused silica, Teflon polytetrafluoroethylene polymer, chrome oxide ceramic particle surface, Pyromark 2500 paint, Krylon 1602 paint, and Duraflect coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persky, Merle J.; Szczesniak, Martin

    2008-04-01

    Infrared, spectral, directional-hemispherical reflectivity measurements of polished fused silica, Teflon polytetrafluoroethylene polymer, chrome oxide ceramic particle surface, Pyromark 2500 paint, Krylon 1602 paint, and Duraflect coating are provided. The reflectance was measured with an estimated accuracy of 0.01 to 0.02 units and a precision of 0.005 units. All the surfaces were measured at ambient temperatures. Additionally, the chrome oxide ceramic particle surface was measured at 486 K and the Pyromark 2500 at four temperatures to 877 K. Polarization measurements are also provided for fused silica, Duraflect, chrome oxide ceramic particle surface, and Pyromark 2500 paint. Separate diffuse and specular reflectance components for the Duraflect and chrome oxide ceramic surfaces are included. Fresnel-based predictions for fused silica parallel and perpendicular polarized reflections are compared to measurements. It is notable that the Pyromark 2500 and chrome oxide ceramic particle surfaces exhibit a significant lack of manufacturing repeatability.