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Sample records for direct thrombin inhibitor

  1. Natural inhibitors of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Huntington, James A

    2014-04-01

    The serine protease thrombin is the effector enzyme of blood coagulation. It has many activities critical for the formation of stable clots, including cleavage of fibrinogen to fibrin, activation of platelets and conversion of procofactors to active cofactors. Thrombin carries-out its multiple functions by utilising three special features: a deep active site cleft and two anion binding exosites (exosite I and II). Similarly, thrombin inhibitors have evolved to exploit the unique features of thrombin to achieve rapid and specific inactivation of thrombin. Exogenous thrombin inhibitors come from several different protein families and are generally found in the saliva of haematophagous animals (blood suckers) as part of an anticoagulant cocktail that allows them to feed. Crystal structures of several of these inhibitors reveal how peptides and proteins can be targeted to thrombin in different and interesting ways. Thrombin activity must also be regulated by endogenous inhibitors so that thrombi do not occlude blood flow and cause thrombosis. A single protein family, the serpins, provides all four of the endogenous thrombin inhibitors found in man. The crystal structures of these serpins bound to thrombin have been solved, revealing a similar exosite-dependence on complex formation. In addition to forming the recognition complex, serpins destroy the structure of thrombin, allowing them to be released from cofactors and substrates for clearance. This review examines how the special features of thrombin have been exploited by evolution to achieve inhibition of the ultimate coagulation protease.

  2. Screening of direct thrombin inhibitors from Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae by a peak fractionation approach.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Song, Hui-Peng; Li, Ping; Zhou, Ping; Dong, Xin; Chen, Jun

    2015-05-10

    Thrombin plays a significant role in thromboembolic disease. In this work, a peak fractionation approach combined with an activity assay method was used to screen direct thrombin inhibitors from Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae (RSM), a famous herbal remedy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases in China. A total of 91 fractions were collected from the RSM extract, and 19 fractions out of them showed thrombin inhibitory effects with dose-effect relationship. Among them, three compounds were unambiguously identified as 15, 16-dihydrotanshinone I, cryptotanshinone and tanshinone IIA with IC50 values of 29.39, 81.11 and 66.60μM, respectively. The three compounds were reported with direct thrombin inhibition activities for the first time and their ligand-thrombin interactions were explored by a molecular docking research. These results may contribute to explain the medical benefit of RSM for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25819728

  3. Thrombostatin FM compounds: direct thrombin inhibitors – mechanism of action in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, M. T.; Burke, F.; Warnock, M.; Zhou, Y.; Sweigart, J.; Chen, A.; Ricketts, D.; Lucchesi, B. R.; Chen, Z.; Di Cera, E.; Hilfinger, J.; Kim, J. S.; Mosberg, H. I.; Schmaier, A. H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background Novel pentapeptides called Thrombostatin FM compounds consisting mostly of D-isomers and unusual amino acids were prepared based upon the stable angiotensin converting enzyme breakdown product of bradykinin – RPPGF. Methods and Results These peptides are direct thrombin inhibitors prolonging the thrombin clotting time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and prothrombin time at ≥0.78, 1.6, and 1.6 µm, respectively. They competitively inhibit α-thrombin-induced cleavage of a chromogenic substrate at 4.4–8.2 µm. They do not significantly inhibit plasma kallikrein, factor (F) XIIa, FXIa, FIXa, FVIIa-TF, FXa, plasmin or cathepsin G. One form, FM19 [rOicPaF(p-Me)], blocks α-thrombin-induced calcium flux in fibroblasts with an IC50 of 6.9 ± 1.2 µm. FM19 achieved 100% inhibition of threshold α- or γ-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation at 8.4 ± 4.7 µm and 16 ± 4 µm, respectively. The crystal structure of thrombin in complex with FM19 shows that the N-terminal D-Arg retrobinds into the S1 pocket, its second residue Oic interacts with His-57, Tyr-60a and Trp-60d, and its C-terminal p-methyl Phe engages thrombin_s aryl binding site composed of Ile-174, Trp-215, and Leu-99. When administered intraperitoneal, intraduodenal, or orally to mice, FM19 prolongs thrombin clotting times and delays carotid artery thrombosis. Conclusion FM19, a low affinity reversible direct thrombin inhibitor, might be useful as an add-on agent to address an unmet need in platelet inhibition in acute coronary syndromes in diabetics and others who with all current antiplatelet therapy still have reactive platelets. PMID:18315550

  4. Thrombostatin FM compounds: direct thrombin inhibitors - mechanism of action in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Nieman, M T; Burke, F; Warnock, M; Zhou, Y; Sweigart, J; Chen, A; Ricketts, D; Lucchesi, B R; Chen, Z; Cera, E Di; Hilfinger, J; Kim, J S; Mosberg, H I; Schmaier, A H

    2008-04-29

    Novel pentapeptides called Thrombostatin FM compounds consisting mostly of D-isomers and unusual amino acids were prepared based upon the stable angiotensin converting enzyme breakdown product of bradykinin - RPPGF. These peptides are direct thrombin inhibitors prolonging the thrombin clotting time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and prothrombin time at ≥0.78, 1.6, and 1.6 μm, respectively. They competitively inhibit α-thrombin-induced cleavage of a chromogenic substrate at 4.4--8.2 μm. They do not significantly inhibit plasma kallikrein, factor (F) XIIa, FXIa, FIXa, FVIIa-TF, FXa, plasmin or cathepsin G. One form, FM19 [rOicPaF(p-Me)], blocks α-thrombin-induced calcium flux in fibroblasts with an IC50 of 6.9 ± 1.2 μm. FM19 achieved 100% inhibition of threshold α- or γ-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation at 8.4 ± 4.7 μm and 16 ± 4 μm, respectively. The crystal structure of thrombin in complex with FM19 shows that the N-terminal D-Arg retrobinds into the S1 pocket, its second residue Oic interacts with His-57, Tyr-60a and Trp-60d, and its C-terminal p-methyl Phe engages thrombin's aryl binding site composed of Ile-174, Trp-215, and Leu-99. When administered intraperitoneal, intraduodenal, or orally to mice, FM19 prolongs thrombin clotting times and delays carotid artery thrombosis. FM19, a low affinity reversible direct thrombin inhibitor, might be useful as an add-on agent to address an unmet need in platelet inhibition in acute coronary syndromes in diabetics and others who with all current antiplatelet therapy still have reactive platelets.

  5. [Successful direct thrombin inhibitor treatment of a left atrial appendage thrombus developed under rivaroxaban therapy].

    PubMed

    Szegedi, Nándor; Gellér, László; Tahin, Tamás; Merkely, Béla; Széplaki, Gábor

    2016-01-24

    The authors present the history of a 62-year-old man on continuous rivaroxaban therapy who was scheduled for pulmonary vein isolation due to persistent atrial fibrillation. Preoperative transesophageal echocardiography detected the presence of left atrial appendage thrombus. Thrombophilia tests showed that the patient was heterozygous carrier of the methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase gene mutation. The authors hypothesized that a direct thrombin inhibitor might exert a more appropriate effect against thrombosis in this case and, therefore, a switch to dabigatran was performed. After two months of anticoagulation with the direct thrombin inhibitor and folic acid supplementation the thrombus resolved. The authors underline that thrombus formation may develop in atrial fibrillation even if the patient is adequately treated with rivaroxaban. This case suggests, that methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase gene mutation may modulate the efficacy of direct Xa factor inhibitors. According to this case history, dabigatran may be an effective therapeutic option in resolving established thrombus.

  6. Design, synthesis and structural exploration of novel fluorinated dabigatran derivatives as direct thrombin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Lin; Ren, Yu-Jie; Dong, Ming-Hui; Ren, Wei-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-one fluorinated dabigatran derivatives were designed based on the bioisosteric principle. All derivatives were synthesised and evaluated for their thrombin inhibitory activity in vitro. Among these compounds, 14h, 14m, 14s and 14t were potent and the activity was in the range of reference drug, dabigatran. Three structural changes were introduced in these 21 compounds to elucidate the structure-activity relationship of the drugs. In addition, prodrugs of compounds 14h and 14s were developed to investigate their anticoagulant activities in vivo. In these experiments, compound 16 showed a fairly strong inhibitory effect on thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, and demonstrated potent activity for inhibiting arteriovenous thrombosis with an inhibition rate of (73 ± 6) %, which was comparable to that of dabigatran etexilate (76 ± 2) %. Moreover, molecular docking studies were performed to understand the binding interactions of active compounds 14h, 14s and 14t with thrombin protein (PDB ID:1KTS). Contour maps obtained from the 3D-QSAR model are meaningful in designing more active molecules to act as direct inhibitors of thrombin.

  7. Rational design and characterization of D-Phe-Pro-D-Arg-derived direct thrombin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Ana C; Clement, Cristina C; Zakia, Sheuli; Gingold, Julian; Philipp, Manfred; Pereira, Pedro J B

    2012-01-01

    The tremendous social and economic impact of thrombotic disorders, together with the considerable risks associated to the currently available therapies, prompt for the development of more efficient and safer anticoagulants. Novel peptide-based thrombin inhibitors were identified using in silico structure-based design and further validated in vitro. The best candidate compounds contained both L- and D-amino acids, with the general sequence D-Phe(P3)-Pro(P2)-D-Arg(P1)-P1'-CONH₂. The P1' position was scanned with L- and D-isomers of natural or unnatural amino acids, covering the major chemical classes. The most potent non-covalent and proteolysis-resistant inhibitors contain small hydrophobic or polar amino acids (Gly, Ala, Ser, Cys, Thr) at the P1' position. The lead tetrapeptide, D-Phe-Pro-D-Arg-D-Thr-CONH₂, competitively inhibits α-thrombin's cleavage of the S2238 chromogenic substrate with a K(i) of 0.92 µM. In order to understand the molecular details of their inhibitory action, the three-dimensional structure of three peptides (with P1' L-isoleucine (fPrI), L-cysteine (fPrC) or D-threonine (fPrt)) in complex with human α-thrombin were determined by X-ray crystallography. All the inhibitors bind in a substrate-like orientation to the active site of the enzyme. The contacts established between the D-Arg residue in position P1 and thrombin are similar to those observed for the L-isomer in other substrates and inhibitors. However, fPrC and fPrt disrupt the active site His57-Ser195 hydrogen bond, while the combination of a P1 D-Arg and a bulkier P1' residue in fPrI induce an unfavorable geometry for the nucleophilic attack of the scissile bond by the catalytic serine. The experimental models explain the observed relative potency of the inhibitors, as well as their stability to proteolysis. Moreover, the newly identified direct thrombin inhibitors provide a novel pharmacophore platform for developing antithrombotic agents by exploring the conformational

  8. Direct thrombin inhibitor-bivalirudin functionalized plasma polymerized allylamine coating for improved biocompatibility of vascular devices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhilu; Tu, Qiufen; Maitz, Manfred F; Zhou, Shuo; Wang, Jin; Huang, Nan

    2012-11-01

    The direct thrombin inhibitor of bivalirudin (BVLD), a short peptide derived from hirudin, has drawn an increasing attention in clinical application because it is safer and more effective than heparin for diabetic patients with moderate- or high-risk for acute coronary syndromes (ACS). In this study, BVLD was covalently conjugated on plasma polymerized allylamine (PPAam) coated 316L stainless steel (SS) to develop an anticoagulant surface. QCM-D real time monitoring result shows that 565±20 ng/cm2 of BVLD was bound to the PPAam surface. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the immobilization of BVLD. The conjugation of BVLD onto the PPAam coating led to enhanced binding of thrombin, and the activity of the thrombin adsorbed on its surface was effectively inhibited. As a result, the BVLD immobilized PPAam (BVLD-PPAam) substrate prolonged the clotting times, and exhibited inhibition in adhesion and activation of platelets and fibrinogen. We also found that the BVLD-PPAam coating significantly enhanced endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and release of nitric oxide (NO) and secretion of prostaglandin I2 (PGI2). In vivo results indicate that the BVLD-PPAam surface restrained thrombus formation by rapidly growing a homogeneous and intact endothelium on its surface. These data suggest the potential of this multifunctional BVLD-PPAam coating for the application not only in general vascular devices such as catheters, tubes, oxygenator, hemodialysis membranes but also vascular grafts and stents.

  9. Management of major bleedings during anticoagulant treatment with the oral direct thrombin inhibitor ximelagatran or warfarin.

    PubMed

    Fernlöf, Gunilla; Sjöström, Britta M; Lindell, Klas M; Wall, Ulrika E

    2009-12-01

    Several new oral anticoagulants are currently investigated in phase III programmes, mainly with inhibition of factor Xa or thrombin as their pharmacological target. Advantages are expected with these new drugs compared with vitamin K antagonists, but one potential drawback is the lack of specific antidotes. During the clinical studies with ximelagatran, an oral direct thrombin inhibitor withdrawn due to hepatic side effects, investigators were instructed to manage bleedings with routine measures. We have retrospectively tried to assess whether this was sufficient or whether there was a need for reversal strategies. The study population consisted of patients with major bleedings in three long-term studies (104 ximelagatran, 155 warfarin). All individual patient narratives were reviewed with respect to management of the bleeding. Complementary data were retrieved from the data-based case report forms. Approximately, two of three of the patients in both groups were subject to some kind of treatment. One-third (1/3) in both groups had transfusions documented and/or received specific medication. Vitamin K was given more often to warfarin patients. Two ximelagatran patients received prothrombin complex (four-factor concentrate), but one was a patient with a severe hepatopathy suspected to be drug-induced. Overall, the case descriptions did not reveal any apparent differences in the course of events between groups. We found no indications that the lack of an antidote posed a clinical problem in patients treated with ximelagatran as compared with warfarin. The relatively short half-life of melagatran, the active metabolite of ximelagatran, may have contributed to these results.

  10. Using the HEMOCLOT direct thrombin inhibitor assay to determine plasma concentrations of dabigatran.

    PubMed

    Stangier, Joachim; Feuring, Martin

    2012-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the suitability of an accurate, sensitive, standardized, chronometric blood coagulation test to determine the anticoagulation activity of dabigatran and to quantify concentrations of dabigatran in plasma. Dabigatran was spiked at increasing concentrations in pooled citrated normal human plasma to measure diluted thrombin time with the HEMOCLOT THROMBIN INHIBITOR assay. Calibration curve linearity, inter-assay and intra-assay precision, and assay accuracy were investigated. Dabigatran stability in plasma and the feasibility of lyophilized dabigatran standards for assay calibration were assessed. Data are presented as back-calculated plasma concentrations of dabigatran using regression analysis. Dabigatran's calibration curve for thrombin clotting time was linear over the concentration range 0-4000  nmol/l (0-1886  ng/ml). The R was 0.99. Total assay imprecision for dabigatran was 4.7-12.0% coefficient of variation, with 1.2-3.1% for intra-run imprecision, 4.0-10.0% for inter-run precision and 0.3-8.3% for between-day imprecision. Assay accuracy was determined at three dabigatran concentrations; deviation from sample target concentrations ranged from -20.7% (100  nmol/l; 47.15  ng/ml) to 5.6% (1500  nmol/l; 707.3  ng/ml). Assay robustness was determined by analysing identical dabigatran samples in two independent laboratories. The mean bias of dabigatran coagulation times between laboratories was 6.6%. The HEMOCLOT Thrombin Inhibitors assay is suitable for determining the anticoagulant activity and calculating plasma concentrations of dabigatran using simple and widely available chronometric coagulation devices. The use of this rapid, established, standardized and calibrated assay should provide accurate and consistent results when assessing the anticoagulant activity of dabigatran. PMID:22227958

  11. Oral, direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors: the replacement for warfarin, leeches, and pig intestines?

    PubMed

    Straub, Alexander; Roehrig, Susanne; Hillisch, Alexander

    2011-05-01

    To prevent thromboses after surgery, patients have until now had to inject themselves daily with heparin. For stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation, patients take vitamin K antagonists of the coumarin type, which have a narrow therapeutic window and whose dosage must be regularly monitored. In order to improve the standard of therapy in thromboembolic diseases such as deep-vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and stroke in atrial fibrillation, intensive research has been carried out over the last decade in the search for new, orally active thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors. A number of these compounds are already on the market or are in advanced clinical development; they could revolutionize the anticoagulant market.

  12. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Marx, Pauline F

    2004-09-01

    The coagulation system is a potent mechanism that prevents blood loss after vascular injury. It consists of a number of linked enzymatic reactions resulting in thrombin generation. Thrombin converts soluble fibrinogen into a fibrin clot. The clot is subsequently removed by the fibrinolytic system upon wound healing. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), which is identical to the previously identified proteins procarboxypeptidase B, R, and U, forms a link between blood coagulation and fibrinolysis. TAFI circulates as an inactive proenzyme in the bloodstream, and becomes activated during blood clotting. The active form, TAFIa, inhibits fibrinolysis by cleaving off C-terminal lysine residues from partially degraded fibrin that stimulates the tissue-type plasminogen activator-mediated conversion of plasminogen to plasmin. Consequently, removal of these lysines leads to less plasmin formation and subsequently to protection of the fibrin clot from break down. Moreover, TAFI may also play a role in other processes such as, inflammation and tissue repair. In this review, recent developments in TAFI research are discussed. PMID:15379716

  13. The direct thrombin inhibitors (argatroban, bivalirudin and lepirudin) and the indirect Xa-inhibitor (danaparoid) increase fibrin network porosity and thus facilitate fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    He, Shu; Blombäck, Margareta; Bark, Niklas; Johnsson, Hans; Wallén, N Hakan

    2010-05-01

    The present study aimed to assess whether the fibrin network structure is modified by the direct thrombin-inhibitors lepirudin, argatroban or bivalirudin and by the indirect Xa-inhibitor danaparoid. Using an in vitro assay that imitates the physiological process of coagulation from thrombin generation to fibrin formation, we examined a normal plasma pool spiked with one of the inhibitors. At concentrations considered to be the plasma levels observed during therapy, almost no influence was detected for lepirudin despite clear-cut effects on "clotting time". However, argatroban, bivalirudin and danaparoid increased the fibrin gel permeability (Ks) to a similar extent. At concentrations higher than the "therapeutic" levels, the dose-response curve in the Ks assay became very steep for lepirudin while those were shallow for the others. In parallel with the drug-induced increases of Ks, larger network pores in 3D-microscopic images and significant shortenings in "clot lysis time" induced by addition of rtPA were observed. Recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) added to danaparoid-treated samples profoundly counteracted the increase of Ks but had only a slight or no effect on the other drugs. Thus, in vitro, argatroban, bivalirudin and danaparoid have comparable anticoagulating effects, rendering the fibrin network more permeable and less resistant to fibrinolysis. For lepirudin, the steep dose-response curve supports previous clinical findings, i.e. this thrombin inhibitor has a narrow therapeutic window. Furthermore, our data suggest that the haemostatic agent, rFVIII, might be effective in treatment of bleeding complications induced by danaparoid. PMID:20216982

  14. Site-specific interaction of thrombin and inhibitors observed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Klingler, J; Friedrich, T

    1997-01-01

    We report on the application of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to observe the interaction between thrombin and thrombin inhibitors. Two site-specific fluorescent labels were used to distinguish between inhibitors directed to the active site, the exosite, or both binding sites of thrombin. For several well-known inhibitors of thrombin, the binding sites observed by FCS correspond to previous studies. The interaction of the recently discovered thrombin inhibitor ornithodorin from the tick Ornithodorus moubata with thrombin was investigated. It was found that this inhibitor, like hirudin and rhodniin, binds to both the active site and exosite of thrombin simultaneously. This study shows the feasibility of FCS as a sensitive and selective method for observing protein-ligand interactions. As an additional technique, simultaneous labeling with both fluorescent labels was successfully demonstrated. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9336216

  15. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and food effect of LB30870, a novel direct thrombin inhibitor, after single oral doses in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Kim, John; Lee, Sung-Hack; Boyce, Malcolm; Warrington, Steve; Cho, Kwan Hyung; Yoon, Suk Kyoon; Park, Hee Dong; Kim, Aeri

    2015-01-01

    1. The safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and food effect of LB30870, a new selective thrombin inhibitor, were studied in 16 healthy men. 2. A double-blind, placebo-controlled single ascending dose study was done at oral doses of 5, 15, 30, 60, 120, and 240 mg under fasting conditions. An open, randomized, balanced cross-over food effect study was done at 60 mg dose. Plasma and urinary concentrations were measured up to 48 h post-dose. Coagulation and thrombin activity markers were measured at selected time points. 3. Cmax of LB30870 was at 1.3-3.0 h post-dose with a mean apparent terminal half-life (t1/2) of 2.8-4.1 h. AUC after doses above 15 mg appeared greater than dose-proportional. In fed state, AUC showed 80% reduction relative to fasting condition. 4. At doses 60 and 120 mg, peak activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) increased by 1.5- and 2-fold, respectively, from baseline. The aPTT and international normalized ratio (INR) were concentration-dependent, with less within-individual variability than ecarin clotting time (ECT), prothrombin time (PT), or thrombin time (TT). 5. Single oral doses of LB30870 up to 240 mg were well tolerated. The food effect must be overcome if LB30870 is to be used as an oral anti-coagulant. PMID:25673087

  16. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Direct thrombin inhibitors versus vitamin K antagonists for preventing cerebral or systemic embolism in people with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014,3:CD009893].

    PubMed

    Vaz Carneiro, António; Costa, João

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the most important complications of lone (non-valvular) atrial fibrillation. Its prevention is usually accomplished through oral anticoagulation. Until a few years ago warfarin was the most used agent, but recently two new pharmacologic classes have been introduced for stroke prevention in these patients: oral direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran and ximelagatran) and oral factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban). In this systematic review, oral direct thrombin inhibitors were compared with warfarin for efficacy and safety. The results indicate that there is no difference in terms of efficacy (except dabigatran 150 mg BID). Oral direct thrombin inhibitors presented less hemorrhages but increased treatment withdrawal due to adverse side-effects (the authors performed post-hoc analyses excluding ximelagatran because this drug was withdrawn from the market owing to safety concerns). There was no difference in terms of mortality between the agents.

  17. 2-(2-Br-phenyl)-8-methoxy-benzoxazinone (HPW-RX2), a direct thrombin inhibitor with a suppressive effect on thromboxane formation in platelets.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin-Chung; Wang, Tsai-Wei; Wang, Wei-Ya; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Wu, Yang-Chang

    2005-12-19

    2-(2-Br-phenyl)-8-methoxy-benzoxazinone (HPW-RX2), a newly synthetic benzoxazinone derivative, has previously been shown to inhibit rabbit platelet aggregation caused by thrombin and arachidonic acid. In the present study, the mechanism for the antiplatelet effect of HPW-RX2 was further investigated. In human platelets, HPW-RX2 concentration-dependently inhibited platelet aggregation, ATP release, P-selectin expression, and intracellular calcium mobilization caused by thrombin. In contrast, HPW-RX2 had no significant effect on either SFLLRN- or GYPGKF-induced platelet aggregation, indicating that HPW-RX2 did not interfere with platelet thrombin receptors. Moreover, HPW-RX2 inhibited the amidolytic activity of thrombin and prolonged the fibrinogen clotting time. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of HPW-RX2 on thrombin-induced platelet aggregation is via direct inhibition of thrombin proteolytic activity. Besides the inhibition on thrombin, HPW-RX2 also prevented platelet aggregation, ATP release, and increase in [Ca2+]i caused by arachidonic acid and low concentration collagen. In a parallel manner, both arachidonic acid-induced thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin D2 formations were decreased in platelets treated with HPW-RX2. This indicates that HPW-RX2 is able to inhibit the arachidonic acid cascade at the cyclooxygenase level. This is the first report of a benzoxazinone derivative possessing both thrombin and cyclooxygenase inhibitory properties. The dual effect of HPW-RX2 might provide extra therapeutic benefits for treatment of arterial thrombosis. PMID:16313903

  18. Relation between dabigatran concentration, as assessed using the direct thrombin inhibitor assay, and activated clotting time/activated partial thromboplastin time in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Kenji; Kuwahara, Taishi; Takagi, Katsumasa; Takigawa, Masateru; Nakajima, Jun; Watari, Yuji; Nakashima, Emiko; Yamao, Kazuya; Fujino, Tadashi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Atsushi

    2015-06-15

    Dabigatran is a direct thrombin inhibitor that has been approved for preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. In this study, we aimed to assess the associations between the dabigatran concentration (calculated through plasma-diluted thrombin time, as assessed using the Hemoclot assay) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and activated clotting time (ACT). We recruited 137 patients with atrial fibrillation who were receiving a normal dose of dabigatran (300 mg/d) or a reduced dose of dabigatran (220 mg/d, usually administered to patients who were elderly, had moderate renal dysfunction, or who were also receiving verapamil). We then assessed the aPTT, ACT, and Hemoclot results of the patients and calculated the plasma dabigatran concentration. The mean plasma concentration of dabigatran was 127 ± 88 ng/ml, although no significant differences in dabigatran concentration, ACT, or aPTT were observed when we compared the 2 doses of dabigatran (300 or 220 mg/d). The dabigatran concentration was within the therapeutic levels in most patients, although a high value (>300 ng/ml) was observed in several patients, which indicated a high risk of bleeding. The dabigatran concentration was strongly and positively correlated with ACT and aPTT (r = 0.87, p <0.001; and r = 0.76, p <0.001; respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that verapamil use was independently associated with elevated dabigatran concentrations (p <0.001). Therefore, ACT and aPTT may be useful for bedside assessment of the anticoagulant activity of dabigatran, and verapamil use may be a risk factor for elevated dabigatran concentrations.

  19. [Surgery and invasive procedures in patients on long-term treatment with oral direct thrombin or factor Xa inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Sié, P; Samama, C-M; Godier, A; Rosencher, N; Steib, A; Llau, J-V; van der Linden, P; Pernod, G; Lecompte, T; Gouin-Thibault, I; Albaladejo, P

    2011-09-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAs), inhibitors of factor IIa or Xa, are expected to replace vitamin K antagonists in most of their indications. It is likely that patients on long-term treatment with DOAs will be exposed to elective or emergency surgery or invasive procedures. Due to the present lack of experience in such conditions, we cannot make recommendations, but only propose perioperative management for optimal safety as regards the risk of bleeding and thrombosis. DOAs may increase surgical bleeding, they have no validated antagonists, they cannot be monitored by simple, standardised laboratory assays, and their pharmacokinetics vary significantly from patient to patient. Although DOAs differ in many respects, the proposals in the perioperative setting need not be specific to each. For procedures with low risk of haemorrhage, a therapeutic window of 48 h (last administration 24h before surgery, restart 24h after) is proposed. For procedures with medium or high haemorrhagic risk, we suggest stopping DOAs 5 days before surgery to ensure complete elimination of the drug in all patients. The treatment should be resumed only when the risk of bleeding has been controlled. In patients with a high risk of thrombosis (e.g. those in atrial fibrillation with an antecedent of stroke), bridging with heparin (low molecular weight, or unfractionated if the former is contraindicated) is proposed. In emergency, the procedure should be postponed for as long as possible (minimum 1-2 half-lives) and non-specific anti-haemorrhagic agents, such as recombinant human activated factor VIIa, or prothrombin concentrates, should not be given for prophylactic reversal, due to their uncertain benefit-risk. PMID:21820844

  20. In vitro interaction of C1-inhibitor with thrombin.

    PubMed

    Cugno, M; Bos, I; Lubbers, Y; Hack, C E; Agostoni, A

    2001-06-01

    Previous observations of increased generation of thrombin during acute attacks of angioedema in plasma of patients with C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) deficiency prompted us to evaluate the interaction of C1-INH with thrombin in both purified systems and human plasma. For this purpose, we used several methods: (1) sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting analysis; (2) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to measure complexes between C1-INH and thrombin and inactivated C1-INH; and (3) kinetic studies using a chromogenic assay. We found that the interaction of purified C1-INH with thrombin is associated with the formation of bimolecular complexes of molecular weight (Mr) 130 000 and 120 000 as well as with the appearance of a cleaved form of C1-INH of Mr 97 000. The kinetic studies of inhibition of thrombin by C1-INH showed an average second-order rate constant of 19/s per mol/l, which was significantly increased in the presence of heparin. The addition of thrombin to human plasma was not associated with detectable C1-INH-thrombin complex formation or with cleavage of C1-INH. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that C1-INH upon interaction with thrombin, in part, forms enzyme-inhibitor complexes and, in part, is cleaved. The low second-order rate constant and the lack of a significant interaction in plasma suggest that the inhibition of thrombin by C1-INH has a minor role in circulating blood; however, its role might be important at the endothelial surface, where high concentrations of glycosaminoglycans occur.

  1. Inhibition of thrombin-mediated cellular effects by triabin, a highly potent anion-binding exosite thrombin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Glusa, E; Bretschneider, E; Daum, J; Noeske-Jungblut, C

    1997-06-01

    Triabin, a 17 kDa protein from the saliva of the assassin bug Triatoma pallidipennis is a potent thrombin inhibitor interfering with the anion-binding exosite of the enzyme. The recombinant protein, produced by the baculovirus/insect cell system, was used to study the inhibitory effect on thrombin-mediated cellular responses. The thrombin (1 nM)-stimulated aggregation of washed human platelets and the rise in cytoplasmic calcium in platelets were inhibited by triabin at nanomolar concentrations. In contrast, the rise in calcium induced by the thrombin receptor-activating peptide (10 microM) was not suppressed by triabin. In isolated porcine pulmonary arteries, preconstricted with PGF 2 alpha thrombin (2 nM) elicited an endothelium-dependent relaxation which was inhibited by triabin in the same concentration range as found for the inhibition of platelet aggregation. Higher concentrations of triabin were required to diminish the contractile response of endotheliumdenuded pulmonary vessels to thrombin (10 nM). In cultured bovine coronary smooth muscle cells, the mitogenic activity of thrombin (3 nM), measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation, was also suppressed by triabin. In all these assays, the inhibitory effect of triabin was dependent on the thrombin concentration used. These studies suggest that the new anion-binding exosite thrombin inhibitor triabin is one of the most potent inhibitors of thrombin-mediated cellular effects. PMID:9241757

  2. Thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor as a bleeding predictor in liver transplantation: a pilot observational study

    PubMed Central

    Nedel, Wagner Luis; Rodrigues Filho, Edison Moraes; Pasqualotto, Alessandro Comarú

    2016-01-01

    Objective To correlate the levels of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor in the immediate postoperative period and at 24 hours postoperatively with the volume of intraoperative bleeding. Methods Twenty-one patients allocated immediately before (elective or emergency) liver transplantation were analyzed. Blood samples were collected for thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor analysis at three different time points: immediately before liver transplantation (preoperative thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor), immediately after the surgical procedure (immediate postoperative thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor), and 24 hours after surgery (thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor 24 hours after surgery). The primary outcome of the study was to correlate the preoperative and immediate postoperative levels of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor with intraoperative blood loss. Results There was a correlation between the preoperative thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor levels and bleeding volume (ρ = -0.469; p = 0.05) but no correlation between the immediate postoperative thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor and bleeding volume (ρ = -0.062; p = 0.79). No variable included in the linear regression analysis (prehemoglobin, prefibrinogen and preoperative thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor) was a bleeding predictor. There was a similar trend in the variation between the levels of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor at the three different time points and fibrinogen levels. Patients who died within 6 months (14.3%) showed decreased preoperative and immediate postoperative levels of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis compared with survivors (preoperative: 1.3 ± 0.15 versus 2.55 ± 0.53, p = 0.06; immediate postoperative: 1.2 ± 0.15 versus 2.5 ± 0.42, p = 0.007). Conclusion There was a moderate correlation between preoperative thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor and intraoperative bleeding in liver

  3. Thrombin-Mediated Direct Activation of Proteinase-Activated Receptor-2: Another Target for Thrombin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Hansen, Kristina K; Renaux, Bernard; Polley, Danny; Gibson, Stacy; Vanderboor, Christina; Hollenberg, Morley D

    2016-05-01

    Thrombin is known to signal to cells by cleaving/activating a G-protein-coupled family of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs). The signaling mechanism involves the proteolytic unmasking of an N-terminal receptor sequence that acts as a tethered receptor-activating ligand. To date, the recognized targets of thrombin cleavage and activation for signaling are PAR1 and PAR4, in which thrombin cleaves at a conserved target arginine to reveal a tethered ligand. PAR2, which like PAR1 is also cleaved at an N-terminal arginine to unmask its tethered ligand, is generally regarded as a target for trypsin but not for thrombin signaling. We now show that thrombin, at concentrations that can be achieved at sites of acute injury or in a tumor microenvironment, can directly activate PAR2 vasorelaxation and signaling, stimulating calcium and mitogen-activated protein kinase responses along with triggeringβ-arrestin recruitment. Thus, PAR2 can be added alongside PAR1 and PAR4 to the targets, whereby thrombin can affect tissue function.

  4. A Kazal-type inhibitor with thrombin specificity from Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, T; Kröger, B; Bialojan, S; Lemaire, H G; Höffken, H W; Reuschenbach, P; Otte, M; Dodt, J

    1993-08-01

    A thrombin-specific inhibitor with an apparent molecular mass of 11 kDa has been purified from the insect Rhodnius prolixus. Amino-terminal protein sequence analysis allowed the molecular cloning of the corresponding cDNA. The open reading frame codes for a protein of about 103 amino acid residues and displays an internal sequence homology of residues 6-48 with residues 57-101 indicating a two-domain structure. Based on the amino acid sequence the two domains exhibit high homology to protease inhibitors belonging to the Kazal-type family. Model building suggests that the first domain binds to the active site with residue His10 pointing into the specificity pocket. From gel filtration and tight-binding inhibition experiments the inhibitor appears to form 1:1 complexes with thrombin. Periplasma-directed heterologous expression of the rhodniin cDNA in Escherichia coli yields the intact thrombin inhibitor. Natural and recombinant rhodniin both display inhibition constants of about 2 x 10(-13) M.

  5. Comparative evaluation of direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors with antiplatelet agents under flow and static conditions: an in vitro flow chamber model.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Kazuya; Ohnishi, Tomoko; Sameshima, Hisayo; Miura, Naoki; Koide, Takehiko; Maruyama, Ikuro; Tanaka, Kenichi A

    2014-01-01

    Dabigatran and rivaroxaban are novel oral anticoagulants that specifically inhibit thrombin and factor Xa, respectively. The aim of this study is to elucidate antithrombotic properties of these anticoagulant agents under arterial and venous shear conditions. Whole blood samples treated with dabigatran or rivaroxaban at 250, 500, and 1000 nM, with/without aspirin and AR-C66096, a P2Y12 antagonist, were perfused over a microchip coated with collagen and tissue thromboplastin at shear rates of 240 and 600 s(-1). Fibrin-rich platelet thrombus formation was quantified by monitoring flow pressure changes. Dabigatran at higher concentrations (500 and 1000 nM) potently inhibited thrombus formation at both shear rates, whereas 1000 nM of rivaroxaban delayed, but did not completely inhibit, thrombus formation. Dual antiplatelet agents weakly suppressed thrombus formation at both shear rates, but intensified the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran and rivaroxaban. The anticoagulant effects of dabigatran and rivaroxaban were also evaluated under static conditions using thrombin generation (TG) assay. In platelet-poor plasma, dabigatran at 250 and 500 nM efficiently prolonged the lag time (LT) and moderately reduce peak height (PH) of TG, whereas rivaroxaban at 250 nM efficiently prolonged LT and reduced PH of TG. In platelet-rich plasma, however, both anticoagulants efficiently delayed LT and reduced PH of TG. Our results suggest that dabigatran and rivaroxaban may exert distinct antithrombotic effects under flow conditions, particularly in combination with dual antiplatelet therapy. PMID:24497951

  6. Interaction of C1 inhibitor with thrombin on the endothelial surface.

    PubMed

    Caccia, Sonia; Castelli, Roberto; Maiocchi, Diana; Bergamaschini, Luigi; Cugno, Massimo

    2011-10-01

    Thrombin, the central bioregulatory enzyme of haemostasis, also has a potent vasopermeability effect on the surface of endothelial cells, and has therefore been considered a major link between the activation of the coagulation pathway and inflammation. C1 inhibitor inhibits thrombin with a low second-order rate constant that can be increased by heparin. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the C1 inhibitor-induced inhibition of thrombin is potentiated on the endothelial surface. The interaction of C1 inhibitor and thrombin was evaluated in an in-vitro system of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to which purified C1 inhibitor and thrombin have been added. The role of heparins and selectins has been tested by adding heparinase and Mab to selectins. Kinetic analysis under pseudo-first-order conditions showed that the inhibitory effect of C1 inhibitor on thrombin is greater on the surface of endothelial cells. After incubating nanomolar concentrations of thrombin and micromolar concentrations of C1 inhibitor in a purified system, thrombin activity remained significant, but was almost totally suppressed in the presence of HUVECs. The abolition of such suppression by heparinase and Mab to selectins supports the involvement of heparin and selectins in C1 inhibitor-thrombin interaction. Furthermore, the second-order rate constant was 25 ± 3 /s per mol/l in our purified system, but increased to 100 ± 9 /s per mol/l in the presence of HUVECs. Our results indicate that C1 inhibitor can inhibit thrombin activity on vascular endothelium via binding to selectins and potentiation by heparins. This may contribute to the modulation of thrombin activity on vasopermeability and on coagulation especially when the major natural anticoagulant pathways are impaired. PMID:21959589

  7. Effect of thrombomodulin on the kinetics of the interaction of thrombin with substrates and inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Hofsteenge, J; Taguchi, H; Stone, S R

    1986-01-01

    Thrombomodulin decreased by 20-30% the Michaelis constant of two tripeptidyl p-nitroanilide substrates of thrombin. Thrombomodulin increased the rate of inactivation of thrombin by two peptidyl chloromethane inhibitors by a similar amount. This effect appeared to be due to a decrease in the dissociation constants of the inhibitors. An improved method for the separation of fibrinopeptides A and B by h.p.l.c. was developed, and this method was used to study the effect of thrombomodulin on the thrombin-catalysed cleavage of fibrinogen. In this reaction, thrombomodulin was a competitive inhibitor with respect to the A alpha-chain of fibrinogen. The release of fibrinopeptide B was also inhibited by thrombomodulin. Analysis of the inhibition caused by thrombomodulin with respect to fibrinopeptides A and B yielded the same dissociation constant for the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex. In the presence of thrombomodulin, the rate of inactivation of thrombin by antithrombin III was stimulated 4-fold. This stimulation showed saturation kinetics with respect to thrombomodulin. Thrombomodulin was found to compete with hirudin for a binding site on thrombin. As a result of this competition, hirudin became a slow-binding inhibitor of thrombin at high thrombomodulin concentrations. Estimates of the dissociation constant for thrombomodulin were obtained in several of the above experiments, and the weighted mean value was 0.7 nM. PMID:3026312

  8. Surgery and invasive procedures in patients on long-term treatment with direct oral anticoagulants: thrombin or factor-Xa inhibitors. Recommendations of the Working Group on Perioperative Haemostasis and the French Study Group on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Sié, Pierre; Samama, Charles M; Godier, Anne; Rosencher, Nadia; Steib, Annick; Llau, Juan V; Van der Linden, Philippe; Pernod, Gilles; Lecompte, Thomas; Gouin-Thibault, Isabelle; Albaladejo, Pierre

    2011-12-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAs)--inhibitors of thrombin or factor-Xa--are expected to replace vitamin K antagonists in most of their indications. Patients receiving long-term treatment with DOAs are likely to be exposed to elective or emergency surgery or invasive procedures. Owing to the present lack of experience in such conditions, we cannot make recommendations, but only propose perioperative management for optimal safety regarding the risk of bleeding and thrombosis. DOAs may increase surgical bleeding, they have no validated antagonists, they cannot be monitored by simple standardized laboratory assays and their pharmacokinetics vary significantly between patients. Although DOAs differ in many respects, the proposals in the perioperative setting need not be specific to each. For procedures with low haemorrhagic risk, a therapeutic window of 48 hours (last administration 24 hours before surgery, restart 24 hours after) is proposed. For procedures with medium or high haemorrhagic risk, we suggest stopping DOAs 5 days before surgery to ensure complete elimination in all patients. Treatment should be resumed only when the risk of bleeding has been controlled. In patients at high thrombotic risk (e.g. those in atrial fibrillation with a history of stroke), bridging with heparin (low molecular-weight heparin, or unfractionated heparin, if the former is contraindicated) is proposed. In an emergency, the procedure should be postponed for as long as possible (minimum 1-2 half-lives) and non-specific antihaemorrhagic agents, such as recombinant human activated factor VIIa or prothrombin complex concentrates should not be given for prophylactic reversal due to their uncertain benefit-risk. PMID:22152517

  9. Thrombin during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, L Henry; Colman, Robert W

    2006-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) ignites a massive defense reaction that stimulates all blood cells and five plasma protein systems to produce a myriad of vasoactive and cytotoxic substances, cell-signaling molecules, and upregulated cellular receptors. Thrombin is the key enzyme in the thrombotic portion of the defense reaction and is only partially suppressed by heparin. During CPB, thrombin is produced by both extrinsic and intrinsic coagulation pathways and activated platelets. The routine use of a cell saver and the eventual introduction of direct thrombin inhibitors now offer the possibility of completely suppressing thrombin production and fibrinolysis during cardiac surgery with CPB. PMID:17126170

  10. Monitoring of dabigatran therapy using Hemoclot(®) Thrombin Inhibitor assay in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Samoš, Matej; Stančiaková, Lucia; Ivanková, Jela; Staško, Ján; Kovář, František; Dobrotová, Miroslava; Galajda, Peter; Kubisz, Peter; Mokáň, Marián

    2015-01-01

    Dabigatran, a new direct thrombin inhibitor, achieves strong anticoagulation that is more predictable than warfarin. Nevertheless, a patient on dabigatran therapy (DT) may suffer from thrombotic or bleeding events. The routine monitoring of DT is not recommended, and standard coagulation tests are not sensitive enough for the assessment of DT activity. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical usefulness of the Hemoclot(®) Thrombin Inhibitor (HTI) assay in the assessment of dabigatran plasma levels in patients with non-valvular AF. Nineteen patients (12 men, 7 women) on DT were included in this preliminary prospective observational study. Dabigatran was administrated twice daily in a two dose regimens: 150 mg (5 patients) and 110 mg (14 patients). Blood samples were taken for the assessment of trough and peak levels of dabigatran. Dabigatran concentrations were measured with the HTI assay. The average dabigatran trough level was 69.3 ± 55.5 ng/ml and the average dabigatran peak level was 112.7 ± 66.6 ng/ml. The dabigatran trough plasma concentration was in the established reference range in 15 patients and the dabigatran peak plasma concentration was in the established reference range in 9 patients, respectively. Despite the fact that the activated partial thromboplastin and thrombin times were generally changed (prolonged), these tests failed to identify the patients with too low or too high dabigatran concentrations. The study confirmed the high sensitivity of the HTI assay for the assessment of dabigatran plasma levels. When compared to standard coagulation tests, the HTI is a more suitable assay for the monitoring of patients treated with dabigatran. Monitoring of DT may be beneficial in selected patients; however, further studies will be needed for the final clarification of this issue. PMID:25103614

  11. Evaluation of Potential Thrombin Inhibitors from the White Mangrove (Laguncularia racemosa (L.) C.F. Gaertn.)

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Caroline Fabri Bittencourt; Gaeta, Henrique Hessel; Belchor, Mariana Novo; Ferreira, Marcelo José Pena; Pinho, Marcus Vinícius Terashima; de Oliveira Toyama, Daniela; Toyama, Marcos Hikari

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to verify the effects of methanol (MeOH) and hydroalcoholic (HA) extracts and their respective partition phases obtained from white mangrove (Laguncularia racemosa (L.) C.F. Gaertn.) leaves on human thrombin activity. Among the extracts and phases tested, only the ethyl acetate and butanolic partitions significantly inhibited human thrombin activity and the coagulation of plasma in the presence of this enzyme. Chromatographic analyses of the thrombin samples incubated with these phases revealed that different compounds were able to interact with thrombin. The butanolic phase of the MeOH extract had the most potent inhibitory effects, reducing enzymatic activity and thrombin-induced plasma coagulation. Two glycosylated flavonoids in this partition were identified as the most potent inhibitors of human thrombin activity, namely quercetin-3-O-arabinoside (QAra) and quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside (Qn). Chromatographic analyses of thrombin samples incubated with these flavonoids demonstrated the chemical modification of this enzyme, suggesting that the MeOH extract contained other compounds that both induced structural changes in thrombin and diminished its activity. In this article, we show that despite the near absence of the medical use of mangrove compounds, this plant contains natural compounds with potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26197325

  12. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Dabigatran Etexilate Mimics, a Novel Class of Thrombin Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaochi; Dai, Peng; Xu, Yungen; Chen, Qiufang; Zhu, Qihua; Gong, Guoqing

    2015-08-01

    Human α-thrombin is a particularly promising target for anticoagulant therapy, and identification of oral small-molecular inhibitors of thrombin remains a research focus. On the basis of the X-ray crystal structure of human α-thrombin and its inhibitor dabigatran, we designed and synthesized a series of dabigatran etexilate mimics containing a novel tricyclic fused scaffold. The biological evaluations reveal that all of the compounds possess moderate activity of antiplatelet aggregation induced by thrombin in vitro. Moreover, compound I-8, which contains 2-hydroxymethyl-3,5,6-trimethylpyrazine (HTMP), a cleavable moiety with antiplatelet activity, shows the best anticoagulant effect among the tested compounds in vivo. Those synthesized compounds that have better in vitro activity were subjected to bleeding complication tests, and the results demonstrate that the novel compounds are less likely to have bleeding risk than dabigatran etexilate.

  13. Cloning, purification and biochemical characterization of dipetarudin, a new chimeric thrombin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    López, M; Mende, K; Steinmetzer, T; Nowak, G

    2003-03-25

    The development of thrombin inhibitors could provide invaluable progress for antithrombotic therapy. In this paper, we report the cloning, purification and biochemical characterization of dipetarudin, a chimeric thrombin inhibitor composed of the N-terminal head structure of dipetalogastin II, the strongest inhibitor from the assassin bug Dipetalogaster maximus, and the exosite 1 blocking segment of hirudin, connected through a five glycine linker. The cloning of dipetarudin was performed by a simple method which had not been used previously to clone chimeras. Biochemical characterization of dipetarudin revealed that it is a slow, tight-binding inhibitor with a molecular mass (M(r)=7560) and a thrombin inhibitory activity (K(i)=446 fM) comparable to r-hirudin. PMID:12651003

  14. Design, synthesis and antithrombotic evaluation of novel dabigatran etexilate analogs, a new series of non-peptides thrombin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongxing; Wang, Shaochi; Diao, Xiaojuan; Zhu, Qihua; Shen, Huiliang; Han, Xueqing; Wang, Yiwei; Gong, Guoqing; Xu, Yungen

    2015-12-01

    Thrombin is a serine protease that plays a key role in blood clotting, which makes it a promising target for the treatment of thrombotic diseases. Dabigatran is direct potent thrombin inhibitor. Based on bioisosteric and scaffold hopping principle, two dabigatran mimics (I-1 and II-1) in which the benzamidine moiety of dabigatran was replaced by a tricyclic fused scaffold were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro activities for inhibiting thrombin. The results reveal that compounds I-1 (IC50=9.20nM) and II-1 (IC50=7.48nM) are potent direct thrombin inhibitors and the activity is in the range of reference drug. On this basis, twenty-two ester and carbamate derivatives of I-1 or II-1 were prepared and evaluated for their anticoagulant activity. Prodrugs I-4a (IC50=0.73μM), I-4b (IC50=0.75μM), II-2a (IC50=1.44μM) and II-2b (IC50=0.91μM) display excellent effects of inhibiting thrombin induced-platelet aggregation. Moreover, compounds I-9 and II-4, which contain a cleavable moiety with anti-platelet activity, show the best anticoagulant efficacy among the tested compounds in the rat venous thrombosis model. The compounds which have better in vitro and in vivo activity were subjected to rat tail bleeding test, and the result demonstrates that compound I-9 is less likely to have bleeding risk than dabigatran etexilate.

  15. Two heads are better than one: crystal structure of the insect derived double domain Kazal inhibitor rhodniin in complex with thrombin.

    PubMed

    van de Locht, A; Lamba, D; Bauer, M; Huber, R; Friedrich, T; Kröger, B; Höffken, W; Bode, W

    1995-11-01

    Rhodniin is a highly specific inhibitor of thrombin isolated from the assassin bug Rhodnius prolixus. The 2.6 Angstrum crystal structure of the non-covalent complex between recombinant rhodniin and bovine alpha-thrombin reveals that the two Kazal-type domains of rhodniin bind to different sites of thrombin. The amino-terminal domain binds in a substrate-like manner to the narrow active-site cleft of thrombin; the imidazole group of the P1 His residue extends into the S1 pocket to form favourable hydrogen/ionic bonds with Asp189 at its bottom, and additionally with Glu192 at its entrance. The carboxy-terminal domain, whose distorted reactive-site loop cannot adopt the canonical conformation, docks to the fibrinogen recognition exosite via extensive electrostatic interactions. The rather acidic polypeptide linking the two domains is displaced from the thrombin surface, with none of its residues involved in direct salt bridges with thrombin. The tight (Ki = 2 x 10(-13) M) binding of rhodniin to thrombin is the result of the sum of steric and charge complementarity of the amino-terminal domain towards the active-site cleft, and of the electrostatic interactions between the carboxy-terminal domain and the exosite. PMID:7489704

  16. Two heads are better than one: crystal structure of the insect derived double domain Kazal inhibitor rhodniin in complex with thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    van de Locht, A; Lamba, D; Bauer, M; Huber, R; Friedrich, T; Kröger, B; Höffken, W; Bode, W

    1995-01-01

    Rhodniin is a highly specific inhibitor of thrombin isolated from the assassin bug Rhodnius prolixus. The 2.6 Angstrum crystal structure of the non-covalent complex between recombinant rhodniin and bovine alpha-thrombin reveals that the two Kazal-type domains of rhodniin bind to different sites of thrombin. The amino-terminal domain binds in a substrate-like manner to the narrow active-site cleft of thrombin; the imidazole group of the P1 His residue extends into the S1 pocket to form favourable hydrogen/ionic bonds with Asp189 at its bottom, and additionally with Glu192 at its entrance. The carboxy-terminal domain, whose distorted reactive-site loop cannot adopt the canonical conformation, docks to the fibrinogen recognition exosite via extensive electrostatic interactions. The rather acidic polypeptide linking the two domains is displaced from the thrombin surface, with none of its residues involved in direct salt bridges with thrombin. The tight (Ki = 2 x 10(-13) M) binding of rhodniin to thrombin is the result of the sum of steric and charge complementarity of the amino-terminal domain towards the active-site cleft, and of the electrostatic interactions between the carboxy-terminal domain and the exosite. Images PMID:7489704

  17. Non-covalent thrombin inhibitors featuring P3-heterocycles with P1-bicyclic arginine surrogates.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jingrong Jean; Araldi, Gian-Luca; Reiner, John E; Reddy, Komandla Malla; Kemp, Scott J; Ho, Jonathan Z; Siev, Daniel V; Mamedova, Lala; Gibson, Tony S; Gaudette, John A; Minami, Nathaniel K; Anderson, Susanne M; Bradbury, Annette E; Nolan, Thomas G; Semple, J Edward

    2002-10-21

    Novel, potent, and highly selective classes of thrombin inhibitors were identified, which resulted from judicious combination of P4-aromatics and P2-P3-heterocyclic dipeptide surrogates with weakly basic (calcd pKa approximately non-basic-8.6) bicyclic P1-arginine mimics. The design, synthesis, and biological activity of achiral, non-covalent, orally bioavailable inhibitors NC1-NC44 featuring P1-indazoles, benzimidazoles, indoles, benzotriazoles, and aminobenzisoxazoles is disclosed.

  18. Computer based screening of compound databases: 1. Preselection of benzamidine-based thrombin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fox, T; Haaksma, E E

    2000-07-01

    We present a computational protocol which uses the known three-dimensional structure of a target enzyme to identify possible ligands from databases of compounds with low molecular weight. This is accomplished by first mapping the essential interactions in the binding site with the program GRID. The resulting regions of favorable interaction between target and ligand are translated into a database query, and with UNITY a flexible 3D database search is performed. The feasibility of this approach is calibrated with thrombin as the target. Our results show that the resulting hit lists are enriched with thrombin inhibitors compared to the total database.

  19. Molecular modeling studies, synthesis and biological evaluation of dabigatran analogues as thrombin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ming-Hui; Chen, Hai-Feng; Ren, Yu-Jie; Shao, Fang-Ming

    2016-01-15

    In this work, 48 thrombin inhibitors based on the structural scaffold of dabigatran were analyzed using a combination of molecular modeling techniques. We generated three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models based on three alignments for both comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity index analysis (CoMSIA) to highlight the structural requirements for thrombin protein inhibition. In addition to the 3D-QSAR study, Topomer CoMFA model also was established with a higher leave-one-out cross-validation q(2) and a non-cross-validation r(2), which suggest that the three models have good predictive ability. The results indicated that the steric, hydrophobic and electrostatic fields play key roles in QSAR model. Furthermore, we employed molecular docking and re-docking simulation explored the binding relationship of the ligand and the receptor protein in detail. Molecular docking simulations identified several key interactions that were also indicated through 3D-QSAR analysis. On the basis of the obtained results, two compounds were designed and predicted by three models, the biological evaluation in vitro (IC50) demonstrated that these molecular models were effective for the development of novel potent thrombin inhibitors.

  20. Pilot study of the efficacy of a thrombin inhibitor for use during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    DeAnda, A; Coutre, S E; Moon, M R; Vial, C M; Griffin, L C; Law, V S; Komeda, M; Leung, L L; Miller, D C

    1994-08-01

    Heparin is normally used for anticoagulation during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), but its use is contraindicated in patients with a history of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, heparin-provoked thrombosis, or both. Heparin therapy can also be ineffective due to heparin resistance. A short-acting, oligonucleotide-based thrombin inhibitor (thrombin aptamer) may potentially serve as a substitute for heparin in these and other clinical situations. We tested a novel thrombin aptamer in a canine CPB pilot study to determine its anticoagulant efficacy, the resultant changes in coagulation variables, and the aptamer's clearance mechanisms and pharmacokinetics. Seven dogs were studied initially: Four received varied doses of the aptamer (to establish the pharmacokinetic profile) and 3 received heparin. Subsequently, 4 other dogs underwent CPB, receiving a constant infusion of the aptamer before CPB (to characterize the baseline coagulation status), with partial CPB and hemodilution, during 60 minutes of total CPB, and, finally, after a 2-hour recovery period. At a 0.5 mg.kg-1.min-1 dose, the activated clotting time rose with aptamer infusion from 106 +/- 12 seconds to 187 +/- 8 seconds (+/- 1 standard deviation) (p = 0.014), increased further with hemodilution (to 259 +/- 41 seconds; p = 0.017), and was even more prolonged during total CPB (> 1,500 seconds; p < 0.001). This later increase in the activated clotting time paralleled a rise in the plasma concentration of the thrombin aptamer during total CPB, as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8067830

  1. A Food Effect Study of an Oral Thrombin Inhibitor and Prodrug Approach To Mitigate It.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihye; Kim, Bongchan; Kim, Tae Hun; Lee, Sun Hwa; Park, Hee Dong; Chung, Kyungha; Lee, Sung-Hack; Paek, Seungyup; Kim, Eunice EunKyeong; Yoon, SukKyoon; Kim, Aeri

    2016-04-01

    LB30870, a new direct thrombin inhibitor, showed 80% reduction in oral bioavailability in fed state. The present study aims to propose trypsin binding as a mechanism for such negative food effect and demonstrate a prodrug approach to mitigate food effect. Effect of food composition on fed state oral bioavailability of LB30870 was studied in dogs. Various prodrugs were synthesized, and their solubility, permeability, and trypsin binding affinity were measured. LB30870 and prodrugs were subject to cocrystallization with trypsin, and the X-ray structures of cocrystals were determined. Food effect was studied in dogs for selected prodrugs. Protein or lipid meal appeared to affect oral bioavailability of LB30870 in dogs more than carbohydrate meal. Blocking both carboxyl and amidine groups of LB30870 resulted in trypsin Ki values orders of magnitude higher than that of LB30870. Prodrugs belonged to either Biopharmaceutical Classification System I, II, or III. X-ray crystallography revealed that prodrugs did not bind to trypsin, but instead their hydrolysis product at the amidine blocking group formed cocrystal with trypsin. A prodrug with significantly less food effect than LB30870 was identified. Binding of prodrugs to food components such as dietary fiber appeared to counteract the positive effect brought with the prodrug approach. Further formulation research is warranted to enhance the oral bioavailability of prodrugs. In conclusion, this study is the first to demonstrate that the negative food effect of LB30870 can be attributed to trypsin binding. Trypsin binding study is proposed as a screening tool during lead optimization to minimize food effect.

  2. [Management of major bleeding complications and emergency surgery in patients on long-term treatment with direct oral anticoagulants, thrombin or factor-Xa inhibitors. Proposals of the Working Group on Perioperative Haemostasis (GIHP) - March 2013].

    PubMed

    Pernod, G; Albaladejo, P; Godier, A; Samama, C M; Susen, S; Gruel, Y; Blais, N; Fontana, P; Cohen, A; Llau, J V; Rosencher, N; Schved, J F; de Maistre, E; Samama, M M; Mismetti, P; Sié, P

    2013-10-01

    New direct oral anticoagulants (NOAC), inhibitors of factor IIa or Xa, are expected to be widely used for the treatment of venous thromboembolic disease, or in case of atrial fibrillation. Such anticoagulant treatments are known to be associated with haemorrhagic complications. Moreover, it is likely that such patients on long-term treatment with NOAC will be exposed to emergency surgery or invasive procedures. Due to the present lack of experience in such conditions, we cannot make recommendations, but only propose management for optimal safety as regards the risk of bleeding in such emergency conditions. In this article, only dabigatran and rivaroxaban were discussed. For emergency surgery at risk of bleeding, we propose to dose the plasmatic concentration of drug. Levels inferior or equal to 30ng/mL for both dabigatran and rivaroxaban, should enable the realization of a high bleeding risk surgery. For higher concentration, it was proposed to postpone surgery by monitoring the evolution of the drug concentration. Action is then defined by the kind of NOAC and its concentration. If the dosage of the drug is not immediately available, proposals only based on the usual tests, PT and aPTT, also are presented. However, these tests do not really assess drug concentration or bleeding risk. In case of severe haemorrhage in a critical organ, it is proposed to reduce the effect of anticoagulant therapy using a nonspecific procoagulant drug (activated prothrombin concentrate, FEIBA, 30-50U/kg, or non-activated 4-factors prothrombin concentrates 50U/kg). For any other type of severe haemorrhage, the administration of such a procoagulant drug, potentially thrombogenic in these patients, will be discussed regarding concentration of NACO and possibilities for mechanical haemostasis.

  3. Optimization of the production of triabin, a novel thrombin inhibitor, in High Five™ insect cells infected with a recombinant baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Vallazza, M; Petri, T

    1999-03-01

    The isolation of a new type of thrombin inhibitor, called triabin, from the saliva of the hematophagous bug Triatoma pallidipennis, has recently been described. In the in vitro platelet aggregation inhibition assay triabin has a similar potency as the thrombin inhibitor hirudin now in phase III clinical trials. However, in another in vitro assay using a low molecular weight substrate for thrombin, triabin does not inhibit thrombin completely even at 6 fold higher molar doses in comparison with hirudin. This means that triabin has a novel mode of action towards thrombin making triabin into an interesting candidate as a therapeutic agent. Recently it has been shown that a recombinant baculovirus can be efficiently used for the triabin production in insect cells and that the yields in adherent cultures of High Five™ cells (approx. 20 mg l-1) were about 7 fold higher than in adherent cultures of Sf9 cells (approx. 3 mg l- 1). To optimize the triabin yield from the baculovirus/insect cell expression system, experiments were performed with suspension adapted cultures of High Five™ cells to investigate the effects of the state of the host cell, of the multiplicity of infection, of the cell density at the time of infection and of supplementation of the medium with nutrients and oxygen. Triabin yields of up to 200 mg l-1, as determined by an activity assay, could finally be obtained here. PMID:22359057

  4. A plasmin-activatable thrombin inhibitor reduces experimental thrombosis and assists experimental thrombolysis in murine models.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, W P; Eltringham-Smith, L J; Gataiance, S; Bhakta, V

    2015-05-01

    The leech protein hirudin is a potent natural thrombin inhibitor. Its potential as an antithrombotic agent is limited by its promotion of bleeding. We attempted to modify this profile by positioning albumin and a plasmin cleavage site on its N-terminus, in recombinant protein HSACHV3 [comprising hirudin variant 3 (HV3) fused to the C-terminus of human serum albumin (HSA) via a plasmin cleavage site (C)], Previously we showed that HSACHV3 inhibited thrombin in a plasmin-dependent manner, and that, unlike HV3, it did not increase bleeding in vivo when administered to mice. Here we tested HSACHV3 for the ability to reduce thrombosis and assist enzymatic thrombolysis in animal models. Intravenous administration of HSACHV3, but not a control protein lacking the plasmin cleavage site (HSAHV3), reduced thrombus weight by 2.1-fold in the ferric chloride-injured mouse vena cava. Similarly, thrombi formed in a rabbit jugular vein stasis model were 1.7-fold lighter in animals treated with HSACHV3 compared to those receiving HSAHV3. Administration of 60 mg/kg body weight HSACHV3 prolonged the time to occlusion in the ferric chloride-injured mouse carotid artery by threefold compared to vehicle controls, while equimolar HSAHV3 had no effect. HSACHV3 had no ability to restore flow to the murine carotid arteries occluded by ferric chloride treatment, but combining HSACHV3 (60 mg/kg) with recombinant mutant tissue plasminogen activator (TNKase) significantly reduced the time to restore patency to the artery compared to TNKase alone. Unlike unfused HV3, HSACHV3 did not increase bleeding in a mouse liver laceration model. Our results show that HSACHV3 acts as an antithrombotic agent that does not promote bleeding and which speeds the time to flow restoration when used as an adjunct to pharmacological thrombolysis in animal models. PMID:25481811

  5. METHODS OF TREATING OR PREVENTING DEMYELINATION USING THROMBIN INHIBITORS AND METHODS OF DETECTING DEMYELINATION USING NEUROFASCIN 155 | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (“NICHD”), seek CRADA partner or collaboration for development of agents to treat multiple sclerosis or other conditions associated with myelin remodeling by administering an agent that inhibits cleavage of Neurofascin 155 or Caspr1. The agent could be a thrombin inhibitor, an agent that inhibits thrombin expression, an anti-thrombin antibody that specifically inhibits thrombin mediated cleavage of Neurofascin 155, a mutated version or fragment of Neurofascin 155 or Caspr1, or antibodies to Neurofascin 155 or Caspr1.

  6. Dabigatran and Argatroban Diametrically Modulate Thrombin Exosite Function

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Calvin H.; Stafford, Alan R.; Leslie, Beverly A.; Fredenburgh, James C.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombin is a highly plastic molecule whose activity and specificity are regulated by exosites 1 and 2, positively-charged domains that flank the active site. Exosite binding by substrates and cofactors regulates thrombin activity by localizing thrombin, guiding substrates, and by inducing allosteric changes at the active site. Although inter-exosite and exosite-to-active-site allostery have been demonstrated, the impact of active site ligation on exosite function has not been examined. To address this gap, we used surface plasmon resonance to determine the effects of dabigatran and argatroban, active site-directed inhibitors, on thrombin binding to immobilized γA/γA-fibrin or glycoprotein Ibα peptide via exosite 1 and 2, respectively, and thrombin binding to γA/γ′-fibrin or factor Va, which is mediated by both exosites. Whereas dabigatran attenuated binding, argatroban increased thrombin binding to γA/γA- and γA/γ′-fibrin and to factor Va. The results with immobilized fibrin were confirmed by examining the binding of radiolabeled thrombin to fibrin clots. Thus, dabigatran modestly accelerated the dissociation of thrombin from γA/γA-fibrin clots, whereas argatroban attenuated dissociation. Dabigatran had no effect on thrombin binding to glycoprotein Ibα peptide, whereas argatroban promoted binding. These findings not only highlight functional effects of thrombin allostery, but also suggest that individual active site-directed thrombin inhibitors uniquely modulate exosite function, thereby identifying potential novel mechanisms of action. PMID:27305147

  7. Design and synthesis of conformationally restricted inhibitors of active thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa).

    PubMed

    Brink, Mikael; Dahlén, Anders; Olsson, Thomas; Polla, Magnus; Svensson, Tor

    2014-04-01

    A series of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-benzimidazole-5-carboxylic acid and 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-7-carboxylic acid derivatives designed as inhibitors of TAFIa has been prepared via a common hydrogenation-alkylation sequence starting from the appropriate benzimidazole and imidazopyridine system. We present a successful design strategy using a conformational restriction approach resulting in potent and selective inhibitors of TAFIa. The X-ray structure of compound 5 in complex with a H333Y/H335Q double mutant TAFI indicate that the conformational restriction is responsible for the observed potency increase. PMID:24588961

  8. Study of the Differential Activity of Thrombin Inhibitors Using Docking, QSAR, Molecular Dynamics, and MM-GBSA

    PubMed Central

    Mena-Ulecia, Karel; Tiznado, William; Caballero, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Non-peptidic thrombin inhibitors (TIs; 177 compounds) with diverse groups at motifs P1 (such as oxyguanidine, amidinohydrazone, amidine, amidinopiperidine), P2 (such as cyanofluorophenylacetamide, 2-(2-chloro-6-fluorophenyl)acetamide), and P3 (such as phenylethyl, arylsulfonate groups) were studied using molecular modeling to analyze their interactions with S1, S2, and S3 subsites of the thrombin binding site. Firstly, a protocol combining docking and three dimensional quantitative structure–activity relationship was performed. We described the orientations and preferred active conformations of the studied inhibitors, and derived a predictive CoMSIA model including steric, donor hydrogen bond, and acceptor hydrogen bond fields. Secondly, the dynamic behaviors of some selected TIs (compounds 26, 133, 147, 149, 162, and 177 in this manuscript) that contain different molecular features and different activities were analyzed by creating the solvated models and using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We used the conformational structures derived from MD to accomplish binding free energetic calculations using MM-GBSA. With this analysis, we theorized about the effect of van der Waals contacts, electrostatic interactions and solvation in the potency of TIs. In general, the contents reported in this article help to understand the physical and chemical characteristics of thrombin-inhibitor complexes. PMID:26599107

  9. Study of the Differential Activity of Thrombin Inhibitors Using Docking, QSAR, Molecular Dynamics, and MM-GBSA.

    PubMed

    Mena-Ulecia, Karel; Tiznado, William; Caballero, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Non-peptidic thrombin inhibitors (TIs; 177 compounds) with diverse groups at motifs P1 (such as oxyguanidine, amidinohydrazone, amidine, amidinopiperidine), P2 (such as cyanofluorophenylacetamide, 2-(2-chloro-6-fluorophenyl)acetamide), and P3 (such as phenylethyl, arylsulfonate groups) were studied using molecular modeling to analyze their interactions with S1, S2, and S3 subsites of the thrombin binding site. Firstly, a protocol combining docking and three dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship was performed. We described the orientations and preferred active conformations of the studied inhibitors, and derived a predictive CoMSIA model including steric, donor hydrogen bond, and acceptor hydrogen bond fields. Secondly, the dynamic behaviors of some selected TIs (compounds 26, 133, 147, 149, 162, and 177 in this manuscript) that contain different molecular features and different activities were analyzed by creating the solvated models and using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We used the conformational structures derived from MD to accomplish binding free energetic calculations using MM-GBSA. With this analysis, we theorized about the effect of van der Waals contacts, electrostatic interactions and solvation in the potency of TIs. In general, the contents reported in this article help to understand the physical and chemical characteristics of thrombin-inhibitor complexes. PMID:26599107

  10. A new electrochemically active-inactive switching aptamer molecular beacon to detect thrombin directly in solution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guifang; Shen, Bijun; Zhang, Fan; Wu, Jikui; Xu, Ying; He, Pingang; Fang, Yuzhi

    2010-06-15

    A new electrochemical aptamer molecular beacon (MB) was designed by the carminic acid (CA) covalently linking at the each end of a special single-stranded stem-loop shaped oligonucleotide and named as CAs-MB. CA is an electrochemically active molecule and two CA molecules at the ends of molecular beacon stem were closed enough to associate each other to be as CA dimer. The dimer was electrochemically inactive. It separated into two CA monomers and produced the electrochemical signal while CAs-MB combined with target. In this protocol, the detection strategy of CAs-MB for thrombin is based on electrochemical active-inactive switching between monomer and dimer forms of CA. In order to enhance the electrochemical signal, magnetic nanobeads (MNB) was applied by connecting CAs-MB with MNB through a duplex of DNA. With the magnetic enrichment, the detection limit for thrombin reached to 42.4 pM. The experiment results showed that this type of electrochemical active-inactive switching aptamer molecular beacon allowed the direct detection of target proteins in the solution with no requirement of removing uncombined CAs-MB. Besides, CAs-MB/MNB can be easily regenerated by using 2M NaCl solution to cleave the thrombin from the aptasensor. PMID:20378327

  11. A new electrochemically active-inactive switching aptamer molecular beacon to detect thrombin directly in solution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guifang; Shen, Bijun; Zhang, Fan; Wu, Jikui; Xu, Ying; He, Pingang; Fang, Yuzhi

    2010-06-15

    A new electrochemical aptamer molecular beacon (MB) was designed by the carminic acid (CA) covalently linking at the each end of a special single-stranded stem-loop shaped oligonucleotide and named as CAs-MB. CA is an electrochemically active molecule and two CA molecules at the ends of molecular beacon stem were closed enough to associate each other to be as CA dimer. The dimer was electrochemically inactive. It separated into two CA monomers and produced the electrochemical signal while CAs-MB combined with target. In this protocol, the detection strategy of CAs-MB for thrombin is based on electrochemical active-inactive switching between monomer and dimer forms of CA. In order to enhance the electrochemical signal, magnetic nanobeads (MNB) was applied by connecting CAs-MB with MNB through a duplex of DNA. With the magnetic enrichment, the detection limit for thrombin reached to 42.4 pM. The experiment results showed that this type of electrochemical active-inactive switching aptamer molecular beacon allowed the direct detection of target proteins in the solution with no requirement of removing uncombined CAs-MB. Besides, CAs-MB/MNB can be easily regenerated by using 2M NaCl solution to cleave the thrombin from the aptasensor.

  12. Antithrombotic properties of SSR182289A, a new, orally active thrombin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Lorrain, J; Millet, L; Lechaire, I; Lochot, S; Ferrari, P; Visconte, C; Sainte-Marie, M; Lunven, C; Berry, C N; Schaeffer, P; Herbert, J-M; O'Connor, S E

    2003-02-01

    N-[3-[[[(1S)-4-(5-Amino-2-pyridinyl)-1-[[4-difluoromethylene)-1-piperidinyl]carbonyl]butyl]amino]sulfonyl][1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl]acetamide hydrochloride (SSR182289A) is a novel, potent, and selective thrombin inhibitor. We have examined the antithrombotic properties of SSR182289A administered by i.v. and p.o. routes in several different animal thrombosis models in comparison with reference antithrombotic agents. Oral administration of SSR182289A produced dose-related antithrombotic effects in the following models; rat venous thrombosis (ED(50) 0.9 mg/kg p.o.), rat silk thread arterio-venous (AV) shunt (ED(50) 3.8 mg/kg p.o.), rat thromboplastin-induced AV shunt (ED(50) 3.1 mg/kg p.o.), rat carotid artery thrombosis (ED(200) 5.9 mg/kg p.o.), and rabbit venous thrombosis (ED(50) 7.5 mg/kg p.o.). Administered as an i.v. bolus, SSR182289A showed antithrombotic activity in the above models with ED(50)/ED(200) values in the range of 0.2 to 1.9 mg/kg i.v. SSR182289A increased rat tail transection bleeding time at doses > or =10 mg/kg p.o. In the rat thromboplastin-induced AV shunt model, SSR182289A 10 mg/kg p.o. produced marked antithrombotic effects at 30, 60, 120, and 240 min after administration. Hence, SSR182289A demonstrates potent oral antithrombotic properties in animal venous, AV-shunt, and arterial thrombosis models.

  13. Rapid Detection of Thrombin and Other Protease Activity Directly in Whole Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Johnson Chung Sing

    Thrombin is a serine protease that plays a key role in the clotting cascade to promote hemostasis following injury to the endothelium. From a clinical diagnostic perspective, in-vivo thrombin activity is linked to various blood clotting disorders, as well as cardiovascular disease (DVT, arteriosclerosis, etc). Thus, the ability to rapidly measure protease activity directly in whole blood will provide important new diagnostics, and clinical researchers with a powerful tool to further elucidate the relationship between circulating protease levels and disease. The ultimate goal is to design novel point of care (POC) diagnostic devices that are capable of monitoring protease activities directly in whole blood and biological sample. A charge-changing substrate specific to the thrombin enzyme was engineered and its functionality was confirmed by a series of experiments. This led to the preliminary design, construction, and testing of two device platforms deemed fully functional for the electrophoretic separation and focusing of charged peptide fragments. The concept of using the existing charge-changing substrate platform for bacterial protease detection was also investigated. Certain strains of E coli are associated with severe symptoms such as abdominal cramps, bloody diarrhea, and vomiting. The OmpT protease is expressed on the outer membrane of E coli and plays a role in the cleavage of antimicrobial peptides, the degradation of recombinant heterologous proteins, and the activation of plasminogen in the host. Thus, a synthetic peptide substrate specific to the OmpT protease was designed and modeled for the purpose of detecting E coli in biological sample.

  14. Feasibility of using thrombin generation assay (TGA) for monitoring of haemostasis during supplementation therapy in haemophilic patients without inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ay, Y; Balkan, C; Karapinar, D Y; Akin, M; Bilenoğlu, B; Kavakli, K

    2012-11-01

    Monitoring factor replacement treatment and observing concordance with clinical haemostasis is crucial in vital haemorrhages and major surgeries in haemophilic patients. We aimed to investigate the value of the thrombin generation assay (TGA) and thromboelastography (TEG) for monitoring haemostasis in haemophilic patients during factor replacement treatment. The study group consisted of 29 patients (21 haemophilia A, 8 haemophilia B). All the patients FVIII-inhibitor were negative. A total of 35 bleeding episodes and/or surgical interventions were evaluated. aPTT, FVIII/FIX activity, TEG and TGA tests were conducted before and after factor therapy during the bleeding episode or surgical prophylaxis of haemophilic patients. Correlations among these tests were evaluated and compared with clinical responses. No correlation was found among aPTT, factor activities and clinical outcome. There were also no correlation found between TEG parameters and clinical outcome. The only significant correlation found between TGA parameters and clinical outcome was the correlation between peak thrombin. In conclusion, we found superiority of TGA-peak thrombin over other traditional tests for monitoring haemostasis in haemophilic patients in this study.

  15. Flexibility of the Thrombin-activatable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor Pro-domain Enables Productive Binding of Protein Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Valnickova, Zuzana; Sanglas, Laura; Arolas, Joan L.; Petersen, Steen V.; Schar, Christine; Otzen, Daniel; Aviles, Francesc X.; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier; Enghild, Jan J.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported that thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) exhibits intrinsic proteolytic activity toward large peptides. The structural basis for this observation was clarified by the crystal structures of human and bovine TAFI. These structures evinced a significant rotation of the pro-domain away from the catalytic moiety when compared with other pro-carboxypeptidases, thus enabling access of large peptide substrates to the active site cleft. Here, we further investigated the flexible nature of the pro-domain and demonstrated that TAFI forms productive complexes with protein carboxypeptidase inhibitors from potato, leech, and tick (PCI, LCI, and TCI, respectively). We determined the crystal structure of the bovine TAFI-TCI complex, revealing that the pro-domain was completely displaced from the position observed in the TAFI structure. It protruded into the bulk solvent and was disordered, whereas TCI occupied the position previously held by the pro-domain. The authentic nature of the presently studied TAFI-inhibitor complexes was supported by the trimming of the C-terminal residues from the three inhibitors upon complex formation. This finding suggests that the inhibitors interact with the active site of TAFI in a substrate-like manner. Taken together, these data show for the first time that TAFI is able to form a bona fide complex with protein carboxypeptidase inhibitors. This underlines the unusually flexible nature of the pro-domain and implies a possible mechanism for regulation of TAFI intrinsic proteolytic activity in vivo. PMID:20880845

  16. Ligand binding cooperativity: Bioisosteric replacement of CO with SO2 among thrombin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Said, Ahmed M; Hangauer, David G

    2016-08-15

    Ligand-protein binding is a complex process that involves the formation of number of non-covalent interactions, e.g. H-bonds and hydrophobic interactions, between the ligand and the protein host. Upon binding, ligand functional groups can act synergistically (positive cooperativity) to improve the overall ligand binding affinity beyond what would be expected from their individual contributions. In this study, using thrombin as a protein model system, we evaluated the effect of the bioisosteric replacement of a carbonyl functionality with a sulphonyl functionality on positive cooperativity between their H-bonds with thrombin and hydrophobic binding in the adjacent S3 pocket. The positive cooperativity observed was greatly reduced when replacing the carbonyl group with a sulphonyl group. Evaluating how bioisosteric replacements affect cooperativity is important for making better informed ligand optimization SAR decisions. PMID:27445170

  17. An autoantibody directed against human thrombin anion-binding exosite in a patient with arterial thrombosis: effects on platelets, endothelial cells, and protein C activation.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, E; Lafay, M; Gaussem, P; Picard, V; Jandrot-Perrus, M; Aiach, M; Rendu, F

    1994-09-15

    An autoantibody, developed by a patient with severe and recurrent arterial thrombosis, was characterized to be directed against the anion-binding exosite of thrombin, and inhibited all thrombin interactions requiring this secondary binding site without interfering with the catalytic site. The effect of the antibody was studied on thrombin interactions with platelets and endothelial cells from human umbilical veins (HUVEC). The autoantibody specifically and concentration-dependently inhibited alpha-thrombin-induced platelet activation and prostacyclin (PGI2) synthesis from HUVEC. It had no effect when gamma-thrombin or the thrombin receptor activation peptide SFLLR were the inducers. The effect of the antibody on protein C activation has been studied. The antibody blocked the thrombin-thrombomodulin activation of protein C. The inhibition of the activation was maximal with a low concentration of thrombomodulin. The fact that the autoantibody inhibited concentration-dependent alpha-thrombin-induced platelet and endothelial cell functions emphasizes the crucial role of the anion-binding exosite of thrombin to activate its receptor. In regard to the pathology, the antibody inhibited two vascular processes implicated in thrombin-antithrombotic functions, PGI2 secretion, and protein C activation, which could be implicated in this arterial thrombotic disease.

  18. Effect of the oral thrombin inhibitor dabigatran on allergic lung inflammation induced by repeated house dust mite administration in mice.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Johannes D; Berkhout, Lea C; de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; Yang, Jack; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Meijers, Joost C M; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-10-15

    Asthma is a chronic disease of the airways; asthma patients are hampered by recurrent symptoms of dyspnoea and wheezing caused by bronchial obstruction. Most asthma patients suffer from chronic allergic lung inflammation triggered by allergens such as house dust mite (HDM). Coagulation activation in the pulmonary compartment is currently recognized as a feature of allergic lung inflammation, and data suggest that coagulation proteases further drive inflammatory mechanisms. Here, we tested whether treatment with the oral thrombin inhibitor dabigatran attenuates allergic lung inflammation in a recently developed HDM-based murine asthma model. Mice were fed dabigatran (10 mg/g) or placebo chow during a 3-wk HDM airway exposure model. Dabigatran treatment caused systemic thrombin inhibitory activity corresponding with dabigatran levels reported in human trials. Surprisingly, dabigatran did not lead to inhibition of HDM-evoked coagulation activation in the lung as measured by levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes and D-dimer. Repeated HDM administration caused an influx of eosinophils and neutrophils into the lungs, mucus production in the airways, and a T helper 2 response, as reflected by a rise in bronchoalveolar IL-4 and IL-5 levels and a systemic rise in IgE and HDM-IgG1. Dabigatran modestly improved HDM-induced lung pathology (P < 0.05) and decreased IL-4 levels (P < 0.01), without influencing other HDM-induced responses. Considering the limited effects of dabigatran in spite of adequate plasma levels, these results argue against clinical evaluation of dabigatran in patients with asthma.

  19. The effect of a polyurethane coating incorporating both a thrombin inhibitor and nitric oxide on hemocompatibility in extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Major, Terry C; Brisbois, Elizabeth J; Jones, Anna M; Zanetti, Margaux E; Annich, Gail M; Bartlett, Robert H; Handa, Hitesh

    2014-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) releasing (NORel) materials have been extensively investigated to create localized increases in NO concentration by the proton driven diazeniumdiolate-containing polymer coatings and demonstrated to improve extracorporeal circulation (ECC) hemocompatibility. In this work, the NORel polymeric coating composed of a diazeniumdiolated dibutylhexanediamine (DBHD-N2O2)-containing hydrophobic Elast-eon™ (E2As) polyurethane was combined with a direct thrombin inhibitor, argatroban (AG), and evaluated in a 4 h rabbit thrombogenicity model without systemic anticoagulation. In addition, the immobilizing of argatroban to E2As polymer was achieved by either a polyethylene glycol-containing (PEGDI) or hexane methylene (HMDI) diisocyanate linker. The combined polymer film was coated on the inner walls of ECC circuits to yield significantly reduced ECC thrombus formation compared to argatroban alone ECC control after 4 h blood exposure (0.6 ± 0.1 AG/HMDI/NORel vs 1.7 ± 0.2 cm(2) AG/HMDI control). Platelet count (2.8 ± 0.3 AG/HMDI/NORel vs 1.9 ± 0.1 × 10(8)/ml AG/HMDI control) and plasma fibrinogen levels were preserved after 4 h blood exposure with both the NORel/argatroban combination and the AG/HMDI control group compared to baseline. Platelet function as measured by aggregometry remained near normal in both the AG/HMDI/NORel (63 ± 5%) and AG/HMDI control (58 ± 7%) groups after 3 h compared to baseline (77 ± 1%). Platelet P-selectin mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) as measured by flow cytometry also remained near baseline levels after 4 h on ECC to ex vivo collagen stimulation (16 ± 3 AG/HMDI/NORel vs 11 ± 2 MFI baseline). These results suggest that the combined AG/HMDI/NORel polymer coating preserves platelets in blood exposure to ECCs to a better degree than AG/PEGDI/NORel, NORel alone or AG alone. These combined antithrombin, NO-mediated antiplatelet effects were shown to improve thromboresistance of the AG

  20. The effect of a polyurethane coating incorporating both a thrombin inhibitor and nitric oxide on hemocompatibility in extracorporeal circulation

    PubMed Central

    Major, Terry C.; Brisbois, Elizabeth J.; Jones, Anna M.; Zanetti, Margaux E.; Annich, Gail M.; Bartlett, Robert H.; Handa, Hitesh

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) releasing (NORel) materials have been extensively investigated to create localized increases in NO concentration by the proton driven diazeniumdiolate-containing polymer coatings and demonstrated to improve extracorporeal circulation (ECC) hemocompatibility. In this work, the NORel polymeric coating composed of a diazeniumdiolated dibutylhexanediamine (DBHD-N2O2)-containing hydrophobic Elast-eon™ (E2As) polyurethane was combined with a direct thrombin inhibitor, argatroban (AG), and evaluated in a 4 h rabbit thrombogenicity model without systemic anticoagulation. In addition, the immobilizing of argatroban to E2As polymer was achieved by either a polyethylene glycol-containing (PEGDI) or hexane methylene (HMDI) diisocyanate linker. The combined polymer film was coated on the inner walls of ECC circuits to yield significantly reduced ECC thrombus formation compared to argatroban alone ECC control after 4 h blood exposure (0.6 ± 0.1 AG/HMDI/NORel vs 1.7 ± 0.2 cm2 AG/HMDI control). Platelet count (2.8 ± 0.3 AG/HMDI/NORel vs 1.9 ± 0.1 × 108/ml AG/HMDI control) and plasma fibrinogen levels were preserved after 4 h blood exposure with both the NORel/argatroban combination and the AG/HMDI control group compared to baseline. Platelet function as measured by aggregometry remained near normal in both the AG/HMDI/NORel (63 ± 5%) and AG/HMDI control (58 ± 7%) groups after 3 h compared to baseline (77 ± 1%). Platelet P-selectin mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) as measured by flow cytometry also remained near baseline levels after 4 h on ECC to ex vivo collagen stimulation (16 ± 3 AG/HMDI/NORel vs 11 ± 2 MFI baseline). These results suggest that the combined AG/HMDI/NORel polymer coating preserves platelets in blood exposure to ECCs to a better degree than AG/PEGDI/NORel, NORel alone or AG alone. These combined antithrombin, NO-mediated antiplatelet effects were shown to improve thromboresistance of the AG/HMDI/NORel polymer-coated ECCs and move

  1. Anticoagulant Activity of a Unique Sulfated Pyranosic (1→3)-β-l-Arabinan through Direct Interaction with Thrombin*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Paula V.; Quintana, Irene; Cerezo, Alberto S.; Caramelo, Julio J.; Pol-Fachin, Laercio; Verli, Hugo; Estevez, José M.; Ciancia, Marina

    2013-01-01

    A highly sulfated 3-linked β-arabinan (Ab1) with arabinose in the pyranose form was obtained from green seaweed Codium vermilara (Bryopsidales). It comprised major amounts of units sulfated on C-2 and C-4 and constitutes the first polysaccharide of this type isolated in the pure form and fully characterized. Ab1 showed anticoagulant activity by global coagulation tests. Less sulfated arabinans obtained from the same seaweed have less or no activity. Ab1 exerts its activity through direct and indirect (antithrombin- and heparin cofactor II-mediated) inhibition of thrombin. Direct thrombin inhibition was studied in detail. By native PAGE, it was possible to detect formation of a complex between Ab1 and human thrombin (HT). Ab1 binding to HT was measured by fluorescence spectroscopy. CD spectra of the Ab1 complex suggested that ligand binding induced a small conformational change on HT. Ab1-thrombin interactions were studied by molecular dynamic simulations using the persulfated octasaccharide as model compound. Most carbohydrate-protein contacts would occur by interaction of sulfate groups with basic amino acid residues on the surface of the enzyme, more than 60% of them being performed by the exosite 2-composing residues. In these interactions, the sulfate groups on C-2 were shown to interact more intensely with the thrombin structure. In contrast, the disulfated oligosaccharide does not promote major conformational modifications at the catalytic site when complexed to exosite 1. These results show that this novel pyranosic sulfated arabinan Ab1 exerts its anticoagulant activity by a mechanism different from those found previously for other sulfated polysaccharides and glycosaminoglycans. PMID:23161548

  2. Structure and Behavior of Human α-Thrombin upon Ligand Recognition: Thermodynamic and Molecular Dynamics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Giesel, Guilherme M.; Palmieri, Leonardo C.; Monteiro, Robson Q.; Verli, Hugo; Lima, Luis Mauricio T. R.

    2011-01-01

    Thrombin is a serine proteinase that plays a fundamental role in coagulation. In this study, we address the effects of ligand site recognition by alpha-thrombin on conformation and energetics in solution. Active site occupation induces large changes in secondary structure content in thrombin as shown by circular dichroism. Thrombin-D-Phe-Pro-Arg-chloromethyl ketone (PPACK) exhibits enhanced equilibrium and kinetic stability compared to free thrombin, whose difference is rooted in the unfolding step. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements in solution reveal an overall similarity in the molecular envelope of thrombin and thrombin-PPACK, which differs from the crystal structure of thrombin. Molecular dynamics simulations performed with thrombin lead to different conformations than the one observed in the crystal structure. These data shed light on the diversity of thrombin conformers not previously observed in crystal structures with distinguished catalytic and conformational behaviors, which might have direct implications on novel strategies to design direct thrombin inhibitors. PMID:21935446

  3. An electrochemical aptasensor for thrombin detection based on direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase using a functionalized graphene hybrid for amplification.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lijuan; Yan, Bin; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo; Yuan, Yali; Xie, Shunbi; Jiang, Liping; He, Ying

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we reported a new label-free electrochemical aptasensor for highly sensitive detection of thrombin using direct electron transfer of glucose oxidase (GOD) as a redox probe and a gold nanoparticle-polyaniline-graphene (Au-PANI-Gra) hybrid for amplification. The Au-PANI-Gra hybrid with large surface area provided a biocompatible sensing platform for the immobilization of GOD. GOD was encapsulated into the three-dimensional netlike (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTS) to form the MPTS-GOD biocomposite, which not only retained the native functions and properties, but also exhibited tunable porosity, high thermal stability, and chemical inertness. With abundant thiol tail groups on MPTS, MPTS-GOD was able to chemisorb onto the surface of the Au-PANI-Gra modified electrode through the strong affinity of the Au-S bond. The electrochemical signal originated from GOD, avoiding the addition or labeling of other redox mediators. After immobilizing the thiolated thrombin binding aptamer through gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), GOD as a blocking reagent was employed to block the remaining active sites of the AuNPs and avoid the nonspecific adsorption. The proposed method avoided the labeling process of redox probes and increased the amount of electroactive GOD. The concentration of thrombin was monitored based on the decrease of current response through cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 0.1 M PBS (pH 7.4). With the excellent direct electron transfer of double layer GOD membranes, the resulting aptasensor exhibited high sensitivity for detection of thrombin with a wide linear range from 1.0 × 10(-12) to 3.0 × 10(-8) M. The proposed aptasensor also showed good stability, satisfactory reproducibility and high specificity, which provided a promising strategy for electrochemical aptamer-based detection of other biomolecules.

  4. Measurement of dabigatran in standardly used clinical assays, whole blood viscoelastic coagulation, and thrombin generation assays.

    PubMed

    van Ryn, Joanne; Grottke, Oliver; Spronk, Henri

    2014-09-01

    Dabigatran, a direct thrombin inhibitor, is increasingly used clinically as one of the new oral anticoagulants. This review summarizes the assays available to measure its activity and includes the relative sensitivity of the different assays for this agent. In addition to plasma-based clotting tests, assays commonly used in surgical/emergency settings, such as activated clotting time and thromboelastometry/thromboelastography, are reviewed. In addition, the thrombin generation assay is discussed as an important method to determine the potential risk of thrombosis or bleeding and its relevance to the measurement of direct thrombin inhibitors. PMID:25168938

  5. [Thrombin generation assays and their clinical application].

    PubMed

    Kern, Anita; Várnai, Katalin; Vásárhelyi, Barna

    2014-06-01

    Thrombin is a key enzyme of the coagulation system, having both pro- and anticoagulant functions. Thus, the generation of thrombin is one of the most important steps in coagulation. Global haemostasis assay, the so-called thrombin generation test is appropriate for its assessment. Since thrombin generation is sensible for both pro- and anticoagulant processes it can be applied for the general characterisation of the risk of thrombosis and bleeding, too. Clinical studies confirmed augmented thrombin generation in patients with high risk of venous or arterial thrombosis. Anticoagulant therapy (also novel oral anticoagulant treatment) can be monitored by thrombin generation. In case of haemophilia thrombin generation assays reflect bleeding severity. It is applicable for monitoring of both conventional haemophilia treatment and inhibitor-bypassing therapy, which is needed when inhibitors develop in patients. Standardization of thrombin generation methods and determination of cut off values are required before its application in clinical practice.

  6. Isolation, Co-Crystallization and Structure-Based Characterization of Anabaenopeptins as Highly Potent Inhibitors of Activated Thrombin Activatable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor (TAFIa)

    PubMed Central

    Schreuder, Herman; Liesum, Alexander; Lönze, Petra; Stump, Heike; Hoffmann, Holger; Schiell, Matthias; Kurz, Michael; Toti, Luigi; Bauer, Armin; Kallus, Christopher; Klemke-Jahn, Christine; Czech, Jörg; Kramer, Dan; Enke, Heike; Niedermeyer, Timo H. J.; Morrison, Vincent; Kumar, Vasant; Brönstrup, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Mature thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa) is a carboxypeptidase that stabilizes fibrin clots by removing C-terminal arginines and lysines from partially degraded fibrin. Inhibition of TAFIa stimulates the degradation of fibrin clots and may help to prevent thrombosis. Applying a lead finding approach based on literature-mining, we discovered that anabaenopeptins, cyclic peptides produced by cyanobacteria, were potent inhibitors of TAFIa with IC50 values as low as 1.5 nM. We describe the isolation and structure elucidation of 20 anabaenopeptins, including 13 novel congeners, as well as their pronounced structure-activity relationships (SAR) with respect to inhibition of TAFIa. Crystal structures of the anabaenopeptins B, C and F bound to the surrogate protease carboxypeptidase B revealed the binding modes of these large (~850 Da) compounds in detail and explained the observed SAR, i.e. the strong dependence of the potency on a basic (Arg, Lys) exocyclic residue that addressed the S1’ binding pocket, and a broad tolerance towards substitutions in the pentacyclic ring that acted as a plug of the active site. PMID:27604544

  7. Isolation, Co-Crystallization and Structure-Based Characterization of Anabaenopeptins as Highly Potent Inhibitors of Activated Thrombin Activatable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor (TAFIa).

    PubMed

    Schreuder, Herman; Liesum, Alexander; Lönze, Petra; Stump, Heike; Hoffmann, Holger; Schiell, Matthias; Kurz, Michael; Toti, Luigi; Bauer, Armin; Kallus, Christopher; Klemke-Jahn, Christine; Czech, Jörg; Kramer, Dan; Enke, Heike; Niedermeyer, Timo H J; Morrison, Vincent; Kumar, Vasant; Brönstrup, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Mature thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa) is a carboxypeptidase that stabilizes fibrin clots by removing C-terminal arginines and lysines from partially degraded fibrin. Inhibition of TAFIa stimulates the degradation of fibrin clots and may help to prevent thrombosis. Applying a lead finding approach based on literature-mining, we discovered that anabaenopeptins, cyclic peptides produced by cyanobacteria, were potent inhibitors of TAFIa with IC50 values as low as 1.5 nM. We describe the isolation and structure elucidation of 20 anabaenopeptins, including 13 novel congeners, as well as their pronounced structure-activity relationships (SAR) with respect to inhibition of TAFIa. Crystal structures of the anabaenopeptins B, C and F bound to the surrogate protease carboxypeptidase B revealed the binding modes of these large (~850 Da) compounds in detail and explained the observed SAR, i.e. the strong dependence of the potency on a basic (Arg, Lys) exocyclic residue that addressed the S1' binding pocket, and a broad tolerance towards substitutions in the pentacyclic ring that acted as a plug of the active site. PMID:27604544

  8. Thrombin Time

    MedlinePlus

    ... monitor unfractionated heparin therapy and to detect heparin contamination in a blood sample. While it is still ... thrombin time may sometimes be ordered when heparin contamination of a sample is suspected or when a ...

  9. Efficacious and orally bioavailable thrombin inhibitors based on a 2,5-thienylamidine at the P1 position: discovery of N-carboxymethyl-d-diphenylalanyl-l-prolyl[(5-amidino-2-thienyl)methyl]amide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Koo; Park, Cheol Won; Jung, Won-Hyuk; Park, Hee Dong; Lee, Sun Hwa; Chung, Kyung Ha; Park, Su Kyung; Kwon, O Hwan; Kang, Myunggyun; Park, Doo-Hee; Lee, Sang Koo; Kim, Eunice E; Yoon, Suk Kyoon; Kim, Aeri

    2003-08-14

    Thrombin, a crucial enzyme in the blood coagulation, has been a target for antithrombotic therapy. Orally active thrombin inhibitors would provide effective and safe prophylaxis for venous and arterial thrombosis. We conducted optimization of a highly efficacious benzamidine-based thrombin inhibitor LB30812 (3, K(i) = 3 pM) to improve oral bioavailability. Of a variety of arylamidines investigated at the P1 position, 2,5-thienylamidine effectively replaced the benzamidine without compromising the thrombin inhibitory potency and oral absorption. The sulfamide and sulfonamide derivatization at the N-terminal position in general afforded highly potent thrombin inhibitors but with moderate oral absorption, while the well-absorbable N-carbamate derivatives exhibited limited metabolic stability in S9 fractions. The present work culminated in the discovery of the N-carboxymethyl- and 2,5-thienylamidine-containing compound 22 that exhibits the most favorable profiles of anticoagulant and antithrombotic activities as well as oral bioavilability (K(i) = 15 pM; F = 43%, 42%, and 15% in rats, dogs, and monkeys, respectively). This compound on a gravimetric basis was shown to be more effective than a low molecular weight heparin, enoxaparin, in the venous thrombosis models of rat and rabbit. Compound 22 (LB30870) was therefore selected for further preclinical and clinical development. PMID:12904065

  10. Combined administration of FVIII and rFVIIa improves haemostasis in haemophilia A patients with high-responding inhibitors--a thrombin generation-guided pilot study.

    PubMed

    Livnat, T; Martinowitz, U; Azar-Avivi, S; Zivelin, A; Brutman-Barazani, T; Lubetsky, A; Kenet, G

    2013-09-01

    Treatment of haemophilia A patients with inhibitors is challenging, and may require individually tailored regimens. Whereas low titre inhibitor patients may respond to high doses of factor VIII (FVIII), high-responding inhibitor patients render replacement therapy ineffective and often require application of bypassing agents. Thrombin generation (TG) assays may be used to monitor haemostasis and/or predict patients' response to bypass agents. In this study we defined by TG, the potential contribution of FVIII to recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa)-induced haemostasis in inhibitor plasma. Based upon results, prospectively designed individual regimens of coadministration of rFVIIa and FVIII were applied. Plasma samples from 14 haemophilia patients with inhibitors (including high titre inhibitors) were tested. The response to increasing concentrations of FVIII, rFVIIa or both was assayed by TG. Eight patients, chosen following consent and at physician's discretion, comprised the combined FVIII-rFVIIa therapy clinical study cohort. Combined spiking with FVIII/rFVIIa improved TG induced by rFVIIa alone in all inhibitor plasmas. Combined rFVIIa and FVIII therapy was applied during bleeding or immune tolerance to eight patients, for a total of 393 episodes. Following a single combined dose, 90% haemostasis was documented and neither thrombosis nor any complications evolved. During study period decline of inhibitor levels and bleeding frequency were noted. Pre-analytical studies enabled us to prospectively tailor individual therapy regimens. We confirmed for the first time that the in vitro advantage of combining FVIII and rFVIIa, indeed accounts for improved haemostasis and may safely be applied to inhibitor patients.

  11. Calibrated automated thrombin generation measurement in clotting plasma.

    PubMed

    Hemker, H Coenraad; Giesen, Peter; Al Dieri, Raed; Regnault, Véronique; de Smedt, Eric; Wagenvoord, Rob; Lecompte, Thomas; Béguin, Suzette

    2003-01-01

    Calibrated automated thrombography displays the concentration of thrombin in clotting plasma with or without platelets (platelet-rich plasma/platelet-poor plasma, PRP/PPP) in up to 48 samples by monitoring the splitting of a fluorogenic substrate and comparing it to a constant known thrombin activity in a parallel, non-clotting sample. Thus, the non-linearity of the reaction rate with thrombin concentration is compensated for, and adding an excess of substrate can be avoided. Standard conditions were established at which acceptable experimental variation accompanies sensitivity to pathological changes. The coefficients of variation of the surface under the curve (endogenous thrombin potential) are: within experiment approximately 3%; intra-individual: <5% in PPP, <8% in PRP; interindividual 15% in PPP and 19% in PRP. In PPP, calibrated automated thrombography shows all clotting factor deficiencies (except factor XIII) and the effect of all anticoagulants [AVK, heparin(-likes), direct inhibitors]. In PRP, it is diminished in von Willebrand's disease, but it also shows the effect of platelet inhibitors (e.g. aspirin and abciximab). Addition of activated protein C (APC) or thrombomodulin inhibits thrombin generation and reflects disorders of the APC system (congenital and acquired resistance, deficiencies and lupus antibodies) independent of concomitant inhibition of the procoagulant pathway as for example by anticoagulants.

  12. Investigation of the selectivity of thrombin-binding aptamers for thrombin titration in murine plasma.

    PubMed

    Trapaidze, Ana; Hérault, Jean-Pascal; Herbert, Jean-Marc; Bancaud, Aurélien; Gué, Anne-Marie

    2016-04-15

    Detection of thrombin in plasma raises timely challenges to enable therapeutic management of thrombosis in patients under vital threat. Thrombin binding aptamers represent promising candidates as sensing elements for the development of real-time thrombin biosensors; however implementation of such biosensor requires the clear understanding of thrombin-aptamer interaction properties in real-like environment. In this study, we used Surface Plasmon Resonance technique to answer the questions of specificity and sensitivity of thrombin detection by the thrombin-binding aptamers HD1, NU172 and HD22. We systematically characterized their properties in the presence of thrombin, as well as interfering molecular species such as the thrombin precursor prothrombin, thrombin in complex with some of its natural inhibitors, nonspecific serum proteins, and diluted plasma. Kinetic experiments show the multiple binding modes of HD1 and NU172, which both interact with multiple sites of thrombin with low nanomolar affinities and show little specificity of interaction for prothrombin vs. thrombin. HD22, on the other hand, binds specifically to thrombin exosite II and has no affinity to prothrombin at all. While thrombin in complex with some of its inhibitors could not be recognized by any aptamer, the binding of HD1 and NU172 properties is compromised by thrombin inhibitors alone, as well as with serum albumin. Finally, the complex nature of plasma was overwhelming for HD1, but we define conditions for the thrombin detection at 10nM range in 100-fold diluted plasma by HD22. Consequently HD22 showed key advantage over HD1 and NU172, and appears as the only alternative to design an aptasensor.

  13. Inhibitory effect of apixaban compared with rivaroxaban and dabigatran on thrombin generation assay.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pancras C; White, Andrew; Luettgen, Joseph

    2013-02-01

    The effect of the oral direct activated factor X (factor Xa) inhibitor apixaban on tissue factor-induced thrombin generation in human plasma was investigated in vitro using the calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) method and compared with the oral direct factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban and the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran. Pooled citrated, anticoagulated, platelet-poor human plasma was spiked with apixaban, rivaroxaban, or dabigatran at concentrations of 0.01 to 10 μM. The inhibitory potencies of the compounds were quantified by 5 CAT parameters: the control thrombin lag time (LT) and time to thrombin peak (TTP) for the doubling of inhibitor concentration (IC2x); and the control endogenous thrombin potential (ETP), thrombin peak, and maximum rate of thrombin generation (Vmax) for the inhibitor concentration, which inhibited 50% (IC50). The inhibitors modified CAT concentration dependently. Their inhibitory potencies, expressed as IC2x LT, IC2x TTP, IC50 ETP, IC50 peak thrombin, and IC50 Vmax, were as follows: 0.10 ± 0.01, 0.19 ± 0.02, 0.65 ± 0.11, 0.089 ± 0.019, and 0.049 ± 0.007 μM for apixaban; 0.049 ± 0.007, 0.070 ± 0.009, 0.43 ± 0.07, 0.048 ± 0.008, and 0.022 ± 0.005 μM for rivaroxaban; and 0.063 ± 0.019, 0.18 ± 0.06, 0.50 ± 0.08, 0.55 ± 0.06, and 0.57 ± 0.27 μM for dabigatran. In summary, apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran have similar potencies in the prolongation of LT and TTP. The CAT parameters that are related to the rate of thrombin generation during the propagation phase (ie, peak thrombin and Vmax) are more sensitive to activities of apixaban and rivaroxaban than dabigatran. The ETP is the least sensitive parameter for measuring the activities of these inhibitors. Recombinant activated factor VII at 5 and 50 μg/mL reversed the anticoagulant effects of apixaban more at 0.2 μM than at 2 μM. Our study suggests that the CAT method is a sensitive assay to monitor the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of

  14. Challenges of the management of severe hemophilia A with inhibitors: two case reports emphasizing the potential interest of a high-purity human Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate and individually tailored prophylaxis guided by thrombin-generation test.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Sophie; Crampe, Carine; Dargaud, Yesim; Lavigne-Lissalde, Géraldine; Escuriola-Ettingshausen, Carmen; Tardy, Brigitte; Meley, Roland; Thouvenin, Sandrine; Stephan, Jean L; Berger, Claire

    2015-12-01

    Severe hemophilia A is an X-linked bleeding disorder. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the best strategy of treatment when patients develop inhibitors. The objective is to illustrate the benefit of a high-purity human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor (VWF) concentrate (Octanate) in the management of ITI. We also wanted to raise the potential interest of laboratory assays such as thrombin-generation test (TGT) and epitope mapping. Two patients were treated during ITI, first with a recombinant FVIII and then with plasma-derived factor VIII without success, and, finally, with Octanate. Bypassing agents were used based on the results of TGT. Epitope mapping was performed during ITI therapy. These observations suggest the potential contribution of Octanate in the management of ITI in difficult cases. The use of bypassing agents can be necessary in prophylaxis or to treat bleedings, and may be guided by TGT results. Epitope mapping is used to describe the inhibitor. This article shows a decrease of the inhibitor directed against the C2 domain after initiation of Octanate. A high-purity human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate (Octanate) may be a valuable therapeutical option for ITI therapy. TGT and epitope mapping could be of help in the management of ITI.

  15. Challenges of the management of severe hemophilia A with inhibitors: two case reports emphasizing the potential interest of a high-purity human Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate and individually tailored prophylaxis guided by thrombin-generation test.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Sophie; Crampe, Carine; Dargaud, Yesim; Lavigne-Lissalde, Géraldine; Escuriola-Ettingshausen, Carmen; Tardy, Brigitte; Meley, Roland; Thouvenin, Sandrine; Stephan, Jean L; Berger, Claire

    2015-12-01

    Severe hemophilia A is an X-linked bleeding disorder. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the best strategy of treatment when patients develop inhibitors. The objective is to illustrate the benefit of a high-purity human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor (VWF) concentrate (Octanate) in the management of ITI. We also wanted to raise the potential interest of laboratory assays such as thrombin-generation test (TGT) and epitope mapping. Two patients were treated during ITI, first with a recombinant FVIII and then with plasma-derived factor VIII without success, and, finally, with Octanate. Bypassing agents were used based on the results of TGT. Epitope mapping was performed during ITI therapy. These observations suggest the potential contribution of Octanate in the management of ITI in difficult cases. The use of bypassing agents can be necessary in prophylaxis or to treat bleedings, and may be guided by TGT results. Epitope mapping is used to describe the inhibitor. This article shows a decrease of the inhibitor directed against the C2 domain after initiation of Octanate. A high-purity human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate (Octanate) may be a valuable therapeutical option for ITI therapy. TGT and epitope mapping could be of help in the management of ITI. PMID:26517064

  16. Thrombin-Inhibiting Anticoagulant Liposomes: Development and Characterization.

    PubMed

    Endreas, Wegderes; Brüßler, Jana; Vornicescu, Doru; Keusgen, Michael; Bakowsky, Udo; Steinmetzer, Torsten

    2016-02-01

    Many peptides and peptidomimetic drugs suffer from rapid clearance in vivo; this can be reduced by increasing their size through oligomerization or covalent conjugation with polymers. As proof of principle, an alternative strategy for drug oligomerization is described, in which peptidomimetic thrombin inhibitors are incorporated into the liposome surface. For this purpose, the inhibitor moieties were covalently coupled to a palmitic acid residue through a short bifunctionalized ethylene glycol spacer. These molecules were directly added to the lipid mixture used for liposome preparation. The obtained liposomes possess strong thrombin inhibitory potency in enzyme kinetic measurements and anticoagulant activity in plasma. Their strong potency and positive ζ potential indicate that large amounts of the benzamidine-derived inhibitors are located on the surface of the liposomes. This concept should be applicable to other drug molecules that suffer from rapid elimination and allow covalent modification with a suitable fatty acid residue. PMID:26662675

  17. Thrombin Generation in Zebrafish Blood.

    PubMed

    Schurgers, Evelien; Moorlag, Martijn; Hemker, Coenraad; Lindhout, Theo; Kelchtermans, Hilde; de Laat, Bas

    2016-01-01

    To better understand hypercoagulability as an underlying cause for thrombosis, the leading cause of death in the Western world, new assays to study ex vivo coagulation are essential. The zebrafish is generally accepted as a good model for human hemostasis and thrombosis, as the hemostatic system proved to be similar to that in man. Their small size however, has been a hurdle for more widespread use in hemostasis related research. In this study we developed a method that enables the measurement of thrombin generation in a single drop of non-anticoagulated zebrafish blood. Pre-treatment of the fish with inhibitors of FXa and thrombin, resulted in a dose dependent diminishing of thrombin generation, demonstrating the validity of the assay. In order to establish the relationship between whole blood thrombin generation and fibrin formation, we visualized the resulting fibrin network by scanning electron microscopy. Taken together, in this study we developed a fast and reliable method to measure thrombin generation in whole blood collected from a single zebrafish. Given the similarities between coagulation pathways of zebrafish and mammals, zebrafish may be an ideal animal model to determine the effect of novel therapeutics on thrombin generation. Additionally, because of the ease with which gene functions can be silenced, zebrafish may serve as a model organism for mechanistical research in thrombosis and hemostasis. PMID:26872266

  18. Thrombin Generation in Zebrafish Blood

    PubMed Central

    Hemker, Coenraad; Lindhout, Theo; Kelchtermans, Hilde; de Laat, Bas

    2016-01-01

    To better understand hypercoagulability as an underlying cause for thrombosis, the leading cause of death in the Western world, new assays to study ex vivo coagulation are essential. The zebrafish is generally accepted as a good model for human hemostasis and thrombosis, as the hemostatic system proved to be similar to that in man. Their small size however, has been a hurdle for more widespread use in hemostasis related research. In this study we developed a method that enables the measurement of thrombin generation in a single drop of non-anticoagulated zebrafish blood. Pre-treatment of the fish with inhibitors of FXa and thrombin, resulted in a dose dependent diminishing of thrombin generation, demonstrating the validity of the assay. In order to establish the relationship between whole blood thrombin generation and fibrin formation, we visualized the resulting fibrin network by scanning electron microscopy. Taken together, in this study we developed a fast and reliable method to measure thrombin generation in whole blood collected from a single zebrafish. Given the similarities between coagulation pathways of zebrafish and mammals, zebrafish may be an ideal animal model to determine the effect of novel therapeutics on thrombin generation. Additionally, because of the ease with which gene functions can be silenced, zebrafish may serve as a model organism for mechanistical research in thrombosis and hemostasis. PMID:26872266

  19. Inhibition of the effects of thrombin on guinea pig platelets by the diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor RHC 80267

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, D.; Sutherland, C.A.; Khandwala, A.S.; Jamall, I.S.; Kapoor, A.L.

    1986-10-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) and diacylglycerol lipase (DGL) activities were found in guinea pig platelet microsome preparations. No phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity was detected. RHC 80267 (1,6-di (0-(carbamoyl) cyclohexanone oxime)hexane) inhibited DGL activity (IC50 = 4 uM) from guinea pig platelet microsomes but had no effect on PLC. RHC 80267 inhibited platelet aggregation (IC50 = 11 uM), release of arachidonic acid (AA), its metabolites, and ATP (IC50 = 4.5 uM) when guinea pig platelets were challenged with a low concentration of thrombin. We propose that PLC-DGL is an important enzymatic pathway for the release of AA in guinea pig platelets.

  20. Results of clot waveform analysis and thrombin generation test for a plasma-derived factor VIIa and X mixture (MC710) in haemophilia patients with inhibitors--phase I trial: 2nd report.

    PubMed

    Shirahata, A; Fukutake, K; Mimaya, J; Takamatsu, J; Shima, M; Hanabusa, H; Takedani, H; Takashima, Y; Matsushita, T; Tawa, A; Higasa, S; Takata, N; Sakai, M; Kawakami, K; Ohashi, Y; Saito, H

    2013-03-01

    We reported the results of a clinical pharmacological study of MC710 (a mixture of plasma-derived FVIIa and FX) in haemophilia patients with inhibitors during a non-haemorrhagic state. This report provides the results of a clot waveform analysis (CWA) and thrombin generation test (TGT) using blood samples obtained in this study. CWA and TGT were conducted using blood samples obtained from a pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study in which MC710 (five dose rates: 20, 40, 80, 100 and 120 μg kg(-1)) was compared with NovoSeven (120 μg kg(-1)) and FEIBA (two dose rates: 50 and 75 U kg(-1)) as control drugs in 11 haemophilia patients with inhibitors without haemorrhagic symptoms. CWA showed that MC710 provided significantly greater improvement than the control drugs in activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) at 80 μg kg(-1); maximum clot velocity and maximum clot acceleration were more enhanced by MC710 than by control drugs. TGT revealed that MC710 significantly shortened the initiation time of thrombin generation in comparison to FEIBA and induced greater thrombin generation potency than NovoSeven. It was not clear whether or not MC710 caused significant dose-dependent changes in the two measurements; however, differences between MC710 and the control drugs were clarified. MC710 was confirmed to have superior coagulation activity and thrombin productivity and is expected to have superior bypassing activity. PMID:22989180

  1. The modification of the thrombin generation test for the clinical assessment of dabigatran etexilate efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gribkova, Irina V.; Lipets, Elena N.; Rekhtina, Irina G.; Bernakevich, Alex I.; Ayusheev, Dorzho B.; Ovsepyan, Ruzanna A.; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I.; Sinauridze, Elena I.

    2016-01-01

    A new oral anticoagulant, dabigatran etexilate (DE, a prodrug of direct thrombin inhibitor (DTI) dabigatran), has been used clinically to prevent thrombosis. The assessment of dabigatran efficiency is necessary in some clinical cases, such as renal insufficiency, risk of bleeding, and drug interactions. However, a specific thrombin generation test (TGT) that is one of the most informative and sensitive to anticoagulant therapy (calibrated automated thrombinography (САТ)) shows a paradoxical increase of test parameters, such as endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) and peak thrombin, in patients receiving DE. The paradoxical behaviour of ETP and peak thrombin in these patients in the presence of DTIs is mostly caused by a decrease in the activity of thrombin in the α2-macroglobulin-thrombin complex that is used as a calibrator in CAT. For a correct estimation of the TGT parameters in patient’s plasma containing DTIs we proposed to use our previously described alternative calibration method that is based on the measurement of the fluorescence signal of a well-known concentration of the reaction product (7-amino-4-methylcoumarin). In this study, the validity of such approach was demonstrated in an ex vivo study in patients with knee replacement and two special patients with multiple myeloma, who received DE for thrombosis prophylaxis. PMID:27377013

  2. The modification of the thrombin generation test for the clinical assessment of dabigatran etexilate efficiency.

    PubMed

    Gribkova, Irina V; Lipets, Elena N; Rekhtina, Irina G; Bernakevich, Alex I; Ayusheev, Dorzho B; Ovsepyan, Ruzanna A; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I; Sinauridze, Elena I

    2016-01-01

    A new oral anticoagulant, dabigatran etexilate (DE, a prodrug of direct thrombin inhibitor (DTI) dabigatran), has been used clinically to prevent thrombosis. The assessment of dabigatran efficiency is necessary in some clinical cases, such as renal insufficiency, risk of bleeding, and drug interactions. However, a specific thrombin generation test (TGT) that is one of the most informative and sensitive to anticoagulant therapy (calibrated automated thrombinography (САТ)) shows a paradoxical increase of test parameters, such as endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) and peak thrombin, in patients receiving DE. The paradoxical behaviour of ETP and peak thrombin in these patients in the presence of DTIs is mostly caused by a decrease in the activity of thrombin in the α2-macroglobulin-thrombin complex that is used as a calibrator in CAT. For a correct estimation of the TGT parameters in patient's plasma containing DTIs we proposed to use our previously described alternative calibration method that is based on the measurement of the fluorescence signal of a well-known concentration of the reaction product (7-amino-4-methylcoumarin). In this study, the validity of such approach was demonstrated in an ex vivo study in patients with knee replacement and two special patients with multiple myeloma, who received DE for thrombosis prophylaxis. PMID:27377013

  3. Specificity and selectivity profile of EP217609: a new neutralizable dual-action anticoagulant that targets thrombin and factor Xa

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Richard; Petitou, Maurice

    2012-01-01

    EP217609 is a new dual-action parenteral anticoagulant that combines an indirect factor Xa inhibitor (fondaparinux analog) and a direct thrombin inhibitor (α-NAPAP analog) in a single molecule together with a biotin tag to allow avidin neutralization. EP217609 exhibits an unprecedented pharmacologic profile in showing high bioavailability, long plasma half-life, and potent antithrombotic activity in animals without the complications of thrombin rebound. Here we report the exceptional specificity and selectivity profile of EP217609. EP217609 inhibited thrombin with rapid kinetics (kon > 107M−1s−1), a high affinity (KI = 30-40pM), and more than 1000-fold selectivity over other coagulation and fibrinolytic protease targets, comparing favorably with the best direct thrombin inhibitors known. EP217609 bound antithrombin with high affinity (KD = 30nM) and activated the serpin to rapidly (kass ∼ 106M−1s−1) and selectively (> 20-fold) inhibit factor Xa. The dual inhibitor moieties of EP217609 acted largely independently with only modest linkage effects of ligand occupancy of one inhibitor moiety on the potency of the other (∼ 5-fold). In contrast, avidin binding effectively neutralized the potency of both inhibitor moieties (20- to 100-fold). These findings demonstrate the superior anticoagulant efficacy and rapid avidin neutralizability of EP217609 compared with anticoagulants that target thrombin or factor Xa alone. PMID:22144183

  4. Characterization of Thrombin-Bound Dabigatran Effects on Protease-Activated Receptor-1 Expression and Signaling In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Buxin; Soto, Antonio G.; Coronel, Luisa J.; Goss, Ashley; van Ryn, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Thrombin, the key effector protease of the coagulation cascade, drives fibrin deposition and activates human platelets through protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1). These processes are critical to the progression of thrombotic diseases. Thrombin is the main target of anticoagulant therapy, and major efforts have led to the discovery of new oral direct inhibitors of thrombin. Dabigatran is the first oral anticoagulant licensed for the prevention of thromboembolisms associated with orthopedic surgery and stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. Dabigatran is a direct thrombin inhibitor that effectively blocks thrombin’s catalytic activity but does not preclude thrombin’s exosites and binding to fibrinogen. Thus, we hypothesized that catalytically inactive thrombin retains the capacity to bind to PAR1 through exosite-I and may modulate its function independent of receptor cleavage and activation. Here, we report that dabigatran at clinically relevant concentrations is an effective and acute inhibitor of thrombin-induced PAR1 cleavage, activation, internalization, and β-arrestin recruitment in vitro. Interestingly, prolonged exposure to catalytic inactive thrombin incubated with dabigatran at 20-fold higher therapeutic concentration resulted in increased PAR1 cell-surface expression, which correlated with higher detectable levels of ubiquitinated receptor. These findings are consistent with ubiquitin function as a negative regulator of PAR1 constitutive internalization. Increased PAR1 expression also enhanced agonist-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis and endothelial barrier permeability. Thus, catalytically inactive thrombin appears to modulate PAR1 function in vitro by stabilizing receptor cell-surface expression; but given the high clearance rate of thrombin, the high concentration of dabigatran required to achieve this effect the in vivo physiologic relevance is unknown. PMID:25934730

  5. The antithrombotic effect of potent bifunctional thrombin inhibitors based on hirudin sequence, P551 and P532, on He-Ne laser-induced thrombosis in rat mesenteric microvessels.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, T; Tsuda, Y; Konishi, Y; Okada, Y; Matsuoka, A; Giddings, J C; Yamamoto, J

    1998-06-01

    The antithrombotic effect of potent synthetic bifunctional non-substrate type thrombin inhibitors based on hirudin sequences, P551 and P532, on Helium-Neon laser-induced thrombosis was investigated in rat mesenteric microvessels and compared with other types of thrombin inhibitors. P551 and P532, when given intravenously, inhibited platelet-rich thrombus formation in both arterioles and venules in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect was maximal immediately after intravenous administration and persisted for 20-30 minutes in both arterioles and venules. The minimal effective doses of P551 and P532 were 1.0 mg/ kg (intravenously) in both. However, the time course of the antithrombotic effect was not in keeping with the inhibitory effect measured by an activated partial thromboplastin time and was similar to other types of inhibitors in spite of different half-lives. The current findings show that P551 and P532 had significant inhibitory effects on platelet-rich thrombus formation and suggest that these bifunctional thrombin inhibitors could be potent antithrombotic agents. PMID:9694241

  6. Influence of physicochemical properties and intestinal region on the absorption of 3-fluoro-2-pyrimidylmethyl 3-(2,2-difluoro-2-(2-pyridyl)ethylamino)-6-chloropyrazin-2-one-1-acetamide, a water insoluble thrombin inhibitor, in dogs.

    PubMed

    Euler, Danielle; Frech, Patricia; Karki, Shyam; Cowden, Cameron; Pearce, Gareth; Mehta, Pratik; Lindemann, Christopher; Byway, Paul; Wang, Michael; Gibson, Todd; Cheng, Yu; Kwei, Gloria; Rose, Jayna

    2004-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties of 3-fluoro-2-pyrimidylmethyl 3-(2,2-difluoro-2-(2-pyridyl)ethylamino)-6-chloropyrazin-2-one-1-acetamide, a direct thrombin inhibitor (1, Fig. 1). Three crystalline forms were characterized and studies were planned to investigate the absorption characteristics of the three selected crystalline forms. Due to the short half-life observed in preclinical species, regional absorption studies were also conducted to support potential controlled release formulation development. Results showed that the absorption of 1 was dependent on the surface area of the particles administered as suspensions and was independent of the crystal forms. From Caco-2 cell transport studies, it was determined that the permeability of 1 was high. Based on the low aqueous solubility it would be classified as a class 2 compound in the Biopharmaceutics Classification System. Regional absorption results suggested that the compound was absorbed along the gastrointestinal tract in Beagle dogs, however colonic absorption appeared to be reduced by slower dissolution.

  7. Targeting the GPIbα Binding Site of Thrombin To Simultaneously Induce Dual Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Effects

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Exosite 2 of human thrombin contributes to two opposing pathways, the anticoagulant pathway and the platelet aggregation pathway. We reasoned that an exosite 2 directed allosteric thrombin inhibitor should simultaneously induce anticoagulant and antiplatelet effects. To assess this, we synthesized SbO4L based on the sulfated tyrosine-containing sequence of GPIbα. SbO4L was synthesized in three simple steps in high yield and found to be a highly selective, direct inhibitor of thrombin. Michelis–Menten kinetic studies indicated a noncompetitive mechanism of inhibition. Competitive inhibition studies suggested ideal competition with heparin and glycoprotein Ibα, as predicted. Studies with site-directed mutants of thrombin indicated that SbO4L binds to Arg233, Lys235, and Lys236 of exosite 2. SbO4L prevented thrombin-mediated platelet activation and aggregation as expected on the basis of competition with GPIbα. SbO4L presents a novel paradigm of simultaneous dual anticoagulant and antiplatelet effects achieved through the GPIbα binding site of thrombin. PMID:24635452

  8. Monitoring thrombin generation and screening anticoagulants through pulse laser-induced fragmentation of biofunctional nanogold on cellulose membranes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Jia; Chiu, Wei-Jane; Unnikrishnan, Binesh; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2014-09-10

    Thrombin generation (TG) has an important part in the blood coagulation system, and monitoring TG is useful for diagnosing various health issues related to hypo-coagulability and hyper-coagulability. In this study, we constructed probes by using mixed cellulose ester membranes (MCEMs) modified with gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) for monitoring thrombin activity using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). The LDI process produced Au cationic clusters ([Au(n)](+); n = 1-3) that we detected through MS. When thrombin reacted with fibrinogen on the Au NPs-MCEMs, insoluble fibrin was formed, hindering the formation of Au cationic clusters and, thereby, decreasing the intensity of their signals in the mass spectrum. Accordingly, we incorporated fibrinogen onto the Au NPs-MCEMs to form Fib-Au NPs-MCEM probes to monitor TG with good selectivity (>1000-fold toward thrombin with respect to other proteins or enzymes) and sensitivity (limit of detection for thrombin of ca. 2.5 pM in human plasma samples). Our probe exhibited remarkable performance in monitoring the inhibition of thrombin activity by direct thrombin inhibitors. Analyses of real samples using our new membrane-based probe suggested that it will be highly useful in practical applications for the effective management of hemostatic complications.

  9. Thrombin action decreases acetylcholine receptor aggregate number and stability in cultured mouse myotubes.

    PubMed

    Davenport, R W; Lanuza, M; Kim, S; Jia, M; Snyder, E; Nelson, P G

    2000-08-30

    Neurons develop and make very stable, long-term synaptic connections with other nerve cells and with muscle. Synaptic stability at the neuromuscular junction changes over development in that a proliferation of synaptic input are made to individual myotubes and synapses from all but one neuron are lost during development. In an established co-culture paradigm in which spinal motoneurons synaptically contact myotubes, thrombin and associated protease inhibitors have been shown to affect the loss of functional synaptic contacts [6]. Evidence has not been provided which clearly demonstrate whether protease/protease inhibitors affect either the pre- or postsynaptic terminal, or both. In an effort to determine whether these reagents directly affect postsynaptic receptors on myotubes, myotubes were cultured in the absence of neurons and the spontaneous presence and stability of aggregates of acetylcholine receptors (AChR) in control and thrombin-containing media were evaluated. In dishes fixed after treatment and in dishes in which individual aggregates were observed live, thrombin action appeared to increase loss of AChR aggregates over time. Hirudin, a specific inhibitor of the thrombin protease, diminished this loss. Neither reagent affected the overall incorporation or degradation of AChR; therefore, it appears these protease/protease inhibitors affect the state of AChR aggregation. PMID:10960680

  10. Sulfated Low Molecular Weight Lignins, Allosteric Inhibitors of Coagulation Proteinases via the Heparin Binding Site, Significantly Alter the Active Site of Thrombin and Factor Xa Compared to Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Brian L.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfated low molecular weight lignins (LMWLs) have been found to bind in the heparin binding sites of coagulation proteinases. LMWLs represent a library of diverse non-carbohydrate, aromatic molecules which are structures different from heparin, but still potently inhibit thrombin and factor Xa. To better understand their mechanism of action, we studied the effects of three sulfated LMWLs (CDSO3, FDSO3, and SDSO3) on the active sites of thrombin and factor Xa. LMWLs were found to uniformly inhibit the catalytic activity of thrombin and factor Xa, regardless of the substrate used. Michaelis-Menten kinetic studies indicate that maximal velocity of hydrolysis of each chromogenic substrate decreases significantly in the presence of sulfated LMWLs, while the effect on Michaelis constant is dependent on the nature of the substrate. These studies indicate that LMWLs inhibit thrombin and factor Xa through allosteric disruption of the catalytic apparatus, specifically through the catalytic step. As opposed to heparin, LMWLs significantly alter the binding of the active site fluorescent ligand p-aminobenzamidine. LMWLs also had a greater effect on the molecular orientation of fluorescein-labeled His 57 than heparin. The molecular geometry surrounding the most important catalytic amino acid, Ser 195, was significantly altered by the binding of LMWLs while heparin had no measurable effect on Ser 195. These results further advance the concept of sulfated LMWLs as heparin mimics and will aid the design of anticoagulants based on their novel scaffold. PMID:25242245

  11. Sulfated low molecular weight lignins, allosteric inhibitors of coagulation proteinases via the heparin binding site, significantly alter the active site of thrombin and factor xa compared to heparin.

    PubMed

    Henry, Brian L; Desai, Umesh R

    2014-11-01

    Sulfated low molecular weight lignins (LMWLs) have been found to bind in the heparin binding sites of coagulation proteinases. LMWLs represent a library of diverse non-carbohydrate, aromatic molecules which are structures different from heparin, but still potently inhibit thrombin and factor Xa. To better understand their mechanism of action, we studied the effects of three sulfated LMWLs (CDSO3, FDSO3, and SDSO3) on the active sites of thrombin and factor Xa. LMWLs were found to uniformly inhibit the catalytic activity of thrombin and factor Xa, regardless of the substrate used. Michaelis-Menten kinetic studies indicate that maximal velocity of hydrolysis of each chromogenic substrate decreases significantly in the presence of sulfated LMWLs, while the effect on Michaelis constant is dependent on the nature of the substrate. These studies indicate that LMWLs inhibit thrombin and factor Xa through allosteric disruption of the catalytic apparatus, specifically through the catalytic step. As opposed to heparin, LMWLs significantly alter the binding of the active site fluorescent ligand p-aminobenzamidine. LMWLs also had a greater effect on the molecular orientation of fluorescein-labeled His 57 than heparin. The molecular geometry surrounding the most important catalytic amino acid, Ser 195, was significantly altered by the binding of LMWLs while heparin had no measurable effect on Ser 195. These results further advance the concept of sulfated LMWLs as heparin mimics and will aid the design of anticoagulants based on their novel scaffold. PMID:25242245

  12. Thrombin exacerbates brain edema in focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hua, Y; Wu, J; Keep, R F; Hoff, J T; Xi, G

    2003-01-01

    Thrombin contributes to edema formation after intracerebral hemorrhage. Recent studies suggest that thrombin may also play a role in ischemic brain damage. In the present study, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital. Middle cerebral artery (MCA) was occluded using the suture method. We found that brain thrombin activity was elevated after permanent MCA occlusion as was prothrombin messenger RNA expression. Intracerebral injection of a thrombin inhibitor, hirudin, reduced neurological deficits following cerebral ischemia. In contrast, intracerebral administration of exogenous thrombin (at a dose that is non-toxic to normal brain), markedly exacerbated brain edema after transient focal cerebral ischemia. These results indicate that extravascular thrombin inhibition may be a new therapeutic target for cerebral ischemia.

  13. Thrombin Cleavage of Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 Inhibits Cytoadherence

    PubMed Central

    Gillrie, Mark R.; Renaux, Bernard; Russell-Goldman, Eleanor; Avril, Marion; Brazier, Andrew J.; Mihara, Koichiro; Di Cera, Enrico; Milner, Danny A.; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Smith, Joseph D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains one of the most deadly infections worldwide. The pathogenesis of the infection results from the sequestration of infected erythrocytes (IRBC) in vital organs, including the brain, with resulting impairment of blood flow, hypoxia, and lactic acidosis. Sequestration occurs through the adhesion of IRBC to host receptors on microvascular endothelium by Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1), a large family of variant surface antigens, each with up to seven extracellular domains that can bind to multiple host receptors. Consequently, antiadhesive therapies directed at single endothelial adhesion molecules may not be effective. In this study, we demonstrated that the serine protease thrombin, which is pivotal in the activation of the coagulation cascade, cleaved the major parasite adhesin on the surface of IRBC. As a result, adhesion under flow was dramatically reduced, and already adherent IRBC were detached. Thrombin cleavage sites were mapped to the Duffy binding-like δ1 (DBLδ1) domain and interdomains 1 and 2 in the PfEMP1 of the parasite line IT4var19. Furthermore, we observed an inverse correlation between the presence of thrombin and IRBC in cerebral malaria autopsies of children. We investigated a modified (R67A) thrombin and thrombin inhibitor, hirugen, both of which inhibit the binding of substrates to exosite I, thereby reducing its proinflammatory properties. Both approaches reduced the barrier dysfunction induced by thrombin without affecting its proteolytic activity on PfEMP1, raising the possibility that thrombin cleavage of variant PfEMP1 may be exploited as a broadly inhibitory antiadhesive therapy. PMID:27624125

  14. [Measuring thrombin formation].

    PubMed

    Hemker, H C

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of thrombin formation makes it possible to estimate the risk of haemorrhage or thrombosis much more accurately than by using clotting time. This new technique allows better monitoring of the effect of prophylactic and therapeutic anticoagulant therapy. Thrombin formation is, however, not yet routinely measured. PMID:27650017

  15. New directions for protease inhibitors directed drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshio; Kiso, Yoshiaki

    2016-11-01

    Proteases play crucial roles in various biological processes, and their activities are essential for all living organisms-from viruses to humans. Since their functions are closely associated with many pathogenic mechanisms, their inhibitors or activators are important molecular targets for developing treatments for various diseases. Here, we describe drugs/drug candidates that target proteases, such as malarial plasmepsins, β-secretase, virus proteases, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Previously, we reported inhibitors of aspartic proteases, such as renin, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease, human T-lymphotropic virus type I protease, plasmepsins, and β-secretase, as drug candidates for hypertension, adult T-cell leukaemia, human T-lymphotropic virus type I-associated myelopathy, malaria, and Alzheimer's disease. Our inhibitors are also described in this review article as examples of drugs that target proteases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 563-579, 2016. PMID:26584340

  16. Allosteric Partial Inhibition of Monomeric Proteases. Sulfated Coumarins Induce Regulation, not just Inhibition, of Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Verespy III, Stephen; Mehta, Akul Y.; Afosah, Daniel; Al-Horani, Rami A.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteases can offer major regulatory advantages, but remains a concept on paper to date; although it has been routinely documented for receptors and oligomeric proteins. Thrombin, a key protease of the coagulation cascade, displays significant conformational plasticity, which presents an attractive opportunity to discover small molecule probes that induce sub-maximal allosteric inhibition. We synthesized a focused library of some 36 sulfated coumarins to discover two agents that display sub-maximal efficacy (~50%), high potency (<500 nM) and high selectivity for thrombin (>150-fold). Michaelis-Menten, competitive inhibition, and site-directed mutagenesis studies identified exosite 2 as the site of binding for the most potent sulfated coumarin. Stern-Volmer quenching of active site-labeled fluorophore suggested that the allosteric regulators induce intermediate structural changes in the active site as compared to those that display ~80–100% efficacy. Antithrombin inactivation of thrombin was impaired in the presence of the sulfated coumarins suggesting that allosteric partial inhibition arises from catalytic dysfunction of the active site. Overall, sulfated coumarins represent first-in-class, sub-maximal inhibitors of thrombin. The probes establish the concept of allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteins. This concept may lead to a new class of anticoagulants that are completely devoid of bleeding. PMID:27053426

  17. Homologous desensitization of HEL cell thrombin receptors. Distinguishable roles for proteolysis and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Brass, L F

    1992-03-25

    Loss of sensitivity to thrombin following an initial response is characteristic of a number of cell types, including platelets. It has recently been proposed that thrombin receptors resemble other G protein-coupled receptors, but that activation involves a novel mechanism in which thrombin cleaves the receptor, exposing a new N terminus that serves as the ligand for the receptor. Based upon this model, we have examined the mechanism of thrombin receptor desensitization by comparing the effects of thrombin with those of a peptide corresponding to the N-terminal sequence of the receptor following proteolysis by thrombin: SFLLRNPNDKYEPF or TRP42/55. Like thrombin, TRP42/55 stimulated pertussis toxin-sensitive inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation, raised cytosolic Ca2+, and inhibited cAMP formation in the megakaryoblastic HEL cell line. Exposure to either thrombin or TRP42/55 desensitized the cells to both, but not to a third agonist, neuropeptide Y. The rate of recovery after desensitization depended upon the order of agonist addition. Resensitization of the cell to thrombin following a brief exposure to thrombin required up to 24 h and could be inhibited with cycloheximide. Resensitization to TRP42/55 after exposure to thrombin, or to thrombin after exposure to TRP42/55, on the other hand, was detectable within 30 min and could be inhibited by serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitors, but not by cycloheximide. Loss of responsiveness to thrombin and TRP42/55 was also observed following addition of the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). However, while the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine completely prevented the desensitization caused by TPA, it had only a limited effect on the desensitization caused by TRP42/55. These results demonstrate that the G protein-mediated effects of thrombin can be reproduced by a receptor-derived peptide and suggest that desensitization occurs by at least two mechanisms. The first, which is seen with thrombin

  18. Molecular basis of thrombomodulin activation of slow thrombin

    PubMed Central

    ADAMS, T.E.; LI, W.; HUNTINGTON, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Coagulation is a highly regulated process where the ability to prevent blood loss after injury is balanced against the maintenance of blood fluidity. Thrombin is at the center of this balancing act. It is the critical enzyme for producing and stabilizing a clot, but when complexed with thrombomodulin (TM) it is converted to a powerful anticoagulant. Another cofactor that may play a role in determining thrombin function is the monovalent cation Na+. Its apparent affinity suggests that half of the thrombin generated is in a Na+-free ‘slow’ state and half is in a Na+-coordinated ‘fast’ state. While slow thrombin is a poor procoagulant enzyme, when complexed to TM it is an effective anticoagulant. Methods To better understand this molecular transformation we solved a 2.4 Å structure of thrombin complexed with EGF domains 4–6 of TM in the absence of Na+ and other cofactors or inhibitors. Results We find that TM binds as previously observed, and that the thrombin component resembles structures of the fast form. The Na+ binding loop is observed in a conformation identical to the Na+-bound form, with conserved water molecules compensating for the missing ion. Using the fluorescent probe p-aminobenzamidine we show that activation of slow thrombin by TM principally involves the opening of the primary specificity pocket. Conclusions These data show that TM binding alters the conformation of thrombin in a similar manner as Na+ coordination, resulting in an ordering of the Na+ binding loop and an opening of the adjacent S1 pocket. We conclude that other, more subtle subsite changes are unlikely to influence thrombin specificity toward macromolecular substrates. PMID:19656282

  19. Antiplatelet therapy: thrombin receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Tello-Montoliu, Antonio; Tomasello, Salvatore D; Ueno, Masafumi; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2011-01-01

    Activated platelets stimulate thrombus formation in response to rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque or endothelial cell erosion, promoting atherothrombotic disease. Multiple pathways contribute to platelet activation. Aspirin, an irreversible inhibitor of thromboxane A2 synthesis, in combination with clopidogrel, an inhibitor of P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate platelet receptors, represent the current standard-of-care of antiplatelet therapy for patients with acute coronary syndrome and for those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Although these agents have demonstrated significant clinical benefit, the increased risk of bleeding and the recurrence of thrombotic events represent substantial limitations. Thrombin is one of the most important platelet activators. The inhibition of protease-activated receptor 1 showed a good safety profile in preclinical studies. In fact, phase II studies with vorapaxar (SCH530348) and atopaxar (E5555) showed no increase of bleeding events in addition to the current standard-of-care of antiplatelet therapy. Although the results of phase III trials for both drugs are awaited, this family is a promising new addition to the current clinical practice for patients with atherothrombotic disease, not only as an alternative, but also as additional therapy. PMID:21906120

  20. gammaA/gamma' fibrinogen inhibits thrombin-induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lovely, Rehana S; Rein, Chantelle M; White, Tara C; Jouihan, Sari A; Boshkov, Lynn K; Bakke, Antony C; McCarty, Owen J; Farrell, David H

    2008-11-01

    The minor gammaA/gamma' fibrinogen isoform contains a high affinity binding site for thrombin exosite II that is lacking in the major gammaA/gammaA fibrinogen isoform. We therefore investigated the biological consequences of the gamma' chain binding to thrombin. Thrombin-induced platelet aggregation was inhibited by gammaA/gamma' fibrinogen. Carboxyl terminal peptide fragment gamma'410-427 from the gamma' chain was also inhibitory, with an IC(50) of approximately 200 microM in whole plasma. Deletion of the peptide from either the amino or carboxyl end significantly decreased inhibition. In contrast to thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, aggregation induced by epinephrine, ADP, arachidonic acid, or SFLLRN peptide showed little inhibition by the gamma' peptide. The inhibition of thrombin-induced platelet aggregation was not due to direct inhibition of the thrombin active site, since cleavage of a small peptidyl substrate was 91% of normal even in the presence of 1 mM gamma'410-427. The gamma'410-427 peptide blocked platelet adhesion to immobilized thrombin under both static and flow conditions, blocked soluble thrombin binding to platelet GPIbalpha, and inhibited PAR1 cleavage by thrombin. These results suggest that the gamma' chain of fibrinogen inhibits thrombin-induced platelet aggregation by binding to thrombin exosite II. Thrombin that is bound to the gamma' chain is thereby prevented from activating platelets, while retaining its amidolytic activity. PMID:18989528

  1. Possible involvement of thrombin/protease-activated receptor 1 system in the pathogenesis of endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Yasushi; Osuga, Yutaka; Hirata, Tetsuya; Yoshino, Osamu; Koga, Kaori; Harada, Miyuki; Morimoto, Chieko; Nose, Emi; Yano, Tetsu; Tsutsumi, Osamu; Taketani, Yuji

    2005-06-01

    Endometriosis is known to be associated with local inflammatory reactions. Given the emerging concept of thrombin and its specific receptor, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), as important players in inflammation and cell proliferation, we investigated whether thrombin and PAR1 might be involved in the pathophysiology of the disease, using a primary cell culture system of endometriotic tissues. PAR1 mRNA was expressed in primary endometriotic stromal cells (ESCs). Thrombin and SFLLRN (Ser-Phe-Leu-Leu-Arg-Asp), a PAR1 agonist peptide, increased the mRNA expression of IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the protein secretion of IL-8 nd MCP-1 in ESCs. The addition of thrombin inhibitor d-phenylalanyl-l-prolyl-l arginine chloromethyl ketone (PPACK) together with thrombin inhibited the thrombin-induced secretion of IL-8 and MCP-1. Thrombin, but not SFLLRN, activated matrix metalloproteinase-2 in ESCs, and the effect was inhibited by PPACK. Thrombin and SFLLRN increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive ratio of ESCs, indicating their cell proliferation-stimulating effects. The thrombin-induced increase in proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive ratio was diminished by PPACK. These findings imply that the thrombin system might be involved in the pathophysiology of endometriosis, stimulating inflammatory responses of endometriotic cells and their mitogenic activity. PMID:15755869

  2. Kinetics of activated thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa)-catalyzed cleavage of C-terminal lysine residues of fibrin degradation products and removal of plasminogen-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jonathan H; Cook, Paul F; Nesheim, Michael E

    2011-06-01

    Partial digestion of fibrin by plasmin exposes C-terminal lysine residues, which comprise new binding sites for both plasminogen and tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). This binding increases the catalytic efficiency of plasminogen activation by 3000-fold compared with tPA alone. The activated thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa) attenuates fibrinolysis by removing these residues, which causes a 97% reduction in tPA catalytic efficiency. The aim of this study was to determine the kinetics of TAFIa-catalyzed lysine cleavage from fibrin degradation products and the kinetics of loss of plasminogen-binding sites. We show that the k(cat) and K(m) of Glu(1)-plasminogen (Glu-Pg)-binding site removal are 2.34 s(-1) and 142.6 nm, respectively, implying a catalytic efficiency of 16.21 μm(-1) s(-1). The corresponding values of Lys(77)/Lys(78)-plasminogen (Lys-Pg)-binding site removal are 0.89 s(-1) and 96 nm implying a catalytic efficiency of 9.23 μm(-1) s(-1). These catalytic efficiencies of plasminogen-binding site removal by TAFIa are the highest of any TAFIa-catalyzed reaction with a biological substrate reported to date and suggest that plasmin-modified fibrin is a primary physiological substrate for TAFIa. We also show that the catalytic efficiency of cleavage of all C-terminal lysine residues, whether they are involved in plasminogen binding or not, is 1.10 μm(-1) s(-1). Interestingly, this value increases to 3.85 μm(-1) s(-1) in the presence of Glu-Pg. These changes are due to a decrease in K(m). This suggests that an interaction between TAFIa and plasminogen comprises a component of the reaction mechanism, the plausibility of which was established by showing that TAFIa binds both Glu-Pg and Lys-Pg. PMID:21467042

  3. Ultrasonic-Guided Percutaneous Injection of Pancreatic Pseudoaneurysm with Thrombin

    SciTech Connect

    Sparrow, Patrick Asquith, John; Chalmers, Nick

    2003-06-15

    Pancreatic pseudoaneurysm is a relatively uncommon complication of chronic pancreatitis, with an associated high mortality if rupture or hemorrhage occurs. We present a case of pancreatic pseudoaneurysm complicating pancreatitis which was successfully treated by direct percutaneous injection of thrombin into the aneurysmal sac. Follow-up at 8 weeks did not demonstrate recurrence. This case indicates that percutaneous thrombin injection offers effective treatment of visceral arterial pseudoaneurysms.

  4. Low paediatric thrombin generation is caused by an attenuation of prothrombin conversion.

    PubMed

    Kremers, Romy M W; Wagenvoord, Rob J; de Laat, H Bas; Monagle, Paul; Hemker, H Coenraad; Ignjatovic, Vera

    2016-06-01

    Thrombin generation (TG) is decreased in children. TG is determined by two underlying processes: the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin and the inactivation of thrombin. Therefore, lower TG capacity in children can either be caused by a reduction of prothrombin conversion, an increase of thrombin inactivation, or both. In 36 children and 8 adults, TG and the factors that determine thrombin inactivation (antithrombin, α2Macroglobulin (α2M) and fibrinogen) were measured. Prothrombin conversion, thrombin inhibitor complex formation, and the overall thrombin decay capacity were determined. In silico modelling was performed to determine the contribution prothrombin conversion and thrombin inactivation to deviant paediatric TG. Both the amount of prothrombin converted and the maximal prothrombin conversion rate are significantly reduced in children as compared to adults. This is partly due to the prothrombin levels being lower and partly to a lower prothrombin conversion rate. The overall thrombin decay capacity is not significantly different in children, but α2Macroglobulin plays a more important role than it does in adults. In silico experiments demonstrate that reduced prothrombin conversion and to a lesser extent elevated α2M levels provide an explanation for low TG in children. Young age has a dual effect on prothrombin conversion. Lower plasma prothrombin levels result in decreased prothrombin conversion but the rate of prothrombin conversion is also decreased, i. e. the development of prothrombinase is lower than in adults.

  5. Atorvastatin neutralises the thrombin-induced tissue factor expresion in endothelial cells via geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sales, Vicenta; Vila, Virtudes; Ferrando, Marcos; Reganon, Edelmiro

    2011-01-01

    Statins may have beneficial effects in atherogenesis given their antithrombotic properties involving non-lipid mechanisms that modify endothelial function of tissue factor induction by thrombin. In this study, we investigate the effect of atorvastatin on tissue factor (TF) activity in thrombin-stimulated endothelial cells and its regulation through mevalonate or its derivatives. First subculture of human umbilical endothelial cells was used for this study. Cells were treated with thrombin and atorvastatin for different time intervals and dosage. Tissue factor activity was measured as Factor Xa generation induced by Tissue Factor-Factor VIIa complex on confluent cells. Our results show that atorvastatin prevents the thrombin-induced up-regulation of tissue factor activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Mevalonate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate reversed this inhibitory effect of atorvastatin on tissue factor activity, while the presence of farnesyl pyrophosphate did not prevent the atorvastatin effect on thrombin-induced tissue factor activity. Rho-kinase inhibitor did not affect the thrombin stimulation of tissue factor activity. High amount of hydrophobic isoprenoid groups decreases the thrombin-induced TF activity and may promote endothelial cell anti-thrombotic action. Rho kinase pathways do not have a major role in the thrombin-mediated TF activity. The inhibitory effect of atorvastatin on thrombin-induced TF activity was partially reversed by MVA and GGPP but not FPP.

  6. Direct inhibitors of InhA active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Manjunatha, Ujjini H.; Rao, Srinivasa P. S.; Kondreddi, Ravinder Reddy; Noble, Christian G.; Camacho, Luis R.; Tan, Bee H.; Ng, Seow H.; Ng, Pearly Shuyi; Ma, N. L.; Lakshminarayana, Suresh B.; Herve, Maxime; Barnes, S. Whitney; Yu, Weixuan; Kuhen, Kelli; Blasco, Francesca; Beer, David; Walker, John R.; Tonge, Peter J.; Glynne, Richard; Smith, Paul W.; Diagana, Thierry T.

    2015-01-01

    New chemotherapeutic agents are urgently required to combat the global spread of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The mycobacterial enoyl reductase, InhA, is one of the few clinically-validated targets in tuberculosis drug discovery. Here, we report the identification of a new class of direct InhA inhibitors, the 4-hydroxy-2-pyridones, using phenotypic high-throughput whole-cell screening. This class of orally-active compounds showed potent bactericidal activity against common isoniazid-resistant TB clinical isolates. Biophysical studies revealed that 4-hydroxy-2-pyridones bound specifically to InhA in an NADH-dependent manner and blocked the enoyl-substrate binding pocket. The lead compound NITD-916 directly blocked InhA in a dose-dependent manner and showed in vivo efficacy in acute and established mouse models of infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Collectively, our structural and biochemical data open up new avenues for rational structure-guided optimization of the 4-hydroxy-2-pyridone class of compounds for the treatment of MDR-TB. PMID:25568071

  7. Thrombin induces neurodegeneration and microglial activation in the cortex in vivo and in vitro: proteolytic and non-proteolytic actions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da Yong; Park, Keun Woo; Jin, Byung Kwan

    2006-08-01

    The present study evaluated the role of thrombin and its receptors in neurodegeneration and microglial activation. Immunocytochemical evidence indicated that intracortical injection of thrombin resulted in a significant loss of neurons and the activation of microglia in the rat cortex in vivo. Reverse transcription PCR and double-label immunocytochemistry further demonstrated the early and transient expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neurotoxic factors as well as their colocalization within activated microglia. The thrombin-induced loss of cortical neurons was partially blocked by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, and by NS-398, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, indicating that the activation of microglia is involved in the neurotoxicity of thrombin in the cortex in vivo. In addition, thrombin activated cortical microglia in culture, as indicated by the expression of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and produced cell death in microglia-free, neuron-enriched cortical cultures. However, agonist peptides for thrombin receptors, including protease-activated receptor-1 (SFLLRN), -3 (TFRGAP), and -4 (GYPGKF), failed to activate microglia and were not neurotoxic in culture. Intriguingly, morphological and biochemical evidence indicated that thrombin-induced neurotoxicity but not microglial activation was prevented by hirudin, a specific inhibitor of thrombin. Collectively, the present data suggest that a non-proteolytic activity of thrombin activates microglia and that the proteolytic activity mediates its neurotoxicity. PMID:16777064

  8. Endothelial Angiogenesis and Barrier Function in Response to Thrombin Require Ca2+ Influx through the Na+/Ca2+ Exchanger*

    PubMed Central

    Andrikopoulos, Petros; Kieswich, Julius; Harwood, Steven M.; Baba, Akemichi; Matsuda, Toshio; Barbeau, Olivier; Jones, Keith; Eccles, Suzanne A.; Yaqoob, Muhammad M.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombin acts on the endothelium by activating protease-activated receptors (PARs). The endothelial thrombin-PAR system becomes deregulated during pathological conditions resulting in loss of barrier function and a pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic endothelial phenotype. We reported recently that the ion transporter Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) operating in the Ca2+-influx (reverse) mode promoted ERK1/2 activation and angiogenesis in vascular endothelial growth factor-stimulated primary human vascular endothelial cells. Here, we investigated whether Ca2+ influx through NCX was involved in ERK1/2 activation, angiogenesis, and endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to thrombin. Reverse-mode NCX inhibitors and RNAi-mediated NCX1 knockdown attenuated ERK1/2 phosphorylation in response to thrombin or an agonist of PAR-1, the main endothelial thrombin receptor. Conversely, promoting reverse-mode NCX by suppressing Na+-K+-ATPase activity enhanced ERK1/2 activation. Reverse-mode NCX inhibitors and NCX1 siRNA suppressed thrombin-induced primary human vascular endothelial cell angiogenesis, quantified as proliferation and tubular differentiation. Reverse-mode NCX inhibitors or NCX1 knockdown preserved barrier integrity upon thrombin stimulation in vitro. Moreover, the reverse-mode NCX inhibitor SEA0400 suppressed Evans' blue albumin extravasation to the lung and kidneys and attenuated edema formation and ERK1/2 activation in the lungs of mice challenged with a peptide activator of PAR-1. Mechanistically, thrombin-induced ERK1/2 activation required NADPH oxidase 2-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and reverse-mode NCX inhibitors and NCX1 siRNA suppressed thrombin-induced ROS production. We propose that reverse-mode NCX is a novel mechanism contributing to thrombin-induced angiogenesis and hyperpermeability by mediating ERK1/2 activation in a ROS-dependent manner. Targeting reverse-mode NCX could be beneficial in pathological conditions involving

  9. [Antidotes to novel direct oral anticoagulants].

    PubMed

    Khorev, N G; Momot, A P; Kon'kova, V O

    2016-01-01

    During the last 10 years, several novel direct oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have entered the clinical arena and were registered in the Russian Federation for use in patients presenting with atrial fibrillation, venous thrombosis, and pulmonary artery thromboembolism. NOACs are classified into two groups: direct thrombin inhibitor (notably dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (including rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban). Their disadvantage is lack of specific antidotes in case of an emergency situation (injury, infarction, stroke requiring thrombolysis, urgent operation). The review contains the data on the existing therapeutic regimens of treating haemorrhage on the background of taking these coagulants. This is followed by analysing the present-day results of clinical trials aimed at working out pharmaceutical agents (andexanet alpha, idarucizumab, aripazine) being antidotes to direct thrombin inhibitor and the factor Xa inhibitors. Administration of these agents makes it possible to reverse coagulation and minimize the aftermaths of haemorrhage in patients taking these drugs, in emergency situations. PMID:27626268

  10. Comparison of the structures of the cyclotheonamide A complexes of human alpha-thrombin and bovine beta-trypsin.

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, V.; Lee, A. Y.; Clardy, J.; Tulinsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    Thrombin, a trypsin-like serine protease present in blood, plays a central role in the regulation of thrombosis and hemostasis. A cyclic pentapeptide, cyclotheonamide A (CtA), isolated from sponges of the genus Theonella, inhibits thrombin, trypsin, and certain other serine proteases. Enzyme inhibition data for CtA indicate that it is a moderate inhibitor of alpha-thrombin (K(i) = 1.0 nM), but substantially more potent toward trypsin (K(i) = 0.2 nM). The comparative study of the crystal structures of the CtA complexes of alpha-thrombin and beta-trypsin reported here focuses on structure-function relationships in general and the enhanced specificity of trypsin, in particular. The crystal structures of the CtA complexes of thrombin and trypsin were solved and refined at 1.7 and 2.0 A resolution, respectively. The structures show that CtA occupies the active site with the Pro-Arg motif positioned in the S2 and S1 binding sites. The alpha-keto group of CtA is involved in a tetrahedral intermediate hemiketal structure with Ser 195 OG of the catalytic triad and is positioned within bonding distance from, and orthogonal to, the re-face of the carbonyl of the arginine of CtA. As in other productive binding modes of serine proteases, the Ser 214-Gly 216 segment runs in a twisted antiparallel beta-strand manner with respect to the diaminopropionic acid (Dpr)-Arg segment of CtA. The Tyr 60A-Thr 60I insertion loop of thrombin makes a weak aromatic stacking interaction with the v-Tyr of CtA through Trp 60D. The Glu 39 Tyr and Leu 41 Phe substitutions in trypsin produce an enhanced aromatic interaction with D-Phe of CtA, which also leads to different orientations of the side chains of D-Phe and the v-Tyr. The comparison of the CtA complexes of thrombin and trypsin shows that the gross structural features of both in the active site region are the same, whereas the differences observed are mainly due to minor insertions and substitutions. In trypsin, the substitution of Ile 174

  11. Thrombin stimulation of inflammatory breast cancer cells leads to aggressiveness via the EGFR-PAR1-Pak1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Kazufumi; Bui-Nguyen, Tri M; Divijendra Natha, Reddy S; Schwartz, Arnold M; Levine, Paul; Kumar, Rakesh

    2012-12-27

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) accounts for a small fraction but aggressive form of epithelial breast cancer. Although the role of thrombin in cancer is beginning to be unfolded, its impact on the biology of IBC remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to establish the role of thrombin on the invasiveness of IBC cells. The IBC SUM149 cell line was treated with thrombin in the absence or presence of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor erlotinib and protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) inhibitor. The effects of pharmacological inhibitors on the ability of thrombin to stimulate the growth rate and invasiveness were examined. We found that the inhibition of putative cellular targets of thrombin action suppresses both the growth and invasiveness of SUM149 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, thrombin-mediated increased invasion of SUM149 cells was routed through EGFR phosphorylation, and in turn, stimulation of the p21-activated kinase (Pak1) activity in a EGFR-sensitive manner. Interestingly, thrombin-mediated activation of the Pak1 pathway stimulation was blocked by erlotinib and PAR1 inhibitor. For proof-of-principle studies, we found immunohistochemical evidence of Pak1 activation as well as expression of PAR1 in IBC. Thrombin utilizes EGFR to relay signals promoting SUM149 cell growth and invasion via the Pak1 pathway. The study provides the rationale for future therapeutic approaches in mitigating the invasive nature of IBC by targeting Pak1 and/or EGFR.

  12. Directed molecular screening for RecA ATPase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wigle, Tim J; Singleton, Scott F

    2007-06-15

    The roles of bacterial RecA in the evolution and transmission of antibiotic resistance genes make it an attractive target for inhibition by small molecules. We report two complementary fluorescence-based ATPase assays that were used to screen for inhibitors of RecA. We elected to employ the ADP-linked variation of the assay, with a Z' factor of 0.83 in 96-well microplates, to assess whether 18 select compounds could inhibit ATP hydrolysis by RecA. The compounds represented five sets of related inhibitor scaffolds, each of which had the potential to cross-inhibit RecA. Although nucleotide analogs, known inhibitors of GHL ATPases, and known protein kinase inhibitors were not active against RecA, we found that three suramin-like agents substantially inhibited RecA's ATPase activity. PMID:17499507

  13. Inactivation of thrombin by a fucosylated chondroitin sulfate from echinoderm.

    PubMed

    Mourão, P A; Boisson-Vidal, C; Tapon-Bretaudière, J; Drouet, B; Bros, A; Fischer, A

    2001-04-15

    A polysaccharide extracted from the sea cucumber body wall has the same backbone structure as the mammalian chondroitin sulfate, but some of the glucuronic acid residues display sulfated fucose branches. These branches confer high anticoagulant activity to the polysaccharide. Since the sea cucumber chondroitin sulfate has analogy in structure with mammalian glycosaminoglycans and sulfated fucans from brown algae, we compared its anticoagulant action with that of heparin and of a homopolymeric sulfated fucan with approximately the same level of sulfation as the sulfated fucose branches found in the sea cucumber polysaccharide. These various compounds differ not only in their anticoagulant potencies but also in the mechanisms of thrombin inhibition. Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate, like heparin, requires antithrombin or heparin cofactor II for thrombin inhibition. Sulfated fucans from brown algae have an antithrombin effect mediated by antithrombin and heparin cofactor II, plus a direct antithrombin effect more pronounced for some fractions. But even in the case of these two polysaccharides, we observed some differences. In contrast with heparin, total inhibition of thrombin in the presence of antithrombin is not achieved with fucosylated chondroitin sulfate, possibly reflecting a less specific interaction. Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate is able to inhibit thrombin generation after stimulation by both contact-activated and thromboplastin-activated systems. It delayed only the contact-induced thrombin generation, as expected for an anticoagulant without direct thrombin inhibition. Overall, the specific spatial array of the sulfated fucose branches in the fucosylated chondroitin sulfate not only confer high anticoagulant activity to the polysaccharide but also determine differences in the way it inhibits thrombin.

  14. Thrombin-inhibiting nanoparticles rapidly constitute versatile and detectable anticlotting surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley Myerson, Jacob; He, Li; Allen, John Stacy; Williams, Todd; Lanza, Gregory; Tollefsen, Douglas; Caruthers, Shelton; Wickline, Samuel

    2014-09-01

    Restoring an antithrombotic surface to suppress ongoing thrombosis is an appealing strategy for treatment of acute cardiovascular disorders such as erosion of atherosclerotic plaque. An antithrombotic surface would present an alternative to systemic anticoagulation with attendant risks of bleeding. We have designed thrombin-targeted nanoparticles (NPs) that bind to sites of active clotting to extinguish local thrombin activity and inhibit platelet deposition while exhibiting only transient systemic anticoagulant effects. Perfluorocarbon nanoparticles (PFC NP) were functionalized with thrombin inhibitors (either D-phenylalanyl-L-prolyl-L-arginyl-chloromethyl ketone or bivalirudin) by covalent attachment of more than 15 000 inhibitors to each PFC NP. Fibrinopeptide A (FPA) ELISA demonstrated that thrombin-inhibiting NPs prevented cleavage of fibrinogen by both free and clot-bound thrombin. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed that a layer of thrombin-inhibiting NPs prevented growth of clots in vitro. Thrombin-inhibiting NPs were administered in vivo to C57BL6 mice subjected to laser injury of the carotid artery. NPs significantly delayed thrombotic occlusion of the artery, whereas an equivalent bolus of free inhibitor was ineffective. For thrombin-inhibiting NPs, only a short-lived (˜10 min) systemic effect on bleeding time was observed, despite prolonged clot inhibition. Imaging and quantification of in vivo antithrombotic NP layers was demonstrated by MRI of the PFC NP. 19F MRI confirmed colocalization of particles with arterial thrombi, and quantitative 19F spectroscopy demonstrated specific binding and retention of thrombin-inhibiting NPs in injured arteries. The ability to rapidly form and image a new antithrombotic surface in acute vascular syndromes while minimizing risks of bleeding would permit a safer method of passivating active lesions than current systemic anticoagulant regimes.

  15. Thrombin-Inhibiting Nanoparticles Rapidly Constitute Versatile and Detectable Anticlotting Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Myerson, Jacob Wheatley; He, Li; Allen, John Stacy; Williams, Todd; Lanza, Gregory; Tollefsen, Douglas; Caruthers, Shelton; Wickline, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Restoring an antithrombotic surface to suppress ongoing thrombosis is an appealing strategy for treatment of acute cardiovascular disorders such as erosion of atherosclerotic plaque. An antithrombotic surface would present an alternative to systemic anticoagulation with attendant risks of bleeding. We have designed thrombin-targeted nanoparticles that bind to sites of active clotting to extinguish local thrombin activity and inhibit platelet deposition while exhibiting only transient systemic anticoagulant effects. Perfluorocarbon nanoparticles (PFC NP) were functionalized with thrombin inhibitors (either PPACK or bivalirudin) by covalent attachment of more than 15,000 inhibitors to each PFC NP. Fibrinopeptide A ELISA demonstrated that thrombin-inhibiting NPs prevented cleavage of fibrinogen by both free and clot-bound thrombin. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed that a layer of thrombin-inhibiting NPs prevented growth of clots in vitro. Thrombin-inhibiting NPs were administered in vivo to C57BL6 mice subjected to laser injury of the carotid artery. NPs significantly delayed thrombotic occlusion of the artery, whereas an equivalent bolus of free inhibitor was ineffective. For thrombin-inhibiting NPs, only a short-lived (~10 minutes) systemic effect on bleeding time was observed, despite prolonged clot inhibition. Imaging and quantification of in vivo antithrombotic NP layers was demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the PFC NP. 19F MRI confirmed colocalization of particles with arterial thrombi, and quantitative 19F spectroscopy demonstrated specific binding and retention of thrombin-inhibiting NPs in injured arteries. The ability to rapidly form and image a new antithrombotic surface in acute vascular syndromes while minimizing risks of bleeding would permit a safer method of passivating active lesions than current systemic anticoagulant regimes. PMID:25200815

  16. Interaction of hirudin with thrombin: Identification of a minimal binding domain of hirudin that inhibits clotting activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S.J.T.; Yates, M.T.; Owen, T.J.; Krstenansky, J.L. )

    1988-10-18

    Hirudin, isolated from the European leech Hirudo medicinalis, is a potent inhibitor of thrombin, forming an almost irreversible thrombin-hirudin complex. Previously, the authors have shown that the carboxyl terminus of hirudin (residues 45-65) inhibits clotting activity and without binding to the catalytic site of thrombin. In the present study, a series of peptides corresponding to this carboxyl-terminal region of hirudin have been synthesized, and their anticoagulant activity and binding properties to thrombin were examined. Binding was assessed by their ability to displace {sup 125}I-hirudin 45-65 from Sepharose-immobilized thrombin and by isolation of peptide-thrombin complexes. They show that the carboxyl-terminal 10 amino acid residues 56-65 (Phe-Glu-Glu-Ile-Pro-Glu-Glu-Tyr-Leu-Gln) are minimally required for binding to thrombin and inhibition of clotting. Phe-56 was critical for maintaining anticoagulant activity as demonstrated by the loss of activity when Phe-56 was substituted with D-Phe, Glu, or Leu. In addition, they found that the binding of the carboxyl-terminal peptide of hirudin with thrombin was associated with a significant conformational change of thrombin as judged by circular dichroism. This conformational change might be responsible for the loss of clotting activity of thrombin.

  17. The thrombin E192Q-BPTI complex reveals gross structural rearrangements: implications for the interaction with antithrombin and thrombomodulin.

    PubMed Central

    van de Locht, A; Bode, W; Huber, R; Le Bonniec, B F; Stone, S R; Esmon, C T; Stubbs, M T

    1997-01-01

    Previous crystal structures of thrombin indicate that the 60-insertion loop is a rigid moiety that partially occludes the active site, suggesting that this structural feature plays a decisive role in restricting thrombin's specificity. This restricted specificity is typified by the experimental observation that thrombin is not inhibited by micromolar concentrations of basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). Surprisingly, a single atom mutation in thrombin (E192Q) results in a 10(-8) M affinity for BPTI. The crystal structure of human thrombin mutant E192Q has been solved in complex with BPTI at 2.3 A resolution. Binding of the Kunitz inhibitor is accompanied by gross structural rearrangements in thrombin. In particular, thrombin's 60-loop is found in a significantly different conformation. Concomitant reorganization of other surface loops that surround the active site, i.e. the 37-loop, the 148-loop and the 99-loop, is observed. Thrombin can therefore undergo major structural reorganization upon strong ligand binding. Implications for the interaction of thrombin with antithrombin and thrombomodulin are discussed. PMID:9214615

  18. Kinetic mechanism for the interaction of Hirulog with thrombin.

    PubMed

    Parry, M A; Maraganore, J M; Stone, S R

    1994-12-13

    Hirulog (D-FPRPGGGGDGDFEEIPEEYL) is a bivalent inhibitor of thrombin consisting of a moiety (D-FPRP) that binds to the active-site cleft and a hirudin-like C-terminal region (DGDFEEIPEEYL) that binds to the positively charged surface groove of thrombin known as the anion-binding exosite. The formation of the thrombin-Hirulog complex was studied using steady-state and rapid kinetics at 37 degrees C. The inhibition constant for Hirulog was found to be 1.9 nM. Hirulog was slowly degraded by thrombin with a kcat value of 0.01 s-1. The formation of the complex resulted in an enhancement of 44% in the intrinsic fluorescence of thrombin. The kinetics of the increase in thrombin fluorescence were described by a double-exponential decay. The dependence of the rate constant for the fast phase on the concentration of Hirulog could be described by the Michaelis-Menten equation with Km and kmax values of 0.75 +/- 0.12 microM and 325 +/- 17 s-1. The data were consistent with a mechanism in which the C-terminal region of Hirulog binds to the anion-binding exosite with a dissociation constant of 0.75 microM in the first step, followed by two intramolecular steps with rate constants of about 300 and 30 s-1. A C-terminal fragment of hirudin was found to compete in the first step confirming that this process corresponded to the binding of the hirudin-like C-terminus of Hirulog to the anion-binding exosite.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7993908

  19. Thrombin binds to murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and enhances colony-stimulating factor-1-driven mitogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Clohisy, D.R.; Erdmann, J.M.; Wilner, G.D. )

    1990-05-15

    The binding and mitogenic properties of thrombin have been established in various transformed cell lines. In such systems, thrombin induces cell division in the absence of exogenous growth factors, and the enzyme is considered to act directly as a mitogen. This study explores thrombin's interaction with nontransformed, growth factor-dependent cells. Binding of 125I-alpha-thrombin to colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-1-dependent bone marrow-derived macrophages is saturable, time-dependent, and displaceable by both unlabeled alpha-thrombin, and esterolytically inactive thrombin. Both dissociation studies of pre-bound radio-labeled thrombin and Scatchard analysis assisted by the program Ligand suggest adherence of thrombin-binding data to a multi-site model. There are an estimated 2 x 10(4) high affinity sites (Kd = 7 x 10(-9)M) and 2 x 10(6) low affinity sites (Kd = 9 x 10(-7)M) per cell. Quiescent bone marrow-derived macrophages were cultured with either 10(-8)M thrombin, 1000 units of CSF-1/ml, or both and (3H)thymidine incorporation was determined. Thrombin alone did not induce mitogenesis. CSF-1 induced mitogenesis with peak (3H) thymidine incorporation occurring 24 h after addition of the mitogen. This CSF-1-dependent mitogenic influence was enhanced greater than 2-fold by treatment with thrombin.

  20. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors: a novel direction for Alzheimer's management.

    PubMed

    Nivsarkar, Manish; Banerjee, Aryamitra; Padh, Harish

    2008-01-01

    Research in Alzheimer's disease (AD) currently includes various cellular, molecular, genetic, clinical and therapeutic approaches. The cytopathological significance of oxidative damage has been studied in neurons of AD patients. Many epidemiological studies suggest that use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) delay or slow the clinical expression of AD, and anti-oxidant properties of NSAIDs have also been previously described. Therefore, in this study we examined the role of various cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 inhibitors (NSAIDs) in a rat model of aluminum-induced oxidative stress to mimic AD-like conditions. We found that the animals receiving aluminum treatment for one month (4.2 mg/kg, ip) had highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (expressed as malondialdehyde--MDA). Moreover, treatment with the COX-2 inhibitor, rofecoxib (0.83 mg/kg, po), was able to significantly reduce this oxidative stress (p<0.05 when compared to aluminum treatment alone on MDA levels). But, nonspecific COX inhibitors (flurbiprofen, 0.83 mg/kg twice a day po and ibuprofen, 100 mg/kg, po), did not protect again oxidative stress. Thus, in agreement with earlier epidemiological studies, we propose that COX-2 specific NSAIDs may be beneficial in AD management. Further experimental work towards identifying the most efficacious COX-2 inhibitors, as well as the mechanism of action and the optimal dosage regimen should be executed.

  1. Different approaches for the detection of thrombin by an electrochemical aptamer-based assay coupled to magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Centi, S; Messina, G; Tombelli, S; Palchetti, I; Mascini, M

    2008-06-15

    Different assay formats based on the coupling of magnetic beads with electrochemical transduction were compared here for the detection of thrombin by using a thrombin specific aptamer. By using the thrombin-binding aptamer, a direct and an indirect competitive assay for thrombin have been developed by immobilising the aptamer or the protein, respectively. Moreover, another strategy was based on the direct measurement of the enzymatic product of thrombin captured by the immobilised aptamer. All the assays were developed by coupling the electrochemical transduction with the innovative and advantageous use of magnetic beads. The assays based on the immobilisation of the protein were not successful since no binding was recorded between thrombin and its aptamer. With the direct competitive assay, when the aptamer was immobilised onto the magnetic beads, a detection limit of 430nM for thrombin was achieved. A lower detection limit for the protein (175nM) was instead obtained by detecting the product of the enzymatic reaction catalysed by thrombin. All these assays were finally compared with a sandwich assay which reached a detection limit of 0.45nM of thrombin demonstrating the best analytical performances. With this comparison the importance of a deep study on the different analytical approaches for thrombin detection to reach the performances of the best assay configuration has been demonstrated.

  2. Development and Optimization of a Thrombin Sandwich Aptamer Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Meneghello, Anna; Sosic, Alice; Antognoli, Agnese; Cretaio, Erica; Gatto, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    A sandwich microarray employing two distinct aptamers for human thrombin has been optimized for the detection of subnanomolar concentrations of the protein. The aptamer microarray demonstrates high specificity for thrombin, proving that a two-site binding assay with the TBA1 aptamer as capture layer and the TBA2 aptamer as detection layer can ensure great specificity at times and conditions compatible with standard routine analysis of biological samples. Aptamer microarray sensitivity was evaluated directly by fluorescent analysis employing Cy5-labeled TBA2 and indirectly by the use of TBA2-biotin followed by detection with fluorescent streptavidin. Sub-nanomolar LODs were reached in all cases and in the presence of serum, demonstrating that the optimized aptamer microarray can identify thrombin by a low-cost, sensitive and specific method.

  3. Thrombin stimulates VSMC proliferation through an EGFR-dependent pathway: involvement of MMP-2.

    PubMed

    Smiljanic, Katarina; Obradovic, Milan; Jovanovic, Aleksandra; Djordjevic, Jelena; Dobutovic, Branislava; Jevremovic, Danimir; Marche, Pierre; Isenovic, Esma R

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF), general metalloproteinases, matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2) in mediating the mitogenic action of thrombin in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) was investigated. The incubation of rat VSMC with thrombin (1 U/ml) for 5 min resulted in significant (p < 0.001) increase of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by 8.7 ± 0.9-fold, EGFR phosphorylation by 8.5 ± 1.3-fold (p < 0.001) and DNA synthesis by 3.6 ± 0.4-fold (p < 0.001). Separate 30-min pretreatments with EGFR tyrosine kinase irreversible inhibitor, 10 µM PD169540 (PD), and 20 µM anti-HB-EGF antibody significantly reduced thrombin-stimulated EGFR and ERK1/2 phosphorylation by 81, 72 % and by 48 and 61 %, respectively. Furthermore, the same pretreatments with PD or anti-HB-EGF antibody reduced thrombin-induced VSMC proliferation by 44 and 45 %, respectively. In addition, 30-min pretreatments with 10 µM specific MMP-2 inhibitor significantly reduced thrombin-stimulated phosphorylation of both EGFR and ERK1/2 by 25 %. Moreover, the same pretreatment with MMP-2 inhibitor reduced thrombin-induced VSMC proliferation by 45 %. These results show that the thrombin-induced DNA synthesis correlates with the level of ERK1/2 activation rather than EGFR activation. These results further suggest that thrombin acts through EGFR and ERK 1/2 signaling pathways involving MMP-2 to upregulate proliferation of VSMC.

  4. Quantitative phosphoproteomics unveils temporal dynamics of thrombin signaling in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Hernández-Fernaud, Juan Ramon; van den Eshof, Bart L.; Neilson, Lisa J.; Meijer, Alexander B.; Mertens, Koen

    2014-01-01

    Thrombin is the key serine protease of the coagulation cascade and a potent trigger of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1)-mediated platelet aggregation. In recent years, PAR1 has become an appealing target for anticoagulant therapies. However, the inhibitors that have been developed so far increase bleeding risk in patients, likely because they interfere with endogenous PAR1 signaling in the endothelium. Because of its complexity, thrombin-induced signaling in endothelial cells has remained incompletely understood. Here, we have combined stable isotope amino acids in cell culture, affinity-based phosphopeptide enrichment, and high-resolution mass spectrometry and performed a time-resolved analysis of the thrombin-induced signaling in human primary endothelial cells. We identified 2224 thrombin-regulated phosphorylation sites, the majority of which have not been previously related to thrombin. Those sites were localized on proteins that are novel to thrombin signaling, but also on well-known players such as PAR1, Rho-associated kinase 2, phospholipase C, and proteins related to actin cytoskeleton, cell-cell junctions, and Weibel-Palade body release. Our study provides a unique resource of phosphoproteins and phosphorylation sites that may generate novel insights into an intimate understanding of thrombin-mediated PAR signaling and the development of improved PAR1 antagonists that affect platelet but not endothelial cell function. PMID:24501219

  5. Quantitative phosphoproteomics unveils temporal dynamics of thrombin signaling in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Hernández-Fernaud, Juan Ramon; van den Eshof, Bart L; Neilson, Lisa J; Meijer, Alexander B; Mertens, Koen; Zanivan, Sara

    2014-03-20

    Thrombin is the key serine protease of the coagulation cascade and a potent trigger of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1)-mediated platelet aggregation. In recent years, PAR1 has become an appealing target for anticoagulant therapies. However, the inhibitors that have been developed so far increase bleeding risk in patients, likely because they interfere with endogenous PAR1 signaling in the endothelium. Because of its complexity, thrombin-induced signaling in endothelial cells has remained incompletely understood. Here, we have combined stable isotope amino acids in cell culture, affinity-based phosphopeptide enrichment, and high-resolution mass spectrometry and performed a time-resolved analysis of the thrombin-induced signaling in human primary endothelial cells. We identified 2224 thrombin-regulated phosphorylation sites, the majority of which have not been previously related to thrombin. Those sites were localized on proteins that are novel to thrombin signaling, but also on well-known players such as PAR1, Rho-associated kinase 2, phospholipase C, and proteins related to actin cytoskeleton, cell-cell junctions, and Weibel-Palade body release. Our study provides a unique resource of phosphoproteins and phosphorylation sites that may generate novel insights into an intimate understanding of thrombin-mediated PAR signaling and the development of improved PAR1 antagonists that affect platelet but not endothelial cell function. PMID:24501219

  6. The ornithodorin-thrombin crystal structure, a key to the TAP enigma?

    PubMed Central

    van de Locht, A; Stubbs, M T; Bode, W; Friedrich, T; Bollschweiler, C; Höffken, W; Huber, R

    1996-01-01

    Ornithodorin, isolated from the blood sucking soft tick Ornithodoros moubata, is a potent (Ki = 10(-12) M) and highly selective thrombin inhibitor. Internal sequence homology indicates a two domain protein. Each domain resembles the Kunitz inhibitor basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) and also the tick anticoagulant peptide (TAP) isolated from the same organism. The 3.1 A crystal structure of the ornithodorin-thrombin complex confirms that both domains of ornithodorin exhibit a distorted BPTI-like fold. The N-terminal portion and the C-terminal helix of each domain are structurally very similar to BPTI, whereas the regions corresponding to the binding loop of BPTI adopt different conformations. Neither of the two 'reactive site loops' of ornithodorin contacts the protease in the ornithodorin-thrombin complex. Instead, the N-terminal residues of ornithodorin bind to the active site of thrombin, reminiscent of the thrombin-hirudin interaction. The C-terminal domain binds at the fibrinogen recognition exosite. Molecular recognition of its target protease by this double-headed Kunitz-type inhibitor diverges considerably from other members of this intensely studied superfamily. The complex structure provides a model to explain the perplexing results of mutagenesis studies on the TAP-factor Xa interaction. Images PMID:8947023

  7. Thrombin generation and fibrin clot formation under hypothermic conditions: an in vitro evaluation of tissue factor initiated whole blood coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Whelihan, Matthew F.; Kiankhooy, Armin; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite trauma-induced hypothermic coagulopathy being familiar in the clinical setting, empirical experimentation concerning this phenomenon is lacking. In this study we investigated the effects of hypothermia on thrombin generation, clot formation and global hemostatic functions in an in vitro environment using a whole blood model and thromboelastography (TEG) which can recapitulate hypothermia. Methods Blood was collected from healthy individuals through venipuncture and treated with corn trypsin inhibitor, to block the contact pathway. Coagulation was initiated with 5pM tissue factor at temperatures 37°C, 32°C, and 27°C. Reactions were quenched over time with soluble and insoluble components of each time point analyzed for thrombin generation, fibrinogen consumption, factor (f)XIII activation and fibrin deposition. Global coagulation potential was evaluated through TEG. Results Data showed that thrombin generation in samples at 37°C and 32°C had comparable rates while 27°C had a much lower rate (39.2 ± 1.1 and 43 ± 2.4 nM/min vs 28.6 ± 4.4 nM/min, respectively). Fibrinogen consumption and fXIII activation were highest at 37°C followed by 32°C and 27°C (13.8 ± 2.9 percent/min vs 7.8 ± 1.8 percent/min, respectively). Fibrin formation as seen through clot weights also followed this trend. TEG data showed clot formation was fastest in samples at 37°C and lowest at 27°C. Maximum clot strength was similar for each temperature. Also, percent lysis of clots was highest at 37°C followed by 32°C and then 27°C. Conclusions Induced hypothermic conditions directly affect the rate of thrombin generation and clot formation while global clot stability remains intact. PMID:24331944

  8. Thrombin interaction with fibrin polymerization sites.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, K

    1997-05-15

    Thrombin is central to hemostasis, and postclotting fibrinolysis and wound healing. During clotting, thrombin transforms plasma fibrinogen into polymerizing fibrin, which selectively adsorbs the enzyme into the clot. This protects thrombin from heparin-antithrombin inactivation, thus preserving the enzyme for postclotting events. To determine how the fibrin N-terminal polymerization sites of A alpha 17-23 (GPRVVER) and B beta 15-25 (GHRPLDKKREE) and their analogs may interact with thrombin, amidolysis vs. plasma- and fibrinogen-clotting assays were used to differentiate blockade of catalytic site vs. other thrombin domains. Amidolysis studies suggest GPRVVER inhibition of thrombin catalytic site through hydrophobic interaction, and GPRVVER inhibited clotting. Neither GPRP nor VVER nor the B beta 15-25 homologs inhibited amidolysis. Contrary to heparin, acyl-DKKREE promoted plasma-clotting, but inhibited fibrinogen-clotting. In addition, acyl-DKKREE reversed the anticoagulant effect of heparin (0.1 U/ml) in plasma. The results suggest fibrin B beta 15-25 interaction with thrombin, possibly by blocking the heparin-binding site. Together with the reported fibrin A alpha 27-50 binding to thrombin, polymerizing fibrin appears to initially bind to thrombin catalytic site and exosite-1 through A alpha 17-50, and to another thrombin site through B beta 15-25. As these fibrin sites are also involved in polymerization, competition of the polymerization process with thrombin-binding could subsequently dislodge thrombin from fibrin alpha-chain. This may re-expose the catalytic site and exosite-1, thus explaining the thrombogenicity of clot-bound thrombin. The implications of these findings in polymerization mechanism and anticoagulant design are discussed.

  9. Aspartame and aspartame derivatives effect human thrombin catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Julie E; Berliner, Lawrence J

    2004-12-20

    The study of small Asp-Phe analogs was undertaken since this dipeptide sequence is critical in fibrinogen recognition and catalysis. The inhibition of clotting activity by Asp-Phe-methyl ester (aspartame), formyl-Asp-Phe-methyl ester and acetyl-Asp-Phe was biphasic in all cases, indicating the presence of at least two binding sites. The N-terminally blocked derivatives are stronger inhibitors than aspartame. In contrast, tosyl-Gly-Pro-Arg-p'-nitroanilide hydrolysis was inhibited minimally by Asp-Phe-methyl, ester [Ki(app)=98 mM]. Acetyl-Asp-Phe inhibition of thrombin amidase activity was biphasic, tenfold stronger and appeared to be strongly cooperative. These results are discussed with respect to the inhibition of alpha-thrombin by ATP.

  10. Zinc modulates thrombin adsorption to fibrin

    SciTech Connect

    Hopmeier, P.; Halbmayer, M.; Fischer, M.; Marx, G. )

    1990-05-01

    Human thrombin with high affinity to Sepharose insolubilized fibrin monomers (high-affinity thrombin) was used to investigate the effect of Zn(II) on the thrombin adsorption to fibrin. Results showed that at Zn(II) concentrations exceeding 100 mumols/l, thrombin binding to fibrin was decreased concomitant with the Zn(II) concentration and time; at lower Zn(II) concentrations, thrombin adsorption was enhanced. Experimental results were identical by using 125I-labelled high-affinity alpha-thrombin or by measuring the thrombin activity either by chromogenic substrate or by a clotting time method. In contrast, Ca(II) alone (final conc. 3 mmol/l) or in combination with Zn(II) was not effective. However, at higher Ca(II) concentrations (7.5-15 mmol/l), thrombin adsorption was apparently decreased. Control experiments revealed that Zn(II) had no impact on the clottability of fibrinogen, and that the results of the experiments with Ca(II) were not altered by possible cross-linking of fibrin. We conclude that unlike Ca(II), Zn(II) is highly effective in modulating thrombin adsorption to fibrin.

  11. Substitution of valine for glycine-558 in the congenital dysthrombin thrombin Quick II alters primary substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, R.A.; Mann, K.G. )

    1989-03-07

    Thrombin Quick II is one of two dysfunctional forms of thrombin derived from the previously described congenital dysprothrombin prothrombin Quick. Thrombin Quick II does not clot fibrinogen, hydrolyze p-nitroanilide substrates of thrombin, or bind N{sup 2}-(5-(dimethylamino)naphthalene-1-sulfonyl)arginine N,N-(3-ethyl-1,5-pentanediyl)amide, a high-affinity competitive inhibitor of thrombin. To determine the structural alteration in thrombin Quick II, the reduced, carboxymethylated protein was hydrolyzed by a lysyl endopeptidase. A peptide not present in a parallel thrombin hydrolysate was identified by reverse-phase chromatography. This Gly residue, which is highly conserved in the chymotrypsin family of serine proteases, forms part of the substrate binding pocket for bulky aromatic and basic side chains in chymotrypsin and trypsin, respectively. However, in porcine elastase 1, the corresponding residue is threonine. Consistent with the identified structural alteration, thrombin Quick II incorporates ({sup 3}H)diisopropyl fluorophosphate stoichiometrically and hydrolyzes the elastase substrate succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Leu-p-nitroanilide with a relative k{sub cat}/K{sub M} of 0.14 when compared to thrombin. This results from a 3-fold increase in K{sub M} and a 2.5-fold decrease in k{sub cat} for thrombin Quick II when compared to thrombin acting on the same substrate. These results and those of other investigators studying mutant trypsins support the conclusion that the catalytic activity of serine proteases is very sensitive to structural alterations in the primary substrate binding pocket.

  12. Effect of rabbit thrombomodulin on thrombin inhibition by antithrombin in the presence of heparin.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M C

    1989-04-01

    Thrombomodulin acts as a cofactor for protein C activation by thrombin (PC activation cofactor activity) and inhibits thrombin-induced fibrinogen clotting (direct anticoagulant activity). In addition, rabbit thrombomodulin has been shown to promote thrombin inactivation by antithrombin (AT-dependent anticoagulant activity). However, a non-acidic form (i.e. non-retarded on ion-exchange chromatography) of thrombomodulin generated by limited proteolysis retained only the PC activation cofactor activity. The acidic form (retarded on ion-exchange chromatography) of thrombomodulin is now shown to prevent the rapid inactivation of thrombin by antithrombin in the presence of heparin, presumably by preventing the formation of the ternary thrombin-AT-heparin complex. This effect was not observed with non-acidic thrombomodulin. When submitted to chondroitinase digestion, thrombomodulin was converted into an essentially non-acidic form that lacked both the AT-dependent and the direct anticoagulant activities but showed a PC activation cofactor function indistinguishable from that of native thrombomodulin. This chondroitinase-digested form did not prevent the catalytic effect of heparin on the inhibition of thrombin by AT. It is concluded that the acidic domain of rabbit thrombomodulin, a chondroitin (dermatan) sulfate glycosaminoglycan, interacts with a site of the thrombin molecule that is not involved in the protein C activation cofactor function, but is essential to the cleavage of fibrinogen or binding of heparin.

  13. Protein kinase C and P2Y12 take center stage in thrombin-mediated activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Moore, S F; Hunter, R W; Hers, I

    2014-01-01

    Background Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1), reduces platelet spreading, thrombus stability, and clot retraction. Despite an important role of mTORC1 in platelet function, little is known about how it is regulated. The objective of this study was to determine the signaling pathways that regulate mTORC1 in human platelets. Methods Mammalian target of rapamycin complex-1 activation was assessed by measuring the phosphorylation of its downstream substrate ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K). Results Thrombin or the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbal 12-myristate 13-acetate stimulated activation of mTORC1 in a PKC-dependent, Akt-independent manner that correlated with phosphorylation of tuberin/tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) (Ser939 and Thr1462). In contrast, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)–stimulated TSC2 phosphorylation was completely dependent on phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3 kinase)/Akt but did not result in any detectable mTORC1 activation. Early (Ser939 and Thr1462) and late (Thr1462) TSC2 phosphorylation in response to thrombin were directly PKC dependent, whereas later TSC2 (Ser939) and p70S6K phosphorylation were largely dependent on paracrine signaling through P2Y12. PKC-mediated adenosine diphosphate (ADP) secretion was essential for thrombin-stimulated mTORC1 activation, as (i) ADP rescued p70S6K phosphorylation in the presence of a PKC inhibitor and (ii) P2Y12 antagonism prevented thrombin-mediated mTORC1 activation. Rescue of mTORC1 activation with exogenous ADP was completely dependent on the Src family kinases but independent of PI3 kinase/Akt. Interestingly, although inhibition of Src blocked the ADP rescue, it had little effect on thrombin-stimulated p70S6K phosphorylation under conditions where PKC was not inhibited. Conclusion These results demonstrate that thrombin activates the mTORC1 pathway in human platelets through PKC-mediated ADP secretion and subsequent activation of P2Y12, in a manner

  14. Active but inoperable thrombin is accumulated in a plasma protein layer surrounding Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Naudin, Clément; Hurley, Sinead M; Malmström, Erik; Plug, Tom; Shannon, Oonagh; Meijers, Joost C M; Mörgelin, Matthias; Björck, Lars; Herwald, Heiko

    2015-10-01

    Activation of thrombin is a critical determinant in many physiological and pathological processes including haemostasis and inflammation. Under physiological conditions many of these functions are involved in wound healing or eradication of an invading pathogen. However, when activated systemically, thrombin can contribute to severe and life-threatening conditions by causing complications such as multiple multi-organ failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. In the present study we investigated how the activity of thrombin is modulated when it is bound to the surface of Streptococcus pyogenes. Our data show that S. pyogenes bacteria become covered with a proteinaceous layer when incubated with human plasma, and that thrombin is a constituent of this layer. Though the coagulation factor is found attached to the bacteria with a functional active site, thrombin has lost its capacity to interact with its natural substrates and inhibitors. Thus, the interaction of bacteria with human plasma renders thrombin completely inoperable at the streptococcal surface. This could represent a host defense mechanism to avoid systemic activation of coagulation which could be otherwise induced when bacteria enter the circulation and cause systemic infection.

  15. Adhesion of platelets to purified solid-phase von Willebrand factor: effects of wall shear rate, ADP, thrombin, and ristocetin.

    PubMed

    Olson, J D; Zaleski, A; Herrmann, D; Flood, P A

    1989-07-01

    When platelets are stimulated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP), thrombin, or ristocetin, they bind soluble von Willebrand factor (vWF). In contrast, platelets adhere to solid-phase vWF without apparent stimulus. This work characterizes the adhesion of washed human platelets to highly purified solid-phase human vWF. VWF (iodine 125-labeled vWF) was demonstrated to bind in a quantifiable fashion to the internal surfaces of glass capillary tubes, saturating at a surface density of 3.0 mg/ml. The multimeric structure of bound vWF was the same as that of normal vWF. Platelets were washed, labeled with indium 111, and resuspended with washed red blood cells (RBCs) in balanced salt solution containing Ca++, Mg++, and apyrase. The washed platelet RBC suspension was aspirated through capillary tubes to which vWF was adsorbed. Adhesion of platelets to adsorbed vWF was directly dependent on the surface density of vWF. Increasing wall shear rate (100 to 5000 sec-1) produced increasing platelet adhesion to maximum reached at 2500 sec-1. Platelets bound to the solid-phase vWF in an irreversible fashion, and, as demonstrated with scanning electron microscopy, they spread on the surface. When used to stimulate the platelets, ADP, thrombin, and ristocetin all increased the platelet adhesion to solid-phase vWF. ADP- and thrombin-stimulated reactions were inhibited by prior treatment of the platelets with 5'-p-fluorosulfonylbenzoyl adenosine. This inhibitor of ADP binding had no effect on the baseline platelet adhesion reaction (without ADP or thrombin). Adenosine in concentration up to 1 mmol/L failed to inhibit adhesion. The data demonstrate that washed platelets adhere to solid-phase vWF without added agonists, that the reaction is dependent on surface density vWF and wall shear rate, that they bind irreversibly, and that they demonstrate surface spreading. In addition, these platelets can be stimulated to increase their adherence to vWF by using ADP, thrombin, and ristocetin.

  16. Studies of thrombin-induced proteoglycan release in the degradation of human and bovine cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Furmaniak-Kazmierczak, E; Cooke, T D; Manuel, R; Scudamore, A; Hoogendorn, H; Giles, A R; Nesheim, M

    1994-01-01

    Because fibrin is commonly observed within arthritic joints, studies were undertaken to determine whether purified coagulation and fibrinolytic proteases degrade cartilage in vitro and to seek evidence for the activation of coagulation in arthritic joints through measurements of the levels of inhibitor-enzyme complexes and several other proteins associated with coagulation and fibrinolysis. The concentrations of 13 plasma proteins and complexes of thrombin and Factor Xa with antithrombin III were measured in synovial fluids recovered at the time of knee replacement surgery. All zymogens necessary to constitute the coagulation cascade were present. Thrombin and the combination of prothrombin plus prothrombinase induced proteoglycan release from both normal and arthritic cartilages. Factor Xa and plasmin induced release from diseased cartilage only, and urokinase, tissue plasminogen activator, and activated protein C were without effect at the levels used. At saturating levels of thrombin (> or = 2.0 microM) 80% of the proteoglycan content of normal cartilage was released within 24 h. Thrombin, which is cationic, reversibly binds cartilage with Kd = 7.0 +/- 1.0 microM and Bmax = 820 +/- 70 ng/mg of human cartilage. Levels of thrombin-antithrombin III complexes in synovial fluids and arthritis were 4-fold higher in osteo (OA) and 43-fold higher in rheumatoid (RA) than in controls (0.98 nM). Factor Xa-antithrombin III complex levels were threefold lower in OA and fivefold higher in RA than in controls (0.24 nM). These elevated levels of enzyme-inhibitor complexes imply a history of activation of coagulation within the joint, especially in RA. Since thrombin degrades cartilage in vitro and had been generated in vivo, as inferred by the existence of thrombin-antithrombin III complexes, intraarticular activation of coagulation may both contribute to the pathology of arthritis and comprise a target for therapy and diagnosis. PMID:8040300

  17. Thrombin-mediated activation of endogenous factor XI in plasma in the presence of physiological glycosaminoglycans occurs only with high concentrations of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Wuillemin, W A; Mertens, K; ten Cate, H; Hack, C E

    1996-02-01

    The variable bleeding tendency associated with a genetic deficiency of factor XI (FXI) and the lack of bleeding disorders in individuals with a genetic deficiency of factor XII (FXII) suggest an alternative mechanism for FXI activation in vivo. Recently, thrombin has been shown to activate FXI. However, in plasma this activation has been shown to occur only with exogenous FXI and a non-physiological cofactor (sulphatides), and the occurrence of this reaction in a plasma environment has been questioned. Using recently developed sensitive assays for FXIa-inhibitor complexes we found thrombin-mediated and FXII-dependent activation of endogenous FXI in plasma in the presence of heparan sulphate, heparin, dermatan sulphate or dextran sulphate. Using heparan sulphate, which is present in the human vascular system, activation of about 1-2% of plasma FXI was observed, however, only after addition of very high amounts (500 nmol/l) of human alpha-thrombin to FXII-deficient plasma (at a 1 to 4 final dilution). We conclude that endogenous FXI in plasma can be activated by thrombin in the presence of various glycosaminoglycans, including the physiological compounds heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate, but only at very high concentrations of thrombin, corresponding to 100% prothrombin activation in undiluted plasma.

  18. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibition: overview of the therapeutic use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, and direct renin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Kelly; Smith, Holly; Biederman, Jason

    2014-12-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) therapy in hypertensive diabetic patients with macroalbuminuria, microalbuminuria, or normoalbuminuria has been repeatedly shown to improve cardiovascular mortality and reduce the decline in glomerular filtration rate. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade in normotensive diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria or microalbuminuria cannot be advocated at present. Dual RAAS inhibition with ACE inhibitors plus ARBs or ACE inhibitors plus direct renin inhibitors has failed to improve cardiovascular or renal outcomes but has predisposed patients to serious adverse events.

  19. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibition: overview of the therapeutic use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, and direct renin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Kelly; Smith, Holly; Biederman, Jason

    2014-12-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) therapy in hypertensive diabetic patients with macroalbuminuria, microalbuminuria, or normoalbuminuria has been repeatedly shown to improve cardiovascular mortality and reduce the decline in glomerular filtration rate. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade in normotensive diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria or microalbuminuria cannot be advocated at present. Dual RAAS inhibition with ACE inhibitors plus ARBs or ACE inhibitors plus direct renin inhibitors has failed to improve cardiovascular or renal outcomes but has predisposed patients to serious adverse events. PMID:25439533

  20. Systems biology of coagulation initiation: kinetics of thrombin generation in resting and activated human blood.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Manash S; Denney, William S; Jing, Huiyan; Diamond, Scott L

    2010-09-30

    Blood function defines bleeding and clotting risks and dictates approaches for clinical intervention. Independent of adding exogenous tissue factor (TF), human blood treated in vitro with corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI, to block Factor XIIa) will generate thrombin after an initiation time (T(i)) of 1 to 2 hours (depending on donor), while activation of platelets with the GPVI-activator convulxin reduces T(i) to ∼20 minutes. Since current kinetic models fail to generate thrombin in the absence of added TF, we implemented a Platelet-Plasma ODE model accounting for: the Hockin-Mann protease reaction network, thrombin-dependent display of platelet phosphatidylserine, VIIa function on activated platelets, XIIa and XIa generation and function, competitive thrombin substrates (fluorogenic detector and fibrinogen), and thrombin consumption during fibrin polymerization. The kinetic model consisting of 76 ordinary differential equations (76 species, 57 reactions, 105 kinetic parameters) predicted the clotting of resting and convulxin-activated human blood as well as predicted T(i) of human blood under 50 different initial conditions that titrated increasing levels of TF, Xa, Va, XIa, IXa, and VIIa. Experiments with combined anti-XI and anti-XII antibodies prevented thrombin production, demonstrating that a leak of XIIa past saturating amounts of CTI (and not "blood-borne TF" alone) was responsible for in vitro initiation without added TF. Clotting was not blocked by antibodies used individually against TF, VII/VIIa, P-selectin, GPIb, protein disulfide isomerase, cathepsin G, nor blocked by the ribosome inhibitor puromycin, the Clk1 kinase inhibitor Tg003, or inhibited VIIa (VIIai). This is the first model to predict the observed behavior of CTI-treated human blood, either resting or stimulated with platelet activators. CTI-treated human blood will clot in vitro due to the combined activity of XIIa and XIa, a process enhanced by platelet activators and which proceeds in the

  1. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  2. Investigation of the heparin-thrombin interaction by dynamic force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congzhou; Jin, Yingzi; Desai, Umesh R.; Yadavalli, Vamsi K.

    2015-01-01

    Background The interaction between heparin and thrombin is a vital step in the blood (anti) coagulation process. Unraveling the molecular basis of the interactions is therefore extremely important for understanding the mechanisms of this complex biological process. Methods In this study, we use a combination of an efficient thiolation chemistry of heparin, a self-assembled monolayer-based single molecule platform, and dynamic force spectroscopy to provide new insights into the heparin-thrombin interaction from an energy viewpoint at the molecular scale. Results Well-separated single molecules of heparin covalently attached to mixed self-assembled monolayers are demonstrated, whereby interaction forces with thrombin can be measured via atomic force microscopy-based spectroscopy. Further these interactions are studied at different loading rates and salt concentrations to directly obtain kinetic parameters. Conclusions An increase in the loading rate shows a higher interaction force between the heparin and thrombin, which can be directly linked to the kinetic dissociation rate constant (koff ). The stability of the heparin/thrombin complex decreased with increasing NaCl concentration such that the off-rate was found to be driven primarily by non-ionic forces. General Significance These results contribute to understanding the role of specific and nonspecific forces that drive heparin-thrombin interactions under applied force or flow conditions. PMID:25647100

  3. Direct oral anticoagulants and venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2016-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), consisting of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a major clinical concern associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The cornerstone of management of VTE is anticoagulation, and traditional anticoagulants include parenteral heparins and oral vitamin K antagonists. Recently, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed and licensed, including direct factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) and thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran etexilate). This narrative review focusses on the characteristics of these direct anticoagulants and the main results of published clinical studies on their use in the prevention and treatment of VTE. PMID:27581829

  4. Crystallographic determination of the structures of human alpha-thrombin complexed with BMS-186282 and BMS-189090.

    PubMed Central

    Malley, M. F.; Tabernero, L.; Chang, C. Y.; Ohringer, S. L.; Roberts, D. G.; Das, J.; Sack, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    The crystallographic structures of the ternary complexes of human alpha-thrombin with hirugen (a sulfated hirudin fragment) and the small-molecule active site thrombin inhibitors BMS-186282 and BMS-189090 have been determined at 2.6 and 2.8 A. In both cases, the inhibitors, which adopt very similar bound conformations, bind in an antiparallel beta-strand arrangement relative to the thrombin main chain in a manner like that reported for PPACK, D-Phe-Pro-Arg-CH2Cl. They do, however, exhibit differences in the binding of the alkyl guanidine moiety in the specificity pocket. Numerous hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions serve to stabilize the inhibitors in the binding pocket. Although PPACK forms covalent bonds to both serine and the histidine of the catalytic triad of thrombin, neither BMS-186282 nor BMS-189090 bind covalently and only BMS-186282 forms a hydrogen bond to the serine of the catalytic triad. Both inhibitors bind with high affinity (Ki = 79 nM and 3.6 nM, respectively) and are highly selective for thrombin over trypsin and other serine proteases. PMID:8745399

  5. [Sodium ions as the effector of catalytic action of alpha-thrombin].

    PubMed

    Kolodzeĭskaia, M V; Volkov, G L

    2007-01-01

    A process of thrombin interaction with synthetic and natural substrates in the presence of Na+ ions has been analyzed in the survey. Molecular bases of this interaction have been presented, interrelation between the structure and function of thrombin has been noted; the nature of the unique site of its active centre which determines high thrombin affinity for the substrates and increase of its catalytic activity defined by the term of "specificity to univalent cations" have been considered in detail. Na+ ions play the role of allosteric effector in realization of two informational states of thrombin which penform, respectively, two fundamental and competing functions in the process of hemostasis. The molecular basis of the process of Na+ binding with thrombin is rather simple and depends only on the single site which importance for the enzyme function is marked by numerous investigations of a number of authors, and it is shown that Na(+)-binding site is distributed in the other zone of thrombin molecule as compared to exosites I and II, which do not take part in Na(+)-binding and allosteric transduction. Considerable attention was given to conformational conversions of a thrombin molecule caused by Na+ ions binding. It was shown that the transition slow <--> fast of the enzyme forms leads to formation of the ion pair Arg-187: Asp-222, optimal orientation of Asp-189 and Ser-195 for binding of substrates and considerable shift of the lateral chain Glu-192 determined by the disturbance of the lattice of water molecules which connects Na(+)-binding site with aminoacid Ser-195 of the active centre of the enzyme. New data have been presented which indicate that the changes in the lattice of water molecules and allosteric nucleus of Na(+)-binding site of the enzyme are the basic link of raising the affinity between the thrombin and substrate and mechanism of the enzyme activation by Na(+)-ions. The survey touches some problems of creation of allosteric inhibitors of

  6. [Inhibitory effect of methyl esters of arginine-containing oligopeptides on thrombin and trypsin].

    PubMed

    Poiarkova, S A; Kibirev, V K; Serebrianyĭ, S B

    1987-01-01

    Stereoisomeric oligopeptides were studied for their inhibitory effect on the hydrolysis of benzoyl-L-arginine methyl ester catalyzed by thrombin and trypsin, as well as on the thrombin-fibrinogen reaction. Comparison of the peptide structures, their conformational flexibility and inhibitory effects on thrombin and trypsin shows the availability of the essential differences in organization and functioning of the subsites S3, S2 and S'1 of these enzymes. In contrast to trypsin, thrombin is shown to be characterized by more pronounced secondary stereospecificity. This manifests in the more vigorous dropping of the catalytic constants of thrombin-catalyzed esterolysis than those of trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of the substrates, containing D-amino acids at the subsite P2. It is revealed that the peptide Tos-D-Val-D-Ala-D-Agr-D-Phe-OCH3 is the most powerful inhibitor among studied compounds. It is noteworthy that its antithrombin effect is almost an order of magnitude higher than its antitrypsin effect.

  7. The effect of fibrin(ogen) on thrombin generation and decay.

    PubMed

    Kremers, R M W; Wagenvoord, R J; Hemker, H C

    2014-09-01

    Defibrination causes a ~30% decrease of thrombin generation (TG) which can be restored by adding native fibrinogen in its original concentration (3 mg/ml). The fibrinogen variant γA/γ', which binds thrombin with high affinity, is over four times more efficient in this respect than the more common γA/γA form. By using high tissue factor concentrations we accelerated prothrombin conversion so as to obtain a descending part of the TG curve that was governed by thrombin decay only. From that part we calculated the antithrombin (AT)- and α2-macroglobulin-dependent decay constants at a series of concentrations of native, γA/γA and γA/γ' fibrinogen. We found that the increase of TG in the presence of fibrinogen is primarily due to a dose-dependent decrease of thrombin inactivation by α2-macroglobulin, where the γA/γ' form is much more active than the γA/γA form. AT-dependent decay is somewhat decreased by γA/γ' fibrinogen but hardly by the γA/γA form. We assume that binding of thrombin to fibrin(ogen) interferes with its binding to inhibitors. Attenuation of decay only in part explains the stimulating effect of fibrinogen on TG, as fibrinogen stimulates prothrombin conversion, regardless of the fibrinogen variant.

  8. Transfected adenosine A1 receptor-mediated modulation of thrombin-stimulated phospholipase C and phospholipase A2 activity in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Dickenson, J M; Hill, S J

    1997-02-19

    Thrombin receptor activation in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stimulates the hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids and the release of arachidonic acid. Our previous studies have shown that activation of the human transfected adenosine A1 receptor in CHO cells (CHO-A1) potentiates the accumulation of inositol phosphates elicited by endogenous P2U purinoceptors and CCKA receptors. In this study we have investigated whether adenosine A1 receptor activation can modulate thrombin-stimulated arachidonic acid release and/or inositol phospholipid hydrolysis in CHO-A1 cells. Thrombin stimulated [3H]arachidonic acid release and total [3H]inositol phosphate accumulation in CHO-A1 cells. Both these responses to thrombin were were insensitive to pertussis toxin. The protein kinase C activator, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), potentiated thrombin-stimulated [3H]arachidonic acid. In marked contrast, PMA inhibited thrombin-stimulated [3H]inositol phosphate accumulation. The selective protein kinase C inhibitor Ro 31-8220 (3-¿1-[3-(2-isothioureido)propyl] indol-3-yl¿-4-(1-methylindol-3-yl)-3-pyrrolin-2,5-dione) had no effect on thrombin-stimulated [3H]arachidonic acid release but reversed the potentiation of thrombin-stimulated [3H]arachidonic acid release elicited by PMA. The selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) augmented the release of [3H]arachidonic acid produced by thrombin. Co-activation of the adenosine A1 receptor also potentiated thrombin-stimulated [3H]inositol phosphate accumulation. The synergistic interactions between the adenosine A1 receptor and thrombin were abolished in pertussis-toxin-treated cells. The potentiation of [3H]arachidonic acid release by CPA was blocked by the protein kinase C inhibitors Ro 31-8220 and GF 109203X (3-[1-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]-1 H-indol-3-yl]-4-(1 H-indol-3-yl)- 1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione). In conclusion, thrombin receptor activation in CHO-A1 cells stimulates the accumulation of [3H

  9. Thrombin generation using the calibrated automated thrombinoscope to assess reversibility of dabigatran and rivaroxaban.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Richard; Thom, James; Wood, Alicia; Phillips, Michael; Muhammad, Shoaib; Baker, Ross

    2014-05-01

    The new direct-acting anticoagulants such as dabigatran and rivaroxaban are usually not monitored but may be associated with haemorrhage, particularly where renal impairment occurs. They have no effective "antidotes". We studied 17 patients receiving dabigatran 150 mg twice daily for non-valvular atrial fibrillation and 15 patients receiving rivaroxaban 10 mg daily for the prevention of deep venous thrombosis after hip or knee replacement surgery. We assessed the effect of these drugs on commonly used laboratory tests and Calibrated Automated Thrombogram (CAT) using plasma samples. We also assessed effects in fresh whole blood citrated patient samples using thromboelastography on the TEG and the ROTEM. The efficacy of nonspecific haemostatic agents prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC), Factor VIII Inhibitor By-passing Activity (FEIBA) and recombinant activated factor VII (rVIIa) were tested by reversal of abnormal thrombin generation using the CAT. Concentrations added ex vivo were chosen to reflect doses normally given in vivo. Dabigatran significantly increased the dynamic parameters of the TEG and ROTEM and the lag time of the CAT. It significantly reduced the endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) and reduced the peak height of the CAT. Rivaroxaban did not affect the TEG and ROTEM parameters but did increase the lag time and reduce ETP and peak height of the CAT. For both drugs, these parameters were significantly and meaningfully corrected by PCC and FEIBA and to a lesser but still significant extent by rFVIIa. These results may be useful in devising a reversal strategy in patients but clinical experience will be needed to verify them.

  10. Effect of ketoconazole and diltiazem on the pharmacokinetics of apixaban, an oral direct factor Xa inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Charles E; Byon, Wonkyung; Song, Yan; Wang, Jessie; Schuster, Alan E; Boyd, Rebecca A; Zhang, Donglu; Yu, Zhigang; Dias, Clapton; Shenker, Andrew; LaCreta, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Aim Apixaban is an orally active inhibitor of coagulation factor Xa and is eliminated by multiple pathways, including renal and non-renal elimination. Non-renal elimination pathways consist of metabolism by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, primarily CYP3A4, as well as direct intestinal excretion. Two single sequence studies evaluated the effect of ketoconazole (a strong dual inhibitor of CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein [P-gp]) and diltiazem (a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor and a P-gp inhibitor) on apixaban pharmacokinetics in healthy subjects. Method In the ketoconazole study, 18 subjects received apixaban 10 mg on days 1 and 7, and ketoconazole 400 mg once daily on days 4–9. In the diltiazem study, 18 subjects received apixaban 10 mg on days 1 and 11 and diltiazem 360 mg once daily on days 4–13. Results Apixaban maximum plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration–time curve extrapolated to infinity increased by 62% (90% confidence interval [CI], 47, 78%) and 99% (90% CI, 81, 118%), respectively, with co-administration of ketoconazole, and by 31% (90% CI, 16, 49%) and 40% (90% CI, 23, 59%), respectively, with diltiazem. Conclusion A 2-fold and 1.4-fold increase in apixaban exposure was observed with co-administration of ketoconazole and diltiazem, respectively. PMID:25377242

  11. Na+/H+ exchanger-1 inhibitors decrease myocardial superoxide production via direct mitochondrial action.

    PubMed

    Garciarena, Carolina D; Caldiz, Claudia I; Correa, María V; Schinella, Guillermo R; Mosca, Susana M; Chiappe de Cingolani, Gladys E; Cingolani, Horacio E; Ennis, Irene L

    2008-12-01

    The possibility of a direct mitochondrial action of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger-1 (NHE-1) inhibitors decreasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was assessed in cat myocardium. Angiotensin II and endothelin-1 induced an NADPH oxidase (NOX)-dependent increase in anion superoxide (O(2)(-)) production detected by chemiluminescence. Three different NHE-1 inhibitors [cariporide, BIIB-723, and EMD-87580] with no ROS scavenger activity prevented this increase. The mitochondria appeared to be the source of the NOX-dependent ROS released by the "ROS-induced ROS release mechanism" that was blunted by the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel blockers 5-hydroxydecanoate and glibenclamide, inhibition of complex I of the electron transport chain with rotenone, and inhibition of the permeability transition pore (MPTP) by cyclosporin A. Cariporide also prevented O(2)(-) production induced by the opening of mK(ATP) with diazoxide. Ca(2+)-induced swelling was evaluated in isolated mitochondria as an indicator of MPTP formation. Cariporide decreased mitochondrial swelling to the same extent as cyclosporin A and bongkrekic acid, confirming its direct mitochondrial action. Increased O(2)(-) production, as expected, stimulated ERK1/2 and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase phosphorylation. This was also prevented by cariporide, giving additional support to the existence of a direct mitochondrial action of NHE-1 inhibitors in preventing ROS release. In conclusion, we report a mitochondrial action of NHE-1 inhibitors that should lead us to revisit or reinterpret previous landmark observations about their beneficial effect in several cardiac diseases, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury and cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Further studies are needed to clarify the precise mechanism and site of action of these drugs in blunting MPTP formation and ROS release. PMID:18801963

  12. c-Src mediates thrombin-induced NF-kappaB activation and IL-8/CXCL8 expression in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Cheng, Hui-Wen; Hsu, Ming-Jen; Chen, Mei-Chieh; Lin, Chia-Chin; Chen, Bing-Chang

    2006-09-01

    In this study, we examined the regulation of NF-kappaB activation and IL-8/CXCL8 expression by thrombin in human lung epithelial cells (EC). Thrombin caused a concentration-dependent increase in IL-8/CXCL8 release in a human lung EC line (A549) and primary normal human bronchial EC. In A549 cells, thrombin, SFLLRN-NH2 (a protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) agonist peptide), and GYPGQV-NH2 (a PAR4 agonist peptide), but not TFRGAP-NH2 (a PAR3 agonist peptide), induced an increase in IL-8/CXCL8-luciferase (Luc) activity. The thrombin-induced IL-8/CXCL8 release was attenuated by D-phenylalanyl-L-prolyl-L-arginine chloromethyl ketone (a thrombin inhibitor), U73122 (a phosphoinositide-phospholipase C inhibitor), Ro-32-0432 (a protein kinsase C alpha (PKC alpha) inhibitor), an NF-kappaB inhibitor peptide, and Bay 117082 (an IkappaB phosphorylation inhibitor). Thrombin-induced increase in IL-8/CXCL8-Luc activity was inhibited by the dominant-negative mutant of c-Src and the cells transfected with the kappaB site mutation of the IL-8/CXCL8 construct. Thrombin caused time-dependent increases in phosphorylation of c-Src at tyrosine 416 and c-Src activity. Thrombin-elicited c-Src activity was inhibited by Ro-32-0432. Stimulation of cells with thrombin activated IkappaB kinase alphabeta (IKK alphabeta), IkappaB alpha phosphorylation, IkappaB alpha degradation, p50 and p65 translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus, NF-kappaB-specific DNA-protein complex formation, and kappaB-Luc activity. Pretreatment of A549 cells with Ro-32-4032 and the dominant-negative mutant of c-Src DN inhibited thrombin-induced IKK alphabeta activity, kappaB-Luc activity, and NF-kappaB-specific DNA-protein complex formation. Further studies revealed that thrombin induced PKC alpha, c-Src, and IKK alphabeta complex formation. These results show for the first time that thrombin, acting through PAR1 and PAR4, activates the phosphoinositide-phospholipase C/PKC alpha/c-Src/IKK alphabeta signaling pathway

  13. The protease thrombin is an endogenous mediator of hippocampal neuroprotection against ischemia at low concentrations but causes degeneration at high concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Striggow, Frank; Riek, Monika; Breder, Jörg; Henrich-Noack, Petra; Reymann, Klaus G.; Reiser, Georg

    2000-01-01

    We have considered the extracellular serine protease thrombin and its receptor as endogenous mediators of neuronal protection against brain ischemia. Exposure of gerbils to prior mild ischemic insults, here two relatively short-lasting occlusions (2 min) of both common carotid arteries applied at 1-day intervals 2 days before a severe occlusion (6 min), caused a robust ischemic tolerance of hippocampal CA1 neurons. This resistance was impaired if the specific thrombin inhibitor hirudin was injected intracerebroventricularly before each short-lasting insult. Thus, efficient native neuroprotective mechanisms exist and endogenous thrombin seems to be involved therein. In vitro experiments using organotypic slice cultures of rat hippocampus revealed that thrombin can have protective but also deleterious effects on hippocampal CA1 neurons. Low concentrations of thrombin (50 pM, 0.01 unit/ml) or of a synthetic thrombin receptor agonist (10 μM) induced significant neuroprotection against experimental ischemia. In contrast, 50 nM (10 units/ml) thrombin decreased further the reduced neuronal survival that follows the deprivation of oxygen and glucose, and 500 nM even caused neuronal cell death by itself. Degenerative thrombin actions also might be relevant in vivo, because hirudin increased the number of surviving neurons when applied before a 6-min occlusion. Among the thrombin concentrations tested, 50 pM induced intracellular Ca2+ spikes in fura-2-loaded CA1 neurons whereas higher concentrations caused a sustained Ca2+ elevation. Thus, distinct Ca2+ signals may define whether or not thrombin initiates protection. Taken together, in vivo and in vitro data suggest that thrombin can determine neuronal cell death or survival after brain ischemia. PMID:10681455

  14. Antitubercular drugs for an old target: GSK693 as a promising InhA direct inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Hoyos, María; Perez-Herran, Esther; Gulten, Gulcin; Encinas, Lourdes; Álvarez-Gómez, Daniel; Alvarez, Emilio; Ferrer-Bazaga, Santiago; García-Pérez, Adolfo; Ortega, Fátima; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Rullas-Trincado, Joaquin; Blanco Ruano, Delia; Torres, Pedro; Castañeda, Pablo; Huss, Sophie; Fernández Menéndez, Raquel; González Del Valle, Silvia; Ballell, Lluis; Barros, David; Modha, Sundip; Dhar, Neeraj; Signorino-Gelo, François; McKinney, John D; García-Bustos, Jose Francisco; Lavandera, Jose Luis; Sacchettini, James C; Jimenez, M Soledad; Martín-Casabona, Nuria; Castro-Pichel, Julia; Mendoza-Losana, Alfonso

    2016-06-01

    Despite being one of the first antitubercular agents identified, isoniazid (INH) is still the most prescribed drug for prophylaxis and tuberculosis (TB) treatment and, together with rifampicin, the pillars of current chemotherapy. A high percentage of isoniazid resistance is linked to mutations in the pro-drug activating enzyme KatG, so the discovery of direct inhibitors (DI) of the enoyl-ACP reductase (InhA) has been pursued by many groups leading to the identification of different enzyme inhibitors, active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), but with poor physicochemical properties to be considered as preclinical candidates. Here, we present a series of InhA DI active against multidrug (MDR) and extensively (XDR) drug-resistant clinical isolates as well as in TB murine models when orally dosed that can be a promising foundation for a future treatment. PMID:27428438

  15. Correlated Motions and Residual Frustration in Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Thrombin is the central protease in the cascade of blood coagulation proteases. The structure of thrombin consists of a double β-barrel core surrounded by connecting loops and helices. Compared to chymotrypsin, thrombin has more extended loops that are thought to have arisen from insertions in the serine protease that evolved to impart greater specificity. Previous experiments showed thermodynamic coupling between ligand binding at the active site and distal exosites. We present a combined approach of molecular dynamics (MD), accelerated molecular dynamics (AMD), and analysis of the residual local frustration of apo-thrombin and active-site-bound (PPACK-thrombin). Community analysis of the MD ensembles identified changes upon active site occupation in groups of residues linked through correlated motions and physical contacts. AMD simulations, calibrated on measured residual dipolar couplings, reveal that upon active site ligation, correlated loop motions are quenched, but new ones connecting the active site with distal sites where allosteric regulators bind emerge. Residual local frustration analysis reveals a striking correlation between frustrated contacts and regions undergoing slow time scale dynamics. The results elucidate a motional network that probably evolved through retention of frustrated contacts to provide facile conversion between ensembles of states. PMID:23621631

  16. Designing Allosteric Regulators of Thrombin. Monosulfated Benzofuran Dimers Selectively Interact With Arg173 of Exosite II to Induce Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Aziz, May H.; Sidhu, Preetpal Singh; Liang, Aiye; Kim, Ji Yeong; Mosier, Philip D.; Zhou, Qibing; Farrell, David H.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2012-01-01

    Earlier, we reported on the design of sulfated benzofuran dimers (SBDs) as allosteric inhibitors of thrombin (Sidhu et al. (2011) J Med Chem 54: 5522-5531). To identify the site of binding of SBDs, we studied thrombin inhibition in the presence of exosite 1 and 2 ligands. Whereas hirudin peptide and heparin octasaccharide did not affect the IC50 of thrombin inhibition by a high affinity SBD, the presence of full-length heparin reduced inhibition potency by 4-fold. The presence of γ’ fibrinogen peptide, which recognizes Arg93, Arg97, Arg173, Arg175 and other residues, resulted in a loss of affinity that correlated with the ideal Dixon-Webb competitive profile. Replacement of several arginines and lysines of exosite 2 with alanine did not affect thrombin inhibition potency, except for Arg173, which displayed a 22-fold reduction in IC50. Docking studies suggested a hydrophobic patch around Arg173 as a plausible site of SBD binding to thrombin. Absence of Arg173-like residue in factor Xa supported the observed selectivity of inhibition by SBDs. Cellular toxicity studies indicated that SBDs are essentially non-toxic to cells at concentrations as high as 250 mg/kg. Overall, the work presents the localization of the SBD binding site, which could lead to allosteric modulators of thrombin that are completely different from all clinically used anticoagulants. PMID:22788964

  17. Anti-inflammatory compounds parthenolide and Bay 11-7082 are direct inhibitors of the inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Juliana, Christine; Fernandes-Alnemri, Teresa; Wu, Jianghong; Datta, Pinaki; Solorzano, Leobaldo; Yu, Je-Wook; Meng, Rong; Quong, Andrew A; Latz, Eicke; Scott, Charles P; Alnemri, Emad S

    2010-03-26

    Activation of the inflammasome generates the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta and -18, which are important mediators of inflammation. Abnormal activation of the inflammasome leads to many inflammatory diseases, including gout, silicosis, neurodegeneration, and genetically inherited periodic fever syndromes. Therefore, identification of small molecule inhibitors that target the inflammasome is an important step toward developing effective therapeutics for the treatment of inflammation. Here, we show that the herbal NF-kappaB inhibitory compound parthenolide inhibits the activity of multiple inflammasomes in macrophages by directly inhibiting the protease activity of caspase-1. Additional investigations of other NF-kappaB inhibitors revealed that the synthetic I kappaB kinase-beta inhibitor Bay 11-7082 and structurally related vinyl sulfone compounds selectively inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome activity in macrophages independent of their inhibitory effect on NF-kappaB activity. In vitro assays of the effect of parthenolide and Bay 11-7082 on the ATPase activity of NLRP3 demonstrated that both compounds inhibit the ATPase activity of NLRP3, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of these compounds on inflammasome activity could be mediated in part through their effect on the ATPase activity of NLRP3. Our results thus elucidate the molecular mechanism for the therapeutic anti-inflammatory activity of parthenolide and identify vinyl sulfones as a new class of potential therapeutics that target the NLRP3 inflammasome.

  18. SLOW THROMBIN IS ZYMOGEN-LIKE

    PubMed Central

    Huntington, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Blood coagulation is the result of a cascade of zymogen activation events, however, its initiation is allosteric. Factor VIIa circulates in a zymogen-like state and is allosterically activated by binding to tissue factor. Thrombin, the final protease generated in the blood coagulation cascade, has also been shown to exist in a low activity state in the absence of cofactors, and the structural features of this ‘slow’ form has been studied for many years. In this manuscript I will review the general features that render zymogens inactive and how proteolytic cleavage results in activation, but I will also show how this distinction is blurred by zymogens that have activity (protease-like zymogens) and proteases with low activity (zymogen-like proteases). This will then be applied in the analysis of slow thrombin to reveal how allosteric activation of thrombin simply reflects the conversion from a zymogen-like enzyme to an active serine protease. PMID:19630791

  19. Tissue factor and cancer procoagulant expressed by glioma cells participate in their thrombin-mediated proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ogiichi, T; Hirashima, Y; Nakamura, S; Endo, S; Kurimoto, M; Takaku, A

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between coagulation cascade activation and glioma cell proliferation was examined. The human glioma cell lines T98G, TM-1 and normal human astrocyte cell strain (NHA) were examined. Using anti-tissue factor (TF) antibody, immunocytochemical detection of TF antigen was obtained in both cell lines and cell strain. TF antigen in cell lysates was also measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In a one-stage clotting assay, T98G, TM-1 and NHA revealed procoagulant activity (PCA) in normal human plasma and factor VII deficient plasma. PCA in normal human plasma was significantly inhibited by both inhibitory anti-TF antibody and cysteine protease inhibitor HgCl2. This result indicates that T98G, TM-1 and NHA cells express not only TF but also cancer procoagulant (CP) at the same time. In a cell proliferation assay, thrombin induced proliferation in T98G and TM-1 cells in a dose-dependent fashion and in NHA cell in a bell-shaped fashion. This mitogenic stimulant was inhibited by the specific thrombin inhibitor hirudin. The combinations of coagulation factors II, V, and X with or without factor VII induced proliferation in T98G, TM-1, and NHA cells. The maximal mitogenic stimulatory effects were larger in glioma cells than in NHA. These mitogenic stimulatory effects were also inhibited by hirudin. Each coagulation factor on its own or in any other combination of coagulation factors had no proliferative effect. Thus, these mitogenic stimulatory effects were considered to be the effect of thrombin. In conclusion, T98G and TM-1 human glioma cells express two different types of procoagulants TF and CP. In the presence of coagulation factors, these glioma cells can generate thrombin and this thrombin generation is capable of inducing glioma cell proliferation in vitro.

  20. Potent Host-Directed Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Myxovirus RNA-Dependent RNA-Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Stefanie A.; Ndungu, J. Maina; Yoon, Jeong-Joong; Dochow, Melanie; Sun, Aiming; Natchus, Michael; Snyder, James P.; Plemper, Richard K.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of host cell factors required for virus replication rather than of pathogen components opens new perspectives to counteract virus infections. Anticipated advantages of this approach include a heightened barrier against the development of viral resistance and a broadened pathogen target spectrum. Myxoviruses are predominantly associated with acute disease and thus are particularly attractive for this approach since treatment time can be kept limited. To identify inhibitor candidates, we have analyzed hit compounds that emerged from a large-scale high-throughput screen for their ability to block replication of members of both the orthomyxovirus and paramyxovirus families. This has returned a compound class with broad anti-viral activity including potent inhibition of different influenza virus and paramyxovirus strains. After hit-to-lead chemistry, inhibitory concentrations are in the nanomolar range in the context of immortalized cell lines and human PBMCs. The compound shows high metabolic stability when exposed to human S-9 hepatocyte subcellular fractions. Antiviral activity is host-cell species specific and most pronounced in cells of higher mammalian origin, supporting a host-cell target. While the compound induces a temporary cell cycle arrest, host mRNA and protein biosynthesis are largely unaffected and treated cells maintain full metabolic activity. Viral replication is blocked at a post-entry step and resembles the inhibition profile of a known inhibitor of viral RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp) activity. Direct assessment of RdRp activity in the presence of the reagent reveals strong inhibition both in the context of viral infection and in reporter-based minireplicon assays. In toto, we have identified a compound class with broad viral target range that blocks host factors required for viral RdRp activity. Viral adaptation attempts did not induce resistance after prolonged exposure, in contrast to rapid adaptation to a pathogen-directed

  1. Thrombin drives tumorigenesis in colitis-associated colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeldt, Leah; Kombrinck, Keith; Flick, Matthew J.; Steinbrecher, Kris A.; Harmel-Laws, Eleana; Mullins, Eric S.; Shaw, Maureen; Witte, David P.; Revenko, Alexey; Monia, Brett; Palumbo, Joseph S.

    2014-01-01

    The established association between inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer underscores the importance of inflammation in colon cancer development. Based on evidence that hemostatic proteases are powerful modifiers of both inflammatory pathologies and tumor biology, gene-targeted mice carrying low levels of prothrombin were used to directly test the hypothesis that prothrombin contributes to tumor development in colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC). Remarkably, imposing a modest 50% reduction in circulating prothrombin in fII+/− mice, a level that carries no significant bleeding risk, dramatically decreased adenoma formation following an azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate challenge. Similar results were obtained with pharmacological inhibition of prothrombin expression or inhibition of thrombin proteolytic activity. Detailed longitudinal analyses showed that the role of thrombin in tumor development in CAC was temporally associated with the antecedent inflammatory colitis. However, direct studies of the antecedent colitis showed that mice carrying half-normal prothrombin levels were comparable to control mice in mucosal damage, inflammatory cell infiltration and associated local cytokine levels. These results suggest that thrombin supports early events coupled to inflammation-mediated tumorigenesis in CAC that are distinct from overall inflammation-induced tissue damage and inflammatory cell trafficking. That prothrombin is linked to early events in CAC was strongly inferred by the observation that prothrombin deficiency dramatically reduced the formation of very early, pre-cancerous aberrant crypt foci. Given the importance of inflammation in the development of colon cancer, these studies suggest that therapeutic interventions at the level of hemostatic factors may be an effective means to prevent and/or impede colitis-associated colon cancer progression. PMID:24710407

  2. Oxidation of human alpha-thrombin by the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-chloride system: structural and functional effects.

    PubMed

    De Cristofaro, R; Landolfi, R

    2000-02-01

    The myeloperoxidase-H2O2-chloride system (MPOS) is exploited by white blood cells to generate reactive oxygen species in many processes involved in the pathogenesis of inflammation and atherothrombosis. This, study investigated the biochemical and functional effects of alpha-thrombin oxidation by MPOS. This system, in the presence of 100 microM L-tyrosine, caused in the thrombin molecule loss of tryptophan and lysine residues and formation of dityrosine, chloramine and carbonyl groups. The same changes could be directly induced by thrombin incubation with reagent HOCI, but not with H2O2 alone. Exposure to either MPOS or HOCl caused major functional abnormalities in human alpha-thrombin. The interaction of oxidized (ox-)thrombin with Protein C and antithrombin III-heparin complex were most sensitive to oxidation, being the kcat/Km value for Protein C hydrolysis roughly reduced 13-fold and the affinity for the antithrombin III-heparin complex decreased approximately 15-fold. Ox-thrombin interaction with small synthetic peptides showed several changes, arising from a perturbation of the S2-S3 specificity of the enzyme. Ox-thrombin was also characterized by a 5-fold decrease of the kcat/Km value for both fibrinopeptide A and B release from fibrinogen, a 5.8-fold increase of the EC50 value for platelet activation and a 2-fold decrease of binding affinity for thrombomodulin. The above results indicate a high sensitivity of thrombin to oxidative modifications by myeloperoxidase. Perturbed interactions with Protein C and the heparin-ATIII complex were the most relevant functional abnormalities of ox-thrombin. PMID:10739383

  3. Thrombin-mediated IL-10 up-regulation involves protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 expression in human mononuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Naldini, Antonella; Bernini, Claudia; Pucci, Annalisa; Carraro, Fabio

    2005-09-01

    Thrombin, the key enzyme of the coagulation cascade, exerts cellular effects through activation of the protease-activated receptors (PARs). Interleukin (IL)-10, besides its anti-inflammatory properties, is considered a major denominator of the immunosuppressive effect during human endotoxemia. We have recently shown that thrombin inhibits IL-12 production in human mononuclear cells and that such inhibition is accompanied by IL-10 up-regulation. To our knowledge, there are no data available to show that thrombin mediates IL-10 production by its interactions with PAR-1. We here report that human alpha-thrombin enhances IL-10 expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in established monocytic cell lines and that this up-regulation requires PAR-1 expression. The use of proteolytically inactive thrombin reveals that such enhancement requires thrombin proteolytic activity. Addition of PAR-1 agonist peptides, such as SFLLRN, results in a significant increase of IL-10 production. PAR-1 expression is required for thrombin-induced IL-10 production, as shown by experiments performed with antisense or sense PAR-1 oligonucleotides. Treatment with thrombin or SFLLRN of monocytic cell lines, such as U937 and Mono Mac-6, results in an increased IL-10 production. This suggests that the observed IL-10 up-regulation may be the result of a direct interaction with monocytes. The observation that thrombin-mediated up-regulation of IL-10 may require the expression of the PAR-1 receptor identifies a new, functional link between inflammation and coagulation. Our results may also contribute to better design therapeutic strategies to treat several disorders, characterized by the presence of inflammatory as well as coagulant responses. PMID:15961578

  4. Three different signal amplification strategies for the impedimetric sandwich detection of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Ocaña, Cristina; del Valle, Manel

    2016-03-17

    In this work, we report a comparative study on three highly specific amplification strategies for the ultrasensitive detection of thrombin with the use of aptamer sandwich protocol. The protocol consisted on the use of a first thrombin aptamer immobilized on the electrode surface, the recognition of thrombin protein, and the reaction with a second biotinylated thrombin aptamer forming the sandwich. Through the exposed biotin end, three variants have been tested to amplify the electrochemical impedance signal. The strategies included (a) silver enhancement treatment, (b) gold enhancement treatment and (c) insoluble product produced by the combination of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and 3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole (AEC). The properties of the sensing surface were probed by electrochemical impedance measurements in the presence of the ferrocyanide/ferricyanide redox marker. Insoluble product strategy and silver enhancement treatment resulted in the lowest detection limit (0.3 pM), while gold enhancement method resulted in the highest reproducibility, 8.8% RSD at the pM thrombin concentration levels. Results of silver and gold enhancement treatment also permitted direct inspection by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). PMID:26920780

  5. Highly sensitive thermal detection of thrombin using aptamer-functionalized phase change nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaoming; Hossain, Mainul; Ma, Liyuan; Ma, Zeyu; Hickman, James J; Su, Ming

    2010-10-15

    This paper describes a novel thermal biosensing technique for the highly sensitive and selective detection of thrombin using RNA aptamer-functionalized phase change nanoparticles as thermal probes. The presence of thrombin in solution leads to attachment of nanoparticles onto a substrate modified with the same aptamer by forming sandwiched complexes. The phase changes of nanoparticles from solid to liquid adsorb heat energy and generate sharp melting peaks during linear temperature scans, where the positions and areas of the melting peaks reflect the presence and the amount of thrombin, respectively. A detection sensitivity of 22 nM is achieved on flat aluminum surfaces, and the sensitivity can be enhanced by four times using silicon nanopillar substrates that have higher surface area. The thermal detection is immune to colored species in solution and has been used directly to detect thrombin in serum samples. By combining the high specificity of aptamers and the large surface area of silicon nanostructures, the thermal signals obtained during phase change of nanoparticles provide a highly sensitive, selective and low-cost method for thrombin detection.

  6. Ethanol interferes with thrombin mediated changes in the morphology and cytoskeleton of human vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, K.J.; Rubin, R.; Hoek, J.; Williams, S.K. )

    1991-03-15

    The effect of physiological concentrations of ethanol (EtOH) on the response of human vascular endothelial cells (EC) to thrombin was examined Treatment of EC with EtOH concentrations of 20-85mM for 2-10 min. produced no significant changes in the morphology of 3- and 4-day monolayers established on fibronectin coated polystyrene. When examined immunofluorescently no significantly changes in the microfilament or microtubule structures were seen. Exposure of EC monolayers to 0.5 and 1 U/ml of thrombin for 1-60 minutes causes a concentration and time dependent monolayer retraction, evidenced by a general decrease in cell size, increase in visible gaps in the monolayer and redistribution of the microtubule and microfilament networks. Pretreatment of EC monolayers with EtOH for 3-5 minutes prior to addition of thrombin prevents the changes seen with thrombin alone. Immunofluorescent examination of the microfilament and microtubule structures suggests than EtOH may act in part via the microtubule network, which appears to be disorganized/disrupted when the EC are exposed to EtOH and then thrombin. Colchicine studies show that EC which have been pretreated with EtOH respond to colchicine differently then cells which have not previously seen EtOH. These data suggest that EtOH may alter EC monolayer responsiveness either by indirect changes which are reflected in cytoskeletal disorganization or possibly by direct influence on the cytoskeleton.

  7. Thrombin Activates Latent TGFβ1 via Integrin αvβ1 in Gingival Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yang, W H; Deng, Y T; Hsieh, Y P; Wu, K J; Kuo, M Y P

    2016-07-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, apoptosis, and extracellular matrix production. It also plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of gingival overgrowth. Thrombin is a key player in tissue repair, remodeling, and fibrosis after an injury, and it exerts profibrotic effects by activating protease-activated receptors. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF or CCN2) modulates cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, matrix production, and wound healing. It is overexpressed in many fibrotic disorders, including gingival overgrowth, and it is positively associated with the degree of fibrosis in gingival overgrowth. In human gingival fibroblasts, we previously found that TGFβ1 induced CCN2 protein synthesis through c-jun N-terminal kinase and Smad3 activation. Thrombin stimulates CCN2 synthesis through protease-activated receptor 1 and c-jun N-terminal kinase signaling. Curcumin inhibited TGFβ1- and thrombin-induced CCN2 synthesis. In this study, we demonstrated that thrombin and protease-activated receptor 1 agonist SFLLRN induced latent TGFβ1 activation and Smad3 phosphorylation in human gingival fibroblasts. Pretreatment with a TGFβ-neutralizing antibody, TGFβ type I receptor inhibitor SB431542, and Smad3 inhibitor SIS3 inhibited approximately 86%, 94%, and 100% of thrombin-induced CCN2 synthesis, respectively. Furthermore, blocking integrin subunits αv and β1 with antibodies effectively inhibited SFLLRN-induced Smad3 phosphorylation and CCN2 synthesis and increased activated TGFβ1 levels; however, similar effects were not observed for integrins αvβ3 and αvβ5. These results suggest that protease-activated receptor 1-induced CCN2 synthesis in human gingival fibroblasts is mediated through integrin αvβ1-induced latent TGFβ1 activation and subsequent TGFβ1 signaling. Moreover, curcumin dose dependently decreased thrombin-induced activated TGFβ1 levels. Curcumin-inhibited thrombin-induced CCN2

  8. Regulation of Thrombin-Induced Lung Endothelial Cell Barrier Disruption by Protein Kinase C Delta

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lishi; Chiang, Eddie T.; Kelly, Gabriel T.; Kanteti, Prasad; Singleton, Patrick A.; Camp, Sara M.; Zhou, Tingting; Dudek, Steven M.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Wang, Ting; Black, Steven M.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Protein Kinase C (PKC) plays a significant role in thrombin-induced loss of endothelial cell (EC) barrier integrity; however, the existence of more than 10 isozymes of PKC and tissue–specific isoform expression has limited our understanding of this important second messenger in vascular homeostasis. In this study, we show that PKCδ isoform promotes thrombin-induced loss of human pulmonary artery EC barrier integrity, findings substantiated by PKCδ inhibitory studies (rottlerin), dominant negative PKCδ construct and PKCδ silencing (siRNA). In addition, we identified PKCδ as a signaling mediator upstream of both thrombin-induced MLC phosphorylation and Rho GTPase activation affecting stress fiber formation, cell contraction and loss of EC barrier integrity. Our inhibitor-based studies indicate that thrombin-induced PKCδ activation exerts a positive feedback on Rho GTPase activation and contributes to Rac1 GTPase inhibition. Moreover, PKD (or PKCμ) and CPI-17, two known PKCδ targets, were found to be activated by PKCδ in EC and served as modulators of cytoskeleton rearrangement. These studies clarify the role of PKCδ in EC cytoskeleton regulation, and highlight PKCδ as a therapeutic target in inflammatory lung disorders, characterized by the loss of barrier integrity, such as acute lung injury and sepsis. PMID:27442243

  9. Electrostatic interactions in the heparin-enhanced reaction between human thrombin and antithrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, L C; Jørgensen, M

    1983-01-01

    Binding of heparin to thrombin is monitored by means of an aqueous two-phase partition system, and binding of heparin to antithrombin is monitored by means of heparin induced enhancement of the intrinsic fluorescence of the protein. Both types of binding are studied at various electrolyte compositions of the medium. Heparin is displaced from thrombin at lower concentrations of electrolyte than those necessary for its displacement from antithrombin. K+ is more efficient than Na+, which is again more efficient than Li+ in displacing heparin from these proteins. The kinetics of the reaction between thrombin and antithrombin in the presence of heparin were studied by using an assay where synthetic peptide substrate is present in the reaction mixture during the reaction between proteinase and inhibitor. The kinetics are studied at various electrolyte compositions of the medium and the results are compared with those obtained from the binding studies performed under similar conditions. The results are consistent with a model where binding of heparin to antithrombin causes enhancement of the reaction rate, and where this enhancement is abolished again when additional binding of heparin to thrombin takes place on further addition of heparin. PMID:6870832

  10. A Universal Base in a Specific Role: Tuning up a Thrombin Aptamer with 5-Nitroindole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Vladimir B.; Varizhuk, Anna M.; Pozmogova, Galina E.; Smirnov, Igor P.; Kolganova, Natalia A.; Timofeev, Edward N.

    2015-11-01

    In this study we describe new modified analogs of the thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) containing 5-nitroindole residues. It has been shown that all modified TBAs form an anti-parallel G-quadruplex structure and retain the ability to inhibit thrombin. The most advanced TBA variant (TBA-N8) has a substantially increased clotting time and two-fold lower IC50 value compared to the unmodified prototype. Molecular modelling studies suggest that the improved anticoagulant properties of TBA-N8 result from changes in the binding mode of the analog. A modified central loop in TBA-N8 is presumed to participate in the binding of the target protein. Studies of FAM labelled TBA and TBA-N8 showed an improved binding affinity of the modified aptamer and provided evidence of a direct interaction between the modified central loop and thrombin. Our findings have implications for the design of new aptamers with improved binding affinities.

  11. A Universal Base in a Specific Role: Tuning up a Thrombin Aptamer with 5-Nitroindole

    PubMed Central

    Tsvetkov, Vladimir B.; Varizhuk, Anna M.; Pozmogova, Galina E.; Smirnov, Igor P.; Kolganova, Natalia A.; Timofeev, Edward N.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we describe new modified analogs of the thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) containing 5-nitroindole residues. It has been shown that all modified TBAs form an anti-parallel G-quadruplex structure and retain the ability to inhibit thrombin. The most advanced TBA variant (TBA-N8) has a substantially increased clotting time and two-fold lower IC50 value compared to the unmodified prototype. Molecular modelling studies suggest that the improved anticoagulant properties of TBA-N8 result from changes in the binding mode of the analog. A modified central loop in TBA-N8 is presumed to participate in the binding of the target protein. Studies of FAM labelled TBA and TBA-N8 showed an improved binding affinity of the modified aptamer and provided evidence of a direct interaction between the modified central loop and thrombin. Our findings have implications for the design of new aptamers with improved binding affinities.

  12. Percutaneous Thrombin Injection to Complete SMA Pseudoaneurysm Exclusion After Failing of Endograft Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Szopinski, Piotr Ciostek, Piotr; Pleban, Eliza; Iwanowski, Jaroslaw; Krol, Malgorzata Serafin-; Marianowska, Agnieszka; Noszczyk, Wojciech

    2005-05-15

    Visceral aneurysms are potentially life-threatening vascular lesions. Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) pseudoaneurysms are a rare but well-recognized complication of chronic pancreatitis. Open surgical repair of such an aneurysm, especially in patients after previous surgical treatment, might be dangerous and risky. Stent graft implantation makes SMA pseudoaneurysm exclusion possible and therefore avoids a major abdominal operation. Percutaneous direct thrombin injection is also one of the methods of treating aneurysms in this area. We report a first case of percutaneous ultrasound-guided thrombin injection to complete SMA pseudoaneurysm exclusion after an unsuccessful endograft placement. Six-month follow-up did not demonstrate any signs of aneurysm recurrence.

  13. The thrombin receptor extracellular domain contains sites crucial for peptide ligand-induced activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bahou, W F; Coller, B S; Potter, C L; Norton, K J; Kutok, J L; Goligorsky, M S

    1993-01-01

    A thrombin receptor (TR) demonstrating a unique activation mechanism has recently been isolated from a megakaryocytic (Dami) cell line. To further study determinants of peptide ligand-mediated activation phenomenon, we have isolated, cloned, and stably expressed the identical receptor from a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) library. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing a functional TR (CHO-TR), platelets, and HUVECs were then used to specifically characterize alpha-thrombin- and peptide ligand-induced activation responses using two different antibodies: anti-TR34-52 directed against a 20-amino acid peptide spanning the thrombin cleavage site, and anti-TR1-160 generated against the NH2-terminal 160 amino acids of the TR expressed as a chimeric protein in Escherichia coli. Activation-dependent responses to both alpha-thrombin (10 nM) and peptide ligand (20 microM) were studied using fura 2-loaded cells and microspectrofluorimetry. Whereas preincubation of CHO-TR with anti-TR34-52 abolished only alpha-thrombin-induced [Ca2+]i transients, preincubation with anti-TR1-160 abrogated both alpha-thrombin- and peptide ligand-induced responses. This latter inhibitory effect was dose dependent and similar for both agonists, with an EC50 of approximately 90 micrograms/ml. Anti-TR1-160 similarly abolished peptide ligand-induced [Ca2+]i transients in platelets and HUVECs, whereas qualitatively different responses characterized by delayed but sustained elevations in [Ca2+]i transients were evident using alpha-thrombin. Platelet aggregation to low concentrations of both ligands was nearly abolished by anti-TR1-160, although some shape change remained; anti-TR34-52 only inhibited alpha-thrombin-induced aggregation. These data establish that a critical recognition sequence for peptide ligand-mediated receptor activation is contained on the NH2-terminal portion of the receptor, upstream from the first transmembrane domain. Furthermore, alpha-thrombin

  14. Efficient Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Technique Identifies Direct Interaction of Small Molecule Inhibitors with the Target Protein.

    PubMed

    Gal, Maayan; Bloch, Itai; Shechter, Nelia; Romanenko, Olga; Shir, Ofer M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play a critical role in regulating many cellular processes. Finding novel PPI inhibitors that interfere with specific binding of two proteins is considered a great challenge, mainly due to the complexity involved in characterizing multi-molecular systems and limited understanding of the physical principles governing PPIs. Here we show that the combination of virtual screening techniques, which are capable of filtering a large library of potential small molecule inhibitors, and a unique secondary screening by isothermal titration calorimetry, a label-free method capable of observing direct interactions, is an efficient tool for finding such an inhibitor. In this study we applied this strategy in a search for a small molecule capable of interfering with the interaction of the tumor-suppressor p53 and the E3-ligase MDM2. We virtually screened a library of 15 million small molecules that were filtered to a final set of 80 virtual hits. Our in vitro experimental assay, designed to validate the activity of mixtures of compounds by isothermal titration calorimetry, was used to identify an active molecule against MDM2. At the end of the process the small molecule (4S,7R)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-hydroxy-2,7-dimethyl-N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl)-4,6,7,8 tetrahydrIoquinoline-3-carboxamide was found to bind MDM2 with a dissociation constant of ~2 µM. Following the identification of this single bioactive compound, spectroscopic measurements were used to further characterize the interaction of the small molecule with the target protein. 2D NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding region of the small molecule, and fluorescence polarization measurement confirmed that it indeed competes with p53.

  15. Protein-Directed Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry: A Guide to Protein Ligand and Inhibitor Discovery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renjie; Leung, Ivanhoe K H

    2016-07-16

    Protein-directed dynamic combinatorial chemistry is an emerging technique for efficient discovery of novel chemical structures for binding to a target protein. Typically, this method relies on a library of small molecules that react reversibly with each other to generate a combinatorial library. The components in the combinatorial library are at equilibrium with each other under thermodynamic control. When a protein is added to the equilibrium mixture, and if the protein interacts with any components of the combinatorial library, the position of the equilibrium will shift and those components that interact with the protein will be amplified, which can then be identified by a suitable biophysical technique. Such information is useful as a starting point to guide further organic synthesis of novel protein ligands and enzyme inhibitors. This review uses literature examples to discuss the practicalities of applying this method to inhibitor discovery, in particular, the set-up of the combinatorial library, the reversible reactions that may be employed, and the choice of detection methods to screen protein ligands from a mixture of reversibly forming molecules.

  16. Inhibition of thrombin activity with DNA-aptamers.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolsky, A B; Titaeva, E V; Khaspekova, S G; Spiridonova, V A; Kopylov, A M; Mazurov, A V

    2009-07-01

    The effects of two DNA aptamers (oligonucleotides) 15TBA and 31TBA (15- and 31-mer thrombin-binding aptamers, respectively) on thrombin activity were studied. Both aptamers added to human plasma dose-dependently increased thrombin time (fibrin formation upon exposure to exogenous thrombin), prothrombin time (clotting activation by the extrinsic pathway), and activated partial thromboplastin time (clotting activation by the intrinsic pathway). At the same time, these aptamers did not modify amidolytic activity of thrombin evaluated by cleavage of synthetic chromogenic substrate. Aptamers also inhibited thrombin-induced human platelet aggregation. The inhibitory effects of 31TBA manifested at lower concentrations than those of 15TBA in all tests. These data indicate that the studied antithrombin DNA aptamers effectively suppress its two key reactions, fibrin formation and stimulation of platelet aggregation, without modifying active center of the thrombin molecule. PMID:19902090

  17. Thrombin Promotes Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Expression through the PKCδ/c-Src/EGFR/PI3K/Akt/AP-1 Signaling Pathway in Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Yin; Lin, Hsiu-Jung; Chen, Hsin-Shui; Cheng, Shi-Yann; Hsu, Horng-Chaung; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Thrombin is a key mediator of fibrin deposition, angiogenesis, and proinflammatory processes. Abnormalities in these processes are primary features of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) may contribute to the breakdown of articular cartilage during arthritis. However, the role of thrombin in MMP-13 production in chondrocytes is unknown. In this study, we investigated the intracellular signaling pathways involved in thrombin-induced MMP-13 expression in human chondrocytes. We found that stimulation with thrombin led to increased secretion of MMP-13 in cultured human chondrocytes. Further, this thrombin-induced MMP-13 production was reduced after transfection with siRNAs against protease activated receptors 1 and 3 (PAR1 and PAR3), but not with PAR4 siRNA. Treatment with specific inhibitors for PKCδ, c-Src, EGFR, PI3K, Akt, or AP-1 or with the corresponding siRNAs against these signaling proteins also abolished the thrombin-mediated increase in MMP-13 production in chondrocytes. Our results provide evidence that thrombin acts through the PAR1/PAR3 receptors and activates PKCδ and c-Src, resulting in EGFR transactivation and activation of PI3K, Akt, and finally AP-1 on the MMP-13 promoter, thereby contributing to cartilage destruction during arthritis. PMID:24385683

  18. Thrombin as important factor for cutaneous wound healing: comparison of fibrin biomatrices in vitro and in a rat excisional wound healing model.

    PubMed

    Gugerell, Alfred; Pasteiner, Waltraud; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Kober, Johanna; Meinl, Alexandra; Pfeifer, Sabine; Hartinger, Joachim; Wolbank, Susanne; Goppelt, Andreas; Redl, Heinz; Mittermayr, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Fibrin biomatrices have been used for many years for hemostasis and sealing and are a well-established surgical tool. The objective of the present study was to compare two commercially available fibrin biomatrices regarding the effect of their thrombin concentration on keratinocytes and wound healing in vitro and in vivo. Keratinocytes showed significant differences in adhesion, viability, and morphology in the presence of the fibrin matrices in vitro. A high thrombin concentration (800-1,200 IU/mL) caused deteriorated cell compatibility. By using a thrombin inhibitor, those differences could be reversed. In a rat excisional wound healing model, we observed more rapid wound closure and less wound severity in wounds treated with a fibrin matrix containing a lower concentration of thrombin (4 IU/mL). Furthermore, fewer new functional vessels and a lower level of vascular endothelial growth factor were measured in wounds after 7 days treated with the matrix with higher thrombin concentration. These in vivo results may be partially explained by the in vitro biocompatibility data. Additionally, results show that low thrombin biomatrices were degraded faster than the high thrombin material. Hence, we conclude that the composition of fibrin biomatrices influences keratinocytes and therefore has an impact on wound healing.

  19. Active site-directed plasmin inhibitors: Extension on the P2 residue.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Koushi; Gohda, Keigo; Teno, Naoki; Wanaka, Keiko; Tsuda, Yuko

    2016-02-15

    Based on the structure of YO-2 [N-(trans-4-aminomethylcyclohexanecarbonyl)-l-Tyr(O-picolyl)-NH-octyl], active site-directed plasmin (Plm) inhibitors were explored. The picolyl moiety in the Tyr(O-picolyl) residue (namely, the P2 residue) was replaced with smaller or larger groups, such as hydrogen, tert-butyl, benzyl, (2-naphthyl)methyl, and (quinolin-2-yl)methyl. Those efforts produced compound 17 {N-(trans-4-aminomethylcyclohexanecarbonyl)-l-Tyr[O-(quinolin-2-yl)methyl]-NH-octyl} [IC50=0.22 and 77μM for Plm and urokinase (UK), respectively], which showed not only 2.4-fold greater Plm inhibition than YO-2, but also an improvement in selectivity (Plm/UK) by 35-fold. The docking experiments of the Plm-17 complexes disclosed that the amino group of the tranexamyl moiety interacted with the side-chain of Asp753 which formed S1 site.

  20. Heparin enhances the catalytic activity of des-ETW-thrombin.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, C A; Deadman, J J; Le Bonniec, B F; Elgendy, S; Kakkar, V V; Scully, M F

    1996-04-01

    The thrombin mutant, des-ETW-thrombin, lacking Glu(146), Thr(147), and Trp(148) within a unique insertion loop located at the extreme end of the primary specificity pocket, has been shown previously to exhibit reduced catalytic activity with respect to macromolecular and synthetic thrombin substrates and reduced or enhanced susceptibility to inhibition. Investigation of the hydrolysis of peptidyl p-nitroanilide substrates by des-ETW-thrombin showed increased activity in the presence of heparin and other sulphated glycosaminoglycans. No effect was observed upon the activity of wild-type thrombin. Heparin was found to decrease the K(m) for cleavage of four thrombin-specific substrates by des-ETW-thrombin by 3-4-fold. Similarly, pentosan polysulphate (PPS) decreased the K(m) with these substrates by 8-10-fold. Heparin also increased the rate of inhibition of des-ETW-thrombin by antithrombin III and D-phenylalanyl-prolyl-arginylchloromethane (PPACK). The inhibition of des-ETW-thrombin by a number of thrombin-specific peptide boronic acids also showed significant reduction in the final K(i) in the presence of heparin, due to reduction in the off-rate. A peptide analogue of a sequence of hirudin which binds thrombin tightly to exosite I (fibrinogen recognition site) potentiated the activity of des-ETW-thrombin against peptide p-nitroanilide substrates in a manner similar to heparin. The K(i) for the inhibition of des-ETW-thrombin by p-aminobenzamidine was decreased by these ligands from 9.7 mM to 7.5 mM, 5.1 mM, and 2.5 mM in the presence of heparin, hirudin peptide and PPS respectively, suggesting the increased catalytic activity is due to enhanced access to the primary specificity pocket. The positive influence of these ligands on des-ETW-thrombin was reversed in the presence of ATP or ADP; the latter has previously been shown to inhibit thrombin activity by blocking initial interaction with fibrinogen at exosite 1. Because the effect of heparin and PPS is similar to

  1. Discovery of direct inhibitors of Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction as potential therapeutic and preventive agents.

    PubMed

    Abed, Dhulfiqar Ali; Goldstein, Melanie; Albanyan, Haifa; Jin, Huijuan; Hu, Longqin

    2015-07-01

    The Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway is an important antioxidant defense mechanism that protects cells from oxidative stress and the Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction (PPI) has become an important drug target to upregulate the expression of ARE-controlled cytoprotective oxidative stress response enzymes in the development of therapeutic and preventive agents for a number of diseases and conditions. However, most known Nrf2 activators/ARE inducers are indirect inhibitors of Keap1-Nrf2 PPI and they are electrophilic species that act by modifying the sulfhydryl groups of Keap1׳s cysteine residues. The electrophilicity of these indirect inhibitors may cause "off-target" side effects by reacting with cysteine residues of other important cellular proteins. Efforts have recently been focused on the development of direct inhibitors of Keap1-Nrf2 PPI. This article reviews these recent research efforts including the development of high throughput screening assays, the discovery of peptide and small molecule direct inhibitors, and the biophysical characterization of the binding of these inhibitors to the target Keap1 Kelch domain protein. These non-covalent direct inhibitors of Keap1-Nrf2 PPI could potentially be developed into effective therapeutic or preventive agents for a variety of diseases and conditions.

  2. Mutant B-Raf(V600E) Promotes Melanoma Paracellular Transmigration by Inducing Thrombin-mediated Endothelial Junction Breakdown.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pu; Feng, Shan; Liu, Gentao; Wang, Heyong; Zhu, Huifeng; Ren, Qiao; Bai, Huiyuan; Fu, Changliang; Dong, Cheng

    2016-01-29

    Tumor invasiveness depends on the ability of tumor cells to breach endothelial barriers. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which the adhesion of melanoma cells to endothelium regulates adherens junction integrity and modulates tumor transendothelial migration (TEM) by initiating thrombin generation. We found that the B-Raf(V600E) mutation in metastatic melanoma cells up-regulated tissue factor (TF) expression on cell membranes and promoted thrombin production. Co-culture of endothelial monolayers with metastatic melanoma cells mediated the opening of inter-endothelial spaces near melanoma cell contact sites in the presence of platelet-free plasma (PFP). By using small interfering RNA (siRNA), we demonstrated that B-Raf(V600E) and TF silencing attenuated the focal disassembly of adherens junction induced by tumor contact. Vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin) disassembly was dependent on phosphorylation of p120-catenin on Ser-879 and VE-cadherin on Tyr-658, Tyr-685, and Tyr-731, which can be prevented by treatment with the thrombin inhibitor, hirudin, or by silencing the thrombin receptor, protease-activated receptor-1, in endothelial cells. We also provided strong evidence that tumor-derived thrombin enhanced melanoma TEM by inducing ubiquitination-coupled VE-cadherin internalization, focal adhesion formation, and actin assembly in endothelium. Confocal microscopic analysis of tumor TEM revealed that junctions transiently opened and resealed as tumor cells accomplished TEM. In addition, in the presence of PFP, tumor cells preferentially transmigrated via paracellular routes. PFP supported melanoma transmigration under shear conditions via a B-Raf(V600E)-thrombin-dependent mechanism. We concluded that the activation of thrombin generation by cancer cells in plasma is an important process regulating melanoma extravasation by disrupting endothelial junction integrity. PMID:26504080

  3. A balance between TFPI and thrombin-mediated platelet activation is required for murine embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Ellery, Paul E. R.; Maroney, Susan A.; Cooley, Brian C.; Luyendyk, James P.; Zogg, Mark; Weiler, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is a critical anticoagulant protein present in endothelium and platelets. Mice lacking TFPI (Tfpi−/−) die in utero from disseminated intravascular coagulation. They are rescued by concomitant tissue factor (TF) deficiency, demonstrating that TFPI modulates TF function in vivo. Recent studies have found TFPI inhibits prothrombinase activity during the initiation of coagulation and limits platelet accumulation during thrombus formation, implicating TFPI in modulating platelet procoagulant activity. To examine whether altered platelet function would compensate for the lack of TFPI and rescue TFPI-null embryonic lethality, Tfpi+/− mice lacking the platelet thrombin receptor, protease activated receptor 4 (PAR4; Par4−/−), or its coreceptor, PAR3, were mated. PAR3 deficiency did not rescue Tfpi−/− embryos, but >40% of expected Tfpi−/−:Par4−/− offspring survived to adulthood. Adult Tfpi−/−:Par4−/− mice did not exhibit overt thrombosis. However, they had focal sterile inflammation with fibrin(ogen) deposition in the liver and elevated plasma thrombin-antithrombin complexes, indicating activation of coagulation at baseline. Tfpi−/−:Par4−/− mice have platelet and fibrin accumulation similar to Par4−/− mice following venous electrolytic injury but were more susceptible than Par4−/− mice to TF-induced pulmonary embolism. In addition, ∼30% of the Tfpi−/−:Par4−/− mice were born with short tails. Tfpi−/−:Par4−/− mice are the first adult mice described that lack TFPI with unaltered TF. They demonstrate that TFPI physiologically modulates thrombin-dependent platelet activation in a manner that is required for successful embryonic development and identify a role for TFPI in dampening intravascular procoagulant stimuli that lead to thrombin generation, even in the absence of thrombin-mediated platelet activation. PMID:25954015

  4. Elevated Cytokines, Thrombin and PAI-1 in Severe HCPS Patients Due to Sin Nombre Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bondu, Virginie; Schrader, Ron; Gawinowicz, Mary Ann; McGuire, Paul; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Hjelle, Brian; Buranda, Tione

    2015-01-01

    Sin Nombre Hantavirus (SNV, Bunyaviridae Hantavirus) is a Category A pathogen that causes Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome (HCPS) with case fatality ratios generally ranging from 30% to 50%. HCPS is characterized by vascular leakage due to dysregulation of the endothelial barrier function. The loss of vascular integrity results in non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, shock, multi-organ failure and death. Using Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) measurements, we found that plasma samples drawn from University of New Mexico Hospital patients with serologically-confirmed HCPS, induce loss of cell-cell adhesion in confluent epithelial and endothelial cell monolayers grown in ECIS cultureware. We show that the loss of cell-cell adhesion is sensitive to both thrombin and plasmin inhibitors in mild cases, and to thrombin only inhibition in severe cases, suggesting an increasing prothrombotic state with disease severity. A proteomic profile (2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry) of HCPS plasma samples in our cohort revealed robust antifibrinolytic activity among terminal case patients. The prothrombotic activity is highlighted by acute ≥30 to >100 fold increases in active plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) which, preceded death of the subjects within 48 h. Taken together, this suggests that PAI-1 might be a response to the severe pathology as it is expected to reduce plasmin activity and possibly thrombin activity in the terminal patients. PMID:25674766

  5. Inhibition of the generation of thrombin and factor Xa by a fucoidan from the brown seaweed Ecklonia kurome.

    PubMed

    Nishino, T; Fukuda, A; Nagumo, T; Fujihara, M; Kaji, E

    1999-10-01

    The effects of a fucoidan (C-II), which was purified from the brown seaweed Ecklonia kurome, on the generation of thrombin and factor Xa have been investigated by measuring the amidolytic activities by using the respective specific chromogenic substrates in both plasma and purified systems. C-II inhibited significantly the generation of thrombin in both the intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways, although the intrinsic inhibitory effect by C-II was more remarkable than the extrinsic one. On the other hand, C-II was a good inhibitor of the factor Xa generation in the intrinsic pathway, while it was a poor one in the extrinsic pathway. In the purified systems C-II also inhibited the formation of prothrombin-activating complex (i.e., prothrombinase), but not its activity. The concentration of C-II required for 50% inhibition of thrombin generation was about one-tenth to one-seventh of that of the activity of the generated thrombin in plasma. These results indicate that C-II has an inhibitory effect on the generation of thrombin by blocking the formation of prothrombinase and by preventing the generation of intrinsic factor Xa in addition to its antithrombin activity, and also that the generation-inhibitory effect is more remarkable than C-II's enhancement effect on the antithrombin activity by heparin cofactor II in plasma.

  6. The Role of Thrombin and Cell Contractility in Regulating Clustering and Collective Migration of Corneal Fibroblasts in Different ECM Environments

    PubMed Central

    Miron-Mendoza, Miguel; Graham, Eric; Kivanany, Pouriska; Quiring, Jonathan; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We previously reported that extracellular matrix composition (fibrin versus collagen) modulates the pattern of corneal fibroblast spreading and migration in 3-D culture. In this study, we investigate the role of thrombin and cell contractility in mediating these differences in cell behavior. Methods. To assess cell spreading, corneal fibroblasts were plated on top of fibrillar collagen and fibrin matrices. To assess 3-dimensional cell migration, compacted collagen matrices seeded with corneal fibroblasts were embedded inside acellular collagen or fibrin matrices. Constructs were cultured in serum-free media containing platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), with or without thrombin, the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632, and/or the myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin. We used 3-dimensional and 4-dimensional imaging to assess cell mechanical behavior, connectivity and cytoskeletal organization. Results. Thrombin stimulated increased contractility of corneal fibroblasts. Thrombin also induced Rho kinase–dependent clustering of cells plated on top of compliant collagen matrices, but not on rigid substrates. In contrast, cells on fibrin matrices coalesced into clusters even when Rho kinase was inhibited. In nested matrices, cells always migrated independently through collagen, even in the presence of thrombin. In contrast, cells migrating into fibrin formed an interconnected network. Both Y-27632 and blebbistatin reduced the migration rate in fibrin, but cells continued to migrate collectively. Conclusions. The results suggest that while thrombin-induced actomyosin contraction can induce clustering of fibroblasts plated on top of compliant collagen matrices, it does not induce collective cell migration inside 3-D collagen constructs. Furthermore, increased contractility is not required for clustering or collective migration of corneal fibroblasts interacting with fibin. PMID:25736789

  7. Thrombin mediates migration of rat brain astrocytes via PLC, Ca²⁺, CaMKII, PKCα, and AP-1-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Lee, I-Ta; Wu, Wen-Bin; Liu, Chiung-Ju; Hsieh, Hsi-Lung; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chien-Chung; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2013-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays a crucial role in pathological processes of brain inflammation, injury, and neurodegeneration. Thrombin has been known as a regulator of MMP-9 expression and cells migration. However, the mechanisms underlying thrombin-induced MMP-9 expression in rat brain astrocytes (RBA-1 cells) remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that thrombin induced the expression of pro-form MMP-9 and migration of RBA-1 cells, which were inhibited by pretreatment with the inhibitor of Gq-coupled receptor (GPAnt2A), Gi/o-coupled receptor (GPAnt2), PC-PLC (D609), PI-PLC (U73122), Ca(2+)-ATPase (thapsigargin, TG), calmodulin (CaMI), CaMKII (KN62), PKC (Gö6976 or GF109203X), MEK1/2 (PD98059), p38 MAPK (SB202190), JNK1/2 (SP600125), or AP-1 (Tanshinone IIA) or the intracellular calcium chelator (BAPTA/AM) and transfection with siRNA of PKCα, Erk2, JNK1, p38 MAPK, c-Jun, or c-Fos. In addition, thrombin-induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was attenuated by PPACK (a thrombin inhibitor). Thrombin further induced CaMKII phosphorylation and PKCα translocation, which were inhibited by U73122, D609, KN62, TG, or BAPTA/AM. Thrombin also induced PKCα-dependent p42/p44 MAPK and JNK1/2, but not p38 MAPK activation. Finally, we showed that thrombin enhanced c-Fos expression and c-Jun phosphorylation. c-Fos mRNA levels induced by thrombin were reduced by PD98059, SP600125, and Gö6976, but not SB202190. Thrombin stimulated in vivo binding of c-Fos to the MMP-9 promoter, which was reduced by pretreatment with SP600125 or PD98059, but not SB202190. These results concluded that thrombin activated a PLC/Ca(2+)/CaMKII/PKCα/p42/p44 MAPK and JNK1/2 pathway, which in turn triggered AP-1 activation and ultimately induced MMP-9 expression in RBA-1 cells.

  8. Hypersensitivity to thrombin of platelets from hypercholesterolemic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Winocour, P.D.; Rand, M.L.; Kinlough-Rathbone, R.L.; Mustard, J.F.

    1986-03-01

    Hypersensitivity of platelets to thrombin has been associated with hypercholesterolemia. The authors have examined the mechanisms involved in this hypersensitivity. Rats were given diets rich in milk fat and containing added cholesterol and taurocholate to produce hypercholesterolemia (HC) (262 +/- 25 mg%) or added sitosterol as a normocholesterolemic control (NC) (89 +/- 6 mg%). Washed platelets were prelabelled with /sup 14/C-serotonin. In the presence of acetylsalicyclic acid (ASA) (to inhibit thromboxane A/sub 2/ (TXA/sub 2/) formation) and creatine phosphate/creatine phosphokinase (CP/CPK) (to remove released ADP), HC platelets aggregated more (26 +/- 1%) and released more /sup 14/C (9.1 +/- 2.0%) than NC platelets (aggregation: 0%, p < 0.001; /sup 14/C release: 1.5 +/- 0.5%, p < 0.002) in response to thrombin (0.075 U/ml). Thus, a pathway independent of released ADP or TXA/sub 2/ formation is involved in the hypersensitivity of HC platelets to thrombin. Total binding of /sup 125/I-thrombin to HC platelets was less than that to NC platelets but HC platelets were smaller and had less protein than NC platelets; the thrombin binding per mg platelet protein was the same for HC and NC platelets, indicating that hypersensitivity to thrombin of HC platelets does not result from increased thrombin binding. Thus, hypersensitivity of HC platelets to thrombin is not due to TXA/sub 2/ formation, the action of released ADP or increased thrombin binding.

  9. Laccaic Acid A Is a Direct, DNA-competitive Inhibitor of DNA Methyltransferase 1*

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Rebecca L.; Cryderman, Diane E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Wallrath, Lori L.; Brenner, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Methylation of cytosines in CpG dinucleotides is the predominant epigenetic mark on vertebrate DNA. DNA methylation is associated with transcriptional repression. The pattern of DNA methylation changes during development and with disease. Human DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1), a 1616-amino acid multidomain enzyme, is essential for maintenance of DNA methylation in proliferating cells and is considered an important cancer drug target. Using a fluorogenic, endonuclease-coupled DNA methylation assay with an activated form of Dnmt1 engineered to lack the replication foci targeting sequence domain, we discovered that laccaic acid A (LCA), a highly substituted anthraquinone natural product, is a direct inhibitor with a 310 nm Ki. LCA is competitive with the DNA substrate in in vitro methylation assays and alters the expression of methylated genes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells synergistically with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. LCA represents a novel class of Dnmt-targeted molecular probes, with biochemical properties that allow it to distinguish between non DNA-bound and DNA-bound Dnmt1. PMID:23839987

  10. Direct imaging of the disruption of hepatitis C virus replication complexes by inhibitors of lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Lyn, Rodney K.; Kennedy, David C.; Sagan, Selena M.; Blais, David R.; Rouleau, Yanouchka; Pegoraro, Adrian F.; Xie, X. Sunney; Stolow, Albert; Pezacki, John Paul

    2009-11-10

    Here we have simultaneously characterized the influence of inhibitors of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) and the mevalonate pathway on hepatocyte lipid metabolism and the subcellular localization of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA using two-photon fluorescence (TPF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Using this approach, we demonstrate that modulators of PPARalpha signaling rapidly cause the dispersion of HCV RNA from replication sites and simultaneously induce lipid storage and increases in lipid droplet size. We demonstrate that reductions in the levels of cholesterol resulting from inhibition of the mevalonate pathway upregulates triglyceride levels. We also show that the rate of dispersion of HCV RNA is very rapid when using a PPARalpha antagonist. This occurs with a faster rate to that of direct inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) using lovastatin in living cells, demonstrating the potential therapeutic value of modulating host cell pathways as part of a strategy to eliminate chronic HCV infection.

  11. The vaccinia virus-encoded Bcl-2 homologues do not act as direct Bax inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Postigo, Antonio; Way, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Many viruses, including members of several poxvirus genera, encode inhibitors that block apoptosis by simultaneously binding the proapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins Bak and Bax. The Orthopoxvirus vaccinia virus encodes the Bcl-2-like F1 protein, which sequesters Bak but not Bax. However, N1, a potent virulence factor, is reported to be antiapoptotic and to interact with Bax. Here we investigated whether vaccinia virus inhibits Bak/Bax-dependent apoptosis via the cooperative action of F1 and N1. We found that Western Reserve (WR) and ΔN1L viruses inhibited drug- and infection-induced apoptosis equally. Meanwhile, infections with ΔF1L or ΔN1L/F1L virus resulted in similar levels of Bax activation and apoptosis. Outside the context of infection, N1 did not block drug- or Bax-induced cell death or interact with Bax. In addition to F1 and N1, vaccinia virus encodes further structural homologs of Bcl-2 proteins that are conserved in orthopoxviruses, including A46, A52, B14, C1, C6, C16/B22, K7, and N2. However, we found that these do not associate with Bax or inhibit drug-induced cell death. Based on our findings that N1 is not an antiapoptotic protein, we propose that the F1 orthologs represent the only orthopoxvirus Bcl-2 homolog to directly inhibit the Bak/Bax checkpoint.

  12. Effect of thrombin and bradykinin on endothelial cell mechanical properties monitored through membrane deformation.

    PubMed

    Cuerrier, Charles M; Gagner, Andréanne; Lebel, Réjean; Gobeil, Fernand; Grandbois, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The endothelium is closely implicated in the control and maintenance of the vascular homeostasis. The functions of endothelial cells are highly regulated by several agonists of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), which can mediate signals involved in morphological remodeling. Here, we evaluated the mechanical properties of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in responses to two physiological agonists namely thrombin and bradykinin. We used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique to study changes in cell membrane stiffness and interaction between the actin cytoskeleton and the cell membrane. HUVEC stimulated with thrombin (10 nM) and bradykinin (1 microM) showed a temporal increase in their membrane stiffness from 5.0 +/- 0.1 kPa (control) to 8.2 +/- 0.4 kPa (thrombin) and 7.3 +/- 0.5 kPa (bradykinin) and in membrane tethers elongation forces from 43.9 +/- 0.9 pN (control) to 49.5 +/- 0.8 pN (thrombin) and 53.1 +/- 0.8 pN (bradykinin). These results were consistent with the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton observed in fluorescence microscopy. This study demonstrates that these agonists induce important modifications of the cell membrane properties that can be directly linked to the reorganization and the interaction of the actin cytoskeleton near the apical side of the membrane. These changes in the mechanical properties of endothelial cells provide relevant informations in the biological and pathophysiological behaviors of endothelial cells. PMID:19415761

  13. Lupus anticoagulants form immune complexes with prothrombin and phospholipid that can augment thrombin production in flow.

    PubMed

    Field, S L; Hogg, P J; Daly, E B; Dai, Y P; Murray, B; Owens, D; Chesterman, C N

    1999-11-15

    Lupus anticoagulants (LA) are a family of autoantibodies that are associated with in vitro anticoagulant activity but a strong predisposition to in vivo thrombosis. They are directed against plasma phospholipid binding proteins, including prothrombin. We found that a murine monoclonal antiprothrombin antibody and 7 of 7 LA IgGs tested enhanced binding of prothrombin to 25:75 phosphatidyl serine:phosphatidyl choline vesicles in a concentration-dependent manner. We hypothesized that enhanced binding of prothrombin to phospholipid in the presence of LA IgG might result in increased thrombin production when reactions are performed in flow. Thrombin production by purified prothrombinase components was measured in a phospholipid-coated flow reactor. The flow reactor was incubated with prothrombin, calcium ions, and the IgGs and then perfused with prothrombin, calcium ions, the IgGs, factor Va, and factor Xa. A murine monoclonal antiprothrombin antibody and 4 of 6 LA IgGs from patients with a history of thrombosis increased thrombin production up to 100% over control in the first 15 minutes. In summary, LA IgGs concentrate prothrombin on a phospholipid surface that can augment thrombin production by prothrombinase in flow. These observations suggest that LA might propagate coagulation in flowing blood by facilitating prothrombin interaction with the damaged blood vessel wall.

  14. Ex vivo reversal of effects of rivaroxaban evaluated using thromboelastometry and thrombin generation assay

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, B.; Würtinger, P.; Streif, W.; Sturm, W.; Fries, D.; Bachler, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background In major bleeding events, the new direct oral anticoagulants pose a great challenge for physicians. The aim of the study was to test for ex vivo reversal of the direct oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban with various non-specific reversal agents: prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC), activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC), recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa), and fibrinogen concentrate (FI). Methods Blood was obtained from healthy volunteers and from patients treated with rivaroxaban. Blood samples from healthy volunteers were spiked with rivaroxaban to test the correlation between rivaroxaban concentration and coagulation tests. Patient blood samples were spiked with various concentrations of the above-mentioned agents and analysed using thromboelastometry and thrombin generation. Results When added in vitro, rivaroxaban was significantly (P<0.05) correlated with ROTEM® thromboelastometry EXTEM (extrinsic coagulation pathway) clotting time (CT), time to maximal velocity (MaxV−t), and with all measured thrombin generation parameters. In vivo, CT, MaxV−t, lag time, and peak thrombin generation (Cmax) were significantly correlated with rivaroxaban concentrations. Regarding reversal of rivaroxaban, all tested agents significantly (P<0.05) reduced EXTEM CT, but to different extents: rFVIIa by 68%, aPCC by 47%, PCC by 17%, and FI by 9%. Only rFVIIa reversed EXTEM CT to baseline values. Both PCC (+102%) and aPCC (+232%) altered overall thrombin generation (area under the curve) and increased Cmax (+461% for PCC, +87.5% for aPCC). Conclusions Thromboelastometry and thrombin generation assays do not favour the same reversal agents for rivaroxaban anticoagulation. Controlled clinical trials are urgently needed to establish doses and clinical efficacy of potential reversal agents. Clinical trial registration EudracCT trial no. 213-00474-30. PMID:27623677

  15. Development of Trypsin-Like Serine Protease Inhibitors as Therapeutic Agents: Opportunities, Challenges, and their Unique Structure-Based Rationales.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guyan; Bowen, J Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Xa) which prevents the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin. In addition, dabigatran etexikate (Pradaxa), the direct thrombin inhibitor (fIIa) is also now widely prescribed. PMID:26369819

  16. Thrombin Induces Tumor Cell Cycle Activation and Spontaneous Growth by Down-regulation of p27Kip1, in Association with the Up-regulation of Skp2 and MiR-222

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liang; Ibrahim, Sherif; Liu, Cynthia; Skaar, Jeffrey; Pagano, Michele; Karpatkin, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The effect of thrombin on tumor cell cycle activation and spontaneous growth was examined in synchronized serum-starved tumor cell lines and a model of spontaneous prostate cancer development in TRAMP mice. BrdUrd incorporation and propidium iodide staining of prostate LNCaP cells arrested in G0 and treated with thrombin or serum revealed a 48- and 29-fold increase in S phase cells, respectively, at 8 hours. Similar results were obtained with TRAMP cells and a glioblastoma cell line, T98G. Cell cycle kinases and inhibitors in synchronized tumor cells revealed high levels of p27Kip1 and low levels of Skp2 and cyclins D1 and A. Addition of thrombin, TFLLRN, or serum down-regulated p27Kip1 with concomitant induction of Skp2, Cyclin D1, and Cyclin A with similar kinetics. LNCaP p27Kip1-transfected cells or Skp2 knockdown cells were refractory to thrombin-induced cell cycle activation. MicroRNA 222, an inhibitor of p27Kip1, was robustly up-regulated by thrombin. The in vitro observations were tested in vivo with transgenic TRAMP mice. Repetitive thrombin injection enhanced prostate tumor volume 6- to 8-fold (P < 0.04). Repetitive hirudin, a specific potent antithrombin, decreased tumor volume 13- to 24-fold (P < 0.04). Thus, thrombin stimulates tumor cell growth in vivo by down-regulation of p27Kip1. PMID:19351827

  17. Characterization of irreversible kinase inhibitors by directly detecting covalent bond formation: a tool for dissecting kinase drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Klüter, Sabine; Simard, Jeffrey R; Rode, Haridas B; Grütter, Christian; Pawar, Vijaykumar; Raaijmakers, Hans C A; Barf, Tjeerd A; Rabiller, Matthias; van Otterlo, Willem A L; Rauh, Daniel

    2010-12-10

    Targeting protein kinases in cancer therapy with irreversible small-molecule inhibitors is moving to the forefront of kinase-inhibitor research and is thought to be an effective means of overcoming mutation-associated drug resistance in epidermal growth factor receptor kinase (EGFR). We generated a detection technique that allows direct measurements of covalent bond formation without relying on kinase activity, thereby allowing the straightforward investigation of the influence of steric clashes on covalent inhibitors in different resistant kinase mutants. The obtained results are discussed together with structural biology and biochemical studies of catalytic activity in both wild-type and gatekeeper mutated kinase variants to draw conclusions about the impact of steric hindrance and increased catalytic activity in drug-resistant kinase variants. PMID:21080395

  18. VEGF and thrombin induce MKP-1 through distinct signaling pathways: role for MKP-1 in endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Corttrell M; Chandrasekharan, Unni M; Mavrakis, Lori; DiCorleto, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    We have previously reported that MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1/CL100) is a thrombin-responsive gene in endothelial cells (ECs). We now show that VEGF is another efficacious activator of MKP-1 expression in human umbilical vein ECs. VEGF-A and VEGF-E maximally induced MKP-1 expression in ECs; however, the other VEGF subtypes had no effect. Using specific neutralizing antibodies, we determined that VEGF induced MKP-1 specifically through VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR-2), leading to the downstream activation of JNK. The VEGF-A(165) isoform stimulated MKP-1 expression, whereas the VEGF-A(162) isoform induced the gene to a lesser extent, and the VEGF-A(121) isoform had no effect. Furthermore, specific blocking antibodies against neuropilins, VEGFR-2 coreceptors, blocked MKP-1 induction. A Src kinase inhibitor (PP1) completely blocked both VEGF- and thrombin-induced MKP-1 expression. A dominant negative approach revealed that Src kinase was required for VEGF-induced MKP-1 expression, whereas Fyn kinase was critical for thrombin-induced MKP-1 expression. Moreover, VEGF-induced MKP-1 expression required JNK, whereas ERK was critical for thrombin-induced MKP-1 expression. In ECs treated with short interfering (si)RNA targeting MKP-1, JNK, ERK, and p38 phosphorylation were prolonged following VEGF stimulation. An ex vivo aortic angiogenesis assay revealed a reduction in VEGF- and thrombin-induced sprout outgrowth in segments from MKP-1-null mice versus wild-type controls. MKP-1 siRNA also significantly reduced VEGF-induced EC migration using a transwell assay system. Overall, these results demonstrate distinct MAPK signaling pathways for thrombin versus VEGF induction of MKP-1 in ECs and point to the importance of MKP-1 induction in VEGF-stimulated EC migration. PMID:18003751

  19. Coordinate activation of human platelet protease-activated receptor-1 and -4 in response to subnanomolar alpha-thrombin.

    PubMed

    Ofosu, Frederick A; Dewar, Lori; Craven, Sharon J; Song, Yingqi; Cedrone, Aisha; Freedman, John; Fenton, John W

    2008-10-01

    We previously demonstrated that human platelets activated with SFLLRN release PAR-1 activation peptide, PAR-1-(1-41), even in the presence of hirudin. This observation suggests that during their activation, platelets generate a protease that activates PAR-1. In this study, PAR-1 and -4 activation peptides were detected 10 s after thrombin, 10 microm SFLLRN, or 100 microm AYPGKF were added to platelets. When SFLLRN or AYGPKF were added to platelets, generation of PAR-1 and -4 activation peptides was complete at 10 s. Generation of both PAR-1 and -4 activation peptides in response to 1 nm alpha-thrombin was significantly inhibited by affinity-purified anti-PAR-1-(35-62) IgY, anti-PAR-4-(34-54) IgY, and by the specific PAR-1 antagonist BMS 200261, but not by the PAR-4 antagonist YD3. Effective inhibition of platelet aggregation in response to 1.0 nm alpha-thrombin occurred only in the presence of both anti-PAR span antibodies. We conclude that platelet activation initiated with thrombin proceeds via simultaneous PAR-1 and -4 activation. Inhibiting the activation of either PAR inhibits activation of the other. Both PAR-1 and -4 activation must be inhibited to prevent platelet activation subsequent to thrombin binding to platelets. The more efficient generation of PAR activation peptides by platelets activated with SFLLRN or AYGPKF, compared with alpha-thrombin, indicates that a platelet-derived serine protease that is inactivated by soybean trypsin inhibitor propagates PAR-1 and -4 activation. PMID:18682394

  20. Metabolism and excretion of rivaroxaban, an oral, direct factor Xa inhibitor, in rats, dogs, and humans.

    PubMed

    Weinz, C; Schwarz, T; Kubitza, D; Mueck, W; Lang, D

    2009-05-01

    Rivaroxaban is a novel, oral, direct factor Xa inhibitor for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic disorders. The objective of this study was to investigate the in vivo metabolism and excretion of rivaroxaban in rats, dogs, and humans. Single doses of [(14)C]rivaroxaban (3 and 1 mg/kg) were administered to rats (orally/intravenously) and dogs (orally), respectively. A single oral dose of [(14)C]rivaroxaban (10 mg) was administered to healthy human males (n = 4). Plasma and excreta were collected and profiled for radioactivity. Recovery of total radioactivity was high and > or = 92% in all species. Unchanged rivaroxaban was the major compound in plasma at all time points investigated, across all species. No major or pharmacologically active circulating metabolites were detected. Rivaroxaban and its metabolites were rapidly excreted; urinary excretion of radioactivity was 25 and 52%, and fecal excretion was 67 and 43% of the dose in rats and dogs, respectively. In humans, 66% of the dose was excreted renally (36% unchanged drug) and 28% in the feces. Radioactivity profiles in excreta were similar across species. Three metabolic pathways were identified: oxidative degradation of the morpholinone moiety (major pathway) and hydrolysis of the central amide bond and of the lactam amide bond in the morpholinone ring (minor pathways). M-1, the main metabolite in excreta of all species, was eliminated via both renal and fecal/biliary routes. In total, 82 to 89% of the dose administered was assigned to unchanged rivaroxaban and its metabolites in the excreta of rats, dogs, and humans. PMID:19196845

  1. Effect of the direct factor Xa inhibitor apixaban in rat models of thrombosis and hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, William A; Bostwick, Jeffrey S; Stewart, Anne B; Steinbacher, Thomas E; Xin, Baomin; Wong, Pancras C

    2010-06-01

    Apixaban is an oral, direct, and highly selective factor Xa inhibitor in late-stage clinical development for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Apixaban was evaluated in rat thrombosis and hemostasis models. Thrombosis was produced in the carotid artery by FeCl2 application, in the vena cava by either FeCl2 application or tissue factor injection, and in an arterial-venous shunt. Hemostasis was assessed using cuticle, renal cortex, and mesenteric artery bleeding times. Intravenous apixaban infusions of 0.1, 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg per hour increased the ex vivo prothrombin time to 1.24, 1.93, 2.75, and 3.98 times control, respectively. The 0.3, 1, and 3-mg/kg per hour doses inhibited thrombosis in all models. Concentrations for 50% thrombus reduction ranged from 1.84 to 7.57 microM. The 3-mg/kg per hour dose increased cuticle, renal, and mesenteric bleeding times to 1.92, 2.13, and 2.98 times control, respectively. Lower doses had variable (1 mg/kg per hour) or no effect (0.1, 0.3 mg/kg per hour) on hemostasis. Heparin's prolongation of renal and cuticle bleeding time was twice that of apixaban when administered at a dose that approximated apixaban (3 mg/kg per hour) efficacy in arterial thrombosis. In summary, apixaban was effective in a broad range of thrombosis models at doses producing modest increases in multiple bleeding time models. PMID:20224421

  2. A current evaluation of the safety of angiotensin receptor blockers and direct renin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Siragy, Helmy M

    2011-01-01

    The safety of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) for the treatment of hypertension and cardiovascular and renal diseases has been well documented in numerous randomized clinical trials involving thousands of patients. However, recent concerns have surfaced about possible links between ARBs and increased risks of myocardial infarction and cancer. Less is known about the safety of the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren, which was approved as an antihypertensive in 2007. This article provides a detailed review of the safety of ARBs and aliskiren, with an emphasis on the risks of cancer and myocardial infarction associated with ARBs. Safety data were identified by searching PubMed and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Web sites through April 2011. ARBs are generally well tolerated, with no known class-specific adverse events. The possibility of an increased risk of myocardial infarction associated with ARBs was suggested predominantly because the Valsartan Antihypertensive Long-Term Use Evaluation (VALUE) trial reported a statistically significant increase in the incidence of myocardial infarction with valsartan compared with amlodipine. However, no large-scale, randomized clinical trials published after the VALUE study have shown a statistically significant increase in the incidence of myocardial infarction associated with ARBs compared with placebo or non-ARBs. Meta-analyses examining the risk of cancer associated with ARBs have produced conflicting results, most likely due to the inherent limitations of analyzing heterogeneous data and a lack of published cancer data. An ongoing safety investigation by the FDA has not concluded that ARBs increase the risk of cancer. Pooled safety results from clinical trials indicate that aliskiren is well tolerated, with a safety profile similar to that of placebo. ARBs and aliskiren are well tolerated in patients with hypertension and certain cardiovascular and renal conditions; their benefits outweigh possible safety concerns

  3. 21 CFR 864.7875 - Thrombin time test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thrombin time test. 864.7875 Section 864.7875 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7875 Thrombin time test....

  4. 21 CFR 864.7875 - Thrombin time test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thrombin time test. 864.7875 Section 864.7875 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7875 Thrombin time test....

  5. 21 CFR 864.7875 - Thrombin time test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thrombin time test. 864.7875 Section 864.7875 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7875 Thrombin time test....

  6. 21 CFR 864.7875 - Thrombin time test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thrombin time test. 864.7875 Section 864.7875 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7875 Thrombin time test....

  7. 21 CFR 864.7875 - Thrombin time test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thrombin time test. 864.7875 Section 864.7875 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7875 Thrombin time test....

  8. Acidosis, magnesium and acetylsalicylic acid: Effects on thrombin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisevich, Nikolaj; Loznikova, Svetlana; Sukhodola, Aleksandr; Halets, Inessa; Bryszewska, Maria; Shcharbin, Dzmitry

    2013-03-01

    Thrombin, an enzyme from the hydrolase family, is the main component of the blood coagulation system. In ischemic stroke it acts as a serine protease that converts soluble fibrinogen into insoluble strands of fibrin forming blood clots in the brain. It has been found to phosphoresce at room temperature in the millisecond and microsecond ranges. The phosphorescence of thrombin was studied under physiological conditions, in acidosis (decrease of pH from 8.0 to 5.0) and on the addition of salts (magnesium sulfate and sodium chloride) and of acetylsalicylic acid, and its connection with thrombin function is discussed. Acidosis significantly increased the internal dynamics of thrombin. We propose that lactate-acidosis plays a protective role in stroke, preventing the formation of clots. The addition of NaCl and MgSO4 in different concentrations increased the internal dynamics of thrombin. Also, the addition of MgSO4 decreased thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. However, magnesium sulfate and acetylsalicylic acid in the therapeutic concentrations used for treatment of ischemic stroke had no effect on thrombin internal dynamics. The data obtained will help to elucidate the conformational stability of thrombin under conditions modulating lactate-acidosis and in the presence of magnesium sulfate.

  9. Acidosis, magnesium and acetylsalicylic acid: effects on thrombin.

    PubMed

    Borisevich, Nikolaj; Loznikova, Svetlana; Sukhodola, Aleksandr; Halets, Inessa; Bryszewska, Maria; Shcharbin, Dzmitry

    2013-03-01

    Thrombin, an enzyme from the hydrolase family, is the main component of the blood coagulation system. In ischemic stroke it acts as a serine protease that converts soluble fibrinogen into insoluble strands of fibrin forming blood clots in the brain. It has been found to phosphoresce at room temperature in the millisecond and microsecond ranges. The phosphorescence of thrombin was studied under physiological conditions, in acidosis (decrease of pH from 8.0 to 5.0) and on the addition of salts (magnesium sulfate and sodium chloride) and of acetylsalicylic acid, and its connection with thrombin function is discussed. Acidosis significantly increased the internal dynamics of thrombin. We propose that lactate-acidosis plays a protective role in stroke, preventing the formation of clots. The addition of NaCl and MgSO(4) in different concentrations increased the internal dynamics of thrombin. Also, the addition of MgSO(4) decreased thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. However, magnesium sulfate and acetylsalicylic acid in the therapeutic concentrations used for treatment of ischemic stroke had no effect on thrombin internal dynamics. The data obtained will help to elucidate the conformational stability of thrombin under conditions modulating lactate-acidosis and in the presence of magnesium sulfate.

  10. Role of thrombin signalling in platelets in haemostasis and thrombosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambrano, Gilberto R.; Weiss, Ethan J.; Zheng, Yao-Wu; Huang, Wei; Coughlin, Shaun R.

    2001-09-01

    Platelets are critical in haemostasis and in arterial thrombosis, which causes heart attacks and other events triggered by abnormal clotting. The coagulation protease thrombin is a potent activator of platelets ex vivo. However, because thrombin also mediates fibrin deposition and because multiple agonists can trigger platelet activation, the relative importance of platelet activation by thrombin in haemostasis and thrombosis is unknown. Thrombin triggers cellular responses at least in part through protease-activated receptors (PARs). Mouse platelets express PAR3 and PAR4 (ref. 9). Here we show that platelets from PAR4-deficient mice failed to change shape, mobilize calcium, secrete ATP or aggregate in response to thrombin. This result demonstrates that PAR signalling is necessary for mouse platelet activation by thrombin and supports the model that mouse PAR3 (mPAR3) does not by itself mediate transmembrane signalling but instead acts as a cofactor for thrombin cleavage and activation of mPAR4 (ref. 10). Importantly, PAR4-deficient mice had markedly prolonged bleeding times and were protected in a model of arteriolar thrombosis. Thus platelet activation by thrombin is necessary for normal haemostasis and may be an important target in the treatment of thrombosis.

  11. Regulated shedding of syndecan-1 and -4 ectodomains by thrombin and growth factor receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, S V; Fitzgerald, M L; Bernfield, M

    1997-06-01

    The syndecan family of transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans is abundant on the surface of all adherent mammalian cells. Syndecans bind and modify the action of various growth factors/cytokines, proteases/antiproteases, cell adhesion molecules, and extracellular matrix components. Syndecan expression is highly regulated during wound repair, a process orchestrated by many of these effectors. Each syndecan ectodomain is shed constitutively by cultured cells, but the mechanism and significance of this shedding are not understood. Therefore, we examined (i) whether physiological agents active during wound repair influence syndecan shedding, and (ii) whether wound fluids contain shed syndecan ectodomains. Using SVEC4-10 endothelial cells we find that certain proteases and growth factors accelerate shedding of the syndecan-1 and -4 ectodomains. Protease-accelerated shedding is completely inhibited by serum-containing media. Thrombin activity is duplicated by the 14-amino acid thrombin receptor agonist peptide that directly activates the thrombin receptor and is not inhibited by serum. Epidermal growth factor family members accelerate shedding but FGF-2, platelet-derived growth factor-AB, transforming growth factor-beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and vascular endothelial cell growth factor 165 do not. Shed ectodomains are soluble, stable in the conditioned medium, have the same size core proteins regardless whether shed at a basal rate, or accelerated by thrombin or epidermal growth factor-family members and are found in acute human dermal wound fluids. Thus, shedding is accelerated by activation of at least two distinct receptor classes, G protein-coupled (thrombin) and protein tyrosine kinase (epidermal growth factor). Proteases and growth factors active during wound repair can accelerate syndecan shedding from cell surfaces. Regulated shedding of syndecans suggests physiological roles for the soluble proteoglycan ectodomains.

  12. Thrombography reveals thrombin generation potential continues to deteriorate following cardiopulmonary bypass surgery despite adequate hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Raymond K; Sleep, Joseph R; Visner, Allison J; Raasch, David J; Lanza, Louis A; DeValeria, Patrick A; Torloni, Antonio S; Arabia, Francisco A

    2011-03-01

    The intrinsic and extrinsic activation pathways of the hemostatic system converge when prothrombin is converted to thrombin. The ability to generate an adequate thrombin burst is the most central aspect of the coagulation cascade. The thrombin-generating potential in patients following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may be indicative of their hemostatic status. In this report, thrombography, a unique technique for directly measuring the potential of patients' blood samples to generate adequate thrombin bursts, is used to characterize the coagulopathic profile in post-CPB patients. Post-CPB hemostasis is typically achieved with protamine reversal of heparin anticoagulation and occasionally supplemented with blood product component transfusions. In this pilot study, platelet poor plasma samples were derived from 11 primary cardiac surgery patients at five time points: prior to CPB, immediately post-protamine, upon arrival to the intensive care unit (ICU), 3 hours post-ICU admission, and 24 hours after ICU arrival. Thrombography revealed that the Endogenous Thrombin Potential (ETP) was not different between [Baseline] and [PostProtamine] but proceeded to deteriorate in the immediate postoperative period. At the [3HourPostICU] time point, the ETP was significantly lower than the [Baseline] values, 1233 +/- 591 versus 595 +/- 379 nM.min (mean +/- SD; n=9, p < .005), despite continued adequacy of hemostasis. ETPs returned to baseline values the day after surgery. Transfusions received, conventional blood coagulation testing results, and blood loss volumes are also presented. Despite adequate hemostasis, thrombography reveals an underlying coagulopathic process that could put some cardiac surgical patients at risk for postoperative bleeding. Thrombography is a novel technique that could be developed into a useful tool for perfusionists and physicians to identify coagulopathies and optimize blood management following CPB. PMID:21449230

  13. Planar Hall magnetoresistive aptasensor for thrombin detection.

    PubMed

    Sinha, B; Ramulu, T S; Kim, K W; Venu, R; Lee, J J; Kim, C G

    2014-09-15

    The use of aptamer-based assays is an emerging and attractive approach in disease research and clinical diagnostics. A sensitive aptamer-based sandwich-type sensor is presented to detect human thrombin using a planar Hall magnetoresistive (PHR) sensor in cooperation with superparamagnetic labels. A PHR sensor has the great advantages of a high signal-to-noise ratio, a small offset voltage and linear response in the low-field region, allowing it to act as a high-resolution biosensor. In the system presented here, the sensor has an active area of 50 µm × 50 µm with a 10-nm gold layer deposited onto the sensor surface prior to the binding of thiolated DNA primary aptamer. A polydimethylsiloxane well of 600-µm radius and 1-mm height was prepared around the sensor surface to maintain the same specific area and volume for each sensor. The sensor response was traced in real time upon the addition of streptavidin-functionalized magnetic labels on the sensor. A linear response to the thrombin concentration in the range of 86 pM-8.6 µM and a lower detection limit down to 86 pM was achieved by the proposed present method with a sample volume consumption of 2 µl. The proposed aptasensor has a strong potential for application in clinical diagnosis.

  14. The Transition of Prothrombin to Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, Sriram

    2013-01-01

    Summary The proteolytic conversion of prothrombin to thrombin catalysed by prothrombinase is one of the more extensively studied reactions of blood coagulation. Sophisticated biophysical and biochemical insights into the players of this reaction were developed in the early days of the field. Yet, many basic enzymological questions remained unanswered. I summarise new developments that uncover mechanisms by which high substrate specificity is achieved, and the impact of these strategies on enzymic function. Two principles emerge that deviate from conventional wisdom that has otherwise dominated thinking in the field. 1) Enzymic specificity is dominated by the contribution of exosite binding interactions between substrate and enzyme rather than by specific recognition of sequences flanking the scissile bond. Coupled with the regulation of substrate conformation as a result of the zymogen to proteinase transition, novel mechanistic insights result for numerous aspects of enzyme function. 2) The transition of zymogen to proteinase following cleavage is not absolute and instead, thrombin can reversibly interconvert between zymogen-like and proteinase-like forms depending on the complement of ligands bound to it. This establishes new paradigms for considering proteinase allostery and how enzyme function may be modulated by ligand binding. These insights into the action of prothrombinase on prothrombin have wide-ranging implications for the understanding of function in blood coagulation. PMID:23809130

  15. Mechanistic Modeling of the Effects of Acidosis on Thrombin Generation

    PubMed Central

    Mitrophanov, Alexander Y.; Rosendaal, Frits R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acidosis, a frequent complication of trauma and complex surgery, results from tissue hypoperfusion and IV resuscitation with acidic fluids. While acidosis is known to inhibit the function of distinct enzymatic reactions, its cumulative effect on the blood coagulation system is not fully understood. Here, we use computational modeling to test the hypothesis that acidosis delays and reduces the amount of thrombin generation in human blood plasma. Moreover, we investigate the sensitivity of different thrombin generation parameters to acidosis, both at the individual and population level. METHODS: We used a kinetic model to simulate and analyze the generation of thrombin and thrombin–antithrombin complexes (TAT), which were the end points of this study. Large groups of temporal thrombin and TAT trajectories were simulated and used to calculate quantitative parameters, such as clotting time (CT), thrombin peak time, maximum slope of the thrombin curve, thrombin peak height, area under the thrombin trajectory (AUC), and prothrombin time. The resulting samples of parameter values at different pH levels were compared to assess the acidosis-induced effects. To investigate intersubject variability, we parameterized the computational model using the data on clotting factor composition for 472 subjects from the Leiden Thrombophilia Study. To compare acidosis-induced relative parameter changes in individual (“virtual”) subjects, we estimated the probabilities of relative change patterns by counting the pattern occurrences in our virtual subjects. Distribution overlaps for thrombin generation parameters at distinct pH levels were quantified using the Bhattacharyya coefficient. RESULTS: Acidosis in the range of pH 6.9 to 7.3 progressively increased CT, thrombin peak time, AUC, and prothrombin time, while decreasing maximum slope of the thrombin curve and thrombin peak height (P < 10–5). Acidosis delayed the onset and decreased the amount of TAT generation (P

  16. Activation of pro-(matrix metalloproteinase-2) (pro-MMP-2) by thrombin is membrane-type-MMP-dependent in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and generates a distinct 63 kDa active species.

    PubMed Central

    Lafleur, M A; Hollenberg, M D; Atkinson, S J; Knäuper, V; Murphy, G; Edwards, D R

    2001-01-01

    Thrombin, a critical enzyme in the coagulation cascade, has also been associated with angiogenesis and activation of the zymogen form of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 or gelatinase-A). We show that thrombin activated pro-MMP-2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner in cultured human umbilical-vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to generate a catalytically active 63 kDa protein that accumulated as the predominant form in the conditioned medium. This 63 kDa thrombin-activated MMP-2 is distinct from the 62 kDa species found following concanavalin A or PMA stimulated pro-MMP-2 activation. Hirudin and leupeptin blocked thrombin-induced pro-MMP-2 activation, demonstrating that the proteolytic activity of thrombin is essential. However, activation was also dependent upon membrane-type-MMP (MT-MMP) action, since it was blocked by EDTA, o-phenanthroline, hydroxamate metalloproteinase inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and TIMP-4, but not TIMP-1. Thrombin inefficiently cleaved recombinant 72 kDa pro-MMP-2, but efficiently cleaved the 64 kDa MT-MMP-processed intermediate form in the presence of cells. Thrombin also rapidly (within 1 h) increased cellular MT-MMP activity, and at longer time points (>6 h) it increased expression of MT1-MMP mRNA and protein. Thus signalling via proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) may play a role in thrombin-induced MMP-2 activation, though this does not appear to involve PAR1, PAR2, or PAR4 in HUVECs. These results indicate that in HUVECs the activation of pro-MMP-2 by thrombin involves increased MT-MMP activity and preferential cleavage of the MT-MMP-processed 64 kDa MMP-2 form in the presence of cells. The integration of these proteinase systems in the vascular endothelium may be important during thrombogenesis and tissue remodelling associated with neovascularization. PMID:11415441

  17. Recent findings and future directions for interpolar mitotic kinesin inhibitors in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Stephanie M.; Collins, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The kinesin class of microtubule-associated motor proteins present attractive anti-cancer targets owing to their roles in key functions in dividing cells. Two interpolar mitotic kinesins Eg5 and HSET have opposing motor functions in mitotic spindle assembly with respect to microtubule movement, but both offer opportunities to develop cancer selective therapeutic agents. Here, we summarize the progress to date in developing inhibitors of Eg5 and HSET, with an emphasis on structural biology insights into the binding modes of allosteric inhibitors, compound selectivity and mechanisms of action of different chemical scaffolds. We discuss translation of preclinical studies to clinical experience with Eg5 inhibitors, recent findings on potential resistance mechanisms, and explore the implications for future anticancer drug development against these targets. PMID:26976726

  18. New direct inhibitors of InhA with antimycobacterial activity based on a tetrahydropyran scaffold.

    PubMed

    Pajk, Stane; Živec, Matej; Šink, Roman; Sosič, Izidor; Neu, Margarete; Chung, Chun-wa; Martínez-Hoyos, María; Pérez-Herrán, Esther; Álvarez-Gómez, Daniel; Álvarez-Ruíz, Emilio; Mendoza-Losana, Alfonso; Castro-Pichel, Julia; Barros, David; Ballell-Pages, Lluís; Young, Robert J; Convery, Maire A; Encinas, Lourdes; Gobec, Stanislav

    2016-04-13

    Tetrahydropyran derivative 1 was discovered in a high-throughput screening campaign to find new inhibitors of mycobacterial InhA. Following initial in-vitro profiling, a structure-activity relationship study was initiated and a focused library of analogs was synthesized and evaluated. This yielded compound 42 with improved antimycobacterial activity and low cytotoxicity. Additionally, the crystal structure of InhA in complex with inhibitor 1 was resolved, to reveal the binding mode and provide hints for further optimization. PMID:26900657

  19. Label-free impedimetric biosensor for thrombin using the thrombin-binding aptamer as receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frense, D.; Kang, S.; Schieke, K.; Reich, P.; Barthel, A.; Pliquett, U.; Nacke, T.; Brian, C.; Beckmann, D.

    2013-04-01

    This study presents the further establishment of impedimetric biosensors with aptamers as receptors. Aptamers are short single-stranded oligonucleotides which bind analytes with a specific region of their 3D structure. Electrical impedance spectroscopy is a sensitive method for analyzing changes on the electrode surface, e.g. caused by receptor-ligand-interactions. Fast and inexpensive prototyping of electrodes on the basis of commercially available compact discs having a 24 carat gold reflective layer was investigated. Electrode structures (CDtrodes [1]) in the range from few millimetres down to 100 microns were realized. The well-studied thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) was used as receptor for characterizing these micro- and macro-electrodes. The impedance signal showed a linear correlation for concentrations of thrombin between 1.0 nM to 100 nM. This range corresponds well with most of the references and may be useful for the point-of-care testing (POCT).

  20. Direct Effects, Compensation, and Recovery in Female Fathead Minnows Exposed to a Model Aromatase Inhibitor

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports on the effects of a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, on molecular and biochemical endpoints within the fathead minnow reproductive axis. Unlike previous studies, this work incorporated extensive time-course characterization over the course of an 8 d exposu...

  1. APTAMER-BASED SERRS SENSOR FOR THROMBIN DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, H; Baker, B R; Wachsmann-Hogiu, S; Pagba, C V; Laurence, T A; Lane, S M; Lee, L P; Tok, J B

    2008-07-02

    We describe an aptamer-based Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) sensor with high sensitivity, specificity, and stability for the detection of a coagulation protein, human a-thrombin. The sensor achieves high sensitivity and a limit of detection of 100 pM by monitoring the SERRS signal change upon the single step of thrombin binding to immobilized thrombin binding aptamer. The selectivity of the sensor is demonstrated by the specific discrimination of thrombin from other protein analytes. The specific recognition and binding of thrombin by the thrombin binding aptamer is essential to the mechanism of the aptamer-based sensor, as shown through measurements using negative control oligonucleotides. In addition, the sensor can detect 1 nM thrombin in the presence of complex biofluids, such as 10% fetal calf serum, demonstrating that the immobilized, 5{prime}-capped, 3{prime}-capped aptamer is sufficiently robust for clinical diagnostic applications. Furthermore, the proposed sensor may be implemented for multiplexed detection using different aptamer-Raman probe complexes.

  2. Thrombin regulation of synaptic plasticity: implications for physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Nicola; Itsekson, Zeev; Dominissini, Dan; Blatt, Ilan; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon; Tanne, David; Chapman, Joab

    2013-09-01

    Thrombin, a serine protease involved in the coagulation cascade has been recently shown to affect neuronal function following blood-brain barrier breakdown. Several lines of evidence have shown that thrombin may exist in the brain parenchyma under normal physiological conditions, yet its role in normal brain functions and synaptic transmission has not been established. In an attempt to shed light on the physiological functions of thrombin and Protease Activated Receptor 1 (PAR1) in the brain, we studied the effects of thrombin and a PAR1 agonist on long term potentiation (LTP) in mice hippocampal slices. Surprisingly, different concentrations of thrombin affect LTP through different molecular routes converging on PAR1. High thrombin concentrations induced an NMDA dependent, slow onset LTP, whereas low concentrations of thrombin promoted a VGCCs, mGluR-5 dependent LTP through activated Protein C (aPC). Remarkably, aPC facilitated LTP by activating PAR1 through an Endothelial Protein C Receptor (EPCR)-mediated mechanism which involves intracellular calcium stores. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which PAR1 may regulate the threshold for synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus and provide additional insights into the role of this receptor in normal and pathological conditions.

  3. Thrombin and human plasma kallikrein inhibition during simulated extracorporeal circulation block platelet and neutrophil activation.

    PubMed

    Wachtfogel, Y T; Kettner, C; Hack, C E; Nuijens, J H; Reilly, T M; Knabb, R M; Kucich, U; Niewiarowski, S; Edmunds, L H; Colman, R W

    1998-10-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass causes hemorrhagic complications, and initiates a chemical and cellular inflammatory response. Contact of blood with synthetic surfaces leads to qualitative and quantitative alterations in platelets, neutrophils, complement, and contact systems. Despite the fact that cardiopulmonary bypass is carried out in the presence of high doses of heparin, there is significant activation of both platelets and neutrophils. Thrombin is protected on cell and fibrin surfaces from antithrombin, even in the presence of high doses of heparin (approximately 5 U/ml). We therefore studied the effect of a small (Mr = 497), highly effective (Ki = 41 pM), reversible tripeptide inhibitor of thrombin, DUP 714 (1 microM), in a well characterized model of simulated extracorporeal circulation. In the absence of DUP 714, platelet counts decreased by 75% 5 min after the start of extracorporeal bypass and increased to 48% at 120 min of recirculation. DUP 714 significantly preserved platelet counts, decreased plasma levels of platelet beta-thromboglobulin levels, but did not prevent a decrease in sensitivity of platelets to adenosine diphosphate. Kallikrein-C1-inhibitor and C1-C1-inhibitor complexes increased progressively from 0.32 U/ml to 0.67 U/ml and from 4.45 U/ml to 7.25 U/ml, respectively, during 120 min of recirculation without DUP 714. Addition of DUP 714 significantly inhibited kallikrein-C1-inhibitor complex formation but did not affect C1-C1-inhibitor complexes. In the absence of DUP 714, human neutrophil elastase levels rose from a baseline of 0.01 +/- 0.00 microg/ml to 1.18 +/- 0.21 microg/ml during 120 min of recirculation. Human neutrophil elastase release at 120 min was significantly inhibited in the presence of DUP 714 to 37% of the value with heparin alone. These results indicated that addition of this novel thrombin (and kallikrein) inhibitor to heparin preserved platelet counts, decreased platelet secretion, and provided the additional benefit of

  4. The interaction of thrombin with platelet protease nexin

    SciTech Connect

    Knupp, C.L. )

    1989-10-01

    Thrombin interacts with a platelet protein which is immunologically related to fibroblast protease nexin and has been termed platelet protease nexin I (PNI). Conflicting hypotheses about the relationship of the thrombin-PNI complex formation to platelet activation have been proposed. The studies presented here demonstrate that the platelet-associated and supernatant complexes with added 125I-thrombin are formed only under conditions which produce platelet activation in normal and chymotrypsin-modified platelets. The platelet-associated complex is formed prior to the appearance of complexes in supernatants. Appearance of the supernatant complex coincides with the appearance of thrombospondin in the reaction supernatants. Excess native thrombin, dansylarginine N-(3-ethyl-1,5-pentanediyl) amide or hirudin can prevent radiolabeled platelet-associated complex formation if added before 125I-thrombin. DAPA or hirudin can prevent or dissociate complex formation if added up to one minute after thrombin but not at later time points. The surface associated complex is accessible to trypsin although a portion remains with the cytoskeletal proteins when thrombin-activated platelets are solubilized with Triton X 100. The surface-associated complex formation parallels many aspects of the specific measurable thrombin binding, yet it does not appear to involve other identified surface glycoprotein thrombin receptors or substrates. Although the time course of appearance of the complexes in supernatants is consistent with other data which suggest that PNI may be released from platelet granules during platelet activation, other explanations for the appearance of PNI on the platelet surface and in supernatants during platelet activation are possible.

  5. [Role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and myosin light chain kinase during the activation of thrombin receptors].

    PubMed

    Han, Yue; Gao, Hai-Li; Zhang, Wei; Bai, Xia; Dai, Lan; Sheng, Wen-Hong; Sun, Ai-Ning; Wu, De-Pei; Wang, Zhao-Yue; Ruan, Chang-Geng

    2009-06-01

    The objective of study was to compare the influences of wortmannin on platelet aggregation and platelet membrane surface glycoproteins GPIb expression after thrombin receptor activation, and to investigate the role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in the course of thrombin receptor activation. Peptide SFLLRN (PAR1-AP) and AYPGKF (PAR4-AP) were used for stimulating platelet, and the changes of platelet aggregation and GPIb were analyzed with 100 nmol/L wortmannin (inhibitor of PI3-K) and 10 micromol/L wortmannin (inhibitor of MLCK). The results indicated that the platelet activation was influenced by either concentration of wortmannin in response to PAR stimulation. Platelet aggregation was apparently inhibited by 10 micromol/L wortmannin through both PAR peptides, and was slightly inhibited by 100 nmol/L wortmannin only under PAR1-AP activation. In addition, GPIbalpha internalization was partly inhibited by 100 nmol/L wortmannin in response to PAR1 (p < 0.05 at 1, 2, 5 min) and PAR4 (p < 0.05 at 2, 5, 10 min) activation. Meanwhile, 10 micromol/L wortmannin induced little change for GPIbalpha centralisation in the course of PAR activation, with a delayed restoration of surface GPIbalpha observed under PAR1-AP activation, and no change of GPIbalpha redistribution existed under PAR4-AP activation. It is concluded that the different roles of PI3-K and MLCK exist in the course of thrombin receptor activation. PI3-K accelerates the short course of GPIb centralisation for two PAR signal pathways, while MLCK inhibits the restoration of GPIbalpha in PAR1 pathway. PMID:19549383

  6. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B initiates protein kinase C translocation and eicosanoid metabolism while inhibiting thrombin-induced aggregation in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Tran, Uyen; Boyle, Thomas; Shupp, Jeffrey W; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti

    2006-08-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) B, a heat-stable toxin secreted by Staphylococcus aureus, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and exacerbation of several critical illnesses. It has been hypothesized that enterotoxins may interact with blood products such as platelets, in addition to T-lymphocytes and renal proximal tubule cells. The aim of this present study was to elucidate whether SEB directly alters human platelet function. Human platelet rich plasma (PRP) was pre-incubated with SEA, SEB, SEC or TSST-1, (at various concentrations and incubation times). After incubation, PRP was exposed to thrombin and aggregation was assessed. Incubation with all toxins tested resulted in decreased aggregation, specifically; exposure to 10mu g/ml of SEB for 30 min caused a 20% decrease and a 49% decrease at 90 min. A similar reduction in aggregation was seen in samples incubated with phorbol myristate acetate, a known stimulator of protein kinase C (PKC). Further, platelets exposed to SEB exhibited an increased plasma membrane PKC activity. Sphingosine, an inhibitor of PKC proved to block the SEB-induced reduction in aggregation. SEB effects on platelet metabolism were investigated using high performance liquid chromatography showing up to a 2-fold increase of active metabolites lipoxin A4 and 12-HETE, as compared to control. These data indicate that SEB is able to induce platelet dysfunction, and these effects may be mediated through activation of PKC.

  7. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B initiates protein kinase C translocation and eicosanoid metabolism while inhibiting thrombin-induced aggregation in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Tran, Uyen; Boyle, Thomas; Shupp, Jeffrey W; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti

    2006-08-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) B, a heat-stable toxin secreted by Staphylococcus aureus, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and exacerbation of several critical illnesses. It has been hypothesized that enterotoxins may interact with blood products such as platelets, in addition to T-lymphocytes and renal proximal tubule cells. The aim of this present study was to elucidate whether SEB directly alters human platelet function. Human platelet rich plasma (PRP) was pre-incubated with SEA, SEB, SEC or TSST-1, (at various concentrations and incubation times). After incubation, PRP was exposed to thrombin and aggregation was assessed. Incubation with all toxins tested resulted in decreased aggregation, specifically; exposure to 10mu g/ml of SEB for 30 min caused a 20% decrease and a 49% decrease at 90 min. A similar reduction in aggregation was seen in samples incubated with phorbol myristate acetate, a known stimulator of protein kinase C (PKC). Further, platelets exposed to SEB exhibited an increased plasma membrane PKC activity. Sphingosine, an inhibitor of PKC proved to block the SEB-induced reduction in aggregation. SEB effects on platelet metabolism were investigated using high performance liquid chromatography showing up to a 2-fold increase of active metabolites lipoxin A4 and 12-HETE, as compared to control. These data indicate that SEB is able to induce platelet dysfunction, and these effects may be mediated through activation of PKC. PMID:16550298

  8. Thrombin activation and liver inflammation in advanced hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    González-Reimers, Emilio; Quintero-Platt, Geraldine; Martín-González, Candelaria; Pérez-Hernández, Onán; Romero-Acevedo, Lucía; Santolaria-Fernández, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with increased thrombotic risk. Several mechanisms are involved including direct endothelial damage by the HCV virus, with activation of tissue factor, altered fibrinolysis and increased platelet aggregation and activation. In advanced stages, chronic HCV infection may evolve to liver cirrhosis, a condition in which alterations in the portal microcirculation may also ultimately lead to thrombin activation, platelet aggregation, and clot formation. Therefore in advanced HCV liver disease there is an increased prevalence of thrombotic phenomena in portal vein radicles. Increased thrombin formation may activate hepatic stellate cells and promote liver fibrosis. In addition, ischemic changes derived from vascular occlusion by microthrombi favor the so called parenchymal extinction, a process that promotes collapse of hepatocytes and the formation of gross fibrous tracts. These reasons may explain why advanced HCV infection may evolve more rapidly to end-stage liver disease than other forms of cirrhosis. PMID:27182154

  9. The membrane potential modulates thrombin-stimulated Ca²⁺ mobilization and platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Albarrán, Letizia; Dionisio, Natalia; López, Esther; Salido, Ginés M; Rosado, Juan A

    2013-10-15

    G protein-coupled receptors can be directly modulated by changes in transmembrane voltage in a variety of cell types. Here we show that, while changes in the membrane voltage itself do not induce detectable modifications in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, platelet stimulation with thrombin or the PAR-1 and PAR-4 agonist peptides SFLLRN and AYPGKF, respectively, results in Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores that is sensitive to the membrane depolarisation. Direct activation of G proteins or phospholipase C by AlF4(-) and m-3M3FBS, respectively, leads to Ca(2+) release that is insensitive to changes in the membrane potential. Thapsigargin-, as well as OAG-induced Ca(2+) entry are affected by the membrane voltage, probably as a result of the modification in the driving force for Ca(2+) influx; however, hyperpolarisation does not enhance thrombin- or OAG-evoked Ca(2+) entry probably revealing the presence of a voltage-sensitive regulatory mechanism. Transmembrane voltage also modulates the activity of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) most likely due to a decrease in the phosphotyrosine content of the pump. Thrombin-stimulated platelet aggregation is modulated by membrane depolarisation by a mechanism that is, at least partially, independent of Ca(2+). These observations indicate that PAR-1 and PAR-4 receptors are modulated by the membrane voltage in human platelets. PMID:23988350

  10. Thrombin produces phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 by a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-independent mechanism in the human astrocytoma cell line 1321N1.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, M; Bayón, Y; Sánchez Crespo, M; Nieto, M L

    1997-01-01

    The release of [3H]arachidonic acid was studied in the 1321N1 astrocytoma cell line upon stimulation with thrombin. The effect of thrombin was antagonized by hirudin only when both compounds were added simultaneously, which suggests activation of thrombin receptor. Evidence that the cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) takes part in thrombin-induced arachidonate release was provided by the finding that thrombin induced retardation of the mobility of cPLA2 in SDS/polyacrylamide gels, which is a feature of the activation of cPLA2 by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Thrombin induced activation of two members of the MAP kinase family whose consensus primary sequence appears in cPLA2, namely p42-MAP kinase and c-Jun kinase. However, the activation of c-Jun kinase preceded the phosphorylation of cPLA2 more clearly than the activation of p42-MAK kinase did. Both cPLA2 and c-Jun kinase activation were not affected by PD-98059, a specific inhibitor of MAP kinase kinases, which indeed completely blocked p42-MAP kinase shift. Heat shock, a well-known activator of c-Jun kinase, also phosphorylated cPLA2 but not p42-MAP kinase. These data indicate the existence in astrocytoma cells of a signalling pathway triggered by thrombin receptor stimulation that activates a kinase cascade acting on the Pro-Leu-Ser-Pro consensus primary sequence, activates cPLA2, and associates the release of arachidonate with nuclear signalling pathways. PMID:9359863

  11. Thrombin receptor deficiency leads to a high bone mass phenotype by decreasing the RANKL/OPG ratio.

    PubMed

    Tudpor, Kukiat; van der Eerden, Bram C J; Jongwattanapisan, Prapaporn; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M; Bindels, René J M; Hoenderop, Joost G J

    2015-03-01

    Thrombin and its receptor (TR) are, respectively, expressed in osteoclasts and osteoblasts. However, their physiological roles on bone metabolism have not been fully elucidated. Here we investigated the bone microarchitecture by micro-computed tomography (μCT) and demonstrated increased trabecular and cortical bone mass in femurs of TR KO mice compared to WT littermates. Trabecular thickness and connectivity were significantly enhanced. The physiological role of TR on both inorganic and organic phases of bone is illustrated by a significant increase in BMD and a decrease in urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD) crosslink concentration in TR KO mice. Moreover, TR KO cortical bone expanded and had a higher polar moment of inertia (J), implying stronger bone. Bone histomorphometry illustrated unaltered osteoblast and osteoclast number and surface in femoral metaphyses, indicating that thrombin/TR regulates osteoblasts and osteoclasts at functional levels. Serum analysis showed a decrease in RANKL and an increase in osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels and reflected a reduced RANKL/OPG ratio in the TR KO group. In vitro experiments using MC3T3 pre-osteoblasts demonstrated a TR-dependent stimulatory effect of thrombin on the RANKL/OPG ratio. This effect was blocked by TR antagonist and p42/p44-ERK inhibitor. In addition, thrombin also intensified p42/p44-ERK expression and phosphorylation. In conclusion, the thrombin/TR system maintains normal bone remodeling by activating RANKL and limiting OPG synthesis by osteoblasts through the p42/44-ERK signaling pathway. Consequently, TR deficiency inhibits osteoclastogenesis, resulting in a high bone mass phenotype. PMID:25460576

  12. Role of Rac 1 and cAMP in endothelial barrier stabilization and thrombin-induced barrier breakdown.

    PubMed

    Baumer, Y; Spindler, V; Werthmann, R C; Bünemann, M; Waschke, J

    2009-09-01

    Barrier stabilizing effects of cAMP as well as of the small GTPase Rac 1 are well established. Moreover, it is generally believed that permeability-increasing mediators such as thrombin disrupt endothelial barrier functions primarily via activation of Rho A. In this study, we provide evidence that decrease of both cAMP levels and of Rac 1 activity contribute to thrombin-mediated barrier breakdown. Treatment of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) with Rac 1-inhibitor NSC-23766 decreased transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) and caused intercellular gap formation. These effects were reversed by addition of forskolin/rolipram (F/R) to increase intracellular cAMP but not by the cAMP analogue 8-pCPT-2'-O-Methyl-cAMP (O-Me-cAMP) which primarily stimulates protein kinase A (PKA)-independent signaling via Epac/Rap 1. However, both F/R and O-Me-cAMP did not increase TER above control levels in the presence of NSC-23766 in contrast to experiments without Rac 1 inhibition. Because Rac 1 was required for maintenance of barrier functions as well as for cAMP-mediated barrier stabilization, we tested the role of Rac 1 and cAMP in thrombin-induced barrier breakdown. Thrombin-induced drop of TER and intercellular gap formation were paralleled by a rapid decrease of cAMP as revealed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The efficacy of F/R or O-Me-cAMP to block barrier-destabilizing effects of thrombin was comparable to Y27632-induced inhibition of Rho kinase but was blunted when Rac 1 was inactivated by NSC-23766. Taken together, these data indicate that decrease of cAMP and Rac 1 activity may be an important step in inflammatory barrier disruption.

  13. Recombinant Buckwheat Trypsin Inhibitor Induces Mitophagy by Directly Targeting Mitochondria and Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Hep G2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuanhua; Li, Shanshan; Ren, Rong; Li, Jiao; Cui, Xiaodong

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondria are essential targets for cancer chemotherapy and other disease treatments. Recombinant buckwheat trypsin inhibitor (rBTI), a member of the potato type I proteinase inhibitor family, was derived from tartary buckwheat extracts. Our results showed that rBTI directly targeted mitochondria and induced mitochondrial fragmentation and mitophagy. This occurs through enhanced depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation associated with the rise of the superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and glutathione peroxidase (GSH) content, and changes in the GSH/oxidized glutathione ratio. Mild and transient ROS induced by rBTI were shown to be important signaling molecules required to induce Hep G2 mitophagy to remove dysfunctional mitochondria. Furthermore, rBTI could directly induce mitochondrial fragmentation. It was also noted that rBTI highly increased colocalization of mitochondria in treated cells compared to nontreated cells. Tom 20, a subunit of the translocase of the mitochondrial outer membrane complex responsible for recognizing mitochondrial presequences, may be the direct target of rBTI.

  14. Recombinant Buckwheat Trypsin Inhibitor Induces Mitophagy by Directly Targeting Mitochondria and Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Hep G2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuanhua; Li, Shanshan; Ren, Rong; Li, Jiao; Cui, Xiaodong

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondria are essential targets for cancer chemotherapy and other disease treatments. Recombinant buckwheat trypsin inhibitor (rBTI), a member of the potato type I proteinase inhibitor family, was derived from tartary buckwheat extracts. Our results showed that rBTI directly targeted mitochondria and induced mitochondrial fragmentation and mitophagy. This occurs through enhanced depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation associated with the rise of the superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and glutathione peroxidase (GSH) content, and changes in the GSH/oxidized glutathione ratio. Mild and transient ROS induced by rBTI were shown to be important signaling molecules required to induce Hep G2 mitophagy to remove dysfunctional mitochondria. Furthermore, rBTI could directly induce mitochondrial fragmentation. It was also noted that rBTI highly increased colocalization of mitochondria in treated cells compared to nontreated cells. Tom 20, a subunit of the translocase of the mitochondrial outer membrane complex responsible for recognizing mitochondrial presequences, may be the direct target of rBTI. PMID:26301894

  15. Thrombomodulin Binding Selects the Catalytically Active Form of Thrombin.

    PubMed

    Handley, Lindsey D; Treuheit, Nicholas A; Venkatesh, Varun J; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2015-11-01

    Human α-thrombin is a serine protease with dual functions. Thrombin acts as a procoagulant, cleaving fibrinogen to make the fibrin clot, but when bound to thrombomodulin (TM), it acts as an anticoagulant, cleaving protein C. A minimal TM fragment consisting of the fourth, fifth, and most of the sixth EGF-like domain (TM456m) that has been prepared has much improved solubility, thrombin binding capacity, and anticoagulant activity versus those of previous TM456 constructs. In this work, we compare backbone amide exchange of human α-thrombin in three states: apo, D-Phe-Pro-Arg-chloromethylketone (PPACK)-bound, and TM456m-bound. Beyond causing a decreased level of amide exchange at their binding sites, TM and PPACK both cause a decreased level of amide exchange in other regions including the γ-loop and the adjacent N-terminus of the heavy chain. The decreased level of amide exchange in the N-terminus of the heavy chain is consistent with the historic model of activation of serine proteases, which involves insertion of this region into the β-barrel promoting the correct conformation of the catalytic residues. Contrary to crystal structures of thrombin, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results suggest that the conformation of apo-thrombin does not yet have the N-terminus of the heavy chain properly inserted for optimal catalytic activity, and that binding of TM allosterically promotes the catalytically active conformation. PMID:26468766

  16. A peptide (P2) derived from the variable heavy chain of an anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody (LYP20) inhibits leucocyte adhesion to thrombin-activated platelets and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Joseph F; McGregor, John L

    2003-02-01

    P-selectin, a member of the selectin family of adhesion molecules, is present in endothelial Weibel-Palade bodies and platelet alpha-granules, and is rapidly expressed on their surface upon activation, resulting in leucocyte adhesion. LYP20 is a functional monoclonal antibody previously generated in our laboratory that binds with high affinity and specificity directed against P-selectin. This binding is largely imparted by the specific sequence of amino acids present on the hypervariable portions of the IgG chains. We now show that a peptide derived from the heavy chain of mAb LYP20 dose dependently inhibits the adhesion of poly morphonuclear cells to resting and thrombin-activated endothelial cells (EC) and platelets. The scrambled form of this peptide, identical in amino acid composition to the authentic peptide but with altered sequence, was not inhibitory at corresponding concentrations. Binding studies revealed that this peptide also dose dependently bound to both resting and thrombin-activated EC and platelets. Our results may prove useful for the development of new therapeutic inhibitors to modulate leucocyte interactions in inflammatory disorders. PMID:12588346

  17. Inhibitor focusing: direct selection of drug targets from proteomes using activity-based probes.

    PubMed

    Nomanbhoy, Tyzoon K; Rosenblum, Jonathan; Aban, Arwin; Burbaum, Jonathan J

    2003-02-01

    In the latter stages of drug discovery and development, assays that establish drug selectivity and toxicity are important when side effects, which are often due to lack of specificity, determine drug candidate viability. There has been no comprehensive or systematic methodology to measure these factors outside of whole-animal assays, and such phenomenological assays generally fail to establish the additional targets of a given small molecule, or the molecular origin of toxicity. Consequently, small-molecule development programs destined for failure often reach advanced stages of testing, and the money and time invested in such programs could be saved if information on selectivity were available early in the process. Here, we present a methodology that utilizes chemical ABPs in combination with small-molecule inhibitors to selectively label small-molecule binding sites in whole proteomic samples. In principle, the ABP and small molecule will compete for similar binding sites, such that the small molecule will protect against modification by the ABP. Thus, after removal of the small molecule, the binding site for the ABP will be revealed, and a second probe can then be used to label the small-molecule binding sites selectively. To demonstrate this experimentally, we mapped the binding sites of the DPP4 inhibitor, IT, in a number of different tissue types. PMID:15090140

  18. Management of anti-thrombin III deficiency during pregnancy without administration of anti-thrombin III.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, J R; Geerts, W; Panju, A; Nguyen, P; Hirsh, J

    1986-02-15

    We report a patient with hereditary antithrombin III deficiency who was successfully treated with heparin throughout pregnancy. Functional antithrombin III levels fell to 0.32 U/ml during heparin treatment, but it was possible to achieve a heparin effect, measured by the activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin clotting time and heparin assay with subcutaneous heparin in doses of 30,000 U to 35,000 U/24 hours. This achieve an long term heparin effect was obtained without the need for antithrombin III infusions.

  19. Potentiation of thrombin generation in hemophilia A plasma by coagulation factor VIII and characterization of antibody-specific inhibition.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Bhavya S; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Doering, Christopher B; Meeks, Shannon L

    2012-01-01

    Development of inhibitory antibodies to coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) is the primary obstacle to the treatment of hemophilia A in the developed world. This adverse reaction occurs in 20-30% of persons with severe hemophilia A treated with fVIII-replacement products and is characterized by the development of a humoral and neutralizing immune response to fVIII. Patients with inhibitory anti-fVIII antibodies are treated with bypassing agents including recombinant factor VIIa (rfVIIa). However, some patients display poor hemostatic response to bypass therapy and improved treatment options are needed. Recently, we demonstrated that fVIII inhibitors display widely variable kinetics of inhibition that correlate with their respective target epitopes. Thus, it was hypothesized that for antibodies that display slow rates of inhibition, supplementation of rfVIIa with fVIII would result in improved thrombin generation and be predictive of clinical responses to this novel treatment regimen. In order to test this hypothesis, 10 murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with non-overlapping epitopes spanning fVIII, differential inhibition titers, and inhibition kinetics were studied using a thrombin generation assay. Of the 3 MAbs with high inhibitory titers, only the one with fast and complete (classically defined as "type I") kinetics displayed significant inhibition of thrombin generation with no improvement upon supplementation of rfVIIa with fVIII. The other two MAbs that displayed incomplete (classically defined as "type II") inhibition did not suppress the potentiation of thrombin generation by fVIII. All antibodies that did not completely inhibit fVIII activity demonstrated potentiation of thrombin generation by the addition of fVIII as compared to rfVIIa alone. In conclusion, fVIII alone or in combination with rfVIIa corrects the thrombin generation defect produced by the majority of anti-fVIII MAbs better than single agent rfVIIa. Therefore, combined fVIII/rfVIIa therapy

  20. Factor Xa Inhibitor Suppresses the Release of Phosphorylated HSP27 from Collagen-Stimulated Human Platelets: Inhibition of HSP27 Phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP Kinase.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Masanori; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kito, Yuko; Enomoto, Yukiko; Iida, Hiroki; Ogura, Shinji; Otsuka, Takanobu; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kozawa, Osamu; Iwama, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of factor Xa (FXa) are widely recognized as useful therapeutic tools for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation or venous thrombosis. Thrombin, which is rapidly generated from pro-thrombin through the activation of factor X to FXa, acts as a potent activator of human platelets. Thus, the reduction of thrombin generation by FXa inhibitor eventually causes a suppressive effect on platelet aggregation. However, little is known whether FXa inhibitors directly affect the function of human platelets. We have previously reported that collagen induces the phosphorylation of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), a low-molecular weight heat shock protein via Rac-dependent activation of p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in human platelets, eventually resulting in the release of HSP27. In the present study, we investigated the direct effect of FXa inhibitor on the collagen-induced human platelet activation. Rivaroxaban as well as edoxaban significantly reduced the collagen-induced phosphorylation of both HSP27 and p44/p42 MAP kinase without affecting the platelet aggregation. Rivaroxaban significantly inhibited the release of phosphorylated HSP27 from collagen-stimulated platelets but not the secretion of platelet derived growth factor-AB. In patients administrated with rivaroxaban, the collagen-induced levels of phosphorylated HSP27 were markedly diminished after 2 days of administration, which failed to affect the platelet aggregation. These results strongly suggest that FXa inhibitor reduces the collagen-stimulated release of phosphorylated HSP27 from human platelets due to the inhibition of HSP27 phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP kinase. PMID:26867010

  1. Factor Xa Inhibitor Suppresses the Release of Phosphorylated HSP27 from Collagen-Stimulated Human Platelets: Inhibition of HSP27 Phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP Kinase.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Masanori; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kito, Yuko; Enomoto, Yukiko; Iida, Hiroki; Ogura, Shinji; Otsuka, Takanobu; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kozawa, Osamu; Iwama, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of factor Xa (FXa) are widely recognized as useful therapeutic tools for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation or venous thrombosis. Thrombin, which is rapidly generated from pro-thrombin through the activation of factor X to FXa, acts as a potent activator of human platelets. Thus, the reduction of thrombin generation by FXa inhibitor eventually causes a suppressive effect on platelet aggregation. However, little is known whether FXa inhibitors directly affect the function of human platelets. We have previously reported that collagen induces the phosphorylation of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), a low-molecular weight heat shock protein via Rac-dependent activation of p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in human platelets, eventually resulting in the release of HSP27. In the present study, we investigated the direct effect of FXa inhibitor on the collagen-induced human platelet activation. Rivaroxaban as well as edoxaban significantly reduced the collagen-induced phosphorylation of both HSP27 and p44/p42 MAP kinase without affecting the platelet aggregation. Rivaroxaban significantly inhibited the release of phosphorylated HSP27 from collagen-stimulated platelets but not the secretion of platelet derived growth factor-AB. In patients administrated with rivaroxaban, the collagen-induced levels of phosphorylated HSP27 were markedly diminished after 2 days of administration, which failed to affect the platelet aggregation. These results strongly suggest that FXa inhibitor reduces the collagen-stimulated release of phosphorylated HSP27 from human platelets due to the inhibition of HSP27 phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP kinase.

  2. Factor Xa Inhibitor Suppresses the Release of Phosphorylated HSP27 from Collagen-Stimulated Human Platelets: Inhibition of HSP27 Phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Masanori; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kito, Yuko; Enomoto, Yukiko; Iida, Hiroki; Ogura, Shinji; Otsuka, Takanobu; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kozawa, Osamu; Iwama, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of factor Xa (FXa) are widely recognized as useful therapeutic tools for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation or venous thrombosis. Thrombin, which is rapidly generated from pro-thrombin through the activation of factor X to FXa, acts as a potent activator of human platelets. Thus, the reduction of thrombin generation by FXa inhibitor eventually causes a suppressive effect on platelet aggregation. However, little is known whether FXa inhibitors directly affect the function of human platelets. We have previously reported that collagen induces the phosphorylation of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), a low-molecular weight heat shock protein via Rac-dependent activation of p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in human platelets, eventually resulting in the release of HSP27. In the present study, we investigated the direct effect of FXa inhibitor on the collagen-induced human platelet activation. Rivaroxaban as well as edoxaban significantly reduced the collagen-induced phosphorylation of both HSP27 and p44/p42 MAP kinase without affecting the platelet aggregation. Rivaroxaban significantly inhibited the release of phosphorylated HSP27 from collagen-stimulated platelets but not the secretion of platelet derived growth factor-AB. In patients administrated with rivaroxaban, the collagen-induced levels of phosphorylated HSP27 were markedly diminished after 2 days of administration, which failed to affect the platelet aggregation. These results strongly suggest that FXa inhibitor reduces the collagen-stimulated release of phosphorylated HSP27 from human platelets due to the inhibition of HSP27 phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP kinase. PMID:26867010

  3. Rational identification of enoxacin as a novel V-ATPase-directed osteoclast inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Toro, Edgardo J; Ostrov, David A; Wronski, Thomas J; Holliday, L Shannon

    2012-03-01

    Binding between vacuolar H+-ATPases (V-ATPases) and microfilaments is mediated by an actin binding domain in the B-subunit. Both isoforms of mammalian B-subunit bind microfilaments with high affinity. A similar actinbinding activity has been demonstrated in the B-subunit of yeast. A conserved "profilin-like" domain in the B-subunit mediates this actin-binding activity, named due to its sequence and structural similarity to an actin-binding surface of the canonical actin binding protein profilin. Subtle mutations in the "profilin-like" domain eliminate actin binding activity without disrupting the ability of the altered protein to associate with the other subunits of V-ATPase to form a functional proton pump. Analysis of these mutated B-subunits suggests that the actin-binding activity is not required for the "housekeeping" functions of V-ATPases, but is important for certain specialized roles. In osteoclasts, the actin-binding activity is required for transport of V-ATPases to the plasma membrane, a prerequisite for bone resorption. A virtual screen led to the identification of enoxacin as a small molecule that bound to the actin-binding surface of the B2-subunit and competitively inhibited B2-subunit and actin interaction. Enoxacin disrupted osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro, but did not affect osteoblast formation or mineralization. Recently, enoxacin was identified as an inhibitor of the virulence of Candida albicans and more importantly of cancer growth and metastasis. Efforts are underway to determine the mechanisms by which enoxacin and other small molecule inhibitors of B2 and microfilament binding interaction selectively block bone resorption, the virulence of Candida, cancer growth, and metastasis.

  4. The Effects of Thrombin on Adenyl Cyclase Activity and a Membrane Protein from Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Brodie, G. N.; Baenziger, Nancy Lewis; Chase, Lewis R.; Majerus, Philip W.

    1972-01-01

    Washed human platelets were incubated with 0.1-1.0 U/ml human thrombin and the effects on adenyl cyclase activity and on a platelet membrane protein (designated thrombin-sensitive protein) were studied. Adenyl cyclase activity was decreased 70-90% when intact platelets were incubated with thrombin. The T½ for loss of adenyl cyclase activity was less than 15 sec at 1 U/ml thrombin. There was no decrease of adenyl cyclase activity when sonicated platelets or isolated membranes were incubated with these concentrations of thrombin. Loss of adenyl cyclase activity was relatively specific since the activities of other platelet membrane enzymes were unaffected by thrombin. Prior incubation of platelets with dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), prostaglandin E1, or theophylline protected adenyl cyclase from inhibition by thrombin. Incubation of intact but not disrupted platelets with thrombin resulted in the release of thrombin-sensitive protein from the platelet membrane. The rapid release of this protein (T½ < 15 sec) at low concentrations of thrombin suggested that removal of thrombin-sensitive protein from the platelet membrane is an integral part of the platelet release reaction. This hypothesis is supported by the parallel effects of thrombin on adenyl cyclase activity and thrombin-sensitive protein release in the presence of dibutyryl cyclic AMP, prostaglandin E1, and theophylline at varying concentrations of thrombin. Images PMID:4331802

  5. A rapid pro-hemostatic approach to overcome direct oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Nabil K; Ivanciu, Lacramioara; Davidson, Robert; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Krishnaswamy, Sriram; Camire, Rodney M

    2016-08-01

    Direct inhibitors of coagulation factor Xa (FXa) or thrombin are promising oral anticoagulants that are becoming widely adopted. The ability to reverse their anticoagulant effects is important when serious bleeding occurs or urgent medical procedures are needed. Here, using experimental mouse models of hemostasis, we show that a variant coagulation factor, FXa(I16L), rapidly restores hemostasis in the presence of the anticoagulant effects of these inhibitors. The ability of FXa(I16L) to reverse the anticoagulant effects of FXa inhibitor depends, at least in part, on the ability of the active site inhibitor to hinder antithrombin-dependent FXa inactivation, paradoxically allowing uninhibited FXa to persist in plasma. Because of its inherent catalytic activity, FXa(I16L) is more potent (by >50-fold) in the hemostasis models tested than a noncatalytic antidote that is currently in clinical development. FXa(I16L) also reduces the anticoagulant-associated bleeding in vivo that is induced by the thrombin inhibitor dabigatran. FXa(I16L) may be able to fill an important unmet clinical need for a rapid, pro-hemostatic agent to reverse the effects of several new anticoagulants. PMID:27455511

  6. Multitarget-directed tricyclic pyridazinones as G protein-coupled receptor ligands and cholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pau, Amedeo; Catto, Marco; Pinna, Giovanni; Frau, Simona; Murineddu, Gabriele; Asproni, Battistina; Curzu, Maria M; Pisani, Leonardo; Leonetti, Francesco; Loza, Maria Isabel; Brea, José; Pinna, Gérard A; Carotti, Angelo

    2015-06-01

    By following a multitarget ligand design approach, a library of 47 compounds was prepared, and they were tested as binders of selected G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and inhibitors of acetyl and/or butyryl cholinesterase. The newly designed ligands feature pyridazinone-based tricyclic scaffolds connected through alkyl chains of variable length to proper amine moieties (e.g., substituted piperazines or piperidines) for GPCR and cholinesterase (ChE) molecular recognition. The compounds were tested at three different GPCRs, namely serotoninergic 5-HT1A, adrenergic α1A, and dopaminergic D2 receptors. Our main goal was the discovery of compounds that exhibit, in addition to ChE inhibition, antagonist activity at 5-HT1A because of its involvement in neuronal deficits typical of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. Ligands with nanomolar affinity for the tested GPCRs were discovered, but most of them behaved as dual antagonists of α1A and 5-HT1A receptors. Nevertheless, several compounds displaying this GPCR affinity profile also showed moderate to good inhibition of AChE and BChE, thus deserving further investigations to exploit the therapeutic potential of such unusual biological profiles.

  7. Directed HIV-1 Evolution of Protease Inhibitor Resistance by Second-Generation Short Hairpin RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Schopman, Nick C. T.; Braun, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Despite the success of antiretroviral drugs in decreasing AIDS-related mortality, a substantial fraction of HIV-infected patients experience therapy failure due to the emergence of drug-resistant virus variants. For durable inhibition of HIV-1 replication, the emergence of such escape viruses must be controlled. In addition to antiretroviral drugs, RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene therapy can be used to inhibit HIV-1 replication by targeting the viral RNA genome. RNAi is an evolutionary conserved gene silencing mechanism that mediates the sequence-specific breakdown of the targeted mRNA. Here we investigated an alternative strategy combining the activity of a protease inhibitor (PI) with second-generation short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) designed to specifically block the emergence of PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. We demonstrate that dominant viral escape routes can be effectively blocked by second-generation shRNAs and that virus evolution can be redirected toward less-fit variants. These results are of importance for a deeper understanding of HIV-1 evolution under combined drug and RNAi pressure and may be used to design future therapeutic approaches. PMID:22064528

  8. Directed HIV-1 evolution of protease inhibitor resistance by second-generation short hairpin RNAs.

    PubMed

    Schopman, Nick C T; Braun, Anja; Berkhout, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Despite the success of antiretroviral drugs in decreasing AIDS-related mortality, a substantial fraction of HIV-infected patients experience therapy failure due to the emergence of drug-resistant virus variants. For durable inhibition of HIV-1 replication, the emergence of such escape viruses must be controlled. In addition to antiretroviral drugs, RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene therapy can be used to inhibit HIV-1 replication by targeting the viral RNA genome. RNAi is an evolutionary conserved gene silencing mechanism that mediates the sequence-specific breakdown of the targeted mRNA. Here we investigated an alternative strategy combining the activity of a protease inhibitor (PI) with second-generation short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) designed to specifically block the emergence of PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. We demonstrate that dominant viral escape routes can be effectively blocked by second-generation shRNAs and that virus evolution can be redirected toward less-fit variants. These results are of importance for a deeper understanding of HIV-1 evolution under combined drug and RNAi pressure and may be used to design future therapeutic approaches. PMID:22064528

  9. Piperlongumine as a direct TrxR1 inhibitor with suppressive activity against gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zou, Peng; Xia, Yiqun; Ji, Jiansong; Chen, Weiqian; Zhang, Jinsan; Chen, Xi; Rajamanickam, Vinothkumar; Chen, Gaozhi; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Lingfeng; Wang, Yifeng; Yang, Shulin; Liang, Guang

    2016-05-28

    Piperlongumine (PL), a natural alkaloid isolated from the fruit of long pepper, is known to selectively kill tumor cells while sparing their normal counterparts. However, the cellular target and potent anticancer efficacy of PL in numerous types of human cancer cells have not been fully defined. We report here that PL may interact with the thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), an important selenocysteine (Sec)-containing antioxidant enzyme, to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. By inhibiting TrxR1 activity and increasing intracellular ROS levels, PL induces a lethal endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in human gastric cancer cells. Importantly, knockdown of TrxR1 sensitizes cells to PL treatment, and PL displays synergistic lethality with GSH inhibitors (BSO and Erastin) against gastric cancer cells. In vivo, PL treatment markedly reduces the TrxR1 activity and tumor cell burden. Remarkably, TrxR1 was significantly overexpressed in gastric cancer cell lines and human gastric cancer tissues. Targeting TrxR1 with PL thus discloses a previously unrecognized mechanism underlying the biological activity of PL and provides an in-depth insight into the action of PL in the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26963494

  10. Pharmacokinetics of the direct factor Xa inhibitor edoxaban and digoxin administered alone and in combination.

    PubMed

    Mendell, Jeanne; Noveck, Robert J; Shi, Minggao

    2012-10-01

    The oral anticoagulant edoxaban, a factor Xa inhibitor, will likely be coadministered with digoxin in some patients with atrial fibrillation. Both drugs are substrates for P-glycoprotein. The objective of this phase 1, parallel study was to assess the effects of coadministration of both drugs on their respective pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD). Forty-eight subjects, aged 18 to 45 years, received either edoxaban 60 mg once daily × 7 days (n = 24) or digoxin 0.25 mg twice daily × 2 days and once daily × 5 days (n = 24) and then concomitantly for 7 days. Serial blood and urine samples were collected for digoxin and edoxaban concentrations on days 7 and 14. Serial coagulation assays were measured for edoxaban on days 7 and 14. Edoxaban PK parameters demonstrated mild increases in area under the curve and peak concentrations of 9.5% and 15.6%, respectively, when coadministered with digoxin. Although digoxin PK parameters demonstrated increased area under the curve and peak concentrations of 8.3% and 28%, respectively, plasma concentrations were within the established therapeutic range. Edoxaban PD were consistent with PK. Both drugs were well tolerated alone or in combination. No clinically significant changes in PK, PD, or renal elimination were observed with concomitant administration of edoxaban and digoxin. PMID:23064240

  11. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Acrylamide Derivatives as Direct NLRP3 Inflammasome Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cocco, Mattia; Miglio, Gianluca; Giorgis, Marta; Garella, Davide; Marini, Elisabetta; Costale, Annalisa; Regazzoni, Luca; Vistoli, Giulio; Orioli, Marica; Massulaha-Ahmed, Raïhane; Détraz-Durieux, Isabelle; Groslambert, Marine; Py, Bénédicte F; Bertinaria, Massimo

    2016-08-19

    NLRP3 inflammasome plays a key role in the intracellular activation of caspase-1, processing of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and pyroptotic cell death cascade. The overactivation of NLRP3 is implicated in the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory diseases, known as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), and in the progression of several diseases, such as atherosclerosis, type-2 diabetes, gout, and Alzheimer's disease. In this study, the synthesis of acrylamide derivatives and their pharmaco-toxicological evaluation as potential inhibitors of NLRP3-dependent events was undertaken. Five hits were identified and evaluated for their efficiency in inhibiting IL-1β release from different macrophage subtypes, including CAPS mutant macrophages. The most attractive hits were tested for their ability to inhibit NLRP3 ATPase activity on human recombinant NLRP3. This screening allowed the identification of 14, 2-(2-chlorobenzyl)-N-(4-sulfamoylphenethyl)acrylamide, which was able to concentration-dependently inhibit NLRP3 ATPase with an IC50 value of 74 μm. The putative binding pose of 14 in the ATPase domain of NLRP3 was also proposed. PMID:26990578

  12. A Novel Photoelectrochemical Biosensor for Tyrosinase and Thrombin Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiexia; Liu, Yifan; Zhao, Guang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    A novel photoelectrochemical biosensor for step-by-step assay of tyrosinase and thrombin was fabricated based on the specific interactions between the designed peptide and the target enzymes. A peptide chain with a special sequence which contains a positively charged lysine-labeled terminal, tyrosine at the other end and a cleavage site recognized by thrombin between them was designed. The designed peptide can be fixed on surface of the CdTe quantum dots (QDs)-modified indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrode through electrostatic attraction to construct the photoelectrochemical biosensor. The tyrosinase target can catalyze the oxidization of tyrosine by oxygen into ortho-benzoquinone residues, which results in a decrease in the sensor photocurrent. Subsequently, the cleavage site could be recognized and cut off by another thrombin target, restoring the sensor photocurrent. The decrease or increase of photocurrent in the sensor enables us to assay tyrosinase and thrombin. Thus, the detection of tyrosinase and thrombin can be achieved in the linear range from 2.6 to 32 μg/mL and from 4.5 to 100 μg/mL with detection limits of 1.5 μg/mL and 1.9 μg/mL, respectively. Most importantly, this strategy shall allow us to detect different classes of enzymes simultaneously by designing various enzyme-specific peptide substrates. PMID:26805846

  13. A Novel Photoelectrochemical Biosensor for Tyrosinase and Thrombin Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiexia; Liu, Yifan; Zhao, Guang-Chao

    2016-01-21

    A novel photoelectrochemical biosensor for step-by-step assay of tyrosinase and thrombin was fabricated based on the specific interactions between the designed peptide and the target enzymes. A peptide chain with a special sequence which contains a positively charged lysine-labeled terminal, tyrosine at the other end and a cleavage site recognized by thrombin between them was designed. The designed peptide can be fixed on surface of the CdTe quantum dots (QDs)-modified indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrode through electrostatic attraction to construct the photoelectrochemical biosensor. The tyrosinase target can catalyze the oxidization of tyrosine by oxygen into ortho-benzoquinone residues, which results in a decrease in the sensor photocurrent. Subsequently, the cleavage site could be recognized and cut off by another thrombin target, restoring the sensor photocurrent. The decrease or increase of photocurrent in the sensor enables us to assay tyrosinase and thrombin. Thus, the detection of tyrosinase and thrombin can be achieved in the linear range from 2.6 to 32 μg/mL and from 4.5 to 100 μg/mL with detection limits of 1.5 μg/mL and 1.9 μg/mL, respectively. Most importantly, this strategy shall allow us to detect different classes of enzymes simultaneously by designing various enzyme-specific peptide substrates.

  14. A Novel Photoelectrochemical Biosensor for Tyrosinase and Thrombin Detection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiexia; Liu, Yifan; Zhao, Guang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    A novel photoelectrochemical biosensor for step-by-step assay of tyrosinase and thrombin was fabricated based on the specific interactions between the designed peptide and the target enzymes. A peptide chain with a special sequence which contains a positively charged lysine-labeled terminal, tyrosine at the other end and a cleavage site recognized by thrombin between them was designed. The designed peptide can be fixed on surface of the CdTe quantum dots (QDs)-modified indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrode through electrostatic attraction to construct the photoelectrochemical biosensor. The tyrosinase target can catalyze the oxidization of tyrosine by oxygen into ortho-benzoquinone residues, which results in a decrease in the sensor photocurrent. Subsequently, the cleavage site could be recognized and cut off by another thrombin target, restoring the sensor photocurrent. The decrease or increase of photocurrent in the sensor enables us to assay tyrosinase and thrombin. Thus, the detection of tyrosinase and thrombin can be achieved in the linear range from 2.6 to 32 μg/mL and from 4.5 to 100 μg/mL with detection limits of 1.5 μg/mL and 1.9 μg/mL, respectively. Most importantly, this strategy shall allow us to detect different classes of enzymes simultaneously by designing various enzyme-specific peptide substrates. PMID:26805846

  15. Impedimetric thrombin aptasensor based on chemically modified graphenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Pumera, Martin

    2011-12-01

    Highly sensitive biosensors are of high importance to the biomedical field. Graphene represents a promising transducing platform for construction of biosensors. Here for the first time we compare the biosensing performance of a wide set of graphenes prepared by different methods. In this work, we present a simple and label-free electrochemical impedimetric aptasensor for thrombin based on chemically modified graphene (CMG) platforms such as graphite oxide (GPO), graphene oxide (GO), thermally reduced graphene oxide (TR-GO) and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ER-GO). Disposable screen-printed electrodes were first modified with chemically modified graphene (CMG) materials and used to immobilize a DNA aptamer which is specific to thrombin. The basis of detection relies on the changes in impedance spectra of redox probe after the binding of thrombin to the aptamer. It was discovered that graphene oxide (GO) is the most suitable material to be used as compared to the other three CMG materials. Furthermore, the optimum concentration of aptamer to be immobilized onto the modified electrode surface was determined to be 10 μM and the linear detection range of thrombin was 10-50 nM. Lastly, the aptasensor was found to demonstrate selectivity for thrombin. Such simply fabricated graphene oxide aptasensor shows high promise for clinical diagnosis of biomarkers and point-of-care analysis.

  16. Direct Effects, Compensation, and Recovery in Female Fathead Minnows Exposed to a Model Aromatase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Mueller, Nathaniel D.; Martinović, Dalma; Makynen, Elizabeth A.; Kahl, Michael D.; Jensen, Kathleen M.; Durhan, Elizabeth J.; Cavallin, Jenna E.; Bencic, David; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Several chemicals in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. Objectives The objective of this study was to provide a detailed characterization of molecular and biochemical responses of female fathead minnows to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole (FAD). Methods Fish were exposed via water to 0, 3, or 30 μg FAD/L for 8 days and then held in clean water for 8 days, with samples collected at four time points during each 8-day period. We quantified ex vivo steroid production, plasma steroids, and plasma vitellogenin (Vtg) concentrations and analyzed relative transcript abundance of 10 key regulatory genes in ovaries and 3 in pituitary tissue by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Ex vivo 17β-estradiol (E2) production and plasma E2 and Vtg concentrations were significantly reduced after a single day of exposure to 3 μg or 30 μg FAD/L. However, plasma E2 concentrations recovered by the eighth day of exposure in the 3-μg/L group and within 1 day of cessation of exposure in the 30-μg/L group, indicating concentration- and time-dependent physiologic compensation and recovery. Concentration-dependent increases in transcripts coding for aromatase (A isoform), cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, and follicle-stimulating hormone receptor all coincided with increased E2 production and recovery of plasma E2 concentrations. Conclusions Results of this research highlight the need to consider compensation/adaptation and recovery when developing and interpreting short-term bioassays or biomarkers or when trying to predict the effects of chemical exposures based on mode of action. PMID:19440503

  17. TAK-063, a PDE10A Inhibitor with Balanced Activation of Direct and Indirect Pathways, Provides Potent Antipsychotic-Like Effects in Multiple Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazunori; Harada, Akina; Suzuki, Hirobumi; Miyamoto, Maki; Kimura, Haruhide

    2016-08-01

    Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) inhibitors are expected to be novel drugs for schizophrenia through activation of both direct and indirect pathway medium spiny neurons. However, excess activation of the direct pathway by a dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF82958 canceled antipsychotic-like effects of a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol in methamphetamine (METH)-induced hyperactivity in rats. Thus, balanced activation of these pathways may be critical for PDE10A inhibitors. Current antipsychotics and the novel PDE10A inhibitor TAK-063, but not the selective PDE10A inhibitor MP-10, produced dose-dependent antipsychotic-like effects in METH-induced hyperactivity and prepulse inhibition in rodents. TAK-063 and MP-10 activated the indirect pathway to a similar extent; however, MP-10 caused greater activation of the direct pathway than did TAK-063. Interestingly, the off-rate of TAK-063 from PDE10A in rat brain sections was faster than that of MP-10, and a slower off-rate PDE10A inhibitor with TAK-063-like chemical structure showed an MP-10-like pharmacological profile. In general, faster off-rate enzyme inhibitors are more sensitive than slower off-rate inhibitors to binding inhibition by enzyme substrates. As expected, TAK-063 was more sensitive than MP-10 to binding inhibition by cyclic nucleotides. Moreover, an immunohistochemistry study suggested that cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels in the direct pathway were higher than those in the indirect pathway. These data can explain why TAK-063 showed partial activation of the direct pathway compared with MP-10. The findings presented here suggest that TAK-063's antipsychotic-like efficacy may be attributable to its unique pharmacological properties, resulting in balanced activation of the direct and indirect striatal pathways. PMID:26849714

  18. The phosphorylation status of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 in astrocytes and neurons from rat hippocampus determines the thrombin-induced calcium release and ROS generation.

    PubMed

    Zündorf, Gregor; Reiser, Georg

    2011-12-01

    Challenge of protease-activated receptors induces cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) ](c)) increase, mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation with a bandwidth of responses in individual cells. We detected in this study in situ the thrombin-induced [Ca(2+) ](c) rise and ROS formation in dissociated hippocampal astrocytes and neurons in a mixed culture. In identified cells, single cell responses were correlated with extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation level. On average, in astrocytes, thrombin induced a transient [Ca(2+) ](c) rise with concentration-dependent increase in amplitude and extrusion rate and high ERK1/2 phosphorylation level. Correlation analysis of [Ca(2+) ](c) response characteristics of single astrocytes reveals that astrocytes with nuclear phosphoERK1/2 localization have a smaller Ca(2+) amplitude and extrusion rate compared with cells with a cytosolic phosphoERK1/2 localization. In naive neurons, without thrombin challenge, variable ERK1/2 phosphorylation patterns are observed. ROS were detected by hydroethidine. Only in neurons with increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation level, we see sustained intracellular rise in fluorescence of the dye lasting over several minutes. ROS formation was abolished by pre-incubation with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. Additionally, thrombin induced an immediate, transient hydroethidine fluorescence increase. This was interpreted as NADPH oxidase-mediated O(2) (•-) -release into the extracellular milieu, because it was decreased by pre-incubation with apocynin, and could be eluted by superfusion. In conclusion, the phosphorylation status of ERK1/2 determines the thrombin-dependent [Ca(2+) ](c) increase and ROS formation and, thus, influences the capacity of thrombin to regulate neuroprotection or neurodegeneration. PMID:21988180

  19. Population Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Modeling Analysis of GCC‐4401C, a Novel Direct Factor Xa Inhibitor, in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Choi, HY; Choi, S; Kim, YH

    2016-01-01

    GCC‐4401C, an orally active direct factor Xa inhibitor that is similar to rivaroxaban, is currently under development for venous thromboembolic disease (VTE). The purpose of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PKs) and pharmacodynamics (PDs) of GCC‐4401C by population modeling analysis and to predict proper dosage regimens compared to rivaroxaban using data from two phase I clinical studies. Plasma GCC‐4401C concentrations over time were best described by a two‐compartment linear model and body weight was associated with central volume of distribution. Relevant PD markers generally changed in a dose‐dependent manner and were described well with sigmoid, simple maximum effect, or linear models. GCC‐4401C was absorbed more rapidly than rivaroxaban. Comparisons based on simulations of PD marker changes over time suggest that 20 mg and 40 mg of GCC‐4401C administered under fasted status are comparable to 10 mg and 20 mg of rivaroxaban under fed status. PMID:27511836

  20. Fractal gold modified electrode for ultrasensitive thrombin detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Wang, Shuqi; Dong, Haifeng; Liu, Guodong; Wen, Yongqiang; Wang, Shutao; Zhang, Xueji

    2012-05-01

    We report a label-free and ultrasensitive aptasensor based on a fractal gold modified (FracAu) electrode for thrombin detection with a femtomolar detection limit. The FracAu electrode was prepared by electrodeposition of hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (HAuCl4) onto a bare indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode surface. After this process the electrode was characterized by SEM. A thiol-modified aptamer against thrombin was immobilized on the FracAu electrode through a self-assembling process. Upon thrombin binding, the interfacial electron transfer of the FracAu electrode was perturbed by the formation of an aptamer-thrombin complex. The concentration of thrombin in the sample solution was determined by measuring the change in the oxidation peak current of hydroxymethyl ferrocene (C11H12FeO) with differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The current response (reduced peak current) had a linear relationship with the logarithm of thrombin concentrations in the range of 10-15 to 10-10 M with a detection limit of 5.7 fM. Furthermore, the as-prepared FracAu electrode exhibited high selectivity. The application of FracAu electrodes may be extended to prepare other types of biosensors, such as immunosensors, enzyme biosensors and DNA biosensors. These results show that FracAu electrodes have great promise for clinical diagnosis of disease-related biomarkers.We report a label-free and ultrasensitive aptasensor based on a fractal gold modified (FracAu) electrode for thrombin detection with a femtomolar detection limit. The FracAu electrode was prepared by electrodeposition of hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (HAuCl4) onto a bare indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode surface. After this process the electrode was characterized by SEM. A thiol-modified aptamer against thrombin was immobilized on the FracAu electrode through a self-assembling process. Upon thrombin binding, the interfacial electron transfer of the FracAu electrode was perturbed by the formation of an aptamer-thrombin complex. The

  1. New method for determining thrombin-clottable fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Frigola, A; Angeloni, S; Cerqueti, A R

    1977-11-01

    We describe a new method for determination of thrombin-clottable fibrinogen, which eliminates the systematic error caused by occlusion of other serum proteins in the fibrin clot and reduces the sensitivity to high concentrations of fibrin degradation products. Essentially, the method consists of densitometric quantitation of the fibrin band after a standard electrophoresis run of plasma, thrombin fixation of the fibrinogen, and removal of the non-clotted proteins by washing in saline. The procedure shows good precision and gives results that are accurate, significantly correlate with results for the classical thrombin clotting method (r = 0.92, P less than .001), and are not affected by fibrin degradation product concentrations up to 900 mg/liter. These characteristics make the method especially valuable in establishing fibrogen concentration in patients who are undergoing thrombolytic therapy.

  2. Thrombin-Responsive Gated Silica Mesoporous Nanoparticles As Coagulation Regulators.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ravishankar; Ribes, Àngela; Mas, Núria; Aznar, Elena; Sancenón, Félix; Marcos, M Dolores; Murguía, Jose R; Venkataraman, Abbaraju; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón

    2016-02-01

    The possibility of achieving sophisticated actions in complex biological environments using gated nanoparticles is an exciting prospect with much potential. We herein describe new gated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) loaded with an anticoagulant drug and capped with a peptide containing a thrombin-specific cleavage site. When the coagulation cascade was triggered, active thrombin degraded the capping peptidic sequence and induced the release of anticoagulant drugs to delay the clotting process. The thrombin-dependent response was assessed and a significant increase in coagulation time in plasma from 2.6 min to 5 min was found. This work broadens the application of gated silica nanoparticles and demonstrates their ability to act as controllers in a complex scenario such as hemostasis. PMID:26794474

  3. The Importance of Thrombin in Cerebral Injury and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Krenzlin, Harald; Lorenz, Viola; Danckwardt, Sven; Kempski, Oliver; Alessandri, Beat

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that prothrombin and its active derivative thrombin are expressed locally in the central nervous system. So far, little is known about the physiological and pathophysiological functions exerted by thrombin in the human brain. Extra-hepatic prothrombin expression has been identified in neuronal cells and astrocytes via mRNA measurement. The actual amount of brain derived prothrombin is expected to be 1% or less compared to that in the liver. The role in brain injury depends upon its concentration, as higher amounts cause neuroinflammation and apoptosis, while lower concentrations might even be cytoprotective. Its involvement in numerous diseases like Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis, cerebral ischemia and haemorrhage is becoming increasingly clear. This review focuses on elucidation of the cerebral thrombin expression, local generation and its role in injury and disease of the central nervous system. PMID:26761005

  4. RNA-seq analysis of transcriptomes in thrombin-treated and control human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cheranova, Dilyara; Gibson, Margaret; Chaudhary, Suman; Zhang, Li Qin; Heruth, Daniel P; Grigoryev, Dmitry N; Ye, Shui Qing

    2013-01-01

    thrombin and RNA isolation, quality analysis and quantification. The second part describes library construction and sequencing. The third part describes the data analysis. The fourth part describes an RT-PCR validation assay. Representative results of several key steps are displayed. Useful tips or precautions to boost success in key steps are provided in the Discussion section. Although this protocol uses human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells treated with thrombin, it can be generalized to profile transcriptomes in both mammalian and non-mammalian cells and in tissues treated with different stimuli or inhibitors, or to compare transcriptomes in cells or tissues between a healthy state and a disease state. PMID:23426025

  5. RNA-seq analysis of transcriptomes in thrombin-treated and control human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cheranova, Dilyara; Gibson, Margaret; Chaudhary, Suman; Zhang, Li Qin; Heruth, Daniel P; Grigoryev, Dmitry N; Ye, Shui Qing

    2013-02-13

    thrombin and RNA isolation, quality analysis and quantification. The second part describes library construction and sequencing. The third part describes the data analysis. The fourth part describes an RT-PCR validation assay. Representative results of several key steps are displayed. Useful tips or precautions to boost success in key steps are provided in the Discussion section. Although this protocol uses human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells treated with thrombin, it can be generalized to profile transcriptomes in both mammalian and non-mammalian cells and in tissues treated with different stimuli or inhibitors, or to compare transcriptomes in cells or tissues between a healthy state and a disease state.

  6. Unraveling a novel Rac1-mediated signaling pathway that regulates cofilin dephosphorylation and secretion in thrombin-stimulated platelets.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Dharmendra; Goyal, Pankaj; Dwivedi, Suman; Siess, Wolfgang

    2009-07-01

    In platelets stimulated by thrombin to secrete and aggregate, cofilin is rapidly dephosphorylated leading to its activation. Cofilin by severing existing actin filaments and stimulating F-actin polymerization on newly created barbed ends dynamizes the actin cytoskeleton. We previously found that cofilin dephosphorylation is Ca(2+)-dependent and occurs upstream of degranulation in stimulated platelets. We report now in thrombin-stimulated platelets that Rac1 and class II PAKs (PAK4/5/6) were rapidly (within 5 seconds) activated, whereas PAK1/2 (class I PAKs) phosphorylation was slower. The Rac1-specific inhibitor NSC23766 blocked phosphorylation of class II PAKs, but not PAK1/2. Moreover, inhibition of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin inhibited Rac1 activation and class II PAKs phosphorylation. Prevention of Rac1 activation by calcineurin inhibition or NSC23766 also blocked cofilin dephosphorylation and platelet granule secretion indicating that a calcineurin/Rac1/class II PAKs pathway regulates cofilin dephosphorylation leading to secretion. We further found that PI3-kinases were activated downstream of Rac1, but were not involved in regulating cofilin dephosphorylation and secretion in thrombin-stimulated platelets. Our study unravels a Ca(2+)-dependent pathway of secretion in stimulated platelets as a signaling pathway linking Rac1 activation to actin dynamics: calcineurin-->Rac1-->class II PAKs-->cofilin activation. We further demonstrate that this pathway is separate and independent of the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway mediating secretion.

  7. [Pancreatic tail pseudoaneurysm: percutaneous treatment by thrombin injection].

    PubMed

    Pacheco Jiménez, M; Moreno Sánchez, T; Moreno Rodríguez, F; Guillén Rico, M

    2014-01-01

    Visceral artery pseudoaneurysms secondary to acute and/or chronic pancreatitis are a relatively common and potentially serious complication. Endovascular techniques are the most currently accepted techniques, given the higher morbidity-mortality of surgery. The thrombosis of the pseudoaneurysm using an ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection is emerging as a useful option in those cases in which endovascular embolisation is not possible. We present the case of a patient with a pseudoaneurysm of the transverse pancreatic artery secondary to chronic pancreatitis, and successfully treated by administering percutaneous thrombin.

  8. Thrombin stimulates tumor-platelet adhesion in vitro and metastasis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Nierodzik, M L; Plotkin, A; Kajumo, F; Karpatkin, S

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed a role for platelets and the platelet-adhesive proteins, fibronectin and von Willebrand factor (vWF) in platelet-tumor cell interaction in vitro and metastasis in vivo. The present report documents the effect of thrombin treatment of platelets on this interaction in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, thrombin at 100-1,000 mU/ml maximally stimulated the adhesion of six different tumor cell lines from three different species two- to fivefold. As little as 1-10 mU/ml was effective. The effect of thrombin was specific (inhibitable by hirudin, dansyl-arginine N-(3-ethyl-1,5 pentanediyl) amide and unreactive with the inactive thrombin analogue N-P-tosyl-L-phenylchloromethylketone-thrombin and D-phenylalanyl-L-propyl-L-arginine chloromethylketone-thrombin (PPACK-thrombin), and required high-affinity thrombin receptors (competition with PPACK-thrombin but not with N-P-tosyl-L-lysine-chloromethyl-ketone-thrombin). Functionally active thrombin was required on the platelet surface. Binding of tumor cells to thrombin-activated platelets was inhibitable by agents known to interfere with the platelet GPIIb-GPIIIa integrin: monoclonal antibody 10E5, tetrapeptide RGDS and gamma chain fibrinogen decapeptide LGGAKQAGDV, as well as polyclonal antibodies against the platelet adhesive ligands, fibronectin and vWF. In vivo, thrombin at 250-500 mU per animal increased murine pulmonary metastases fourfold with CT26 colon carcinoma cells and 68-413-fold with B16 amelanotic melanoma cells. Thus, thrombin amplifies tumor-platelet adhesion in vitro two- to fivefold via occupancy of high-affinity platelet thrombin receptors, and modulation of GPIIb-GPIIIa adhesion via an RGD-dependent mechanism. In vivo, thrombin enhances tumor metastases 4-413-fold with two different tumor cell lines. PMID:1845869

  9. Participation of the hypophyseal-adrenal cortex system in thrombin clearance during immobilization stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudryashov, B. A.; Uljanov, A. M.; Shapiro, F. B.; Bazazyan, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    Thrombin marked with I-131 resulted in a considerable increase of the thrombined clearance rate in healthy male rats during stress caused by an immobilization lasting 30 minutes, and in an increase of thrombin clearance occurred by a combination of immobilization and administration of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH). Contrary to ACTH, the thrombin clearance is not stimulated in healthy animals by hydrocortisone. The results of the examination are presented.

  10. Banded crystallization of tricosane in the presence of kinetic inhibitors during directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutter, Jeffrey L.; Hudson, Stephen; Smith, Christopher; Tetervak, Alexander; Zhang, Jizhong

    2004-12-01

    Driven by the need to prevent crystallization of normal alkanes from diesel fuels in cold climates, the petroleum industry has developed additives to slow the growth of these crystals and alter their morphology. While the utility of such additives has been proven at the operational level, few studies have directly monitored their effect at microscopic scales. Here, we present a study of such additives in model n-alkane systems. We find a dramatic effect on the growth morphology: rather than the usual plate-like growth exhibited by pure wax, we see highly branched microcrystalline meshes. Under certain conditions, these meshes form well-defined bands with spacings larger than 200 μm. We suggest that successive bands form by nucleation via a metastable phase ahead of the inhibited growth front.

  11. Early intraplatelet signaling enhances the release of human platelet PAR-1 and -4 amino-terminal peptides in response to thrombin.

    PubMed

    Ofosu, Frederick A; Dewar, Lori; Song, Yingqi; Cedrone, Aisha C; Hortelano, Gonzalo; Craven, Sharon J

    2009-02-24

    Activation of washed human platelets initiated with alpha-thrombin, SFLLRN, or AYPGKF invariably results in the generation of PAR-1-(1-41) and PAR-4-(1-47). PAR-1-(1-41) and PAR-4-(1-47) are amino-terminal peptides generated when PAR-1 and -4 are cleaved in their first extracellular domains after R(41) and R(47), respectively, to expose the tethered ligand domains of PAR-1 and -4. Since soybean trypsin inhibitor decreases generation of PAR-1-(1-41) and PAR-4-(1-47) and other platelet aggregation-related responses to these three agonists, but does not inactivate alpha-thrombin, a platelet trypsin-like proteinase apparently activates PAR-1 and -4 to propagate PAR-dependent platelet responses. This study identified the signaling pathways implicated in the generation of the platelet proteinase that in turn produces PAR-1-(1-41) and PAR-4-(1-47), to thereby drive the subsequent PAR-dependent platelet aggregation-related responses to alpha-thrombin, SFLLRN, or AYPGKF. Only inhibitors of signaling enzymes that prevented ATP release (forskolin, PGE(1), or BIMI-1) prevented or delayed the generation of PAR-1-(1-41) and PAR-4-(1-47) in response to all three agonists. SBTI prevented platelet aggregation initiated by alpha-thrombin, SFLLRN, or AYPGKF but did so less effectively when it was added 10 s after each agonist. Thus, the platelet-derived proteinase acts within 10 s of each agonist addition to generate PAR-1-(1-41) and PAR-4-(1-47). Furthermore, alpha-thrombin may not effectively catalyze PAR-1-(1-41) and PAR-4-(1-47) generation. We propose that unidentified ATP-dependent phosphorylation reactions catalyzed by PKC help to generate the platelet-derived proteinase that propagates human platelet PAR-1 and -4 activation by the three agonists. PMID:19182900

  12. Inhibition of thrombin generation in plasma by fibrin formation (Antithrombin I).

    PubMed

    de Bosch, N B; Mosesson, M W; Ruiz-Sáez, A; Echenagucia, M; Rodriguez-Lemoin, A

    2002-08-01

    The adsorption of thrombin to fibrin during clotting defines "Antithrombin I" activity. We confirmed that thrombin generation in afibrinogenemic or in Reptilase defibrinated normal plasma was higher than in normal plasma. Repletion of these fibrinogen-deficient plasmas with fibrinogen 1 (gamma A/gamma A), whose fibrin has two "low affinity" non-substrate thrombin binding sites, resulted in moderately reduced thrombin generation by 29-37%. Repletion with fibrinogen 2 (gamma'/gamma A), which in addition to low affinity thrombin-binding sites in fibrin, has a "high affinity" non-substrate thrombin binding site in the carboxy-terminal region of its gamma' chain, was even more effective and reduced thrombin generation by 57-67%. Adding peptides that compete for thrombin binding to fibrin [S-Hir53-64 (hirugen) or gamma'414-427] caused a transient delay in the onset of otherwise robust thrombin generation, indicating that fibrin formation is necessary for full expression of Antithrombin I activity. Considered together, 1) the increased thrombin generation in afibrinogenemic or fibrinogen-depleted normal plasma that is mitigated by fibrinogen replacement; 2) evidence that prothrombin activation is increased in afibrinogenemia and normalized by fibrinogen replacement; 3) the severe thrombophilia that is associated with defective thrombin-binding in dysfibrinogenemias Naples I and New York I, and 4) the association of afibrinogenemia or hypofibrinogenemia with venous or arterial thromboembolism, indicate that Antithrombin I (fibrin) modulates thromboembolic potential by inhibiting thrombin generation in blood.

  13. The Direct Factor Xa Inhibitor Rivaroxaban Passes Into Human Breast Milk.

    PubMed

    Wiesen, Martin H J; Blaich, Cornelia; Müller, Carsten; Streichert, Thomas; Pfister, Roman; Michels, Guido

    2016-07-01

    Thromboembolic disorders frequently require antithrombotic treatment during pregnancy and lactation. Vitamin K antagonists and heparins are the treatment options of choice in breastfeeding women. Factors including the route of administration, discomfort during treatment, and fetal and neonatal safety affect women's choices about anticoagulant therapy. Direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have emerged as alternatives to these agents and may offer advantages compared with vitamin K antagonists. As breastfeeding women were excluded from clinical trials evaluating DOACs, no safety and efficacy data are available for these special patients and, crucially, estimates for infant exposure are lacking. Therefore, the manufacturer recommends against using DOACs during the lactation period. We present the case of a patient who stopped breastfeeding owing to a diagnosis of postpartum cardiomyopathy. Anticoagulation with enoxaparin that commenced after the diagnosis of postpartum pulmonary embolism was switched to rivaroxaban. At that time, breast milk samples were collected and rivaroxaban concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry. Rivaroxaban appears in human breast milk in comparatively small amounts; its safety has not been determined. PMID:27396794

  14. Crystal structure of human factor VIIa/tissue factor in complex with peptide mimetic inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kadono, Shojiro; Sakamoto, Akihisa; Kikuchi, Yasufumi; Oh-eda, Masayoshi; Yabuta, Naohiro; Koga, Takaki; Hattori, Kunihiro; Shiraishi, Takuya; Haramura, Masayuki; Kodama, Hirofumi; Esaki, Toru; Sato, Haruhiko; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Itoh, Susumu; Ohta, Masateru; Kozono, Toshiro

    2004-11-26

    The 3D structure of human factor VIIa/soluble tissue factor in complex with a peptide mimetic inhibitor, propylsulfonamide-D-Thr-Met-p-aminobenzamidine, is determined by X-ray crystallography. As compared with the interactions between thrombin and thrombin inhibitors, the interactions at S2 and S3 sites characteristic of factor VIIa and factor VIIa inhibitors are revealed. The S2 site has a small pocket, which is filled by the hydrophobic methionine side chain in P2. The small S3 site fits the small size residue, D-threonine in P3. The structural data and SAR data of the peptide mimetic inhibitor show that these interactions in the S2 and S3 sites play an important role for the improvement of selectivity versus thrombin. The results will provide valuable information for the structure-based drug design of specific inhibitors for FVIIa/TF. PMID:15504346

  15. Actin polymerisation regulates thrombin-evoked Ca(2+) signalling after activation of PAR-4 but not PAR-1 in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Harper, Matthew T; Sage, Stewart O

    2006-05-01

    The role of actin polymerisation in regulating thrombin-evoked Ca(2+) signalling was investigated in human platelets. We have previously reported that cytochalasin D (Cyt D) inhibits thapsigargin-evoked store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), which is believed to contribute a major component of thrombin-evoked Ca(2+) entry in platelets. In contrast, Cyt D increased thrombin-evoked Ca(2+) entry to 147.5 +/- 9.2% and Sr(2+) entry to 134.2 +/- 6.4% of control. Similar results were obtained with latrunculin A. This potentiation was not affected if protein kinase C was inhibited using Ro-31-8220, suggesting that it did not involve PKC-dependent non-capacitative Ca(2+) entry. Ca(2+) entry evoked by the PAR-4 agonist, AYPGKF, was increased to 133.7 +/- 12.8% of control by Cyt D, whereas Ca(2+) signalling evoked by the PAR-1 agonist, SFLLRN, was unaffected. The PAR-4 antagonist, tcY-NH(2), abolished the effect of Cyt D on thrombin-evoked Ca(2+) entry. Biotinylation of cell-surface proteins showed that PAR-4 was internalised after stimulation by thrombin. Cyt D reduced this internalisation. These data suggest that Cyt D prevents the internalisation of PAR-4, which may lead to prolonged signalling from this receptor. This may mask a direct effect of Cyt D on the activation of SOCE after the activation of PAR-4. PMID:16702038

  16. Nafamostat mesilate, a broad spectrum protease inhibitor, modulates platelet, neutrophil and contact activation in simulated extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, S; Gikakis, N; Hack, C E; Niewiarowski, S; Edmunds, L H; Koneti Rao, A; Sun, L; Cooper, S L; Colman, R W

    1996-01-01

    Activation of humoral and cellular participants in inflammation enhances the risk of postoperative bleeding and multiple organ damage in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). We now compare the effects of heparin alone in combination with nafamostat mesilate (NM), a protease inhibitor with specificity of trypsin-like enzymes, in an extracorporeal circuit which simulates CPB. NM significantly inhibits the release of platelet beta-thromboglobulin (beta TG) at 60 and 120 min. Platelet counts do not differ. ADP-induced aggregation decreases in circuits with NM, which is due to a direct effect of NM on platelet function. NM prevents any significant release of neutrophil elastase; at 120 min, plasma elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin complex is 0.16 micrograms/ml in the NM group and 1.24 micrograms/ml in the control group. NM completely inhibits formation of complexes of C1 inhibitor with kallikrein and FXIIa. NM does not alter markers of complement activation (C1-C1-inhibitor complex and C5b-9), or indicators of thrombin formation (F1.2). However, at 120 min, thrombin activity as measured by release of fibrinopeptide A is significantly decreased. The data indicate that complement activation during CPB correlates poorly with neutrophil activation and that either kallikrein or FXIIa or both may be more important agonists. The ability of NM to inhibit two important contact system proteins and platelet and neutrophil release raises the possibility of suppressing the inflammatory response during clinical CPB.

  17. Preparation and characterization of human thrombin for use in a fibrin glue.

    PubMed

    Rock, G; Neurath, D; Semple, E; Harvey, M; Freedman, M

    2007-06-01

    Cryoprecipitate is frequently combined with thrombin to produce a fibrin sealant to enhance haemostasis during surgical procedures. We evaluated the thrombin produced from plasma using the Thrombin Processing Device (TPD)trade mark (Thermogenesis, Rancho Cordova, CA, USA). Plasma (250 mL) was processed in the CryoSeal FS System using the CP-3 disposable to produce cryoprecipitate by automated freezing and thawing. Simultaneously, thrombin was generated using the attached TPD. The cryoprecipitate and thrombin were harvested after approximately 50 min and then frozen and stored at -80 degrees C until analysis of total protein, fibrinogen, factor VIII (FVIII) activity, von Willebrand factor (vWF) and thrombin activity. Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) gel electrophoresis was used to compare thrombin. After combining the thrombin with cryoprecipitate, the rate of clot initiation and strength was measured using a Thromboelastograph (TEG) (Haemoscope Corp, Skokie, IL, USA). Cryoprecipitate was produced, with a fibrinogen concentration of 22 +/- 7.7 g L(-1) (20 +/- 2% recovery), FVIII activity of 14.2 +/- 4.0 IU mL(-1) and vWF of 19.9 +/- 5.2 IU mL(-1). The separate thrombin product had a concentration of 64.3 +/- 16.7 IU mL(-1) of thrombin and a total protein of 0.39 +/- 0.1 g, with SDS gel electrophoresis showing a major band at 37 kD, as did the commercial human thrombin. The TEG curves of cryoprecipitate and TPD-produced or commercial thrombin were compared. The R values (time to clot initiation) were somewhat slower with the TPD-produced thrombin, but the maximum strength (MA) of the clots was similar. In conclusion, human thrombin can be produced during automated cryoprecipitate production. This thrombin is in sufficient concentration to initiate clotting and cross-linking of fibrin from cryoprecipitate to produce an entirely autologous fibrin glue.

  18. Factor Xa inhibitors: new anti-thrombotic agents and their characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ieko, Masahiro; Tarumi, Takashi; Nakabayashi, Toru; Yoshida, Mika; Naito, Sumiyoshi; Koike, Takao

    2006-01-01

    Factor Xa (FXa) is a key enzyme that is positioned at the convergence of the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways in the blood coagulation cascade, and inactivation by a specific FXa inhibitor effectively prevents the generation of thrombin. Various types of low molecular weight (LMW) heparin, which function as semi-selective and indirect FXa inhibitors, are replacing unfractionated heparin (UFH) as agents for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE), as well as in initial treatment for coronary events. Of those, heparinoid has been shown to be safer and more effective for the prevention of postoperative VTE than UFH, especially for treatment of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Further, synthetic pentasaccharide has been found to offer advantages over current thromboprophylactic regimens in a number of patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery. Other studies have shown that pentasaccharide is more effective for overall VTE in comparison with LMW heparin, though it was also associated with an increased rate of major bleeding. Synthetic, selective, and direct inhibitors to FXa, such as DX-9065a, are highly potent and orally bioavailable antithrombotic agents that have demonstrated an improved side effect profile, probably by allowing sufficient thrombin to remain for platelet activation and normal hemostasis, while preventing pathological thrombus formation. For thrombosis therapy, the most desirable type of antithrombotic agent is an orally active drug that has a broad range of effective doses and no hemorrhagic side effects. Presently, many types of direct inhibitors are in various stages of clinical trials and expected to provide significant benefits as compared to currently utilized therapy strategies. PMID:16146728

  19. Effects of thrombin on the integrity of monolayers of cultured human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Galdal, K.S.; Evensen, S.A.; Brosstad, F.

    1982-09-01

    /sup 51/Cr-prelabelled endothelial cells (EC) in confluent monolayers were incubated in RPMI 1640 + foetal calf serum 20% (v/v) to which purified thrombin was added. Thrombin (greater than or equal to 0.1 NIH U/ml) significantly accelerated /sup 51/Cr-release and caused extensive but reversible cell contraction. Thrombin-exposed EC reacted to a new dose of thrombin with no appreciable shape change, but /sup 51/Cr-efflux was again accelerated. EC exposed to thrombin pretreated with N-bromosuccinimide (modifying the macromolecular site) or phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (blocking the serine site) retained normal morphology and did not leak excess amounts of /sup 51/Cr. Antithrombin III also inhibited the effect of thrombin. Pretreatment of EC with either indomethacin, aspirin, sulfinpyrazone, pronase or neuraminidase did not influence the effect of subsequent thrombin exposure.

  20. Cellular Models of Aggregation-dependent Template-directed Proteolysis to Characterize Tau Aggregation Inhibitors for Treatment of Alzheimer Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Charles R.; Storey, John M. D.; Clunas, Scott; Harrington, Kathleen A.; Horsley, David; Ishaq, Ahtsham; Kemp, Steven J.; Larch, Christopher P.; Marshall, Colin; Nicoll, Sarah L.; Rickard, Janet E.; Simpson, Michael; Sinclair, James P.; Storey, Lynda J.; Wischik, Claude M.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a degenerative tauopathy characterized by aggregation of Tau protein through the repeat domain to form intraneuronal paired helical filaments (PHFs). We report two cell models in which we control the inherent toxicity of the core Tau fragment. These models demonstrate the properties of prion-like recruitment of full-length Tau into an aggregation pathway in which template-directed, endogenous truncation propagates aggregation through the core Tau binding domain. We use these in combination with dissolution of native PHFs to quantify the activity of Tau aggregation inhibitors (TAIs). We report the synthesis of novel stable crystalline leucomethylthioninium salts (LMTX®), which overcome the pharmacokinetic limitations of methylthioninium chloride. LMTX®, as either a dihydromesylate or a dihydrobromide salt, retains TAI activity in vitro and disrupts PHFs isolated from AD brain tissues at 0.16 μm. The Ki value for intracellular TAI activity, which we have been able to determine for the first time, is 0.12 μm. These values are close to the steady state trough brain concentration of methylthioninium ion (0.18 μm) that is required to arrest progression of AD on clinical and imaging end points and the minimum brain concentration (0.13 μm) required to reverse behavioral deficits and pathology in Tau transgenic mice. PMID:25759392

  1. Discovery of novel STAT3 small molecule inhibitors via in silico site-directed fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenying; Xiao, Hui; Lin, Jiayuh; Li, Chenglong

    2013-06-13

    Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been validated as an attractive therapeutic target for cancer therapy. To stop both STAT3 activation and dimerization, a viable strategy is to design inhibitors blocking its SH2 domain phosphotyrosine binding site that is responsible for both actions. A new fragment-based drug design (FBDD) strategy, in silico site-directed FBDD, was applied in this study. A designed novel compound, 5,8-dioxo-6-(pyridin-3-ylamino)-5,8-dihydronaphthalene-1-sulfonamide (LY5), was confirmed to bind to STAT3 SH2 by fluorescence polarization assay. In addition, four out of the five chosen compounds have IC50 values lower than 5 μM for the U2OS cancer cells. 8 (LY5) has an IC50 range in 0.5-1.4 μM in various cancer cell lines. 8 also suppresses tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model. This study has demonstrated the utility of this approach and could be used to other drug targets in general. PMID:23651330

  2. Romidepsin (FK228) and its analogs directly inhibit phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity and potently induce apoptosis as histone deacetylase/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase dual inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Ken; Katoh, Tadashi; Shimodaira, Hideki; Oda, Akifumi; Takahashi, Ohgi; Ishioka, Chikashi

    2012-11-01

    Activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling is involved in carcinogenesis and cancer progression. The PI3K inhibitors are considered candidate drugs for cancer treatment. Here, we describe a drug screening system for novel PI3K inhibitors using Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with deleterious mutations in the ATP-binding cassette transporter genes, because wild-type S. cerevisiae uses drug efflux pumps for reducing intracellular drug concentrations. By screening the chemical library of the Screening Committee of Anticancer Drugs, we identified the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor romidepsin (FK228) and its novel analogs. In vitro PI3K activity assays confirmed that these compounds directly inhibit PI3K activity at μM-range concentrations. FK-A5 analog was the most potent inhibitor. Western blotting revealed that these compounds inhibit phosphorylation of protein kinase B and downstream signaling components. Molecular modeling of the PI3K-FK228 complex indicated that FK228 binds to the ATP-binding pocket of PI3K. At μM-range concentrations, FK228 and FK-A5 show potent cytotoxicity, inducing apoptosis even in HDAC inhibitor-resistant cells. Furthermore, HDAC/PI3K dual inhibition by FK228 and FK-A5 at μM-range concentrations potentiates the apoptosis induction, mimicking the effect of combining specific HDAC and PI3K inhibitors. In this study, we showed that FK228 and its analogs directly inhibit PI3K activity and induce apoptosis at μM-range concentrations, similar to HDAC/PI3K dual inhibition. In future, optimizing the potency of FK228 and its analogs against PI3K may contribute to the development of novel HDAC/PI3K dual inhibitors for cancer treatment.

  3. Combination of antibodies directed against different ErbB3 surface epitopes prevents the establishment of resistance to BRAF/MEK inhibitors in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Fattore, Luigi; Malpicci, Debora; Marra, Emanuele; Belleudi, Francesca; Noto, Alessia; De Vitis, Claudia; Pisanu, Maria Elena; Coluccia, Pierpaolo; Camerlingo, Rosa; Roscilli, Giuseppe; Ribas, Antoni; Di Napoli, Arianna; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Mancini, Rita; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2015-09-22

    Patients with metastatic melanoma bearing V600 mutations in BRAF oncogene clinically benefit from the treatment with BRAF inhibitors alone or in combination with MEK inhibitors. However, a limitation to such treatment is the occurrence of resistance. Tackling the adaptive changes helping cells survive from drug treatment may offer new therapeutic opportunities. Very recently the ErbB3 receptor has been shown to act as a central node promoting survival of BRAF mutated melanoma. In this paper we first demonstrate that ErbB3/AKT hyperphosphorylation occurs in BRAF mutated melanoma cell lines following exposure to BRAF and/or MEK inhibitors. This strongly correlates with increased transcriptional activation of its ligand neuregulin. Anti-ErbB3 antibodies impair the establishment of de novo cell resistance to BRAF inhibition in vitro. In order to more potently ablate ErbB3 activity we used a combination of two anti-ErbB3 antibodies directed against distinct epitopes of its extracellular domain. These two antibodies in combo with BRAF/MEK inhibitors potently inhibit in vitro cell growth and tumor regrowth after drug withdrawal in an in vivo xenograft model. Importantly, residual tumor masses from mice treated by the antibodies and BRAF/ERK inhibitors combo are characterized almost exclusively by large necrotic areas with limited residual areas of tumor growth. Taken together, our findings support the concept that triple therapy directed against BRAF/MEK/ErbB3 may be able to provide durable control of BRAF mutated metastatic melanoma.

  4. Combination of antibodies directed against different ErbB3 surface epitopes prevents the establishment of resistance to BRAF/MEK inhibitors in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Fattore, Luigi; Malpicci, Debora; Marra, Emanuele; Belleudi, Francesca; Noto, Alessia; De Vitis, Claudia; Pisanu, Maria Elena; Coluccia, Pierpaolo; Camerlingo, Rosa; Roscilli, Giuseppe; Ribas, Antoni; Di Napoli, Arianna; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Mancini, Rita; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2015-01-01

    Patients with metastatic melanoma bearing V600 mutations in BRAF oncogene clinically benefit from the treatment with BRAF inhibitors alone or in combination with MEK inhibitors. However, a limitation to such treatment is the occurrence of resistance. Tackling the adaptive changes helping cells survive from drug treatment may offer new therapeutic opportunities. Very recently the ErbB3 receptor has been shown to act as a central node promoting survival of BRAF mutated melanoma. In this paper we first demonstrate that ErbB3/AKT hyperphosphorylation occurs in BRAF mutated melanoma cell lines following exposure to BRAF and/or MEK inhibitors. This strongly correlates with increased transcriptional activation of its ligand neuregulin. Anti-ErbB3 antibodies impair the establishment of de novo cell resistance to BRAF inhibition in vitro. In order to more potently ablate ErbB3 activity we used a combination of two anti-ErbB3 antibodies directed against distinct epitopes of its extracellular domain. These two antibodies in combo with BRAF/MEK inhibitors potently inhibit in vitro cell growth and tumor regrowth after drug withdrawal in an in vivo xenograft model. Importantly, residual tumor masses from mice treated by the antibodies and BRAF/ERK inhibitors combo are characterized almost exclusively by large necrotic areas with limited residual areas of tumor growth. Taken together, our findings support the concept that triple therapy directed against BRAF/MEK/ErbB3 may be able to provide durable control of BRAF mutated metastatic melanoma. PMID:26208478

  5. Coupling of the thrombin receptor to G12 may account for selective effects of thrombin on gene expression and DNA synthesis in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Post, G R; Collins, L R; Kennedy, E D; Moskowitz, S A; Aragay, A M; Goldstein, D; Brown, J H

    1996-01-01

    In 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, thrombin, but not carbachol, induces AP-1-mediated gene expression and DNA synthesis. To understand the divergent effects of these G protein-coupled receptor agonists on cellular responses, we examined Gq-dependent signaling events induced by thrombin receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor stimulation. Thrombin and carbachol induce comparable changes in phosphoinositide and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis, mobilization of intracellular Ca2+, diglyceride generation, and redistribution of protein kinase C; thus, activation of these Gq-signaling pathways appears to be insufficient for gene expression and mitogenesis. Thrombin increases Ras and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation to a greater extent than carbachol in 1321N1 cells. The effects of thrombin are not mediated through Gi, since ribosylation of Gi/Go proteins by pertussis toxin does not prevent thrombin-induced gene expression or thrombin-stimulated DNA synthesis. We recently reported that the pertussis toxin-insensitive G12 protein is required for thrombin-induced DNA synthesis. We demonstrate here, using transfection of receptors and G proteins in COS-7 cells, that G alpha 12 selectively couples the thrombin receptor to AP-1-mediated gene expression. This does not appear to result from increased mitogen-activated protein kinase activity but may reflect activation of a tyrosine kinase pathway. We suggest that preferential coupling of the thrombin receptor to G12 accounts for the selective ability of thrombin to stimulate Ras, mitogen-activated protein kinase, gene expression, and mitogenesis in 1321N1 cells. Images PMID:8930892

  6. The refined 1.9-A X-ray crystal structure of D-Phe-Pro-Arg chloromethylketone-inhibited human alpha-thrombin: structure analysis, overall structure, electrostatic properties, detailed active-site geometry, and structure-function relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Bode, W.; Turk, D.; Karshikov, A.

    1992-01-01

    Thrombin is a multifunctional serine proteinase that plays a key role in coagulation while exhibiting several other key cellular bioregulatory functions. The X-ray crystal structure of human alpha-thrombin was determined in its complex with the specific thrombin inhibitor D-Phe-Pro-Arg chloromethylketone (PPACK) using Patterson search methods and a search model derived from trypsinlike proteinases of known spatial structure (Bode, W., Mayr, I., Baumann, U., Huber, R., Stone, S.R., & Hofsteenge, J., 1989, EMBO J. 8, 3467-3475). The crystallographic refinement of the PPACK-thrombin model has now been completed at an R value of 0.156 (8 to 1.92 A); in particular, the amino- and the carboxy-termini of the thrombin A-chain are now defined and all side-chain atoms localized; only proline 37 was found to be in a cis-peptidyl conformation. The thrombin B-chain exhibits the characteristic polypeptide fold of trypsinlike serine proteinases; 195 residues occupy topologically equivalent positions with residues in bovine trypsin and 190 with those in bovine chymotrypsin with a root-mean-square (r.m.s.) deviation of 0.8 A for their alpha-carbon atoms. Most of the inserted residues constitute novel surface loops. A chymotrypsinogen numbering is suggested for thrombin based on the topological equivalences. The thrombin A-chain is arranged in a boomeranglike shape against the B-chain globule opposite to the active site; it resembles somewhat the propeptide of chymotrypsin(ogen) and is similarly not involved in substrate and inhibitor binding. Thrombin possesses an exceptionally large proportion of charged residues. The negatively and positively charged residues are not distributed uniformly over the whole molecule, but are clustered to form a sandwichlike electrostatic potential; in particular, two extended patches of mainly positively charged residues occur close to the carboxy-terminal B-chain helix (forming the presumed heparin-binding site) and on the surface of loop segment 70

  7. Cysteine proteases from the Asclepiadaceae plants latex exhibited thrombin and plasmin like activities.

    PubMed

    Shivaprasad, H V; Riyaz, M; Venkatesh Kumar, R; Dharmappa, K K; Tarannum, Shaista; Siddesha, J M; Rajesh, R; Vishwanath, B S

    2009-10-01

    In the present study we evaluated the presence of cysteine protease from the latex of four plants Asclepias curassavica L., Calotropis gigantea R.Br., Pergularia extensa R.Br. and Cynanchum puciflorum R.Br. belongs to the family Asclepiadaceae. Cysteine proteases from these plants latex exhibited both thrombin and plasmin like activities. Latex enzyme fraction in a concentration dependent manner induced the formation of clot in citrated blood plasma. Direct incubation of fibrinogen with latex enzyme fraction resulted in the formation of fibrin clot similar to thrombin enzyme. However prolonged incubation resulted in degradation of the formed fibrin clot suggesting plasmin like activity. Latex enzyme fraction preferentially hydrolyzed Aalpha and Bbeta chains of fibrinogen to form fibrin clot. Latex enzyme fraction also hydrolyzed the subunits of fully cross linked fibrin efficiently, the order of hydrolysis was alpha-polymer > alpha-chains > beta-chain and gamma-gamma dimer. Cysteine proteases from all the four Asclepiadaceae plants latex exhibited similar action on fibrinogen and fibrin. This study scientifically validate the use of plant latex in stop bleeding and wound healing by traditional healers all over the world.

  8. X-ray structure at 1.75 resolution of a norovirus 3C protease linked to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Jon; Coates, Leighton; Hussey, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses are recognized universally as the most important cause of human epidemic non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a 3C cysteine protease that cleaves a 200kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional proteins. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the Southampton norovirus 3C protease (SV3CP) bound to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor (MAPI) which has been refined at 1.75 resolution, following initial MAD phasing with a selenomethionine derivative. The inhibitor, acetyl-Glu-Phe-Gln-Leu-Gln-X, based on a 3C protease cleavage recognition sequences in the 200kDa polyprotein substrate, reacts covalently through its propenylethylester group (X) with the active site nucleophile, Cys 139. The 3C protease-inhibitor structure permits, for the first time, the identification of substrate recognition and binding groups and provides important new information for the development of antiviral prophylactics.

  9. Brain Endothelial Cells Synthesize Neurotoxic Thrombin in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiangling; Wright, Jill; Wall, Trevor; Grammas, Paula

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by neuronal death; thus, identifying neurotoxic proteins and their source is central to understanding and treating AD. The multifunctional protease thrombin is neurotoxic and found in AD senile plaques. The objective of this study was to determine whether brain endothelial cells can synthesize thrombin and thus be a source of this neurotoxin in AD brains. Microvessels were isolated from AD patient brains and from age-matched controls. Reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that thrombin message was highly expressed in microvessels from AD brains but was not detectable in control vessels. Similarly, Western blot analysis of microvessels showed that the thrombin protein was highly expressed in AD- but not control-derived microvessels. In addition, high levels of thrombin were detected in cerebrospinal fluid obtained from AD but not control patients, and sections from AD brains showed reactivity to thrombin antibody in blood vessel walls but not in vessels from controls. Finally, we examined the ability of brain endothelial cells in culture to synthesize thrombin and showed that oxidative stress or cell signaling perturbations led to increased expression of thrombin mRNA in these cells. The results demonstrate, for the first time, that brain endothelial cells can synthesize thrombin, and suggest that novel therapeutics targeting vascular stabilization that prevent or decrease release of thrombin could prove useful in treating this neurodegenerative disease. PMID:20150433

  10. Hemostatic effect and distribution of new rhThrombin formulations in rats

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtová, L'udmila; Sadloňová, Irina; Murányi, Andrej; Zigová, Jana; Múčková, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant human thrombin (rhThrombin) is a potential hemostatic alternative to bovine and human plasma-derived thrombin. Hemostatic, liver regeneration effect and plasma concentrations of rhThrombin (SCILL) tested in the form of solution and hydrogels (thermo-sensitive poloxamer gel and carbomer gel; hameln rds) were evaluated. In the bleeding model, rhThrombin was applied locally on the bleeding site. The time to hemostasis was measured. The rhThrombin in liquid form as well as the thermo-sensitive gel forming formulation significantly reduced the bleeding time in comparison to saline. In the regeneration model, a cut in the form “V” was made on the liver and rhThrombin in both formulations was applied at defined concentrations to the wound for 5 min. The rats survived 1, 3 and 5 days after the injury and treatment. Histological examination showed better results in the group treated with rh Thrombin gel in comparison to the liquid form – solution; differences were insignificant. Low [125I]-rhThrombin radioactivity was evaluated in plasma after topical application (solution and both hydrogels) at hemostatic effective doses to partial hepatectomy in rats. Locally applied rh Thrombin on the rat damaged liver tissue never reached pharmacologically active systemic levels. The plasmatic levels and the content of this active protein in injured liver tissue were lower after application of its hydrogels versus solution. PMID:26109904

  11. Compound C inhibits in vitro angiogenesis and ameliorates thrombin-induced endothelial barrier failure.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Dursun; Klewer, Matthias; Bauer, Pascal; Tanislav, Christian; Sedding, Daniel; Rohrbach, Susanne; Schulz, Rainer; Aslam, Muhammad

    2015-12-01

    Compound C (comp. C) is a cell-permeable pyrrazolopyrimidine derivative and widely used as adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor to characterise the role of AMPK in various physiological processes. However, its AMPK-independent effects have also been reported. In the present study we investigated the effects of moderate dose (1-10μM) comp. C on endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, in vitro angiogenesis, and endothelial barrier function. Comp. C was unable to inhibit AMPK phosphorylation (activation) induced by metformin and A-769662 in ECs even at concentration of 10μM. At lower concentration (1μM), comp. C inhibited and potentiated the inhibitory effects of metformin and A-769662 on EC proliferation, migration, tube formation, and sprouting without inducing apoptosis. However, at higher concentration (10μM), it strongly induced apoptosis as measured by enhanced caspase 3/7 activity. Moreover, comp. C antagonised thrombin-induced EC hyperpermeability accompanied by activation of Rac1 and strengthening of adherens junctions (AJs). This EC barrier protective effect was not affected by the presence of AMPK activators. The data of the present study demonstrate that long-term treatment of ECs with low concentration comp. C inhibits EC proliferation and angiogenesis without induction of apoptosis. While short-term incubation antagonises thrombin-induced EC hyperpermeability presumably via Rac1-dependent strengthening of AJs. Furthermore, higher concentration of comp. C (10μM or above) is toxic for ECs and warns that this agent should be used with caution to demonstrate the AMPK-mediated effects. PMID:26522925

  12. Determination of phosphodiesterase type V inhibitors in wastewater by direct injection followed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Causanilles, Ana; Emke, Erik; de Voogt, Pim

    2016-09-15

    A simple, fast and reliable analytical method for the determination of phosphodiesterase type V inhibitors in wastewater was developed and validated. The method was based on direct injection followed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry with triple quadrupole as mass analyzer. Transformation products and analogues were included in the target list besides the three active pharmaceutical ingredients (sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil). The method performance was thoroughly investigated, including the analyte stability in wastewater and matrix effect. All target compounds presented linear fits between their LOD and 500ng/L. The quantification limits ranged from 1.6 to 30ng/L for all compounds except for n-octylnortadalafil (LOQ: 100ng/L); precision calculated as intraday repeatability was lower than 30%; accuracy calculated as procedural recovery ranged successfully between 85 and 105% in all cases. The method was applied to samples collected during three week-long monitoring campaigns performed in 2013, 2014 and 2015 in three Dutch cities. Only sildenafil and its two metabolites, desmethyl- and desethylsildenafil, were present with normalized loads ranging from LOQ to 8.3, 11.8 and 21.6mg/day/1000 inh, respectively. Two additional week-long sets of samples were collected in Amsterdam at the time that a festival event took place, bringing around 350,000 visitors to the city. The difference in drug usage patterns was statistically studied: "weekday" versus "weekend", "normal" versus "atypical" week; and results discussed. The metabolite to parent drug concentration ratio evolution during consecutive years was discussed, leading to several possible explanations that should be further investigated. Finally, wastewater-based epidemiology approach was applied to back-calculate sildenafil consumption. PMID:27161135

  13. Aminopeptidase inhibitor ubenimex (bestatin) inhibits the growth of human choriocarcinoma in nude mice through its direct cytostatic activity.

    PubMed

    Inoi, K; Goto, S; Nomura, S; Isobe, K; Nawa, A; Okamoto, T; Tomoda, Y

    1995-01-01

    Ubenimex (bestatin), a potent inhibitor of aminopeptidases, is known to have immunomodulatory and host-mediated antitumor activities. In this paper, we investigated the inhibitory effects of bestatin on the growth of human choriocarcinoma both in vitro and in vivo using the established choriocarcinoma cell line NaUCC-4. Bestatin inhibited the in vitro proliferation of NaUCC-4 cells concentration- and time-dependently at more than 72 h incubation. DNA histograms by flow cytometric analysis revealed that exposure to bestatin at 5 to 20 micrograms/ml for 72 h caused mild accumulation of NaUCC-4 cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, although no clear arrest was observed in any phase of cell cycle. In vivo antitumor activity of bestatin was examined using the NaUCC-4 choriocarcinoma-xenografted nude mouse model. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited by daily i.p. administration of bestatin for 4 weeks at doses of 2 and 20 mg/kg (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively), but not by 0.2 mg/kg as compared with control. No significant augmentation of NK activity or B cell mitogenicity in spleen cells taken from these NaUCC-4-hearing nude mice was observed following treatment with bestatin at either 2 or 20 mg/kg. These results indicate that bestatin inhibits the growth of NaUCC-4 choriocarcinoma in vivo as well as in vitro not via potentiation of effector cells but rather by its direct cytostatic activity, and suggest that bestatin may have an additional therapeutic property besides as a BRM for its use in the treatment of choriocarcinoma.

  14. Structural insights into the ATP binding pocket of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase by site-directed mutagenesis, inhibitor binding analysis, and homology modeling.

    PubMed

    Gunby, Rosalind H; Ahmed, Shaheen; Sottocornola, Roberta; Gasser, Marc; Redaelli, Sara; Mologni, Luca; Tartari, Carmen J; Belloni, Valentina; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Scapozza, Leonardo

    2006-09-21

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a valid target for anticancer therapy; however, potent ALK inhibitors suitable for clinical use are lacking. Because the majority of described kinase inhibitors bind in the ATP pocket of the kinase domain, we have characterized this pocket in ALK using site-directed mutagenesis, inhibition studies, and molecular modeling. Mutation of the gatekeeper residue, a key structural determinant influencing inhibitor binding, rendered the fusion protein, NPM/ALK, sensitive to inhibition by SKI-606 in the nanomolar range, while PD173955 inhibited the NPM/ALK mutant at micromolar concentrations. In contrast, both wild type and mutant NPM/ALK were insensitive to imatinib. Computer modeling indicated that docking solutions obtained with a homology model representing the intermediate conformation of the ALK kinase domain reflected closely experimental data. The good agreement between experimental and virtual results indicate that the ALK molecular models described here are useful tools for the rational design of ALK selective inhibitors. In addition, 4-phenylamino-quinoline compounds may have potential as templates for ALK inhibitors. PMID:16970400

  15. Combined thrombin and autologous blood for repair of lumbar durotomy.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Wael Mohamed Mohamed; Aboul-Enein, Hisham A

    2016-10-01

    Lumbar durotomy can be intended or unintended and can result in persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Several methods are used to manage this complication including bed rest and CSF diversion. In this study, we theorize that the use of thrombin-soaked gel foam together with autologous blood laid on the sutured dural tear can prevent persistent CSF leak. A retrospective review of the records of patients who underwent lumbar surgery and had an unintended dural tear with CSF leak, comparing the outcome of patients who were submitted to thrombin-soaked gel foam together with autologous blood (group A) to patients treated by subfacial drain, tight bandage, and bed rest (group B). A total of 1371 patients had lumbar surgery, of whom 131 had dural tear. Group A included 62 patients, while group B included 69 patients. 8.1 % of group A patients had CSF leak as compared to 17.4 % of group B patients at postoperative day 14. The incidence of postoperative CSF leak and duration of postoperative hospital stay were statistically lower in group A than in group B (p < 0.05). Combining thrombin and autologous blood for repair of lumbar durotomy is an effective and a relatively cheap way to decrease CSF leak in the early postoperative period as well as decreasing postoperative hospital stay. It also resulted in decreased complications rate in the late postoperative period. PMID:26864189

  16. An electrochemical aptasensor electrocatalyst for detection of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Tian, Rong; Chen, Xiaojun; Li, Qingwen; Yao, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    This work reports a novel signal amplification strategy based on three-dimensional ordered macroporous C60-poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (3DOM C60-PEDOT-[BMIm][BF6]) for ultrasensitive detection of thrombin by cascade catalysis of Au-PEDOT@SiO2 microspheres and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Au-PEDOT@SiO2 microspheres were constructed not only as nanocarriers to anchor the large amounts of secondary thrombin aptamers but also as nanocatalysts to catalyze the oxidation of ethanol efficiently. Significantly, the electrochemical signal was greatly enhanced based on cascade catalysis: First, ADH catalyzed the oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde with the concomitant generation of NADH in the presence of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrate (NAD(+)). Then, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as nanocatalysts could effectively catalyze NADH to produce NAD(+) with the help of PEDOT as redox probe. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed aptasensor exhibits a linear range of 2 × 10(-13) to 2 × 10(-8) M with a low detection limit of 2 × 10(-14) M for thrombin detection and shows high sensitivity and good specificity. PMID:26869084

  17. Expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 by monocytes and endothelial cells exposed to thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Colotta, F.; Sciacca, F. L.; Sironi, M.; Luini, W.; Rabiet, M. J.; Mantovani, A.

    1994-01-01

    Thrombin, in addition to being a key enzyme in hemostasis, affects a series of endothelial and leukocyte functions and thus may be involved in the regulation of inflammatory reactions. Because leukocyte recruitment and activation are important events in inflammatory and thrombotic processes, in this study we have examined the possibility that thrombin induces the production of a cytokine chemotactic for mononuclear phagocytes. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed in vitro to thrombin expressed transcripts of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1; alternative acronyms: JE, monocyte chemotactic and activating factor, tumor-derived chemotactic factor). Thrombin was two- to threefold less effective than endotoxin in inducing MCP-1 transcripts in PBMC. Among circulating mononuclear cells, monocytes were identified as the cells expressing MCP-1 in response to thrombin. Monocytes expressed thrombin receptor transcripts. Boiling, hirudin, antithrombin III, and mutation of the catalytic site serine 205 into alanine) blocked the capacity of thrombin to induce MCP-1 expression. The thrombin receptor-activating peptide mimicked the effect of thrombin in inducing MCP-1 expression. Induction of MCP-1 transcript by thrombin was not reduced by blocking interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor, suggesting that these mediators are not involved in thrombin-induced expression of MCP-1. In addition to monocytes, endothelial cells (EC) also expressed MCP-1 in response to thrombin, although at lower levels compared with monocytes. Actinomycin D experiments indicated that induction of MCP-1 by thrombin in PBMC and EC was gene transcription dependent. The inhibition of protein synthesis blocked thrombin-induced MCP-1 expression in PBMC, whereas it superinduced both constitutive and thrombin-inducible expression of MCP-1 in EC, indicating different mechanisms of regulation of this gene in mononuclear phagocytes versus endothelial cells. Thrombin stimulated mononuclear

  18. The ATP-gated P2X1 receptor plays a pivotal role in activation of aspirin-treated platelets by thrombin and epinephrine.

    PubMed

    Grenegård, Magnus; Vretenbrant-Oberg, Karin; Nylander, Martina; Désilets, Stéphanie; Lindström, Eva G; Larsson, Anders; Ramström, Ida; Ramström, Sofia; Lindahl, Tomas L

    2008-07-01

    Human platelets express protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) and PAR4 but limited data indicate for differences in signal transduction. We studied the involvement of PAR1 and PAR4 in the cross-talk between thrombin and epinephrine. The results show that epinephrine acted via alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptors to provoke aggregation, secretion, and Ca(2+) mobilization in aspirin-treated platelets pre-stimulated with subthreshold concentrations of thrombin. Incubating platelets with antibodies against PAR4 or the PAR4-specific inhibitor pepducin P4pal-i1 abolished the aggregation. Furthermore, platelets pre-exposed to the PAR4-activating peptide AYPGKF, but not to the PAR1-activating peptide SFLLRN, were aggregated by epinephrine, whereas both AYPGKF and SFLLRN synergized with epinephrine in the absence of aspirin. The roles of released ATP and ADP were elucidated by using antagonists of the purinergic receptors P2X(1), P2Y(1), and P2Y(12) (i.e. NF449, MRS2159, MRS2179, and cangrelor). Intriguingly, ATP, but not ADP, was required for the epinephrine/thrombin-induced aggregation. In Western blot analysis, a low concentration of AYPGKF, but not SFLLRN, stimulated phosphorylation of Akt on serine 473. Moreover, the phosphatidyl inositide 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 antagonized the effect of epinephrine combined with thrombin or AYPGKF. Thus, in aspirin-treated platelets, PAR4, but not PAR1, interacts synergistically with alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptors, and the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway is involved in this cross-talk. Furthermore, in PAR4-pretreated platelets, epinephrine caused dense granule secretion, and subsequent signaling from the ATP-gated P2X(1)-receptor and the alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor induced aggregation. These results suggest a new mechanism that has ATP as a key element and circumvents the action of aspirin on epinephrine-facilitated PAR4-mediated platelet activation. PMID:18480058

  19. Nanocomplexation of thrombin with cationic amylose derivative for improved stability and hemostatic efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Baoxiong; Li, Zhihua; Pang, Jiadong; Li, Wenbin; Huang, Pinbo; Wang, Jie; Zhou, Yu; Lin, Qing; Zhou, Quanbo; Ye, Xiao; Ye, Huilin; Liu, Yimin; Zhang, Li-Ming; Chen, Rufu

    2015-01-01

    As a topical hemostatic agent, thrombin has wide application for many surgical treatments. However, native thrombin always suffers from its physical and chemical instabilities. In this work, a nanocomplexation strategy was developed for modifying the stability and hemostatic efficacy of thrombin, in which a water-soluble cationic amylose derivative containing poly(l-lysine) dendrons was prepared by a click reaction and then used to complex thrombin in an aqueous system. For resultant thrombin nanocomplexes, their morphology and particle size distribution were investigated. Their stabilities were studied in terms of activity retention percentages under different storage time, pH values, and illumination time. In addition, their ability to achieve in vitro fibrinogen and blood coagulation were evaluated. Via a rat hepatic hemorrhage model and a rat iliac artery hemorrhage model, these thrombin nanocomplexes were confirmed to have good tissue biocompatibility and in vivo hemostatic effectiveness. PMID:25673989

  20. Plasma from chronic liver disease subjects exhibit differential ability to generate thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhineng J.; Sheth, Siddharth H.; Smith, Chad H.; Schmotzer, Amy R.; Lippello, Anita L.; Al-Khafaji, Ali; Chopra, Kapil B.; Smith, Roy E.

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis in chronic liver disease (CLD) results in complex alterations in procoagulant and anticoagulant proteins. Although an elevated International Normalized Ratio (INR) is a prominent feature of progressive fibrosis, the utility of the INR to accurately reflect the net effect of these changes on the coagulation system is uncertain. In subjects with CLD, elevated INRs have been observed in both bleeding and thrombotic complications, suggesting limitations of the INR in characterizing the coagulation status. Unlike the INR, which is preferentially sensitive to the extrinsic pathway, the direct measurement of thrombin generation (TG) better captures the global coagulation cascade. We conducted a pilot study measuring the INR, chromogenic factor X (cFX) and TG in CLD subjects and compared them to control subjects and subjects on warfarin anticoagulation. We observed a large interquartile range (IQR) in TG among compensated CLD subjects across a narrow INR range, suggesting that the INR is a suboptimal surrogate measure of TG in CLD subjects. PMID:26200653

  1. Dynamics Govern Specificity of a Protein-Protein Interface: Substrate Recognition by Thrombin.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julian E; Huber, Roland G; Waldner, Birgit J; Kahler, Ursula; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R

    2015-01-01

    Biomolecular recognition is crucial in cellular signal transduction. Signaling is mediated through molecular interactions at protein-protein interfaces. Still, specificity and promiscuity of protein-protein interfaces cannot be explained using simplistic static binding models. Our study rationalizes specificity of the prototypic protein-protein interface between thrombin and its peptide substrates relying solely on binding site dynamics derived from molecular dynamics simulations. We find conformational selection and thus dynamic contributions to be a key player in biomolecular recognition. Arising entropic contributions complement chemical intuition primarily reflecting enthalpic interaction patterns. The paradigm "dynamics govern specificity" might provide direct guidance for the identification of specific anchor points in biomolecular recognition processes and structure-based drug design. PMID:26496636

  2. Thrombin inhibits IFN-gamma production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by promoting a Th2 profile.

    PubMed

    Naldini, Antonella; Morena, Emilia; Filippi, Irene; Pucci, Annalisa; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Cirino, Giuseppe; Carraro, Fabio

    2006-11-01

    Thrombin, the key enzyme of the coagulation cascade, is involved in inflammation. It was proposed recently that thrombin activity may play an important role in allergic inflammation. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is a potent Th1-related cytokine secreted by activated T cells and is usually downregulated in allergic inflammation. We recently demonstrated that thrombin enhances interleukin-10 (IL-10) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Thus, we hypothesized that thrombin may promote a Th2 profile. We here report that human alpha- thrombin downregulates IFN-gamma expression at both protein and mRNA levels in activated PBMCs. The use of proteolytically inactive thrombin and of the specific thrombin receptor agonist peptide, SFLLRN, shows that this downregulation is thrombin specific and requires thrombin proteolytic activity. The addition of an anti- IL-10 monoclonal antibody (mAb) to thrombin-treated PBMCs abolishes IFN-gamma downregulation, suggesting that thrombin exerts its effect through IL-10, a Th2-related cytokine. Furthermore, IFN-gamma reduction was accompanied by increased IL-4 release, as well as by an increase in the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1. In conclusion, the observation that thrombin affects the production of IFN-gamma (Th1 profile) and IL-4 (Th2 profile) provides further evidence for the role played by thrombin in modulating Th1/Th2 cytokine balance, which could be particularly relevant in allergic inflammation. PMID:17115897

  3. Thrombin-induced activation of astrocytes in mixed rat hippocampal cultures is inhibited by soluble thrombomodulin.

    PubMed

    Niego, Be'eri; Samson, Andre L; Petersen, Karl-Uwe; Medcalf, Robert L

    2011-03-24

    Thrombin, a serine protease known for its role in coagulation, also induces a variety of protease activated receptor (PAR)-mediated responses in the central nervous system that contribute to many brain pathologies. Since the proteolytic specificity of thrombin is uniquely controlled by thrombomodulin (TM), we investigated the mechanisms by which thrombin and a recombinant soluble form of human TM (Solulin, INN: sothrombomodulin alpha; rhsTM) could influence rat hippocampal cultures. Treatment of hippocampal cultures with thrombin for up to 48h resulted in a significant morphological rearrangement with the formation of expansive cell-free areas (CFAs) and a reduction in cell viability; both effects were blocked by rhsTM. Treatment with the selective PAR-1 agonist, TRAP (SFLLRN) caused the formation of CFAs, suggesting that CFA formation involved PAR-1 signaling. Astrocytes prepared from PAR-1(-/-) mice also had an attenuated CFA response to thrombin. Thrombin-induced CFA formation was a consequence of cell movement and substantial changes in cell morphology, rather than due to cell detachment. Immunocytochemical and functional analyses revealed that the thrombin-sensitive cells within these hippocampal cultures were astrocytes. The effects of thrombin on CFA development were mediated by astrocyte-specific release of intracellular calcium and signalling through ERK1/2. rhsTM was able to attenuate thrombin-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Finally, astrocytes were shown to maintain thrombin-sensitivity following neuronal depletion with NMDA, a result which was confirmed with pure astrocyte cultures. Hence thrombin mediates PAR-1-induced activation of hippocampal astrocytes, but not neurons, in a process that can be modulated by rhsTM. PMID:21241677

  4. Pitfalls of the MTT assay: Direct and off-target effects of inhibitors can result in over/underestimation of cell viability.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, A A; Dmitrenko, V V

    2015-12-15

    The MTT assay (to a less degree MTS, XTT or WST) is a widely exploited approach for measuring cell viability/drug cytotoxicity. MTT reduction occurs throughout a cell and can be significantly affected by a number of factors, including metabolic and energy perturbations, changes in the activity of oxidoreductases, endo-/exocytosis and intracellular trafficking. Over/underestimation of cell viability by the MTT assay may be due to both adaptive metabolic and mitochondrial reprogramming of cells subjected to drug treatment-mediated stress and inhibitor off-target effects. Previously, imatinib, rottlerin, ursolic acid, verapamil, resveratrol, genistein nanoparticles and some polypeptides were shown to interfere with MTT reduction rate resulting in inconsistent results between the MTT assay and alternative assays. Here, to test the under/overestimation of viability by the MTT assay, we compared results derived from the MTT assay with the trypan blue exclusion assay after treatment of glioblastoma U251, T98G and C6 cells with three widely used inhibitors with the known direct and side effects on energy and metabolic homeostasis - temozolomide (TMZ), a DNA-methylating agent, temsirolimus (TEM), an inhibitor of mTOR kinase, and U0126, an inhibitor of MEK1/2 kinases. Inhibitors were applied shortly as in IC50 evaluating studies or long as in studies focusing on drug resistance acquisition. We showed that over/underestimation of cell viability by the MTT assay and its significance depends on a cell line, a time point of viability measurement and other experimental parameters. Furthermore, we provided a comprehensive survey of factors that should be accounted in the MTT assay. To avoid result misinterpretation, supplementation of the tetrazolium salt-based assays with other non-metabolic assays is recommended. PMID:26260013

  5. Thrombin-Mediated Platelet Activation of Lysed Whole Blood and Platelet-Rich Plasma: A Comparison Between Platelet Activation Markers and Ultrastructural Alterations.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Tanya N; van der Spuy, Wendy J; Kaberry, Lindsay L; Shayi, Millicent

    2016-06-01

    Platelet ultrastructural alterations representing spurious activation have been identified in pathological conditions. A limitation of platelet studies is that sample preparation may lead to artifactual activation processes which may confound results, impacting the use of scanning electron microscopy as a supplemental diagnostic tool. We used scanning electron microscopy and flow cytometry to analyze platelet activation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood (WB) samples. PRP generated using a single high g force centrifugation, and WB samples treated with a red blood cell lysis buffer, were exposed to increasing concentrations of the agonist thrombin. Platelets in lysed WB samples responded to thrombin by elevating the activation marker CD62p definitively, with corresponding ultrastructural changes indicating activation. Conversely, CD62p expression in PRP preparations remained static. Ultrastructural analysis revealed fully activated platelets even under low concentration thrombin stimulation, with considerable fibrin deposition. It is proposed that the method for PRP production induced premature platelet activation, preventable by using an inhibitor of platelet aggregation and fibrin polymerization. Nevertheless, our results show a definitive correspondence between flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy in platelet activation studies, highlighting the potential of the latter technique as a supplemental diagnostic tool. PMID:27329313

  6. Effect of Fagonia arabica on thrombin induced release of t-PA and complex of PAI-1 tPA in cultured HUVE cells.

    PubMed

    Aloni, Prutha D; Nayak, Amit R; Chaurasia, Sweta R; Deopujari, Jayant Y; Chourasia, Chhaya; Purohit, Hemant J; Taori, Girdhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2016-07-01

    Fagonia arabica (FA) possesses a thrombolytic property which has been earlier reported in our laboratory. Current study was undertaken to investigate the effect of aqueous extract of FA on thrombin-induced tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) release from cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cell line (HUVE) for studying its clot lytic activity. For this, establishment of cell line model has been done by isolating the cells from human umbilical cord. Cell toxicity was evaluated using XTT assay. Estimation of t-PA and PAI-1 t-PA complex were done using ELISA technique. Thrombin treatment induces the t-PA and PAI-1 release from HUVE cell line, and FA treatment was found to antagonize the thrombin induced t-PA and PAI-1 release. Our preliminary results suggest that FA may be used as an alternative to thrombolytic drug. However, study demands further experiments using animal model of thrombosis to establish the role of FA as a novel thrombolytic drug. PMID:27419084

  7. The lack of effect of a prophylactic dose of enoxaparin on thrombin generation in patients subjected to nephrectomy because of kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Szczepański, M; Szostek, P; Pypno, W; Borówka, A

    2001-12-15

    It is assumed that major surgery, connected with extensive tissue dissection, brings about the release of tissue factor into circulation and subsequent activation of coagulation system. This activation results in the thrombin generation, which is supposed to be suppressed by the low-molecular-mass heparins (LMMH), administered to the surgical patients as the prophylaxis against postoperative venous thromboembolism. We have estimated the concentration of circulating thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complex in patients subjected to transperitoneal nephrectomy and randomized into controls and who received 40-mg enoxaparin 12 h before and 12 h after the operation and then once daily for 7 days. We have observed a sharp rise of TAT concentration at the end of surgery and it corresponded to the simultaneous drop of antithrombin (AT) activity. TAT concentration gradually decreased and AT activity increased up to the end of observations on the seventh postoperative day, but there were no differences observed between the groups of patients. We have also observed a biphasic increase of plasmin-plasmin inhibitor (PPI) complex concentration in our patients. Again, there were no differences in PPI between the groups of patients. It is our conclusion that under the conditions of this study, the well-known prophylactic effect of enoxaparin against the venous thromboembolic complications was not mediated by the inhibition of intraoperative thrombin generation. The anti-inflammatory or biophysical influence of LMMH may be rather taken into account in surgical patients receiving prophylactic doses of these heparins.

  8. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of RNase H Activity of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase by RNase H Active Site-Directed Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G. Sridhar; Smith, Robert F.; Daniels, Christopher L.; Abeywickrema, Pravien D.; Reid, John C.; Loughran, H. Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A.; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J.; Williams, Peter D.; Darke, Paul L.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Munshi, Sanjeev

    2010-09-02

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  9. Structural basis for the inhibition of RNase H activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by RNase H active site-directed inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G Sridhar; Smith, Robert F; Daniels, Christopher L; Abeywickrema, Pravien D; Reid, John C; Loughran, H Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J; Williams, Peter D; Darke, Paul L; Hazuda, Daria J; Munshi, Sanjeev

    2010-08-01

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  10. Cross-institute evaluations of inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for direct testing of aerosol and blood samples containing biological warfare agent DNA.

    PubMed

    Minogue, Timothy D; Rachwal, Phillip A; Trombley Hall, Adrienne; Koehler, Jeffery W; Weller, Simon A

    2014-02-01

    Rapid pathogen detection is crucial for the timely introduction of therapeutics. Two groups (one in the United Kingdom and one in the United States) independently evaluated inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for the direct testing of substrates. In the United Kingdom, a multiplexed Bacillus anthracis (target) and Bacillus subtilis (internal-control) PCR was used to evaluate 4 reagents against 5 PCR inhibitors and down-selected the TaqMan Fast Virus 1-Step master mix (Life Technologies Inc.). In the United States, four real-time PCR assays (targeting B. anthracis, Brucella melitensis, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV], and Orthopoxvirus spp.) were used to evaluate 5 reagents (plus the Fast Virus master mix) against buffer, blood, and soil samples and down-selected the KAPA Blood Direct master mix (KAPA Biosystems Inc.) with added Platinum Taq (Life Technologies). The down-selected reagents underwent further testing. In the United Kingdom experiments, both reagents were tested against seven contrived aerosol collector samples containing B. anthracis Ames DNA and B. subtilis spores from a commercial formulation (BioBall). In PCR assays with reaction mixtures containing 40% crude sample, an airfield-collected sample induced inhibition of the B. subtilis PCR with the KAPA reagent and complete failure of both PCRs with the Fast Virus reagent. However, both reagents allowed successful PCR for all other samples-which inhibited PCRs with a non-inhibitor-resistant reagent. In the United States, a cross-assay limit-of-detection (LoD) study in blood was conducted. The KAPA Blood Direct reagent allowed the detection of agent DNA (by four PCRs) at higher concentrations of blood in the reaction mixture (2.5%) than the Fast Virus reagent (0.5%), although LoDs differed between assays and reagent combinations. Across both groups, the KAPA Blood Direct reagent was determined to be the optimal reagent for inhibition relief in PCR.

  11. Cross-Institute Evaluations of Inhibitor-Resistant PCR Reagents for Direct Testing of Aerosol and Blood Samples Containing Biological Warfare Agent DNA

    PubMed Central

    Minogue, Timothy D.; Rachwal, Phillip A.; Trombley Hall, Adrienne; Koehler, Jeffery W.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid pathogen detection is crucial for the timely introduction of therapeutics. Two groups (one in the United Kingdom and one in the United States) independently evaluated inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for the direct testing of substrates. In the United Kingdom, a multiplexed Bacillus anthracis (target) and Bacillus subtilis (internal-control) PCR was used to evaluate 4 reagents against 5 PCR inhibitors and down-selected the TaqMan Fast Virus 1-Step master mix (Life Technologies Inc.). In the United States, four real-time PCR assays (targeting B. anthracis, Brucella melitensis, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV], and Orthopoxvirus spp.) were used to evaluate 5 reagents (plus the Fast Virus master mix) against buffer, blood, and soil samples and down-selected the KAPA Blood Direct master mix (KAPA Biosystems Inc.) with added Platinum Taq (Life Technologies). The down-selected reagents underwent further testing. In the United Kingdom experiments, both reagents were tested against seven contrived aerosol collector samples containing B. anthracis Ames DNA and B. subtilis spores from a commercial formulation (BioBall). In PCR assays with reaction mixtures containing 40% crude sample, an airfield-collected sample induced inhibition of the B. subtilis PCR with the KAPA reagent and complete failure of both PCRs with the Fast Virus reagent. However, both reagents allowed successful PCR for all other samples—which inhibited PCRs with a non-inhibitor-resistant reagent. In the United States, a cross-assay limit-of-detection (LoD) study in blood was conducted. The KAPA Blood Direct reagent allowed the detection of agent DNA (by four PCRs) at higher concentrations of blood in the reaction mixture (2.5%) than the Fast Virus reagent (0.5%), although LoDs differed between assays and reagent combinations. Across both groups, the KAPA Blood Direct reagent was determined to be the optimal reagent for inhibition relief in PCR. PMID:24334660

  12. Paroxetine Is a Direct Inhibitor of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 and Increases Myocardial Contractility

    SciTech Connect

    Thal, David M.; Homan, Kristoff T.; Chen, Jun; Wu, Emily K.; Hinkle, Patricia M.; Huang, Z. Maggie; Chuprun, J. Kurt; Song, Jianliang; Gao, Erhe; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Sklar, Larry A.; Koch, Walter J.; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-08-10

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a well-established therapeutic target for the treatment of heart failure. In this paper we identify the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) paroxetine as a selective inhibitor of GRK2 activity both in vitro and in living cells. In the crystal structure of the GRK2·paroxetine–Gβγ complex, paroxetine binds in the active site of GRK2 and stabilizes the kinase domain in a novel conformation in which a unique regulatory loop forms part of the ligand binding site. Isolated cardiomyocytes show increased isoproterenol-induced shortening and contraction amplitude in the presence of paroxetine, and pretreatment of mice with paroxetine before isoproterenol significantly increases left ventricular inotropic reserve in vivo with no significant effect on heart rate. Neither is observed in the presence of the SSRI fluoxetine. Our structural and functional results validate a widely available drug as a selective chemical probe for GRK2 and represent a starting point for the rational design of more potent and specific GRK2 inhibitors.

  13. Thrombin cleavage of osteopontin disrupts a pro-chemotactic sequence for dendritic cells, which is compensated by the release of its pro-chemotactic C-terminal fragment.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhifei; Morser, John; Leung, Lawrence L K

    2014-09-26

    Thrombin cleavage alters the function of osteopontin (OPN) by exposing an integrin binding site and releasing a chemotactic C-terminal fragment. Here, we examined thrombin cleavage of OPN in the context of dendritic cell (DC) migration to define its functional domains. Full-length OPN (OPN-FL), thrombin-cleaved N-terminal fragment (OPN-R), thrombin- and carboxypeptidase B2-double-cleaved N-terminal fragment (OPN-L), and C-terminal fragment (OPN-CTF) did not have intrinsic chemotactic activity, but all potentiated CCL21-induced DC migration. OPN-FL possessed the highest potency, whereas OPNRAA-FL had substantially less activity, indicating the importance of RGD. We identified a conserved (168)RSKSKKFRR(176) sequence on OPN-FL that spans the thrombin cleavage site, and it demonstrated potent pro-chemotactic effects on CCL21-induced DC migration. OPN-FLR168A had reduced activity, and the double mutant OPNRAA-FLR168A had even lower activity, indicating that these functional domains accounted for most of the pro-chemotactic activity of OPN-FL. OPN-CTF also possessed substantial pro-chemotactic activity, which was fully expressed upon thrombin cleavage and its release from the intact protein, because OPN-CTF was substantially more active than OPNRAA-FLR168A containing the OPN-CTF sequence within the intact protein. OPN-R and OPN-L possessed similar potency, indicating that the newly exposed C-terminal SVVYGLR sequence in OPN-R was not involved in the pro-chemotactic effect. OPN-FL and OPN-CTF did not directly bind to the CD44 standard form or CD44v6. In conclusion, thrombin cleavage of OPN disrupts a pro-chemotactic sequence in intact OPN, and its loss of pro-chemotactic activity is compensated by the release of OPN-CTF, which assumes a new conformation and possesses substantial activity in enhancing chemokine-induced migration of DCs. PMID:25112870

  14. Crystal Structure of Thrombin Bound to the Uncleaved Extracellular Fragment of PAR1

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Prafull S.; Chen, Zhiwei; Di Cera, Enrico

    2010-05-11

    Abundant structural information exists on how thrombin recognizes ligands at the active site or at exosites separate from the active site region, but remarkably little is known about how thrombin recognizes substrates that bridge both the active site and exosite I. The case of the protease-activated receptor PAR1 is particularly relevant in view of the plethora of biological effects associated with its activation by thrombin. Here, we present the 1.8 {angstrom} resolution structure of thrombin S195A in complex with a 30-residue long uncleaved extracellular fragment of PAR1 that documents for the first time a productive binding mode bridging the active site and exosite I. The structure reveals two unexpected features of the thrombin-PAR1 interaction. The acidic P3 residue of PAR1, Asp{sup 39}, does not hinder binding to the active site and actually makes favorable interactions with Gly{sup 219} of thrombin. The tethered ligand domain shows a considerable degree of disorder even when bound to thrombin. The results fill a significant gap in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of recognition by thrombin in ways that are relevant to other physiological substrates.

  15. Poor prognosis of hypocoagulability assessed by thrombin generation assay in disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyunghoon; Kim, Ji-Eun; Kwon, Jihyun; Kim, Inho; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Park, Seonyang; Han, Kyou-Sup; Kim, Hyun Kyung

    2014-04-01

    Overall assessment of the hemostatic system including procoagulant and anticoagulant changes may help assess the clinical status and prognosis of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The thrombin generation assay provides useful information about the global hemostatic status. Therefore, we measured several parameters of global hemostatic potential by the thrombin generation assay in patients suspected of having DIC. A total of 114 patients with suspected DIC were included. The thrombin generation assay was performed on the calibrated automated thrombogram using tissue factor with or without the addition of thrombomodulin, showing three parameters: lag time, endogenous thrombin potential (ETP), and peak thrombin. Both 1 and 5 pmol/l tissue factor-stimulated ETP and peak thrombin were well correlated with DIC severity. Interestingly, antithrombin level greatly affected ETP, whereas protein C influenced lag time. Prognostic analysis revealed that the area under the curve of peak thrombin stimulated by 1 pmol/l tissue factor was superior to that of D-dimer. Moreover, multivariate Cox analysis showed that the lag time and time to peak with both 1 and 5 pmol/l tissue factor were independent prognostic markers. ETP and peak thrombin well reflect DIC severity. Hypocoagulability manifesting as prolonged lag time and time to peak is expected to be an independent prognostic marker in DIC.

  16. Thrombin and fibrinogen γ' impact clot structure by marked effects on intrafibrillar structure and protofibril packing.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Marco M; Macrae, Fraser L; Duval, Cédric; McPherson, Helen R; Bridge, Katherine I; Ajjan, Ramzi A; Ridger, Victoria C; Connell, Simon D; Philippou, Helen; Ariëns, Robert A S

    2016-01-28

    Previous studies have shown effects of thrombin and fibrinogen γ' on clot structure. However, structural information was obtained using electron microscopy, which requires sample dehydration. Our aim was to investigate the role of thrombin and fibrinogen γ' in modulating fibrin structure under fully hydrated conditions. Fibrin fibers were studied using turbidimetry, atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, and magnetic tweezers in purified and plasma solutions. Increased thrombin induced a pronounced decrease in average protofibril content per fiber, with a relatively minor decrease in fiber size, leading to the formation of less compact fiber structures. Atomic force microscopy under fully hydrated conditions confirmed that fiber diameter was only marginally decreased. Decreased protofibril content of the fibers produced by high thrombin resulted in weakened clot architecture as analyzed by magnetic tweezers in purified systems and by thromboelastometry in plasma and whole blood. Fibers produced with fibrinogen γ' showed reduced protofibril packing over a range of thrombin concentrations. High-magnification electron microscopy demonstrated reduced protofibril packing in γ' fibers and unraveling of fibers into separate protofibrils. Decreased protofibril packing was confirmed in plasma for high thrombin concentrations and fibrinogen-deficient plasma reconstituted with γ' fibrinogen. These findings demonstrate that, in fully hydrated conditions, thrombin and fibrinogen γ' have dramatic effects on protofibril content and that protein density within fibers correlates with strength of the fibrin network. We conclude that regulation of protofibril content of fibers is an important mechanism by which thrombin and fibrinogen γ' modulate fibrin clot structure and strength. PMID:26608329

  17. How Na+ Activates Thrombin – A Review of the Functional and Structural Data

    PubMed Central

    Huntington, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Thrombin is often referred to as the ultimate blood coagulation protease. This is true in both senses: it is the final protease generated in the series of proteolytic events known as the blood coagulation cascade, and it is the effector of clot formation, cleaving over twelve different substrates and interacting with at least six cofactors. Regulation of thrombin activity is thus of great relevance to determining the correct haemostatic balance, with dysregulation leading to bleeding or thrombosis. One of the most enigmatic and controversial regulators of thrombin activity is the monovalent cation Na+. When bound to Na+, thrombin adopts a ‘fast’ conformation which cleaves all procoagulant substrates more rapidly, and when free of Na+, thrombin reverts to a ‘slow’ state which preferentially activates the protein C anticoagulant pathway. Thus, Na+ binding allosterically modulates the activity of thrombin and helps determine the haemostatic balance. Over the last 30 years there has been a great deal of research into the structural basis of thrombin allostery. Biochemical and mutagenesis studies established which regions and residues are involved in the slow→fast conformational change, and recently several crystal structures of the putative slow form have been solved. In this article I review the biochemical and crystallographic data to see if we are any closer to understanding the conformational basis of the Na+ activation of thrombin. PMID:18979627

  18. Conventional protein kinase C isoforms differentially regulate ADP- and thrombin-evoked Ca²⁺ signalling in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Lever, Robert A; Hussain, Azhar; Sun, Benjamin B; Sage, Stewart O; Harper, Alan G S

    2015-12-01

    Rises in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) are central in platelet activation, yet many aspects of the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Most studies examine how experimental manipulations affect agonist-evoked rises in [Ca(2+)]cyt, but these only monitor the net effect of manipulations on the processes controlling [Ca(2+)]cyt (Ca(2+) buffering, sequestration, release, entry and removal), and cannot resolve the source of the Ca(2+) or the transporters or channels affected. To investigate the effects of protein kinase C (PKC) on platelet Ca(2+) signalling, we here monitor Ca(2+) flux around the platelet by measuring net Ca(2+) fluxes to or from the extracellular space and the intracellular Ca(2+) stores, which act as the major sources and sinks for Ca(2+) influx into and efflux from the cytosol, as well as monitoring the cytosolic Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]cyt), which influences platelet Ca(2+) fluxes via Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange. The intracellular store Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]st) was monitored using Fluo-5N, the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]ext) was monitored using Fluo-4 whilst [Ca(2+)]cyt and [Na(+)]cyt were monitored using Fura-2 and SFBI, respectively. PKC inhibition using Ro-31-8220 or bisindolylmaleimide I potentiated ADP- and thrombin-evoked rises in [Ca(2+)]cyt in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). PKC inhibition potentiated ADP-evoked but reduced thrombin-evoked intracellular Ca(2+) release and Ca(2+) removal into the extracellular medium. SERCA inhibition using thapsigargin and 2,5-di(tert-butyl) l,4-benzohydroquinone abolished the effect of PKC inhibitors on ADP-evoked changes in [Ca(2+)]cyt but only reduced the effect on thrombin-evoked responses. Thrombin evokes substantial rises in [Na(+)]cyt which would be expected to reduce Ca(2+) removal via the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX). Thrombin-evoked rises in [Na(+)]cyt were potentiated by PKC inhibition, an effect which was not due to altered changes in non

  19. Conventional protein kinase C isoforms differentially regulate ADP- and thrombin-evoked Ca²⁺ signalling in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Lever, Robert A; Hussain, Azhar; Sun, Benjamin B; Sage, Stewart O; Harper, Alan G S

    2015-12-01

    Rises in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) are central in platelet activation, yet many aspects of the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Most studies examine how experimental manipulations affect agonist-evoked rises in [Ca(2+)]cyt, but these only monitor the net effect of manipulations on the processes controlling [Ca(2+)]cyt (Ca(2+) buffering, sequestration, release, entry and removal), and cannot resolve the source of the Ca(2+) or the transporters or channels affected. To investigate the effects of protein kinase C (PKC) on platelet Ca(2+) signalling, we here monitor Ca(2+) flux around the platelet by measuring net Ca(2+) fluxes to or from the extracellular space and the intracellular Ca(2+) stores, which act as the major sources and sinks for Ca(2+) influx into and efflux from the cytosol, as well as monitoring the cytosolic Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]cyt), which influences platelet Ca(2+) fluxes via Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange. The intracellular store Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]st) was monitored using Fluo-5N, the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]ext) was monitored using Fluo-4 whilst [Ca(2+)]cyt and [Na(+)]cyt were monitored using Fura-2 and SFBI, respectively. PKC inhibition using Ro-31-8220 or bisindolylmaleimide I potentiated ADP- and thrombin-evoked rises in [Ca(2+)]cyt in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). PKC inhibition potentiated ADP-evoked but reduced thrombin-evoked intracellular Ca(2+) release and Ca(2+) removal into the extracellular medium. SERCA inhibition using thapsigargin and 2,5-di(tert-butyl) l,4-benzohydroquinone abolished the effect of PKC inhibitors on ADP-evoked changes in [Ca(2+)]cyt but only reduced the effect on thrombin-evoked responses. Thrombin evokes substantial rises in [Na(+)]cyt which would be expected to reduce Ca(2+) removal via the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX). Thrombin-evoked rises in [Na(+)]cyt were potentiated by PKC inhibition, an effect which was not due to altered changes in non

  20. Aptamer RA36 inhibits of human, rabbit, and rat plasma coagulation activated with thrombin or snake venom coagulases.

    PubMed

    Savchik, E Yu; Kalinina, T B; Drozd, N N; Makarov, V A; Zav'yalova, E G; Lapsheva, E N; Mudrik, N N; Babij, A V; Pavlova, G V; Golovin, A V; Kopylov, A M

    2013-11-01

    RA36 DNA aptamer is a direct anticoagulant prolonging clotting time of human, rabbit, and rat plasma in the thrombin time test. Anticoagulant activity of RA36 is lower than that of recombinant hirudin. During inhibition of human plasma clotting activated with echitox (coagulase from Echis multisquamatus venom), the aptamer presumably binds to meisothrombin exosite I. The sensitivity of human plasma to the aptamer 5-fold surpasses that of rat plasma. Analysis of RA36 binding to coagulase of Agkistrodon halys venom (ancistron) is required for proving the effect of aptamer on polymerization of human fibrinogen. PMID:24319726

  1. Enhanced endogenous thrombolysis induced by a specific factor Xa inhibitor, DX-9065a, evaluated in a rat arterial thrombolysis model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Masaru; Onobayashi, Yuko; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Giddings, John C; Yamamoto, Junichiro

    2002-04-15

    We have previously established an animal model to investigate mechanisms of arterial thrombolysis in vivo and have demonstrated that endogenous thrombolysis, mediated by thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor, is enhanced by administration of specific thrombin inhibitors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a synthetic and specific factor Xa inhibitor, DX-9065a, on endogenous fibrinolysis. Mural thrombi were formed in rat mesenteric arterioles by helium-neon laser irradiation in the presence of Evans blue. Thrombolysis was continuously monitored by video microscopy and was quantified using image analysis software. Oral and intravenous administration of DX-9065a enhanced endogenous thrombolysis in vivo. The mechanisms require additional investigation using other experimental systems, but nevertheless, the present results extended our previous findings and further suggested that the enhanced fibrinolysis might be due to depressed activity thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor. The synthetic factor Xa inhibitor could provide the basis for a useful thrombolytic agent. PMID:12182917

  2. Development of a novel tricyclic class of potent and selective FIXa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dongfang; Andre, Patrick; Bateman, Thomas J; Berger, Richard; Chen, Yi-Heng; Desai, Kunal; Dewnani, Sunita; Ellsworth, Kenneth; Feng, Daming; Geissler, Wayne M; Guo, Liangqin; Hruza, Alan; Jian, Tianying; Li, Hong; Metzger, Joe; Parker, Dann L; Reichert, Paul; Sherer, Edward C; Smith, Cameron J; Sonatore, Lisa M; Tschirret-Guth, Richard; Wu, Jane; Xu, Jiayi; Zhang, Ting; Campeau, Louis-Charles; Orr, Robert; Poirier, Marc; McCabe-Dunn, Jamie; Araki, Kazuto; Nishimura, Teruyuki; Sakurada, Isao; Hirabayashi, Tomokazu; Wood, Harold B

    2015-11-15

    Using structure based drug design, a novel class of potent coagulation factor IXa (FIXa) inhibitors was designed and synthesized. High selectivity over FXa inhibition was achieved. Selected compounds were evaluated in rat IV/PO pharmacokinetic (PK) studies and demonstrated desirable oral PK profiles. Finally, the pharmacodynamics (PD) of this class of molecules were evaluated in thrombin generation assay (TGA) in Corn Trypsin Inhibitor (CTI) citrated human plasma and demonstrated characteristics of a FIXa inhibitor. PMID:26318999

  3. Development of a novel class of potent and selective FIXa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Andre, Patrick; Bateman, Thomas J; Chen, Yi-Heng; Desai, Kunal; Ellsworth, Kenneth; Geissler, Wayne M; Guo, Liangqin; Hruza, Alan; Jian, Tianying; Meng, Dongfang; Parker, Dann L; Qian, Xiaoxia; Reichert, Paul; Sherer, Edward C; Shu, Min; Smith, Cameron J; Sonatore, Lisa M; Tschirret-Guth, Richard; Nolting, Andrew F; Orr, Robert; Campeau, Louis-Charles; Araki, Kazuto; Nishimura, Teruyuki; Sakurada, Isao; Wood, Harold B

    2015-11-01

    Using structure based drug design (SBDD), a novel class of potent coagulation Factor IXa (FIXa) inhibitors was designed and synthesized. High selectivity over FXa inhibition was achieved. Selected compounds demonstrated oral bioavailability in rat IV/PO pharmacokinetic (PK) studies. Finally, the pharmacodynamics (PD) of this class of molecules was evaluated in Thrombin Generation Assay (TGA) in Corn Trypsin Inhibitor (CTI) citrated human plasma and demonstrated characteristics of a FIXa inhibitor. PMID:25978966

  4. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of new peptide-based ureas and thioureas as potential antagonists of the thrombin receptor PAR1.

    PubMed

    Ventosa-Andrés, Pilar; Valdivielso, Angel M; Pappos, Ioannis; García-López, M Teresa; Tsopanoglou, Nikos E; Herranz, Rosario

    2012-12-01

    By applying a diversity oriented synthesis strategy for the search of new antagonists of the thrombin receptor PAR1, a series of peptide-based ureas and thioureas, including analogues of the PAR1 reference antagonist RWJ-58259, has been designed and synthesized. The general synthetic scheme involves reduction of basic amino acid-derived amino nitriles by hydrogen transfer from hydrazine monohydrate in the presence of Raney Ni, followed by reaction with diverse isocyanates and isothiocyanates, and protecting group removal. All new compounds have been evaluated as inhibitors of human platelet aggregation induced by the PAR1 agonist SFLLRN. Some protected peptide-based ureas displayed significant antagonist activity. PMID:23123726

  5. Batroxobin binds fibrin with higher affinity and promotes clot expansion to a greater extent than thrombin.

    PubMed

    Vu, Trang T; Stafford, Alan R; Leslie, Beverly A; Kim, Paul Y; Fredenburgh, James C; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2013-06-01

    Batroxobin is a thrombin-like serine protease from the venom of Bothrops atrox moojeni that clots fibrinogen. In contrast to thrombin, which releases fibrinopeptide A and B from the NH2-terminal domains of the Aα- and Bβ-chains of fibrinogen, respectively, batroxobin only releases fibrinopeptide A. Because the mechanism responsible for these differences is unknown, we compared the interactions of batroxobin and thrombin with the predominant γA/γA isoform of fibrin(ogen) and the γA/γ' variant with an extended γ-chain. Thrombin binds to the γ'-chain and forms a higher affinity interaction with γA/γ'-fibrin(ogen) than γA/γA-fibrin(ogen). In contrast, batroxobin binds both fibrin(ogen) isoforms with similar high affinity (Kd values of about 0.5 μM) even though it does not interact with the γ'-chain. The batroxobin-binding sites on fibrin(ogen) only partially overlap with those of thrombin because thrombin attenuates, but does not abrogate, the interaction of γA/γA-fibrinogen with batroxobin. Furthermore, although both thrombin and batroxobin bind to the central E-region of fibrinogen with a Kd value of 2-5 μM, the α(17-51) and Bβ(1-42) regions bind thrombin but not batroxobin. Once bound to fibrin, the capacity of batroxobin to promote fibrin accretion is 18-fold greater than that of thrombin, a finding that may explain the microvascular thrombosis that complicates envenomation by B. atrox moojeni. Therefore, batroxobin binds fibrin(ogen) in a manner distinct from thrombin, which may contribute to its higher affinity interaction, selective fibrinopeptide A release, and prothrombotic properties. PMID:23612970

  6. A mutant trypsin-like enzyme from Streptomyces fradiae, created by site-directed mutagenesis, improves affinity chromatography for protein trypsin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Katoh, T; Kikuchi, N; Nagata, K; Yoshida, N

    1996-08-01

    The Ser-170 residue of a trypsin-like enzyme from Streptomyces fradiae (SFT), which is considered to be the active-site serine, was replaced with alanine by site-directed mutagenesis to improve the affinity chromatography step for a Kazal-type trypsin inhibitor pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI). The resulting mutant SFT, designated as [S170A]SFT, was expressed in Streptomyces lividans and purified to homogeneity. [S170A]SFT was catalytically inactive, but still had the ability to bind tightly to PSTI and to soybean trypsin inhibitor with dissociation constants of 3.1 x 10(-7) M and 1.9 x 10(-8) M respectively. We further demonstrated that recombinant human PSTI secreted into Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture broth could be purified to homogeneity with a one-step [S170A]SFT-affinity column. The purified PSTI contained no molecules intramolecularly cleaved by active trypsin, which are found when trypsin-affinity chromatography is used for the purification. This eliminated the need for further separation of intact PSTI from intramolecularly cleaved PSTI by high-performance liquid chromatography, thus simplifying and improving its purification process.

  7. Plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor I release during experimental endotoxaemia in chimpanzees: effect of interventions in the cytokine and coagulation cascades.

    PubMed

    Biemond, B J; Levi, M; Ten Cate, H; Van der Poll, T; Büller, H R; Hack, C E; Ten Cate, J W

    1995-05-01

    1. Disseminated intravascular coagulation frequently accompanies Gram-negative sepsis and may contribute to widespread deposition of microthrombi. Besides the endotoxin-induced activation of coagulation, an important role for the fibrinolytic system has been postulated. The precise mechanisms underlying these fibrinolytic changes during endotoxaemia are not known but have been suggested to be mediated directly by cytokines or secondary to thrombin generation. 2. In the present study we have delineated in detail the fibrinolytic response to a bolus injection of endotoxin in non-human primates and analysed the contribution of cytokines and thrombin generation to the endotoxin-induced release of tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. Chimpanzees received a bolus injection of endotoxin alone or in combination with blocking monoclonal antibodies directed against tumour necrosis factor or interleukin 6 or in combination with pentoxifylline. Furthermore, to assess the effect of coagulation activation on the activation of fibrinolysis, another group of chimpanzees received endotoxin in combination with either anti-tissue factor antibodies or recombinant hirudin. 3. Infusion of endotoxin induced a rapid increase in plasminogen activator activity and tissue-type plasminogen activator antigen levels and subsequent plasmin generation, reaching peak levels 2h after endotoxin administration. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 levels remained constant for the first 2 h, after which time a steep increase was observed. Plasminogen activator activity and plasmin generation decreased simultaneously with the rise in plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 levels. Fibrinolytic activity remained suppressed during the remainder of the study owing to sustained increased levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. The administration of pentoxifylline strongly attenuated the release of tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1

  8. Thrombin Receptor-Activating Protein (TRAP)-Activated Akt Is Involved in the Release of Phosphorylated-HSP27 (HSPB1) from Platelets in DM Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Tsujimoto, Masanori; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Akamatsu, Shigeru; Enomoto, Yukiko; Iida, Hiroki; Otsuka, Takanobu; Ogura, Shinji; Iwama, Toru; Kojima, Kumi; Kozawa, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    It is generally known that heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is phosphorylated through p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. We have previously reported that HSP27 is released from human platelets associated with collagen-induced phosphorylation. In the present study, we conducted an investigation into the effect of thrombin receptor-activating protein (TRAP) on the release of HSP27 in platelets in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. The phosphorylated-HSP27 levels induced by TRAP were directly proportional to the aggregation of platelets. The levels of phosphorylated-HSP27 (Ser-78) were correlated with the levels of phosphorylated-p38 MAP kinase and phosphorylated-Akt in the platelets stimulated by 10 µM TRAP but not with those of phosphorylated-p44/p42 MAP kinase. The levels of HSP27 released from the TRAP (10 µM)-stimulated platelets were correlated with the levels of phosphorylated-HSP27 in the platelets. The released platelet-derived growth factor-AB (PDGF-AB) levels were in parallel with the HSP27 levels released from the platelets stimulated by 10 µM TRAP. Although the area under the curve (AUC) of small aggregates (9–25 µm) induced by 10 µM TRAP showed no significant correlation with the released HSP27 levels, AUC of medium aggregates (25–50 µm), large aggregates (50–70 µm) and light transmittance were significantly correlated with the released HSP27 levels. TRAP-induced phosphorylation of HSP27 was truly suppressed by deguelin, an inhibitor of Akt, in the platelets from a healthy subject. These results strongly suggest that TRAP-induced activation of Akt in addition to p38 MAP kinase positively regulates the release of phosphorylated-HSP27 from human platelets, which is closely related to the platelet hyper-aggregation in type 2 DM patients. PMID:27187380

  9. Loop Electrostatics Asymmetry Modulates the Preexisting Conformational Equilibrium in Thrombin.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Nicola; Zerbetto, Mirco; Acquasaliente, Laura; Tescari, Simone; Frezzato, Diego; Polimeno, Antonino; Gohara, David W; Di Cera, Enrico; De Filippis, Vincenzo

    2016-07-19

    Thrombin exists as an ensemble of active (E) and inactive (E*) conformations that differ in their accessibility to the active site. Here we show that redistribution of the E*-E equilibrium can be achieved by perturbing the electrostatic properties of the enzyme. Removal of the negative charge of the catalytic Asp102 or Asp189 in the primary specificity site destabilizes the E form and causes a shift in the 215-217 segment that compromises substrate entrance. Solution studies and existing structures of D102N document stabilization of the E* form. A new high-resolution structure of D189A also reveals the mutant in the collapsed E* form. These findings establish a new paradigm for the control of the E*-E equilibrium in the trypsin fold. PMID:27347732

  10. Peak Thrombin Generation and Subsequent Venous Thromboembolism: The Longitudinal Investigation of Thromboembolism Etiology (LITE)

    PubMed Central

    Lutsey, Pamela L.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Cushman, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Background Thrombin is an enzyme essential to the acceleration of the coagulation cascade and the conversion of fibrinogen to clottable fibrin. Objectives We evaluated the relation of basal peak thrombin generation to risk of future VTE, and determined whether associations were independent of other coagulation markers. Methods LITE ascertained VTE in two prospective population-based cohorts: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study and the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS). Peak thrombin generation was measured on stored plasma in a nested case-control sample (434 cases, 1,004 controls). Logistic regression was used to estimate the relation of peak thrombin generation to VTE, adjusted for age, sex, race, center and BMI. Mediation was evaluated by additionally adjusting for factor VIII and D-dimer. Results Relative to the first quartile of peak thrombin generation, the odds ratio (95% CI) of VTE for those above the median was 1.74 (1.28–2.37). The association was modestly attenuated by adjustment for factor VIII and D-dimer 1.47 (1.05–2.05). Associations appeared stronger for idiopathic than for secondary VTE. Elevated peak thrombin generation more than added to the VTE risk associated with Factor V Leiden or low aPTT. Conclusions In this prospective study of two independent cohorts, elevated basal peak thrombin generation was associated with subsequent risk of VTE, independent of established VTE risk factors. PMID:19656279

  11. The Organophosphate Paraoxon and Its Antidote Obidoxime Inhibit Thrombin Activity and Affect Coagulation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Golderman, Valery; Shavit-Stein, Efrat; Tamarin, Ilia; Rosman, Yossi; Shrot, Shai; Rosenberg, Nurit

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) are potentially able to affect serine proteases by reacting with their active site. The potential effects of OPs on coagulation factors such as thrombin and on coagulation tests have been only partially characterized and potential interactions with OPs antidotes such as oximes and muscarinic blockers have not been addressed. In the current study, we investigated the in vitro interactions between coagulation, thrombin, the OP paraoxon, and its antidotes obidoxime and atropine. The effects of these substances on thrombin activity were measured in a fluorescent substrate and on coagulation by standard tests. Both paraoxon and obidoxime but not atropine significantly inhibited thrombin activity, and prolonged prothrombin time, thrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time. When paraoxon and obidoxime were combined, a significant synergistic effect was found on both thrombin activity and coagulation tests. In conclusion, paraoxon and obidoxime affect thrombin activity and consequently alter the function of the coagulation system. Similar interactions may be clinically relevant for coagulation pathways in the blood and possibly in the brain. PMID:27689805

  12. STIM1 and Orai1 mediate thrombin-induced Ca(2+) influx in rat cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Claudia; Sampieri, Alicia; Vivas, Oscar; Peña-Segura, Claudia; Vaca, Luis

    2012-12-01

    In astrocytes, thrombin leads to cytoplasmic Ca(2+) elevations modulating a variety of cytoprotective and cytotoxic responses. Astrocytes respond to thrombin stimulation with a biphasic Ca(2+) increase generated by an interplay between ER-Ca(2+) release and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE). In many cell types, STIM1 and Orai1 have been demonstrated to be central components of SOCE. STIM1 senses the ER-Ca(2+) depletion and binds Orai1 to activate Ca(2+) influx. Here we used immunocytochemistry, overexpression and siRNA assays to investigate the role of STIM1 and Orai1 in the thrombin-induced Ca(2+) response in primary cultures of rat cortical astrocytes. We found that STIM1 and Orai1 are endogenously expressed in cortical astrocytes and distribute accordingly with other mammalian cells. Importantly, native and overexpressed STIM1 reorganized in puncta under thrombin stimulation and this reorganization was reversible. In addition, the overexpression of STIM1 and Orai1 increased by twofold the Ca(2+) influx evoked by thrombin, while knockdown of endogenous STIM1 and Orai1 significantly decreased this Ca(2+) influx. These results indicate that STIM1 and Orai1 underlie an important fraction of the Ca(2+) response that astrocytes exhibit in the presence of thrombin. Thrombin stimulation in astrocytes leads to ER-Ca(2+) release which causes STIM1 reorganization allowing the activation of Orai1 and the subsequent Ca(2+) influx.

  13. Selective intracellular delivery of proteasome inhibitors through pH-sensitive polymeric micelles directed to efficient antitumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Quader, S; Cabral, H; Mochida, Y; Ishii, T; Liu, X; Toh, K; Kinoh, H; Miura, Y; Nishiyama, N; Kataoka, K

    2014-08-28

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system is central in the regulation of cellular proteins controlling cell cycle progression and apoptosis, drawing much interest for developing effective targeted cancer therapies. Herein, we developed a novel pH-responsive polymeric-micelle-based carrier system to effectively deliver the proteasome inhibitor MG132 into cancer cells. MG132 is covalently bound to the block copolymer composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyaspartate through an acid-labile hydrazone bond. This bond is stable at physiological condition, but hydrolytically degradable in acidic compartments in the cell, such as late-endosomes and lysosomes, and thus, it was used for controlled release of MG132 after EPR-mediated preferential accumulation of the micelles into the tumor. MG132-loaded micelles have monodispersed size distribution with an average diameter of 45nm, and critical micelle concentration is well below 10(-7)M. In vitro studies against several cancer cell lines confirmed that MG132-loaded micelles retained the cytotoxic effect, and this activity was indeed due to the inhibition of proteasome by released MG132 from the micelles. Real-time in vitro confocal-microscopy experiments clearly indicated that MG132-conjugated micelles disintegrated only inside the target cells. By intravital confocal micro-videography, we also confirmed the prolonged circulation of MG132 loaded micelles in the bloodstream, which lead to tumor specific accumulation of micelles, as confirmed by in vivo imaging 24h after injection. These micelles showed significantly lower in vivo toxicity than free MG132, while achieving remarkable antitumor effect against a subcutaneous HeLa-luc tumor model. Our findings create a paradigm for future development of polymeric-micelle-based carrier system for other peptide aldehyde type proteasome inhibitors to make them effective cohort of the existing cancer therapeutic regiments. PMID:24892974

  14. Activation of NRF2 Signaling in HEK293 Cells by a First-in-Class Direct KEAP1-NRF2 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xia; Thorne, Gabriell; Hu, Longqin; Joy, Melanie S; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2015-06-01

    Under basal conditions, the antioxidant transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) is bound to the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1) protein and targeted for proteasomal degradation in the cytoplasm. In response to cellular injury or chemical treatment, NRF2 dissociates from KEAP1 and activates the transcription of protective genes and defends against injury. LH601A is a first-in-class direct inhibitor of the KEAP1-NRF2 protein-protein interaction. The purpose of this study was to determine whether LH601A activates NRF2 signaling in human kidney cells. Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells were treated with LH601A or the indirect NRF2 activator, sulforaphane (SFN) for 6 or 16 h. SFN and LH601A upregulated NRF2 target genes heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) (two- to sevenfold), thioredoxin 1 (TRX1) (twofold) and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) mRNAs (twofold). Both compounds also elevated HO-1 and TRX1 protein expression. Since NRF2 activation can protect tissues from injury, LH601A, a direct inhibitor of the KEAP1-NRF2 interaction may be used to defend against kidney injury and/or diseases.

  15. Factor Xa in mouse fibroblasts may induce fibrosis more than thrombin.

    PubMed

    Kitasato, Lisa; Yamaoka-Tojo, Minako; Hashikata, Takehiro; Ishii, Sayaka; Kameda, Ryo; Shimohama, Takao; Tojo, Taiki; Ako, Junya

    2014-01-01

    Coagulation factors are known to play a role in wound healing by stimulating fibroblasts and might be associated with tissue fibrosis, however, only limited data exist. Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), activated by thrombin or factor (F) Xa, and PAR2, activated by FXa, have recently been reported to play roles not only in the coagulation system, but also in cardiac fibrosis. Furthermore, a previous report found that FX deficiency in mice led to the development of cardiac fibrosis. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated cellular biological function under conditions of overexpressed thrombin and FXa in fibroblasts.Cell migration and proliferation with FXa (1U/mL) and thrombin (1U/mL) stimulation were evaluated. Cells incubated without FXa or thrombin were used as control. H2O2 and TGF-β1 production were measured using ELISA. Signal pathways were evaluated using a signal pathway reporter assay.Cell migration and proliferation were increased in FXa-stimulated cells (4.1-fold increase for migration, 1.3-fold for proliferation compared with control, respectively) and thrombin (4.1-fold increase for migration, 1.3-fold for proliferation as compared to control, respectively). H2O2 production was higher in FXa-stimulated cells compared to thrombin (1.3-fold increase) and control cells (1.4-fold increased). TGF-β1 production was up-regulated after FXa addition (12.6-fold increase compared with thrombin, 1.8-fold increase compared with control, respectively). In FXa-stimulated cells, AP-1 and NF-kB were increased compared to control (P < 0.05).These data suggest that FXa and thrombin play important roles in the fibrotic process that could also lead to cardiac fibrosis, and that at least some of these signalings are more accelerated with FXa compared to thrombin. PMID:24942638

  16. Crystal structure of wild-type human thrombin in the Na+-free state

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Daniel J. D.; Adams, Ty E.; Li, Wei; Huntington, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Regulation of thrombin activity is critical for haemostasis and the prevention of thrombosis. Thrombin has several procoagulant substrates, including fibrinogen and platelet receptors, and essential cofactors for stimulating its own formation. However, thrombin is also capable of serving an anticoagulant function by activating protein C. The specificity of thrombin is primarily regulated by binding to the cofactor TM (thrombomodulin), but co-ordination of Na+ can also affect thrombin activity. The Na+-free form is often referred to as ‘slow’ because of reduced rates of cleavage of procoagulant substrates, but the slow form is still capable of rapid activation of protein C in the presence of TM. The molecular basis of the slow proteolytic activity of thrombin has remained elusive, in spite of two decades of solution studies and many published crystallographic structures. In the present paper, we report the first structure of wild-type unliganded human thrombin grown in the absence of co-ordinating Na+. The Na+-binding site is observed in a highly ordered position 6 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) removed from that seen in the Na+-bound state. The movement of the Na+ loop results in non-catalytic hydrogen-bonding in the active site and blocking of the S1 and S2 substrate-binding pockets. Similar, if more dramatic, changes were observed in a previous structure of the constitutively slow thrombin variant E217K. The slow behaviour of thrombin in solutions devoid of Na+ can now be understood in terms of an equilibrium between an inert species, represented by the crystal structure described in the present paper, and an active form, where the addition of Na+ populates the active state. PMID:16201969

  17. Meclizine, a pregnane X receptor agonist, is a direct inhibitor and mechanism-based inactivator of human cytochrome P450 3A.

    PubMed

    Foo, Winnie Yin Bing; Tay, Hwee Ying; Chan, Eric Chun Yong; Lau, Aik Jiang

    2015-10-01

    Meclizine is an agonist of human pregnane X receptor (PXR). It increases CYP3A4 mRNA expression, but decreases CYP3A-catalyzed testosterone 6β-hydroxylation in primary cultures of human hepatocytes, as assessed at 24h after the last dose of meclizine. Therefore, the hypothesis to be tested is that meclizine inactivates human CYP3A enzymes. Our findings indicated that meclizine directly inhibited testosterone 6β-hydroxylation catalyzed by human liver microsomes, recombinant CYP3A4, and recombinant CYP3A5. The inhibition of human liver microsomal testosterone 6β-hydroxylation by meclizine occurred by a mixed mode and with an apparent Ki of 31±6μM. Preincubation of meclizine with human liver microsomes and NADPH resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in testosterone 6β-hydroxylation. The extent of inactivation required the presence of NADPH, was unaffected by nucleophilic trapping agents or reactive oxygen species scavengers, attenuated by a CYP3A substrate, and not reversed by dialysis. Meclizine selectively inactivated CYP3A4, but not CYP3A5. In contrast to meclizine, which has a di-substituted piperazine ring, norchlorcyclizine, which is a N-debenzylated meclizine metabolite with a mono-substituted piperazine ring, did not inactivate but directly inhibited hepatic microsomal CYP3A activity. In conclusion, meclizine inhibited human CYP3A enzymes by both direct inhibition and mechanism-based inactivation. In contrast, norchlorcyclizine is a direct inhibitor but not a mechanism-based inactivator. Furthermore, a PXR agonist may also be an inhibitor of a PXR-regulated enzyme, thereby giving rise to opposing effects on the functional activity of the enzyme and indicating the importance of measuring the catalytic activity of nuclear receptor-regulated enzymes. PMID:26239802

  18. Reactivity of mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes with thrombin-treated mouse platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, S

    1989-01-01

    The reactivity of mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes (BrMRBC) with mouse platelets before and after thrombin treatment was assessed by flow cytometry. Anti-BrMRBC antibodies could bind to thrombin-treated platelets, although normal platelets were also weakly reactive with the antibodies. The binding of anti-BrMRBC antibodies to platelets was confirmed by complement-dependent lysis. It is suggested that thrombin-activated platelets may be a real target for anti-BrMRBC antibodies. PMID:2467876

  19. Discovering Anti-platelet Drug Combinations with an Integrated Model of Activator-Inhibitor Relationships, Activator-Activator Synergies and Inhibitor-Inhibitor Synergies

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Federica; Golla, Kalyan; Fitzpatrick, Darren J.; Casey, Fergal P.; Moran, Niamh; Shields, Denis C.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying effective therapeutic drug combinations that modulate complex signaling pathways in platelets is central to the advancement of effective anti-thrombotic therapies. However, there is no systems model of the platelet that predicts responses to different inhibitor combinations. We developed an approach which goes beyond current inhibitor-inhibitor combination screening to efficiently consider other signaling aspects that may give insights into the behaviour of the platelet as a system. We investigated combinations of platelet inhibitors and activators. We evaluated three distinct strands of information, namely: activator-inhibitor combination screens (testing a panel of inhibitors against a panel of activators); inhibitor-inhibitor synergy screens; and activator-activator synergy screens. We demonstrated how these analyses may be efficiently performed, both experimentally and computationally, to identify particular combinations of most interest. Robust tests of activator-activator synergy and of inhibitor-inhibitor synergy required combinations to show significant excesses over the double doses of each component. Modeling identified multiple effects of an inhibitor of the P2Y12 ADP receptor, and complementarity between inhibitor-inhibitor synergy effects and activator-inhibitor combination effects. This approach accelerates the mapping of combination effects of compounds to develop combinations that may be therapeutically beneficial. We integrated the three information sources into a unified model that predicted the benefits of a triple drug combination targeting ADP, thromboxane and thrombin signaling. PMID:25875950

  20. High-resolution structures of two complexes between thrombin and thrombin-binding aptamer shed light on the role of cations in the aptamer inhibitory activity

    PubMed Central

    Russo Krauss, Irene; Merlino, Antonello; Randazzo, Antonio; Novellino, Ettore; Mazzarella, Lelio; Sica, Filomena

    2012-01-01

    The G-quadruplex architecture is a peculiar structure adopted by guanine-rich oligonucleotidic sequences, and, in particular, by several aptamers, including the thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) that has the highest inhibitory activity against human α-thrombin. A crucial role in determining structure, stability and biological properties of G-quadruplexes is played by ions. In the case of TBA, K+ ions cause an enhancement of the aptamer clotting inhibitory activity. A detailed picture of the interactions of TBA with the protein and with the ions is still lacking, despite the importance of this aptamer in biomedical field for detection and inhibition of α-thrombin. Here, we fill this gap by presenting a high-resolution crystallographic structural characterization of the thrombin–TBA complex formed in the presence of Na+ or K+ and a circular dichroism study of the structural stability of the aptamer both free and complexed with α-thrombin, in the presence of the two ionic species. The results indicate that the different effects exerted by Na+ and K+ on the inhibitory activity of TBA are related to a subtle perturbation of a few key interactions at the protein–aptamer interface. The present data, in combination with those previously obtained on the complex between α-thrombin and a modified aptamer, may allow the design of new TBA variants with a pharmacological performance enhancement. PMID:22669903

  1. Effect of the Direct Renin Inhibitor Aliskiren on Urinary Albumin Excretion in Spontaneous Type 2 Diabetic KK-Ay Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Masako; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Funabiki, Kazuhiko; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Although angiotensin II-mediated inflammation and extracellular matrix accumulation are considered to be associated with the progression of diabetic nephropathy, these processes have not yet been sufficiently clarified. The objective of this study was to determine whether the correction of the abnormal renal expression of MMPs and its inhibitors (MMPs/TIMPs) and cytokines following the administration of aliskiren to KK-Ay mice results in a renoprotective effect. Methods. KK-Ay mice were divided into two groups, that is, untreated (saline) and treated (aliskiren) groups. Systolic BP, HbA1c levels, and the albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) were measured. The renal expression of MMPs/TIMPs, fibronectin, type IV collagen, MCP-1, and (pro)renin receptor ((P)RR) was examined using real-time PCR and/or immunohistochemical staining. Renal MAPK and NF-κB activity were also examined by Western blot analyses and ELISA, respectively. Results. Significant decreases in systolic BP and ACR levels were observed in treated KK-Ay mice compared with the findings in untreated KK-Ay mice. Furthermore, increases in MMPs/TIMPs, fibronectin, type IV collagen, MCP-1, and (P)RR expression, in addition to MAPK and NF-κB activity, were significantly attenuated by aliskiren administration. Conclusions. It appears that aliskiren improves albuminuria and renal fibrosis by regulating inflammation and the alteration of collagen synthesis and degradation. PMID:23819050

  2. Thrombin induces Sp1-mediated antiviral effects in cytomegalovirus-infected human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Martin; Vogel, Jens-Uwe; Höver, Gerold; Prösch, Susanna; Kotchetkov, Ruslan; Cinatl, Jaroslav; Koch, Frank; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2004-11-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) retinitis causing retinal detachment and destruction of the blood-retina barrier is closely related to retinal hemorrhage/coagulation. However, the effects of procoagulants on HCMV (re)activation in retinal cells have not been investigated yet. Therefore, we studied whether thrombin modulates the expression of HCMV immediate early (IE) and late (L) genes in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE). Thrombin specifically stimulated the protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) on RPE and, surprisingly, inhibited basal and 12,0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-stimulated HCMV IE gene expression in infected RPE. On the other hand, HCMV strongly induced Sp1 DNA binding activity, which was prevented by thrombin/PAR1-mediated Sp1 hyperphosphorylation. Our data suggest that thrombin/PAR-1 may inhibit Sp1-dependent HCMV replication, which might be an important regulatory mechanism for HCMV persistence and replication in RPE.

  3. An Investigation of the Characteristics of the Enzyme Thrombin, Suitable for Classwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blofield, B. Ann

    1972-01-01

    Shows how a simple investigation of the enzyme, thrombin, can provide a series of experiments giving information on enzyme characteristics. The results also provide a basis for discussion of the coagulation mechanism and related phenomena. (Author/AL)

  4. Pseudoaneurysm After Spontaneous Rupture of Renal Angiomyolipoma in Tuberous Sclerosis: Successful Treatment with Percutaneous Thrombin Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Corso, Rocco Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Rampoldi, Antonio; Leni, Davide; Ticca, Cristiana; Vercelli, Ruggero; Vanzulli, Angelo

    2005-04-15

    We report a case of a large perinephric pseudoaneurysm due to spontaneous rupture of renal angiomyolipoma, occluded by percutaneous thrombin injection under ultrasound guidance in a young woman affected by tuberous sclerosis.

  5. ATP-competitive LRRK2 inhibitors interfere with monoclonal antibody binding to the kinase domain of LRRK2 under native conditions. A method to directly monitor the active conformation of LRRK2?

    PubMed

    Gillardon, Frank; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Froehlich, Thomas; Ueffing, Marius; Hengerer, Bastian; Gloeckner, Christian J

    2013-03-30

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease. LRRK2 kinase activity is required for toxicity in neuronal cell cultures suggesting that selective kinase inhibitors may prevent neurodegeneration in patients. Directly monitoring LRRK2 activity in cells would be advantageous for the development of small molecule LRRK2 inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate that a monoclonal anti-LRRK2 antibody directed against the activation segment binds less efficiently to native LRRK2 protein in the presence of ATP-competitive LRRK2 inhibitors. Since kinase inhibitors prevent autophosphorylation and refolding of the activation segment, we hypothesize that the antibody preferentially binds to the active conformation of LRRK2 under native conditions.

  6. Probing the location and function of the conserved histidine residue of phosphoglucose isomerase by using an active site directed inhibitor N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Meng, M.; Chane, T. L.; Sun, Y. J.; Hsiao, C. D.

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase (EC 5.3.1.9) catalyzes the interconversion of D-glucopyranose-6-phosphate and D-fructofuranose-6-phosphate by promoting an intrahydrogen transfer between C1 and C2. A conserved histidine exists throughout all phosphoglucose isomerases and was hypothesized to be the base catalyzing the isomerization reaction. In the present study, this conserved histidine, His311, of the enzyme from Bacillus stearothermophilus was subjected to mutational analysis, and the mutational effect on the inactivation kinetics by N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate was investigated. The substitution of His311 with alanine, asparagine, or glutamine resulted in the decrease of activity, in k(cat)/K(M), by a factor of 10(3), indicating the importance of this residue. N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate inactivated irreversibly the activity of wild-type phosphoglucose isomerase; however, His311 --> Ala became resistant to this inhibitor, indicating that His311 is located in the active site and is responsible for the inactivation of the enzyme by this active site-directed inhibitor. The pKa of His311 was estimated to be 6.31 according to the pH dependence of the inactivation. The proximity of this value with the pKa value of 6.35, determined from the pH dependence of k(cat)/K(M), supports a role of His311 as a general base in the catalysis. PMID:10595547

  7. Membrane lipid peroxidation in neurodegeneration: Role of thrombin and proteinase-activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Citron, Bruce A; Ameenuddin, Syed; Uchida, K; Suo, William Z; SantaCruz, Karen; Festoff, Barry W

    2016-07-15

    Thrombin and membrane lipid peroxidation (MLP) have been implicated in various central nervous system (CNS) disorders from CNS trauma to stroke, Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's (PD) diseases. Because thrombin also induces MLP in platelets and its involvement in neurodegenerative diseases we hypothesized that its deleterious effects might, in part, involve formation of MLP in neuronal cells. We previously showed that thrombin induced caspase-3 mediated apoptosis in motor neurons, via a proteinase-activated receptor (PAR1). We have now investigated thrombin's influence on the oxidative state of neurons leading to induction of MLP-protein adducts. Translational relevance of thrombin-induced MLP is supported by increased levels of 4-hydroxynonenal-protein adducts (HNEPA) in AD and PD brains. We now report for the first time that thrombin dose-dependently induces formation of HNEPA in NSC34 mouse motor neuron cells using anti-HNE and anti-acrolein monoclonal antibodies. The most prominent immunoreactive band, in SDS-PAGE, was at ∼54kDa. Membrane fractions displayed higher amounts of the protein-adduct than cytosolic fractions. Thrombin induced MLP was mediated, at least in part, through PAR1 since a PAR1 active peptide, PAR1AP, also elevated HNEPA levels. Of interest, glutamate and Fe2SO4 also increased the ∼54kDa HNEPA band in these cells but to a lesser extent. Taken together our results implicate the involvement of thrombin and MLP in neuronal cell loss observed in various CNS degenerative and traumatic pathologies. PMID:27138068

  8. Percutaneous Repair of Radial Artery Pseudoaneurysm in a Hemodialysis Patient Using Sonographically Guided Thrombin Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Corso, Rocco Rampoldi, Antonio; Vercelli, Ruggero; Leni, Davide; Vanzulli, Angelo

    2006-02-15

    We report a case of a radial artery pseudoaneurysm complicating an incorrect puncture of a Brescia-Cimino hemodialysis fistula that was treated with percutaneous ultrasound-guided thrombin injection. The pseudoaneurysm recurred after the initial successful thrombin injection. With a second injection we obtained permanent pseudoaneurysm occlusion. Our case illustrates that this procedure is an effective treatment in this type of arteriovenous fistula complication. We compare this case with the only similar one we could find in the literature.

  9. Thrombin stimulates albumin transcytosis in lung microvascular endothelial cells via activation of acid sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Wittenberg, Claudia; Lee, Warren L; Reppien, Eike; Goldenberg, Neil M; Lindner, Karsten; Gao, Yizhuo; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Drab, Marek; Mühlfeld, Christian; Dombrowsky, Heike; Ochs, Matthias; Schütze, Stefan; Uhlig, Stefan

    2016-04-15

    Transcellular albumin transport occurs via caveolae that are abundant in lung microvascular endothelial cells. Stimulation of albumin transcytosis by proinflammatory mediators may contribute to alveolar protein leak in lung injury, yet the regulation of albumin transport and its underlying molecular mechanisms are so far incompletely understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that thrombin may stimulate transcellular albumin transport across lung microvascular endothelial cells in an acid-sphingomyelinase dependent manner. Thrombin increased the transport of fluorescently labeled albumin across confluent human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HMVEC-L) monolayers to an extent that markedly exceeds the rate of passive diffusion. Thrombin activated acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) and increased ceramide production in HMVEC-L, but not in bovine pulmonary artery cells, which showed little albumin transport in response to thrombin. Thrombin increased total caveolin-1 (cav-1) content in both whole cell lysates and lipid rafts from HMVEC-L, and this effect was blocked by inhibition of ASM or de novo protein biosynthesis. Thrombin-induced uptake of albumin into lung microvascular endothelial cells was confirmed in isolated-perfused lungs by real-time fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy of gold-labeled albumin. Inhibition of ASM attenuated thrombin-induced albumin transport both in confluent HMVEC-L and in intact lungs, whereas HMVEC-L treatment with exogenous ASM increased albumin transport and enriched lipid rafts in cav-1. Our findings indicate that thrombin stimulates transcellular albumin transport in an acid sphingomyelinase-dependent manner by inducing de novo synthesis of cav-1 and its recruitment to membrane lipid rafts. PMID:26851257

  10. Thrombin-activable factor X re-establishes an intrinsic amplification in tenase-deficient plasmas.

    PubMed

    Louvain-Quintard, Virginie B; Bianchini, Elsa P; Calmel-Tareau, Claire; Tagzirt, Madjid; Le Bonniec, Bernard F

    2005-12-16

    Classical hemophilia results from a defect of the intrinsic tenase complex, the main factor X (FX) activator. Binding of factor VIIa to tissue factor triggers coagulation, but little amplification of thrombin production occurs. Handling of hemophilia by injection of the deficient or missing (thus foreign) factor often causes immunological complications. Several strategies have been designed to bypass intrinsic tenase complex, but none induce true auto-amplification of thrombin production. In an attempt to re-establish a cyclic amplification of prothrombin activation in the absence of tenase, we prepared a chimera of FX having fibrinopeptide A for the activation domain (FX(FpA)). We reasoned that cascade initiation would produce traces of thrombin that would activate FX(FpA) (contrary to its normal homologue). Given that the activation domain of FX is released upon activation, thrombin cleavage would produce authentic FXa that would produce more thrombin, which in turn would activate more chimeras. FX(FpA) was indeed activable by thrombin, albeit at a relatively low rate (5 x 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)). Nevertheless, FX(FpA) allowed in vitro amplification of thrombin production, and 100 nM efficiently corrected thrombin generation in tenase-deficient plasmas. A decisive advantage of FX(FpA) could be that the artificial cascade is self-regulating: FX(FpA) had little influence on the clotting time of normal plasma, yet corrected that of tenase deficiency. Another advantage could be the half-life of FX(FpA) in blood; FX has a half-life of about 30 h (less than 3 h for FVIIa). It is also reasonable to expect little or no immunogenicity, because FX and fibrinopeptide A both circulate normally in the blood of hemophiliacs.

  11. Linkage between proton binding and amidase activity in human gamma-thrombin.

    PubMed

    De Cristofaro, R; Fenton, J W; Di Cera, E

    1992-02-01

    The amidase activity of human gamma-thrombin has been studied in the pH range 6-10 as a function of NaCl concentration and temperature. As recently found for human alpha-thrombin [Di Cera, E., De Cristofaro, R., Albright, D.J., & Fenton, J.W., II (1991) Biochemistry 30, 7913-7924], the Michaelis-Menten constant, Km, shows a bell-shaped dependence over this pH range with a minimum around pH 7.9 in the presence of 0.1 M NaCl at 25 degrees C. The catalytic constant, kcat, has a bell-shaped pH dependence with a maximum around pH 8.6. A thermodynamic analysis of these parameters has enabled a characterization of the linkage between proton and substrate binding, its dependence on NaCl concentration, and the relevant entropic and enthalpic contributions to binding and catalytic events. Three groups seem to be responsible for the control of gamma-thrombin amidase activity as a function of pH. One of these groups has pK values that are significantly different from those found for alpha-thrombin, and all groups show slightly perturbed enthalpies of ionization. The dependence of gamma-thrombin amidase activity on NaCl concentration is different from that of alpha-thrombin. Increasing NaCl concentration always decreases the substrate affinity for the enzyme in the case of alpha-thrombin, regardless of pH. In the case of gamma-thrombin, such an effect is observed only in the pH range 7.5-9, and a reversed linkage is observed at pH less than 7 and greater than 9.5.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1310421

  12. Follow-up of thrombin generation after prostate cancer surgery: global test for increased hypercoagulability.

    PubMed

    Benyo, Matyas; Flasko, Tibor; Molnar, Zsuzsanna; Kerenyi, Adrienne; Batta, Zoltan; Jozsa, Tamas; Harsfalvi, Jolan

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies provided evidence that evaluation of thrombin generation identifies patients at thrombotic risk. Thrombin generation has a central role in hemorrhage control and vascular occlusion and its measurement provides new metrics of these processes providing sufficient evaluation of an individual's hemostatic competence and response to anticoagulant therapy. The objective of the study is to assess a new measure of hypercoagulability that predisposes to venous thromboembolism in the postoperative period after radical prostatectomy. Pre- (day-1) and postoperative (hour 1, day 6, month 1 and 10) blood samples of 24 patients were tested for plasma thrombin generation (peak thrombin), routine hematology and hemostasis. Patients received low molecular weight heparin for thromboprophylaxis. Peak thrombin levels were higher in patients compared to controls at baseline (p<0.001), and elevated further in the early postoperative period (p<0.001). Longer general anesthesia and high body mass index were associated with increased thrombin generation after surgery (p = 0.024 and p = 0.040). D dimer and fibrinogen levels were higher after radical prostatectomy (p = 0.001 and p<0.001). Conventional clotting tests remained within the reference range. Our study contributed to the cognition of the hypercoagulable state in cancer patients undergoing pelvic surgery and revealed the course of thrombin generation after radical prostatectomy. Whilst it is unsurprising that thrombin generation increases after tissue trauma, further evaluation of this condition during the postoperative period would lead urologists to an international and well-supported consensus regarding thromboprophylaxis in order to provide better clinical outcome. Considering the routine evaluation of procoagulant activity and extending prophylactic anticoagulant therapy accordingly may potentially prevent late thrombotic events. PMID:23236465

  13. Ezrin/radixin/moesin proteins differentially regulate endothelial hyperpermeability after thrombin.

    PubMed

    Adyshev, Djanybek M; Dudek, Steven M; Moldobaeva, Nurgul; Kim, Kyung-mi; Ma, Shwu-Fan; Kasa, Anita; Garcia, Joe G N; Verin, Alexander D

    2013-08-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) barrier disruption induced by inflammatory agonists such as thrombin leads to potentially lethal physiological dysfunction such as alveolar flooding, hypoxemia, and pulmonary edema. Thrombin stimulates paracellular gap and F-actin stress fiber formation, triggers actomyosin contraction, and alters EC permeability through multiple mechanisms that include protein kinase C (PKC) activation. We previously have shown that the ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) actin-binding proteins differentially participate in sphingosine-1 phosphate-induced EC barrier enhancement. Phosphorylation of a conserved threonine residue in the COOH-terminus of ERM proteins causes conformational changes in ERM to unmask binding sites and is considered a hallmark of ERM activation. In the present study we test the hypothesis that ERM proteins are phosphorylated on this critical threonine residue by thrombin-induced signaling events and explore the role of the ERM family in modulating thrombin-induced cytoskeletal rearrangement and EC barrier function. Thrombin promotes ERM phosphorylation at this threonine residue (ezrin Thr567, radixin Thr564, moesin Thr558) in a PKC-dependent fashion and induces translocation of phosphorylated ERM to the EC periphery. Thrombin-induced ERM threonine phosphorylation is likely synergistically mediated by protease-activated receptors PAR1 and PAR2. Using the siRNA approach, depletion of either moesin alone or of all three ERM proteins significantly attenuates thrombin-induced increase in EC barrier permeability (transendothelial electrical resistance), cytoskeletal rearrangements, paracellular gap formation, and accumulation of phospho-myosin light chain. In contrast, radixin depletion exerts opposing effects on these indexes. These data suggest that ERM proteins play important differential roles in the thrombin-induced modulation of EC permeability, with moesin promoting barrier dysfunction and radixin opposing it. PMID:23729486

  14. Thrombin-linked aptamer assay for detection of platelet derived growth factor BB on magnetic beads in a sandwich format.

    PubMed

    Guo, Limin; Zhao, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Here we describe a thrombin-linked aptamer assay (TLAA) for protein by using thrombin as an enzyme label, harnessing enzyme activity of thrombin and aptamer affinity binding. TLAA converts detection of specific target proteins to the detection of thrombin by using a DNA sequence that consists of two aptamers with the first aptamer binding to the specific target protein and the second aptamer binding to thrombin. Through the affinity binding, the thrombin enzyme is labeled on the protein target, and thrombin catalyzes the hydrolysis of small peptide substrate into product, generating signals for quantification. As a proof of principle, we show a sandwich TLAA for platelet derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) by using anti-PDGF-BB antibody coated on magnetic beads and an oligonucleotide containing the aptamer for PDGF-BB and the aptamer for thrombin. The binding of PDGF-BB to both the antibody and the aptamer results in labeling the complex with thrombin. We achieved detection of PDGF-BB at 16 pM. This TLAA contributes a new application of thrombin and its aptamer in bioanalysis, and shows potentials in assay developments. PMID:27343590

  15. Highly specific detection of thrombin using an aptamer-based suspension array and the interaction analysis via microscale thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanan; Liu, Nan; Ma, Xinhua; Li, Xiaoli; Ma, Jia; Li, Ya; Zhou, Zhijiang; Gao, Zhixian

    2015-04-21

    A novel aptamer-based suspension array detection platform was designed for the sensitive, specific and rapid detection of human α-thrombin as a model. Thrombin was first recognized by a 29-mer biotinylated thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) in solution. Then 15-mer TBA modified magnetic beads (MBs) captured the former TBA-thrombin to form an aptamer-thrombin-aptamer sandwich complex. The median fluorescence intensity obtained via suspension array technology was positively correlated with the thrombin concentration. The interactions between TBAs and thrombin were analyzed using microscale thermophoresis (MST). The dissociation constants could be respectively achieved to be 44.2 ± 1.36 nM (TBA1-thrombin) and 15.5 ± 0.637 nM (TBA2-thrombin), which demonstrated the high affinities of TBA-thrombin and greatly coincided with previous reports. Interaction conditions such as temperature, reaction time, and coupling protocol were optimized. The dynamic quantitative working range of the aptamer-based suspension array was 18.37-554.31 nM, and the coefficients of determination R(2) were greater than 0.9975. The lowest detection limit of thrombin was 5.4 nM. This method was highly specific for thrombin without being affected by other analogs and interfering proteins. The recoveries of thrombin spiked in diluted human serum were in the range 82.6-114.2%. This innovative aptamer-based suspension array detection platform not only exhibits good sensitivity based on MBs facilitating highly efficient separation and amplification, but also suggests high specificity by the selective aptamer binding, thereby suggesting the expansive application prospects in research and clinical fields.

  16. Baicalin protects against thrombin induced cell injury in SH-SY5Y cells

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Xiao-Ning; Mu, Wei-Na; Liu, Yuan-Tao; Wang, Mei-Hong; Kong, Feng; Sun, Chao; Zhou, Qing-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Baicalin, an extract from the dried root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, was shown to be neuroprotective. However, the precise mechanisms are incompletely known. In this study, we determined the effect of baicalin on thrombin induced cell injury in SH-SY5Y cells, and explored the possible mechanisms. SH-SY5Y cells was treated with thrombin alone or pre-treated with baicalin (5, 10, 20 μM) for 2 h followed by thrombin treatment. Cells without thrombin and baicalin treatment were used as controls. Cell viability was detected by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry. Real-time PCR was performed to determine the mRNA expression of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1). Western blotting was conducted to determine the protein expression of PAR-1, Caspase-3 and NF-κB. Baicalin reduced cell death following thrombin treatment in a dose-dependent manner, with concomitant inhibition of NF-κB activation and suppression of PAR-1 expression. In addition, baicalin reduced Caspase-3 expression. The above findings indicated that baicalin prevents against cell injury after thrombin stimulation possibly through inhibition of PAR-1 expression and NF-κB activation. PMID:26823714

  17. Reversal of trauma-induced amnesia in mice by a thrombin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Itzekson, Zeev; Maggio, Nicola; Milman, Anat; Shavit, Efrat; Pick, Chaim G; Chapman, Joab

    2014-05-01

    Minimal traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is associated with the existence of retrograde amnesia and microscopic bleeds containing activated coagulation factors. In an mTBI model, we report that thrombin induces amnesia through its receptor protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1). Thrombin activity was significantly elevated (32 %, p < 0.05) 5 min following mTBI compared to controls. Amnesia was assessed by the novel object recognition test in mTBI animals and in animals injected intracerebroventricularly (ICV) with either thrombin or a PAR-1 agonist 1 h after the acquisition phase. Saline-injected controls had a preference index of over 0.3 while mTBI animals and those injected with thrombin or the PAR-1 agonist spent equal time with both objects indicating no recall of the object presented to them 24 h previously (p < 0.05). Co-injecting a PAR-1 antagonist (SCH79797) completely blocked the amnestic effects of mTBI, thrombin, and the PAR-1 agonist. Long-term potentiation, measured in hippocampal slices 24 h after mTBI, ICV thrombin or the PAR-1 agonist, was significantly impaired and this effect was completely reversed by the PAR-1 antagonist. The results support a crucial role for PAR-1 in the generation of amnesia following mTBI, revealing a novel therapeutic target for the cognitive effects of brain trauma.

  18. The PAK system links Rho GTPase signaling to thrombin-mediated platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Sandra M.; Loren, Cassandra P.; Haley, Kristina M.; Itakura, Asako; Pang, Jiaqing; Greenberg, Daniel L.; David, Larry L.; Manser, Ed; Chernoff, Jonathan; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of the platelet actin cytoskeleton by the Rho family of small GTPases is essential for the proper maintenance of hemostasis. However, little is known about how intracellular platelet activation from Rho GTPase family members, including Rac, Cdc42, and Rho, translate into changes in platelet actin structures. To better understand how Rho family GTPases coordinate platelet activation, we identified platelet proteins associated with Rac1, a Rho GTPase family member, and actin regulatory protein essential for platelet hemostatic function. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that upon platelet activation with thrombin, Rac1 associates with a set of effectors of the p21-activated kinases (PAKs), including GIT1, βPIX, and guanine nucleotide exchange factor GEFH1. Platelet activation by thrombin triggered the PAK-dependent phosphorylation of GIT1, GEFH1, and other PAK effectors, including LIMK1 and Merlin. PAK was also required for the thrombin-mediated activation of the MEK/ERK pathway, Akt, calcium signaling, and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure. Inhibition of PAK signaling prevented thrombin-induced platelet aggregation and blocked platelet focal adhesion and lamellipodia formation in response to thrombin. Together, these results demonstrate that the PAK signaling system is a key orchestrator of platelet actin dynamics, linking Rho GTPase activation downstream of thrombin stimulation to PAK effector function, MAP kinase activation, calcium signaling, and PS exposure in platelets. PMID:23784547

  19. Thrombin-induced contraction in alveolar epithelial cells probed by traction microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gavara, Núria; Sunyer, Raimon; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Farré, Ramon; Rotger, Mar; Navajas, Daniel

    2006-08-01

    Contractile tension of alveolar epithelial cells plays a major role in the force balance that regulates the structural integrity of the alveolar barrier. The aim of this work was to study thrombin-induced contractile forces of alveolar epithelial cells. A549 alveolar epithelial cells were challenged with thrombin, and time course of contractile forces was measured by traction microscopy. The cells exhibited basal contraction with total force magnitude 55.0 +/- 12.0 nN (mean +/- SE, n = 12). Traction forces were exerted predominantly at the cell periphery and pointed to the cell center. Thrombin (1 U/ml) induced a fast and sustained 2.5-fold increase in traction forces, which maintained peripheral and centripetal distribution. Actin fluorescent staining revealed F-actin polymerization and enhancement of peripheral actin rim. Disruption of actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D (5 microM, 30 min) and inhibition of myosin light chain kinase with ML-7 (10 microM, 30 min) and Rho kinase with Y-27632 (10 microM, 30 min) markedly depressed basal contractile tone and abolished thrombin-induced cell contraction. Therefore, the contractile response of alveolar epithelial cells to the inflammatory agonist thrombin was mediated by actin cytoskeleton remodeling and actomyosin activation through myosin light chain kinase and Rho kinase signaling pathways. Thrombin-induced contractile tension might further impair alveolar epithelial barrier integrity in the injured lung. PMID:16675616

  20. Thrombin use in surgery: an evidence-based review of its clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Sung W; Lew, Wesley K; Weaver, Fred A

    2010-01-01

    When surgical ligation of bleeding fails, or is not possible, surgeons rely on a number of hemostatic aids, including thrombin. This review discusses the history, pharmacology and clinical application of thrombin as a surgical hemostat. The initial thrombin was bovine in origin, but its use has been complicated by the formation of antibodies that cross-react with human coagulation factors. This has been associated with life-threatening bleeding and in some circumstances anaphylaxis and death. Human thrombin, isolated from pooled plasma of donors, was developed in an effort to minimize these risks, but its downsides are its limited availability and the potential for transmitting blood-borne pathogens. Recently a recombinant thrombin has been developed, and approved for use by the FDA. It has the advantage of being minimally antigenic and devoid of the risk of viral transmission. Thrombin is often used in conjunction with other hemostatic aids, including absorbable agents such as Gelfoam, and with fibrinogen in fibrin glues. The last part of this review will discuss these agents in detail, and review their clinical applications. PMID:22282693

  1. Electrochemical aptamer sensor for thrombin detection based on Au nanoneedle and enzymatic ascorbic acid oxidization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Hua, Mei; Luo, Lei; Du, Huali; Yang, Yunhui

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe an aptamer-based sandwich-type electrochemical sensor for the detection of human alpha-thrombin. Au nanoneedles were synthesized in the hole of the naked polycarbonate (PC) template using electrodepositing strategy. The thiolated thrombin aptamer I was immobilized as the capture probe on the gold nanoneedles through Au-S bond. After the thrombin was captured, the biotinylated aptamer II, used as the detection probe, was bound to thrombin. Then, the streptavidin-conjugated alkaline phosphatase (SA-ALP) was linked to the biotinylated aptamer II and catalyze hydrolyzation reaction of ascorbic acid 2-phosphate to produce ascorbic acid. Differential pulse voltammetry was used to detect the oxidizing current of ascorbic acid, which is proportional to the concentration of thrombin bound on the electrode surface ranging from 0.24 nM to 150 nM with a detection limit of 0.1 nM at 3 sigma. This assay is rapid, simple, sensitive and highly specific. It could be applied to detect thrombin in complex real sample.

  2. Thrombin Production and Human Neutrophil Elastase Sequestration by Modified Cellulosic Dressings and Their Electrokinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Judson Vincent; Prevost, Nicolette

    2011-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex series of biochemical and cellular events. Optimally, functional material design addresses the overlapping acute and inflammatory stages of wound healing based on molecular, cellular, and bio-compatibility issues. In this paper the issues addressed are uncontrolled hemostasis and inflammation which can interfere with the orderly flow of wound healing. In this regard, we review the serine proteases thrombin and elastase relative to dressing functionality that improves wound healing and examine the effects of charge in cotton/cellulosic dressing design on thrombin production and elastase sequestration (uptake by the wound dressing). Thrombin is central to the initiation and propagation of coagulation, and elastase is released from neutrophils that can function detrimentally in a stalled inflammatory phase characteristic of chronic wounds. Electrokinetic fiber surface properties of the biomaterials of this study were determined to correlate material charge and polarity with function relative to thrombin production and elastase sequestration. Human neutrophil elastase sequestration was assessed with an assay representative of chronic wound concentration with cotton gauze cross-linked with three types of polycarboxylic acids and one phosphorylation finish; thrombin production, which was assessed in a plasma-based assay via a fluorogenic peptide substrate, was determined for cotton, cotton-grafted chitosan, chitosan, rayon/polyester, and two kaolin-treated materials including a commercial hemorrhage control dressing (QuickClot Combat Gauze). A correlation in thrombin production to zeta potential was found. Two polycarboxylic acid cross linked and a phosphorylated cotton dressing gave high elastase sequestration. PMID:24956451

  3. Thrombin production and human neutrophil elastase sequestration by modified cellulosic dressings and their electrokinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Judson Vincent; Prevost, Nicolette

    2011-12-15

    Wound healing is a complex series of biochemical and cellular events. Optimally, functional material design addresses the overlapping acute and inflammatory stages of wound healing based on molecular, cellular, and bio-compatibility issues. In this paper the issues addressed are uncontrolled hemostasis and inflammation which can interfere with the orderly flow of wound healing. In this regard, we review the serine proteases thrombin and elastase relative to dressing functionality that improves wound healing and examine the effects of charge in cotton/cellulosic dressing design on thrombin production and elastase sequestration (uptake by the wound dressing). Thrombin is central to the initiation and propagation of coagulation, and elastase is released from neutrophils that can function detrimentally in a stalled inflammatory phase characteristic of chronic wounds. Electrokinetic fiber surface properties of the biomaterials of this study were determined to correlate material charge and polarity with function relative to thrombin production and elastase sequestration. Human neutrophil elastase sequestration was assessed with an assay representative of chronic wound concentration with cotton gauze cross-linked with three types of polycarboxylic acids and one phosphorylation finish; thrombin production, which was assessed in a plasma-based assay via a fluorogenic peptide substrate, was determined for cotton, cotton-grafted chitosan, chitosan, rayon/polyester, and two kaolin-treated materials including a commercial hemorrhage control dressing (QuickClot Combat Gauze). A correlation in thrombin production to zeta potential was found. Two polycarboxylic acid cross linked and a phosphorylated cotton dressing gave high elastase sequestration.

  4. Hsp90 (heat shock protein 90) inhibitor occupancy is a direct determinant of client protein degradation and tumor growth arrest in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tillotson, Bonnie; Slocum, Kelly; Coco, John; Whitebread, Nigel; Thomas, Brian; West, Kip A; MacDougall, John; Ge, Jie; Ali, Janid A; Palombella, Vito J; Normant, Emmanuel; Adams, Julian; Fritz, Christian C

    2010-12-17

    Several Hsp90 (heat shock protein 90) inhibitors are currently under clinical evaluation as anticancer agents. However, the correlation between the duration and magnitude of Hsp90 inhibition and the downstream effects on client protein degradation and cancer cell growth inhibition has not been thoroughly investigated. To investigate the relationship between Hsp90 inhibition and cellular effects, we developed a method that measures drug occupancy on Hsp90 after treatment with the Hsp90 inhibitor IPI-504 in living cells and in tumor xenografts. In cells, we find the level of Hsp90 occupancy to be directly correlated with cell growth inhibition. At the molecular level, the relationship between Hsp90 occupancy and Hsp90 client protein degradation was examined for different client proteins. For sensitive Hsp90 clients (e.g. HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2), client protein levels directly mirror Hsp90 occupancy at all time points after IPI-504 administration. For insensitive client proteins, we find that protein abundance matches Hsp90 occupancy only after prolonged incubation with drug. Additionally, we investigate the correlation between plasma pharmacokinetics (PK), tumor PK, pharmacodynamics (PD) (client protein degradation), tumor growth inhibition, and Hsp90 occupancy in a xenograft model of human cancer. Our results indicate Hsp90 occupancy to be a better predictor of PD than either plasma PK or tumor PK. In the nonsmall cell lung cancer xenograft model studied, a linear correlation between Hsp90 occupancy and tumor growth inhibition was found. This novel binding assay was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo and could be used as a pharmacodynamic readout in the clinic.

  5. A Large-Scale Identification of Direct Targets of the Tomato MADS Box Transcription Factor RIPENING INHIBITOR Reveals the Regulation of Fruit Ripening[W

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Masaki; Nakano, Toshitsugu; Shima, Yoko; Ito, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    The fruit ripening developmental program is specific to plants bearing fleshy fruits and dramatically changes fruit characteristics, including color, aroma, and texture. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) MADS box transcription factor RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN), one of the earliest acting ripening regulators, is required for both ethylene-dependent and -independent ripening regulatory pathways. Recent studies have identified two dozen direct RIN targets, but many more RIN targets remain to be identified. Here, we report the large-scale identification of direct RIN targets by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with DNA microarray analysis (ChIP-chip) targeting the predicted promoters of tomato genes. Our combined ChIP-chip and transcriptome analysis identified 241 direct RIN target genes that contain a RIN binding site and exhibit RIN-dependent positive or negative regulation during fruit ripening, suggesting that RIN has both activator and repressor roles. Examination of the predicted functions of RIN targets revealed that RIN participates in the regulation of lycopene accumulation, ethylene production, chlorophyll degradation, and many other physiological processes. Analysis of the effect of ethylene using 1-methylcyclopropene revealed that the positively regulated subset of RIN targets includes ethylene-sensitive and -insensitive transcription factors. Intriguingly, ethylene is involved in the upregulation of RIN expression during ripening. These results suggest that tomato fruit ripening is regulated by the interaction between RIN and ethylene signaling. PMID:23386264

  6. A large-scale identification of direct targets of the tomato MADS box transcription factor RIPENING INHIBITOR reveals the regulation of fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Masaki; Nakano, Toshitsugu; Shima, Yoko; Ito, Yasuhiro

    2013-02-01

    The fruit ripening developmental program is specific to plants bearing fleshy fruits and dramatically changes fruit characteristics, including color, aroma, and texture. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) MADS box transcription factor RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN), one of the earliest acting ripening regulators, is required for both ethylene-dependent and -independent ripening regulatory pathways. Recent studies have identified two dozen direct RIN targets, but many more RIN targets remain to be identified. Here, we report the large-scale identification of direct RIN targets by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with DNA microarray analysis (ChIP-chip) targeting the predicted promoters of tomato genes. Our combined ChIP-chip and transcriptome analysis identified 241 direct RIN target genes that contain a RIN binding site and exhibit RIN-dependent positive or negative regulation during fruit ripening, suggesting that RIN has both activator and repressor roles. Examination of the predicted functions of RIN targets revealed that RIN participates in the regulation of lycopene accumulation, ethylene production, chlorophyll degradation, and many other physiological processes. Analysis of the effect of ethylene using 1-methylcyclopropene revealed that the positively regulated subset of RIN targets includes ethylene-sensitive and -insensitive transcription factors. Intriguingly, ethylene is involved in the upregulation of RIN expression during ripening. These results suggest that tomato fruit ripening is regulated by the interaction between RIN and ethylene signaling.

  7. Effect of thrombin on purine metabolism in the guinea pig heart

    SciTech Connect

    Whelton, B.K.; Thompson, C.I.; Sparks, H.V.

    1986-03-01

    In vitro coronary endothelial cells (EC) release adenosine (ADO) in response to thrombin (THR). The authors tested the hypothesis that THR causes the release of ADO from in situ EC of isolated guinea pig hearts. The authors preferentially labelled the EC by infusing 2,8-/sup 3/H-ADO (ADO; 5 x 10/sup -8/ M) into the heart for 30 minutes. Then THR (1 U/ml) or THR plus allopurinol (2.4 x 10-/sup 4M) was infused into the heart. Venous effluent samples analyzed for ADO, ADO and /sup 3/H-H/sub 2/O. THR increased the release of ADO from 32 +/- 11 pm/min/g to 175 +/- 47 after 4 minutes (p < 0.02, n = 5). Despite the increase in total ADO release, ADO did not increase. Release of H/sub 2/O increased from 10.1 +/- 10/sup 3/ dpm/min/g to 23.5 +/- 5.7 x 10/sup 3/ at 4 minutes. In the presence of the xanthine oxidase/dehydrogenase inhibitor allopurinol, H/sub 2/O release in response to THR fell to 3.6 +/- 1.2 x 10 dpm/min/gm. The authors conclude that the labelled EC are not the source of ADO released in response to THR. Instead the ADO released by THR comes from an unlabelled compartment, most likely the myocytes. This suggests that ADO release from myocytes may be a mechanism to regulate thrombogenesis. The THR-induced increase in H/sub 2/O release and it's inhibition by allopurinol indicates that THR enhances purine catabolism in EC.

  8. Thrombin-dependent Incorporation of von Willebrand Factor into a Fibrin Network*

    PubMed Central

    Miszta, Adam; Pelkmans, Leonie; Lindhout, Theo; Krishnamoorthy, Ganeshram; de Groot, Philip G.; Hemker, Coenraad H.; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Kelchtermans, Hilde; de Laat, Bas

    2014-01-01

    Attachment of platelets from the circulation onto a growing thrombus is a process involving multiple platelet receptors, endothelial matrix components, and coagulation factors. It has been indicated previously that during a transglutaminase reaction activated factor XIII (FXIIIa) covalently cross-links von Willebrand factor (VWF) to polymerizing fibrin. Bound VWF further recruits and activates platelets via interactions with the platelet receptor complex glycoprotein Ib (GPIb). In the present study we found proof for binding of VWF to a fibrin monomer layer during the process of fibrinogen-to-fibrin conversion in the presence of thrombin, arvin, or a snake venom from Crotalus atrox. Using a domain deletion mutant we demonstrated the involvement of the C domains of VWF in this binding. Substantial binding of VWF to fibrin monomers persisted in the presence of the FXIIIa inhibitor K9-DON, illustrating that cross-linking via factor XIII is not essential for this phenomenon and suggesting the identification of a second mechanism through which VWF multimers incorporate into a fibrin network. Under high shear conditions, platelets were shown to adhere to fibrin only if VWF had been incorporated. In conclusion, our experiments show that the C domains of VWF and the E domain of fibrin monomers are involved in the incorporation of VWF during the polymerization of fibrin and that this incorporation fosters binding and activation of platelets. Fibrin thus is not an inert end product but partakes in further thrombus growth. Our findings help to elucidate the mechanism of thrombus growth and platelet adhesion under conditions of arterial shear rate. PMID:25381443

  9. Thrombin-dependent Incorporation of von Willebrand Factor into a Fibrin Network.

    PubMed

    Miszta, Adam; Pelkmans, Leonie; Lindhout, Theo; Krishnamoorthy, Ganeshram; de Groot, Philip G; Hemker, Coenraad H; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Kelchtermans, Hilde; de Laat, Bas

    2014-12-26

    Attachment of platelets from the circulation onto a growing thrombus is a process involving multiple platelet receptors, endothelial matrix components, and coagulation factors. It has been indicated previously that during a transglutaminase reaction activated factor XIII (FXIIIa) covalently cross-links von Willebrand factor (VWF) to polymerizing fibrin. Bound VWF further recruits and activates platelets via interactions with the platelet receptor complex glycoprotein Ib (GPIb). In the present study we found proof for binding of VWF to a fibrin monomer layer during the process of fibrinogen-to-fibrin conversion in the presence of thrombin, arvin, or a snake venom from Crotalus atrox. Using a domain deletion mutant we demonstrated the involvement of the C domains of VWF in this binding. Substantial binding of VWF to fibrin monomers persisted in the presence of the FXIIIa inhibitor K9-DON, illustrating that cross-linking via factor XIII is not essential for this phenomenon and suggesting the identification of a second mechanism through which VWF multimers incorporate into a fibrin network. Under high shear conditions, platelets were shown to adhere to fibrin only if VWF had been incorporated. In conclusion, our experiments show that the C domains of VWF and the E domain of fibrin monomers are involved in the incorporation of VWF during the polymerization of fibrin and that this incorporation fosters binding and activation of platelets. Fibrin thus is not an inert end product but partakes in further thrombus growth. Our findings help to elucidate the mechanism of thrombus growth and platelet adhesion under conditions of arterial shear rate. PMID:25381443

  10. Functional role of the polysaccharide component of rabbit thrombomodulin proteoglycan. Effects on inactivation of thrombin by antithrombin, cleavage of fibrinogen by thrombin and thrombin-catalysed activation of factor V.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M C; Lindahl, U

    1990-09-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM), a major anticoagulant protein at the vessel wall, serves as a potent cofactor for the activation of Protein C by thrombin. Previous work has indicated that (rabbit) TM is a proteoglycan that contains a single polysaccharide chain, tentatively identified as a sulphated galactosaminoglycan, and furthermore suggested that this component may be functionally related to additional anticoagulant activities expressed by the TM molecule [Bourin, Ohlin, Lane, Stenflo & Lindahl (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 8044-8052]. Results of the present study establish that (enzymic) removal of the polysaccharide chain abolishes the inhibitory effect of TM on thrombin-induced fibrinogen clotting as well as the promoting effect of TM on the inactivation of thrombin by antithrombin, but does not affect the ability of TM to serve as a cofactor in the activation of Protein C. Studies of yet another biological activity of rabbit TM, namely the ability to prevent the activation of Factor V by thrombin [Esmon, Esmon & Harris (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 7944-7947], confirmed that TM markedly delays the conversion of the native 330 kDa Factor V precursor into polypeptide intermediates, and further into the 96 kDa heavy chain and 71-74 kDa light-chain components of activated Factor Va. In contrast, the activation kinetics of a similar sample of Factor V incubated with thrombin in the presence of chondroitinase ABC-digested TM did not differ from that observed in the absence of TM. It is concluded that the inhibitory effect of TM on Factor V activation also depends on the presence of the polysaccharide component on the TM molecule.

  11. Direct costs of first-generation protease inhibitors for the treatment of genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C viral infection.

    PubMed

    Sethi, N; Tapper, E B; Vong, A; Sethi, S; Rourke, M; Afdhal, N H

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of Hepatitis C therapy, robust real-world data are needed to understand the costs and benefits of treatment alternatives. The objective of this study was to evaluate the true direct cost of treatment in an unselected sequential population of patients treated at a tertiary care centre for hepatitis C virus genotype 1. A total of 200 consecutive patients were treated with interferon, ribavirin and a first-generation direct-acting antiviral agent (DAA) between 2011 and 2013. A total of 41% had cirrhosis, 31% were prior relapsers, and 41% were prior partial or null responders. Costs used were wholesale acquisition cost prices for medications, average hospital costs per day for each diagnosis code based on US inpatient hospital charges. All costs were adjusted to 2013 dollars. Sustained virologic response (SVR) was achieved in 97 patients (48.5%). A total of 14% experienced relapse, 19% breakthrough or nonresponse, and 18.5% discontinued secondary to side effects. Twenty per cent of patients had at least one hospitalization attributable to a complication of therapy. Thirty-seven per cent of patients required erythropoietin-stimulating agents, 16% received filgastrim, and 15% needed a red blood cell transfusion. The mean overall cost of treatment was $83,851 per patient. The cost per SVR was $172,889; $266,670 for patients with cirrhosis. The costs per SVR after treatment with first-generation DAAs are dependent on the stage of disease and therapy side effects. These real-world costs significantly exceed those described in prior cost-effectiveness assessments and should be used instead for future studies.

  12. Direct costs of first-generation protease inhibitors for the treatment of genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C viral infection.

    PubMed

    Sethi, N; Tapper, E B; Vong, A; Sethi, S; Rourke, M; Afdhal, N H

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of Hepatitis C therapy, robust real-world data are needed to understand the costs and benefits of treatment alternatives. The objective of this study was to evaluate the true direct cost of treatment in an unselected sequential population of patients treated at a tertiary care centre for hepatitis C virus genotype 1. A total of 200 consecutive patients were treated with interferon, ribavirin and a first-generation direct-acting antiviral agent (DAA) between 2011 and 2013. A total of 41% had cirrhosis, 31% were prior relapsers, and 41% were prior partial or null responders. Costs used were wholesale acquisition cost prices for medications, average hospital costs per day for each diagnosis code based on US inpatient hospital charges. All costs were adjusted to 2013 dollars. Sustained virologic response (SVR) was achieved in 97 patients (48.5%). A total of 14% experienced relapse, 19% breakthrough or nonresponse, and 18.5% discontinued secondary to side effects. Twenty per cent of patients had at least one hospitalization attributable to a complication of therapy. Thirty-seven per cent of patients required erythropoietin-stimulating agents, 16% received filgastrim, and 15% needed a red blood cell transfusion. The mean overall cost of treatment was $83,851 per patient. The cost per SVR was $172,889; $266,670 for patients with cirrhosis. The costs per SVR after treatment with first-generation DAAs are dependent on the stage of disease and therapy side effects. These real-world costs significantly exceed those described in prior cost-effectiveness assessments and should be used instead for future studies. PMID:26010946

  13. Cleavage of the thrombin receptor: identification of potential activators and inactivators.

    PubMed Central

    Parry, M A; Myles, T; Tschopp, J; Stone, S R

    1996-01-01

    The kinetic parameters were determined for the hydrolysis of a peptide based on the activation site of the thrombin receptor (residues 38-60) by thrombin and 12 other proteases. The kcat and Km values for the cleavage of this peptide (TR39-40) by thrombin were 107 s-1 and 1.3 microM; the kcat/Km of TR39-40 is among the highest observed for thrombin. A model is presented that reconciles the parameters for cleavage of the peptide with the concentration dependence of cellular responses to thrombin. Cleavage of TR39-40 was not specific for thrombin. The pancreatic proteases trypsin and chymotrypsin hydrolysed TR39-40 efficiently (kcat/Km > 10(6) M-1.s-1). Whereas trypsin cleaved TR39-40 at the thrombin activation site (Arg41-Ser42), chymotrypsin hydrolysed the peptide after Phe43. This chymotryptic cleavage would result in inactivation of the receptor. The efficient cleavage of TR39-40 by chymotrypsin (kcat/Km approximately 10(6) M-1.s-1) was predominantly due to a low Km value (2.8 microM). The proteases factor Xa, plasmin, plasma kallikrein, activated protein C and granzyme A also hydrolysed TR39-40 at the Arg41-Ser43 bond, but exhibited kcat/Km values that were at least 10(3)-fold lower than that observed with thrombin. Both tissue and urokinase plasminogen activators as well as granzyme B and neutrophil elastase were unable to cleave TR39-60 at appreciable rates. However, neutrophil cathepsin G hydrolysed the receptor peptide after Phe55. Like the chymotryptic cleavage, this cleavage would lead to inactivation of the receptor, but the cathepsin G reaction was markedly less efficient; the kcat/K(m) value was almost four orders of magnitude lower than that for thrombin. In addition to the above cleavage sites, a secondary site for thrombin and other arginine-specific proteases was identified at Arg46, but the cleavage at this site only occurred at very low rates and is unlikely to be significant in vivo. PMID:8947506

  14. Effects of Aerobic Capacity on Thrombin-Induced Hydrocephalus and White Matter Injury.

    PubMed

    Ni, Wei; Gao, Feng; Zheng, Mingzhe; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Keep, Richard F; Xi, Guohua; Hua, Ya

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that intracerebral hemorrhage-induced brain injury is less in rats bred for high aerobic capacity (high capacity runners; HCR) compared with those bred for low aerobic capacity (low capacity runners; LCRs). Thrombin, an essential component in the coagulation cascade, is produced after cerebral hemorrhage. Intraventricular injection of thrombin causes significant hydrocephalus and white matter damage. In the present study, we examined the effect of exercise capacity on thrombin-induced hydrocephalus and white matter damage. Mid-aged (13-month-old) female LCRs (n = 13) and HCRs (n = 12) rats were used in this study. Rats received an intraventricular injection of thrombin (3 U, 50 μl). All rats underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 24 h and were then euthanized for brain histology and Western blot. The mortalities were 20 % in LCRs and 33 % in HCRs after thrombin injection (p > 0.05). No rats died after saline injection. Intraventricular thrombin injection resulted in hydrocephalus and periventricular white matter damage as determined on MRI. In LCR rats, thrombin induced significant ventricle enlargement (23.0 ± 2.3 vs12.8 ± 1.9 mm(3) in LCR saline group; p < 0.01) and white matter lesion (9.3 ± 7.6 vs 0.6 ± 0.5 mm(3) in LCR saline group, p < 0.05). In comparison, in HCR rats thrombin induced less ventricular enlargement (17.3 ± 3.9 vs 23.0 ± 2.3 mm(3) in LCRs, p < 0.01) and smaller white matter lesions (2.6 ± 1.2 mm(3) vs 9.3 ± 7.6 mm(3) in LCRs, p < 0.05). In LCR rats, there was also upregulation of heat shock protein-32, a stress marker, and microglial activation in the periventricular white matter. These changes were significantly reduced in HCR rats. Intraventricular injection of thrombin caused more white matter damage and hydrocephalus in rats with low aerobic capacity. A differential effect of thrombin may contribute to differences in the effects of cerebral

  15. Effects on coagulation and fibrinolysis induced by influenza in mice with a reduced capacity to generate activated protein C and a deficiency in plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1.

    PubMed

    Keller, Tymen T; van der Sluijs, Koen F; de Kruif, Martijn D; Gerdes, Victor E A; Meijers, Joost C M; Florquin, Sandrine; van der Poll, Tom; van Gorp, Eric C M; Brandjes, Dees P M; Büller, Harry R; Levi, Marcel

    2006-11-24

    Influenza infections increase the risk of diseases associated with a prothrombotic state, such as venous thrombosis and atherothrombotic diseases. However, it is unclear whether influenza leads to a prothrombotic state in vivo. To determine whether influenza activates coagulation, we measured coagulation and fibrinolysis in influenza-infected C57BL/6 mice. We found that influenza increased thrombin generation, fibrin deposition, and fibrinolysis. In addition, we used various anti- and prothrombotic models to study pathways involved in the influenza-induced prothrombotic state. A reduced capacity to generate activated protein C in TM(pro/pro) mice increased thrombin generation and fibrinolysis, whereas treatment with heparin decreased thrombin generation in influenza-infected C57Bl/6 mice. Thrombin generation was not changed in hyperfibrinolytic mice, deficient in plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1(-/-)); however, increased fibrin degradation was seen. Treatment with tranexamic acid reduced fibrinolysis, but thrombin generation was unchanged. We conclude that influenza infection generates thrombin, increased by reduced levels of protein C and decreased by heparin. The fibrinolytic system appears not to be important for thrombin generation. These findings suggest that influenza leads to a prothrombotic state by coagulation activation. Heparin treatment reduces the influenza induced prothrombotic state. PMID:17068293

  16. Dynamic affinity chromatography in the separation of sulfated lignins binding to thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Aiye; Thakkar, Jay N.; Hindle, Michael; Desai, Umesh R.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfated low molecular weight lignins (LMWLs), a mixture of chemo-enzymatically prepared oligomers, have been found to be potent antagonists of coagulation. However, structures that induce anticoagulation remain unidentified. The highly polar sulfate groups on these molecules and the thousands of different structures present in these mixtures make traditional chromatographic resolution of sulfated LMWLs difficult. We performed dynamic thrombin affinity chromatography monitored using chromogenic substrate hydrolysis assay to isolate sulfated LMWL fractions that differed significantly in their biophysical and biochemical properties. Three fractions, I35, I55 and Peak II, were isolated from the starting complex mixture. Independent plasma clotting assays suggested that I35 possessed good anticoagulation potential (APTT = 4.2 μM; PT = 6.8 μM), while I55 and Peak II were approximately 10- and 100-fold less potent. The ESI-MS spectrum of this oligomeric fraction showed multiple peaks at 684.8, 610.6, 557.4, 541.4, 536.5, and 519.4 m/z, which most probably arise from variably functionalized (β-O4—β-β-linked trimers and/or a β-O4—β-O4-linked dimers. The first direct observation of these structures in sulfated LMWLs will greatly assist in the discovery of more potent sulfated LMWL-based anticoagulants. PMID:23122400

  17. Bi-directional induction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 during T lymphoma/endothelial cell contact: implication of ICAM-1.

    PubMed

    Aoudjit, F; Potworowski, E F; St-Pierre, Y

    1998-03-15

    The mechanisms that lead to the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMPs) during the invasive process of normal and transformed T cells remain largely unknown. Since vascular cells form a dynamic tissue capable of responding to local stimuli and activating cells through the expression of cytokine receptors and specific cell adhesion molecules, we hypothesized that the firm adhesion of T lymphoma cells to endothelial cells is a critical event in the local production of MMP and TIMP. In the present work, we show that adhesion of lymphoma cells to endothelial cells induced a transient and reciprocal de novo expression of MMP-9 mRNA and enzymatic activity by both cell types. Up-regulation of MMP-9 in T lymphoma cells was concomitant to that of TIMP-1, and required direct contact with endothelial cells. Induction of MMP-9, but not of TIMP-1, was blocked by anti-LFA-1 and anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 Abs, indicating that induction of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in lymphoma cells required direct, yet distinct, intercellular contact. In contrast, the induction of MMP-9 in endothelial cells by T lymphoma cells did not necessitate direct contact and could be achieved by exposure to IL-1 and TNF, or to the supernatant of T lymphoma cell culture. Together, these results demonstrate that firm adhesion of T lymphoma cells to endothelial cells participates in the production of MMP-9 in both cell types through bi-directional signaling pathways, and identify intercellular adhesion molecule-1/LFA-1 as a key interaction in the up-regulation of MMP-9 in T lymphoma cells.

  18. A small molecule inhibitor of tropomyosin dissociates actin binding from tropomyosin-directed regulation of actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bonello, Teresa T.; Janco, Miro; Hook, Jeff; Byun, Alex; Appaduray, Mark; Dedova, Irina; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah; Hardeman, Edna C.; Stehn, Justine R.; Böcking, Till; Gunning, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    The tropomyosin family of proteins form end-to-end polymers along the actin filament. Tumour cells rely on specific tropomyosin-containing actin filament populations for growth and survival. To dissect out the role of tropomyosin in actin filament regulation we use the small molecule TR100 directed against the C terminus of the tropomyosin isoform Tpm3.1. TR100 nullifies the effect of Tpm3.1 on actin depolymerisation but surprisingly Tpm3.1 retains the capacity to bind F-actin in a cooperative manner. In vivo analysis also confirms that, in the presence of TR100, fluorescently tagged Tpm3.1 recovers normally into stress fibers. Assembling end-to-end along the actin filament is thereby not sufficient for tropomyosin to fulfil its function. Rather, regulation of F-actin stability by tropomyosin requires fidelity of information communicated at the barbed end of the actin filament. This distinction has significant implications for perturbing tropomyosin-dependent actin filament function in the context of anti-cancer drug development. PMID:26804624

  19. [Side-effects of pegylated interferon plus ribavirin therapy with or without protease inhibitor direct acting antiviral agents during treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection].

    PubMed

    Hunyady, Béla; Kovács, Balázs; Battyáni, Zita

    2011-12-11

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects 2-3% of the population, approximately 170 million people worldwide, causing chronic HCV-related hepatitis with subsequent liver cirrhosis, hepatic failure, hepatocellular cancer, and liver-related mortality in a large number of patients. The gold standard therapy, pegylated interferon alpha in combination with ribavirin can eradicate hepatitis C virus infection in approx. 40% of treatment-naïve patients infected with HCV genotype G1, and only 15-20% of patients with previous treatment. Success rate is substantially improved with the development and registration of two direct acting anti-hepatitis C virus protease inhibitors (boceprevir and telaprevir) in the second decade of 21st century: combined with the standard therapy, almost three quarter of previously untreated, and more than half of previously unsuccessfully treated patients can achieve sustained viral response with protease inhibitor based triple therapies. A major barrier to successful treatment is the association of peginterferon/ribavirin therapy with frequent and sometimes serious adverse effects. In clinical trials, approximately 10-15% of treated patients discontinue peginterferon and ribavirin due to adverse events; however, in routine clinical practice, the rate of treatment discontinuation has been reported to be substantially higher. The side effects of peginterferon/ribavirin therapy affect virtually all organ systems, and addition of protease inhibitor can amplify these side effects (particularly anemia), and/or may lead to new ones (i.e., dysgeusia with boceprevir or skin rush with telaprevir). There is considerable regional and global variability in the nature and prevalence of these adverse effects as well as in the best strategies to ameliorate their impact on hepatitis C virus treatment. This article summarizes the side effects of dual and triple therapies and their management based on the labels of the drugs, on a comprehensive literature review

  20. Active site-directed inhibitors of cytochrome P-450scc. Structural and mechanistic implications of a side chain-substituted series of amino-steroids.

    PubMed

    Sheets, J J; Vickery, L E

    1983-10-10

    A series of analogues of cholesterol, each having a shortened side chain and a primary amine group, were prepared and tested for their effects on bovine adrenocortical cholesterol side chain cleavage cytochrome P-450 (P-450scc). A previous study had shown that one derivative, 22-amino-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3 beta-ol, is a potent competitive inhibitor of the enzyme and forms a complex in which the steroid ring binds to the cholesterol site and the side chain amine forms a bond with the heme iron (Sheets, J. J., and Vickery, L. E. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79, 5773-5777). In the studies reported here, the 23-amine derivative, 23-amino-24-nor-5-cholen-3 beta-ol, was found to be an equally potent inhibitor and to be competitive with respect to cholesterol (Ki = 38 nM). Binding of the 23-amine to P-450scc also caused formation of a low spin complex with an absorption maximum at 422 nm, indicative of a nitrogen-donor ligand. Other derivatives in which the side chain amine was linked closer to the steroid, 17 beta-amino-5-androsten-3 beta-ol and (20 R + S)-20-amino-5-pregnen-3 beta-ol, were found to be only very weak inhibitors (I50 greater than 100 microM) and did not produce the 422 nm spectral form when bound. Derivatives in which the amine was attached a greater distance from the steroid ring, 24-amino-5-cholen-3 beta-ol and 25-amino-26,27-bisnor-5-cholesten-3 beta-ol, caused a progressive decrease in inhibitory potency and a failure to produce the 422 nm form on binding. The dependence of the type of interaction of these amino-steroids with P-450scc upon the amine position establishes that the steroid binding site and the heme catalytic site of the enzyme are fixed within a specific distance of one another. The heme appears to be located sufficiently close to the position that the side chain of cholesterol would occupy to allow for direct attack of an iron-bound oxidant to occur during hydroxylation and side chain cleavage.

  1. The regulatory mechanism of fruit ripening revealed by analyses of direct targets of the tomato MADS-box transcription factor RIPENING INHIBITOR.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Masaki; Ito, Yasuhiro

    2013-06-01

    The developmental process of ripening is unique to fleshy fruits and a key factor in fruit quality. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) MADS-box transcription factor RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN), one of the earliest-acting ripening regulators, is required for broad aspects of ripening, including ethylene-dependent and -independent pathways. However, our knowledge of direct RIN target genes has been limited, considering the broad effects of RIN on ripening. In a recent work published in The Plant Cell, we identified 241 direct RIN target genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with DNA microarray (ChIP-chip) and transcriptome analysis. Functional classification of the targets revealed that RIN participates in the regulation of many biological processes including well-known ripening processes such as climacteric ethylene production and lycopene accumulation. In addition, we found that ethylene is required for the full expression of RIN and several RIN-targeting transcription factor genes at the ripening stage. Here, based on our recently published findings and additional data, we discuss the ripening processes regulated by RIN and the interplay between RIN and ethylene.

  2. Direct inhibition of the signaling functions of the mammalian target of rapamycin by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors, wortmannin and LY294002.

    PubMed Central

    Brunn, G J; Williams, J; Sabers, C; Wiederrecht, G; Lawrence, J C; Abraham, R T

    1996-01-01

    The immunosuppressant, rapamycin, inhibits cell growth by interfering with the function of a novel kinase, termed mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). The putative catalytic domain of mTOR is similar to those of mammalian and yeast phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinases. This study demonstrates that mTOR is a component of a cytokine-triggered protein kinase cascade leading to the phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor-4E (eIF-4E) binding protein, PHAS-1, in activated T lymphocytes. This event promotes G1 phase progression by stimulating eIF-4E-dependent translation initiation. A mutant YAC-1 T lymphoma cell line, which was selected for resistance to the growth-inhibitory action of rapamycin, was correspondingly resistant to the suppressive effect of this drug on PHAS-1 phosphorylation. In contrast, the PI 3-kinase inhibitor, wortmannin, reduced the phosphorylation of PHAS-1 in both rapamycin-sensitive and -resistant T cells. At similar drug concentrations (0.1-1 microM), wortmannin irreversibly inhibited the serine-specific autokinase activity of mTOR. The autokinase activity of mTOR was also sensitive to the structurally distinct PI 3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002, at concentrations (1-30 microM) nearly identical to those required for inhibition of the lipid kinase activity of the mammalian p85-p110 heterodimer. These studies indicate that the signaling functions of mTOR, and potentially those of other high molecular weight PI 3-kinase homologs, are directly affected by cellular treatment with wortmannin or LY294002. Images PMID:8895571

  3. Cell-derived microparticles circulate in healthy humans and support low grade thrombin generation.

    PubMed

    Berckmans, R J; Nieuwland, R; Böing, A N; Romijn, F P; Hack, C E; Sturk, A

    2001-04-01

    We determined the numbers, cellular origin and thrombin-generating properties of microparticles in healthy individuals (n = 15). Microparticles, isolated from fresh blood samples and identified by flow cytometry, originated from platelets [237 x 10(6)/L (median; range 116-565)], erythrocytes (28 x 10(6)/L; 13-46), granulocytes (46 x 10(6)/L; 16-94) and endothelial cells (64 x 10(6)/L; 16-136). They bound annexin V, indicating surface exposure of phosphatidylserine, and supported coagulation in vitro. Interestingly, coagulation occurred via tissue factor (TF)-independent pathways, because antibodies against TF or factor (F)VII were ineffective. In contrast, in our in vitro experiments coagulation was partially inhibited by antibodies against FXII (12%, p = 0.006), FXI (36%, p <0.001), FIX (28%, p <0.001) or FVIII (32%, p <0.001). Both the number of annexin V-positive microparticles present in plasma and the thrombin-generating capacity inversely correlated to the plasma concentrations of thrombin-antithrombin complex (r = -0.49, p = 0.072 and r = -0.77, p = 0.001, respectively), but did not correlate to prothrombin fragment F1+2 (r = -0.002, p = 0.99). The inverse correlations between the number of microparticles and their thrombin-forming capacity and the levels of thrombin-antithrombin complex in plasma may indicate that microparticles present in the circulation of healthy individuals have an anticoagulant function by promoting the generation of low amounts of thrombin that activate protein C. We conclude that microparticles in blood from healthy individuals support thrombin generation via TF- and FVII-independent pathways, and which may have an anticoagulant function.

  4. Adenosine regulates the proinflammatory signaling function of thrombin in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hassanian, Seyed Mahdi; Dinarvand, Peyman; Rezaie, Alireza R.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma level of the regulatory metabolite adenosine increases during the activation of coagulation and inflammation. Here we investigated the effect of adenosine on modulation of thrombin-mediated proinflammatory responses in HUVECs. We found that adenosine inhibits the barrier-disruptive effect of thrombin in HUVECs by a concentration-dependent manner. Analysis of cell surface expression of adenosine receptors revealed that A2A and A2B are expressed at the highest level among the four receptor subtypes (A2B>A2A>A1>A3) on HUVECs. The barrier-protective effect of adenosine in response to thrombin was recapitulated by the A2A specific agonist, CGS 21680, and abrogated both by the siRNA knockdown of the A2A receptor and by the A2A-specific antagonists, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261. The thrombin-induced RhoA activation and its membrane translocation were both inhibited by adenosine in a cAMP-dependent manner, providing a molecular mechanism through which adenosine exerts a barrier-protective function. Adenosine also inhibited thrombin-mediated activation of NF-κB and decreased adhesion of monocytic THP-1 cells to stimulated HUVECs via down-regulation of expression of cell surface adhesion molecules, VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin. Moreover, adenosine inhibited thrombin-induced elevated expression of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and HMGB-1; and chemokines, MCP-1, CXCL-1 and CXCL-3. Taken together, these results suggest that adenosine may inhibit thrombin-mediated proinflammatory signaling responses, thereby protecting the endothelium from injury during activation of coagulation and inflammation. PMID:24477600

  5. Fibrinogen blocks the autoactivation and thrombin-mediated activation of factor XI on dextran sulfate.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, C F; Colman, R W

    1992-01-01

    The intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation is activated when factor XIa, one of the three contact-system enzymes, is generated and then activates factor IX. Factor XI has been shown to be efficiently activated in vitro by surface-bound factor XIIa after factor XI is transported to the surface by its cofactor, high molecular weight kininogen (HK). However, individuals lacking any of the three contact-system proteins--namely, factor XII, prekallikrein, and HK--do not suffer from bleeding abnormalities. This mystery has led several investigators to search for an "alternate" activation pathway for factor XI. Recently, factor XI has been reported to be autoactivated on the soluble "surface" dextran sulfate, and thrombin was shown to accelerate the autoactivation. However, it was also reported that HK, the cofactor for factor XIIa-mediated activation of factor XI, actually diminishes the thrombin-catalyzed activation rate of factor XI. Nonetheless, it was suggested that thrombin was a more efficient activator than factor XIIa. In this report we investigated the effect of fibrinogen, the major coagulation protein in plasma, on the activation rate of factor XI. Fibrinogen, the preferred substrate for thrombin in plasma, virtually prevented autoactivation of factor XI as well as the thrombin-mediated activation of factor XI, while having no effect on factor XIIa-catalyzed activation. HK dramatically curtailed the autoactivation of factor XI in addition to the thrombin-mediated activation. These data indicate that factor XI would not be autoactivated in a plasma environment, and thrombin would, therefore, be unlikely to potentiate the activation. We believe that the "missing pathway" for factor XI activation remains an enigma that warrants further investigation. PMID:1454798

  6. Evaluation of a Heparin-Calibrated Antifactor Xa Assay for Measuring the Anticoagulant Effect of Oral Direct Xa Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Jacob; Trujillo, Toby; Fisher, Sheila; Ko, Ann; Lind, Stuart E; Kiser, Tyree H

    2016-07-01

    The introduction of oral direct anti-Xa anticoagulants apixaban and rivaroxaban has significantly impacted the treatment and prevention of thromboembolic disease. Clinical scenarios exist in which a quantitative assessment for degree of anticoagulation due to these agents would aid management. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the chromogenic antifactor Xa assay calibrated with heparin standards at our institution for assessment of intensity of anticoagulation with rivaroxaban or apixaban in addition to its current use for unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin. We also aimed to propose expected steady state peak and trough antifactor Xa activities for these agents based upon dosing regimens approved for nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Antifactor Xa activity correlated very strongly with apixaban and rivaroxaban concentration in both spiked samples and treated patient plasma samples (r (2) = .99, P < .001). This correlation was observed over a broad range (20-500 ng/mL) of drug concentrations, as sample dilution with pooled normal plasma significantly extended the range of quantitative assessment. Based on drug concentrations previously published in pharmacokinetic studies, the expected steady state peak and trough antifactor Xa activity ranges for apixaban are 1.80 to 2.20 IU/mL and 0.70 to 1.10 IU/mL, respectively. For rivaroxaban, these ranges are 3.80 to 6.20 IU/mL and 0.60 to 1.00 IU/mL, respectively. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that heparin-calibrated antifactor Xa activity correlates strongly with apixaban and rivaroxaban concentration. The dilution of samples allowed for this correlation to be extended over the majority of on-therapy drug concentrations.

  7. Thrombin Injection for Treatment of Brachial Artery Pseudoaneurysm at the Site of a Hemodialysis Fistula: Report of Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Timothy W.I.; Abraham, Robert J.

    2000-09-15

    We report two patients with arteriovenous hemodialysis fistulas that were complicated by brachial artery pseudoaneurysms. Each pseudoanerysm was percutaneously thrombosed with an injection of thrombin, using techniques to prevent escape of thrombin into the native brachial artery. In one patient, an angioplasty balloon was inflated across the neck of the aneurysm during thrombin injection. In the second patient, thrombin was injected during ultrasound-guided compression of the neck of the pseudoaneurysm. Complete thrombosis of each pseudoaneurysm was achieved within 30 sec. No ischemic or embolic events occurred. This technique may be useful in treating pseudoaneurysms of smaller peripheral arteries.

  8. An electrochemical label-free and sensitive thrombin aptasensor based on graphene oxide modified pencil graphite electrode.

    PubMed

    Ahour, F; Ahsani, M K

    2016-12-15

    In this work, we tactfully constructed a novel label-free electrochemical aptasensor for rapid and facile detection of thrombin using graphene oxide (GO) and thrombin binding aptamer (TBA). The strategy relies on the preferential adsorption of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to GO over aptamer-target complexes. The TBA-thrombin complex formation was monitored by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) using the guanine oxidation signal. In the absence of thrombin, the aptamers adsorbed onto the surface of GO leading to a strong background guanine oxidation signal. Conversely, in the presence of thrombin, the conformational transformation of TBA after incubating with the thrombin solution and formation of the aptamer-thrombin complexes which had weak binding ability to GO, leads to the desorption of TBA-thrombin complex from electrode surface and significant oxidation signal decrease. The selectivity of the biosensor was studied using other biological substances. The biosensor's signal was proportional to the thrombin concentration from 0.1 to 10nM with a detection limit of 0.07nM. Particularly, the proposed method could be widely applied to the aptamer-based determination of other target analytes. PMID:27476058

  9. Platelet activation via PAR4 is involved in the initiation of thrombin generation and in clot elasticity development.

    PubMed

    Vretenbrant, Karin; Ramström, Sofia; Bjerke, Maria; Lindahl, Tomas L

    2007-03-01

    Thrombin is a pivotal enzyme formed in the coagulation cascade and an important and potent platelet activator. The two protease-activated thrombin receptors on human platelets are denoted PAR1 and PAR4. The physiological relevance of PAR4 is still unclear, as both aggregation and secretion can be accomplished by PAR1 activation alone. In the present study we have investigated the role of PARs in platelet activation, blood coagulation, clot elasticity and fibrinolysis. Flow cytometry, free oscillation rheometry and thrombin generation measurements were used to analyze blood or platelet-rich plasma from healthy individuals. Maximum PAR1 activation with the peptide SFLLRN gave fewer fibrinogen-binding platelets with lower mean fluorescent intensity than maximum PAR4 activation with AYPGKF. Inhibition of any of the receptors prolonged clotting times. However, PAR1 is more important for fibrinolysis; inhibition of this receptor prolonged all the steps in the fibrinolytic process. Clot elasticity decreased significantly when the PAR4 receptor was inhibited. In the thrombin generation measurements, PAR4 inhibition delayed the thrombin generation start and peak, but did not affect the total amount of thrombin generated. PAR1 inhibition had no significant impact on thrombin generation. We found that PAR4 is most likely activated by low concentrations of thrombin during the initial phase of thrombin generation and is of importance to the clotting time. Furthermore, we suggest that the PAR4 receptor may have a physiological role in the stabilisation of the coagulum. PMID:17334509

  10. Kinetic analysis of a unique direct prothrombinase, fgl2, and identification of a serine residue critical for the prothrombinase activity.

    PubMed

    Chan, Camie W Y; Chan, Matthew W C; Liu, Mingfeng; Fung, Laisum; Cole, Edward H; Leibowitz, Julian L; Marsden, Philip A; Clark, David A; Levy, Gary A

    2002-05-15

    fgl2 prothrombinase, by its ability to generate thrombin, has been shown to be pivotal to the pathogenesis of viral-induced hepatitis, cytokine-induced fetal loss syndrome, and xeno- and allograft rejection. In this study, the molecular basis of fgl2 prothrombinase activity was examined in detail. Purified fgl2 protein generated in a baculovirus expression system had no measurable prothrombinase activity, whereas the activity was restored when the purified protein was reconstituted into phosphatidyl-L-serine-containing vesicles. Reconstituted fgl2 catalyzed the cleavage of human prothrombin to thrombin with kinetics consistent with a first order reaction, with an apparent V(max) value of 6 mol/min/mol fgl2 and an apparent K(m) value for prothrombin of 8.3 microM. The catalytic activity was totally dependent on calcium, and factor Va (500 nM) enhanced the catalytic efficiency of fgl2 by increasing the apparent V(max) value to 3670 mol/min/mol fgl2 and decreasing the apparent K(m) value for prothrombin to 7.2 microM. By a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and production of truncated proteins, it was clearly shown that residue Ser(89) was critical for the prothrombinase activity of fgl2. Furthermore, fgl2 prothrombinase activity was not inhibited by antithrombin III, soybean trypsin inhibitor, 4-aminobenzamidine, aprotinin, or phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, whereas diisopropylfluorophosphate completely abrogated the activity. In this work we provide direct evidence that fgl2 cleaves prothrombin to thrombin consistent with serine protease activity and requires calcium, phospholipids, and factor Va for its full activity. PMID:11994472

  11. A sensitive nanoporous gold-based electrochemical aptasensor for thrombin detection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Huajun; Sun, Yanli; Huang, Xirong; Qu, Yinbo

    2010-08-01

    An attempt was made in the present paper to develop a nanoporous gold (NPG)-based electrochemical aptasensor for thrombin detection. The substrate electrode NPG was in situ fabricated by a facile one-step square wave potential pulse (SWPP) treatment. The treatment involved repeated gold oxidation-reduction and intensive H(2) bubbles evolution. After 100min treatment, the active surface area of Au increased greatly (34 times). The electrochemical aptasensor was fabricated using a layer-by-layer assembling strategy. A "sandwich" structure was formed via thrombin connecting the aptamer-modified NPG and the aptamer-modified Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). The AuNPs was modified with two kinds of single strand DNA (ssDNA). One was aptamer of thrombin, but the other was not, reducing the cross-reaction between thrombin and its aptamer on the same AuNP. The electrochemical signal produced by the [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) bound to ssDNA via electrostatic interaction was measured by chronocoulometry. Due to the amplification effects of both NPG and AuNPs, this novel NPG-based aptasensor could detect thrombin quantitatively in the range of 0.01-22nM with a detection limit as low as 30fM. The present aptasensor also exhibited excellent selectivity, stability and reusability.

  12. Random Forests Are Able to Identify Differences in Clotting Dynamics from Kinetic Models of Thrombin Generation.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Jayavel; Bukkapatnam, Satish T S; Narayanan, Krishna R; Srinivasa, Arun R

    2016-01-01

    Current methods for distinguishing acute coronary syndromes such as heart attack from stable coronary artery disease, based on the kinetics of thrombin formation, have been limited to evaluating sensitivity of well-established chemical species (e.g., thrombin) using simple quantifiers of their concentration profiles (e.g., maximum level of thrombin concentration, area under the thrombin concentration versus time curve). In order to get an improved classifier, we use a 34-protein factor clotting cascade model and convert the simulation data into a high-dimensional representation (about 19000 features) using a piecewise cubic polynomial fit. Then, we systematically find plausible assays to effectively gauge changes in acute coronary syndrome/coronary artery disease populations by introducing a statistical learning technique called Random Forests. We find that differences associated with acute coronary syndromes emerge in combinations of a handful of features. For instance, concentrations of 3 chemical species, namely, active alpha-thrombin, tissue factor-factor VIIa-factor Xa ternary complex, and intrinsic tenase complex with factor X, at specific time windows, could be used to classify acute coronary syndromes to an accuracy of about 87.2%. Such a combination could be used to efficiently assay the coagulation system. PMID:27171403

  13. Intrabronchial Infusion of Autologous Blood Plus Thrombin for Intractable Pneumothorax After Bronchial Occlusion Using Silicon Spigots

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Yasuharu; Kawamura, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Shin; Tsukamoto, Hiroaki; Mochiduki, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bronchial occlusion therapy using silicon spigots is effective for intractable pneumothorax. However, sometimes the pneumothorax is refractory to bronchial occlusion because of collateral ventilation. For such difficult pneumothoraces, we attempted an intrabronchial infusion of autologous blood plus thrombin to control collateral ventilation and stop air leaks. Methods: We performed bronchial occlusions using silicon spigots in patients with spontaneous pneumothorax secondary to emphysema and refractory to chest drainage, but which was inoperable owing to each patient’s poor surgical candidacy and poor overall health condition. When bronchial occlusion proved ineffective, we undertook intrabronchial infusion of autologous blood plus thrombin, 2 to 4 days after bronchial occlusion. A catheter was inserted into the subpleural area, through a gap between the silicon spigot and the bronchial wall, using a flexible bronchoscope under fluoroscopic guidance. Autologous blood, followed by a thrombin solution, was infused using the catheter. We repeated the same infusion a total of 4 to 6 times while changing the target bronchi. All interventions were performed under local anesthesia. Results: The subjects were 9 men, aged from 61 to 88 years, with smoking histories. Three patients also had interstitial pneumonia, and 6 patients had undergone pleurodesis in vain before bronchial occlusion. For 4of the 9 patients, autologous blood plus thrombin infusions successfully stopped air leaks, and in 3 patients, intrabronchial infusions and pleurodesis halted leaks altogether. Conclusion: Intrabronchial infusion of autologous blood plus thrombin was effective for intractable pneumothoraces that could not be clinically managed, even by bronchial occlusion using silicon spigots. PMID:27454474

  14. Influence of ionic strength, pH and aptamer configuration for binding affinity to thrombin.

    PubMed

    Hianik, Tibor; Ostatná, Veronika; Sonlajtnerova, Michaela; Grman, Igor

    2007-01-01

    We used the methods of electrochemical indicators and the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) for detection of thrombin-aptamer interactions. We analyzed how the method of immobilization of aptamer to a solid support, the aptamer configuration as well as variation in ionic strength and pH will affect the binding of thrombin to the aptamer. The immobilization of aptamer by means of avidin-biotin technology revealed best results in sensitivity in comparison with immobilization utilizing dendrimers of first generation and in comparison with chemisorption of aptamer to a gold surface. Linear and molecular beacon aptamers of similar structure of binding site revealed similar binding properties to thrombin. Increased concentration of NaCl resulted in weakening of the binding of thrombin to the aptamers, probably due to shielding effect of Na(+) ions. The binding of the thrombin to the aptamer depends on electrolyte pH, which is presumably connected with maintaining the three dimensional aptamer configuration, optimal for binding the protein.

  15. In vivo fluorescence imaging of atherosclerotic plaques with activatable cell-penetrating peptides targeting thrombin activity†

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Emilia S.; Whitney, Michael A.; Friedman, Beth; Aguilera, Todd A.; Crisp, Jessica L.; Baik, Fred M.; Jiang, Tao; Baird, Stephen M.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Tsien, Roger Y.

    2012-01-01

    Thrombin and other coagulation enzymes have been shown to be important during atherosclerotic disease development. Study of these proteases is currently limited because of lack of robust molecular imaging agents for imaging protease activity in vivo. Activatable cell penetrating peptides (ACPPs) have been used to monitor MMP activity in tumors and, in principle, can be modified to detect other proteases. We have developed a probe that incorporates the peptide sequence DPRSFL from the proteinase activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) into an ACPP and shown that it is preferentially cleaved by purified thrombin. Active thrombin in serum cleaves DPRSFL–ACPP with >90% inhibition by lepirudin or argatroban. The DPRSFL–ACPP cleavage product accumulated in advanced atherosclerotic lesions in living mice, with 85% reduction in retention upon pre-injection of mice with hirudin. Uptake of the ACPP cleavage product was highest in plaques with histological features associated with more severe disease. Freshly resected human atheromas bathed in DPRSFL–ACPP retained 63% greater cleavage product compared to control ACPP. In conclusion, DPRSFL–ACPP can be used to study thrombin activity in coagulation and atherosclerosis with good spatial and temporal resolution. Thrombin-sensitive ACPPs may be developed into probes for early detection and intraoperative imaging of high risk atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:22534729

  16. The belonging of gpMuc, a glycoprotein from Mucuna pruriens seeds, to the Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor family explains its direct anti-snake venom activity.

    PubMed

    Scirè, Andrea; Tanfani, Fabio; Bertoli, Enrico; Furlani, Emiliano; Nadozie, Hope-Onyekwere N; Cerutti, Helena; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Bini, Luca; Guerranti, Roberto

    2011-07-15

    In Nigeria, Mucuna pruriens seeds are locally prescribed as an oral prophylactic for snake bite and it is claimed that when two seeds are swallowed they protect the individual for a year against snake bites. In order to understand the Mucuna pruriens antisnake properties, the proteins from the acqueous extract of seeds were purified by three chromatographic steps: ConA affinity chromatography, tandem anionic-cationic exchange and gel filtration, obtaining a fraction conventionally called gpMucB. This purified fraction was analysed by SDS-PAGE obtaining 3 bands with apparent masses ranging from 20 to 24 kDa, and by MALDI-TOF which showed two main peaks of 21 and 23 kDa and another small peak of 19 kDa. On the other hand, gel filtration analysis of the native protein indicated a molecular mass of about 70 kDa suggesting that in its native form, gpMucB is most likely an oligomeric multiform protein. Infrared spectroscopy of gpMucB indicated that the protein is particularly thermostable both at neutral and acidic pHs and that it is an all beta protein. All data suggest that gpMucB belongs to the Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor family explaining the direct anti-snake venom activity of Mucuna pruriens seeds.

  17. Thrombin products: economic impact of immune-mediated coagulopathies and practical formulary considerations.

    PubMed

    Voils, Stacy A

    2009-07-01

    Thrombin has demonstrated utility in aiding surgical hemostasis since its introduction more than 60 years ago. It is used across a wide variety of surgical procedures by virtually every specialty. Only recently have new equally effective and safe products entered the market, causing decision makers to evaluate formulary selection among products with otherwise modest differences. This evaluation includes identifying costs beyond those of acquisition and storage, as well as indirect factors such as monitoring or specialized distribution requirements. One factor to consider specifically in selection of topical thrombin products is the potential for patients to develop an immune-mediated coagulopathy (IMC) after exposure to bovine-derived thrombin. Costs due to adverse drug events fall into the category of indirect costs and, in some instances, can be substantial if bleeding due to IMC occurs. PMID:19558281

  18. Thrombin enhances the barrier function of rat microvascular endothelium in a PAR-1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Troyanovsky, B; Alvarez, D F; King, J A; Schaphorst, K L

    2008-02-01

    Thrombin is a multifunctional coagulation protease with pro- and anti-inflammatory vascular effects. We questioned whether thrombin may have segmentally differentiated effects on pulmonary endothelium. In cultured rat endothelial cells, rat thrombin (10 U/ml) recapitulated the previously reported decrease in transmonolayer electrical resistance (TER), F-actin stress fiber formation, paracellular gap formation, and increased permeability. In contrast, in rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC), isolated on the basis of Griffonia simplicifolia lectin recognition, thrombin increased TER, induced fewer stress fibers, and decreased permeability. To assess for differential proteinase-activated receptor (PAR) expression as a basis for the different responses, PAR family expression was analyzed. Both pulmonary artery endothelial cells and PMVEC expressed PAR-1 and PAR-2; however, only PMVEC expressed PAR-3, as shown by both RT-PCR and Western analysis. PAR-1 activating peptides (PAR-APs: SFLLRN-NH(2) and TFLLRN-NH(2)) were used to confirm a role for the PAR-1 receptor. PAR-APs (25-250 muM) also increased TER, formed fewer stress fibers, and did not induce paracellular gaps in PMVEC in contrast to that shown in pulmonary artery endothelial cells. These results were confirmed in isolated perfused rat lung preparations. PAR-APs (100 mug/ml) induced a 60% increase in the filtration coefficient over baseline. However, by transmission electron microscopy, perivascular fluid cuffs were seen only along conduit veins and arteries without evidence of intra-alveolar edema. We conclude that thrombin exerts a segmentally differentiated effect on endothelial barrier function in vitro, which corresponds to a pattern of predominant perivascular fluid cuff formation in situ. This may indicate a distinct role for thrombin in the microcirculation. PMID:18083763

  19. Colorimetric detection of DNA by modulation of thrombin activity on gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jian, Jyun-Wei; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2011-02-18

    A colorimetric, non-cross-linking aggregation-based gold-nanoparticle (AuNP) probe has been developed for the detection of DNA and the analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). The probe acts by modulating the enzyme activity of thrombin relative to fibrinogen. A thrombin-binding aptamer with a 29-base-long oligonucleotide (TBA(29)) assembled on the nanoparticles (TBA(29)-AuNPs) through sandwich DNA hybridization was found to possess ultra-high anticoagulant potency. The enzyme inhibition of thrombin was determined by thrombin-induced aggregation of fibrinogen-functionalized 56 nm AuNPs (Fib-AuNPs). The potency of the inhibition of TBA(29)-AuNPs relative to thrombin--and thus the degree of aggregation of the Fib-AuNPs--is highly dependent on the concentration of perfectly matched DNA (DNA(pm)). Under optimal conditions [Tris-HCl (20 mM, pH 7.4), KCl (5 mM), MgCl(2) (1 mM), CaCl(2) (1 mM), NaCl (150 mM), thrombin (10 pM), and TBA(29)-AuNPs (20 pM)], the new TBA(29)-AuNP/Fib-AuNP probe shows linear sensitivity to DNA(pm) in the concentration range 20-500 pM with a correlation coefficient of 0.96. The limit of detection for DNA(pm) was experimentally determined to be 12 pM, based on a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3. The new probe was successfully applied to the analysis of an SNP that is responsible for sickle cell anemia. Relative to conventional molecular-beacon-based probes, the new probe offers the advantages of higher sensitivity and selectivity towards DNA and lower cost, showing its great potential for practical studies of SNPs.

  20. An aptamer-based assay for thrombin via structure switch based on gold nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jing; Cheng, Gui-Fang; He, Pin-Gang; Fang, Yu-Zhi

    2010-03-15

    An aptamer-based assay for thrombin with high specificity and sensitivity was presented. In the protocol, the aptamer for thrombin was immobilized on magnetic nanoparticle, and its complementary oligonucleotide was labeled with gold nanoparticles, then the aptamer was hybridized with the complementary oligonucleotide to form the duplex structure as a probe, this probe could be used for the specific recognition for thrombin. In the presence of thrombin, the aptamer prefer to form the G-quarter structure with thrombin, resulting in the dissociation of the duplex of the probe and the release of the gold labeled oligonucleotide. Upon this, we were able to detect thrombin through the detection of the electrochemical signal of gold nanoparticles. The strategy combines with the high specificity of aptamer and the excellent characteristics of nanoparticles. This assay is simple, rapid, sensitive and highly specific, it does not require labeling of thrombin, and it could be applied to detect thrombin in complex real sample. The method shows great potential in other protein analysis and in disease diagnosis.

  1. PAR1-dependent and independent increases in COX-2 and PGE2 in human colonic myofibroblasts stimulated by thrombin.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Michelle L; Zaidi, Nosheen F; Hollenberg, Morley D; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2003-05-01

    Subepithelial myofibroblast-derived prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) regulates epithelial chloride secretion in the intestine. Thrombin is elevated in inflammatory conditions of the bowel. Therefore, we sought to determine a role for thrombin in regulating PGE(2) synthesis by colonic myofibroblasts. Incubation of cultured CCD-18Co colonic myofibroblasts with thrombin, the proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR(1))-activating peptide (Cit-NH(2)), and peptides corresponding to 2 noncatalytic regions of thrombin (TP367 and TP508) for 18 h increased both cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression (immunocytochemistry) and PGE(2) synthesis (enzyme immunoassay). Inhibition of thrombin by D-Phe-Pro-Arg-chloromethylketone (PPACK) did not significantly reduce PGE(2) synthesis, which remained elevated compared with control. We also investigated the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) dependence of thrombin-induced PGE(2) elevations. Recombinant human bFGF concentration dependently increased PGE(2) synthesis, and a bFGF neutralizing antibody inhibited PGE(2) synthesis induced by TP367 and TP508 (approximately 40%) and by thrombin (approximately 20%) (but not Cit-NH(2)). Thrombin, therefore, upregulates COX-2-derived PGE(2) synthesis by both catalytic cleavage of PAR(1) and bFGF-dependent noncatalytic activity. This presents a novel mechanism by which intestinal myofibroblasts might regulate epithelial chloride secretion. PMID:12505789

  2. Traumatic Inferior Gluteal Artery Aneurysm Managed with Emergency Transcatheter Thrombin Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert; Zielinski, Maciej; Wykretowicz, Mateusz; Piekarek, Alina; Majewski, Waclaw

    2010-06-15

    Pseudoaneurysms of the inferior gluteal artery (IGA) are rare and are often caused by trauma. Treatment options vary and include surgery, ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection, and endovascular procedures such as stent-graft placement, coil embolization, and glue injection. We report a 70-year-old male who presented to the hospital after a road accident with a posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm that was treated by endovascular thrombin embolization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of inferior gluteal artery false aneurysm treated by this method.

  3. Liquid-Crystal Biosensor Based on Nickel-Nanosphere-Induced Homeotropic Alignment for the Amplified Detection of Thrombin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dongyu; Peng, Yi; Xu, Lihong; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Qian; Guo, Lin

    2015-10-28

    A new liquid-crystal (LC)-based sensor operated by nickel nanosphere (NiNS)-induced homeotropic alignment for the label-free monitoring of thrombin was reported. When doped with NiNSs, a uniform vertical orientation of 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) was easily obtained. A sandwich system of aptamer/thrombin/aptamer-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was fabricated, and AuNPs-aptamer conjugation caused the disruption of the 5CB orientation, leading to an obvious change of the optical appearance from a dark to a bright response to thrombin concentrations from 0.1 to 100 nM. This design also allowed quantitative detection of the thrombin concentration. This distinctive and sensitive thrombin LC sensor provides a new principle for building LC-sensing systems.

  4. Thrombin stimulates IL-6 and IL-8 expression in cytomegalovirus-infected human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Martin; Vogel, Jens-Uwe; Höver, Gerold; Kotchetkov, Ruslan; Cinatl, Jaroslav; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2004-02-01

    Recently, we reported that thrombin specifically stimulates protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) signaling in RPE entailing inhibition of Sp1 dependent HCMV replication. We now studied whether thrombin modulates the expression of the proinflammatory cytokine/chemokines IL-6 and IL-8 in mock- and cytomegalovirus-infected human retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE). Our data show that thrombin/PAR-1 stimulates IL-6 and IL-8 gene transcription and protein secretion in both mock- and HCMV-infected RPE. Thrombin/PAR-1-mediated signaling stimulated PKC and NF-kappaB-dependent IL-6 and IL-8 gene expression via phosphoinositide 3-kinase and further downstream via p42/44 and p38 MAPKs. Thus, thrombin/PAR-1-mediated IL-6/IL-8 gene expression is uncoupled from Sp1 inhibition and may support proinflammatory pathomechanisms probably involved in hemorrhage/HCMV retinitis progression.

  5. Liquid-Crystal Biosensor Based on Nickel-Nanosphere-Induced Homeotropic Alignment for the Amplified Detection of Thrombin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dongyu; Peng, Yi; Xu, Lihong; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Qian; Guo, Lin

    2015-10-28

    A new liquid-crystal (LC)-based sensor operated by nickel nanosphere (NiNS)-induced homeotropic alignment for the label-free monitoring of thrombin was reported. When doped with NiNSs, a uniform vertical orientation of 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) was easily obtained. A sandwich system of aptamer/thrombin/aptamer-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was fabricated, and AuNPs-aptamer conjugation caused the disruption of the 5CB orientation, leading to an obvious change of the optical appearance from a dark to a bright response to thrombin concentrations from 0.1 to 100 nM. This design also allowed quantitative detection of the thrombin concentration. This distinctive and sensitive thrombin LC sensor provides a new principle for building LC-sensing systems. PMID:26458050

  6. Identification of T. gondii Myosin Light Chain-1 as a Direct Target of TachypleginA-2, a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Parasite Motility and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Jacqueline M.; Tran, Fanny; Pathak, Ravindra B.; Poupart, Séverine; Heaslip, Aoife T.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Westwood, Nicholas J.; Ward, Gary E.

    2014-01-01

    Motility of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii plays an important role in the parasite’s life cycle and virulence within animal and human hosts. Motility is driven by a myosin motor complex that is highly conserved across the Phylum Apicomplexa. Two key components of this complex are the class XIV unconventional myosin, TgMyoA, and its associated light chain, TgMLC1. We previously showed that treatment of parasites with a small-molecule inhibitor of T. gondii invasion and motility, tachypleginA, induces an electrophoretic mobility shift of TgMLC1 that is associated with decreased myosin motor activity. However, the direct target(s) of tachypleginA and the molecular basis of the compound-induced TgMLC1 modification were unknown. We show here by “click” chemistry labelling that TgMLC1 is a direct and covalent target of an alkyne-derivatized analogue of tachypleginA. We also show that this analogue can covalently bind to model thiol substrates. The electrophoretic mobility shift induced by another structural analogue, tachypleginA-2, was associated with the formation of a 225.118 Da adduct on S57 and/or C58, and treatment with deuterated tachypleginA-2 confirmed that the adduct was derived from the compound itself. Recombinant TgMLC1 containing a C58S mutation (but not S57A) was refractory to click labelling and no longer exhibited a mobility shift in response to compound treatment, identifying C58 as the site of compound binding on TgMLC1. Finally, a knock-in parasite line expressing the C58S mutation showed decreased sensitivity to compound treatment in a quantitative 3D motility assay. These data strongly support a model in which tachypleginA and its analogues inhibit the motility of T. gondii by binding directly and covalently to C58 of TgMLC1, thereby causing a decrease in the activity of the parasite’s myosin motor. PMID:24892871

  7. Effects of Mucuna pruriens protease inhibitors on Echis carinatus venom.

    PubMed

    Hope-Onyekwere, Nnadozie Stanley; Ogueli, Godwin Ifeanyi; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Cerutti, Helena; Cito, Annarita; Aguiyi, John C; Guerranti, Roberto

    2012-12-01

    The medicinal plant Mucuna pruriens, with reputed anti-snake venom properties has been reported to contain a kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor. This study was undertaken to further evaluate the protease inhibitory potential of gpMuc, a multiform glycoprotein, and other protein fractions from M. pruriens seeds against trypsin, chymotrypsin, Echis carinatus snake venom, ecarin and thrombin. The results showed that gpMuc inhibited both trypsin and chymotrypsin activities and was thermally stable, maintaining its trypsin inhibitory activity at temperatures of up to 50°C. Its structural conformation was also maintained at pH ranges of 4-7. Immunoreactivity study confirms that it contains protease-recognizing epitope on one of its isoforms. The whole protein extract of M. pruriens seeds inhibited prothrombin activation by ecarin and whole E. carinatus venom, and also thrombin-like activity using chromogenic assay. PMID:22447581

  8. Stimulation of activin A expression in rat aortic smooth muscle cells by thrombin and angiotensin II correlates with neointimal formation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Pawlowski, J E; Taylor, D S; Valentine, M; Hail, M E; Ferrer, P; Kowala, M C; Molloy, C J

    1997-01-01

    Vasoactive GTP-binding protein-coupled receptor agonists (e.g., angiotensin II [AII] and alpha-thrombin) stimulate the production of mitogenic factors from vascular smooth muscle cells. In experiments to identify mitogens secreted from AII- or alpha-thrombin-stimulated rat aortic smooth muscle (RASM) cells, neutralizing antibodies directed against several growth factors (e.g., PDGF and basic fibroblast growth factor [basic FGF]) failed to inhibit the mitogenic activity of conditioned media samples derived from the cells. In this report, we found that polyclonal neutralizing antibodies directed against purified human placental basic FGF reduced the mitogenic activity of AII-stimulated RASM cell-conditioned media and in immunoblot experiments identified a 26-kD protein (14 kD under reducing conditions) that was distinct from basic FGF. After purification from RASM cell-conditioned medium, amino acid sequence analysis identified the protein as activin A, a member of the TGF-beta superfamily. Increased activin A expression was observed after treatment of the RASM cells with AII, alpha-thrombin, and the protein kinase C agonist PMA. In contrast, PDGF-BB or serum caused only a minor induction of this protein. Although activin A alone only weakly stimulated RASM cell DNA synthesis, it demonstrated a potent comitogenic effect in combination with either EGF or heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor in the RASM cells, increasing DNA synthesis by up to fourfold. Furthermore, in a rat carotid injury model, activin A mRNA was upregulated within 6 h after injury followed by increases in immunoreactive protein detected in the expanding neointima 7 and 14 d later. Taken together, these results indicate that activin A is a vascular smooth muscle cell-derived factor induced by vasoactive agonists that may, either alone or in combination with other vascular derived growth factors, have a role in neointimal formation after arterial injury. PMID:9239411

  9. Chromogenic laboratory assays to measure the factor Xa-inhibiting properties of apixaban--an oral, direct and selective factor Xa inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Becker, Richard C; Yang, Hongqiu; Barrett, Yuchen; Mohan, Puneet; Wang, Jessie; Wallentin, Lars; Alexander, John H

    2011-08-01

    An ability to readily determine an anticoagulant effect with an emerging class of direct, active site, oral factor Xa inhibitors is viewed by the medical community as attractive and by some as an absolute requirement for their use in clinical practice. We performed a pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic substudy in APPRAISE-1-a study of apixaban in patients with acute coronary syndrome(ACS). A total of 1691 patients had blood sampled for apixaban plasma concentrations using mass spectrometry/high performance liquid chromatography and anti-Xa activity using a chromogenic assay employing either low molecular weight heparin or apixaban as reference standards. Anti-Xa activity, determined by either anti-Xa-LMWH (r = 0.9671; P < 0.0001) or anti-Xa-apixaban (r = 0.9669; P < 0.0001) correlated strongly and in a linear fashion with apixaban plasma concentrations. The correlations for each method were equally strong at low (<100 ng/ml) (r = 0.86, P < 0.0001; r = 0.85, P < 0.0001), intermediate(100-200 ng/ml) (r = 0.73, P < 0.0001; r = 0.69, P < 0.0001) and high (>200 ng/ml) (r = 0.91, P < 0.0001; r = 0.91, P < 0.0001) plasma concentrations of apixaban, respectively. Our pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic substudy suggests that an apixaban-mediated anticoagulant effect can be detected even at very low plasma concentrations using a standard laboratory chromogenic anti-Xa assay with either LMWH or apixaban calibrators. While establishing parameters for safety and efficacy will require further investigation, an ability to discern the presence of a drug effect may provide clinically useful information. PMID:21516308

  10. In vitro metabolism of rivaroxaban, an oral, direct factor Xa inhibitor, in liver microsomes and hepatocytes of rats, dogs, and humans.

    PubMed

    Lang, D; Freudenberger, C; Weinz, C

    2009-05-01

    The in vitro metabolism of rivaroxaban, a novel, oral, direct factor Xa inhibitor for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic disorders, was investigated in several species, including humans. The objective of this study was to elucidate metabolite structures and identify the metabolic pathways to provide support for in vivo safety and clinical studies. [(14)C]Rivaroxaban was incubated with liver microsomes and hepatocytes of rats, dogs, and humans. The samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-(14)C-tandem mass spectroscopy, to generate metabolite profiles and propose or confirm the structures of the metabolites formed. In vitro metabolite profiles showed no major differences between species. The main oxidative metabolic pathways identified for all species were hydroxylation at the morpholinone moiety (M-2, M-3, and M-8) and to a lesser extent at the oxazolidinone moiety (M-9). M-2 was the main metabolite in all microsomal incubations. M-1, a morpholinone ring-opened product formed by further oxidation of M-2, was the main metabolite in all hepatocyte incubations. Other pathways were amide hydrolysis at the morpholinone ring (M-7) and the chlorothiophene amide moiety (M-13 and M-15). In hepatocytes, M-13 was readily conjugated with glycine, leading to M-4. The metabolic fate of unlabeled M-15 was investigated separately. Incubations with human liver microsomes and hepatocytes showed that M-15 was first oxidized to the aldehyde intermediate M-16 and subsequently reduced to M-17 (alcohol) or oxidized to M-18 (carboxylic acid). No metabolism at the chlorothiophene moiety itself was found. Overall, rivaroxaban showed no species differences in metabolism, with different independent metabolic pathways and no formation of reactive metabolites. PMID:19196846

  11. The Role of Hepatitis C Virus Core Antigen Testing in the Era of Direct Acting Antiviral Therapies: What We Can Learn from the Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Linh Thuy; Gray, Emma; O'Leary, Aisling; Carr, Michael; De Gascun, Cillian F.

    2016-01-01

    Direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapies have revolutionised the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV). The financial cost of DAAs however is significant, and first generation protease inhibitors (PIs) also require frequent monitoring of viral RNA levels to guide treatment. In this context, we examined the relevance of HCV antigen testing to evaluate the potential role in monitoring virological response to HCV antiviral treatment with the PI-based triple therapies, telaprevir (TVR) and boceprevir (BOC). Chronic HCV-infected individuals (n = 152) enrolled in the Irish Hepatitis C Outcomes Research Network (ICORN) study were prospectively analysed for baseline markers and the early viral kinetics associated with SVR. The sustained virological response (SVR) rates in the cohort receiving TVR and BOC were 87.3% and 73.8%, respectively. Baseline factors associated with successful outcome in TVR therapy were age (P = 0.0098), IFNL3 genotype (P = 0.0330) and viral load (P = 0.0456). RNA level at week 4 (P = 0.0068) and viral antigen negativity at week 2 (P = 0.0359) were predictive of SVR for TVR-based therapy. In BOC therapy, prior interferon treatment (P = 0.0209) and IFNL3 genotype (P = 0.0410) were baseline predictors of SVR. Evidence of viraemia based either on viral RNA or antigen at week 4 predicted SVR in these patients. Our data showed that rapid decline of HCV antigen to negative level at week 2 in TVR treatment and <0.96 log fmol/l in BOC treatment after commencement of PI triple therapy were associated with SVR. HCV antigen measurement should be considered as a potential alternative for monitoring treatment response during DAA-based regimens. PMID:27711230

  12. PDE10A inhibitors stimulate or suppress motor behavior dependent on the relative activation state of the direct and indirect striatal output pathways

    PubMed Central

    Megens, Anton A H P; Hendrickx, Herman M R; Mahieu, Michel M A; Wellens, Annemie L Y; de Boer, Peter; Vanhoof, Greet

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) regulates the activity of striatal, medium spiny neurons (MSNs), which are divided into a behaviorally stimulating, Gs-coupled D1 receptor-expressing “direct” pathway and a behaviorally suppressant, Gi-coupled D2 receptor-expressing “indirect” pathway. Activating both pathways, PDE10A inhibitors (PDE10AIs) combine functional characteristics of D2 antagonists and D1 agonists. While the effects of PDE10AIs on spontaneous and stimulated behavior have been extensively reported, the present study investigates their effects on suppressed behavior under various conditions of reduced dopaminergic neurotransmission: blockade of D1 receptors with SCH-23390, blockade of D2 receptors with haloperidol, or depletion of dopamine with RO-4-1284 or reserpine. In rats, PDE10AIs displayed relatively low cataleptic activity per se. After blocking D1 receptors, however, they induced pronounced catalepsy at low doses close to those required for inhibition of apomorphine-induced behavior; slightly higher doses resulted in behavioral stimulant effects, counteracting the catalepsy. PDE10AIs also counteracted catalepsy and related behaviors induced by D2 receptor blockade or dopamine depletion; catalepsy was replaced by behavioral stimulant effects under the latter but not the former condition. Similar interactions were observed at the level of locomotion in mice. At doses close to those inhibiting d-amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion, PDE10AIs reversed hypolocomotion induced by D1 receptor blockade or dopamine depletion but not hypolocomotion induced by D2 receptor blockade. It is concluded that PDE10AIs stimulate or inhibit motor behavior dependent on the relative activation state of the direct and indirect striatal output pathways. PMID:25505601

  13. A Spider-Derived Kunitz-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor That Acts as a Plasmin Inhibitor and an Elastase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hu; Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Bo Yeon; Zou, Feng Ming; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Je, Yeon Ho; Li, Jianhong; Jin, Byung Rae

    2013-01-01

    Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors are involved in various physiological processes, such as ion channel blocking, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation. While spider-derived Kunitz-type proteins show activity in trypsin or chymotrypsin inhibition and K+ channel blocking, no additional role for these proteins has been elucidated. In this study, we identified the first spider (Araneus ventricosus) Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor (AvKTI) that acts as a plasmin inhibitor and an elastase inhibitor. AvKTI possesses a Kunitz domain consisting of a 57-amino-acid mature peptide that displays features consistent with Kunitz-type inhibitors, including six conserved cysteine residues and a P1 lysine residue. Recombinant AvKTI, expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells, showed a dual inhibitory activity against trypsin (Ki 7.34 nM) and chymotrypsin (Ki 37.75 nM), defining a role for AvKTI as a spider-derived Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor. Additionally, AvKTI showed no detectable inhibitory effects on factor Xa, thrombin, or tissue plasminogen activator; however, AvKTI inhibited plasmin (Ki 4.89 nM) and neutrophil elastase (Ki 169.07 nM), indicating that it acts as an antifibrinolytic factor and an antielastolytic factor. These findings constitute molecular evidence that AvKTI acts as a plasmin inhibitor and an elastase inhibitor and also provide a novel view of the functions of a spider-derived Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor. PMID:23308198

  14. Achiral pyrazinone-based inhibitors of the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease and drug-resistant variants with elongated substituents directed toward the S2 pocket.

    PubMed

    Gising, Johan; Belfrage, Anna Karin; Alogheli, Hiba; Ehrenberg, Angelica; Åkerblom, Eva; Svensson, Richard; Artursson, Per; Karlén, Anders; Danielson, U Helena; Larhed, Mats; Sandström, Anja

    2014-03-13

    Herein we describe the design, synthesis, inhibitory potency, and pharmacokinetic properties of a novel class of achiral peptidomimetic HCV NS3 protease inhibitors. The compounds are based on a dipeptidomimetic pyrazinone glycine P3P2 building block in combination with an aromatic acyl sulfonamide in the P1P1' position. Structure-activity relationship data and molecular modeling support occupancy of the S2 pocket from elongated R(6) substituents on the 2(1H)-pyrazinone core and several inhibitors with improved inhibitory potency down to Ki = 0.11 μM were identified. A major goal with the design was to produce inhibitors structurally dissimilar to the di- and tripeptide-based HCV protease inhibitors in advanced stages of development for which cross-resistance might be an issue. Therefore, the retained and improved inhibitory potency against the drug-resistant variants A156T, D168V, and R155K further strengthen the potential of this class of inhibitors. A number of the inhibitors were tested in in vitro preclinical profiling assays to evaluate their apparent pharmacokinetic properties. The various R(6) substituents were found to have a major influence on solubility, metabolic stability, and cell permeability. PMID:23517538

  15. Galpha12/13- and rho-dependent activation of phospholipase C-epsilon by lysophosphatidic acid and thrombin receptors.

    PubMed

    Hains, Melinda D; Wing, Michele R; Maddileti, Savitri; Siderovski, David P; Harden, T Kendall

    2006-06-01

    Because phospholipase C epsilon (PLC-epsilon) is activated by Galpha(12/13) and Rho family GTPases, we investigated whether these G proteins contribute to the increased inositol lipid hydrolysis observed in COS-7 cells after activation of certain G protein-coupled receptors. Stimulation of inositol lipid hydrolysis by endogenous lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) or thrombin receptors was markedly enhanced by the expression of PLC-epsilon. Expression of the LPA(1) or PAR1 receptor increased inositol phosphate production in response to LPA or SFLLRN, respectively, and these agonist-stimulated responses were markedly enhanced by coexpression of PLC-epsilon. Both LPA(1) and PAR1 receptor-mediated activation of PLC-epsilon was inhibited by coexpression of the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domain of p115RhoGEF, a GTPase-activating protein for Galpha(12/13) but not by expression of the RGS domain of GRK2, which inhibits Galpha(q) signaling. In contrast, activation of the G(q)-coupled M1 muscarinic or P2Y(2) purinergic receptor was neither enhanced by coexpression with PLC-epsilon nor inhibited by the RGS domain of p115RhoGEF but was blocked by expression of the RGS domain of GRK2. Expression of the Rho inhibitor C3 botulinum toxin did not affect LPA- or SFLLRN-stimulated inositol lipid hydrolysis in the absence of PLC-epsilon but completely prevented the PLC-epsilon-dependent increase in inositol phosphate accumulation. Likewise, C3 toxin blocked the PLC-epsilon-dependent stimulatory effects of the LPA(1), LPA(2), LPA(3), or PAR1 receptor but had no effect on the agonist-promoted inositol phosphate response of the M1 or P2Y(2) receptor. Moreover, PLC-epsilon-dependent stimulation of inositol phosphate accumulation by activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, which involves Ras- but not Rho-mediated activation of the phospholipase, was unaffected by C3 toxin. These studies illustrate that specific LPA and thrombin receptors promote inositol lipid signaling via

  16. Targeting the thrombin receptor modulates inflammation and astrogliosis to improve recovery after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Radulovic, Maja; Yoon, Hyesook; Wu, Jianmin; Mustafa, Karim; Scarisbrick, Isobel A

    2016-09-01

    The deregulation of serine protease activity is a common feature of neurological injury, but little is known regarding their mechanisms of action or whether they can be targeted to facilitate repair. In this study we demonstrate that the thrombin receptor (Protease Activated Receptor 1, (PAR1)) serves as a critical translator of the spinal cord injury (SCI) proteolytic microenvironment into a cascade of pro-inflammatory events that contribute to astrogliosis and functional decline. PAR1 knockout mice displayed improved locomotor recovery after SCI and reduced signatures of inflammation and astrogliosis, including expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), vimentin, and STAT3 signaling. SCI-associated elevations in pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-6 were also reduced in PAR1-/- mice and co-ordinate improvements in tissue sparing and preservation of NeuN-positive ventral horn neurons, and PKCγ corticospinal axons, were observed. PAR1 and its agonist's thrombin and neurosin were expressed by perilesional astrocytes and each agonist increased the production of IL-6 and STAT3 signaling in primary astrocyte cultures in a PAR1-dependent manner. In turn, IL-6-stimulated astrocytes increased expression of PAR1, thrombin, and neurosin, pointing to a model in which PAR1 activation contributes to increased astrogliosis by feedforward- and feedback-signaling dynamics. Collectively, these findings identify the thrombin receptor as a key mediator of inflammation and astrogliosis in the aftermath of SCI that can be targeted to reduce neurodegeneration and improve neurobehavioral recovery. PMID:27145117

  17. Treatment of a Splenic Artery Pseudoaneurysm by Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Thrombin Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Mark Richards, Dafydd; Carr, Nicholas

    2007-06-15

    We present a case of a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm secondary to pancreatitis that was successfully treated by transgastric injection of thrombin under endoscopic ultrasound guidance. There has been no recurrence on follow-up CT angiography, and thus complex surgery or endovascular intervention has been avoided.

  18. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Thrombin Injection as First-Line Treatment of Pancreatic Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    McErlean, Aoife; Looby, Seamus; Lee, Michael J.

    2007-06-15

    Pancreatic pseudoaneurysms are a rare but potentially fatal complication of pancreatitis. Surgical intervention and transcatheter embolization are not always feasible therapeutic options. In this report we present a case of a pseudoaneurysm secondary to pancreatitis which, despite being angiographically invisible, was successfully embolized with a single ultrasound-guided percutaneous injection of thrombin.

  19. Flow and delta-P dictate where thrombin, fibrin, and von Willebrand Factor will be found.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Scott L

    2016-05-01

    Hemostasis occurs in two different topological scenarios: complete severing of a vessel or disruption of the vessel wall. Either to meet the daily rigors of active life or during an acute trauma, hemostasis involves the regulated and self-limiting production of thrombin to stop bleeding. In contrast, arterial and venous thrombosis typically involves the unregulated, intraluminal growth of a clot, in the absence of bleeding. For either hemostasis or thrombosis, the presence of flow and pressure gradients (delta-P, ΔP) dictates when and where thrombin and fibrin are located and in what quantity. For hemostatic clots, fibrin formation helped limit clot growth. We found that γ'-fibrinogen had a role in limiting clot growth via anti-thrombin activity at venous, but not arterial conditions. For hemophilic blood, severe factor deficiency (<1% healthy) led to a defect in both platelet and fibrin deposition under flow. However, moderate deficiency, which is associated with a less severe bleeding phenotype, had normalized platelet function but still lacked fibrin production. We conclude signaling levels of thrombin can be generated during moderate hemophilia to sufficiently activate platelets to achieve primary hemostasis, even if fibrin formation remains defective. Finally, as a clot grows, shear stresses can become sufficiently extreme in diseased arteries to drive von Willebrand Factor self-association into massive fibers, potentially the final burst of clot growth towards full thrombotic occlusion. PMID:27207416

  20. Rigidification of the autolysis loop enhances Na[superscript +] binding to thrombin

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, Nicola; Chen, Raymond; Chen, Zhiwei; Bah, Alaji; Di Cera, Enrico

    2011-09-20

    Binding of Na{sup +} to thrombin ensures high activity toward physiological substrates and optimizes the procoagulant and prothrombotic roles of the enzyme in vivo. Under physiological conditions of pH and temperature, the binding affinity of Na{sup +} is weak due to large heat capacity and enthalpy changes associated with binding, and the K{sub d} = 80 mM ensures only 64% saturation of the site at the concentration of Na{sup +} in the blood (140 mM). Residues controlling Na{sup +} binding and activation have been identified. Yet, attempts to improve the interaction of Na{sup +} with thrombin and possibly increase catalytic activity under physiological conditions have so far been unsuccessful. Here we report how replacement of the flexible autolysis loop of human thrombin with the homologous rigid domain of the murine enzyme results in a drastic (up to 10-fold) increase in Na{sup +} affinity and a significant improvement in the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Rigidification of the autolysis loop abolishes the heat capacity change associated with Na{sup +} binding observed in the wild-type and also increases the stability of thrombin. These findings have general relevance to protein engineering studies of clotting proteases and trypsin-like enzymes.

  1. Flow and delta-P dictate where thrombin, fibrin, and von Willebrand Factor will be found.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Scott L

    2016-05-01

    Hemostasis occurs in two different topological scenarios: complete severing of a vessel or disruption of the vessel wall. Either to meet the daily rigors of active life or during an acute trauma, hemostasis involves the regulated and self-limiting production of thrombin to stop bleeding. In contrast, arterial and venous thrombosis typically involves the unregulated, intraluminal growth of a clot, in the absence of bleeding. For either hemostasis or thrombosis, the presence of flow and pressure gradients (delta-P, ΔP) dictates when and where thrombin and fibrin are located and in what quantity. For hemostatic clots, fibrin formation helped limit clot growth. We found that γ'-fibrinogen had a role in limiting clot growth via anti-thrombin activity at venous, but not arterial conditions. For hemophilic blood, severe factor deficiency (<1% healthy) led to a defect in both platelet and fibrin deposition under flow. However, moderate deficiency, which is associated with a less severe bleeding phenotype, had normalized platelet function but still lacked fibrin production. We conclude signaling levels of thrombin can be generated during moderate hemophilia to sufficiently activate platelets to achieve primary hemostasis, even if fibrin formation remains defective. Finally, as a clot grows, shear stresses can become sufficiently extreme in diseased arteries to drive von Willebrand Factor self-association into massive fibers, potentially the final burst of clot growth towards full thrombotic occlusion.

  2. Association between Stable Coronary Artery Disease and In Vivo Thrombin Generation

    PubMed Central

    Baños-González, Manuel Alfonso; Peña-Duque, Marco Antonio; Martínez-Ríos, Marco Antonio; Quintanar-Trejo, Leslie; Aptilon-Duque, Gad; Flores-García, Mirthala; Cruz-Robles, David; Cardoso-Saldaña, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Thrombin has been implicated as a key molecule in atherosclerotic progression. Clinical evidence shows that thrombin generation is enhanced in atherosclerosis, but its role as a risk factor for coronary atherosclerotic burden has not been proven in coronary artery disease (CAD) stable patients. Objectives. To evaluate the association between TAT levels and homocysteine levels and the presence of coronary artery disease diagnosed by coronary angiography in patients with stable CAD. Methods and Results. We included 95 stable patients admitted to the Haemodynamics Department, including 63 patients with significant CAD and 32 patients without. We measured the thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) and homocysteine concentrations in all the patients. The CAD patients exhibited higher concentrations of TAT (40.76 μg/L versus 20.81 μg/L, p = 0.002) and homocysteine (11.36 μmol/L versus 8.81 μmol/L, p < 0.01) compared to the patients without significant CAD. Specifically, in patients with CAD+ the level of TAT level was associated with the severity of CAD being 36.17 ± 24.48 μg/L in the patients with bivascular obstruction and 42.77 ± 31.81 μg/L in trivascular coronary obstruction, p = 0.002. Conclusions. The level of in vivo thrombin generation, quantified as TAT complexes, is associated with the presence and severity of CAD assessed by coronary angiography in stable CAD patients.

  3. Thrombin conducts epithelial‑mesenchymal transition via protease‑activated receptor‑1 in human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Tadayoshi; Fujimoto, Daisuke; Hirono, Yasuo; Goi, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Akio

    2014-12-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is thought to be a key step for cancer metastasis. Using an immunohistochemical approach with gastric carcinoma tissue, we found the expression of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1), along with a metalloproteinase known to activate PAR1, were associated with poorer prognosis, compared with expression-negative tumors, and activated PAR1 promotes gastric cancer cell invasion and proliferation in vivo. In this study we observed EMT induction by the PAR1 agonist α-thrombin, in human gastric cell lines stably expressing PAR1. We investigated α-thrombin-induced changes in the cell forms of pcDNA3.1-MKN45 (MKN45/Mock), pcDNA3.1‑PAR1 transfected MKN45 (MKN45/PAR1), and MKN74. Expression levels of epithelial and mesenchymal markers as well as the distribution of transcriptional factors of E-cadherin in the cytoplasm and nucleus were also noted in these cell lines. We observed α-thrombin-induced morphological changes in MKN45/PAR1 and MKN74 cells. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry of these cells indicated a fall in the expression level of E-cadherin and an increase in fibronectin expression after 48 h. PAR1 activation also induced significant increases in nuclear levels of the Snail which is a repressor of E-cadherin gene expression. We found EMT in gastric cancer cell lines that underwent α-thrombin-induced PAR1 activation. PMID:25231630

  4. Label-free aptamer biosensor for thrombin detection based on functionalized graphene nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingqing; Zhou, Zhixue; Zhai, Yanling; Zhang, Lingling; Hong, Wei; Zhang, Zhiquan; Dong, Shaojun

    2015-08-15

    A label-free and amplified electrochemical impedimetric aptasensor based on functionalized graphene nanocomposites (rGO-AuNPs) was developed for the detection of thrombin, which played a vital role in thrombosis and hemostasis. The thiolated aptamer and dithiothreitol (TBA15-DTT) were firstly immobilized on the gold electrode to capture the thrombin molecules, and then aptamer functionalized graphene nanocomposites (rGO-TBA29) were used to fabricate a sandwich sensing platform for amplifying the impedimetric signals. As numerous negative charges of TBA29 on the electrode repelled to the [Fe(CN)6](4-/3-) anions, resulting in an obvious amplified charge-transfer resistance (Rct) signal. The Rct increase was linearly proportional to the thrombin concentration from 0.3 to 50nM and a detection limit of 0.01nM thrombin was achieved. In addition, graphene could also be labeled with other probes via electrostatic or π-π stacking interactions to produce signals, therefore different detection methods expanding wide application could be used in this model. PMID:25966410

  5. Association between Stable Coronary Artery Disease and In Vivo Thrombin Generation

    PubMed Central

    Baños-González, Manuel Alfonso; Peña-Duque, Marco Antonio; Martínez-Ríos, Marco Antonio; Quintanar-Trejo, Leslie; Aptilon-Duque, Gad; Flores-García, Mirthala; Cruz-Robles, David; Cardoso-Saldaña, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Thrombin has been implicated as a key molecule in atherosclerotic progression. Clinical evidence shows that thrombin generation is enhanced in atherosclerosis, but its role as a risk factor for coronary atherosclerotic burden has not been proven in coronary artery disease (CAD) stable patients. Objectives. To evaluate the association between TAT levels and homocysteine levels and the presence of coronary artery disease diagnosed by coronary angiography in patients with stable CAD. Methods and Results. We included 95 stable patients admitted to the Haemodynamics Department, including 63 patients with significant CAD and 32 patients without. We measured the thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) and homocysteine concentrations in all the patients. The CAD patients exhibited higher concentrations of TAT (40.76 μg/L versus 20.81 μg/L, p = 0.002) and homocysteine (11.36 μmol/L versus 8.81 μmol/L, p < 0.01) compared to the patients without significant CAD. Specifically, in patients with CAD+ the level of TAT level was associated with the severity of CAD being 36.17 ± 24.48 μg/L in the patients with bivascular obstruction and 42.77 ± 31.81 μg/L in trivascular coronary obstruction, p = 0.002. Conclusions. The level of in vivo thrombin generation, quantified as TAT complexes, is associated with the presence and severity of CAD assessed by coronary angiography in stable CAD patients. PMID:27597926

  6. Association between Stable Coronary Artery Disease and In Vivo Thrombin Generation.

    PubMed

    Valente-Acosta, Benjamin; Baños-González, Manuel Alfonso; Peña-Duque, Marco Antonio; Martínez-Ríos, Marco Antonio; Quintanar-Trejo, Leslie; Aptilon-Duque, Gad; Flores-García, Mirthala; Cruz-Robles, David; Cardoso-Saldaña, Guillermo; de la Peña-Díaz, Aurora

    2016-01-01

    Background. Thrombin has been implicated as a key molecule in atherosclerotic progression. Clinical evidence shows that thrombin generation is enhanced in atherosclerosis, but its role as a risk factor for coronary atherosclerotic burden has not been proven in coronary artery disease (CAD) stable patients. Objectives. To evaluate the association between TAT levels and homocysteine levels and the presence of coronary artery disease diagnosed by coronary angiography in patients with stable CAD. Methods and Results. We included 95 stable patients admitted to the Haemodynamics Department, including 63 patients with significant CAD and 32 patients without. We measured the thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) and homocysteine concentrations in all the patients. The CAD patients exhibited higher concentrations of TAT (40.76 μg/L versus 20.81 μg/L, p = 0.002) and homocysteine (11.36 μmol/L versus 8.81 μmol/L, p < 0.01) compared to the patients without significant CAD. Specifically, in patients with CAD+ the level of TAT level was associated with the severity of CAD being 36.17 ± 24.48 μg/L in the patients with bivascular obstruction and 42.77 ± 31.81 μg/L in trivascular coronary obstruction, p = 0.002. Conclusions. The level of in vivo thrombin generation, quantified as TAT complexes, is associated with the presence and severity of CAD assessed by coronary angiography in stable CAD patients. PMID:27597926

  7. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation: Effect of polarization on thrombin-ligand binding energy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Li L; Feng, Guo Q; Zhang, Qing G

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations lasting 500 ns were performed in explicit water to investigate the effect of polarization on the binding of ligands to human α-thrombin based on the standard nonpolarizable AMBER force field and the quantum-derived polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). The PPC includes the electronic polarization effect of the thrombin-ligand complex, which is absent in the standard force field. A detailed analysis and comparison of the results of the MD simulation with experimental data provided strong evidence that intra-protein, protein-ligand hydrogen bonds and the root-mean-square deviation of backbone atoms were significantly stabilized through electronic polarization. Specifically, two critical hydrogen bonds between thrombin and the ligand were broken at approximately 190 ns when AMBER force field was used and the number of intra-protein backbone hydrogen bonds was higher under PPC than under AMBER. The thrombin-ligand binding energy was computed using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method, and the results were consistent with the experimental value obtained using PPC. Because hydrogen bonds were unstable, it was failed to predict the binding affinity under the AMBER force field. Furthermore, the results of the present study revealed that differences in the binding free energy between AMBER and PPC almost comes from the electrostatic interaction. Thus, this study provides evidence that protein polarization is critical to accurately describe protein-ligand binding. PMID:27507430

  8. Trypsin and thrombin accelerate aggregation of human endocrine pancreas precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chiju; Geras-Raaka, Elizabeth; Marcus-Samuels, Bernice; Oron, Yoram; Gershengorn, Marvin C

    2006-02-01

    Human islet-derived precursor cells (hIPCs) and human pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PANC-1) cells can be induced to form aggregates that subsequently differentiate into hormone-expressing islet-like cell aggregates (ICAs). We show that challenge of hIPCs or PANC-1 cells with thrombin or trypsin resulted in stimulation of signaling via the inositol-tris-phosphate second messenger pathway leading to rapid, transient increases in cytosolic calcium ion concentration in the majority of the cells. Because we found that hIPCs, PANC-1 cells, human fetal pancreas, and human adult islets express two protease-activated receptors (PARs), PAR-1 and PAR-2, we tested whether the effects of thrombin and trypsin were mediated, at least in part, by these receptors. Peptide agonists that are relatively specific for PAR-1 (SFLLRN-amide) or PAR-2 (SLIGRL-amide) stimulated increases in inositol phosphates and cytosolic calcium ion concentration, and increased the phosphorylation of Rho, a small G-protein associated with cytoskeletal changes affecting cellular morphology and migration. Most importantly, we show that these agonists increased the rate of hIPC aggregation leading to the formation of more viable, smaller ICAs. Our data show that thrombin and trypsin accelerate aggregation, an early stage of hIPC differentiation in vitro, and imply that pancreatic trypsin and thrombin may be involved in islet development in vivo. PMID:16021635

  9. Aptamer-functionalized hydrogel diffraction gratings for the human thrombin detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqi; Wang, Xiaogong

    2013-07-01

    The aptamer-functionalized hydrogel diffraction gratings were successfully fabricated by incorporating an aptamer and its complementary sequence as crosslinking junctions in the network structure. The gratings showed a sensitive response to human thrombin as read out from the diffracted light.

  10. Thrombin detection in murine plasma using engineered fluorescence resonance energy transfer aptadimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapaidze, Ana; Brut, Marie; Mazères, Serge; Estève, Daniel; Gué, Anne-Marie; Bancaud, Aurélien

    2015-12-01

    Biodetection strategies, in which two sides of one target protein are targeted simultaneously, have been shown to increase specificity, selectivity, and affinity, and it has been suggested that they constitute excellent candidates for protein sensing in complex media. In this study we propose a method to engineer the sequence of a DNA construct dedicated to reversible thrombin detection. This construct, called Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) aptadimer, is assembled with two aptamers, which target different epitopes of thrombin, interconnected with a DNA linker that contains a FRET couple and a reversible double helix stem. In the absence of target, the stem is stable maintaining a FRET couple in close proximity, and fluorescence is unquenched upon thrombin addition due to the dehybridization of the stem. We define design rules for the conception of FRET aptadimers, and develop a software to optimize their functionality. One engineered FRET aptadimer sequence is subsequently characterized experimentally by temperature scanning fluorimetry, demonstrating the relevance of our technology for thrombin sensing in bulk and diluted murine plasma.

  11. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation: Effect of polarization on thrombin-ligand binding energy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li L.; Feng, Guo Q.; Zhang, Qing G.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations lasting 500 ns were performed in explicit water to investigate the effect of polarization on the binding of ligands to human α-thrombin based on the standard nonpolarizable AMBER force field and the quantum-derived polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). The PPC includes the electronic polarization effect of the thrombin-ligand complex, which is absent in the standard force field. A detailed analysis and comparison of the results of the MD simulation with experimental data provided strong evidence that intra-protein, protein-ligand hydrogen bonds and the root-mean-square deviation of backbone atoms were significantly stabilized through electronic polarization. Specifically, two critical hydrogen bonds between thrombin and the ligand were broken at approximately 190 ns when AMBER force field was used and the number of intra-protein backbone hydrogen bonds was higher under PPC than under AMBER. The thrombin-ligand binding energy was computed using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method, and the results were consistent with the experimental value obtained using PPC. Because hydrogen bonds were unstable, it was failed to predict the binding affinity under the AMBER force field. Furthermore, the results of the present study revealed that differences in the binding free energy between AMBER and PPC almost comes from the electrostatic interaction. Thus, this study provides evidence that protein polarization is critical to accurately describe protein-ligand binding. PMID:27507430

  12. N-Benzyl-4-((heteroaryl)methyl)benzamides: A New Class of Direct NADH-Dependent 2-trans Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase (InhA) Inhibitors with Antitubercular Activity.

    PubMed

    Guardia, Ana; Gulten, Gulcin; Fernandez, Raquel; Gómez, Jesus; Wang, Feng; Convery, Maire; Blanco, Delia; Martínez, María; Pérez-Herrán, Esther; Alonso, Marta; Ortega, Fátima; Rullás, Joaquín; Calvo, David; Mata, Lydia; Young, Robert; Sacchettini, James C; Mendoza-Losana, Alfonso; Remuiñán, Modesto; Ballell Pages, Lluís; Castro-Pichel, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Isoniazid (INH) remains one of the cornerstones of antitubercular chemotherapy for drug-sensitive strains of M. tuberculosis bacteria. However, the increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains containing mutations in the KatG enzyme, which is responsible for the activation of INH into its antitubercular form, have rendered this drug of little or no use in many cases of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Presented herein is a novel family of antitubercular direct NADH-dependent 2-trans enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (InhA) inhibitors based on an N-benzyl-4-((heteroaryl)methyl)benzamide template; unlike INH, these do not require prior activation by KatG. Given their direct InhA target engagement, these compounds should be able to circumvent KatG-related resistance in the clinic. The lead molecules were shown to be potent inhibitors of InhA and showed activity against M. tuberculosis bacteria. This new family of inhibitors was found to be chemically tractable, as exemplified by the facile synthesis of analogues and the establishment of structure-activity relationships. Furthermore, a co-crystal structure of the initial hit with the enzyme is disclosed, providing valuable information toward the design of new InhA inhibitors for the treatment of MDR/XDR tuberculosis. PMID:26934341

  13. Pericellular Ca2+ recycling potentiates thrombin-evoked Ca2+ signals in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Stewart O; Pugh, Nicholas; Farndale, Richard W; Harper, Alan G S

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Na+/Ca2+ exchangers (NCXs) potentiate Ca2+ signaling evoked by thapsigargin in human platelets, via their ability to modulate the secretion of autocoids from dense granules. This link was confirmed in platelets stimulated with the physiological agonist, thrombin, and experiments were performed to examine how Ca2+ removal by the NCX modulates platelet dense granule secretion. In cells loaded with the near-membrane indicator FFP-18, thrombin stimulation was observed to elicit an NCX-dependent accumulation of Ca2+ in a pericellular region around the platelets. To test whether this pericellular Ca2+ accumulation might be responsible for the influence of NCXs over platelet function, platelets were exposed to fast Ca2+ chelators or had their glycocalyx removed. Both manipulations of the pericellular Ca2+ rise reduced thrombin-evoked Ca2+ signals and dense granule secretion. Blocking Ca2+-permeable ion channels had a similar effect, suggesting that Ca2+ exported into the pericellular region is able to recycle back into the platelet cytosol. Single cell imaging with extracellular Fluo-4 indicated that thrombin-evoked rises in extracellular [Ca2+] occurred within the boundary described by the cell surface, suggesting their presence within the open canalicular system (OCS). FFP-18 fluorescence was similarly distributed. These data suggest that upon thrombin stimulation, NCX activity creates a rise in [Ca2+] within the pericellular region of the platelet from where it recycles back into the platelet cytosol, acting to both accelerate dense granule secretion and maintain the initial rise in cytosolic [Ca2+]. PMID:24303163

  14. Thrombin mitogenic responses and protein phosphorylation are different in cultured human endothelial cells derived from large and microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, E.; Bikfalvi, A.; Rendu, F.; Toledano, S.L.; Tobelem, G. )

    1989-12-01

    It is well established that thrombin induces various biological responses in endothelial cells derived from large vessels. However, little is known about the effects of thrombin on the microvasculature. Protein phosphorylation may be one of the mechanisms by which an extracellular stimulus initiates cellular events like proliferation. Therefore, we have compared the effects of either human alpha-thrombin or phorbol esters (TPA) on the proliferation or protein phosphorylation in endothelial cells derived from large vessels (umbilical vein, HUVEC) or microvessels (omental tissue, HOMEC). In HOMEC, thrombin did not stimulate cell proliferation and protein phosphorylation while TPA slightly reduced the cell proliferation and induced the phosphorylation of a 27-kDa protein. In contrast, in HUVEC, thrombin or TPA markedly enhanced the cell proliferation and stimulated the phosphorylation of a 59-kDa protein. These data indicate that endothelial cells from large and small vessels respond differently to thrombin and there is a complex and as yet unclear relationship between the proliferation and the protein phosphorylation induced by thrombin.

  15. Modulation of 3D Fibrin Matrix Stiffness by Intrinsic Fibrinogen–Thrombin Compositions and by Extrinsic Cellular Activity

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Haison; Wu, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Fibrin is a substance formed through catalytic conversion of coagulation constituents: fibrinogen and thrombin. The kinetics of the two constituents determines the structural properties of the fibrin architecture. We have shown previously that changing the fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations in the final three-dimensional (3D) fibrin matrix influenced cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we further examined the effect of changing fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations in the absence or presence of fibroblasts on the structural modulus or stiffness of 3D fibrin matrices. We have prepared fibroblast-free and fibroblast-embedded 3D fibrin matrices of different fibrinogen and thrombin formulations, and tested the stiffness of these constructs using standard mechanical testing assays. Results showed that there was a corresponding increase in stiffness with increasing thrombin and fibrinogen concentrations; the increase was more notable with fibrinogen and to a lesser degree with thrombin. The effect of fibroblasts on the stiffness of the fibrin construct was also examined. We have observed a small increase in the stiffness of the fibroblast-incorporated fibrin construct as they proliferated and exhibited spreading morphology. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive report detailing the relationship between fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations, cell proliferation, and stiffness in 3D fibrin matrices. The data obtained may lead to optimally design suitable bioscaffolds where we can control both cell proliferation and structural integrity for a variety of tissue engineering applications. PMID:19309239

  16. Thrombin activation of human platelets dissociates a complex containing gelsolin and actin from phosphatidylinositide-specific phospholipase Cgamma1.

    PubMed Central

    Baldassare, J J; Henderson, P A; Tarver, A; Fisher, G J

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the association of two cytoskeleton proteins, gelsolin and actin, with phosphatidylinositide-specific phospholipase Cgamma1 (PLCgamma1) in resting and thrombin-stimulated human platelets. In unstimulated platelets, gelsolin, actin and PLCgamma1 were immunoprecipitated as a complex by a polyclonal antibody to PLCgamma1. The association of gelsolin and actin was specific for PLCgamma1 because immunoprecipitates of PLCs beta2, beta3, gamma2 and delta1, which are also expressed in human platelets, did not contain detectable gelsolin or actin. Activation with thrombin resulted in platelet aggregation and the dissociation of gelsolin and actin from PLCgamma1. Inhibition of thrombin-induced platelet aggregation blocked the dissociation of gelsolin and actin from PLCgamma1. After stimulation with thrombin, PLCgamma1 activity in immunoprecipitates was increased 2-3-fold. This elevation in PLCgamma1 activity in response to thrombin activation was not observed when platelet aggregation was blocked. Although PLCgamma1 is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to many agonists, we could not detect, by Western analysis with anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies, tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCgamma1 immunoprecipitated from thrombin-stimulated platelets. These results demonstrate that PLCgamma1 is associated with gelsolin and actin in resting platelets, and that thrombin-induced platelet aggregation results in the dissociation of PLCgamma1 from gelsolin and actin, and the stimulation of PLCgamma1 activity. PMID:9164868

  17. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  18. Comparison of the effects of PAR1 antagonists, PAR4 antagonists, and their combinations on thrombin-induced human platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin-Chung; Teng, Che-Ming

    2006-09-28

    Thrombin activates human platelets through proteolytic activation of two protease-activated receptors (PARs), PAR1 and PAR4. In the present study, we show that, RWJ-56110, a potent synthetic PAR1 antagonist, inhibited platelet aggregation caused by a low concentration (0.05 U/ml) of thrombin, but lost its effectiveness when higher concentrations of thrombin were used as stimulators. YD-3, a non-peptide PAR4 antagonist, alone had little or no effect on thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, significantly enhanced the anti-aggregatory activity of PAR1 antagonist. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time that P-selectin expression in thrombin-stimulated platelets can be synergistically prevented by combined treatment of PAR1 antagonist and PAR4 antagonist. These results indicate that thrombin-induced platelet activation cannot be effectively inhibited by just blocking either single thrombin receptor pathway, and suggest a rationale for potential combination therapy in arterial thrombosis. PMID:16890935

  19. Spatial aspects of blood coagulation: two decades of research on the self-sustained traveling wave of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Guria, Konstantin; Guria, Georgy Th

    2015-03-01

    In a number of experimental studies, it has been demonstrated that the forefront of blood coagulation can propagate in the manner of a signal relay. These data strongly support the concept that the formation of a blood clot is governed by a self-sustained traveling wave of thrombin. The present review critically appraises the experimental data obtained in recent decades concerning the self-sustained spatial propagation of thrombin. Open questions regarding the experimental detection of the self-sustained propagation of thrombin are discussed.

  20. Platelet Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shifrin, Megan M; Widmar, S Brian

    2016-03-01

    Antithrombotic medications have become standard of care for management of acute coronary syndrome. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are essential components of platelet function; platelet-inhibiting medications interfere with these components and reduce incidence of thrombosis. Active bleeding is a contraindication for administration of platelet inhibitors. There is currently no reversal agent for platelet inhibitors, although platelet transfusion may be used to correct active bleeding after administration of platelet inhibitors. PMID:26897422

  1. Design and synthesis of pyrrolidine-5,5-trans-lactams (5-oxohexahydropyrrolo[3,2-b]pyrroles) as novel mechanism-based inhibitors of human cytomegalovirus protease. 2. Potency and chirality.

    PubMed

    Borthwick, Alan D; Crame, Andrew J; Ertl, Peter F; Exall, Anne M; Haley, Terry M; Hart, Graham J; Mason, Andrew M; Pennell, Andrew M K; Singh, Onkar M P; Weingarten, Gordon G; Woolven, James M

    2002-01-01

    The stereospecific synthesis of a series of alpha-methylpyrrolidine-5,5-trans-lactam inhibitors of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) protease is described. Examination of the SAR in this series has defined the size and chirality of the alpha-substituent, optimized the acyl substituent on the lactam nitrogen, and defined the steric constraint of this functionality. The SAR of the functionality on the pyrrolidine nitrogen of the trans-lactam has been investigated, and this has led to the discovery of potent serine protease inhibitors that are highly selective for the viral enzyme over the mammalian enzymes elastase, thrombin, and acetylcholine esterase. The mechanism of action of our lead compounds has been established by mass spectrometry, and enzymatic degradation of HCMV deltaAla protease acylated with these inhibitors showed that Ser 132 is the active site nucleophile. The crystal structure of HCMV protease was obtained and used to model the conformationally restricted, chiral (S)-proline-alpha-methyl-5,5-trans-lactams into the active site groove of the enzyme, enabling us to direct and rationalize the SAR in this series. The activity against HCMV deltaAla protease is the greatest with inhibitors based on the dansyl-(S)-proline alpha-methyl-5,5-trans-lactam template, which have low nanomolar activity against the viral enzyme.

  2. Beta-D-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium: Role of Glutamate 186 in Catalysis Revealed by Site-directed Mutagenesis, Alternate Substrates, and Inhibitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-D-xylosidase/alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium (SXA) is the most active enzyme known for catalyzing hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-xylooligosaccharides to D-xylose. Catalysis and inhibitor binding by the GH43 beta-xylosidase are governed by the protonation states of catalytic ...

  3. Beta-D-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium: Role of Glutamate 186 in Catalysis Revealed by Site-Directed Mutagenesis, Alternate Substrates, and Active-site Inhibitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-D-xylosidase/alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium (SXA) is the most active enzyme known for catalyzing hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-xylooligosaccharides to D xylose. Catalysis and inhibitor binding by the GH43 beta-xylosidase are governed by the protonation states of catalytic ...

  4. Corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wisotsky, M.J.; Metro, S.J.

    1989-10-31

    A corrosion inhibitor for use in synthetic ester lubricating oils is disclosed. It comprises an effective amount of: at least one aromatic amide; and at least one hydroxy substituted aromatic compound. The corrosion inhibitor thus formed is particularly useful in synthetic ester turbo lubricating oils.

  5. Thrombin-dependent intravascular leukocyte trafficking regulated by fibrin and the platelet receptors GPIb and PAR4.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Zane S; Zarpellon, Alessandro; Alwis, Imala; Yuan, Yuping; McFadyen, James; Ghasemzadeh, Mehran; Schoenwaelder, Simone M; Ruggeri, Zaverio M; Jackson, Shaun P

    2015-01-01

    Thrombin is a central regulator of leukocyte recruitment and inflammation at sites of vascular injury, a function thought to involve primarily endothelial PAR cleavage. Here we demonstrate the existence of a distinct leukocyte-trafficking mechanism regulated by components of the haemostatic system, including platelet PAR4, GPIbα and fibrin. Utilizing a mouse endothelial injury model we show that thrombin cleavage of platelet PAR4 promotes leukocyte recruitment to sites of vascular injury. This process is negatively regulated by GPIbα, as seen in mice with abrogated thrombin-platelet GPIbα binding (hGPIbα(D277N)). In addition, we demonstrate that fibrin limits leukocyte trafficking by forming a physical barrier to intravascular leukocyte migration. These studies demonstrate a distinct 'checkpoint' mechanism of leukocyte trafficking involving balanced thrombin interactions with PAR4, GPIbα and fibrin. Dysregulation of this checkpoint mechanism is likely to contribute to the development of thromboinflammatory disorders.

  6. The cytoplasmic membrane is a primary target for the staphylocidal action of thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein.

    PubMed Central

    Koo, S P; Yeaman, M R; Nast, C C; Bayer, A S

    1997-01-01

    Thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein (tPMP-1) is a small, cationic peptide released from rabbit platelets exposed to thrombin in vitro. tPMP-1 is microbicidal against a broad spectrum of bloodstream pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus. Preliminary evidence suggests that tPMP-1 targets and disrupts the staphylococcal cytoplasmic membrane. However, it is not clear if the cytoplasmic membrane is a direct or indirect target of tPMP-1. Therefore, we assessed the in vitro activity of tPMP-1 versus protoplasts prepared from logarithmic-phase (LOG) or stationary-phase (STAT) cells of the genetically related S. aureus strains 19S and 19R (tPMP-1 susceptible and resistant, respectively). Protoplasts exposed to tPMP-1 (2 microg/ml) for 2 h at 37 degrees C were monitored for lysis (decrease in optical density at 420 nm) and ultrastructural alterations (by transmission electron microscopy [TEM]). Exposure to tPMP-1 resulted in substantial lysis of LOG but not STAT protoplasts of 19S, coinciding with protoplast membrane disruption observed by TEM. Thus, it appears that tPMP-1-induced membrane damage is influenced by the bacterial growth phase but is independent of the staphylococcal cell wall. In contrast to 19S, neither LOG nor STAT protoplasts of 19R were lysed by tPMP-1. tPMP-1-induced membrane damage was further characterized with anionic planar lipid bilayers subjected to various trans-negative voltages. tPMP-1 increased conductance across bilayers at -90 mV but not at -30 mV. Once initiated, a reduction in voltage from -90 to -30 mV diminished conductance magnitude but did not eliminate tPMP-1-mediated membrane permeabilization. Therefore, tPMP-1 appears to directly target the staphylococcal cytoplasmic membrane as a primary event in its mechanism of action. Specifically, tPMP-1 likely leads to staphylococcal death, at least in part by permeabilizing the bacterial membrane in a voltage-dependent manner. PMID:9353067

  7. Novel magnetic Fe3O4@CdSe composite quantum dot-based electrochemiluminescence detection of thrombin by a multiple DNA cycle amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Jie, Guifen; Yuan, Jinxin

    2012-03-20

    A novel small magnetic electrochemiluminescent Fe(3)O(4)@CdSe composite quantum dot (QD) was facilely prepared and successfully applied to sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection of thrombin by a multiple DNA cycle amplification strategy for the first time. The as-prepared composite QDs feature intense ECL, excellent magnetism, strong fluorescence, and favorable biocompatibility, which offers promising advantages for ECL biosensing. ECL of the composite QDs was efficiently quenched by gold nanoparticles (NPs). Taking advantages of the unique and attractive ECL and magnetic characteristics of the composite QDs, a novel DNA-amplified detection method based on ECL quenching was thus developed for a sensitive assay of thrombin. More importantly, the DNA devices by cleavage reaction were cycled multiple rounds, which greatly amplified the ECL signal and much improve the detection sensitivity. This flexible biosensing system exhibits not only high sensitivity and specificity but also excellent performance in real human serum assay. The present work opens a promising approach to develop magnetic quantum dot-based amplified ECL bioassays, which has wider potential application with more favorable analytical performances than other ECL reagent-based systems. Moreover, the composite QDs are suitable for long-term fluorescent cellular imaging, which also highlights the promising directions for further development of QD-based in vitro and in vivo imaging materials.

  8. [Effect of thrombin and prostaglandins E and F on various indices of carbohydrate metabolism in human platelets].

    PubMed

    Makarov, S A; Kudriavtseva, G V; Kolotilova, A I

    1985-01-01

    After incubation of intact thrombocytes with prostaglandins E2 and F2 alpha stimulation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase activities as well as an increase in the rate of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate accumulation were found. Thrombin inhibited the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity by 30% in these thrombocytes. Addition of thrombin, following the incubation of thrombocytes with prostaglandins, removed the activating effect of the prostaglandins on the pentosephosphate pathway reactions, inhibited glutathione reductase and lactate dehydrogenase.

  9. Improved bleeding scores using Gelfoam(®) Powder with incremental concentrations of bovine thrombin in a swine liver lesion model.

    PubMed

    Morse, Dennis C; Silva, Elif; Bartrom, Jolee; Young, Kelli; Bass, Eric J; Potter, David; Bieber, Trevor

    2016-10-01

    Topical hemostatic agents are used intra-operatively to prevent uncontrolled bleeding. Gelfoam(®) Powder contains a hemostatic agent prepared from purified pork skin gelatin, the efficacy of which is increased when combined with thrombin. However, the effect of increasing concentrations of thrombin on resultant hemostasis is not known. This study sought to evaluate the ability of various concentrations of thrombin in combination with Gelfoam Powder to control bleeding using a swine liver lesion model. Ten pigs underwent a midline laparotomy. Circular lesions were created in the left medial, right medial, and left lateral lobes; six lesions per lobe. Gelfoam Powder was hydrated with Thrombin-JMI(®) diluted to 250, 375, and 770 IU/mL. Each concentration was applied to two lesion sites per lobe. Bleeding scores were measured at 3, 6, 9, and 12 min using a 6-point system; comparison of bleeding scores was performed using ANOVA with the post hoc Tukey test. The bleeding scores with thrombin concentrations at 770 IU/mL were significantly lower than at 250 and 375 IU/mL at all four time points. The percentage of biopsies with a clinically acceptable bleeding score rose from 37.9, 46.6, and 71.2 % at 3 min to 55.2, 69.0, and 88.1 % at 12 min in the 250, 375, and 770 IU/mL thrombin groups, respectively. The study showed that the hemostatic response to thrombin was dose-related: using higher concentrations of thrombin with Gelfoam Powder yielded improved hemostasis, as determined by lower bleeding scores. PMID:27334382

  10. Evidence for the presence of a protease-activated receptor distinct from the thrombin receptor in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Santulli, R J; Derian, C K; Darrow, A L; Tomko, K A; Eckardt, A J; Seiberg, M; Scarborough, R M; Andrade-Gordon, P

    1995-01-01

    Thrombin receptor activation was explored in human epidermal keratinocytes and human dermal fibroblasts, cells that are actively involved in skin tissue repair. The effects of thrombin, trypsin, and the receptor agonist peptides SFLLRN and TFRIFD were assessed in inositolphospholipid hydrolysis and calcium mobilization studies. Thrombin and SFLLRN stimulated fibroblasts in both assays to a similar extent, whereas TFRIFD was less potent. Trypsin demonstrated weak efficacy in these assays in comparison with thrombin. Results in fibroblasts were consistent with human platelet thrombin receptor activation. Keratinocytes, however, exhibited a distinct profile, with trypsin being a far better activator of inositolphospholipid hydrolysis and calcium mobilization than thrombin. Furthermore, SFLLRN was more efficacious than thrombin, whereas no response was observed with TFRIFD. Since our data indicated that keratinocytes possess a trypsin-sensitive receptor, we addressed the possibility that these cells express the human homologue of the newly described murine protease-activated receptor, PAR-2 [Nystedt, S., Emilsson, K., Wahlestedt, C. & Sundelin, J. (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91, 9208-9212]. PAR-2 is activated by nanomolar concentrations of trypsin and possesses the tethered ligand sequence SLIGRL. SLIGRL was found to be equipotent with SFLLRN in activating keratinocyte inositolphospholipid hydrolysis and calcium mobilization. Desensitization studies indicated that SFLLRN, SLIGRL, and trypsin activate a common receptor, PAR-2. Northern blot analyses detected a transcript of PAR-2 in total RNA from keratinocytes but not fibroblasts. Levels of thrombin receptor message were equivalent in the two cell types. Our results indicate that human keratinocytes possess PAR-2, suggesting a potential role for this receptor in tissue repair and/or skin-related disorders. Images Fig. 6 PMID:7568091

  11. Differential involvement of thrombin receptors in Ca2+ release from two different intracellular stores in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Jardin, Isaac; Ben Amor, Nidhal; Bartegi, Ahgleb; Pariente, José A; Salido, Ginés M; Rosado, Juan A

    2007-01-01

    Physiological agonists increase cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration to regulate a number of cellular processes. The platelet thrombin receptors, PAR (protease-activated receptor) 1 PAR-4 and GPIb-IX-V (glycoprotein Ib-IX-V) have been described as potential contributors of thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. Platelets present two separate Ca2+ stores, the DTS (dense tubular system) and acidic organelles, differentiated by the distinct sensitivity of their respective SERCAs (sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+-ATPases) to TG (thapsigargin) and TBHQ [2,5-di-(tert-butyl)-1,4-hydroquinone]. However, the involvement of the thrombin receptors in Ca2+ release from each Ca2+ store remains unknown. Depletion of the DTS using ADP, which releases Ca2+ solely from the DTS, in combination with 10 nM TG, to selectively inhibit SERCA2 located on the DTS reduced Ca2+ release evoked by the PAR-1 agonist, SFLLRN, and the PAR-4 agonist, AYPGKF, by 80 and 50% respectively. Desensitization of PAR-1 and PAR-4 or pre-treatment with the PAR-1 and PAR-4 antagonists SCH 79797 and tcY-NH2 reduced Ca2+ mobilization induced by thrombin, and depletion of the DTS after desensitization or blockade of PAR-1 and PAR-4 had no significant effect on Ca2+ release stimulated by thrombin through the GPIb-IX-V receptor. Converse experiments showed that depletion of the acidic stores using TBHQ reduced Ca2+ release evoked by SFLLRN or AYPGKF, by 20 and 50% respectively, and abolished thrombin-stimulated Ca2+ release through the GPIb-IX-V receptor when PAR-1 and PAR-4 had been desensitized or blocked. Our results indicate that thrombin-induced activation of PAR-1 and PAR-4 evokes Ca2+ release from both Ca2+ stores, while activation of GPIb-IX-V by thrombin releases Ca2+ solely from the acidic compartments in human platelets. PMID:16939417

  12. Subnanomolar concentrations of thrombin enhance the volume-sensitive efflux of taurine from human 1321N1 astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Tooba A; Ward, Caroline E; Fisher, Stephen K

    2005-11-01

    The ability of subnanomolar concentrations of thrombin to protect both neurons and glia from ischemia and other metabolic insults has recently been reported. In this study, we demonstrate an additional neuroprotective property of thrombin; its ability to promote the release of the organic osmolyte, taurine, in response to hypoosmotic stress. Incubation of human 1321N1 astrocytoma cells with hypo-osmolar buffers (320-227 mOsM) resulted in a time-dependent release of taurine. Inclusion of thrombin (EC(50) = 60 pM) resulted in a marked increase in taurine efflux that, although evident under isotonic conditions (340 mOsM), was maximal at an osmolarity of 270 mOsM (3-4-fold stimulation). Thrombin-stimulated taurine efflux was dependent upon its protease activity and could be mimicked by addition of the peptide SFLLRN, a proteinase activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) subtype-specific ligand. Inclusion of anion channel blockers known to inhibit the volume-sensitive organic osmolyte anion channel attenuated thrombin-stimulated taurine release. Depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) with either 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA) or thapsigargin, or alternatively, inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) with bisindolylmaleimide or chelerythrine resulted in a 30 to 50% inhibition of thrombin-stimulated taurine efflux. Under conditions in which intracellular Ca(2+) was depleted and PKC activity inhibited, thrombin-stimulated taurine efflux was reduced by >85%. The results indicate that activation of PAR-1 receptors by thrombin facilitates the ability of 1321N1 astrocytoma cells to release osmolytes in response to a reduction in osmolarity via a mechanism that is dependent on intracellular Ca(2+) and PKC activity. PMID:16051696

  13. Differential involvement of thrombin receptors in Ca2+ release from two different intracellular stores in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Jardin, Isaac; Ben Amor, Nidhal; Bartegi, Ahgleb; Pariente, José A.; Salido, Ginés M.; Rosado, Juan A.

    2006-01-01

    Physiological agonists increase cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration to regulate a number of cellular processes. The platelet thrombin receptors, PAR (protease-activated receptor) 1 PAR-4 and GPIb-IX-V (glycoprotein Ib-IX-V) have been described as potential contributors of thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. Platelets present two separate Ca2+ stores, the DTS (dense tubular system) and acidic organelles, differentiated by the distinct sensitivity of their respective SERCAs (sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+-ATPases) to TG (thapsigargin) and TBHQ [2,5-di-(tert-butyl)-1,4-hydroquinone]. However, the involvement of the thrombin receptors in Ca2+ release from each Ca2+ store remains unknown. Depletion of the DTS using ADP, which releases Ca2+ solely from the DTS, in combination with 10 nM TG, to selectively inhibit SERCA2 located on the DTS reduced Ca2+ release evoked by the PAR-1 agonist, SFLLRN, and the PAR-4 agonist, AYPGKF, by 80 and 50% respectively. Desensitization of PAR-1 and PAR-4 or pre-treatment with the PAR-1 and PAR-4 antagonists SCH 79797 and tcY-NH2 reduced Ca2+ mobilization induced by thrombin, and depletion of the DTS after desensitization or blockade of PAR-1 and PAR-4 had no significant effect on Ca2+ release stimulated by thrombin through the GPIb-IX-V receptor. Converse experiments showed that depletion of the acidic stores using TBHQ reduced Ca2+ release evoked by SFLLRN or AYPGKF, by 20 and 50% respectively, and abolished thrombin-stimulated Ca2+ release through the GPIb-IX-V receptor when PAR-1 and PAR-4 had been desensitized or blocked. Our results indicate that thrombin-induced activation of PAR-1 and PAR-4 evokes Ca2+ release from both Ca2+ stores, while activation of GPIb-IX-V by thrombin releases Ca2+ solely from the acidic compartments in human platelets. PMID:16939417

  14. Thrombin generation by exposure of blood to endotoxin: a simple model to study disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Stief, T W

    2006-04-01

    Pathologic disseminated intravascular coagulation (PDIC) is a serious complication in sepsis. In an in-vitro system consisting of incubation of fresh citrated blood with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) or glucans and subsequent plasma recalcification plasmatic thrombin was quantified. Five hundred microliters of freshly drawn citrated blood of healthy donors were incubated with up to 800 ng/mL LPS (Escherichia coli) or up to 80 microg/mL Zymosan A (ZyA; Candida albicans) for 30 minutes at room temperature (RT). The samples were centrifuged, and 30 microL plasma were recalcified with 1 volume or less of CaCl(2) (25 micromoles Ca(2+)/mL plasma). After 0 to 12 minutes (37 degrees C), 20 microL 2.5 M arginine, pH 8.6, were added. Thirty microliters 0.9 mM HD-CHG-Ala-Arg-pNA in 2.3 M arginine were added, and the absorbance increase at 405 nm was determined. Fifty microliters plasma were also incubated with 5 microL 250 mM CaCl2 for 5, 10, or 15 minutes (37 degrees C). Fifty microliters 2.5 M arginine stops coagulation, and 50 microL 0.77 mM HD-CHG-Ala-Arg-pNA in 2.3 M arginine starts the thrombin detection. The standard was 1 IU/mL thrombin in 7% human albumin instead of plasma. Arginine was also added in the endotoxin exposure time (EET) or in the plasma coagulation reaction time (CRT). Tissue factor (TF)-antigen and soluble CD14 were determined. LPS at blood concentrations greater than 10 ng/mL or ZyA at greater than 1 microg/mL severalfold enhance thrombin generation, when the respective plasmas are recalcified. After 30 minutes EET at RT, the thrombin activity at 12 minutes CRT generated by the addition of 200 ng/mL LPS or 20 microg/mL ZyA is approximately 200 mIU/mL compared to approximately 20 mIU/mL without addition of endotoxin, or compared to about 7 mIU/mL thrombin at 0 minutes CRT. Arginine added to blood or to plasma inhibits thrombin generation; the inhibitory concentration 50% (IC 50) is approximately 15 mM plasma concentration. Endotoxin incubation of blood

  15. [Expression of snake venom thrombin-like enzyme calobin in Pichia pastoris].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shengling; Wang, Peng; Tao, Haoxia; Zhan, Dewen; Wang, Yanchun; Wang, Lingchun; Liu, Chunjie; Zhang, Zhaoshan

    2009-04-01

    Thrombin-like enzymes (TLEs) are studied widely because of their therapeutic potential in myocardial infarction and thrombotic diseases. We synthesized the DNA fragment encoding thrombin-like enzyme calobin from Agkistrodon caliginosus (Korean Viper) venom by fusion PCR and expressed it in Pichia pastoris. After induction by 0.5% methanol for 48 h, the expression level of recombinant calobin reached 3.5 g/L in medium. The recombinant calobin was purified by Q-Sepharose Fast Flow ion-exchange chromatography and Sephacryl-S-100 gel filtration chromatography. Purified sample had a molecular weight of 32 kD shown in SDS-PAGE. It hydrolyzed fibrinogen and formed a light white hydrolysis circle in fibrinogen plate. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that recombinant calobin cleaved Aalpha-chain of fibrinogen specifically, and produced an appropriately 40 kD new band. However, we failed to find its fibrin-clot formation activity. PMID:19637626

  16. Thrombin receptor agonist Peptide immobilized in microspheres stimulates reparative processes in rats with gastric ulcer.

    PubMed

    Rusanova, A V; Makarova, A M; Strukova, S M; Markvicheva, E A; Gorbachyova, L R; Stashevskaya, K S; Vasil'eva, T V; Sidorova, E I; Bespalova, Zh D; Grandfils, Ch

    2006-07-01

    The effect of synthetic thrombin receptor (PAR1) agonist peptide encapsulated in microspheres made of lactic and glycolic acid copolymer on tissue reparation was studied in rats with acetate-induced ulcer. PAR1 agonist peptide was immobilized in biodegraded lactic and glycolic acid microspheres by double emulgation, the kinetics of peptide release was analyzed, and the dynamics of ulcer healing was studied in experimental (administration of microspheres with the peptide into the stomach) and two control groups (administration of saline or spheres without peptide). Thrombin receptor agonist peptide gradually released from lactic and glycolic acid microspheres into the stomach shortened the inflammation phase and shifted the proliferation phase to the earlier period, thus accelerating healing of experimental ulcers in rats. PMID:17369897

  17. Trypsin, Tryptase, and Thrombin Polarize Macrophages towards a Pro-Fibrotic M2a Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    White, Michael J. V.; Gomer, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    For both wound healing and the formation of a fibrotic lesion, circulating monocytes enter the tissue and differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes and pro-fibrotic M2a macrophages, which together with fibroblasts form scar tissue. Monocytes can also differentiate into classically activated M1 macrophages and alternatively activated M2 macrophages. The proteases thrombin, which is activated during blood clotting, and tryptase, which is released by activated mast cells, potentiate fibroblast proliferation and fibrocyte differentiation, but their effect on macrophages is unknown. Here we report that thrombin, tryptase, and the protease trypsin bias human macrophage differentiation towards a pro-fibrotic M2a phenotype expressing high levels of galectin-3 from unpolarized monocytes, or from M1 and M2 macrophages, and that these effects appear to operate through protease-activated receptors. These results suggest that proteases can initiate scar tissue formation by affecting fibroblasts, fibrocytes, and macrophages. PMID:26407067