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Sample records for direct-conversion flat-panel imager

  1. Direct-conversion flat-panel x-ray imaging: reduction of noise by presampling filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, John A.; Ji, Winston G.; Zhao, Wei; Lee, Denny L. Y.

    2000-04-01

    Large area flat panel solid-state detectors are being studied for digital radiography and fluoroscopy. Such systems use active matrix arrays to readout latent charge images created either by direct conversion of x-ray energy to charge in a photoconductor or indirectly using a phosphor and individual photodiodes on the active matrix array. Our work has utilized the direct conversion method because of its simplicity and the higher resolution possible due to the electrostatic collection of secondary quanta. Aliasing of noise occurs in current designs of direct detectors based on amorphous selenium ((alpha) -Se) because of its high intrinsic resolution. This aliasing leads to a decrease in detective quantum efficiency (DQE) as frequency increases. It has been predicted, using a previously developed model of the complete imaging system, that appropriately controlled spatial filtration can reduce this aliased noise and hence increase DQE at the Nyquist frequency, fNY. Our purpose is to experimentally verify this concept by implementing presampling filtration in a practical flat panel system. An (alpha) -Se based flat panel imager is modified by incorporating an insulating layer between the active matrix and the (alpha) -Se layer to introduce a predetermined amount of presampling burring. The modified imager is evaluated using standard linear analysis tools, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS) and DQE(f), and the results are compared to theoretical predictions.

  2. Direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain: feasibility investigation for HARP-AMFPI.

    PubMed

    Wronski, M M; Rowlands, J A

    2008-12-01

    The authors are investigating the concept of a direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain for low-dose x-ray imaging. It consists of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor partitioned into a thick drift region for x-ray-to-charge conversion and a relatively thin region called high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP) in which the charge undergoes avalanche multiplication. An active matrix of thin film transistors is used to read out the electronic image. The authors call the proposed imager HARP active matrix flat panel imager (HARP-AMFPI). The key advantages of HARP-AMFPI are its high spatial resolution, owing to the direct-conversion a-Se layer, and its programmable avalanche gain, which can be enabled during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise and disabled during high dose radiography to prevent saturation of the detector elements. This article investigates key design considerations for HARP-AMFPI. The effects of electronic noise on the imaging performance of HARP-AMFPI were modeled theoretically and system parameters were optimized for radiography and fluoroscopy. The following imager properties were determined as a function of avalanche gain: (1) the spatial frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency; (2) fill factor; (3) dynamic range and linearity; and (4) gain nonuniformities resulting from electric field strength nonuniformities. The authors results showed that avalanche gains of 5 and 20 enable x-ray quantum noise limited performance throughout the entire exposure range in radiography and fluoroscopy, respectively. It was shown that HARP-AMFPI can provide the required gain while maintaining a 100% effective fill factor and a piecewise dynamic range over five orders of magnitude (10(-7)-10(-2) R/frame). The authors have also shown that imaging performance is not significantly affected by the following: electric field strength nonuniformities, avalanche noise for x-ray energies above 1 keV and direct interaction

  3. Direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain: Feasibility investigation for HARP-AMFPI

    SciTech Connect

    Wronski, M. M.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-12-15

    The authors are investigating the concept of a direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain for low-dose x-ray imaging. It consists of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor partitioned into a thick drift region for x-ray-to-charge conversion and a relatively thin region called high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP) in which the charge undergoes avalanche multiplication. An active matrix of thin film transistors is used to read out the electronic image. The authors call the proposed imager HARP active matrix flat panel imager (HARP-AMFPI). The key advantages of HARP-AMFPI are its high spatial resolution, owing to the direct-conversion a-Se layer, and its programmable avalanche gain, which can be enabled during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise and disabled during high dose radiography to prevent saturation of the detector elements. This article investigates key design considerations for HARP-AMFPI. The effects of electronic noise on the imaging performance of HARP-AMFPI were modeled theoretically and system parameters were optimized for radiography and fluoroscopy. The following imager properties were determined as a function of avalanche gain: (1) the spatial frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency; (2) fill factor; (3) dynamic range and linearity; and (4) gain nonuniformities resulting from electric field strength nonuniformities. The authors results showed that avalanche gains of 5 and 20 enable x-ray quantum noise limited performance throughout the entire exposure range in radiography and fluoroscopy, respectively. It was shown that HARP-AMFPI can provide the required gain while maintaining a 100% effective fill factor and a piecewise dynamic range over five orders of magnitude (10{sup -7}-10{sup -2} R/frame). The authors have also shown that imaging performance is not significantly affected by the following: electric field strength nonuniformities, avalanche noise for x-ray energies above 1 keV and direct

  4. Amorphous and Polycrystalline Photoconductors for Direct Conversion Flat Panel X-Ray Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kasap, Safa; Frey, Joel B.; Belev, George; Tousignant, Olivier; Mani, Habib; Greenspan, Jonathan; Laperriere, Luc; Bubon, Oleksandr; Reznik, Alla; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Karim, Karim S.; Rowlands, John A.

    2011-01-01

    In the last ten to fifteen years there has been much research in using amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors as x-ray photoconductors in various x-ray image sensor applications, most notably in flat panel x-ray imagers (FPXIs). We first outline the essential requirements for an ideal large area photoconductor for use in a FPXI, and discuss how some of the current amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors fulfill these requirements. At present, only stabilized amorphous selenium (doped and alloyed a-Se) has been commercialized, and FPXIs based on a-Se are particularly suitable for mammography, operating at the ideal limit of high detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Further, these FPXIs can also be used in real-time, and have already been used in such applications as tomosynthesis. We discuss some of the important attributes of amorphous and polycrystalline x-ray photoconductors such as their large area deposition ability, charge collection efficiency, x-ray sensitivity, DQE, modulation transfer function (MTF) and the importance of the dark current. We show the importance of charge trapping in limiting not only the sensitivity but also the resolution of these detectors. Limitations on the maximum acceptable dark current and the corresponding charge collection efficiency jointly impose a practical constraint that many photoconductors fail to satisfy. We discuss the case of a-Se in which the dark current was brought down by three orders of magnitude by the use of special blocking layers to satisfy the dark current constraint. There are also a number of polycrystalline photoconductors, HgI2 and PbO being good examples, that show potential for commercialization in the same way that multilayer stabilized a-Se x-ray photoconductors were developed for commercial applications. We highlight the unique nature of avalanche multiplication in a-Se and how it has led to the development of the commercial HARP video-tube. An all solid state version of the HARP has been

  5. [Correlation between basic imaging properties and subjective evaluations of two digital radiographic X-ray systems based on direct-conversion flat panel detector].

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Taro; Katayama, Reiji; Morishita, Junji; Sakai, Shinji; Kuroki, Hidefumi; Ohkubo, Seiji; Maeda, Takashi; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2010-11-20

    The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the basic imaging properties of two digital radiographic X-ray systems with a direct conversion flat-panel detector and their image qualities, which were evaluated by the observer in hard copy and soft copy studies. The subjective image quality was evaluated and compared in terms of the low-contrast detectability and image sharpness in the two digital radiographic X-ray systems. We applied the radiographs of a contrast detail phantom to the evaluation of low-contrast detectability and analyzed the contrast detail diagrams. Finally, low-contrast detectability was evaluated by the image quality figure (IQF) calculated from the contrast detail diagrams. Also, the subjective image sharpness of human dry bones of two systems was examined and evaluated by the normalized-rank method. The results indicated that System A tended to provide superior subjective image quality compared to System B in both observer studies. We also found high correlations between IQFs and basic imaging properties, such as the noise power spectrum (NPS) and the noise equivalent quantum (NEQ). In conclusion, the low-contrast detectability of the two digital radiographic X-ray systems with a direct conversion flat-panel detector corresponded to the NPS and the NEQ in both outputs (soft copy and hard copy). On the other hand, the subjective image sharpness of human dry bones was affected by their noise properties.

  6. TU-F-18C-02: Increasing Amorphous Selenium Thickness in Direct Conversion Flat-Panel Imagers for Contrast-Enhanced Dual-Energy Breast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Scaduto, DA; Hu, Y-H; Zhao, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Contrast-enhanced (CE) breast imaging using iodinated contrast agents requires imaging with x-ray spectra at energies greater than those used in mammography. Optimizing amorphous selenium (a-Se) flat panel imagers (FPI) for this higher energy range may increase lesion conspicuity. Methods: We compare imaging performance of a conventional FPI with 200 μm a-Se conversion layer to a prototype FPI with 300 μm a-Se layer. Both detectors are evaluated in a Siemens MAMMOMAT Inspiration prototype digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system using low-energy (W/Rh 28 kVp) and high-energy (W/Cu 49 kVp) x-ray spectra. Detectability of iodinated lesions in dual-energy images is evaluated using an iodine contrast phantom. Effects of beam obliquity are investigated in projection and reconstructed images using different reconstruction methods. The ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio is used as a figure-of-merit to predict the optimal a-Se thickness for CE lesion detectability without compromising conventional full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and DBT performance. Results: Increasing a-Se thickness from 200 μm to 300 μm preserves imaging performance at typical mammographic energies (e.g. W/Rh 28 kVp), and improves the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for high energy (W/Cu 49 kVp) by 30%. While the more penetrating high-energy x-ray photons increase geometric blur due to beam obliquity in the FPI with thicker a-Se layer, the effect on lesion detectability in FBP reconstructions is negligible due to the reconstruction filters employed. Ideal observer SNR for CE objects shows improvements in in-plane detectability with increasing a-Se thicknesses, though small lesion detectability begins to degrade in oblique projections for a-Se thickness above 500 μm. Conclusion: Increasing a-Se thickness in direct conversion FPI from 200 μm to 300 μm improves lesion detectability in CE breast imaging with virtually no cost to conventional FFDM and DBT. This work was partially

  7. Direct-conversion flat-panel detector for region-of-interest angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Arundhuti; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Yang, Chang-Ying J.; Wang, Zhou

    2001-06-01

    Minimally invasive image-guided interventions require very high image resolution and quality, specifically over regions-of-interest (ROI) crucial to the procedure. An ROI high quality image allows limited patient radiation deposition while permitting rapid frame transfer rates. Considering current developments in direct conversion Flat Panel Detectors (FPD), advantages of such an imager for ROI angiography were investigated. The performance of an amorphous-selenium based FPD was simulated to evaluate improvements in MTF and DQE under various angiographic imaging conditions. The detector envisioned incorporates the smallest pixel size of 70 mm, reported to date, and a photoconductor thickness of 1000 mm to permit angiography. The MTF of the FPD is calculated to be 60% at the Nyquist frequency of 7.1 lp/mm compared to 6% for a previously reported CsI(Tl)-based ROI CCD camera. The DQE(0) of the FPD at 0.7 mR and 70 kVp is 74% while for the CCD camera is 70%. At 7.1 lp/mm, the FPD's DQE is 26% while for the CCD camera it is 12%. Images of an undeployed stent with 70 mm pixel mammography FPD prototype, compare favorably with images acquired with the CCD camera. Thus a practical direct flat-panel ROI detector with both improved performance and physical size is proposed.

  8. Comparison of a-Se direct-conversion and CsI(Tl) indirect-conversion flat-panel digital detectors: a clinical assessment of image quality for general radiography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barski, Lori L.; Wang, Xiaohui; Wandtke, John; Waldman, David; Davis, Delphine; Foos, David H.; Dupin, Michael; Huang, Weidong; Yorkston, John

    2006-03-01

    An observer study was conducted to compare the diagnostic quality of human-subject images obtained using a-Se (amorphous selenium) and CsI(Tl) (thalium-doped cesium iodide) flat-panel detectors. Each detector was attached to an X-ray source and gantry equipment of similar configuration and was installed in a university hospital radiology department in X-ray rooms within close proximity. One hundred image pairs that represent a stratified sampling of exam types were acquired. For a particular subject, image pairs were captured of the same body part and projection, using each of the two detectors. The images comprising a pair were captured within a few minutes of each other. Using manual exposure methods, the images were captured with technique factors that correspond to average exposure levels equivalent to approximately a 400-speed screen-film system. Raw image data from both digital radiography systems was stored to a research workstation. To achieve images having the same appearance, the same image-processing software was used to render the data from both systems, although different parameters were used in the frequency processing to account for the different MTF and noise properties of the CsI(Tl) and a-Se detectors. The processed images were evaluated by radiologists who used a research workstation that was equipped with a 3 MP flat-panel monitor, and software to facilitate the image comparisons. Radiologists used subjective rank-order criteria to evaluate overall diagnostic quality and preference. Radiologists' ratings indicate that both detectors produce images that have comparable satisfactory diagnostic quality for images captured using exposure technique factors that correspond to a 400-speed screen-film system, but the CsI(Tl) detector produces significantly higher preference, especially for larger and denser exam types.

  9. Technical advances of interventional fluoroscopy and flat panel image receptor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Jan Paul

    2008-11-01

    In the past decade, various radiation reducing devices and control circuits have been implemented on fluoroscopic imaging equipment. Because of the potential for lengthy fluoroscopic procedures in interventional cardiovascular angiography, these devices and control circuits have been developed for the cardiac catheterization laboratories and interventional angiography suites. Additionally, fluoroscopic systems equipped with image intensifiers have benefited from technological advances in x-ray tube, x-ray generator, and spectral shaping filter technologies. The high heat capacity x-ray tube, the medium frequency inverter generator with high performance switching capability, and the patient dose reduction spectral shaping filter had already been implemented on the image intensified fluoroscopy systems. These three underlying technologies together with the automatic dose rate and image quality (ADRIQ) control logic allow patients undergoing cardiovascular angiography procedures to benefit from "lower patient dose" with "high image quality." While photoconductor (or phosphor plate) x-ray detectors and signal capture thin film transistor (TFT) and charge coupled device (CCD) arrays are analog in nature, the advent of the flat panel image receptor allowed for fluoroscopy procedures to become more streamlined. With the analog-to-digital converter built into the data lines, the flat panel image receptor appears to become a digital device. While the transition from image intensified fluoroscopy systems to flat panel image receptor fluoroscopy systems is part of the on-going "digitization of imaging," the value of a flat panel image receptor may have to be evaluated with respect to patient dose, image quality, and clinical application capabilities. The advantage of flat panel image receptors has yet to be fully explored. For instance, the flat panel image receptor has its disadvantages as compared to the image intensifiers; the cost of the equipment is probably the most

  10. The Usefulness of Three-Dimensional Angiography with a Flat Panel Detector of Direct Conversion Type in a Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization Procedure for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kakeda, Shingo Korogi, Yukunori; Hatakeyama, Yoshihisa; Ohnari, Norihiro; Oda, Nobuhiro; Nishino, Kazuyoshi; Miyamoto, Wataru

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of a three-dimensional (3D) angiography system using a flat panel detector of direct conversion type in treatments with subsegmental transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). Thirty-six consecutive patients who underwent hepatic angiography were prospectively examined. First, two radiologists evaluated the degree of visualization of the peripheral branches of the hepatic arteries on 3D digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Then the radiologists evaluated the visualization of tumor staining and feeding arteries in 25 patients (30 HCCs) who underwent subsegmental TACE. The two radiologists who performed the TACE assessed whether the additional information provided by 3D DSA was useful for treatments. In 34 (94.4%) of 36 patients, the subsegmental branches of the hepatic arteries were sufficiently visualized. The feeding arteries of HCCs were sufficiently visualized in 28 (93%) of 30 HCCs, whereas tumor stains were sufficiently visualized in 18 (60%). Maximum intensity projection images were significantly superior to volume recording images for visualization of the tumor staining and feeding arteries of HCCs. In 27 (90%) of 30 HCCs, 3D DSA provided additional useful information for subsegmental TACE. The high-quality 3D DSA with flat panel detector angiography system provided a precise vascular road map, which was useful for performing subsegmental TACE .of HCCs.

  11. Solid-state flat panel imager with avalanche amorphous selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Howansky, Adrian; Goldan, Amir H.; Tousignant, Olivier; Levéille, Sébastien; Tanioka, K.; Zhao, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPI) have become the dominant detector technology for digital radiography and fluoroscopy. For low dose imaging, electronic noise from the amorphous silicon thin film transistor (TFT) array degrades imaging performance. We have fabricated the first prototype solid-state AMFPI using a uniform layer of avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor to amplify the signal to eliminate the effect of electronic noise. We have previously developed a large area solid-state avalanche a-Se sensor structure referred to as High Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP) capable of achieving gains of 75. In this work we successfully deposited this HARP structure onto a 24 x 30 cm2 TFT array with a pixel pitch of 85 μm. An electric field (ESe) up to 105 Vμm-1 was applied across the a-Se layer without breakdown. Using the HARP layer as a direct detector, an X-ray avalanche gain of 15 +/- 3 was achieved at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. In indirect mode with a 150 μm thick structured CsI scintillator, an optical gain of 76 +/- 5 was measured at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. Image quality at low dose increases with the avalanche gain until the electronic noise is overcome at a constant exposure level of 0.76 mR. We demonstrate the success of a solid-state HARP X-ray imager as well as the largest active area HARP sensor to date.

  12. Solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors and their physical imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cowen, A R; Kengyelics, S M; Davies, A G

    2008-05-01

    Solid-state, digital radiography (DR) detectors, designed specifically for standard projection radiography, emerged just before the turn of the millennium. This new generation of digital image detector comprises a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material combined with an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a thin film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). DR detectors can offer both efficient (low-dose) x-ray image acquisition plus on-line readout of the latent image as electronic data. To date, solid-state, flat-panel, DR detectors have come in two principal designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator-based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor-based) types. This review describes the underlying principles and enabling technologies exploited by these designs of detector, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing performance both against each other and computed radiography (CR). In standard projection radiography indirect conversion DR detectors currently offer superior physical image quality and dose efficiency compared with direct conversion DR and modern point-scan CR. These conclusions have been confirmed in the findings of clinical evaluations of DR detectors. Future trends in solid-state DR detector technologies are also briefly considered. Salient innovations include WiFi-enabled, portable DR detectors, improvements in x-ray absorber layers and developments in alternative electronic media to a-Si:H. PMID:18374710

  13. Calibration of an amorphous-silicon flat panel portal imager for exit-beam dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Josephine; Chuang, Cynthia F.; Morin, Olivier; Aubin, Michele; Pouliot, Jean

    2006-03-15

    Amorphous-silicon flat panel detectors are currently used to acquire digital portal images with excellent image quality for patient alignment before external beam radiation therapy. As a first step towards interpreting portal images acquired during treatment in terms of the actual dose delivered to the patient, a calibration method is developed to convert flat panel portal images to the equivalent water dose deposited in the detector plane and at a depth of 1.5 cm. The method is based on empirical convolution models of dose deposition in the flat panel detector and in water. A series of calibration experiments comparing the response of the flat panel imager and ion chamber measurements of dose in water determines the model parameters. Kernels derived from field size measurements account for the differences in the production and detection of scattered radiation in the two systems. The dissimilar response as a function of beam energy spectrum is characterized from measurements performed at various off-axis positions and for increasing attenuator thickness in the beam. The flat panel pixel inhomogeneity is corrected by comparing a large open field image with profiles measured in water. To verify the accuracy of the calibration method, calibrated flat panel profiles were compared with measured dose profiles for fields delivered through solid water slabs, a solid water phantom containing an air cavity, and an anthropomorphic head phantom. Open rectangular fields of various sizes and locations as well as a multileaf collimator-shaped field were delivered. For all but the smallest field centered about the central axis, the calibrated flat panel profiles matched the measured dose profiles with little or no systematic deviation and approximately 3% (two standard deviations) accuracy for the in-field region. The calibrated flat panel profiles for fields located off the central axis showed a small -1.7% systematic deviation from the measured profiles for the in-field region

  14. MTF analysis for coded aperture imaging in a flat panel display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Sungjoo; Han, Jae-Joon; Park, Dusik

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we analyze the modulation transfer function (MTF) of coded aperture imaging in a flat panel display. The flat panel display with a sensor panel forms lens-less multi-view cameras through the imaging pattern of the modified redundant arrays (MURA) on the display panel. To analyze the MTF of the coded aperture imaging implemented on the display panel, we first mathematically model the encoding process of coded aperture imaging, where the projected image on the sensor panel is modeled as a convolution of the scaled object and a function of the imaging pattern. Then, system point spread function is determined by incorporating a decoding process which is dependent on the pixel pitch of the display screen and the decoding function. Finally, the MTF of the system is derived by the magnitude of the Fourier transform of the determined system point spread function. To demonstrate the validity of the mathematically derived MTF in the system, we build a coded aperture imaging system that can capture the scene in front of the display, where the system consists of a display screen and a sensor panel. Experimental results show that the derived MTF of coded aperture imaging in a flat panel display system well corresponds to the measured MTF.

  15. Using Flat-Panel Perfusion Imaging to Measure Cerebral Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Jung; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chang, Feng-Chi; Hung, Sheng-Che; Chen, Ko-Kung; Yu, Deuerling-Zheng; Wu, Chun-Hsien Frank; Liou, Jy-Kang Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Flat-detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) imaging has demonstrated efficacy in qualitatively accessing the penumbra in acute stroke equivalent to that of magnetic resonance perfusion (MRP). The aim of our study was to evaluate the feasibility of quantifying oligemia in the brain in patients with carotid stenosis. Ten patients with unilateral carotid stenosis of >70% were included. All MRPs and FD-CTPs were performed before stenting. Region-of-interests (ROIs) including middle cerebral artery territory at basal ganglia level on both stenotic and contralateral sides were used for quantitative analysis. Relative time to peak (rTTP) was defined as TTP of the stenotic side divided by TTP of the contralateral side, and so as relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), relative mean transit time (rMTT), and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Absolute and relative TTP, CBV, MTT, CBF between two modalities were compared. For absolute quantitative analysis, the correlation of TTP was highest (r = 0.56), followed by CBV (r = 0.47), MTT (r = 0.47), and CBF (r = 0.43); for relative quantitative analysis, rCBF was the highest (r = 0.79), followed by rTTP (r = 0.75) and rCBV (r = 0.50). We confirmed that relative quantitative assessment of FD-CTP is feasible in chronic ischemic disease. Absolute quantitative measurements between MRP and FD-CTP only expressed moderate correlations. Optimization of acquisitions and algorithms is warranted to achieve better quantification. PMID:27196456

  16. Tracking brachytherapy sources using emission imaging with one flat panel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Song Haijun; Bowsher, James; Das, Shiva; Yin Fangfang

    2009-04-15

    This work proposes to use the radiation from brachytherapy sources to track their dwell positions in three-dimensional (3D) space. The prototype device uses a single flat panel detector and a BB tray. The BBs are arranged in a defined pattern. The shadow of the BBs on the flat panel is analyzed to derive the 3D coordinates of the illumination source, i.e., the dwell position of the brachytherapy source. A kilovoltage x-ray source located 3.3 m away was used to align the center BB with the center pixel on the flat panel detector. For a test plan of 11 dwell positions, with an Ir-192 high dose rate unit, one projection was taken for each dwell point, and locations of the BB shadows were manually identified on the projection images. The 3D coordinates for the 11 dwell positions were reconstructed based on two BBs. The distances between dwell points were compared with the expected values. The average difference was 0.07 cm with a standard deviation of 0.15 cm. With automated BB shadow recognition in the future, this technique possesses the potential of tracking the 3D trajectory and the dwell times of a brachytherapy source in real time, enabling real time source position verification.

  17. Dynamic flat panel detector versus image intensifier in cardiac imaging: dose and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Geiger, B.; Schreiner, A.; Back, C.; Beissel, J.

    2005-12-01

    The practical aspects of the dosimetric and imaging performance of a digital x-ray system for cardiology procedures were evaluated. The system was configured with an image intensifier (II) and later upgraded to a dynamic flat panel detector (FD). Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to phantoms of 16, 20, 24 and 28 cm of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the image quality of a test object were measured. Images were evaluated directly on the monitor and with numerical methods (noise and signal-to-noise ratio). Information contained in the DICOM header for dosimetry audit purposes was also tested. ESAK values per frame (or kerma rate) for the most commonly used cine and fluoroscopy modes for different PMMA thicknesses and for field sizes of 17 and 23 cm for II, and 20 and 25 cm for FD, produced similar results in the evaluated system with both technologies, ranging between 19 and 589 µGy/frame (cine) and 5 and 95 mGy min-1 (fluoroscopy). Image quality for these dose settings was better for the FD version. The 'study dosimetric report' is comprehensive, and its numerical content is sufficiently accurate. There is potential in the future to set those systems with dynamic FD to lower doses than are possible in the current II versions, especially for digital cine runs, or to benefit from improved image quality.

  18. AAPM/RSNA physics tutorial for residents: physics of flat-panel fluoroscopy systems: Survey of modern fluoroscopy imaging: flat-panel detectors versus image intensifiers and more.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, Edward Lee

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the design and operation of both flat-panel detector (FPD) and image intensifier fluoroscopy systems. The different components of each imaging chain and their functions are explained and compared. FPD systems have multiple advantages such as a smaller size, extended dynamic range, no spatial distortion, and greater stability. However, FPD systems typically have the same spatial resolution for all fields of view (FOVs) and are prone to ghosting. Image intensifier systems have better spatial resolution with the use of smaller FOVs (magnification modes) and tend to be less expensive. However, the spatial resolution of image intensifier systems is limited by the television system to which they are coupled. Moreover, image intensifier systems are degraded by glare, vignetting, spatial distortions, and defocusing effects. FPD systems do not have these problems. Some recent innovations to fluoroscopy systems include automated filtration, pulsed fluoroscopy, automatic positioning, dose-area product meters, and improved automatic dose rate control programs. Operator-selectable features may affect both the patient radiation dose and image quality; these selectable features include dose level setting, the FOV employed, fluoroscopic pulse rates, geometric factors, display software settings, and methods to reduce the imaging time.

  19. Indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain: Fundamental feasibility investigation for SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Wei; Li Dan; Reznik, Alla; Lui, B.J.M.; Hunt, D.C.; Rowlands, J.A.; Ohkawa, Yuji; Tanioka, Kenkichi

    2005-09-15

    An indirect flat-panel imager (FPI) with avalanche gain is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI(Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The final electronic image is read out using an active matrix array of thin film transistors (TFT). We call the proposed detector SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager). The advantage of the SHARP-AMFPI is its programmable gain, which can be turned on during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise, and turned off during high dose radiography to avoid pixel saturation. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the important design considerations for SHARP-AMFPI such as avalanche gain, which depends on both the thickness d{sub Se} and the applied electric field E{sub Se} of the HARP layer. To determine the optimal design parameter and operational conditions for HARP, we measured the E{sub Se} dependence of both avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency of an 8 {mu}m HARP layer. The results were used in a physical model of HARP as well as a linear cascaded model of the FPI to determine the following x-ray imaging properties in both the avalanche and nonavalanche modes as a function of E{sub Se}: (1) total gain (which is the product of avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency); (2) linearity; (3) dynamic range; (4) gain nonuniformity resulting from thickness nonuniformity; and (5) effects of direct x-ray interaction in HARP. Our results showed that a HARP layer thickness of 8 {mu}m can provide adequate avalanche gain and sufficient dynamic range for x-ray imaging applications to permit quantum limited operation over the range of exposures needed for radiography and fluoroscopy.

  20. Evaluation of the quality of CT-like images obtained using a commercial flat panel detector system

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, JM; Sutton, DG; Houston, JG

    2006-01-01

    Purpose The development of flat panel detector technology has resulted in renewed interest in the possibility of generating CT-like images from rotational angiographic acquisitions. At least two commercial products now use cone beam reconstruction software in conjunction with flat panel detectors to produce such images. The purpose of the work presented here is to report on image quality obtained from one such system in objective and subjective terms and to compare it with the quality of images obtained from a modern multi-detector CT scanner. Method The Image quality was assessed using a CATPHAN 500 model and an AAPM CT Performance Phantom model. Image noise, CT number accuracy, CT number consistency, Low Contrast Resolution, surface dose and Modulation Transfer Function were assessed for the flat panel detector and compared with results obtained from a 4 slice CT scanner. Results As expected image quality obtained from the CT scanner was much better than from the flat panel detector. Low contrast resolution was much worse and the surface dose was higher for the flat panel detector than the CT scanner. There was an inaccuracy in CT number determination and the noise was greater by a factor of two or three. Limiting resolution was better on images from the CT scanner. Conclusion The poor low contrast resolution from flat panel detector was expected given the expected resolution of ±10 Hounsfield Units. These systems should not be considered as diagnostic CT scanners. However, the remaining performance figures indicate that the CT-like images obtained from this type of equipment are of sufficient quality for at least some clinical applications, such as detection of brain haemorrhages in the vascular suite. PMID:21614331

  1. Image quality assessment of a pre-clinical flat-panel volumetric micro-CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Louise Y.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Holdsworth, David W.

    2006-03-01

    Small animal imaging has recently become an area of increased interest because more human diseases can be modeled in transgenic and knockout rodents. Current micro-CT systems are capable of achieving spatial resolution on the order of 10 μm, giving highly detailed anatomical information. However, the speed of data acquisition of these systems is relatively slow, when compared with clinical CT systems. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging has proven to be a powerful tool clinically in detecting and diagnosing cancer, stroke, pulmonary and ischemic heart diseases. In order to perform this technique in mice and rats, quantitative CT images must be acquired at a rate of at least 1 Hz. Recently, a research pre-clinical CT scanner (eXplore Ultra, GE Healthcare) has been designed specifically for dynamic perfusion imaging in small animals. Using an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector and a clinical slip-ring gantry, this system is capable of acquiring volumetric image data at a rate of 1 Hz, with in-plane resolution of 150 μm, while covering the entire thoracic region of a mouse or whole organs of a rat. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the principal imaging performance of the micro-CT system, in terms of spatial resolution, image uniformity, linearity, dose and voxel noise for the feasibility of imaging mice and rats. Our investigations show that 3D images can be obtained with a limiting spatial resolution of 2.7 line pairs per mm and noise of 42 HU, using an acquisition interval of 8 seconds at an entrance dose of 6.4 cGy.

  2. Generalized DQE analysis of radiographic and dual-energy imaging using flat-panel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, S.; Siewerdsen, J.H.; Jaffray, D.A.; Moseley, D.J.; Bakhtiar, B.

    2005-05-01

    Analysis of detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is an important component of the investigation of imaging performance for flat-panel detectors (FPDs). Conventional descriptions of DQE are limited, however, in that they take no account of anatomical noise (i.e., image fluctuations caused by overlying anatomy), even though such noise can be the most significant limitation to detectability, often outweighing quantum or electronic noise. We incorporate anatomical noise in experimental and theoretical descriptions of the 'generalized DQE' by including a spatial-frequency-dependent noise-power term, S{sub B}, corresponding to background anatomical fluctuations. Cascaded systems analysis (CSA) of the generalized DQE reveals tradeoffs between anatomical noise and the factors that govern quantum noise. We extend such analysis to dual-energy (DE) imaging, in which the overlying anatomical structure is selectively removed in image reconstructions by combining projections acquired at low and high kVp. The effectiveness of DE imaging in removing anatomical noise is quantified by measurement of S{sub B} in an anthropomorphic phantom. Combining the generalized DQE with an idealized task function to yield the detectability index, we show that anatomical noise dramatically influences task-based performance, system design, and optimization. For the case of radiography, the analysis resolves a fundamental and illustrative quandary: The effect of kVp on imaging performance, which is poorly described by conventional DQE analysis but is clarified by consideration of the generalized DQE. For the case of DE imaging, extension of a generalized CSA methodology reveals a potentially powerful guide to system optimization through the optimal selection of the tissue cancellation parameter. Generalized task-based analysis for DE imaging shows an improvement in the detectability index by more than a factor of 2 compared to conventional radiography for idealized detection tasks.

  3. Evaluating the impact of x-ray spectral shape on image quality in flat-panel CT breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, Stephen J.; Thacker, Samta; Gong Xing; Liu, Bob

    2007-01-15

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in exploring the feasibility of dedicated computed tomography (CT) breast imaging using a flat-panel digital detector in a truncated cone-beam imaging geometry. Preliminary results are promising and it appears as if three-dimensional tomographic imaging of the breast has great potential for reducing the masking effect of superimposed parenchymal structure typically observed with conventional mammography. In this study, a mathematical framework used for determining optimal design and acquisition parameters for such a CT breast imaging system is described. The ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is used as a figure of merit, under the assumptions that the imaging system is linear and shift invariant. Computation of the ideal observer SNR used a parallel-cascade model to predict signal and noise propagation through the detector, as well as a realistic model of the lesion detection task in breast imaging. For all evaluations, the total mean glandular dose for a CT breast imaging study was constrained to be approximately equivalent to that of a two-view conventional mammography study. The framework presented was used to explore the effect of x-ray spectral shape across an extensive range of kVp settings, filter material types, and filter thicknesses. The results give an indication of how spectral shape can affect image quality in flat-panel CT breast imaging.

  4. Cone-beam CT breast imaging with a flat panel detector: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lingyun; Shaw, Chris C.; Tu, Shu-Ju; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Liu, Xinming; Kappadath, S. C.

    2005-04-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of using a flat panel based cone-beam computer tomography (CT) system for 3-D breast imaging with computer simulation and imaging experiments. In our simulation study, 3-D phantoms were analytically modeled to simulate a breast loosely compressed into cylindrical shape with embedded soft tissue masses and calcifications. Attenuation coefficients were estimated to represent various types of breast tissue, soft tissue masses and calcifications to generate realistic image signal and contrast. Projection images were computed to incorporate x-ray attenuation, geometric magnification, x-ray detection, detector blurring, image pixelization and digitization. Based on the two-views mammography comparable dose level on the central axis of the phantom (also the rotation axis), x-ray kVp/filtration, transmittance through the phantom, detected quantum efficiency (DQE), exposure level, and imaging geometry, the photon fluence was estimated and used to estimate the phantom noise level on a pixel-by-pixel basis. This estimated noise level was then used with the random number generator to produce and add a fluctuation component to the noiseless transmitted image signal. The noise carrying projection images were then convolved with a Gaussian-like kernel, computed from measured 1-D line spread function (LSF) to simulated detector blurring. Additional 2-D Gaussian-like kernel is designed to suppress the noise fluctuation that inherently originates from projection images so that the reconstructed image detectability of low contrast masses phantom can be improved. Image reconstruction was performed using the Feldkamp algorithm. All simulations were performed on a 24 PC (2.4 GHz Dual-Xeon CPU) cluster with MPI parallel programming. With 600 mrads mean glandular dose (MGD) at the phantom center, soft tissue masses as small as 1 mm in diameter can be detected in a 10 cm diameter 50% glandular 50% adipose or fatter breast tissue, and 2 mm or larger

  5. An investigation of flat panel equipment variables on image quality with a dedicated cardiac phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragusin, O.; Bosmans, H.; Pappas, C.; Desmet, W.

    2008-09-01

    Image quality (IQ) evaluation plays a key role in the process of optimization of new x-ray systems. Ideally, this process should be supported by real clinical images, but ethical issues and differences in anatomy and pathology of patients make it impossible. Phantom studies might overcome these issues. This paper presents the IQ evaluation of 30 cineangiographic films acquired with a cardiac flat panel system. The phantom used simulates the anatomy of the heart and allows the circulation of contrast agent boluses through coronary arteries. Variables investigated with influence on IQ and radiation dose are: tube potential, detector dose, added Copper filters, dynamic density optimization (DDO) and viewing angle. The IQ evaluation consisted of scoring 4 simulated calcified lesions located on different coronary artery segments in terms of degree of visualization. Eight cardiologists rated the lesions using a five-point scale ((1) lesion not visible to (5) very good visibility). Radiation doses associated to the angiograms are expressed in terms of incident air kerma (IAK) and effective dose that has been calculated with PCXMX software (STUK, Finland) from the exposure settings assuming a standard sized patient of 70 Kg. Mean IQ scores ranged from 1.68 to 4.88. The highest IQ scores were obtained for the angiograms acquired with tube potential 80 kVp, no added Cu filters, DDO 60%, RAO and LAO views and the highest entrance detector dose that has been used in the present study, namely 0.17 μGy/im. Radiation doses (IAK ~40 mGy and effective dose of 1 mSv) were estimated for angiograms acquired at 15 frames s-1, detector field-of-view 20 cm, and a length of 5 s. The following parameters improved the IQ factor significantly: a change in tube potential from 96 to 80 kVp, detector dose from 0.10 μGy/im to 0.17 μGy/im, the absence of Copper filtration. DDO variable which is a post-processing parameter should be carefully evaluated because it alters the quality of the

  6. Using LROC analysis to evaluate detection accuracy of microcalcification clusters imaged with flat-panel CT mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xing; Glick, Stephen J.; Vedula, Aruna A.

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the detectability of microcalcification clusters (MCCs) using CT mammography with a flat-panel detector. Compared with conventional mammography, CT mammography can provide improved discrimination between malignant and benign cases as it can provide the radiologist with more accurate morphological information on MCCs. In this study, two aspects of MCC detection with flat-panel CT mammography were examined: (1) the minimal size of MCCs detectable with mean glandular dose (MGD) used in conventional mammography; (2) the effect of different detector pixel size on the detectability of MCCs. A realistic computer simulation modeling x-ray transport through the breast, as well as both signal and noise propagation through the flat-panel imager, was developed to investigate these questions. Microcalcifications were simulated as calcium carbonate spheres with diameters set at the levels of 125, 150 and 175 μm. Each cluster consisted of 10 spheres spread randomly in a 6×6 mm2 region of interest (ROI) and the detector pixel size was set to 100×100, 200×200, or 300×300μm2. After reconstructing 100 projection sets for each case (half with signal present) with the cone-beam Feldkamp (FDK) algorithm, a localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) study was conducted to evaluate the detectability of MCCs. Five observers chose the locations of cluster centers with correspondent confidence ratings. The average area under the LROC curve suggested that the 175 μm MCCs can be detected at a high level of confidence. Results also indicate that flat-panel detectors with pixel size of 200×200 μm2 are appropriate for detecting small targets, such as MCCs.

  7. Calibration model of a dual gain flat panel detector for 2D and 3D x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidgunst, C.; Ritter, D.; Lang, E.

    2007-09-15

    The continuing research and further development in flat panel detector technology have led to its integration into more and more medical x-ray systems for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) imaging, such as fixed or mobile C arms. Besides the obvious advantages of flat panel detectors, like the slim design and the resulting optimum accessibility to the patient, their success is primarily a product of the image quality that can be achieved. The benefits in the physical and performance-related features as opposed to conventional image intensifier systems (e.g., distortion-free reproduction of imaging information or almost linear signal response over a large dynamic range) can be fully exploited, however, only if the raw detector images are correctly calibrated and postprocessed. Previous procedures for processing raw data contain idealizations that, in the real world, lead to artifacts or losses in image quality. Thus, for example, temperature dependencies or changes in beam geometry, as can occur with mobile C arm systems, have not been taken into account up to this time. Additionally, adverse characteristics such as image lag or aging effects have to be compensated to attain the best possible image quality. In this article a procedure is presented that takes into account the important dependencies of the individual pixel sensitivity of flat panel detectors used in 2D or 3D imaging and simultaneously minimizes the work required for an extensive recalibration. It is suitable for conventional detectors with only one gain mode as well as for the detectors specially developed for 3D imaging with dual gain read-out technology.

  8. Gain Correction for an X-ray Imaging System With a Movable Flat Panel Detector and Intrinsic Localization Crosshair.

    PubMed

    Park, Yang-Kyun; Sharp, Gregory C

    2016-04-01

    Gain calibration for X-ray imaging systems with a movable flat panel detector and an intrinsic crosshair is a challenge due to the geometry-dependent heel effect and crosshair artifact. This study aims to develop a gain correction method for such systems by implementing the Multi-Acquisition Gain Image Correction technique. Flood field images containing crosshair and heel effect were acquired in 4 different flat panel detector positions at fixed exposure parameters. The crosshair region was automatically detected using common image processing algorithms and removed by a simple interpolation procedure, resulting in a crosshair-removed image. A large kernel-based correction was then used to remove the heel effect. Mask filters corresponding to each crosshair region were applied to the resultant heel effect-removed images to invalidate the pixels of the original crosshair region. Finally, a seamless gain map was composed with corresponding valid pixels from the processed images either by the sequential replacement or by the selective averaging techniques developed in this study. Quantitative evaluation was performed based on normalized noise power spectrum and detective quantum efficiency improvement factor for the flood field images corrected by the Multi-Acquisition Gain Image Correction-based gain maps. For comparison purposes, a single crosshair-removed gain map was also tested. As a result, it was demonstrated that the Multi-Acquisition Gain Image Correction technique achieved better image quality than the crosshair-removed technique, showing lower normalized noise power spectrum values over most of spatial frequencies. The improvement was more obvious at the priori-crosshair region of the gain map. The mean detective quantum efficiency improvement factor was 1.09 ± 0.06, 2.46 ± 0.32, and 3.34 ± 0.36 in the priori-crosshair region and 2.35 ± 0.31, 2.33 ± 0.31, and 3.09 ± 0.34 in the normal region, for crosshair-removed, Multi-Acquisition Gain Image

  9. Use of personal digital assistants for retrieval of medical images and data on high-resolution flat panel displays.

    PubMed

    Ratib, Osman; McCoy, J Michael; McGill, D Ric; Li, Minglin; Brown, Allen

    2003-01-01

    For its new acute care hospital, the University of California at Los Angeles is evaluating innovative technology involving high-resolution flat panel display devices configured as "network appliances" that can be wall mounted for use in the retrieval and display of medical images and data. Physicians and healthcare providers can log on with wireless handheld computers, which can serve as an identification device as well as a navigational tool for selecting patient records and data. These data are displayed and manipulated on the flat panel display without the need for a keyboard or mouse. A prototype was developed with commercially available image display software, which was modified to allow the remote control of software functions from a handheld device through an infrared communication port. The system also allows navigation through the patient data in a World Wide Web-based electronic patient record. This prototype illustrates the evolution of radiologic facilities toward "shareable" high-quality display devices that allow more convenient and cost-effective access to medical images and related data in complex clinical environments, resulting in a paradigm shift in data navigation and accessibility.

  10. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2011-08-01

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions—for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in

  11. Comparison of the imaging physics performance of a prototype flat-panel detector with a 400-speed screen-film system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.; Roskopf, Marsha L.; Rush, Charles

    2001-06-01

    The performance of a digital radiography system that included a prototype flat panel detector (StingRay) was compared with a 400 speed screen-film system. The flat panel detector consisted of a 500 micrometers thick CsI scintillator with an image matrix size of 3k2. The limiting spatial resolution of screen-film (approximately 4 line pairs/mm) was superior to that of the flat panel detector (approximately 2.5 line pairs/mm). The digital detector had an excellent linearity response (r2 equals 0.997), a dynamic range of 20,000:1, and saturated at a radiation exposure of 60 mR.

  12. X-ray performance of a wafer-scale CMOS flat panel imager for applications in medical imaging and nondestructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Bo Kyung; Jeon, Seongchae; Seo, Chang-Woo

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a wafer-scale complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based X-ray flat panel detector for medical imaging and nondestructive testing applications. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS flat panel imager has been fabricated by using a 0.35 μm 1-poly/4-metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 μm×100 μm and the pixel array format is 1200×1200 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 120mm×120 mm. The 14.3-bit extended counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. The different screens such as thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and terbium gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillators were used as conversion materials for X-rays to visible light photons. The X-ray imaging performance such as X-ray sensitivity as a function of X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution, image lag and X-ray images of various objects were measured under practical medical and industrial application conditions. This paper results demonstrate that our prototype CMOS-based X-ray flat panel imager has the significant potential for medical imaging and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications with high-resolution and high speed rate.

  13. Use and imaging performance of CMOS flat panel imager with LiF/ZnS(Ag) and Gadox scintillation screens for neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, B. K.; kim, J. Y.; Kim, T. J.; Sim, C.; Cho, G.; Lee, D. H.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2011-01-01

    In digital neutron radiography system, a thermal neutron imaging detector based on neutron-sensitive scintillating screens with CMOS(complementary metal oxide semiconductor) flat panel imager is introduced for non-destructive testing (NDT) application. Recently, large area CMOS APS (active-pixel sensor) in conjunction with scintillation films has been widely used in many digital X-ray imaging applications. Instead of typical imaging detectors such as image plates, cooled-CCD cameras and amorphous silicon flat panel detectors in combination with scintillation screens, we tried to apply a scintillator-based CMOS APS to neutron imaging detection systems for high resolution neutron radiography. In this work, two major Gd2O2S:Tb and 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillation screens with various thickness were fabricated by a screen printing method. These neutron converter screens consist of a dispersion of Gd2O2S:Tb and 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillating particles in acrylic binder. These scintillating screens coupled-CMOS flat panel imager with 25x50mm2 active area and 48μm pixel pitch was used for neutron radiography. Thermal neutron flux with 6x106n/cm2/s was utilized at the NRF facility of HANARO in KAERI. The neutron imaging characterization of the used detector was investigated in terms of relative light output, linearity and spatial resolution in detail. The experimental results of scintillating screen-based CMOS flat panel detectors demonstrate possibility of high sensitive and high spatial resolution imaging in neutron radiography system.

  14. A comparison of lesion detection accuracy using digital mammography and flat-panel CT breast imaging (Honorable Mention Poster Award)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xing; Vedula, Aruna A.; Thacker, Samta; Glick, Stephen J.

    2005-04-01

    Although conventional mammography is currently the best modality to detect early breast cancer, it is limited in that the recorded image represents the superposition of a 3D object onto a 2D plane. As an alternative, cone-beam CT breast imaging with a CsI based flat-panel imager (CTBI) has been proposed with the ability to provide 3D visualization of breast tissue. To investigate possible improvements in lesion detection accuracy using CTBI over digital mammography (DM), a computer simulation study was conducted using simulated lesions embedded into a structured 3D breast model. The computer simulation realistically modeled x-ray transport through a breast model, as well as the signal and noise propagation through the flat-panel imager. Polyenergetic x-ray spectra of W/Al 50 kVp for CTBI and Mo/Mo 28 kVp for DM were modeled. For the CTBI simulation, the intensity of the x-ray spectra for each projection view was determined so as to provide a total mean glandular dose (MGD) of 4 mGy, which is approximately equivalent to that given in a conventional two-view screening mammography study. Since only one DM view was investigated here, the intensity of the DM x-ray spectra was defined to give 2 mGy MGD. Irregular lesions were simulated by using a stochastic growth algorithm providing lesions with an effective diameter of 5 mm. Breast tissue was simulated by generating an ensemble of backgrounds with a power law spectrum. To evaluate lesion detection accuracy, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study was performed with 4 observers reading an ensemble of images for each case. The average area under the ROC curves (Az) was 0.94 for CTBI, and 0.81 for DM. Results indicate that a 5 mm lesion embedded in a structured breast phantom can be detected by CT breast imaging with statistically significant higher confidence than with digital mammography.

  15. SU-E-J-45: The Correlation Between CBCT Flat Panel Misalignment and 3D Image Guidance Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Kenton, O; Valdes, G; Yin, L; Teo, B; Brousmiche, S; Wikler, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To simulate the impact of CBCT flat panel misalignment on the image quality, the calculated correction vectors in 3D image guided proton therapy and to determine if these calibration errors can be caught in our QA process. Methods The X-ray source and detector geometrical calibration (flexmap) file of the CBCT system in the AdaPTinsight software (IBA proton therapy) was edited to induce known changes in the rotational and translational calibrations of the imaging panel. Translations of up to ±10 mm in the x, y and z directions (see supplemental) and rotational errors of up to ±3° were induced. The calibration files were then used to reconstruct the CBCT image of a pancreatic patient and CatPhan phantom. Correction vectors were calculated for the patient using the software’s auto match system and compared to baseline values. The CatPhan CBCT images were used for quantitative evaluation of image quality for each type of induced error. Results Translations of 1 to 3 mm in the x and y calibration resulted in corresponding correction vector errors of equal magnitude. Similar 10mm shifts were seen in the y-direction; however, in the x-direction, the image quality was too degraded for a match. These translational errors can be identified through differences in isocenter from orthogonal kV images taken during routine QA. Errors in the z-direction had no effect on the correction vector and image quality.Rotations of the imaging panel calibration resulted in corresponding correction vector rotations of the patient images. These rotations also resulted in degraded image quality which can be identified through quantitative image quality metrics. Conclusion Misalignment of CBCT geometry can lead to incorrect translational and rotational patient correction vectors. These errors can be identified through QA of the imaging isocenter as compared to orthogonal images combined with monitoring of CBCT image quality.

  16. High-energy and thermal-neutron imaging and modeling with an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Claytor, Thomas N; Taddeucci, Terry N; Hills, Charles R; Summa, Deborah A; Davis, Anthony W; McDonald, Thomas E; Schwab, Mark J

    2004-10-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) operates two spallation neutron sources dedicated to research in materials science, condensed-matter physics, and fundamental and applied nuclear physics. Prior to 1995, all thermal neutron radiography at Los Alamos was done on a beam port attached to the Omega West reactor, a small 8MW research reactor used primarily for radioisotope production and prompt and delayed neutron activation analysis. After the closure of this facility, two largely independent radiography development efforts were begun at LANSCE using moderated cold and thermal neutrons from the Target-1 source and high-energy neutrons from the Target-4 source. Investigations with cold and thermal neutrons employed a neutron converter and film, a scintillation screen and CCD camera system, and a new high-resolution amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat-panel detector system. Recent work with high-energy neutrons (En > 1 MeV) has involved storage-phosphor image plates. Some comparison high-energy images were obtained with both image plates and the a-Si panel and showed equivalent image quality for approximately equal exposure times. PMID:15246402

  17. Flat panel ferroelectric electron emission display system

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, S.E.; Orvis, W.J.; Caporaso, G.J.; Wieskamp, T.F.

    1996-04-16

    A device is disclosed which can produce a bright, raster scanned or non-raster scanned image from a flat panel. Unlike many flat panel technologies, this device does not require ambient light or auxiliary illumination for viewing the image. Rather, this device relies on electrons emitted from a ferroelectric emitter impinging on a phosphor. This device takes advantage of a new electron emitter technology which emits electrons with significant kinetic energy and beam current density. 6 figs.

  18. Flat panel ferroelectric electron emission display system

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, Stephen E.; Orvis, William J.; Caporaso, George J.; Wieskamp, Ted F.

    1996-01-01

    A device which can produce a bright, raster scanned or non-raster scanned image from a flat panel. Unlike many flat panel technologies, this device does not require ambient light or auxiliary illumination for viewing the image. Rather, this device relies on electrons emitted from a ferroelectric emitter impinging on a phosphor. This device takes advantage of a new electron emitter technology which emits electrons with significant kinetic energy and beam current density.

  19. Effect of secondary particles on image quality of dynamic flat panels in carbon ion scanning beam treatment

    PubMed Central

    Amano, S; Furukawa, T; Shirai, T; Noda, K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Real-time markerless tumour tracking using radiographic fluoroscopic imaging is one of the better solutions to improving respiratory-gated radiotherapy. However, particle beams cause secondary particles from patients, which could affect radiographs. Here, we evaluated the quality of radiographs during carbon ion pencil beam scanning (CPBS) irradiation for respiratory gating. Methods: A water phantom and chest phantom were used. The phantoms were irradiated with CPBS at 290 MeV n−1 from orthogonal directions. Dose rates were 3.4 × 108, 1.14 × 108 and 3.79 × 107 particles per second. A dynamic flat panel detector (DFPD) was installed on the upstream (DFPD1) or downstream (DFPD2) side of the vertical irradiation port. DFPD images were acquired during CPBS at 15.00, 7.50 and 3.75 frames per second (fps). Charge on the DFPD was cleaned using fast readout technique every 30 fps. DFPD images were acquired during CPBS with radiographic exposure, and results with and without fast readout technique were compared. Results: Secondary particles were visualized as spots or streak-like shapes. Capture of secondary particles from the horizontal beam direction was lower with fast readout technique than without it. With regard to beam irradiation direction dependency, CPBS from the horizontal direction resulted in a greater magnitude of secondary particles reaching DFPD2 than reaching DFPD1. When CPBS was delivered from the vertical direction, however, the magnitude of secondary particles on both DFPDs was very similar. Conclusion: Fast readout technique minimized the effect of secondary particles on DFPD images during CPBS. Advances in knowledge: This technique may be useful for markerless tumour tracking for respiratory gating. PMID:25536444

  20. Large Area Flat Panel Imaging Detectors for Astronomy and Night Time Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; McPhate, J.; Frisch, H.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.; Wagner, R.; Varner, G.

    2013-09-01

    Sealed tube photo-sensing detectors for optical/IR detection have applications in astronomy, nighttime remote reconnaissance, and airborne/space situational awareness. The potential development of large area photon counting, imaging, timing detectors has significance for these applications and a number of other areas (High energy particle detection (RICH), biological single-molecule fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, neutron imaging, time of flight mass spectroscopy, diffraction imaging). We will present details of progress towards the development of a 20 cm sealed tube optical detector with nanoengineered microchannel plates for photon counting, imaging and sub-ns event time stamping. In the operational scheme of the photodetector incoming light passes through an entrance window and interacts with a semitransparent photocathode on the inside of the window. The photoelectrons emitted are accelerated across a proximity gap and are detected by an MCP pair. The pair of novel borosilicate substrate MCPs are functionalized by atomic layer deposition (ALD), and amplify the signal and the resulting electron cloud is detected by a conductive strip line anode for determination of the event positions and the time of arrival. The physical package is ~ 25 x 25 cm but only 1.5 cm thick. Development of such a device in a square 20 cm format presents challenges: hermetic sealing to a large entrance window, a 20 cm semitransparent photocathode with good efficiency and uniformity, 20 cm MCPs with reasonable cost and performance, robust construction to preserve high vacuum and withstand an atmosphere pressure differential. We will discuss the schemes developed to address these issues and present the results for the first test devices. The novel microchannel plates employing borosilicate micro-capillary arrays provide many performance characteristics typical of conventional MCPs, but have been made in sizes up to 20 cm, have low intrinsic background (0.08 events cm2 s-1) and

  1. Theoretical and Monte Carlo optimization of a stacked three-layer flat-panel x-ray imager for applications in multi-spectral diagnostic medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Maurino, Sebastian; Badano, Aldo; Cunningham, Ian A.; Karim, Karim S.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new design of a stacked three-layer flat-panel x-ray detector for dual-energy (DE) imaging. Each layer consists of its own scintillator of individual thickness and an underlying thin-film-transistor-based flat-panel. Three images are obtained simultaneously in the detector during the same x-ray exposure, thereby eliminating any motion artifacts. The detector operation is two-fold: a conventional radiography image can be obtained by combining all three layers' images, while a DE subtraction image can be obtained from the front and back layers' images, where the middle layer acts as a mid-filter that helps achieve spectral separation. We proceed to optimize the detector parameters for two sample imaging tasks that could particularly benefit from this new detector by obtaining the best possible signal to noise ratio per root entrance exposure using well-established theoretical models adapted to fit our new design. These results are compared to a conventional DE temporal subtraction detector and a single-shot DE subtraction detector with a copper mid-filter, both of which underwent the same theoretical optimization. The findings are then validated using advanced Monte Carlo simulations for all optimized detector setups. Given the performance expected from initial results and the recent decrease in price for digital x-ray detectors, the simplicity of the three-layer stacked imager approach appears promising to usher in a new generation of multi-spectral digital x-ray diagnostics.

  2. Flat-Panel Computed Tomography (DYNA-CT) in Neuroradiology. From High-Resolution Imaging of Implants to One-Stop-Shopping for Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, A; Gölitz, P; Engelhorn, T; Kloska, S; Struffert, T

    2015-10-01

    Originally aimed at improving standard radiography by providing higher absorption efficiency and a wider dynamic range, flat-panel detector technology has meanwhile got widely accepted in the neuroradiological community. Especially flat-panel detector computed tomography (FD-CT) using rotational C-arm mounted flat-panel detector technology is capable of volumetric imaging with a high spatial resolution. By providing CT-like images of the brain within the angio suite, FD-CT is able to rapidly visualize hemorrhage and may thus improve complication management without the need of patient transfer. As "Angiographic CT" FD-CT may be helpful during many diagnostic and neurointerventional procedures and for noninvasive monitoring and follow-up. In addition, spinal interventions and high-resolution imaging of the temporal bone might also benefit from FD-CT. Finally, using novel dynamic perfusion and angiographic protocols, FD-CT may provide functional information on brain perfusion and vasculature with the potential to replace standard imaging in selected acute stroke patients.

  3. Impact of flat panel-imager veiling glare on scatter-estimation accuracy and image quality of a commercial on-board cone-beam CT imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Lazos, Dimitrios; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: The purposes of this study is to measure the low frequency drop (LFD) of the modulation transfer function (MTF), associated with the long tails of the detector point spread function (PSF) of an on-board flat panel imager and study its impact on cone-beam CT (CBCT) image quality and scatter measurement accuracy. Methods: Two different experimental methods were used to characterize LFD and its associated PSF of a Varian OBI flat-panel detector system: the edge response function (ERF) method and the disk transfer function (DTF) method. PSF was estimated by fitting parametric models to these measurements for four values of the applied voltage (kVp). The resultant PSF was used to demonstrate the effect of LFD on image contrast and CT number accuracy in CBCT images reconstructed from synthetic datasets, as well as, accuracy of scatter measurements with the beam-stop method. Results: The MTFs derived from the measured ERF data revealed LFDs varying from 8% (at 60 kVp) to 10.5% (at 120 kVp), while the intensity of the long PSF tails was found to increase with increasing kVp. The veiling glare line spread functions derived from the ERF and DTF methods were in excellent agreement. Uncorrected veiling glare reduced contrast and the image intensity in CBCT reconstruction, near the phantom periphery (by 67 Hounsfield units in a 20 cm-in-diameter water phantom) and (to a smaller degree) near inhomogeneities. Use of the bow-tie filter mitigated these effects. Veiling glare also resulted in about 10%-15% overestimation of the scatter-to-primary ratio when measured with the beam-stop or beam-stop array method. Conclusions: The long tails of the detector PSF were found to have a modest dependence of beam spectrum, which is reflected on the MTF curve LFD. Our findings show that uncorrected veiling glare can affect quantitative accuracy and contrast in CBCT imaging, based on flat panel imager. In addition, it results in overestimation of the scatter-to-primary ratio, measured

  4. Analysis of a free-running synchronization artifact correction for MV-imaging with aSi:H flat panels

    SciTech Connect

    Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald; Sedlmayer, Felix; Deutschmann, Heinz; Huber, Stefan

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Solid state flat panel electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are widely used for megavolt (MV) photon imaging applications in radiotherapy. In addition to their original purpose in patient position verification, they are convenient to use in quality assurance and dosimetry to verify beam geometry and dose deposition or to perform linear accelerator (linac) calibration procedures. However, native image frames from amorphous silicon (aSi:H) detectors show a range of artifacts which have to be eliminated by proper correction algorithms. When a panel is operated in free-running frame acquisition mode, moving vertical stripes (periodic synchronization artifacts) are a disturbing feature in image frames. Especially for applications in volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or motion tracking, the synchronization (sync) artifacts are the limiting factor for potential and accuracy since they become even worse at higher frame rates and at lower dose rates, i.e., linac pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs). Methods: The authors introduced a synchronization correction method which is based on a theoretical model describing the interferences of the panel's readout clocking with the linac's dose pulsing. Depending on the applied PRF, a certain number of dose pulses is captured per frame which is readout columnwise, sequentially. The interference of the PRF with the panel readout is responsible for the period and the different gray value levels of the sync stripes, which can be calculated analytically. Sync artifacts can then be eliminated multiplicatively in precorrected frames without additional information about radiation pulse timing. Results: For the analysis, three aSi:H EPIDs of various types were investigated with 6 and 15 MV photon beams at varying PRFs of 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 pulses per second. Applying the sync correction at panels with gadolinium oxysulfide scintillators improved single frame flood field image quality drastically

  5. The use of modern electronic flat panel devices for image guided radiation therapy:. Image quality comparison, intra fraction motion monitoring and quality assurance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nill, S.; Stützel, J.; Häring, P.; Oelfke, U.

    2008-06-01

    With modern radiotherapy delivery techniques like intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) it is possible to delivery a more conformal dose distribution to the tumor while better sparing the organs at risk (OAR) compared to 3D conventional radiation therapy. Due to the theoretically high dose conformity achievable it is very important to know the exact position of the target volume during the treatment. With more and more modern linear accelerators equipped with imaging devices this is now almost possible. These imaging devices are using energies between 120kV and 6MV and therefore different detector systems are used but the vast majority is using amorphous silicon flat panel devices with different scintilator screens and build up materials. The technical details and the image quality of these systems are discussed and first results of the comparison are presented. In addition new methods to deal with motion management and quality assurance procedures are shortly discussed.

  6. Preliminary performance of image quality for a low-dose C-arm CT system with a flat-panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung Cha, Bo; Seo, Chang-Woo; Yang, Keedong; Jeon, Seongchae; Huh, Young

    2015-06-01

    Digital flat panel imager (FPI)-based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely used in C-arm imaging for spine surgery and interventional procedures. The system provides real-time fluoroscopy with high spatial resolution and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of anatomical structure without the need for patient transportation in interventional suite. In this work, a prototype CBCT imaging platform with continuous single rotation about the gantry was developed by using a large-area flat-panel detector with amorphous Si-based thin film transistor matrix. The different 2D projection images were acquired during constant gantry velocity for reconstructed images at a tube voltage of 80-120 kVp, and different current (10-50 mA) conditions. Various scan protocols were applied to a chest phantom human by changing the number of projection images and scanning angles. The projections were then reconstructed into a volumetric data of sections by using a 3D reconstruction algorithm (e.g., filtered back projection). The preliminary quantitative X-ray performance of our CBCT system was investigated by using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine CT phantom in terms of spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and CT number linearity for mobile or fixed C-arm based CBCT application with limited rotational geometry. The novel results of the projection data with different scanning angles and angular increments in the orbital gantry platform were acquired and evaluated experimentally.

  7. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.

    1998-01-01

    A microgap flat panel display which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y "pixel" strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a "pixel" in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel.

  8. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.

    1998-12-08

    A microgap flat panel display is disclosed which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y ``pixel`` strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a ``pixel`` in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel. 6 figs.

  9. High-performance dual-energy imaging with a flat-panel detector: imaging physics from blackboard to benchtop to bedside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewerdsen, J. H.; Shkumat, N. A.; Dhanantwari, A. C.; Williams, D. B.; Richard, S.; Daly, M. J.; Paul, N. S.; Moseley, D. J.; Jaffray, D. A.; Yorkston, J.; Van Metter, R.

    2006-03-01

    The application of high-performance flat-panel detectors (FPDs) to dual-energy (DE) imaging offers the potential for dramatically improved detection and characterization of subtle lesions through reduction of "anatomical noise," with applications ranging from thoracic imaging to image-guided interventions. In this work, we investigate DE imaging performance from first principles of image science to preclinical implementation, including: 1.) generalized task-based formulation of NEQ and detectability as a guide to system optimization; 2.) measurements of imaging performance on a DE imaging benchtop; and 3.) a preclinical system developed in our laboratory for cardiac-gated DE chest imaging in a research cohort of 160 patients. Theoretical and benchtop studies directly guide clinical implementation, including the advantages of double-shot versus single-shot DE imaging, the value of differential added filtration between low- and high-kVp projections, and optimal selection of kVp pairs, filtration, and dose allocation. Evaluation of task-based NEQ indicates that the detectability of subtle lung nodules in double-shot DE imaging can exceed that of single-shot DE imaging by a factor of 4 or greater. Filter materials are investigated that not only harden the high-kVp beam (e.g., Cu or Ag) but also soften the low-kVp beam (e.g., Ce or Gd), leading to significantly increased contrast in DE images. A preclinical imaging system suitable for human studies has been constructed based upon insights gained from these theoretical and experimental studies. An important component of the system is a simple and robust means of cardiac-gated DE image acquisition, implemented here using a fingertip pulse oximeter. Timing schemes that provide cardiac-gated image acquisition on the same or successive heartbeats is described. Preclinical DE images to be acquired under research protocol will afford valuable testing of optimal deployment, facilitate the development of DE CAD, and support

  10. Design and performance of a new a-Si flat-panel imager for use in cardiovascular and mobile C-arm imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tognina, Carlo A.; Mollov, Ivan; Yu, Jiann M.; Webb, Chris; Roos, Pieter G.; Batts, Mark; Trinh, Delenah; Fong, Robert; Taie-Nobraie, Nima; Nepo, Boris; Job, Isaias D.; Gray, Keith; Boyce, Sarah; Colbeth, Richard E.

    2004-05-01

    This paper describes a new flat panel imager designed for use in cardiovascular and mobile C-arm imaging systems. The a-Si sensor array has a 1024 x 1024 matrix with a pixel pitch of 194 μm, resulting in an active area of 198.7 mm x 198.7 mm. The imager allows frame rates of up to 30 fps in full resolution fluoroscopy mode and up to 60 fps in a 2 x 2 binned low dose fluoroscopy mode. Typically, a 600 μm thick deposited columnar CsI(Tl) layer is used as the scintillator. Improvements in the pixel architecture, charge amplifier ASICs, and system level electronics resulted in a very low electronic noise floor, such that both the fluoroscopy and low dose fluoroscopy modes of the panel are x-ray quantum limited below 1 μR/frame. Low power consumption electronics combined with a mechanical design optimized for heat transfer and dissipation makes air-cooling sufficient for most environments. The small size of 24.1 x 24.1 x 6 cm and the weight of only 4.1 kg meet the requirements of C-Arm systems. Special consideration was given to the border around the active area, which has been reduced to 2 cm. Reported performance parameters include linearity, lag, contrast ratio, MTF, and DQE. For the full resolution mode, the MTF is greater than 0.53 and 0.21 at 1 and 2 lp/mm, respectively. DQE measured at 22 nGy/frame was greater than 0.68, 0.50, and 0.23 at 0, 1, and 2 lp/mm, respectively.

  11. SU-C-16A-01: In Vivo Source Position Verification in High Dose Rate (HDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Using a Flat Panel Imager: Initial Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Franich, R; Smith, R; Millar, J; Haworth, A; Taylor, M; McDermott, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We report our initial clinical experience with a novel position-sensitive source-tracking system based on a flat panel imager. The system has been trialled with 4 prostate HDR brachytherapy patients (8 treatment fractions) in this initial study. Methods: The flat panel imaging system was mounted under a customised carbon fibre couch top assembly (Figure 1). Three gold fiducial markers were implanted into the prostate of each patient at the time of catheter placement. X-ray dwell position markers were inserted into three catheters and a radiograph acquired to locate the implant relative to the imaging device. During treatment, as the HDR source dwells were delivered, images were acquired and processed to determine the position of the source in the patient. Source positions measured by the imaging device were compared to the treatment plan for verification of treatment delivery. Results: Measured dwell positions provided verification of relative dwell spacing within and between catheters, in the coronal plane. Measurements were typically within 2.0mm (0.2mm – 3.3mm, s.d. 0.8mm) of the planned positions over 60 dwells (Figure 2). Discrimination between larger dwell intervals and catheter differentiation were clear. This confirms important delivery attributes such as correct transfer tube connection, source step size, relative catheter positions and therefore overall correct plan selection and delivery. The fiducial markers, visible on the radiograph, provided verification of treatment delivery to the correct anatomical location. The absolute position of the dwells was determined by comparing the measured dwell positions with the x-ray markers from the radiograph, validating the programmed treatment indexer length. The total impact on procedure time was less than 5 minutes. Conclusion: The novel, noninvasive HDR brachytherapy treatment verification system was used clinically with minor impact on workflow. The system allows verification of correct treatment

  12. [Flat Panel Detector Philips introduced and its system direction].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shinichi

    2002-01-01

    We introduced digital X-ray diagnostic systems with Flat panel detector both in general X-ray systems and in Angiography systems. Our introduced Flat Panel Detector has the latest technology and has Cesium Iodide (CsI) that absorbs X-ray energy and generates visible light. Detected light signals make digital X-ray images. CsI is the most important material because its absorption rate of X-ray influences the strength of output digital signal. The purpose in this paper is checking that is latest Flat Panel Detector pulls out enough capability CsI has. Especially the thickness of CsI relates to X-ray absorption. X-ray absorption rate depended on the thickness of CsI was calculated by using simulated X-ray model and the future direction of Flat Panel Detector system was discussed. PMID:12766268

  13. Evaluation for Basic Image Qualities Dependence on the Position in XYZ Directions and Acquisition Parameters of the Cone Beam CT for Angiography System with Flat Panel Detector.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Norisato; Mitsui, Kota; Oda, Shinichiro

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the position in XYZ directions and acquisition parameters on the basic image qualities of for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in an angiography system with flat panel detector. The resolution property (modulation transfer function: MTF) and the noise property (Wiener spectrum: WS) of CBCT images in X-Y plane were measured with different acquisition parameters (scan matrix number and projection number) and the effect of the position in XYZ directions. The MTFs with 1024×1024 matrix were higher than those of 512×512 matrix and decreased in the peripheral areas due to the reduction of projection number. The highest and the lowest MTFs were measured at the X-ray tube side and on the detector side of the position in X-Y plane, respectively. The WS-doubled projection number showed about 50% lesser noise level. There were differences in the Wiener spectra (WS) at the position in XYZ directions. We conclude that the resolution and the noise property of CBCT image in X-Y plane showed dependences on the position in XYZ directions and acquisition parameters of the CBCT. PMID:27546079

  14. A real-time flat-panel X-ray pixel imaging system for low-dose medical diagnostics and craniofacial applications.

    PubMed

    Chapuy, S; Dimcovski, D; Dimcovski, Z; Grigoriev, E; Grob, E; Ligier, Y; Pachoud, M; Riondel, F; Rüfenacht, D; Sayegh, C; Terrier, F; Valley, J F; Verdun, F R

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate on-line performance of a real-time digital imaging system based on amorphous silicon technology and to compare it with conventional film-screen equipment. The digital detecting imager consists of (1) a converter, which transforms the energy of the incident X rays into light; (2) a real-time digital detecting system, capable of producing as many as 10 pictures per second using a large-area pixel matrix (20 x 20 cm2) based on solid-state amorphous silicon sensor technology with a pitch of 400 microns; and (3) appropriate computer tools for control, real-time image treatment, data representation, and off-line analysis. Different phantoms were used for qualitative comparison with the conventional film-screen technique, with images obtained with both systems at the normal dose (used as a reference), as well as with dose reduction by a factor of 10 to 100. Basic image quality parameters evaluated showed that the response of the detector is linear in a wide range of entrance air kerma; the dynamic range is higher compared with the conventional film-screen combination; the spatial resolution is 1.25 lp per millimeter, as expected from the pixel size; and good image quality is ensured at doses substantially lower than for the film-screen technique. The flat-panel X-ray imager based on amorphous silicon technology implemented in standard radiographic equipment permits acquisition of real-time images in radiology (as many as 10 images per second) of diagnostic quality with a marked reduction of dose (as much as 100 times) and better contrast compared with the standard film technique. Preliminary results obtained with a 100-micron pitch imager based on the same technology show better quality but a less substantial dose reduction. Applications in craniofacial surgery look promising.

  15. Flat panel planar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1994-11-01

    A prototype 10 inch flat panel Planar Optic Display, (POD), screen has been constructed and tested. This display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optic class sheets bonded together with a cladding layer between each sheet where each glass sheet represents a vertical line of resolution. The display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately 1 inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  16. Imaging responses of on-site CsI and Gd2O2S flat-panel detectors: Dependence on the tube voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Hosang; Chung, Myung Jin; Youn, Seungman; Nam, Jiho; Lee, Jayoung; Park, Dahl; Kim, Wontaek; Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2015-07-01

    One of the emerging issues in radiography is low-dose imaging to minimize patient's exposure. The scintillating materials employed in most indirect flat-panel detectors show a drastic change of X-ray photon absorption efficiency around their K-edge energies that consequently affects image quality. Using various tube voltages, we investigated the imaging performance of most popular scintillators: cesium iodide (CsI) and gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S). The integrated detective quantum efficiencies (iDQE) of four detectors installed in the same hospital were evaluated according to the standardized procedure IEC 62220-1 at tube voltages of 40 - 120 kVp. The iDQE values of the Gd2O2S detectors were normalized by those of CsI detectors to exclude the effects of image postprocessing. The contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were also evaluated by using an anthropomorphic chest phantom. The iDQE of the CsI detector outperformed that of the Gd2O2S detector over all tube voltages. Moreover, we noted that the iDQE of the Gd2O2S detectors quickly rolled off with decreasing tube voltage under 70 kVp. The CNRs of the two scintillators were similar at 120 kVp. At 60 kVp, however, the CNR of Gd2O2S was about half that of CsI. Compared to the Gd2O2S detectors, variations in the DQE performance of the CsI detectors were relatively immune to variations in the applied tube voltages. Therefore, we claim that Gd2O2S detectors are inappropriate for use in low-tube-voltage imaging (e.g., extremities and pediatrics) with low patient exposure.

  17. MTF characterization in 2D and 3D for a high resolution, large field of view flat panel imager for cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Jainil; Mann, Steve D.; Tornai, Martin P.; Richmond, Michelle; Zentai, George

    2014-03-01

    The 2D and 3D modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of a custom made, large 40x30cm2 area, 600- micron CsI-TFT based flat panel imager having 127-micron pixellation, along with the micro-fiber scintillator structure, were characterized in detail using various techniques. The larger area detector yields a reconstructed FOV of 25cm diameter with an 80cm SID in CT mode. The MTFs were determined with 1x1 (intrinsic) binning. The 2D MTFs were determined using a 50.8 micron tungsten wire and a solid lead edge, and the 3D MTF was measured using a custom made phantom consisting of three nearly orthogonal 50.8 micron tungsten wires suspended in an acrylic cubic frame. The 2D projection data was reconstructed using an iterative OSC algorithm using 16 subsets and 5 iterations. As additional verification of the resolution, along with scatter, the Catphan® phantom was also imaged and reconstructed with identical parameters. The measured 2D MTF was ~4% using the wire technique and ~1% using the edge technique at the 3.94 lp/mm Nyquist cut-off frequency. The average 3D MTF measured along the wires was ~8% at the Nyquist. At 50% MTF, the resolutions were 1.2 and 2.1 lp/mm in 2D and 3D, respectively. In the Catphan® phantom, the 1.7 lp/mm bars were easily observed. Lastly, the 3D MTF measured on the three wires has an observed 5.9% RMSD, indicating that the resolution of the imaging system is uniform and spatially independent. This high performance detector is integrated into a dedicated breast SPECT-CT imaging system.

  18. Patient-specific scatter correction for flat-panel detector-based cone-beam CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Brunner, Stephen; Niu, Kai; Schafer, Sebastian; Royalty, Kevin; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-02-01

    A patient-specific scatter correction algorithm is proposed to mitigate scatter artefacts in cone-beam CT (CBCT). The approach belongs to the category of convolution-based methods in which a scatter potential function is convolved with a convolution kernel to estimate the scatter profile. A key step in this method is to determine the free parameters introduced in both scatter potential and convolution kernel using a so-called calibration process, which is to seek for the optimal parameters such that the models for both scatter potential and convolution kernel is able to optimally fit the previously known coarse estimates of scatter profiles of the image object. Both direct measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have been proposed by other investigators to achieve the aforementioned rough estimates. In the present paper, a novel method has been proposed and validated to generate the needed coarse scatter profile for parameter calibration in the convolution method. The method is based upon an image segmentation of the scatter contaminated CBCT image volume, followed by a reprojection of the segmented image volume using a given x-ray spectrum. The reprojected data is subtracted from the scatter contaminated projection data to generate a coarse estimate of the needed scatter profile used in parameter calibration. The method was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated using numerical simulations and experimental CBCT data acquired on a clinical CBCT imaging system. Results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce scatter artefacts and recover the correct CT number. Numerical simulation results show the method is patient specific, can accurately estimate the scatter, and is robust with respect to segmentation procedure. For experimental and in vivo human data, the results show the CT number can be successfully recovered and anatomical structure visibility can be significantly improved.

  19. Evaluation of Effective Dose During Abdominal Three-Dimensional Imaging for Three Flat-Panel-Detector Angiography Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Kidouchi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Asako; Masumoto, Tomohiko; Ozaki, Yutaka

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effective dose during abdominal three-dimensional (3D) imaging on phantoms and estimate the dose-area product (DAP) for effective dose conversion factors for three types of angiographic units. Three-dimensional imaging was performed for three sizes (small, medium, large) of human-shaped phantoms using three types of angiographic units (Allura Xper FD20/10, INNOVA 4100, AXIOM Artis dTA). We calculated 25 organ doses and effective doses using Monte Carlo technique for the three phantoms with a program for a personal computer. As benchmark studies to back up the results by Monte Carlo technique, we measured the organ doses directly on the small phantom using radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters. The DAP value increased as the phantom size increased. The organ doses and the effective doses during the 3D imaging increased as the phantom size increased. The effective doses for the small phantom by Monte Carlo technique were 1.9, 2.2, and 2.1 mSv for the Allura Xper FD20/10, INNOVA 4100, and AXIOM Artis dTA, respectively, while those by direct measurement were 1.6, 2.0, and 2.6 mSv. The effective doses to DAP ratios by Monte Carlo technique were 0.37-0.45, 0.26-0.32, and 0.13-0.15 (mSv Gy{sup -1}cm{sup -2}) for the Allura Xper FD20/10, INNOVA 4100, and AXIOM Artis dTA, respectively. In conclusion, the effective doses during 3D imaging and the dose-to-DAP ratios differ among angiographic units, and the effective dose can be estimated using a proper conversion factor for each angiographic unit.

  20. Evaluation of effective dose during abdominal three-dimensional imaging for three flat-panel-detector angiography systems.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Kidouchi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Asako; Masumoto, Tomohiko; Ozaki, Yutaka

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effective dose during abdominal three-dimensional (3D) imaging on phantoms and estimate the dose-area product (DAP) for effective dose conversion factors for three types of angiographic units. Three-dimensional imaging was performed for three sizes (small, medium, large) of human-shaped phantoms using three types of angiographic units (Allura Xper FD20/10, INNOVA 4100, AXIOM Artis dTA). We calculated 25 organ doses and effective doses using Monte Carlo technique for the three phantoms with a program for a personal computer. As benchmark studies to back up the results by Monte Carlo technique, we measured the organ doses directly on the small phantom using radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters. The DAP value increased as the phantom size increased. The organ doses and the effective doses during the 3D imaging increased as the phantom size increased. The effective doses for the small phantom by Monte Carlo technique were 1.9, 2.2, and 2.1 mSv for the Allura Xper FD20/10, INNOVA 4100, and AXIOM Artis dTA, respectively, while those by direct measurement were 1.6, 2.0, and 2.6 mSv. The effective doses to DAP ratios by Monte Carlo technique were 0.37-0.45, 0.26-0.32, and 0.13-0.15 (mSv Gy⁻¹ cm⁻²) for the Allura Xper FD20/10, INNOVA 4100, and AXIOM Artis dTA, respectively. In conclusion, the effective doses during 3D imaging and the dose-to-DAP ratios differ among angiographic units, and the effective dose can be estimated using a proper conversion factor for each angiographic unit.

  1. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector on a mobile C-arm: preclinical investigation in image-guided surgery of the head and neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewerdsen, J. H.; Chan, Y.; Rafferty, M. A.; Moseley, D. J.; Jaffray, D. A.; Irish, J. C.

    2005-04-01

    A promising imaging platform for combined low-dose fluoroscopy and cone-beam CT (CBCT) guidance of interventional procedures has been developed in our laboratory. Based on a mobile isocentric C-arm (Siemens PowerMobil) incorporating a high-performance flat-panel detector (Varian PaxScan 4030CB), the system demonstrates sub-mm 3D spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility with field of view sufficient for head and body sites. For pre-clinical studies in head neck tumor surgery, we hypothesize that the 3D intraoperative information provided by CBCT permits precise, aggressive techniques with improved avoidance of critical structures. The objectives include: 1) quantify improvement in surgical performance achieved with CBCT guidance compared to open and endoscopic techniques; and 2) investigate specific, challenging surgical tasks under CBCT guidance. Investigations proceed from an idealized phantom model to cadaveric specimens. A novel surgical performance evaluation method based on statistical decision theory is applied to excision and avoidance tasks. Analogous to receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in medical imaging, the method quantifies surgical performance in terms of Lesion-Excised (True-Positve), Lesion-Remaining (False-Negative), Normal-Excised (False-Positive), and Normal-Remaining (True-Negative) fractions. Conservative and aggressive excision and avoidance tasks are executed in 12 cadaveric specimens with and without CBCT guidance, including: dissection through dura, preservation of posterior lamina, ethmoid air cells removal, exposure of peri-orbita, and excision of infiltrated bone in the skull base (clivus). Intraoperative CBCT data was found to dramatically improve surgical performance and confidence in the execution of such tasks. Pre-clinical investigation of this platform in head and neck surgery, as well as spinal, trauma, biopsy, and other nonvascular procedures, is discussed.

  2. Using Flat-Panel Perfusion Imaging to Measure Cerebral Hemodynamics: A Pilot Feasibility Study in Patients With Carotid Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Jung; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chang, Feng-Chi; Hung, Sheng-Che; Chen, Ko-Kung; Yu, Deuerling-Zheng; Wu, Chun-Hsien Frank; Liou, Jy-Kang Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Flat-detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) imaging has demonstrated efficacy in qualitatively accessing the penumbra in acute stroke equivalent to that of magnetic resonance perfusion (MRP). The aim of our study was to evaluate the feasibility of quantifying oligemia in the brain in patients with carotid stenosis.Ten patients with unilateral carotid stenosis of >70% were included. All MRPs and FD-CTPs were performed before stenting. Region-of-interests (ROIs) including middle cerebral artery territory at basal ganglia level on both stenotic and contralateral sides were used for quantitative analysis. Relative time to peak (rTTP) was defined as TTP of the stenotic side divided by TTP of the contralateral side, and so as relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), relative mean transit time (rMTT), and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Absolute and relative TTP, CBV, MTT, CBF between two modalities were compared.For absolute quantitative analysis, the correlation of TTP was highest (r = 0.56), followed by CBV (r = 0.47), MTT (r = 0.47), and CBF (r = 0.43); for relative quantitative analysis, rCBF was the highest (r = 0.79), followed by rTTP (r = 0.75) and rCBV (r = 0.50).We confirmed that relative quantitative assessment of FD-CTP is feasible in chronic ischemic disease. Absolute quantitative measurements between MRP and FD-CTP only expressed moderate correlations. Optimization of acquisitions and algorithms is warranted to achieve better quantification. PMID:27196456

  3. Laser illuminated flat panel display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    A 10 inch laser illuminated flat panel Planar Optic Display (POD) screen has been constructed and tested. This POD screen technology is an entirely new concept in display technology. Although the initial display is flat and made of glass, this technology lends itself to applications where a plastic display might be wrapped around the viewer. The display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optical waveguides where each glass waveguide represents a vertical line of resolution. A black cladding layer, having a lower index of refraction, is placed between each waveguide layer. Since the cladding makes the screen surface black, the contrast is high. The prototype display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately I inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  4. Plasma technology and its use in flat panel digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Zur, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Plasma DR technology is used to produce a cost effective flat panel x-ray detector that acquires digital x-ray images with excellent diagnostic quality. The detector is radiation hard and permanently zero defect, with a full virtual pixel matrix that has no dead lines, pixels, or dead pixel clusters. The technology also allows the full potential of large area amorphous Selenium imaging to finally be realized (see Figure 4).

  5. Combined load test apparatus for flat panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWithey, Robert R.; Martin, Carl J., Jr.; Cerro, Jeffrey A.

    1992-04-01

    Future hypersonic aircraft such as the National Aero-Space Plane and a high speed civil transport will require the design and use of efficient, highly-loaded, flat structural panels to achieve mission requirements. These panels will be subjected to severe combinations of in-plane mechanical distributed loads (i.e., normal loads in two perpendicular directions plus a shear load), in addition to pressure and thermal loads. A testing apparatus is provided for applying uniform combined in-plane stresses to a flat panel containing an interior test area. Actuators cause two sets of load rods to apply loads to the edge of the flat panel. The first set applies loads which are perpendicular to and independent of the loads applied by the second set. The loads are applied according to a cosine load distribution to obtain a uniform stress field within the test area. The flat panel may be rotated with respect to the applied loads to obtain a wide range of combined stresses in the test area. Movement outside the plane of the flat panel may be selectively prevented by connecting the flat panel to a restraining disk by support rods. The support rods then define the test area. A thermal load may be applied to one side of the flat panel and a pressure load may be applied to the other side. The novelty of this method is found in providing a testing apparatus which allows mechanical, thermal and pressure loads to be applied simultaneously to a flat panel for testing purposes.

  6. Military market for flat panel displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1997-07-01

    This paper addresses the number, function and size of primary military displays and establishes a basis to determine the opportunities for technology insertion in the immediate future and into the next millennium. The military displays market is specified by such parameters as active area and footprint size, and other characteristics such as luminance, gray scale, resolution, color capability and night vision imaging system capability. A select grouping of funded, future acquisitions, planned and predicted cockpit kits, and form-fit-function upgrades are taken into account. It is the intent of this paper to provide an overview of the DoD niche market, allowing both government and industry a timely reference to insure meeting DoD requirements for flat-panel displays on schedule and in a cost-effective manner. The aggregate DoD market for direct view displays is presently estimated to be in excess of 157,000. Helmet/head mounted displays will add substantially to this total. The vanishing vendor syndrome for older display technologies is becoming a growing, pervasive problem throughout DoD, which consequently just leverage the more modern display technologies being developed for civil-commercial markets.

  7. Scintillator high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor active-matrix flat panel imager: Zero-spatial frequency x-ray imaging properties of the solid-state SHARP sensor structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wronski, M.; Zhao, W.; Tanioka, K.; DeCrescenzo, G.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The authors are investigating the feasibility of a new type of solid-state x-ray imaging sensor with programmable avalanche gain: scintillator high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor active matrix flat panel imager (SHARP-AMFPI). The purpose of the present work is to investigate the inherent x-ray detection properties of SHARP and demonstrate its wide dynamic range through programmable gain. Methods: A distributed resistive layer (DRL) was developed to maintain stable avalanche gain operation in a solid-state HARP. The signal and noise properties of the HARP-DRL for optical photon detection were investigated as a function of avalanche gain both theoretically and experimentally, and the results were compared with HARP tube (with electron beam readout) used in previous investigations of zero spatial frequency performance of SHARP. For this new investigation, a solid-state SHARP x-ray image sensor was formed by direct optical coupling of the HARP-DRL with a structured cesium iodide (CsI) scintillator. The x-ray sensitivity of this sensor was measured as a function of avalanche gain and the results were compared with the sensitivity of HARP-DRL measured optically. The dynamic range of HARP-DRL with variable avalanche gain was investigated for the entire exposure range encountered in radiography/fluoroscopy (R/F) applications. Results: The signal from HARP-DRL as a function of electric field showed stable avalanche gain, and the noise associated with the avalanche process agrees well with theory and previous measurements from a HARP tube. This result indicates that when coupled with CsI for x-ray detection, the additional noise associated with avalanche gain in HARP-DRL is negligible. The x-ray sensitivity measurements using the SHARP sensor produced identical avalanche gain dependence on electric field as the optical measurements with HARP-DRL. Adjusting the avalanche multiplication gain in HARP-DRL enabled a very wide dynamic range which encompassed all

  8. Phosphors for flat panel emissive displays

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.T.; Walko, R.J.; Phillips, M.L.F.

    1995-07-01

    An overview of emissive display technologies is presented. Display types briefly described include: cathode ray tubes (CRTs), field emission displays (FEDs), electroluminescent displays (ELDs), and plasma display panels (PDPs). The critical role of phosphors in further development of the latter three flat panel emissive display technologies is outlined. The need for stable, efficient red, green, and blue phosphors for RGB fall color displays is emphasized.

  9. Indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Hunt, Dylan C.; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Rowlands, John A.

    2004-05-01

    A new concept - an indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain - for low dose x-ray imaging has been proposed. The detector consists of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor optically coupled to a structured cesium iodide (CsI) scintillator. Under an electric field ESe, the a-Se is sensitive to light and converts the optical photons emitted from CsI into electronic signal. These signals can be stored and read out in the same fashion as in existing flat-panel detectors. When ESe is increased to > 90 V/μm, avalanche multiplication occurs. The avalanche gain ranges between 1-800 depending on ESe and the thickness of the a-Se layer dSe. The avalanche a-Se photoconductor is referred to as HARP (High-gain Avalanche Rushing amorphous Photoconductor). A cascaded linear system model for the proposed detector was developed in order to determine the optimal CsI properties and avalanche gain for different x-ray imaging applications. Our results showed that x-ray quantum noise limited performance can be achieved at the lowest exposure level necessary for fluoroscopy (0.1 μR) and mammography (0.1 mR) with a moderate avalanche gain of 20 (d = 1-2 μm). A laboratory test system using an existing HARP tube optically coupled (through a lens) to a CsI layer was built and the advantage of avalanche gain in overcoming electronic noise was demonstrated experimentally. One of the advantages of the avalanche gain is that it will permit the use of high resolution (HR) CsI (which due to its low light output has not previously been used in flat-panel detectors) to improve DQE at high spatial frequencies.

  10. Low-dose 2.5 MV cone-beam computed tomography with thick CsI flat-panel imager.

    PubMed

    Tang, Grace; Moussot, Christopher; Morf, Daniel; Seppi, Edward; Amols, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Most of the treatment units, both new and old models, are equipped with a megavoltage portal imager but its use for volumetric imaging is limited. This is mainly due to the poor image quality produced by the high-energy treatment beam (> 6MV). A linac at our center is equipped with a prototype 2.5 MV imaging beam. This study evaluates the feasibility of low-dose megavoltage cone-beam imaging with the 2.5MV beam and a thick cesium iodide detector, which is a high-efficiency imager. Basic imaging properties such as spatial resolution and modulation transfer function were assessed for the 2.5 MV prototype imaging system. For image quality and imaging dose, a series of megavoltage cone-beam scans were acquired for the head, thorax, and pelvis of an anthropomorphic phantom and were compared to kilovoltage cone-beam and 6X megavoltage cone-beam images. To demonstrate the advantage of MV imaging, a phantom with metallic inserts was scanned and the image quality was compared to CT and kilovoltage cone-beam scans. With a lower energy beam and higher detector efficiency, the 2.5 MV imaging system generally yields better image quality than does the 6 MV imaging system with the conventional MV imager. In particular, with the anthropomorphic phantom studies, the contrast to noise of bone to tissue is generally improved in the 2.5 MV images compared to 6 MV. With an image quality sufficient for bony alignment, the imaging dose for 2.5 MV cone-beam images is 2.4-3.4 MU compared to 26 MU in 6 MV cone-beam scans for the head, thorax, and pelvis regions of the phantom. Unlike kilovoltage cone-beam, the 2.5 MV imaging system does not suffer from high-Z image artifacts. This can be very useful for treatment planning in cases where high-Z prostheses are present. PMID:27455493

  11. 360-degree three-dimensional flat panel display using holographic optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabu, Hirofumi; Takeuchi, Yusuke; Yoshimoto, Kayo; Takahashi, Hideya; Yamada, Kenji

    2015-03-01

    We proposed the 360-degree 3D display system which is composed of a flat panel display, a light control film, and holographic optical element (HOE). The HOE is a diffraction grating which is made by holography technique. HOE lens can be produced on the thin polygonal glass plate. The light control film and HOE lenses are used to control the direction of light from the flat panel display in our system. The size of proposed system depends on the size of the flat panel display is because other parts of proposed system are thin and placed on the screen of the flat panel display. HOE lenses and a light control film are used to control lights from multiple pixels of a flat panel display to multiple viewpoints. To display large 3D images and to increase viewpoints, we divided parallax images into striped images and distributed them on the display for multiple viewpoints. Therefore, observers can see the large 3D image around the system. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed system, we made the experimental system. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed system, we constructed the part of the proposed system. The experimental system is composed of the liquid crystal display (LCD), prototype HOE lenses, and light control films. We confirmed that experimental system can display two images to different viewpoints. This paper describes the configuration of the proposed system, and also describes the experimental result.

  12. Volume-of-interest imaging of the inner ear in a human temporal bone specimen using a robot- driven C-arm flat panel detector CT system.

    PubMed

    Kolditz, D; Struffert, T; Kyriakou, Y; Bozzato, A; Dörfler, A; Kalender, W A

    2012-11-01

    VOI imaging can provide higher image quality at a reduced dose for a subregion. In this study with a robot-driven C-arm FDCT system, the goals were proof of feasibility for inner ear imaging, higher flexibility during data acquisition, and easier processing during reconstruction. First a low-dose OV scan was acquired allowing an orientation and enabling the selection of the VOI. The C-arm was then moved by the robotic system without a need for patient movement and the VOI was scanned with adapted parameters. Uncompromised artifact-free image quality was achieved by the 2-scan approach and the dose was reduced by 80%-90% in comparison with conventional MSCT and FPCT scans.

  13. Effects of image lag and scatter for dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis using a CsI flat-panel based system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, Ann-Katherine; Puong, Sylvie; Iordache, Razvan; Muller, Serge

    2011-03-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis (CE-DBT) using an iodinated contrast agent is an imaging technique providing 3D functional images of breast lesion vascularity and tissue perfusion. The iodine uptake in the breast is very small and causes only small changes in x-ray transmission; typically less than 5%. This presents significant technical challenges on the imaging system performance. The purpose of this paper was to characterize image lag and scattered radiation and their effects on image quality for dual-energy CE-DBT using a CsI(Tl) phosphor-based detector. Lag was tested using typical clinical acquisition sequences and exposure parameters and under various detector read-out modes. The performance of a prototype anti-scatter grid and its potential benefit on the magnitude and range of the cupping artifact were investigated. Analyses were performed through phantom experiments. Our results illustrate that the magnitude of image lag is negligible and breast texture cancelation is almost perfect when the detector is read out several times between x-ray exposures. The anti-scatter grid effectively reduces scatter and the cupping artifact.

  14. Microhollow electrode discharge flat panel displays

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, K.H.; Tessnow, T.; Peterkin, F.E.; Nunnally, W.C.

    1997-12-31

    Microhollow electrode discharges, discharges between thin metal foils with submillimeter gap and submillimeter holes in cathode and anode, show three distinct modes of operation: (a) at low currents the predischarge mode, a glow discharge between the outer faces of the hollow electrodes, (b) at higher current a phase with increased ionization due to ``pendulum`` electrons in the cathode hole, and (c) at even higher current an abnormal glow discharge between the edges of cathode and anode hole. A fourth discharge mode, the so-called partial discharge seems to occur at high gas pressure at pressure times hole diameter values exceeding 10 Torr cm. Experiments in a 0.2 mm diameter hollow electrode geometry with Xe and Ar at atmospheric pressure have shown that the discharges emit excimer radiation. Control of these discharges which have a sustaining voltage of several hundred volts allows their use in flat panel displays. A second mode of operation which allows one to form addressable flat panel displays is the predischarge mode. It could be shown that with a third electrode close to the cathode, but outside the anode-cathode gap, the intensity of the discharge could be linearly varied by varying the voltage at the third electrode in a range below 100 V. The predischarges have a resistive behavior (positive slope of current-voltage characteristics) which allows one to place them in parallel without individual ballast and without segmentation of anode and cathode. This has been demonstrated in a small device with nine addressable microhollow cathode discharges.

  15. X-ray flat-panel imager (FPI)-based cone-beam volume CT (CBVCT) under a circle-plus-two-arc data acquisition orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Rongfeng; Conover, David L.

    2001-06-01

    The potential of cone beam volume CT (CBVCT) to improve the data acquisition efficiency for volume tomographic imaging is well recognized. A novel x-ray FPI based CBVCT prototype and its preliminary performance evaluation are presented in this paper. To meet the data sufficiency condition, the CBVCT prototype employs a circle-plus-two-arc orbit accomplished by a tiltable circular gantry. A cone beam filtered back-projection (CB-FBP) algorithm is derived for this data acquisition orbit, which employs a window function in the Radon domain to exclude the redundancy between the Radon information obtained from the circular cone beam (CB) data and that from the arc CB data. The number of projection images along the circular sub-orbit and each arc sub-orbit is 512 and 43, respectively. The reconstruction exactness of the prototype x-ray FPI based CBVCT system is evaluated using a disc phantom in which seven acrylic discs are stacked at fixed intervals. Images reconstructed with this algorithm show that both the contrast and geometric distortion existing in the disc phantom images reconstructed by the Feldkamp algorithm are substantially reduced. Meanwhile, the imaging performance of the prototype, such as modulation transfer function (MTF) and low contrast resolution, are quantitatively evaluated in detail through corresponding phantom studies. Furthermore, the capability of the prototype to reconstruct an ROI within a longitudinally unbounded object is verified. The results obtained from this preliminary performance evaluation encourage an expectation of medical applications of the x-ray FPI based CBVCT under the circle-plus-two-arc data acquisition, particularly the application in image-guided interventional procedures and radiotherapy where the movement of a patient table is to be avoided.

  16. Diffractive optics for compact flat panel displays. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, D.; DeLong, K.

    1997-04-29

    Three years ago LLNL developed a practical method to dramatically reduce the chromatic aberration in single element diffractive imaging lenses. High efficiency, achromatic imaging lenses have been fabricated for human vision correction. This LDRD supported research in applying our new methods to develop a unique, diffraction-based optical interface with solid state, microelectronic imaging devices. Advances in microelectronics have led to smaller, more efficient components for optical systems. There have, however, been no equivalent advances in the imaging optics associated with these devices. The goal of this project was to replace the bulky, refractive optics in typical head-mounted displays with micro-thin diffractive optics to directly image flat-panel displays into the eye. To visualize the system think of the lenses of someone`s eyeglasses becoming flat-panel displays. To realize this embodiment, we needed to solve the problems of large chromatic aberrations and low efficiency that are associated with diffraction. We have developed a graceful tradeoff between chromatic aberrations and the diffractive optic thickness. It turns out that by doubling the thickness of a micro-thin diffractive lens we obtain nearly a two-times improvement in chromatic performance. Since the human eye will tolerate one diopter of chromatic aberration, we are able to achieve an achromatic image with a diffractive lens that is only 20 microns thick, versus 3 mm thickness for the comparable refractive lens. Molds for the diffractive lenses are diamond turned with sub-micron accuracy; the final lenses are cast from these molds using various polymers. We thus retain both the micro- thin nature of the diffractive optics and the achromatic image quality of refractive optics. During the first year of funding we successfully extended our earlier technology from 1 cm diameter optics required for vision applications up to the 5 cm diameter optics required for this application. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Radiation Exposure in Biliary Procedures Performed to Manage Anastomotic Strictures in Pediatric Liver Transplant Recipients: Comparison Between Radiation Exposure Levels Using an Image Intensifier and a Flat-Panel Detector-Based System

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto Maruzzelli, Luigi; Tuzzolino, Fabio; Indovina, Pietro Luigi; Luca, Angelo

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to estimate radiation exposure in pediatric liver transplants recipients who underwent biliary interventional procedures and to compare radiation exposure levels between biliary interventional procedures performed using an image intensifier-based angiographic system (IIDS) and a flat panel detector-based interventional system (FPDS). Materials and Methods: We enrolled 34 consecutive pediatric liver transplant recipients with biliary strictures between January 2008 and March 2013 with a total of 170 image-guided procedures. The dose-area product (DAP) and fluoroscopy time was recorded for each procedure. The mean age was 61 months (range 4-192), and mean weight was 17 kg (range 4-41). The procedures were classified into three categories: percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and biliary catheter placement (n = 40); cholangiography and balloon dilatation (n = 55); and cholangiography and biliary catheter change or removal (n = 75). Ninety-two procedures were performed using an IIDS. Seventy-eight procedures performed after July 2010 were performed using an FPDS. The difference in DAP between the two angiographic systems was compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum test and a multiple linear regression model. Results: Mean DAP in the three categories was significantly greater in the group of procedures performed using the IIDS compared with those performed using the FPDS. Statistical analysis showed a p value = 0.001 for the PTBD group, p = 0.0002 for the cholangiogram and balloon dilatation group, and p = 0.00001 for the group with cholangiogram and biliary catheter change or removal. Conclusion: In our selected cohort of patients, the use of an FPDS decreases radiation exposure.

  18. ELECTROLUMINESCENT MATERIAL FOR FLAT PANEL DISPLAY

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.B.

    2000-11-13

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to develop a new-generation electroluminescent (EL) material for flat panel displays and related applications by using unique and complementary research capabilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and OSRAM Sylvania, Inc. The goal was to produce an EL material with a luminance 10 times greater than conventional EL phosphors. An EL material with this increased luminance would have immediate applications for flat panel display devices (e.g., backlighting for liquid-crystal diodes) and for EL lamp technology. OSRAM Sylvania proposed that increased EL phosphor luminance could be obtained by creating composite EL materials capable of alignment under an applied electric field and capable of concentrating the applied electric field. Oak Ridge National Laboratory used pulsed laser deposition as a method for making these composite EL materials. The materials were evaluated for electroluminescence at laboratory facilities at OSRAM Sylvania, Inc. Many composite structures were thus made and evaluated, and it was observed that a composite structure based on alternating layers of a ferroelectric and a phosphor yielded electroluminescence. An enabling step that was not initially proposed but was conceived during the cooperative effort was found to be crucial to the success of the composite structure. The CRADA period expired before we were able to make quantitative measurements of the luminance and efficiency of the composite EL material. Future cooperative work, outside the scope of the CRADA, will focus on making these measurements and will result in the production of a prototype composite EL device.

  19. Multiple-Flat-Panel System Displays Multidimensional Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundo, Daniel; Levit, Creon; Henze, Christopher; Sandstrom, Timothy; Ellsworth, David; Green, Bryan; Joly, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Ames hyperwall is a display system designed to facilitate the visualization of sets of multivariate and multidimensional data like those generated in complex engineering and scientific computations. The hyperwall includes a 77 matrix of computer-driven flat-panel video display units, each presenting an image of 1,280 1,024 pixels. The term hyperwall reflects the fact that this system is a more capable successor to prior computer-driven multiple-flat-panel display systems known by names that include the generic term powerwall and the trade names PowerWall and Powerwall. Each of the 49 flat-panel displays is driven by a rack-mounted, dual-central-processing- unit, workstation-class personal computer equipped with a hig-hperformance graphical-display circuit card and with a hard-disk drive having a storage capacity of 100 GB. Each such computer is a slave node in a master/ slave computing/data-communication system (see Figure 1). The computer that acts as the master node is similar to the slave-node computers, except that it runs the master portion of the system software and is equipped with a keyboard and mouse for control by a human operator. The system utilizes commercially available master/slave software along with custom software that enables the human controller to interact simultaneously with any number of selected slave nodes. In a powerwall, a single rendering task is spread across multiple processors and then the multiple outputs are tiled into one seamless super-display. It must be noted that the hyperwall concept subsumes the powerwall concept in that a single scene could be rendered as a mosaic image on the hyperwall. However, the hyperwall offers a wider set of capabilities to serve a different purpose: The hyperwall concept is one of (1) simultaneously displaying multiple different but related images, and (2) providing means for composing and controlling such sets of images. In place of elaborate software or hardware crossbar switches, the

  20. Sarnoff JND Vision Model for Flat-Panel Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brill, Michael H.; Lubin, Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    This document describes adaptation of the basic Sarnoff JND Vision Model created in response to the NASA/ARPA need for a general-purpose model to predict the perceived image quality attained by flat-panel displays. The JND model predicts the perceptual ratings that humans will assign to a degraded color-image sequence relative to its nondegraded counterpart. Substantial flexibility is incorporated into this version of the model so it may be used to model displays at the sub-pixel and sub-frame level. To model a display (e.g., an LCD), the input-image data can be sampled at many times the pixel resolution and at many times the digital frame rate. The first stage of the model downsamples each sequence in time and in space to physiologically reasonable rates, but with minimum interpolative artifacts and aliasing. Luma and chroma parts of the model generate (through multi-resolution pyramid representation) a map of differences-between test and reference called the JND map, from which a summary rating predictor is derived. The latest model extensions have done well in calibration against psychophysical data and against image-rating data given a CRT-based front-end. THe software was delivered to NASA Ames and is being integrated with LCD display models at that facility,

  1. Image quality evaluation of direct-conversion digital mammography system with new dual a-Se layer detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwabara, Takao; Iwasaki, Nobuyuki; Sendai, Tomonari; Furue, Ryosuke; Agano, Toshitaka

    2009-02-01

    To increase the detection performance of breast cancers in mammograms, we need to improve shape delineation of micro calcifications and tumors. We accomplished this by developing a direct-conversion mammography system with an optical reading method and a new dual a-Se layer detector. The system achieved both small pixel size (50 micrometer) and a high Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) realized by 100 % of fill factor and noise reduction. We evaluated image quality performance and determined the best exposure conditions. We measured DQE and Modulation Transfer Function(MTF) according to the IEC62220-1-2. High DQE was maintained at a low radiation dosage, indicating that the optical reading method accompanies low noises. Response of MTF was maintained at up to the Nyquist frequency of 10 cyc/mm, which corresponds to 50 micrometer pixel size. To determine the best exposure conditions, we measured Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) and visually evaluated images of a resected breast under conditions of MoMo, MoRh, and WRh. There were occasional disagreements between the exposure conditions for achieving the maximum CNR and those for the best image graded by the visual evaluation. This was probably because CNR measurement does not measure effects of scattered X-ray. The images verified the improvement in detection and delineation performance of micro calcifications and tumors.

  2. Single shot x-ray phase contrast imaging using a direct conversion microstrip detector with single photon sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagias, M.; Cartier, S.; Wang, Z.; Bergamaschi, A.; Dinapoli, R.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Stampanoni, M.

    2016-06-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging enables the measurement of the electron density of a sample with high sensitivity compared to the conventional absorption contrast. This is advantageous for the study of dose-sensitive samples, in particular, for biological and medical investigations. Recent developments relaxed the requirement for the beam coherence, such that conventional X-ray sources can be used for phase contrast imaging and thus clinical applications become possible. One of the prominent phase contrast imaging methods, Talbot-Lau grating interferometry, is limited by the manufacturing, alignment, and photon absorption of the analyzer grating, which is placed in the beam path in front of the detector. We propose an alternative improved method based on direct conversion charge integrating detectors, which enables a grating interferometer to be operated without an analyzer grating. Algorithms are introduced, which resolve interference fringes with a periodicity of 4.7 μm recorded with a 25 μm pitch Si microstrip detector (GOTTHARD). The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated by an experiment at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source on a polyethylene sample.

  3. Active noise control using a distributed mode flat panel loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Rajamani, R; Dudney, J; Stelson, K A

    2003-07-01

    A flat panel distributed mode loudspeaker (DML) has many advantages over traditional cone speakers in terms of its weight, size, and durability. However, its frequency response is uneven and complex, thus bringing its suitability for active noise control (ANC) under question. This paper presents experimental results demonstrating the effective use of panel DML speakers in an ANC application. Both feedback and feedforward control techniques are considered. Effective feedback control with a flat panel speaker could open up a whole range of new noise control applications and has many advantages over feedforward control. The paper develops a new control algorithm to attenuate tonal noise of a known frequency by feedback control. However, due to the uneven response of the speakers, feedback control is found to be only moderately effective even for this narrow-band application. Feedforward control proves to be most capable for the flat panel speaker. Using feedforward control, the sound pressure level can be significantly reduced in close proximity to an error microphone. The paper demonstrates an interesting application of the flat panel in which the panel is placed in the path of sound and effectively used to block sound transmission using feedforward control. This is a new approach to active noise control enabled by the use of flat panels and can be used to prevent sound from entering into an enclosure in the first place rather than the traditional approach of attempting to cancel sound after it enters the enclosure.

  4. Motion-compensated defect interpolation for flat-panel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aach, Til; Barth, Erhardt; Mayntz, Claudia

    2004-05-01

    One advantage of flat-panel X-ray detectors is the immediate availability of the acquired images for display. Current limitations in large-area active-matrix manufacturing technology, however, require that the images read out from such detectors be processed to correct for inactive pixels. In static radiographs, these defects can only be interpolated by spatial filtering. Moving X-ray image modalities, such as fluoroscopy or cine-angiography, permit to use temporal information as well. This paper describes interframe defect interpolation algorithms based on motion compensation and filtering. Assuming the locations of the defects to be known, we fill in the defective areas from past frames, where the missing information was visible due to motion. The motion estimator is based on regularized block matching, with speedup obtained by successive elimination and related measures. To avoid the motion estimator locking on to static defects, these are cut out of each block during matching. Once motion is estimated, three methods are available for defect interpolation: direct filling-in by the motion-compensated predecessor, filling-in by a 3D-multilevel median filtered value, and spatiotemporal mean filtering. Results are shown for noisy fluoroscopy sequences acquired in clinical routine with varying amounts of motion and simulated defects up to six lines wide. They show that the 3D-multilevel median filter appears as the method of choice since it causes the least blur of the interpolated data, is robust with respect to motion estimation errors and works even in non-moving areas.

  5. Design and performance of the prototype full field breast tomosynthesis system with selenium based flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Baorui; Ruth, Chris; Stein, Jay; Smith, Andrew; Shaw, Ian; Jing, Zhenxue

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a breast tomosynthesis system utilizing a selenium-based direct conversion flat panel detector. This prototype system is a modification of Selenia, Hologic"s full field digital mammography system, using an add-on breast holding device to allow 3D tomosynthetic imaging. During a tomosynthesis scan, the breast is held stationary while the x-ray source and detector mounted on a c-arm rotate continuously around the breast over an angular range up to 30 degrees. The x-ray tube is pulsed to acquire 11 projections at desired c-arm angles. Images are reconstructed in planes parallel to the breastplate using a filtered backprojection algorithm. Processing time is typically 1 minute for a 50 mm thick breast at 0.1 mm in-plane pixel size, 1 mm slice-to-slice separation. Clinical studies are in progress. Performance evaluations were carried out at the system and the subsystem levels including spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, spectra optimization, imaging technique, and phantom and patient studies. Experimental results show that we have successfully built a tomosynthesis system with images showing less structure noise and revealing 3D information compared with the conventional mammogram. We introduce, for the first time, the definition of "Depth of Field" for tomosynthesis based on a spatial resolution study. This parameter is used together with Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) to evaluate 3D resolution of a tomosynthesis system as a function of system design, imaging technique, and reconstruction algorithm. Findings from the on-going clinical studies will help the design of the next generation tomosynthesis system offering improved performance.

  6. Flat Panel Space Based Space Surveillance Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, R.; Duncan, A.; Wilm, J.; Thurman, S. T.; Stubbs, D. M.; Ogden, C.

    2013-09-01

    Traditional electro-optical (EO) imaging payloads consist of an optical telescope to collect the light from the object scene and map the photons to an image plane to be digitized by a focal plane detector array. The size, weight, and power (SWaP) for the traditional EO imager is dominated by the optical telescope, driven primarily by the large optics, large stiff structures, and the thermal control needed to maintain precision free-space optical alignments. We propose a non-traditional Segmented Planar Imaging Detector for EO Reconnaissance (SPIDER) imager concept that is designed to substantially reduce SWaP, by at least an order of magnitude. SPIDER maximizes performance by providing a larger effective diameter (resolution) while minimizing mass and cost. SPIDER replaces the traditional optical telescope and digital focal plane detector array with a densely packed interferometer array based on emerging photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technologies. Lenslets couple light from the object into a set of waveguides on a PIC. Light from each lenslet is distributed among different waveguides by both field angle and optical frequency, and the lenslets are paired up to form unique interferometer baselines by combining light from different waveguides. The complex spatial coherence of the object (for each field angle, frequency, and baseline) is measured with a balanced four quadrature detection scheme. By the Van-Cittert Zernike Theorem, each measurement corresponds to a unique Fourier component of the incoherent object intensity distribution. Finally, an image reconstruction algorithm is used to invert all the data and form an image. Our approach replaces the large optics and structures required by a conventional telescope with PICs that are accommodated by standard lithographic fabrication techniques (e.g., CMOS fabrication). The standard EO payload integration and test process which involves precision alignment and test of optical components to form a diffraction

  7. Software Simulates Sight: Flat Panel Mura Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    In the increasingly sophisticated world of high-definition flat screen monitors and television screens, image clarity and the elimination of distortion are paramount concerns. As the devices that reproduce images become more and more sophisticated, so do the technologies that verify their accuracy. By simulating the manner in which a human eye perceives and interprets a visual stimulus, NASA scientists have found ways to automatically and accurately test new monitors and displays. The Spatial Standard Observer (SSO) software metric, developed by Dr. Andrew B. Watson at Ames Research Center, measures visibility and defects in screens, displays, and interfaces. In the design of such a software tool, a central challenge is determining which aspects of visual function to include while accuracy and generality are important, relative simplicity of the software module is also a key virtue. Based on data collected in ModelFest, a large cooperative multi-lab project hosted by the Optical Society of America, the SSO simulates a simplified model of human spatial vision, operating on a pair of images that are viewed at a specific viewing distance with pixels having a known relation to luminance. The SSO measures the visibility of foveal spatial patterns, or the discriminability of two patterns, by incorporating only a few essential components of vision. These components include local contrast transformation, a contrast sensitivity function, local masking, and local pooling. By this construction, the SSO provides output in units of "just noticeable differences" (JND) a unit of measure based on the assumed smallest difference of sensory input detectable by a human being. Herein is the truly amazing ability of the SSO, while conventional methods can manipulate images, the SSO models human perception. This set of equations actually defines a mathematical way of working with an image that accurately reflects the way in which the human eye and mind behold a stimulus. The SSO is

  8. Direct conversion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massier, Paul F.; Bankston, C. P.; Williams, R.; Underwood, M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Fabris, G.

    1989-01-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1, 1989 through December 31, 1989. Research on these concepts was initiated during October 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions contain discussions on the following other direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (nitinol heat engines); and also, more complete discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

  9. Direct conversion technology

    SciTech Connect

    Massier, P.F.; Back, L.H.; Ryan, M.A.; Fabris, G.

    1992-01-07

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1991. Research on AMTEC and on LMMHD was initiated during October 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions (Refs. 1--5) contain descriptive and performance discussions of the following direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (Nitionol heat engine); and also, more complete descriptive discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

  10. A semiempirical linear model of indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shih-Ying; Yang Kai; Abbey, Craig K.; Boone, John M.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: It is important to understand signal and noise transfer in the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector when developing and optimizing imaging systems. For optimization where simulating images is necessary, this study introduces a semiempirical model to simulate projection images with user-defined x-ray fluence interaction. Methods: The signal and noise transfer in the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors is characterized by statistics consistent with energy-integration of x-ray photons. For an incident x-ray spectrum, x-ray photons are attenuated and absorbed in the x-ray scintillator to produce light photons, which are coupled to photodiodes for signal readout. The signal mean and variance are linearly related to the energy-integrated x-ray spectrum by empirically determined factors. With the known first- and second-order statistics, images can be simulated by incorporating multipixel signal statistics and the modulation transfer function of the imaging system. To estimate the semiempirical input to this model, 500 projection images (using an indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector in the breast CT system) were acquired with 50-100 kilovolt (kV) x-ray spectra filtered with 0.1-mm tin (Sn), 0.2-mm copper (Cu), 1.5-mm aluminum (Al), or 0.05-mm silver (Ag). The signal mean and variance of each detector element and the noise power spectra (NPS) were calculated and incorporated into this model for accuracy. Additionally, the modulation transfer function of the detector system was physically measured and incorporated in the image simulation steps. For validation purposes, simulated and measured projection images of air scans were compared using 40 kV/0.1-mm Sn, 65 kV/0.2-mm Cu, 85 kV/1.5-mm Al, and 95 kV/0.05-mm Ag. Results: The linear relationship between the measured signal statistics and the energy-integrated x-ray spectrum was confirmed and incorporated into the model. The signal mean and variance factors were linearly related to kV for each filter material (r

  11. Diffractive flat panel solar concentrators of a novel design.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Ties M; de Boer, Dick K G; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-11

    A novel design for a flat panel solar concentrator is presented which is based on a light guide with a grating applied on top that diffracts light into total internal reflection. By combining geometrical and diffractive optics the geometrical concentration ratio is optimized according to the principles of nonimaging optics, while the thickness of the device is minimized due to the use of total internal reflection. PMID:27410900

  12. Flat panel planar optic display. Revision 4/95

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-05-01

    A prototype 10 inch flat panel Planar Optic display, (POD), screen has been constructed and tested. This display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optic glass sheets bonded together with a cladding layer between each sheet where each glass sheet represents a vertical line of resolution. The display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately 1 inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  13. Diffractive flat panel solar concentrators of a novel design.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Ties M; de Boer, Dick K G; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-11

    A novel design for a flat panel solar concentrator is presented which is based on a light guide with a grating applied on top that diffracts light into total internal reflection. By combining geometrical and diffractive optics the geometrical concentration ratio is optimized according to the principles of nonimaging optics, while the thickness of the device is minimized due to the use of total internal reflection.

  14. 75 FR 51286 - Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... COMMISSION Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of Investigation AGENCY: U.S... importation of certain flat panel digital televisions and components thereof by reason of infringement of... certain flat panel digital televisions and components thereof that infringe one or more of claims 22-25...

  15. Dual-exposure technique for extending the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors.

    PubMed

    Sisniega, A; Abella, M; Desco, M; Vaquero, J J

    2014-01-20

    This work presents an approach to extend the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors by combining two acquisitions of the same sample taken with two different x-ray photon flux levels and the same beam spectral configuration. In order to combine both datasets, the response of detector pixels was modelled in terms of mean and variance using a linear model. The model was extended to take into account the effect of pixel saturation. We estimated a joint probability density function (j-pdf) of the pixel values by assuming that each dataset follows an independent Gaussian distribution. This j-pdf was used for estimating the final pixel value of the high-dynamic-range dataset using a maximum likelihood method. The suitability of the pixel model for the representation of the detector signal was assessed using experimental data from a small-animal cone-beam micro-CT scanner equipped with a flat panel detector. The potential extension in dynamic range offered by our method was investigated for generic flat panel detectors using analytical expressions and simulations. The performance of the proposed dual-exposure approach in realistic imaging environments was compared with that of a regular single-exposure technique using experimental data from two different phantoms. Image quality was assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, and analysis of profiles drawn on the images. The dynamic range, measured as the ratio between the exposure for saturation and the exposure equivalent to instrumentation noise, was increased from 76.9 to 166.7 when using our method. Dual-exposure results showed higher contrast-to-noise ratio and contrast resolution than the single-exposure acquisitions for the same x-ray dose. In addition, image artifacts were reduced in the combined dataset. This technique to extend the dynamic range of the detector without increasing the dose is particularly suited to image samples that contain both low and high attenuation regions.

  16. Advantages of using flat-panel LCD for projection displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dean C.

    1995-04-01

    The advantages of applying flat panel Liquid CRystal Displays (LCD) for Projection Displays will be extensively discussed. The selection and fabrication of flat panel LCD in order to meet the specific requirements of projection displays through various technologies will be suggested and explored in detail. The compact, flexible size and easy portability of flat panel LCDs are well known. For practical reasons, it is desirable to take advantages some of these useful properties in Projection Displays. With the recent popularity of large format display sizes, high information content and practicality all increases the demand of projection enlargement for high level performance and comfortable viewing. As a result, Projection Displays are becoming the chosen technological option for effective presentation of visual information. In general, the Liquid Crystal Light Valves (LCLV) used in Projection Displays are simply transmissive flat panel liquid crystal displays. For example at the low end, the monochromatic LCD projection panels are simply transmissive LCDs to be used in combination with laptops or PCs and light sources such as overhead projectors. These projection panels are getting popular for their portability, readability and low cost. However, due to the passive nature of the LCD used in these projector panels, the response time, contrast ratio and color gamut are relatively limited. Whether the newly developed Active Addressing technology will be able to improve the response time, contrast ratio and color gamut of these passive matrix LCDs remain to be proven. In the middle range of projection displays, Liquid Crystal Light Valves using color Active Matrix LCDs are rapidly replacing the dominant CRT based projectors. LCLVs have a number of advantages including portability, easy set-up and data readability. There are several new developments using single crystal, polysilicon as active matrix for LCDs with improved performance. Since single crystal active matrix

  17. An iterative algorithm for soft tissue reconstruction from truncated flat panel projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langan, D.; Claus, B.; Edic, P.; Vaillant, R.; De Man, B.; Basu, S.; Iatrou, M.

    2006-03-01

    The capabilities of flat panel interventional x-ray systems continue to expand, enabling a broader array of medical applications to be performed in a minimally invasive manner. Although CT is providing pre-operative 3D information, there is a need for 3D imaging of low contrast soft tissue during interventions in a number of areas including neurology, cardiac electro-physiology, and oncology. Unlike CT systems, interventional angiographic x-ray systems provide real-time large field of view 2D imaging, patient access, and flexible gantry positioning enabling interventional procedures. However, relative to CT, these C-arm flat panel systems have additional technical challenges in 3D soft tissue imaging including slower rotation speed, gantry vibration, reduced lateral patient field of view (FOV), and increased scatter. The reduced patient FOV often results in significant data truncation. Reconstruction of truncated (incomplete) data is known an "interior problem", and it is mathematically impossible to obtain an exact reconstruction. Nevertheless, it is an important problem in 3D imaging on a C-arm to address the need to generate a 3D reconstruction representative of the object being imaged with minimal artifacts. In this work we investigate the application of an iterative Maximum Likelihood Transmission (MLTR) algorithm to truncated data. We also consider truncated data with limited views for cardiac imaging where the views are gated by the electrocardiogram(ECG) to combat motion artifacts.

  18. View-dependent geometric calibration for offset flat-panel cone beam computed tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van-Giang

    2016-04-01

    Geometric parameters that define the geometry of imaging systems are crucial for image reconstruction and image quality in x-ray computed tomography (CT). The problem of determining geometric parameters for an offset flat-panel cone beam CT (CBCT) system, a recently introduced modality with a large field of view, with the assumption of an unstable mechanism and geometric parameters that vary in each view, is considered. To accurately and rapidly find the geometric parameters for each projection view, we use the projection matrix method and design a dedicated phantom that is partially visible in all projection views. The phantom consists of balls distributed symmetrically in a cylinder to ensure the inclusion of the phantom in all views, and a large portion of the phantom is covered in the projection image. To efficiently use calibrated geometric information in the reconstruction process and get rid of approximation errors, instead of decomposing the projection matrix into actual geometric parameters that are manually corrected before being used in reconstruction, as in conventional methods, we directly use the projection matrix and its pseudo-inverse in projection and backprojection operations of reconstruction algorithms. The experiments illustrate the efficacy of the proposed method with a real offset flat-panel CBCT system in dental imaging.

  19. Direct conversion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massier, P. F.; Bankston, C. P.; Fabris, G.; Kirol, L. D.

    1988-01-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct thermal-to-electric energy conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1988 through December 1988. Research on these concepts was initiated during October 1987. In addition, status reviews and assessments are presented for thermomagnetic converter concepts and for thermoelastic converters (Nitinol heat engines). Reports prepared on previous occasions contain discussions on the following other direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic thermophotovoltaic and thermoacoustic; and also, more complete discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems. A tabulated summary of the various systems which have been reviewed thus far has been prepared. Some of the important technical research needs are listed and a schematic of each system is shown.

  20. Perfusion analysis using a wide coverage flat-panel volume CT: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasruck, M.; Gupta, R.; Reichardt, B.; Klotz, E.; Schmidt, B.; Flohr, T.

    2007-03-01

    We developed a Flat-panel detector based Volume CT (VCT) prototype scanner with large z-coverage. In that prototype scanner a Varian 4030CB a-Si flat-panel detector was mounted in a multi slice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Solutions) which provides a 25 cm field of view with 18 cm z-coverage at isocenter. The large volume covered in one rotation can be used for visualization of complete organs of small animals, e.g. rabbits. By implementing a mode with continuous scanning, we are able to reconstruct the complete volume at any point in time during the propagation of a contrast bolus. Multiple volumetric reconstructions over time elucidate the first pass dynamics of a bolus of contrast resulting in 4-D angiography and potentially allowing whole organ perfusion analysis. We studied to which extent pixel based permeability and blood volume calculation with a modified Patlak approach was possible. Experimental validation was performed by imaging evolution of contrast bolus in New Zealand rabbits. Despite the short circulation time of a rabbit, the temporal resolution was sufficient to visually resolve various phases of the first pass of the contrast bolus. Perfusion imaging required substantial spatial smoothing but allowed a qualitative discrimination of different types of parenchyma in brain and liver. If a true quantitative analysis is possible, requires further studies.

  1. Dose rate and beam profile measurement of proton beam using a flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong-Min

    2015-10-01

    A 20-MeV or 100-MeV proton beam is provided to users for their proton beam irradiation experiments at KOrea Multi-Purpose Accelerator Complex. Radiochromic film (Gafchromic / HDV2) has been used to measure the dose rate and the profile of an incident proton beam during irradiation experiments. However, such measurements using radiochromic film have some inconveniences because an additional scanning process of is required to quantify the film's image. Therefore, we tried to measure the dose rate and beam profile by using a flat panel detector (FPD), which was developed for X-ray radiography as a substitute for radiochromic film because the FPD can measure the beam profile and the dose rate directly through a digitized image with a high spatial resolution. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of using a FPD as a substitute for radiochromic film. The preliminary results for the beam profile and the dose rate measured by using the flat panel detector are reported in the paper.

  2. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Li, Ziping; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun

    2015-12-01

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18-20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  3. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Jun; Li, Ziping; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng

    2015-12-14

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  4. Physical properties of a new flat panel detector with cesium-iodide technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Andreas; Penchev, Petar; Fiebich, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Flat panel detectors have become the standard technology in projection radiography. Further progress in detector technology will result in an improvement of MTF and DQE. The new detector (DX-D45C; Agfa; Mortsel/Belgium) is based on cesium-iodine crystals and has a change in the detector material and the readout electronics. The detector has a size of 30 cm x 24 cm and a pixel matrix of 2560 x 2048 with a pixel pitch of 124 μm. The system includes an automatic exposure detector, which enables the use of the detector without a connection to the x-ray generator. The physical properties of the detector were determined following IEC 62220-1-1 in a laboratory setting. The MTF showed an improvement compared to the previous version of cesium-iodine based flat-panel detectors. Thereby the DQE is also improved especially for the higher frequencies. The new detector showed an improvement in the physical properties compared to the previous versions. This enables a potential for further dose reductions in clinical imaging.

  5. Flat panel detectors--closing the (digital) gap in chest and skeletal radiology.

    PubMed

    Reiff, K J

    1999-08-01

    In the radiological department today the majority of all X-ray procedures on chest and skeletal radiography is performed with classical film-screen-systems. Using digital luminescence radiography (DLR or CR, which stands for Computed Radiography) as a technique has shown a way to replace this 100-year-old procedure of doing general radiography work by acquiring the X-rays digitally via phosphor screens, but this approach has faced criticism from lots of radiologists world wide and therefore has not been widely accepted except in the intensive care environment. A new technology is now rising based on the use of so called flat panel X-ray (FD) detectors. Semi-conducting material detects the X-rays in digital form directly and creates an instantaneous image for display, distribution and diagnosis. This ability combined with a large field of view and compared to existing methods--excellent detective quantum efficiency represents a revolutionary step for chest and skeletal radiography and will put basic X-ray-work back into the focus of radiological solutions. This paper will explain the basic technology of flat panel detectors, possible system solutions based on this new technology, aspects of the user interface influencing the system utilization and versatility as well as the possibility to redefine the patient examination process for chest and skeletal radiography. Furthermore the author discusses limitations for the first released systems, upgrades for the installed base and possible scenarios for the future, e.g. fluoroscopy or angiography application. PMID:10565511

  6. Advances in infrastructure support for flat panel display manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardsley, James N.; Ciesinski, Michael F.; Pinnel, M. Robert

    1997-07-01

    The success of the US display industry, both in providing high-performance displays for the US Department of Defense at reasonable cost and in capturing a significant share of the global civilian market, depends on maintaining technological leadership and on building efficient manufacturing capabilities. The US Display Consortium (USDC) was set up in 1993 by the US Government and private industry to guide the development of the infrastructure needed to support the manufacturing of flat panel displays. This mainly involves the supply of equipment and materials, but also includes the formation of partnerships and the training of a skilled labor force. Examples are given of successful development projects, some involving USDC participation, others through independent efforts of its member companies. These examples show that US-based companies can achieve leadership positions in this young and rapidly growing global market.

  7. Flat-panel video resolution LED display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wareberg, P. G.; Kennedy, D. I.

    The system consists of a 128 x 128 element X-Y addressable LED array fabricated from green-emitting gallium phosphide. The LED array is interfaced with a 128 x 128 matrix TV camera. Associated electronics provides for seven levels of grey scale above zero with a grey scale ratio of square root of 2. Picture elements are on 0.008 inch centers resulting in a resolution of 125 lines-per-inch and a display area of approximately 1 sq. in. The LED array concept lends itself to modular construction, permitting assembly of a flat panel screen of any desired size from 1 x 1 inch building blocks without loss of resolution. A wide range of prospective aerospace applications exist extending from helmet-mounted systems involving small dedicated arrays to multimode cockpit displays constructed as modular screens. High-resolution LED arrays are already used as CRT replacements in military film-marking reconnaissance applications.

  8. Improving the diversity of manufacturing electroluminescent flat panel displays

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, T.S.; Samuels, J.A.; Smith, D.C.

    1995-09-01

    Crystalline calcium thiogallate with a cerium dopant has been deposited by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) at temperatures below 600{degrees}C on a low cost glass substrate. An EL luminance of 1.05 fL was observed 40 volts above threshold at 60 Hz. This is more than an order of magnitude improvement over earlier crystalline-as-deposited thiogallate materials. These results pave the way for the use of MOCVD as a potential method for processing full color thin-film electroluminescent (TFEL) flat panel displays. The formation of the CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Ce phosphor requires precise control over a number of deposition parameters including flow rates, substrate temperature, and reactor pressure. The influence of these parameters will be discussed in terms of structure, uniformity, and TFEL device performance.

  9. EMI investigation and modeling of a flat panel display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Satyajeet

    It is often important to carry out EMI analysis in the design phase of an electronic product to predict the radiated emissions. An EMI analysis is important to predict if the product complies with the FCC regulations as well as to gain an understanding of the noise coupling and radiation mechanisms. EMI analysis and prediction of radiated emissions in electronic products that have an electrically large chassis, pose a challenge due to the presence of multiple resonant structures and noise-coupling mechanisms. The study focusses on the investigation of the main noise coupling mechanisms, the approach and methods used for the modeling of a flat panel display. Full-wave simulation models are a powerful tool for the prediction of radiated emissions and the visualization of coupling paths within the product. The first part deals with the measurement of radiated emissions from the display under standard test conditions and the identification of the main noise sources using near-field scanning. The contribution of the chassis components - frame, back cover and the back panel, to the radiated emission is analyzed using shielding measurements. Noise coupling from the main board, flex cables, display driver boards and the display is analyzed from measurements. The second part deals with the full-wave modeling of the components - main board, flex cables, chassis and the display driver boards. The modeling approach is demonstrated by highlighting some of the challenges in modeling larger structures having many details. The simulation model contains the main components of the TV that contribute to far-field radiation. The full-wave modeling is done using the CST Microwave Studio. Two sets of simulation models are described - the common mode models and the complete models. The use of the common mode models for the identification of the resonant structures is demonstrated. The far-field radiated emissions along with the coupling mechanism within the flat panel display can be

  10. Hysterosalpingography using a flat panel unit: Evaluation and optimization of ovarian radiation dose

    SciTech Connect

    Messaris, Gerasimos A. T.; Abatzis, Ilias; Kagadis, George C.; Samartzis, Alexandros P.; Athanasopoulou, Panagiota; Christeas, Nikolaos; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Karnabatidis, Dimitrios; Nikiforidis, George C.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was the evaluation and optimization of radiation dose to the ovaries (D) in hysterosalpingography (HSG). Methods: The study included a phantom study and a clinical one. In the phantom study, we evaluated imaging results for different geometrical setups and irradiation conditions. In the clinical study, 34 women were assigned into three different fluoroscopy modes and D was estimated with direct cervical TLD measurements. Results: In the phantom study, we used a source-to-image-distance (SID) of 110 cm and a field diagonal of 48 cm, and thus decreased air KERMA rate (KR) by 19% and 70%, respectively, for beam filtration: 4 mm Al and 0.9 mm Cu (Low dose). The least radiation exposure was accomplished by using the 3.75 pps fluoroscopy mode in conjunction with beam filtration: Low dose. In the clinical study, D normalized to 50 s of fluoroscopy time with a 3.75 pps fluoroscopy mode reached a value of 0.45 {+-} 0.04 mGy. Observers' evaluation of diagnostic image quality did not significantly differ for the three different modes of acquisition that were compared. Conclusions: Digital spot radiographs could be omitted in modern flat panel systems during HSG. Fluoroscopy image acquisitions in a modern flat panel unit at 3.75 pps and a beam filtration of 4 mm Al and 0.9 mm Cu demonstrate acceptable image quality with an average D equal to 0.45 mGy. This value is lower compared to the studied literature. For these reasons, the proposed method may be recommended for routine HSG examination in order to limit radiation exposure to the ovaries.

  11. Quantitative carbon ion beam radiography and tomography with a flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Telsemeyer, Julia; Jäkel, Oliver; Martišíková, Mária

    2012-12-01

    High dose gradients are inherent to ion beam therapy. This results in high sensitivity to discrepancies between planned and delivered dose distributions. Therefore an accurate knowledge of the ion stopping power of the traversed tissue is critical. One proposed method to ensure high quality dose deposition is to measure the stopping power by ion radiography. Although the idea of imaging with highly energetic ions is more than forty years old, there is a lack of simple detectors suitable for this purpose. In this study the performance of an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector, originally designed for photon imaging, was investigated for quantitative carbon ion radiography and tomography. The flat-panel detector was exploited to measure the water equivalent thickness (WET) and water equivalent path length (WEPL) of a phantom at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). To do so, the ambiguous correlation of detector signal to particle energy was overcome by active or passive variation of carbon ion beam energy and measurement of the signal-to-beam energy correlation. The active method enables one to determine the WET of the imaged object with an uncertainty of 0.5 mm WET. For tomographic WEPL measurements the passive method was exploited resulting in an accuracy of 0.01 WEPL. The developed imaging technique presents a method to measure the two-dimensional maps of WET and WEPL of phantoms with a simple and commercially available detector. High spatial resolution of 0.8 × 0.8 mm(2) is given by the detector design. In the future this powerful tool will be used to evaluate the performance of the treatment planning algorithm by studying WET uncertainties.

  12. LOW SCATTER, HIGH KILOVOLT, A-SI FLAT PANEL X-RAY DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Peter D.; Claytor, Thomas N.; Berry, Phillip C.; Hills, Charles R.; Keating, Scott C.; Phillips, David H.; Setoodeh, Shariar

    2009-03-03

    We have been using amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat panel detectors in high energy (>400 kV) cone beam computed tomography (CT) applications for a number of years. We have found that these detectors have a significant amount of internal scatter that degrades the accuracy of attenuation images. The scatter errors cause cupping and streaking artifacts that are practically indistinguishable from beam hardening artifacts. Residual artifacts remain after beam hardening correction and over correction increases noise in CT reconstructions. Another important limitation of existing detectors is that they have a high failure rate, especially when operating at megavolt x-ray energies even with a well collimated beam. Due to the limitations of the current detectors, we decided to design a detector specifically for high energies that has significantly reduced scatter. In collaboration with IMTEC, we have built a prototype amorphous silicon flat panel detector that has both improved imaging response and increased lifetime. LANL's contribution is the ''transparent panel concept''(patent pending), in which structures in the x-ray beam path are either eliminated or made as transparent to x-rays as practical (low atomic number and low areal density). This reduces scatter, makes attenuation measurements more accurate, improves the ability to make corrections for beam hardening, and increases signal to noise ratio in DR images and CT reconstructions. IMTEC's contribution is an improved shielding design that will increase the lifetime of the panel. Preliminary results showing the dramatic reduction in self scatter from the panel will be presented as well as the effect of this improvement on CT images.

  13. Low Scatter, High Kilovolt, A-Si Flat Panel X-Ray Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Peter D.; Claytor, Thomas N.; Berry, Phillip C.; Hills, Charles R.; Keating, Scott C.; Phillips, David H.; Setoodeh, Shariar

    2009-03-01

    We have been using amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat panel detectors in high energy (>400 kV) cone beam computed tomography (CT) applications for a number of years. We have found that these detectors have a significant amount of internal scatter that degrades the accuracy of attenuation images. The scatter errors cause cupping and streaking artifacts that are practically indistinguishable from beam hardening artifacts. Residual artifacts remain after beam hardening correction and over correction increases noise in CT reconstructions. Another important limitation of existing detectors is that they have a high failure rate, especially when operating at megavolt x-ray energies even with a well collimated beam. Due to the limitations of the current detectors, we decided to design a detector specifically for high energies that has significantly reduced scatter. In collaboration with IMTEC, we have built a prototype amorphous silicon flat panel detector that has both improved imaging response and increased lifetime. LANL's contribution is the "transparent panel concept" (patent pending), in which structures in the x-ray beam path are either eliminated or made as transparent to x-rays as practical (low atomic number and low areal density). This reduces scatter, makes attenuation measurements more accurate, improves the ability to make corrections for beam hardening, and increases signal to noise ratio in DR images and CT reconstructions. IMTEC's contribution is an improved shielding design that will increase the lifetime of the panel. Preliminary results showing the dramatic reduction in self scatter from the panel will be presented as well as the effect of this improvement on CT images.

  14. Lowering the ignition voltage by the dual microhollow cathode configuration for multichannel flat panel lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae Il; Park, Ki Wan; Lee, Sung Won; Baik, Hong Koo

    2006-03-20

    We have developed a dual microhollow cathode configuration, employing one power supply circuit with a resistor that is suitable for lamp starting without additional power supplier. We also investigated their electrical characteristics and photo images, varying the applied voltage. The electrical and optical measurements showed that the discharge passed through four distinct stages: no discharges, the first microhollow cathode discharges, the both of the first and second microhollow cathode discharges, and finally the main discharge. As a result, the V{sub s} and E{sub s}/p of a dual microhollow configuration were lower by a factor of about 2 than those of a diode at 40 Torr. We have also observed that the parallel operation can be possible with a single resistor in nine channels flat panel lamp.

  15. Cryogenic flat-panel gas-gap heat switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, S.; Keijzer, R.; Buitelaar, P.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2016-09-01

    A compact additive manufactured flat-panel gas-gap heat switch operating at cryogenic temperature is reported in this paper. A guarded-hot-plate apparatus has been developed to measure the thermal conductance of the heat switch with the heat sink temperature in the range of 100-180 K. The apparatus is cooled by a two-stage GM cooler and the temperature is controlled with a heater and a braided copper wire connection. A thermal guard is mounted on the hot side of the device to confine the heat flow axially through the sample. A gas handling system allows testing the device with different gas pressures in the heat switch. Experiments are performed at various heat sink temperatures, by varying gas pressure in the gas-gap and with helium, hydrogen and nitrogen gas. The measured off-conductance with a heat sink temperature of 115 K and the hot plate at 120 K is 0.134 W/K, the on-conductance with helium and hydrogen gases at the same temperatures is 4.80 W/K and 4.71 W/K, respectively. This results in an on/off conductance ratio of 37 ± 7 and 35 ± 6 for helium and hydrogen respectively. The experimental results matches fairly well with the predicted heat conductance at cryogenic temperatures.

  16. Radiation dose reduction using a CdZnTe-based computed tomography system: Comparison to flat-panel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Although x-ray projection mammography has been very effective in early detection of breast cancer, its utility is reduced in the detection of small lesions that are occult or in dense breasts. One drawback is that the inherent superposition of parenchymal structures makes visualization of small lesions difficult. Breast computed tomography using flat-panel detectors has been developed to address this limitation by producing three-dimensional data while at the same time providing more comfort to the patients by eliminating breast compression. Flat panels are charge integrating detectors and therefore lack energy resolution capability. Recent advances in solid state semiconductor x-ray detector materials and associated electronics allow the investigation of x-ray imaging systems that use a photon counting and energy discriminating detector, which is the subject of this article. Methods: A small field-of-view computed tomography (CT) system that uses CdZnTe (CZT) photon counting detector was compared to one that uses a flat-panel detector for different imaging tasks in breast imaging. The benefits afforded by the CZT detector in the energy weighting modes were investigated. Two types of energy weighting methods were studied: Projection based and image based. Simulation and phantom studies were performed with a 2.5 cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cylinder filled with iodine and calcium contrast objects. Simulation was also performed on a 10 cm breast specimen. Results: The contrast-to-noise ratio improvements as compared to flat-panel detectors were 1.30 and 1.28 (projection based) and 1.35 and 1.25 (image based) for iodine over PMMA and hydroxylapatite over PMMA, respectively. Corresponding simulation values were 1.81 and 1.48 (projection based) and 1.85 and 1.48 (image based). Dose reductions using the CZT detector were 52.05% and 49.45% for iodine and hydroxyapatite imaging, respectively. Image-based weighting was also found to have the least beam

  17. Heat Transfar Properties of Flat-Panel Evacuated Porous Insrlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneno, Hirosyi; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    Flat Panel evacuated porous insulators have been produced by filling powder or fiber (such as perlite powder, diatomaceous earth powder, silica aerogel powder, g lass fiber and ceramic fiber) in film-like laminated plastic container and by evacuating to form vacuum in it is interior. Heat transfer properties of these evacuated insulators have been studied under various conditions (such as particle diameter, surface area, packing density, solid volume fraction and void dimension). The apparent mean thermal conductivity has been measured for the boundary surface temperature at cold face temperature 13°C and hot face temperature 35°. The effect of air pressure ranging from 1 Pa to one atomosphere (105 Pa) was examined. The results were as follows. (1) For each powder the apparent mean thermal conductivity decreases with decreasing residual air pressure, and at very low pressure bellow 1 -103 Pa the conductivity becomes indeqendent of pressure. The thermal conductivity at 1.3Pa is 0.0053 W/mK for perlite powder, 0.0048W/mK for diatomaceous earth powder, 0.0043 W/mK for silica aerogel powder and 0.0029W/mK for glass fiber. (2) With decreasing particle size, the apparent mean thermal conductivity is constant independent of residual air pressure in higher pressure region. It is that void dimension continues to decrease with particle size and the mean free path of air becomes comparable with void dimension. (3) In the range of minor solid volume fraction, the apparent mean thermal conductivity at very low precreases with decreasing particle size. This shows the thermal contact resistance of the solid particle increases with decreasing particle size.

  18. Ring artifact corrections in flat-panel detector based cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anas, Emran Mohammad Abu; Kim, Jaegon; Lee, Soo Yeol; Hasan, Md. Kamrul

    2011-03-01

    The use of flat-panel detectors (FPDs) is becoming increasingly popular in the cone beam volume and multi-slice CT imaging. But due to the deficient semiconductor array processing, the diagnostic quality of the FPD-based CT images in both CT systems is degraded by different types of artifacts known as the ring and radiant artifacts. Several techniques have been already published in eliminating the stripe artifacts from the projection data of the multi-slice CT system or in other words, from the sinogram image with a view to suppress the ring and radiant artifacts from the 2-D reconstructed CT images. On the other hand, till now a few articles have been reported to remove the artifacts from the cone beam CT images. In this paper, an effective approach is presented to eliminate the artifacts from the cone beam projection data using the sinogram based stripe artifact removal methods. The improvement in the required diagnostic quality is achieved by applying them both in horizontal and vertical sinograms constituted sequentially from the stacked cone beam projections. Finally, some real CT images have been used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique in eliminating the ring and radiant artifacts from the cone beam volume CT images. A comparative study with the conventional sinogram based approaches is also presented to see the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  19. [Digital thorax radiography: flat-panel detector or storage phosphor plates].

    PubMed

    Schaefer-Prokop, C; Uffmann, M; Sailer, J; Kabalan, N; Herold, C; Prokop, M

    2003-05-01

    Flat panel detectors are characterized by improved handling and increased dose efficiency. This allows for increasing of work flow efficiency and for reducing the exposure dose by about 50% compared to current systems with a sensitivity of 400. Whether the increased dose efficiency should be used to reduce acquisition dose or to increase image quality in the chest, will be shown by further clinical experience and will be also determined by the subjective preference of the radiologists. The decreased level of image noise opens new perspectives for image processing that way that elaborated multifrequency processing allows for optimizing the display of very small and low contrast structures that was so far limited by overlying image noise. Specialized applications of dual energy subtraction and temporal subtraction will also profit by the new detector technology and will be further driven forward in context with applications such as computed assisted diagnosis even though this is currently not yet broadly applied. Storage phosphor radiography still represents an important alternative technique based on its larger flexibility with respect to equipment configuration, its broader application options in intensive care and emergency radiology and due to economic reasons. These facts are further underlined by the fact that image quality also in storage phosphor radiography could be constantly increased by improving detector technology and image processing and consequently has a high standard. PMID:12764583

  20. Reliability of myocardial perfusion quantification in angiography using a digital flat panel cardiac system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Muriel; Vaillant, Regis; Gavit-Houdant, Laurence; Lienard, Jean; Benali, Karim

    2002-04-01

    Discordance between lesion severity from angiocardiography and physiological effects has been reported elsewhere. Quantification of myocardial perfusion during the angiography procedure may supply additional information about short- and long-term outcomes and may be helpful for clinical decision making. In previous works, myocardial perfusion has been assessed using time density curves (TDC), which represent the contrast medium dilution over time in the myocardium. The mean transit time (MTT), derived from the TDC, has been reported as a good indicator of the regional myocardial perfusion. Our objective is to estimate the accuracy and reproducibility of MTT estimation on digital flat panel (DFP) images. We have simulated typical myocardium TDC obtained with a DFP cardiac system (Innova 2000, GE), taking into account scatter and noise. Logarithmic or linear subtractions have been applied to derive a contrast medium concentration proportional quantity from image intensity. A non-linear minimisation realises the model curve fitting. MTT estimates are more stable with linear subtraction in presence of scatter. However logarithmic subtraction presents smaller bias when scatter level is small. Both approaches are equally sensible to image noise. Linear subtraction should be preferred. Image noise has a high influence on MTT accuracy and we may reduce.

  1. Planar cone-beam computed tomography with a flat-panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, D. W.; Youn, H.; Kim, D.; Kam, S.; Jeon, H.; Kim, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    For a dedicated x-ray inspection of printed-circuit boards (PCBs), a bench-top planar cone-beam computed tomography (pCT) system with a flat-panel detector has been built in the laboratory. The system adopts the tomosynthesis technique that can produce cross-sectional images parallel to the axis of rotation for a limited angular range. For the optimal operation of the system and further improvement in the next design, we have evaluated imaging performances, such as modulation-transfer function, noise-power spectrum, and noise-equivalent number of quanta. The performances are comparatively evaluated with the coventional cone-beam CT (CBCT) acquisition for various scanning angular ranges, applied tube voltages, and geometrical magnification factors. The pCT scan shows a poorer noise performance than the conventional CBCT scan because of less number of projection views used for reconstruction. However, the pCT shows a better spatial-resolution performance than the CBCT. Because the image noise can be compensated by an elevated exposure level during scanning, the pCT can be a useful modality for the PCB inspection that requires higher spatial-resolution performance.

  2. Development of patient collation system by kinetic analysis for chest dynamic radiogram with flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Yuichiro; Kodera, Yoshie

    2006-03-01

    In the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) environment, it is important that all images be stored in the correct location. However, if information such as the patient's name or identification number has been entered incorrectly, it is difficult to notice the error. The present study was performed to develop a system of patient collation automatically for dynamic radiogram examination by a kinetic analysis, and to evaluate the performance of the system. Dynamic chest radiographs during respiration were obtained by using a modified flat panel detector system. Our computer algorithm developed in this study was consisted of two main procedures, kinetic map imaging processing, and collation processing. Kinetic map processing is a new algorithm to visualize a movement for dynamic radiography; direction classification of optical flows and intensity-density transformation technique was performed. Collation processing consisted of analysis with an artificial neural network (ANN) and discrimination for Mahalanobis' generalized distance, those procedures were performed to evaluate a similarity of combination for the same person. Finally, we investigated the performance of our system using eight healthy volunteers' radiographs. The performance was shown as a sensitivity and specificity. The sensitivity and specificity for our system were shown 100% and 100%, respectively. This result indicated that our system has excellent performance for recognition of a patient. Our system will be useful in PACS management for dynamic chest radiography.

  3. Contrast-detail analysis of three flat panel detectors for digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Borasi, Giovanni; Samei, Ehsan; Bertolini, Marco; Nitrosi, Andrea; Tassoni, Davide

    2006-06-15

    In this paper we performed a contrast detail analysis of three commercially available flat panel detectors, two based on the indirect detection mechanism (GE Revolution XQ/i, system A, and Trixell/Philips Pixium 4600, system B) and one based on the direct detection mechanism (Hologic DirectRay DR 1000, system C). The experiment was conducted using standard x-ray radiation quality and a widely used contrast-detail phantom. Images were evaluated using a four alternative forced choice paradigm on a diagnostic-quality softcopy monitor. At the low and intermediate exposures, systems A and B gave equivalent performances. At the high dose levels, system A performed better than system B in the entire range of target sizes, even though the pixel size of system A was about 40% larger than that of system B. At all the dose levels, the performances of the system C (direct system) were lower than those of system A and B (indirect systems). Theoretical analyses based on the Perception Statistical Model gave similar predicted SNR{sub T} values corresponding to an observer efficiency of about 0.08 for systems A and B and 0.05 for system C.

  4. Nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond based field emitter array for a flat-panel x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Posada, Chrystian M.; Grant, Edwin J.; Lee, Hyoung K.; Castaño, Carlos H.; Divan, Ralu; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Rosenmann, Daniel; Stan, Liliana

    2014-04-07

    A field emission based flat-panel transmission x-ray source is being developed as an alternative for medical and industrial imaging. A field emitter array (FEA) prototype based on nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond film has been fabricated to be used as the electron source of this flat panel x-ray source. The FEA prototype was developed using conventional microfabrication techniques. The field emission characteristics of the FEA prototype were evaluated. Results indicated that emission current densities of the order of 6 mA/cm{sup 2} could be obtained at electric fields as low as 10 V/μm to 20 V/μm. During the prototype microfabrication process, issues such as delamination of the extraction gate and poor etching of the SiO{sub 2} insulating layer located between the emitters and the extraction layer were encountered. Consequently, alternative FEA designs were investigated. Experimental and simulation data from the first FEA prototype were compared and the results were used to evaluate the performance of alternative single and double gate designs that would yield better field emission characteristics compared to the first FEA prototype. The best simulation results are obtained for the double gate FEA design, when the diameter of the collimator gate is around 2.6 times the diameter of the extraction gate.

  5. A novel technique for ventriculoperitoneal shunting by flat panel detector CT-guided real-time fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shinya; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Mutoh, Tatsushi; Hikichi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Akifumi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Surgical placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) is the main strategy to manage hydrocephalus. However, the failure rate associated with placement of ventricular catheters remains high. Methods: A hybrid operating room, equipped with a flat-panel detector digital subtraction angiography system containing C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CB-CT) imaging, has recently been developed and utilized to assist neurosurgical procedures. We have developed a novel technique using intraoperative fluoroscopy and a C-arm CB-CT system to facilitate accurate placement of a VPS. Results: Using this novel technique, 39 consecutive ventricular catheters were placed accurately, and no ventricular catheter failures were experienced during the follow-up period. Only two patients experienced obstruction of the VPS, both of which occurred in the extracranial portion of the shunt system. Conclusion: Surgical placement of a VPS assisted by flat panel detector CT-guided real-time fluoroscopy enabled accurate placement of ventricular catheters and was associated with a decreased need for shunt revision. PMID:23226605

  6. Investigations of a flat-panel detector for quality assurance measurements in ion beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Bernadette; Telsemeyer, Julia; Huber, Lucas; Ackermann, Benjamin; Jäkel, Oliver; Martišíková, Mária

    2012-01-01

    Increased accuracy in radiation delivery to a patient provided by scanning particle beams leads to high demands on quality assurance (QA). To meet the requirements, an extensive quality assurance programme has been implemented at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center. Currently, high-resolution radiographic films are used for beam spot position measurements and homogeneity measurements for scanned fields. However, given that using this film type is time and equipment demanding, considerations have been made to replace the radiographic films in QA by another appropriate device. In this study, the suitability of the flat-panel detector RID 256 L based on amorphous silicon was investigated as an alternative method. The currently used radiographic films were taken as a reference. Investigations were carried out for proton and carbon ion beams. The detectors were irradiated simultaneously to allow for a direct comparison. The beam parameters (e.g. energy, focus, position) currently used in the daily QA procedures were applied. Evaluation of the measurements was performed using newly implemented automatic routines. The results for the flat-panel detector were compared to the standard radiographic films. Additionally, a field with intentionally decreased homogeneity was applied to test the detector's sensitivities toward possible incorrect scan parameters. For the beam position analyses, the flat-panel detector results showed good agreement with radiographic films. For both detector types, deviations between measured and planned spot distances were found to be below 1% (1 mm). In homogeneously irradiated fields, the flat-panel detector showed a better dose response homogeneity than the currently used radiographic film. Furthermore, the flat-panel detector is sensitive to field irregularities. The flat-panel detector was found to be an adequate replacement for the radiographic film in QA measurements. In addition, it saves time and equipment because no post

  7. Influence of Flat-Panel Fluoroscopic Equipment Variables on Cardiac Radiation Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Nickoloff, Edward L. Lu Zhengfeng; Dutta, Ajoy; So, James; Balter, Stephen; Moses, Jeffrey

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To assess the influence of physician-selectable equipment variables on the potential radiation dose reductions during cardiac catheterization examinations using modern imaging equipment. Materials. A modern bi-plane angiography unit with flat-panel image receptors was used. Patients were simulated with 15-30 cm of acrylic plastic. The variables studied were: patient thickness, fluoroscopy pulse rates, record mode frame rates, image receptor field-of-view (FoV), automatic dose control (ADC) mode, SID/SSD geometry setting, automatic collimation, automatic positioning, and others. Results. Patient radiation doses double for every additional 3.5-4.5 cm of soft tissue. The dose is directly related to the imaging frame rate; a decrease from 30 pps to 15 pps reduces the dose by about 50%. The dose is related to [(FoV){sup -N}] where 2.0 < N < 3.0. Suboptimal positioning of the patient can nearly double the dose. The ADC system provides three selections that can vary the radiation level by 50%. For pediatric studies (2-5 years old), the selection of equipment variables can result in entrance radiation doses that range between 6 and 60 cGy for diagnostic cases and between 15 and 140 cGy for interventional cases. For adult studies, the equipment variables can produce entrance radiation doses that range between 13 and 130 cGy for diagnostic cases and between 30 and 400 cGy for interventional cases. Conclusions. Overall dose reductions of 70-90% can be achieved with pediatric patients and about 90% with adult patients solely through optimal selection of equipment variables.

  8. Super multi-view display with a lower resolution flat-panel display.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Kosuke; Nakamura, Junya

    2011-02-28

    A lenticular-type super multi-view (SMV) display normally requires an ultra high-resolution flat-panel display. To reduce this resolution requirement, two or more views are generated around each eye with an interval smaller than the pupil diameter. Cylindrical lenses constituting a lenticular lens project a group of pixels of the flat-panel display to generate a group of viewing zones. Pixel groups generating left and right viewing zones through the same cylindrical lens are partitioned to separate the two zones. The left and right pixel groups for different cylindrical lenses are interlaced horizontally. A prototype SMV display is demonstrated. PMID:21369242

  9. Enhanced solution velocity between dark and light areas with horizontal tubes and triangular prism baffles to improve microalgal growth in a flat-panel photo-bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zongbo; Cheng, Jun; Xu, Xiaodan; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-07-01

    Novel horizontal tubes and triangular prism (HTTP) baffles that generate flow vortices were developed to increase solution velocity between dark and light areas and thus improve microalgal growth in a flat-panel photo-bioreactor. Solution velocity, mass-transfer coefficient, and mixing time were measured with a particle-imaging velocimeter, dissolved oxygen probes, and pH probes. The solution mass-transfer coefficient increased by 30% and mixing time decreased by 21% when the HTTP baffles were used. The solution velocity between dark and light areas increased from ∼0.9cm/s to ∼3.5cm/s, resulting in a decreased dark-light cycle period to one-fourth. This enhanced flashing light effect with the HTTP baffles dramatically increased microalgae biomass yield by 70% in the flat-panel photo-bioreactor. PMID:27038260

  10. Three-dimensional IMRT verification with a flat-panel EPID.

    PubMed

    Steciw, S; Warkentin, B; Rathee, S; Fallone, B G

    2005-02-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) pretreatment verification procedure has been developed based on the measurement of two-dimensional (2D) primary fluence profiles using an amorphous silicon flat-panel electronic portal imaging device (EPID). As described in our previous work, fluence profiles are extracted from EPID images by deconvolution with kernels that represent signal spread in the EPID due to radiation and optical scattering. The deconvolution kernels are derived using Monte Carlo simulations of dose deposition in the EPID and empirical fitting methods, for both 6 and 15 MV photon energies. In our new 3D verification technique, 2D fluence modulation profiles for each IMRT field in a treatment are used as input to a treatment planning system (TPS), which then generates 3D doses. Verification is accomplished by comparing this new EPID-based 3D dose distribution to the planned dose distribution calculated by the TPS. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) point dose measurements for an IMRT treatment of an anthropomorphic phantom were in good agreement with the EPID-based 3D doses; in contrast, the planned dose under-predicts the TLD measurement in a high-gradient region by approximately 16%. Similarly, large discrepancies between EPID-based and TPS doses were also evident in dose profiles of small fields incident on a water phantom. These results suggest that our 3D EPID-based method is effective in quantifying relevant uncertainties in the dose calculations of our TPS for IMRT treatments. For three clinical head and neck cancer IMRT treatment plans, our TPS was found to underestimate the mean EPID-based doses in the critical structures of the spinal cord and the parotids by approximately 4 Gy (11%-14%). According to radiobiological modeling calculations that were performed, such underestimates can potentially lead to clinically significant underpredictions of normal tissue complication rates.

  11. Evaluation of the potential utility of flat panel CT for quantifying relative contrast enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A. Kyle; Mahvash, Armeen

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Certain directed oncologic therapies seek to take advantage of the fact that tumors are typically more susceptible to directed therapeutic agents than normal tissue owing to their extensive networks of poorly formed, leaky vasculature. If differences between the vascularity of normal and tumor tissues could be quantified, patients could be selected for or excluded from directed treatments on the basis of this difference. However, angiographic imaging techniques such as digital subtraction angiography (DSA) yield two-dimensional data that may be inadequate for this task. As a first step, the authors evaluated the feasibility of using a commercial implementation of flat panel computed tomography (FPCT) to quantify differences in enhancement of a simulated tumor compared with normal tissue based on differences in CT number measured in precontrast and postcontrast scans. Methods: To evaluate the FPCT scanner studied, the authors scanned several phantoms containing simulated normal and tumor tissues. In the first experiment, the authors used an anthropomorphic phantom containing inclusions representing normal, tumor, and bone tissue to evaluate the constancy of CT numbers in scans repeated at clinically relevant intervals of 1 and 3 min. The authors then scanned gelatin phantoms containing dilutions of iodinated contrast to evaluate the accuracy of relative contrast enhancement measurements for a clinical FPCT system. Data were analyzed using widely available software. Results: CT numbers measured in identical locations were constant over both scan intervals evaluated. Measured relative contrast enhancement values were accurate compared with known relative contrast enhancement values. Care must be taken to avoid artifacts in reconstructed images when placing regions of interest. Conclusions: Despite its limitations, FPCT in the interventional laboratory can be used to quantify relative contrast enhancement in phantoms. This is accomplished by measuring CT

  12. Scan equalization digital radiography (SEDR) implemented with an amorphous Selenium flat-panel detector: initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinming; Lai, Chao-Jen; Chen, Lingyun; Han, Tao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Shen, Youtao; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2010-01-01

    It is well recognized in projection radiography that low-contrast detectability suffered in heavily attenuating regions due to excessively low x-ray fluence to the image receptor and higher noise levels. Exposure equalization can improve image quality by increasing the x-ray exposure to heavily attenuating regions, resulting in a more uniform distribution of exposure to the detector. Image quality is also expected to be improved by using the slot-scan geometry to reject scattered radiation effectively without degrading primary x-rays. This paper describes the design of prototype scan equalization digital radiography (SEDR) system implemented with an amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) array based flat-panel detector. With this system, the slot-scan geometry with the alternate line erasure and readout (ALER) technique was used to achieve scatter rejection. A seven-segment beam height modulator assembly was mounted onto the fore-collimator to regulate exposure regionally for chest radiography. The beam modulator assembly, consisting of micro linear motors, lead screw cartridge with lead beam blocks attached, position feedback sensors, and motor driver circuitry, has been tested and found to have an acceptable response for exposure equalization in chest radiography. An anthropomorphic chest phantom was imaged in the posterior-anterior (PA) view under clinical conditions. Scatter component, primary x-rays, scatter-to-primary ratios (SPRs), and primary signal-to-noise ratios (PSNRs) were measured in the SEDR images to evaluate the rejection and redistribution of scattered radiation, and compared with those for conventional full-field imaging with and without anti-scatter grid methods. SPR reduction ratios (SPRRRs, defined as the differences between the non-grid full-field SPRs and the reduced SPRs divided by the former) yielded approximately 59% for the full-field imaging with grid and 82% for SEDR technique in the lungs; and 77% for the full

  13. Photoelectrochemical based direct conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kocha, S.; Arent, D.; Peterson, M.

    1995-09-01

    The goal of this research is to develop a stable, cost effective, photoelectrochemical based system that will split water upon illumination, producing hydrogen and oxygen directly, using sunlight as the only energy input. This type of direct conversion system combines a photovoltaic material and an electrolyzer into a single monolithic device. We report on our studies of two multifunction multiphoton photoelectrochemical devices, one based on the ternary semiconductor gallium indium phosphide, (GaInP{sub 2}), and the other one based on amorphous silicon carbide. We also report on our studies of the solid state surface treatment of GaInP{sub 2} as well as our continuing effort to develop synthetic techniques for the attachment of transition metal complexes to the surface of semiconductor electrodes. All our surface studies are directed at controlling the interface energetics and forming stable catalytic surfaces.

  14. Measurement of joint kinematics using a conventional clinical single-perspective flat-panel radiography system

    SciTech Connect

    Seslija, Petar; Teeter, Matthew G.; Yuan Xunhua; Naudie, Douglas D. R.; Bourne, Robert B.; MacDonald, Steven J.; Peters, Terry M.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: The ability to accurately measure joint kinematics is an important tool in studying both normal joint function and pathologies associated with injury and disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy, accuracy, precision, and clinical safety of measuring 3D joint motion using a conventional flat-panel radiography system prior to its application in an in vivo study. Methods: An automated, image-based tracking algorithm was implemented to measure the three-dimensional pose of a sparse object from a two-dimensional radiographic projection. The algorithm was tested to determine its efficiency and failure rate, defined as the number of image frames where automated tracking failed, or required user intervention. The accuracy and precision of measuring three-dimensional motion were assessed using a robotic controlled, tibiofemoral knee phantom programmed to mimic a subject with a total knee replacement performing a stair ascent activity. Accuracy was assessed by comparing the measurements of the single-plane radiographic tracking technique to those of an optical tracking system, and quantified by the measurement discrepancy between the two systems using the Bland-Altman technique. Precision was assessed through a series of repeated measurements of the tibiofemoral kinematics, and was quantified using the across-trial deviations of the repeated kinematic measurements. The safety of the imaging procedure was assessed by measuring the effective dose of ionizing radiation associated with the x-ray exposures, and analyzing its relative risk to a human subject. Results: The automated tracking algorithm displayed a failure rate of 2% and achieved an average computational throughput of 8 image frames/s. Mean differences between the radiographic and optical measurements for translations and rotations were less than 0.08 mm and 0.07 Degree-Sign in-plane, and 0.24 mm and 0.6 Degree-Sign out-of-plane. The repeatability of kinematics measurements performed

  15. Amorphous Diamond Flat Panel Displays - Final Report of ER-LTR CRADA project with SI Diamond Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ager III, Joel W.

    1998-05-08

    The objective of this project was to determine why diamond-based films are unusually efficient electron emitters (field emission cathodes) at room temperature. Efficient cathodes based on diamond are being developed by SI Diamond Technology (SIDT) as components for bright, sunlight-readable, flat panel displays. When the project started, it was known that only a small fraction (<1%) of the cathode area is active in electron emission and that the emission sites themselves are sub-micron in size. The critical challenge of this project was to develop new microcharacterization methods capable of examining known emission sites. The research team used a combination of cathode emission imaging (developed at SIDT), micro-Raman spectroscopy (LBNL), and electron microscopy and spectroscopy (National Center for Electron Microscopy, LBNL) to examine the properties of known emission sites. The most significant accomplishment of the project was the development at LBNL of a very high resolution scanning probe that, for the first time, measured simultaneously the topography and electrical characteristics of single emission sites. The increased understanding of the emission mechanism helped SIDT to develop a new cathode material,''nano-diamond,'' which they have incorporated into their Field Emission Picture Element (FEPix) product. SIDT is developing large-format flat panel displays based on these picture elements that will be brighter and more efficient than existing outdoor displays such as Jumbotrons. The energy saving that will be realized if field emission displays are introduced commercially is in line with the energy conservation mission of DOE. The unique characterization tools developed in this project (particularly the new scanning microscopy method) are being used in ongoing BES-funded basic research.

  16. [Flat-panel detector technology -State-of-the-art and future prospects-].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Tatsuya

    2002-01-01

    A flat-panel detector (FPD) is a long-awaited technology to implement the digital X-ray imaging technology into the radiological department. This paper describes the state-of-the-art technology and future prospects on the FPD technology. State-of-the-art technology was reviewed taking the CXDI series as an example. Several FPD-based systems have been introduced into the Japanese market since CXDI-11 opened it in November 1998. Accompanying CXDI-C2 for control, CXDI-22 for table position and CXDI-31 for portable, the CXDI series fulfills the requirement of the radiography room being a fully digitalized room. The FPD on the CXDI series is comprised of a scintillator (Gd(2)O(2)S:Tb(3+)) as a primary sensor in which the X-ray is captured and an amorphous silicon detector (LANMIT) as a secondary sensor in which the fluorescent light is detected. Since the scintillator is identical to that of the screen-film systems, it can be said as proven, durable and chemically stable and it is expected to produce the same image quality as the screen-film systems. CXDI-31, a portable FPD-based system, was developed targeting thinner dimensions, lightweight, durability and high spatial resolution. Thoroughly re-designing the mechanical structure and reducing the power consumption at the readout IC realized thinner dimensions. Introducing the portable note PC technologies successfully combined lightweight with durability. Improving the sensor process and re-designing the layout made the sensor high resolution without compromising the signal-to-noise ratio. Future prospects were overviewed in the aspect of technology and applications. Sensitivity, spatial resolution, frame rate and portability were described as the upcoming technology. Increasing gain and reducing noise will realize higher sensitivity, especially by adopting the PbI(2), HgI(2) or such photoconductor materials as the primary sensor. Pixelized amplifier will also achieve higher sensitivity. Layered sensor designed such

  17. A novel heuristic for optimization aggregate production problem: Evidence from flat panel display in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kuhali, K.; Hussain M., I.; Zain Z., M.; Mullenix, P.

    2015-05-01

    Aim: This paper contribute to the flat panel display industry it terms of aggregate production planning. Methodology: For the minimization cost of total production of LCD manufacturing, a linear programming was applied. The decision variables are general production costs, additional cost incurred for overtime production, additional cost incurred for subcontracting, inventory carrying cost, backorder costs and adjustments for changes incurred within labour levels. Model has been developed considering a manufacturer having several product types, which the maximum types are N, along a total time period of T. Results: Industrial case study based on Malaysia is presented to test and to validate the developed linear programming model for aggregate production planning. Conclusion: The model development is fit under stable environment conditions. Overall it can be recommended to adapt the proven linear programming model to production planning of Malaysian flat panel display industry.

  18. Flat panel display using Ti-Cr-Al-O thin film

    DOEpatents

    Jankowski, Alan F.; Schmid, Anthony P.

    2002-01-01

    Thin films of Ti--Cr--Al--O are used as a resistor material. The films are rf sputter deposited from ceramic targets using a reactive working gas mixture of Ar and O.sub.2. Resistivity values from 10.sup.4 to 10.sup.10 Ohm-cm have been measured for Ti--Cr--Al--O film <1 .mu.m thick. The film resistivity can be discretely selected through control of the target composition and the deposition parameters. The application of Ti--Cr--Al--O as a thin film resistor has been found to be thermodynamically stable, unlike other metal-oxide films. The Ti--Cr--Al--O film can be used as a vertical or lateral resistor, for example, as a layer beneath a field emission cathode in a flat panel display; or used to control surface emissivity, for example, as a coating on an insulating material such as vertical wall supports in flat panel displays.

  19. Flat-panel electronic displays: a triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering.

    PubMed

    Hilsum, Cyril

    2010-03-13

    This paper describes the history and science behind the development of modern flat-panel displays, and assesses future trends. Electronic displays are an important feature of modern life. For many years the cathode ray tube, an engineering marvel, was universal, but its shape was cumbersome and its operating voltage too high. The need for a flat-panel display, working at a low voltage, became imperative, and much research has been applied to this need. Any versatile flat-panel display will exploit an electro-optical effect, a transparent conductor and an addressing system to deliver data locally. The first need is to convert an electrical signal into a visible change. Two methods are available, the first giving emission of light, the second modulating ambient illumination. The most useful light-emitting media are semiconductors, historically exploiting III-V or II-VI compounds, but more recently organic or polymer semiconductors. Another possible effect uses gas plasma discharges. The modulating, or subtractive, effects that have been studied include liquid crystals, electrophoresis, electrowetting and electrochromism. A transparent conductor makes it possible to apply a voltage to an extended area while observing the results. The design is a compromise, since the free electrons that carry current also absorb light. The first materials used were metals, but some semiconductors, when heavily doped, give a better balance, with high transmission for a low resistance. Delivering data unambiguously to a million or so picture elements across the display area is no easy task. The preferred solution is an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor deposited at each cross-point in an X-Y matrix. Success in these endeavours has led to many applications for flat-panel displays, including television, flexible displays, electronic paper, electronic books and advertising signs.

  20. Flat-panel electronic displays: a triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hilsum, Cyril

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the history and science behind the development of modern flat-panel displays, and assesses future trends. Electronic displays are an important feature of modern life. For many years the cathode ray tube, an engineering marvel, was universal, but its shape was cumbersome and its operating voltage too high. The need for a flat-panel display, working at a low voltage, became imperative, and much research has been applied to this need. Any versatile flat-panel display will exploit an electro-optical effect, a transparent conductor and an addressing system to deliver data locally. The first need is to convert an electrical signal into a visible change. Two methods are available, the first giving emission of light, the second modulating ambient illumination. The most useful light-emitting media are semiconductors, historically exploiting III–V or II–VI compounds, but more recently organic or polymer semiconductors. Another possible effect uses gas plasma discharges. The modulating, or subtractive, effects that have been studied include liquid crystals, electrophoresis, electrowetting and electrochromism. A transparent conductor makes it possible to apply a voltage to an extended area while observing the results. The design is a compromise, since the free electrons that carry current also absorb light. The first materials used were metals, but some semiconductors, when heavily doped, give a better balance, with high transmission for a low resistance. Delivering data unambiguously to a million or so picture elements across the display area is no easy task. The preferred solution is an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor deposited at each cross-point in an X–Y matrix. Success in these endeavours has led to many applications for flat-panel displays, including television, flexible displays, electronic paper, electronic books and advertising signs. PMID:20123746

  1. High-performance flat-panel solar thermoelectric generators with high thermal concentration.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Daniel; Poudel, Bed; Feng, Hsien-Ping; Caylor, J Christopher; Yu, Bo; Yan, Xiao; Ma, Yi; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Dezhi; Muto, Andrew; McEnaney, Kenneth; Chiesa, Matteo; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Gang

    2011-05-01

    The conversion of sunlight into electricity has been dominated by photovoltaic and solar thermal power generation. Photovoltaic cells are deployed widely, mostly as flat panels, whereas solar thermal electricity generation relying on optical concentrators and mechanical heat engines is only seen in large-scale power plants. Here we demonstrate a promising flat-panel solar thermal to electric power conversion technology based on the Seebeck effect and high thermal concentration, thus enabling wider applications. The developed solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) achieved a peak efficiency of 4.6% under AM1.5G (1 kW m(-2)) conditions. The efficiency is 7-8 times higher than the previously reported best value for a flat-panel STEG, and is enabled by the use of high-performance nanostructured thermoelectric materials and spectrally-selective solar absorbers in an innovative design that exploits high thermal concentration in an evacuated environment. Our work opens up a promising new approach which has the potential to achieve cost-effective conversion of solar energy into electricity.

  2. High-performance flat-panel solar thermoelectric generators with high thermal concentration.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Daniel; Poudel, Bed; Feng, Hsien-Ping; Caylor, J Christopher; Yu, Bo; Yan, Xiao; Ma, Yi; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Dezhi; Muto, Andrew; McEnaney, Kenneth; Chiesa, Matteo; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Gang

    2011-07-01

    The conversion of sunlight into electricity has been dominated by photovoltaic and solar thermal power generation. Photovoltaic cells are deployed widely, mostly as flat panels, whereas solar thermal electricity generation relying on optical concentrators and mechanical heat engines is only seen in large-scale power plants. Here we demonstrate a promising flat-panel solar thermal to electric power conversion technology based on the Seebeck effect and high thermal concentration, thus enabling wider applications. The developed solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) achieved a peak efficiency of 4.6% under AM1.5G (1 kW m(-2)) conditions. The efficiency is 7-8 times higher than the previously reported best value for a flat-panel STEG, and is enabled by the use of high-performance nanostructured thermoelectric materials and spectrally-selective solar absorbers in an innovative design that exploits high thermal concentration in an evacuated environment. Our work opens up a promising new approach which has the potential to achieve cost-effective conversion of solar energy into electricity. PMID:21532584

  3. Development of CT and 3D-CT Using Flat Panel Detector Based Real-Time Digital Radiography System

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindran, V. R.; Sreelakshmi, C.; Vibin

    2008-09-26

    The application of Digital Radiography in the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of space vehicle components is a recent development in India. A Real-time DR system based on amorphous silicon Flat Panel Detector has been developed for the NDE of solid rocket motors at Rocket Propellant Plant of VSSC in a few years back. The technique has been successfully established for the nondestructive evaluation of solid rocket motors. The DR images recorded for a few solid rocket specimens are presented in the paper. The Real-time DR system is capable of generating sufficient digital X-ray image data with object rotation for the CT image reconstruction. In this paper the indigenous development of CT imaging based on the Realtime DR system for solid rocket motor is presented. Studies are also carried out to generate 3D-CT image from a set of adjacent CT images of the rocket motor. The capability of revealing the spatial location and characterisation of defect is demonstrated by the CT and 3D-CT images generated.

  4. A forward bias method for lag correction of an a-Si flat panel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Starman, Jared; Tognina, Carlo; Partain, Larry; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: Digital a-Si flat panel (FP) x-ray detectors can exhibit detector lag, or residual signal, of several percent that can cause ghosting in projection images or severe shading artifacts, known as the radar artifact, in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructions. A major contributor to detector lag is believed to be defect states, or traps, in the a-Si layer of the FP. Software methods to characterize and correct for the detector lag exist, but they may make assumptions such as system linearity and time invariance, which may not be true. The purpose of this work is to investigate a new hardware based method to reduce lag in an a-Si FP and to evaluate its effectiveness at removing shading artifacts in CBCT reconstructions. The feasibility of a novel, partially hardware based solution is also examined. Methods: The proposed hardware solution for lag reduction requires only a minor change to the FP. For pulsed irradiation, the proposed method inserts a new operation step between the readout and data collection stages. During this new stage the photodiode is operated in a forward bias mode, which fills the defect states with charge. A Varian 4030CB panel was modified to allow for operation in the forward bias mode. The contrast of residual lag ghosts was measured for lag frames 2 and 100 after irradiation ceased for standard and forward bias modes. Detector step response, lag, SNR, modulation transfer function (MTF), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) measurements were made with standard and forward bias firmware. CBCT data of pelvic and head phantoms were also collected. Results: Overall, the 2nd and 100th detector lag frame residual signals were reduced 70%-88% using the new method. SNR, MTF, and DQE measurements show a small decrease in collected signal and a small increase in noise. The forward bias hardware successfully reduced the radar artifact in the CBCT reconstruction of the pelvic and head phantoms by 48%-81%. Conclusions: Overall, the

  5. Evaluation of bone substitute materials: comparison of flat-panel based volume CT to conventional multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Sauerbier, Sebastian; Duttenhoefer, Fabian; Sachlos, Elefterios; Haberstroh, Jörg; Scheifele, Christian; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Voss, Pit Jacob; Veigel, Egle; Smedek, Jörg; Ganter, Philip; Tuna, Taskin; Gutwald, Ralf; Palmowski, Moritz

    2013-10-01

    Over the last decade tissue engineering has emerged as a key factor in bone regeneration within the field of cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Despite this in vivo analysis of tissue-engineered-constructs to monitor bone rehabilitation are difficult to conduct. Novel high-resolving flat-panel based volume CTs (fp-VCT) are increasingly used for imaging bone structures. This study compares the potential value of novel fp-VCT with conventional multidetector CT (MDCT) based on a sheep sinus floor elevation model. Calcium-hydroxyapatite reinforced collagen scaffolds were populated with autologous osteoblasts and implanted into sheep maxillary sinus. After 8, 16 and 24 weeks MDCT and fp-VCT scans were performed to investigate the volume of the augmented area; densities of cancellous and compact bone were assessed as comparative values. fp-VCT imaging resulted in higher spatial resolution, which was advantageous when separating closely related anatomical structures (i.e. trabecular and compact bone, biomaterials). Fp-VCT facilitated imaging of alterations occurring in test specimens over time. fp-VCTs therefore displayed high volume coverage, dynamic imaging potential and superior performance when investigating superfine bone structures and bone remodelling of biomaterials. Thus, fp-VCTs may be a suitable instrument for intraoperative imaging and future in vivo tissue-engineering studies.

  6. Circular tomosynthesis implemented with a clinical interventional flat-panel based C-Arm: initial performance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nett, Brian E.; Zambelli, Joseph; Riddell, Cyril; Belanger, Barry; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2007-03-01

    There exists a strong desire for a platform in which researchers may investigate planar tomosynthesis (i.e. all source positions reside in a single plane that is parallel to the reconstructed image planes) trajectories directly on an interventional C-arm system. In this work we describe an experimental system designed to accomplish this aim, as well as the potential of this system for testing multiple aspects of the tomosynthetic image acquisition process. The system enables one to evaluate the effect of the physical imaging parameters on the image quality, as well as the effect of the reconstruction algorithm utilized. The experimental data collection for this work is from the Innova 4100 (Flat-panel based interventional C-arm system manufactured by GE Healthcare). The system is calibrated using a phantom with known geometrical placement of multiple small metallic spheres. Initial performance was assessed with three physical phantoms and performance was assessed by varying: the reconstruction algorithm (backprojection, filtered backprojection), the half tomographic angle (15°, 25°, 35°), and the angular sampling (20,40,80 views / acquisition). Initial results demonstrate the ability to well differentiate simulated vessels separated by 1 cm, even with the modest half tomographic angle of 15° and modest sampling of 20 views/acquisition.

  7. Noise, sampling, and the number of projections in cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.; Gang, G. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the number of projection views on image noise in cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector. Methods: This fairly fundamental consideration in CBCT system design and operation was addressed experimentally (using a phantom presenting a uniform medium as well as statistically motivated “clutter”) and theoretically (using a cascaded systems model describing CBCT noise) to elucidate the contributing factors of quantum noise (σ{sub Q}), electronic noise (σ{sub E}), and view aliasing (σ{sub view}). Analysis included investigation of the noise, noise-power spectrum, and modulation transfer function as a function of the number of projections (N{sub proj}), dose (D{sub tot}), and voxel size (b{sub vox}). Results: The results reveal a nonmonotonic relationship between image noise andN{sub proj} at fixed total dose: for the CBCT system considered, noise decreased with increasing N{sub proj} due to reduction of view sampling effects in the regime N{sub proj} <∼200, above which noise increased with N{sub proj} due to increased electronic noise. View sampling effects were shown to depend on the heterogeneity of the object in a direct analytical relationship to power-law anatomical clutter of the form κ/f {sup β}—and a general model of individual noise components (σ{sub Q}, σ{sub E}, and σ{sub view}) demonstrated agreement with measurements over a broad range in N{sub proj}, D{sub tot}, and b{sub vox}. Conclusions: The work elucidates fairly basic elements of CBCT noise in a manner that demonstrates the role of distinct noise components (viz., quantum, electronic, and view sampling noise). For configurations fairly typical of CBCT with a flat-panel detector (FPD), the analysis reveals a “sweet spot” (i.e., minimum noise) in the rangeN{sub proj} ∼ 250–350, nearly an order of magnitude lower in N{sub proj} than typical of multidetector CT, owing to the relatively high electronic noise in FPDs. The analysis

  8. Percutaneous Glycerol Rhizotomy for Trigeminal Neuralgia Using a Single-Plane, Flat Panel Detector Angiography System: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    ARISHIMA, Hidetaka; KAWAJIRI, Satoshi; ARAI, Hiroshi; HIGASHINO, Yoshifumi; KODERA, Toshiaki; KIKUTA, Ken-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous treatments for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) including glycerol rhizotomy (GR), radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RT), and balloon compression (BC) are effective for patients with medical comorbidities and risk factors of microvascular decompression (MVD). These procedures are usually performed under fluoroscopy. Surgeons advance the needle to the trigeminal plexus through the foramen ovale while observing landmarks of fluoroscopic images; however, it is sometimes difficult to appropriately place the needle tip in Meckel’s cave. We present the technical details of percutaneous GR using a single-plane, flat panel detector angiography system to check the needle positioning. When the needle tip may be located near the trigeminal cistern, three-dimensional (3-D) bone images are taken with cone-beam computed tomography (CT). These images clearly show the position of the needle tip in Meckel’s cave. If it is difficult to place it through the foramen ovale, surgeons perform cone beam CT to observe the actual position of the needle tip at the skull base. After confirming the positional relation between the needle tip and foramen ovale, surgeons can advance it in the precise direction. In 10 procedures, we could place the nerve-block needle in about 14.5 minutes on average without complications. We think that our method is simple and convenient for percutaneous treatments for TN, and it may be helpful for surgeons to perform such treatments. PMID:27041633

  9. Development and evaluation of a digital radiography system using a large-area flat-panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Katsumi; Ikeda, Shigeyuki; Ishikawa, Ken; Iinuma, Gen; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Konno, Yasutaka

    2002-05-01

    A new DR system using a large-area flat panel detector (FPD) with a 40 by 30 cm active area and a 194 micrometers pixel pitch, has been developed to compare with a conventional image intensifier and charge-coupled device camera type DR system. After measuring basic characteristics of the new DR system such as signal-to-noise ratio, modulation transfer function, and detective quantum efficiency, we applied the FPD to a Gastro-Intestinal study with contrast media, and discussed its potential for clinical use with a medical doctor. In radiography mode, the new DR system with a large-are FPD has superior image quality compared with the conventional I.I.- CCD camera type DR system because of high SNR and DQE. In fluoroscopy mode, the SNR of the new DR system at the exposure range of over 2(mu) R/frame is similar with the conventional I.I.-CCD camera type DR system. As a result, we considered that new DR system with a large-area FPD could be applied to a clinical study replacing an I.I.-CCD camera type. In the evaluation using various clinical images taken with the new DR system by a medical doctor, the new DR system with a large-are FPD performed sufficiently for a GI study.

  10. Designing, Modeling, Constructing, and Testing a Flat Panel Speaker and Sound Diffuser for a Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project was to design, model, build, and test a flat panel speaker and frame for a spherical dome structure being made into a simulator. The simulator will be a test bed for evaluating an immersive environment for human interfaces. This project focused on the loud speakers and a sound diffuser for the dome. The rest of the team worked on an Ambisonics 3D sound system, video projection system, and multi-direction treadmill to create the most realistic scene possible. The main programs utilized in this project, were Pro-E and COMSOL. Pro-E was used for creating detailed figures for the fabrication of a frame that held a flat panel loud speaker. The loud speaker was made from a thin sheet of Plexiglas and 4 acoustic exciters. COMSOL, a multiphysics finite analysis simulator, was used to model and evaluate all stages of the loud speaker, frame, and sound diffuser. Acoustical testing measurements were utilized to create polar plots from the working prototype which were then compared to the COMSOL simulations to select the optimal design for the dome. The final goal of the project was to install the flat panel loud speaker design in addition to a sound diffuser on to the wall of the dome. After running tests in COMSOL on various speaker configurations, including a warped Plexiglas version, the optimal speaker design included a flat piece of Plexiglas with a rounded frame to match the curvature of the dome. Eight of these loud speakers will be mounted into an inch and a half of high performance acoustic insulation, or Thinsulate, that will cover the inside of the dome. The following technical paper discusses these projects and explains the engineering processes used, knowledge gained, and the projected future goals of this project

  11. Method of forming a spacer for field emission flat panel displays

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Contolini, R.J.

    1997-08-19

    Spacers are disclosed for applications such as field emission flat panel displays and vacuum microelectronics, and which involves the application of aerogel/xerogel technology to the formation of the spacer. In a preferred approach the method uses a mold and mold release agent wherein the gel precursor is a liquid which can be applied to the mold filling holes which expose the substrate (either the baseplate or the faceplate). A release agent is applied to the mold prior to precursor application to ease removal of the mold after formation of the dielectric spacer. The shrinkage of the gel during solvent extraction also improves mold removal. The final spacer material is a good dielectric, such as silica, secured to the substrate. 3 figs.

  12. Method of forming a spacer for field emission flat panel displays

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Contolini, Robert J.

    1997-01-01

    Spacers for applications such as field emission flat panel displays and vacuum microelectronics, and which involves the application of aerogel/xerogel technology to the formation of the spacer. In a preferred approach the method uses a mold and mold release agent wherein the gel precursor is a liquid which can be applied to the mold filling holes which expose the substrate (either the baseplate or the faceplate). A release agent is applied to the mold prior to precursor application to ease removal of the mold after formation of the dielectric spacer. The shrinkage of the gel during solvent extraction also improves mold removal. The final spacer material is a good dielectric, such as silica, secured to the substrate.

  13. Response of laminated composite flat panels to sonic boom and explosive blast loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, L.; Nosier, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper deals with a theoretical analysis of the dynamic response of shear deformable symmetrically laminated rectangular composite flat panels exposed to sonic boom and explosive blast loadings. The pertinent governing equations incorporating transverse shear deformation, transverse normal stress, as well as the higher-order effects are solved by using the integral-transform technique. The obtained results are compared with their counterparts obtained within the framework of the first-order transverse shear deformation and the classical plate theories and some conclusions concerning their range of applicability are outlined. The paper also contains a detailed analysis of the influence played by the various parameters characterizing the considered pressure pulses as well as the material and geometry of the plate.

  14. Test and Analysis of Foam Impacting a 6x6 Inch RCC Flat Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Wendy B.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents the testing and analyses of a foam projectile impacting onto thirteen 6x6 inch flat panels at a 90 degrees incidence angle. The panels tested in this investigation were fabricated of Reinforced-Carbon-Carbon material and were used to aid in the validation of an existing material model, MAT58. The computational analyses were performed using LS-DYNA, which is a physics-based, nonlinear, transient, finite element code used for analyzing material responses subjected to high impact forces and other dynamic conditions. The test results were used to validate LS-DYNA predictions and to determine the threshold of damage generated by the MAT58 cumulative damage material model. The threshold of damage parameter represents any external or internal visible RCC damage detectable by nondestructive evaluation techniques.

  15. A typical flat-panel membrane bioreactor with a composite membrane for sulfur removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jian; Xiao, Yuan; Song, Jimin; Miao, Junhe

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this work was to provide a concrete study to understand the effects of operation on biofilm morphology and microstructure and degradation efficiency for the disposal of sulfur dioxide produced by coal-fired power plants. For this purpose, a flat-panel reactor-membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a composite membrane consisting of a dense layer and a support layer was designed; the membrane bioreactors inoculated with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were further conducted for the removal of sulfur dioxide. Dry weight, active biomass, pressure drop, removal efficiency, morphology and structure of the formed biofilms were investigated and analyzed over period of biofilm formation. The results found that the dry weight, biomass, pressure drops and removal efficiency increased rapidly during biofilm formation, remained relatively stable in the stabilization period of biofilm growth, and finally reached 0.085 g, 7.00 μg, 180 Pa, and 78%, respectively. Our results suggested the MBR is available for flue-gas desulfurization.

  16. SU-D-12A-04: Investigation of a 2D Antiscatter Grid for Flat Panel Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Altunbas, C; Kavanagh, B; Miften, M; Zhong, Y; Shaw, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To improve CT number accuracy and contrast sensitivity, a novel 2D antiscatter grid (ASG) for flat panel detector (FPD) based CBCT imaging was evaluated. Experiments were performed to characterize the scatter rejection and contrast sensitivity performance of ASG. The reduction in primary transmission for various ASG geometries was also evaluated by a computational model. Methods: The 2D ASG design was based on multi-hole collimators used in Nuclear Medicine. It consisted of abutted hexagon shaped apertures with 2.5 mm pitch and 32 mm height, and separated by 0.25 mm thick lead septa. Scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and mean primary transmission were measured using a benchtop FPD/x-ray source system. Acrylic slabs of varying thicknesses were imaged with a contrast-detail phantom to measure CNR and SPR under different scatter conditions. Primary transmission was also measured by averaging pixel values in flood field images without the phantom. We additionally explored variation of primary transmission with pitch and septum thickness using a computational model of our ASG. Results: Our 2D ASG reduced the SPR from 3.3 to 0.12, and improved CNR by 50% in 20 cm thick slab phantom projections acquired at 120 kVp. While the measured primary transmission was 72.8%, our simulations show that primary transmission can be increased to 86% by reducing the septum thickness to 0.1 mm. Primary transmission further increases to 93% if septum thickness of 0.1 mm is used in conjunction with an increased pitch of 4 mm. Conclusion: The 2D ASG appears to be a promising scatter rejection device, offering both superior scatter rejection and improved contrast sensitivity. Though its lead footprint reduced primary transmission, our work shows that optimization of aperture pitch and septum thickness can significantly improve the primary transmission.

  17. Quantitative kinetic analysis of lung nodules by temporal subtraction technique in dynamic chest radiography with a flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Yuichiro; Kodera, Yoshie; Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru

    2007-03-01

    Early detection and treatment of lung cancer is one of the most effective means to reduce cancer mortality; chest X-ray radiography has been widely used as a screening examination or health checkup. The new examination method and the development of computer analysis system allow obtaining respiratory kinetics by the use of flat panel detector (FPD), which is the expanded method of chest X-ray radiography. Through such changes functional evaluation of respiratory kinetics in chest has become available. Its introduction into clinical practice is expected in the future. In this study, we developed the computer analysis algorithm for the purpose of detecting lung nodules and evaluating quantitative kinetics. Breathing chest radiograph obtained by modified FPD was converted into 4 static images drawing the feature, by sequential temporal subtraction processing, morphologic enhancement processing, kinetic visualization processing, and lung region detection processing, after the breath synchronization process utilizing the diaphragmatic analysis of the vector movement. The artificial neural network used to analyze the density patterns detected the true nodules by analyzing these static images, and drew their kinetic tracks. For the algorithm performance and the evaluation of clinical effectiveness with 7 normal patients and simulated nodules, both showed sufficient detecting capability and kinetic imaging function without statistically significant difference. Our technique can quantitatively evaluate the kinetic range of nodules, and is effective in detecting a nodule on a breathing chest radiograph. Moreover, the application of this technique is expected to extend computer-aided diagnosis systems and facilitate the development of an automatic planning system for radiation therapy.

  18. Reduction of ring artifacts in CBCT: Detection and correction of pixel gain variations in flat panel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Altunbas, Cem; Lai, Chao-Jen; Zhong, Yuncheng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: In using flat panel detectors (FPD) for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), pixel gain variations may lead to structured nonuniformities in projections and ring artifacts in CBCT images. Such gain variations can be caused by change in detector entrance exposure levels or beam hardening, and they are not accounted by conventional flat field correction methods. In this work, the authors presented a method to identify isolated pixel clusters that exhibit gain variations and proposed a pixel gain correction (PGC) method to suppress both beam hardening and exposure level dependent gain variations. Methods: To modulate both beam spectrum and entrance exposure, flood field FPD projections were acquired using beam filters with varying thicknesses. “Ideal” pixel values were estimated by performing polynomial fits in both raw and flat field corrected projections. Residuals were calculated by taking the difference between measured and ideal pixel values to identify clustered image and FPD artifacts in flat field corrected and raw images, respectively. To correct clustered image artifacts, the ratio of ideal to measured pixel values in filtered images were utilized as pixel-specific gain correction factors, referred as PGC method, and they were tabulated as a function of pixel value in a look-up table. Results: 0.035% of detector pixels lead to clustered image artifacts in flat field corrected projections, where 80% of these pixels were traced back and linked to artifacts in the FPD. The performance of PGC method was tested in variety of imaging conditions and phantoms. The PGC method reduced clustered image artifacts and fixed pattern noise in projections, and ring artifacts in CBCT images. Conclusions: Clustered projection image artifacts that lead to ring artifacts in CBCT can be better identified with our artifact detection approach. When compared to the conventional flat field correction method, the proposed PGC method enables characterization of nonlinear

  19. 75 FR 51285 - In the Matter of Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of... that information on this matter can be obtained by contacting the Commission's TDD terminal on...

  20. Cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS flat panel detector: Visibility of simulated microcalcifications

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To measure and investigate the improvement of microcalcification (MC) visibility in cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (Dexela 2923, Perkin Elmer).Methods: Aluminum wires and calcium carbonate grains of various sizes were embedded in a paraffin cylinder to simulate imaging of calcifications in a breast. Phantoms were imaged with a benchtop experimental cone beam CT system at various exposure levels. In addition to the Dexela detector, a high pitch (50 μm), thin (150 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (C7921CA-09, Hamamatsu Corporation, Hamamatsu City, Japan) and a widely used low pitch (194 μm), thick (600 μm) scintillator aSi/CsI flat panel detector (PaxScan 4030CB, Varian Medical Systems) were also used in scanning for comparison. The images were independently reviewed by six readers (imaging physicists). The MC visibility was quantified as the fraction of visible MCs and measured as a function of the estimated mean glandular dose (MGD) level for various MC sizes and detectors. The modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) were also measured and compared for the three detectors used.Results: The authors have demonstrated that the use of a high pitch (75 μm) CMOS detector coupled with a thick (500 μm) CsI scintillator helped make the smaller 150–160, 160–180, and 180–200 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 10.8, 9, and 10.8 mGy, respectively. It also made the larger 200–212 and 212–224 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 7.2 mGy. No performance improvement was observed for 224–250 μm or larger size groups. With the higher spatial resolution of the Dexela detector based system, the apparent dimensions and shapes of MCs were more accurately rendered. The results show that with the aforementioned detector, a 73% visibility could be achieved in imaging 160–180 μm MCs as compared to 28% visibility achieved by

  1. Cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS flat panel detector: Visibility of simulated microcalcifications

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To measure and investigate the improvement of microcalcification (MC) visibility in cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (Dexela 2923, Perkin Elmer). Methods: Aluminum wires and calcium carbonate grains of various sizes were embedded in a paraffin cylinder to simulate imaging of calcifications in a breast. Phantoms were imaged with a benchtop experimental cone beam CT system at various exposure levels. In addition to the Dexela detector, a high pitch (50 μm), thin (150 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (C7921CA-09, Hamamatsu Corporation, Hamamatsu City, Japan) and a widely used low pitch (194 μm), thick (600 μm) scintillator aSi/CsI flat panel detector (PaxScan 4030CB, Varian Medical Systems) were also used in scanning for comparison. The images were independently reviewed by six readers (imaging physicists). The MC visibility was quantified as the fraction of visible MCs and measured as a function of the estimated mean glandular dose (MGD) level for various MC sizes and detectors. The modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) were also measured and compared for the three detectors used. Results: The authors have demonstrated that the use of a high pitch (75 μm) CMOS detector coupled with a thick (500 μm) CsI scintillator helped make the smaller 150–160, 160–180, and 180–200 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 10.8, 9, and 10.8 mGy, respectively. It also made the larger 200–212 and 212–224 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 7.2 mGy. No performance improvement was observed for 224–250 μm or larger size groups. With the higher spatial resolution of the Dexela detector based system, the apparent dimensions and shapes of MCs were more accurately rendered. The results show that with the aforementioned detector, a 73% visibility could be achieved in imaging 160–180 μm MCs as compared to 28% visibility achieved by

  2. Optimization of key building blocks for a large-area radiographic and fluoroscopic dynamic digital x-ray detector based on a-Si:H/CsI:Tl flat panel technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducourant, Thierry; Michel, Marc; Vieux, Gerard; Peppler, Tobias; Trochet, J. C.; Schulz, Reiner F.; Bastiaens, Raoul J. M.; Busse, Falko

    2000-04-01

    This paper introduces the key design optimizations which have been carried out recently in Trixell in order to prepare the future family of large area, combined static (Radiography) and dynamic (Fluoroscopy, Cardio...) digital X-ray detectors based on a-Si:H/CsI:Tl flat panel technology. These optimizations have been carried out on a 16' X 12' prototype that has been designed and built in a product-oriented way. We describe the detector technology and give some of its main characteristics, as well as some preliminary measurement results.The heart of the new prototype is a Cesium Iodide scintillating screen, directly evaporated onto a 2 K X 2.5 K pixel, array of amorphous silicon photodiodes and TFTs deposited on a glass substrate. The pixel pitch is 155 micrometer. The detective flat panel is connected to dedicated electronics which provides line addressing, low-noise column readout and multiplexing into a serial electrical signal. This signal is digitized over 14 bits to provide a direct digital image output, available for the host radiology system via an optical fiber. This type of detector (flat panel + electronics) is built into a light and thin (less than 100 mm) packaging which can be easily integrated in various x-ray equipment such as R&F tables, Angiography systems (incl. Cardiology), and mobile C-arm systems.

  3. Detection of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty with a Non-Flat-Panel Angio Unit Compared to Multidetector Computed Tomography - An Ex Vivo Study

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Clemens Fuchs, Heiko; Westphalen, Kerstin; Hierholzer, Johannes

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the detection of cement leakages after vertebroplasty using angiographic computed tomography (ACT) in a non-flat-panel angio unit compared to multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Vertebroplasty was performed in 19 of 33 cadaver vertebrae (23 thoracic and 10 lumbar segments). In the angio suite, ACT (190{sup o}; 1.5{sup o} per image) was performed to obtain volumetric data. Another volumetric data set of the specimen was obtained by MDCT using a standard algorithm. Nine multiplanar reconstructions in standardized axial, coronal, and sagittal planes of every vertebra were generated from both data sets. Images were evaluated on the basis of a nominal scale with 18 criteria, comprising osseous properties (e.g., integrity of the end plate) and cement distribution (e.g., presence of intraspinal cement). MDCT images were regarded as gold standard and analyzed by two readers in a consensus mode. Rotational acquisitions were analyzed by six blinded readers. Results were correlated with the gold standard using Cohen's {kappa}-coefficient analysis. Furthermore, interobserver variability was calculated. Correlation with the gold standard ranged from no correlation (osseous margins of the neuroforamen, {kappa} = 0.008) to intermediate (trace of vertebroplasty canula; {kappa} = 0.615) for criteria referring to osseous morphology. However, there was an excellent correlation for those criteria referring to cement distribution, with {kappa} values ranging from 0.948 (paravertebral cement distribution) to 0.972 (intraspinal cement distribution). With a minimum of {kappa} = 0.768 ('good correlation') and a maximum of {kappa} = 0.91 ('excellent'), interobserver variability was low. In conclusion, ACT in an angio suite without a flat-panel detector depicts a cement leakage after vertebroplasty as well as MDCT. However, the method does not provide sufficient depiction of osseous morphology.

  4. Nonlinear statistical reconstruction for flat-panel cone-beam CT with blur and correlated noise models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, Steven; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Stayman, J. Webster

    2016-03-01

    Flat-panel cone-beam CT (FP-CBCT) is a promising imaging modality, partly due to its potential for high spatial resolution reconstructions in relatively compact scanners. Despite this potential, FP-CBCT can face difficulty resolving important fine scale structures (e.g, trabecular details in dedicated extremities scanners and microcalcifications in dedicated CBCT mammography). Model-based methods offer one opportunity to improve high-resolution performance without any hardware changes. Previous work, based on a linearized forward model, demonstrated improved performance when both system blur and spatial correlations characteristics of FP-CBCT systems are modeled. Unfortunately, the linearized model relies on a staged processing approach that complicates tuning parameter selection and can limit the finest achievable spatial resolution. In this work, we present an alternative scheme that leverages a full nonlinear forward model with both system blur and spatially correlated noise. A likelihood-based objective function is derived from this forward model and we derive an iterative optimization algorithm for its solution. The proposed approach is evaluated in simulation studies using a digital extremities phantom and resolution-noise trade-offs are quantitatively evaluated. The correlated nonlinear model outperformed both the uncorrelated nonlinear model and the staged linearized technique with up to a 86% reduction in variance at matched spatial resolution. Additionally, the nonlinear models could achieve finer spatial resolution (correlated: 0.10 mm, uncorrelated: 0.11 mm) than the linear correlated model (0.15 mm), and traditional FDK (0.40 mm). This suggests the proposed nonlinear approach may be an important tool in improving performance for high-resolution clinical applications.

  5. Nonlinear Statistical Reconstruction for Flat-Panel Cone-Beam CT with Blur and Correlated Noise Models

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Steven; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Stayman, J. Webster

    2016-01-01

    Flat-panel cone-beam CT (FP-CBCT) is a promising imaging modality, partly due to its potential for high spatial resolution reconstructions in relatively compact scanners. Despite this potential, FP-CBCT can face difficulty resolving important fine scale structures (e.g, trabecular details in dedicated extremities scanners and microcalcifications in dedicated CBCT mammography). Model-based methods offer one opportunity to improve high-resolution performance without any hardware changes. Previous work, based on a linearized forward model, demonstrated improved performance when both system blur and spatial correlations characteristics of FP-CBCT systems are modeled. Unfortunately, the linearized model relies on a staged processing approach that complicates tuning parameter selection and can limit the finest achievable spatial resolution. In this work, we present an alternative scheme that leverages a full nonlinear forward model with both system blur and spatially correlated noise. A likelihood-based objective function is derived from this forward model and we derive an iterative optimization algorithm for its solution. The proposed approach is evaluated in simulation studies using a digital extremities phantom and resolution-noise trade-offs are quantitatively evaluated. The correlated nonlinear model outperformed both the uncorrelated nonlinear model and the staged linearized technique with up to a 86% reduction in variance at matched spatial resolution. Additionally, the nonlinear models could achieve finer spatial resolution (correlated: 0.10 mm, uncorrelated: 0.11 mm) than the linear correlated model (0.15 mm), and traditional FDK (0.40 mm). This suggests the proposed nonlinear approach may be an important tool in improving performance for high-resolution clinical applications. PMID:27110051

  6. Direct conversion of algal biomass to biofuel

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Shuguang; Patil, Prafulla D; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-10-14

    A method and system for providing direct conversion of algal biomass. Optionally, the method and system can be used to directly convert dry algal biomass to biodiesels under microwave irradiation by combining the reaction and combining steps. Alternatively, wet algae can be directly processed and converted to fatty acid methyl esters, which have the major components of biodiesels, by reacting with methanol at predetermined pressure and temperature ranges.

  7. An Output Channel Nonuniformity Compensation Driving Method in Flat Panel Display Driving Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Ho; Ahn, Soon-Sung; Kwon, Christine H.; Kim, Seon-Yung; Lee, Jae-Sic; Choi, Byong-Deok

    2006-12-01

    Modern flat panel displays, including thin-film transistor liquid crystal displays (TFT-LCDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), pursue more and more natural color expression. This requires the data driving system should produce very fine and accurate signal voltages or currents. Especially, the uniformity among channels of a driving system is critically important because the color or luminance differences among columns are easily noticeable. We propose a simple and efficient driving method for solving the artifacts caused by the existing nonuniformity among channels of a driving system, and confirms its impact by simulations using C-programming. The nonuniformity among channels mostly stem from the random offset of the output circuits of a driving system, which in turn is caused by the process variations. The proposed driving method shares N-output circuits between N-output channels such that the existing offsets of the channels are averaged out. Thus, the output signal error due to the offsets spreads out among the channels, improving the uniformity between the channels.

  8. Multi-cusp ion source for doping process of flat panel display manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Inouchi, Yutaka Matsumoto, Takeshi; Dohi, Shojiro; Tanii, Masahiro; Takahashi, Genki; Nishimura, Ippei; Tatemichi, Junichi; Konishi, Masashi; Naito, Masao

    2014-02-15

    We developed a multi-cusp ion source for Nissin ion doping system iG5 which is used in low temperature poly-crystalline silicon processes for flat panel display (FPD) manufacturing. In this ion source, BF{sub 3} or PH{sub 3} diluted H{sub 2} plasmas are produced and large area ribbon ion beams are extracted. In general, ion ratio of B{sup +} in BF{sub 3} plasma is much smaller than BF{sub 2}{sup +} in multi-cusp ion sources. We developed a new method to increase B{sup +} ratio and obtained mass analyzed B{sup +} target current of 130 mA. We employed newly improved multi-slot type electrodes for the beam extraction system and obtained stable beams with the uniformity of below 3%. In BF{sub 3} plasmas, several undesirable metal fluorides are produced in the plasma chamber and deposited on the electrode system, which cause glitches and poor beam uniformity. We introduce several cleaning methods.

  9. The forced radiation efficiency of finite size flat panels that are excited by incident sound.

    PubMed

    Davy, John L

    2009-08-01

    The radiation efficiency of an infinite flat panel that radiates a plane wave into a half space is equal to the inverse of the cosine of the angle between the direction of propagation of the plane wave and the normal to the panel. The fact that this radiation efficiency tends to infinity as the angle tends to 90 degrees causes problems with simple theories of sound insulation. Sato calculated numerical values of radiation efficiency for a finite size rectangular panel in an infinite baffle whose motion is forced by sound incident at an angle to the normal from the other side. This paper presents a simple two dimensional analytic strip theory, which agrees reasonably well with Sato's numerical calculations for a rectangular panel. This leads to the conclusion that it is mainly the length of the panel in the direction of radiation, rather than its width that is important in determining its radiation efficiency. A low frequency correction is added to the analytic strip theory. The theory is analytically integrated over all angles of incidence, with the appropriate weighting function, to obtain the diffuse sound field forced radiation efficiency of a panel. PMID:19640035

  10. Thermal Reactor Model for Large-Scale Algae Cultivation in Vertical Flat Panel Photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Endres, Christian H; Roth, Arne; Brück, Thomas B

    2016-04-01

    Microalgae can grow significantly faster than terrestrial plants and are a promising feedstock for sustainable value added products encompassing pharmaceuticals, pigments, proteins and most prominently biofuels. As the biomass productivity of microalgae strongly depends on the cultivation temperature, detailed information on the reactor temperature as a function of time and geographical location is essential to evaluate the true potential of microalgae as an industrial feedstock. In the present study, a temperature model for an array of vertical flat plate photobioreactors is presented. It was demonstrated that mutual shading of reactor panels has a decisive effect on the reactor temperature. By optimizing distance and thickness of the panels, the occurrence of extreme temperatures and the amplitude of daily temperature fluctuations in the culture medium can be drastically reduced, while maintaining a high level of irradiation on the panels. The presented model was developed and applied to analyze the suitability of various climate zones for algae production in flat panel photobioreactors. Our results demonstrate that in particular Mediterranean and tropical climates represent favorable locations. Lastly, the thermal energy demand required for the case of active temperature control is determined for several locations. PMID:26950078

  11. Compact flat-panel gas-gap heat switch operating at 295 K.

    PubMed

    Krielaart, M A R; Vermeer, C H; Vanapalli, S

    2015-11-01

    Heat switches are devices that can change from a thermally conducting (on-) state to an insulating (off-) state whenever the need arises. They enable adaptive thermal management strategies in which cooling rates are altered either spatially or temporally, leading to a substantial reduction in the energy and mass budget of a large range of systems. State-of-the-art heat switches are only rarely employed in thermal system architectures, since they are rather bulky and have a limited thermal performance (expressed as the heat transfer ratio between the on- and off-state heat conductance). Using selective laser melting additive manufacturing technology, also known as 3D printing, we developed a compact flat-panel gas-gap heat switch that offers superior thermal performance, is simpler and more economic to produce and assemble, contains no moving parts, and is more reliable because it lacks welded joints. The manufactured rectangular panel heat switch has frontal device dimensions of 10 cm by 10 cm, thickness of 3.2 mm and weighs just 121 g. An off heat conductance of 0.2 W/K and on-off heat conductance ratio of 38 is observed at 295 K. PMID:26628181

  12. Compact flat-panel gas-gap heat switch operating at 295 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krielaart, M. A. R.; Vermeer, C. H.; Vanapalli, S.

    2015-11-01

    Heat switches are devices that can change from a thermally conducting (on-) state to an insulating (off-) state whenever the need arises. They enable adaptive thermal management strategies in which cooling rates are altered either spatially or temporally, leading to a substantial reduction in the energy and mass budget of a large range of systems. State-of-the-art heat switches are only rarely employed in thermal system architectures, since they are rather bulky and have a limited thermal performance (expressed as the heat transfer ratio between the on- and off-state heat conductance). Using selective laser melting additive manufacturing technology, also known as 3D printing, we developed a compact flat-panel gas-gap heat switch that offers superior thermal performance, is simpler and more economic to produce and assemble, contains no moving parts, and is more reliable because it lacks welded joints. The manufactured rectangular panel heat switch has frontal device dimensions of 10 cm by 10 cm, thickness of 3.2 mm and weighs just 121 g. An off heat conductance of 0.2 W/K and on-off heat conductance ratio of 38 is observed at 295 K.

  13. The Spatial Effects of Antenna Configuration in a Large Area Inductively Coupled Plasma System for Flat Panel Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon-Geun, Oh; Young-Jun, Lee; Jae-Hong, Jeon; Jong-Hyeon, Seo; Hee-Hwan, Choe

    2014-08-01

    Spatial distributions of plasma parameters such as electron density, electron temperature and electric potential were investigated using a commercial simulation software (COMSOLTM) to predict the effects of antenna configuration in a large area inductively coupled plasma (ICP) system for flat panel displays. Nine planar antenna sets were evenly placed above a ceramic window. While the electron density was influenced by both the input current and gas pressure, the electron temperature and electric potential were dominantly affected by the gas pressure.

  14. SU-E-I-49: Simulation Study for Removing Scatter Radiation in Cesium-Iodine Based Flat Panel Detector System

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Y; Park, M; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, J; Morishita, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study aims to identify the feasibility of a novel cesium-iodine (CsI)-based flat-panel detector (FPD) for removing scatter radiation in diagnostic radiology. Methods: The indirect FPD comprises three layers: a substrate, scintillation, and thin-film-transistor (TFT) layer. The TFT layer has a matrix structure with pixels. There are ineffective dimensions on the TFT layer, such as the voltage and data lines; therefore, we devised a new FPD system having net-like lead in the substrate layer, matching the ineffective area, to block the scatter radiation so that only primary X-rays could reach the effective dimension.To evaluate the performance of this new FPD system, we conducted a Monte Carlo simulation using MCNPX 2.6.0 software. Scatter fractions (SFs) were acquired using no grid, a parallel grid (8:1 grid ratio), and the new system, and the performances were compared.Two systems having different thicknesses of lead in the substrate layer—10 and 20μm—were simulated. Additionally, we examined the effects of different pixel sizes (153×153 and 163×163μm) on the image quality, while keeping the effective area of pixels constant (143×143μm). Results: In case of 10μm lead, the SFs of the new system (∼11%) were lower than those of the other system (∼27% with no grid, ∼16% with parallel grid) at 40kV. However, as the tube voltage increased, the SF of new system (∼19%) was higher than that of parallel grid (∼18%) at 120kV. In the case of 20μm lead, the SFs of the new system were lower than those of the other systems at all ranges of the tube voltage (40–120kV). Conclusion: The novel CsI-based FPD system for removing scatter radiation is feasible for improving the image contrast but must be optimized with respect to the lead thickness, considering the system’s purposes and the ranges of the tube voltage in diagnostic radiology. This study was supported by a grant(K1422651) from Institute of Health Science, Korea University.

  15. Investigation of the use of iodinated contrast agent in a proposed flat-panel CT mammography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didier, Clay; Glick, Stephen; Gong, Xing; Chen, Yu; Mahd, Mufeed

    2007-03-01

    incident on the flat panel detector for an x-ray projection, then using the aforementioned Bakic phantom, a 0.5 cm sphere representing a breast tumor attenuation and a 3.0 mg/ml of Iodinated contrast agent were inserted at various locations with varying attenuation for 100 projection sets with scatter, and 100 projections without scatter. Histograms of the resulting effective attenuation coefficients yielded by Feldkamp filtered backprojection were plotted and compared.

  16. Performance of a direct-detection active matrix flat panel dosimeter (AMFPD) for IMRT measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yu; Moran, Jean M.; Roberts, Donald A.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Fraass, Benedick A.

    2007-12-15

    The dosimetric performance of a direct-detection active matrix flat panel dosimeter (AMFPD) is reported for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) measurements. The AMFPD consists of a-Si:H photodiodes and thin-film transistors deposited on a glass substrate with no overlying scintillator screen or metal plate. The device is operated at 0.8 frames per second in a continuous acquisition or fluoroscopic mode. The effect of the applied bias voltage across the photodiodes on the response of the AMFPD was evaluated because this parameter affects dark signal, lag contributions, and pixel sensitivity. In addition, the AMPFD response was evaluated as a function of dose, dose rate, and energy, for static fields at 10 cm depth. In continuous acquisition mode, the AMFPD maintained a linear dose response (r{sup 2}>0.99999) up to at least 1040 cGy. In order to obtain reliable integrated dose results for IMRT fields, the effects of lag on the radiation signal were minimized by operating the system at the highest frame rate and at an appropriate reverse bias voltage. Segmental MLC and dynamic MLC IMRT fields were measured with the AMFPD, and the results were compared to film, using standard methods for reliable film dosimetry. Both AMFPD and film measurements were independently converted to dose in cGy. {gamma} and {chi} values were calculated as indices of agreement. The results from the AMFPD were in excellent agreement with those from film. When 2% of D{sub max} and 2 mm of distance to agreement were used as the criteria, 98% of the region of interest (defined as the region where dose is greater than 5% of D{sub max}) satisfied |{chi}|{<=}1 on average across the cases that were tested.

  17. Electrical characterization of thermally and mechanically exfoliated silicon films for flat panel display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Felix Paul

    For the next generation of flat panel displays (FPDs), higher resolutions and sharp, full motion video are expected. To meet these requirements, high quality semiconductor material on glass substrates are a desirable way to fabricate the thin film transistors (TFTs) needed to drive the pixels and to quickly and precisely control the currents. Single crystal silicon films can be exfoliated onto Corning I737F glass substrates using ion-cutting techniques. Because the ion-cutting technique requires ion implantation through the film material, the electrical properties of the exfoliated film have to be examined to understand the behavior as it goes through temperature cycling inherent in the TFT fabrication process. After the film exfoliation, Hall effect, hot probe and four point probe measurements are used along with layer by layer etching to get a picture of the carrier depth distribution. The electrical properties of mechanically exfoliated and thermally exfoliated films are compared and discussed in the context of using these for MOSFETs. Finally, p-MOSFETs are fabricated and the transistor parameters such as leakage current, subthreshold slope, on/off current ratio and mobility compare and contrasted with MOSFETs made from bulk silicon. The mechanically exfoliated films show superior performance with respect to the p-MOSFET off-state, drain to source leakage current compared to the thermally exfoliated films. This difference is attributed to the lower temperature the mechanically exfoliated film is subjected to even before film delamination. The temperature difference of the exfoliation temperatures is responsible for a higher density of oxide precipitates in the thermally exfoliated film which leads to higher leakage currents.

  18. Optimization of outdoor cultivation in flat panel airlift reactors for lipid production by Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Münkel, Ronja; Schmid-Staiger, Ulrike; Werner, Achim; Hirth, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Microalgae are discussed as a potential renewable feedstock for biofuel production. The production of highly concentrated algae biomass with a high fatty acid content, accompanied by high productivity with the use of natural sunlight is therefore of great interest. In the current study an outdoor pilot plant with five 30 L Flat Panel Airlift reactors (FPA) installed southwards were operated in 2011 in Stuttgart, Germany. The patented FPA reactor works on the basis of an airlift loop reactor and offers efficient intermixing for homogeneous light distribution. A lipid production process with the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris (SAG 211-12), under nitrogen and phosphorous deprivation, was established and evaluated in regard to the fatty acid content, fatty acid productivity and light yield. In the first set of experiments limitations caused by restricted CO₂ availability were excluded by enriching the media with NaOH. The higher alkalinity allows a higher CO₂ content of supplied air and leads to doubling of fatty acid productivity. The second set of experiments focused on how the ratio of light intensity to biomass concentration in the reactor impacts fatty acid content, productivity and light yield. The specific light availability was specified as mol photons on the reactor surface per gram biomass in the reactor. This is the first publication based on experimental data showing the quantitative correlation between specific light availability, fatty acid content and biomass light yield for a lipid production process under nutrient deprivation and outdoor conditions. High specific light availability leads to high fatty acid contents. Lower specific light availability increases fatty acid productivity and biomass light yield. An average fatty acid productivity of 0.39 g L⁻¹  day⁻¹ for a 12 days batch process with a final fatty acid content of 44.6% [w/w] was achieved. Light yield of 0.4 g mol photons⁻¹ was obtained for the first 6 days of

  19. Assessment of the CO2 fixation capacity of Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047 outdoor cultures in vertical flat-panel reactors.

    PubMed

    Clares, Marta E; Moreno, José; Guerrero, Miguel G; García-González, Mercedes

    2014-10-10

    The extent of biological CO2 fixation was evaluated for outdoor cultures of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047. Culture conditions were optimized indoors in bubble-column photochemostats operating in continuous mode, subjected to irradiance cycles mimicking the light regime outdoors. Highest values achieved for CO2 fixation rate and biomass productivity were 1 and 0.6 g L(-1) day(-1), respectively. The comparison among different reactors operating simultaneously - open pond, horizontal tubular reactor and vertical flat-panel - allowed to assess their relative efficiency for the outdoor development of Anabaena cultures. Despite the higher volumetric CO2 fixation capacity (and biomass productivity) exhibited by the tubular photobioreactor, yield of the flat-panel reactor was 50% higher than that of the tubular option on a per area basis, reaching values over 35 g CO2 fixed m(-2) d(-1). The flat-panel reactor actually represents a most suitable system for CO2 capture coupled to the generation of valuable biomass by Anabaena cultures.

  20. Assessment of the CO2 fixation capacity of Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047 outdoor cultures in vertical flat-panel reactors.

    PubMed

    Clares, Marta E; Moreno, José; Guerrero, Miguel G; García-González, Mercedes

    2014-10-10

    The extent of biological CO2 fixation was evaluated for outdoor cultures of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047. Culture conditions were optimized indoors in bubble-column photochemostats operating in continuous mode, subjected to irradiance cycles mimicking the light regime outdoors. Highest values achieved for CO2 fixation rate and biomass productivity were 1 and 0.6 g L(-1) day(-1), respectively. The comparison among different reactors operating simultaneously - open pond, horizontal tubular reactor and vertical flat-panel - allowed to assess their relative efficiency for the outdoor development of Anabaena cultures. Despite the higher volumetric CO2 fixation capacity (and biomass productivity) exhibited by the tubular photobioreactor, yield of the flat-panel reactor was 50% higher than that of the tubular option on a per area basis, reaching values over 35 g CO2 fixed m(-2) d(-1). The flat-panel reactor actually represents a most suitable system for CO2 capture coupled to the generation of valuable biomass by Anabaena cultures. PMID:25068618

  1. SU-E-I-07: Response Characteristics and Signal Conversion Modeling of KV Flat-Panel Detector in Cone Beam CT System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Ruifen; Pei, Xi; Wang, Hui; Hu, Liqin

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The flat-panel detector response characteristics are investigated to optimize the scanning parameter considering the image quality and less radiation dose. The signal conversion model is also established to predict the tumor shape and physical thickness changes. Methods: With the ELEKTA XVI system, the planar images of 10cm water phantom were obtained under different image acquisition conditions, including tube voltage, electric current, exposure time and frames. The averaged responses of square area in center were analyzed using Origin8.0. The response characteristics for each scanning parameter were depicted by different fitting types. The transmission measured for 10cm water was compared to Monte Carlo simulation. Using the quadratic calibration method, a series of variable-thickness water phantoms images were acquired to derive the signal conversion model. A 20cm wedge water phantom with 2cm step thickness was used to verify the model. At last, the stability and reproducibility of the model were explored during a four week period. Results: The gray values of image center all decreased with the increase of different image acquisition parameter presets. The fitting types adopted were linear fitting, quadratic polynomial fitting, Gauss fitting and logarithmic fitting with the fitting R-Square 0.992, 0.995, 0.997 and 0.996 respectively. For 10cm water phantom, the transmission measured showed better uniformity than Monte Carlo simulation. The wedge phantom experiment show that the radiological thickness changes prediction error was in the range of (-4mm, 5mm). The signal conversion model remained consistent over a period of four weeks. Conclusion: The flat-panel response decrease with the increase of different scanning parameters. The preferred scanning parameter combination was 100kV, 10mA, 10ms, 15frames. It is suggested that the signal conversion model could effectively be used for tumor shape change and radiological thickness prediction. Supported by

  2. Metal-induced unilaterally crystallized polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistor technology and application to flat-panel displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhiguo

    High quality flat-panel displays (FPD) typically use active-matrix (AM) addressing, with the optical state of each pixel controlled by one or more active devices such as amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film transistors (TFT). The successful examples are portable computer and liquid-crystal television (LC-TV). A high level of system on panel (SoP) electronic integration is required for versatile and compact systems. Meanwhile, many self-emitting display technologies are developing fast, active matrix for self-emitting display is typically current driven. The a-Si TFTs suffer from limited current driving capability, polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) device technology is required. A new technology employing metal-induced unilaterally crystallization (MIUC) is presently reported. The device characteristics are obviously better than those in rapid-thermal annealed (RTA) and solid-phase crystallization (SPC) TFTs and the fabrication equipment is much cheaper than excimer laser crystallization (ELC) technology. The field effect mobility (muFE) of p- and n-channel MIUC TFTs is about 100cm2/Vs. Ion/I off is more than seven orders. Gate-induced leakage current in LT-MIUC poly-Si TFTs has been reduced by crystallization before heavy junction implantation to improve material quality and incorporating a gate-modulated lightly-doped drain (gamo-LDD) structure to reduce the electric field near the drain/channel junction region. At the same time, recrystallized (RC) MIUC TFT was researched with device characteristics improved. The 6.6cm 120 x 160 active matrix for OLED display is fabricated using LT-MIUC TFT technology on glass substrate. This display has the advantages of self-emitting, large intrinsic view angle and very fast response. At the same time, 6.6cm 120X160 AM-reflective twist nematic (RTN) display is fabricated using RC-MIUC TFT technology. This display is capable of producing 16 grade levels, 10:1 contrast and video image. The SOP display for AM-OLED were designed

  3. Impact and Penetration of Thin Aluminum 2024 Flat Panels at Oblique Angles of Incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, J. Michael; Emmerling, William; Queitzsch, Gilbert K., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    under more extreme conditions, using a projectile with a more complex shape and sharp contacts, impacting flat panels at oblique angles of incidence.

  4. Dual-energy cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: Effect of reconstruction algorithm on material classification

    SciTech Connect

    Zbijewski, W. Gang, G. J.; Xu, J.; Wang, A. S.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector (FPD) is finding application in areas such as breast and musculoskeletal imaging, where dual-energy (DE) capabilities offer potential benefit. The authors investigate the accuracy of material classification in DE CBCT using filtered backprojection (FBP) and penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction and optimize contrast-enhanced DE CBCT of the joints as a function of dose, material concentration, and detail size. Methods: Phantoms consisting of a 15 cm diameter water cylinder with solid calcium inserts (50–200 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter) and solid iodine inserts (2–10 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter), as well as a cadaveric knee with intra-articular injection of iodine were imaged on a CBCT bench with a Varian 4343 FPD. The low energy (LE) beam was 70 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu), and the high energy (HE) beam was 120 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu, +0.5 mm Ag). Total dose (LE+HE) was varied from 3.1 to 15.6 mGy with equal dose allocation. Image-based DE classification involved a nearest distance classifier in the space of LE versus HE attenuation values. Recognizing the differences in noise between LE and HE beams, the LE and HE data were differentially filtered (in FBP) or regularized (in PL). Both a quadratic (PLQ) and a total-variation penalty (PLTV) were investigated for PL. The performance of DE CBCT material discrimination was quantified in terms of voxelwise specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Results: Noise in the HE image was primarily responsible for classification errors within the contrast inserts, whereas noise in the LE image mainly influenced classification in the surrounding water. For inserts of diameter 28.4 mm, DE CBCT reconstructions were optimized to maximize the total combined accuracy across the range of calcium and iodine concentrations, yielding values of ∼88% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼95% for PLTV at 3.1 mGy total dose, increasing to ∼95% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼98% for PLTV at 15.6 mGy total dose. For a

  5. Dual-energy cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: Effect of reconstruction algorithm on material classification

    PubMed Central

    Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G. J.; Xu, J.; Wang, A. S.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector (FPD) is finding application in areas such as breast and musculoskeletal imaging, where dual-energy (DE) capabilities offer potential benefit. The authors investigate the accuracy of material classification in DE CBCT using filtered backprojection (FBP) and penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction and optimize contrast-enhanced DE CBCT of the joints as a function of dose, material concentration, and detail size. Methods: Phantoms consisting of a 15 cm diameter water cylinder with solid calcium inserts (50–200 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter) and solid iodine inserts (2–10 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter), as well as a cadaveric knee with intra-articular injection of iodine were imaged on a CBCT bench with a Varian 4343 FPD. The low energy (LE) beam was 70 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu), and the high energy (HE) beam was 120 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu, +0.5 mm Ag). Total dose (LE+HE) was varied from 3.1 to 15.6 mGy with equal dose allocation. Image-based DE classification involved a nearest distance classifier in the space of LE versus HE attenuation values. Recognizing the differences in noise between LE and HE beams, the LE and HE data were differentially filtered (in FBP) or regularized (in PL). Both a quadratic (PLQ) and a total-variation penalty (PLTV) were investigated for PL. The performance of DE CBCT material discrimination was quantified in terms of voxelwise specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Results: Noise in the HE image was primarily responsible for classification errors within the contrast inserts, whereas noise in the LE image mainly influenced classification in the surrounding water. For inserts of diameter 28.4 mm, DE CBCT reconstructions were optimized to maximize the total combined accuracy across the range of calcium and iodine concentrations, yielding values of ∼88% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼95% for PLTV at 3.1 mGy total dose, increasing to ∼95% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼98% for PLTV at 15.6 mGy total dose. For a

  6. Comparison of Multidetector Computed Tomography and Flat-Panel Computed Tomography Regarding Visualization of Cortical Fractures, Cortical Defects, and Orthopedic Screws: A Phantom Study.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Lang, Hannah; Lampert, Florian; Kemna, Lars; Konstantinidis, Lukas; Neubauer, Claudia; Reising, Kilian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Goerke, Sebastian M

    2015-08-01

    To compare the visualization of cortical fractures, cortical defects, and orthopedic screws in a dedicated extremity flat-panel computed tomography (FPCT) scanner and a multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanner.We used feet of European roe deer as phantoms for cortical fractures, cortical defects, and implanted orthopedic screws. FPCT and MDCT scans were performed with equivalent dose settings. Six observers rated the scans according to number of fragments, size of defects, size of defects opposite orthopedic screws, and the length of different screws. The image quality regarding depiction of the cortical bone was assessed. The gold standard (real number of fragments) was evaluated by autopsy.The correlation of reader assessment of fragments, cortical defects, and screws with the gold standard was similar for FPCT and MDCT. Three readers rated the subjective image quality of the MDCT to be higher, whereas the others showed no preferences.Although the image quality was rated higher in the MDCT than in the FPCT by 3 out of 6 observers, both modalities proved to be comparable regarding the visualization of cortical fractures, cortical defects, and orthopedic screws and of use to musculoskeletal radiology regarding fracture detection and postsurgical evaluation in our experimental setting. PMID:26252281

  7. Comparison of Multidetector Computed Tomography and Flat-Panel Computed Tomography Regarding Visualization of Cortical Fractures, Cortical Defects, and Orthopedic Screws

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Lang, Hannah; Lampert, Florian; Kemna, Lars; Konstantinidis, Lukas; Neubauer, Claudia; Reising, Kilian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Goerke, Sebastian M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To compare the visualization of cortical fractures, cortical defects, and orthopedic screws in a dedicated extremity flat-panel computed tomography (FPCT) scanner and a multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanner. We used feet of European roe deer as phantoms for cortical fractures, cortical defects, and implanted orthopedic screws. FPCT and MDCT scans were performed with equivalent dose settings. Six observers rated the scans according to number of fragments, size of defects, size of defects opposite orthopedic screws, and the length of different screws. The image quality regarding depiction of the cortical bone was assessed. The gold standard (real number of fragments) was evaluated by autopsy. The correlation of reader assessment of fragments, cortical defects, and screws with the gold standard was similar for FPCT and MDCT. Three readers rated the subjective image quality of the MDCT to be higher, whereas the others showed no preferences. Although the image quality was rated higher in the MDCT than in the FPCT by 3 out of 6 observers, both modalities proved to be comparable regarding the visualization of cortical fractures, cortical defects, and orthopedic screws and of use to musculoskeletal radiology regarding fracture detection and postsurgical evaluation in our experimental setting. PMID:26252281

  8. The influence of antiscatter grids on soft-tissue detectability in cone-beam computed tomography with flat-panel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Siewerdsen, J.H.; Moseley, D.J.; Bakhtiar, B.; Richard, S.; Jaffray, D.A.

    2004-12-01

    The influence of antiscatter x-ray grids on image quality in cone-beam computed tomography (CT) is evaluated through broad experimental investigation for various anatomical sites (head and body), scatter conditions (scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) ranging from {approx}10% to 150%), patient dose, and spatial resolution in three-dimensional reconstructions. Studies involved linear grids in combination with a flat-panel imager on a system for kilovoltage cone-beam CT imaging and guidance of radiation therapy. Grids were found to be effective in reducing x-ray scatter 'cupping' artifacts, with heavier grids providing increased image uniformity. The system was highly robust against ring artifacts that might arise in CT reconstructions as a result of gridline shadows in the projection data. The influence of grids on soft-tissue detectability was evaluated quantitatively in terms of absolute contrast, voxel noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in cone-beam CT reconstructions of 16 cm 'head' and 32 cm 'body' cylindrical phantoms. Imaging performance was investigated qualitatively in observer preference tests based on patient images (pelvis, abdomen, and head-and-neck sites) acquired with and without antiscatter grids. The results suggest that although grids reduce scatter artifacts and improve subject contrast, there is little strong motivation for the use of grids in cone-beam CT in terms of CNR and overall image quality under most circumstances. The results highlight the tradeoffs in contrast and noise imparted by grids, showing improved image quality with grids only under specific conditions of high x-ray scatter (SPR>100%), high imaging dose (D{sub center}>2 cGy), and low spatial resolution (voxel size {>=}1 mm)

  9. Coupled thermal/structural analyses of laser powered glass sealing methods for fiber optic and flat panel display applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, R.S.; Gianoulakis, S.E.

    1996-12-31

    Glasses are used extensively by the electronics industry for packaging and in components. Because glasses have such low fracture toughness, glass components must maintain low tensile stresses to avoid cracking and ensure product stability. Modeling is a key tool for developing designs with low tensile stresses. Thermoelastic analyses are ideal for modeling slow, oven controlled processes where the temperature varies uniformly. Many processing environments, however, involve rapid heating and cooling cycles that produce nonhomogeneous temperature fields causing the volume and stresses in the glass to relax at different rates. This structural relaxation is an important nonlinear material behavior that gives rise to a point-to-point variability in effective properties of the material. To accurately model such stresses, a thermal analysis must be coupled to a structural analysis that employs a viscoelastic model of glass. Laser sealing of glasses is an example of a process where thermal history is an important factor in determining the residual stress state. Recent needs to consider laser sealing methods for fiber optic connectors and flat panel displays have spurred the development of coupled, three-dimensional thermal and structural finite element codes. Analyses of the temperatures and stresses generated in a flat panel display during a laser sealing operation are presented, an the idiosyncrasies and importance of modeling coupled thermal/structural phenomena are discussed.

  10. Quantitative comparison using generalized relative object detectability (G-ROD) metrics of an amorphous selenium detector with high resolution microangiographic fluoroscopes (MAF) and standard flat panel detectors (FPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, M.; Shankar, A.; Jain, A.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Ionita, C. N.; Scott, C.; Karim, K. S.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    A novel amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct detector with CMOS readout has been designed, and relative detector performance investigated. The detector features include a 25μm pixel pitch, and 1000μm thick a-Se layer operating at 10V/μm bias field. A simulated detector DQE was determined, and used in comparative calculations of the Relative Object Detectability (ROD) family of prewhitening matched-filter (PWMF) observer and non-pre-whitening matched filter (NPWMF) observer model metrics to gauge a-Se detector performance against existing high resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscopic (MAF) detectors and a standard flat panel detector (FPD). The PWMF-ROD or ROD metric compares two x-ray imaging detectors in their relative abilities in imaging a given object by taking the integral over spatial frequencies of the Fourier transform of the detector DQE weighted by an object function, divided by the comparable integral for a different detector. The generalized-ROD (G-ROD) metric incorporates clinically relevant parameters (focal- spot size, magnification, and scatter) to show the degradation in imaging performance for detectors that are part of an imaging chain. Preliminary ROD calculations using simulated spheres as the object predicted superior imaging performance by the a-Se detector as compared to existing detectors. New PWMF-G-ROD and NPWMF-G-ROD results still indicate better performance by the a-Se detector in an imaging chain over all sphere sizes for various focal spot sizes and magnifications, although a-Se performance advantages were degraded by focal spot blurring. Nevertheless, the a-Se technology has great potential to provide break- through abilities such as visualization of fine details including of neuro-vascular perforator vessels and of small vascular devices.

  11. Performance of flat panel (AMLCD) units installed in the aft end of drug interdiction P-3s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, Kenneth E.; Sankovic, Michael

    1997-07-01

    The US Navy is proactively upgrading its fleet of P-3 Maritime Patrol Aircraft to continue to meet current and near future challenges to national security. The traditional P-3 role of anti-submarine warfare, though retained, is being expanded to include anti-surface warfare, increased reconnaissance and surveillance, and other missions. As part of the overall improvement program, P-3 cockpit and tactical crewstations throughout the aircraft are being upgraded to improve crew performance. Flat panel display technology is replacing CRTs in five on-going crewstation improvements. This paper reports on one of them: the replacement of CRT displays in a prototype EO/IR crewstation with a suite of four color AMLCDs, one of which is configured with a surface acoustic wave touch overlay to serve as a programmable touch interface. This upgrade is already in service with the fleet.

  12. Application of flat panel OLED display technology for the point-of-care detection of circulating cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Katchman, Benjamin A; Smith, Joseph T; Obahiagbon, Uwadiae; Kesiraju, Sailaja; Lee, Yong-Kyun; O'Brien, Barry; Kaftanoglu, Korhan; Blain Christen, Jennifer; Anderson, Karen S

    2016-07-04

    Point-of-care molecular diagnostics can provide efficient and cost-effective medical care, and they have the potential to fundamentally change our approach to global health. However, most existing approaches are not scalable to include multiple biomarkers. As a solution, we have combined commercial flat panel OLED display technology with protein microarray technology to enable high-density fluorescent, programmable, multiplexed biorecognition in a compact and disposable configuration with clinical-level sensitivity. Our approach leverages advances in commercial display technology to reduce pre-functionalized biosensor substrate costs to pennies per cm(2). Here, we demonstrate quantitative detection of IgG antibodies to multiple viral antigens in patient serum samples with detection limits for human IgG in the 10 pg/mL range. We also demonstrate multiplexed detection of antibodies to the HPV16 proteins E2, E6, and E7, which are circulating biomarkers for cervical as well as head and neck cancers.

  13. Post-buckling of geometrically imperfect shear-deformable flat panels under combined thermal and compressive edge loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, L.; Souza, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The static post-buckling of simply-supported flat panels exposed to a stationary nonuniform temperature field and subjected to a system of subcritical in-plane compressive edge loads is investigated. The study is performed within a refined theory of composite laminated plates incorporating the effect of transverse shear and the geometric nonlinearities. The influence played by a number of effects, among them transverse shear deformation, initial geometric imperfections, the character of the in-plane boundary conditions and thickness ratio are studied and a series of conclusions are outlined. The influence played by the complete temperature field (i.e., the uniform through thickness and thickness-wise gradient) as compared to the one induced by only the uniform one, is discussed and the peculiarities of the resulting post-buckling behaviors are enlightened.

  14. Human health and ecological toxicity potentials due to heavy metal content in waste electronic devices with flat panel displays.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seong-Rin; Schoenung, Julie M

    2010-05-15

    Display devices such as cathode-ray tube (CRT) televisions and computer monitors are known to contain toxic substances and have consequently been banned from disposal in landfills in the State of California and elsewhere. New types of flat panel display (FPD) devices, millions of which are now purchased each year, also contain toxic substances, but have not previously been systematically studied and compared to assess the potential impact that could result from their ultimate disposal. In the current work, the focus is on the evaluation of end-of-life toxicity potential from the heavy metal content in select FPD devices with the intent to inform material selection and design-for-environment (DfE) decisions. Specifically, the metals antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, vanadium, and zinc in plasma TVs, LCD (liquid crystal display) TVs, LCD computer monitors and laptop computers are considered. The human health and ecotoxicity potentials are evaluated through a life cycle assessment perspective by combining data on the respective heavy metal contents, the characterization factors in the U.S. EPA Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts (TRACI), and a pathway and impact model. Principal contributors to the toxicity potentials are lead, arsenic, copper, and mercury. Although the heavy metal content in newer flat panel display devices creates less human health toxicity potential than that in CRTs, for ecological toxicity, the new devices are worse, especially because of the mercury in LCD TVs and the copper in plasma TVs.

  15. X-ray imaging using avalanche multiplication in amorphous selenium: Investigation of depth dependent avalanche noise

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, D. C.; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Rowlands, J. A.

    2007-03-15

    The past decade has seen the swift development of the flat-panel detector (FPD), also known as the active matrix flat-panel imager, for digital radiography. This new technology is applicable to other modalities, such as fluoroscopy, which require the acquisition of multiple images, but could benefit from some improvements. In such applications where more than one image is acquired less radiation is available to form each image and amplifier noise becomes a serious problem. Avalanche multiplication in amorphous selenium (a-Se) can provide the necessary amplification prior to read out so as to reduce the effect of electronic noise of the FPD. However, in direct conversion detectors avalanche multiplication can lead to a new source of gain fluctuation noise called depth dependent avalanche noise. A theoretical model was developed to understand depth dependent avalanche noise. Experiments were performed on a direct imaging system implementing avalanche multiplication in a layer of a-Se to validate the theory. For parameters appropriate for a diagnostic imaging FPD for fluoroscopy the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) was found to drop by as much as 50% with increasing electric field, as predicted by the theoretical model. This drop in DQE can be eliminated by separating the collection and avalanche regions. For example by having a region of low electric field where x rays are absorbed and converted into charge that then drifts into a region of high electric field where the x-ray generated charge undergoes avalanche multiplication. This means quantum noise limited direct conversion FPD for low exposure imaging techniques are a possibility.

  16. Clinical performance of a prototype flat-panel digital detector for general radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Walter; Scalzetti, Ernest M.; Roskopf, Marsha L.; Geiger, Robert

    2001-08-01

    Digital radiographs obtained using a prototype Digital Radiography System (Stingray) were compared with those obtained using conventional screen-film. Forty adult volunteers each had two identical radiographs taken at the same level of radiation exposure, one using screen-film and the other the digital detector. Each digital image was processed by hand to ensure that the printed quality was optimal. Ten radiologists compared the diagnostic image quality of the digital images with the corresponding film radiographs using a seven point ranking scheme.

  17. Detectability of simulated interstitial pneumonia on chest radiographs: comparison between irradiation side sampling indirect flat-panel detector and computed radiography

    PubMed Central

    Yabuuchi, H; Kairada, A; Tanaka, N; Morishita, J; Akasaka, T; Matsuo, Y; Kamitani, T; Yamasaki, Y; Nagao, M; Sasaki, M

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the detectability of simulated interstitial pneumonia on chest radiographs between an irradiation side sampling indirect flat-panel detector (ISS-FPD) and computed radiography (CR). Methods: Simulated interstitial pneumonia findings (ground-glass opacity, reticular opacity and honeycomb lung) were superimposed on an anthropomorphic chest phantom. Chest radiographs were acquired under three exposure levels (4.0, 3.2 and 2.0 mAs) with an ISS-FPD and with CR. 5 thoracic radiologists evaluated 72 images for the presence or absence of a lesion over each of 6 areas. A total of 1296 observations were analysed in a receiver–operating characteristic analysis. A jackknife method was used for the statistical analysis. Results: The areas under the curves (AUCs) for the detection of simulated honeycomb lung obtained with the ISS-FPD were significantly larger than those obtained with CR at all exposure conditions. For the detection of simulated ground-glass opacity and reticular opacity, there were no significant differences between the two systems. In addition, the AUCs for the detectability of simulated honeycomb lung obtained with the ISS-FPD at all exposure levels were significantly larger than those obtained with CR at 4 mAs. Conclusion: The ISS-FPD was superior to CR for the detection of simulated honeycomb lung. Provided that the chosen model is representative of interstitial pneumonia, the use of an ISS-FPD might reduce a patient's exposure dose during the detection of interstitial pneumonia. Advances in knowledge: The ISS-FPD has shown its advantage compared with CR in the detection of honeycombing, one sign of interstitial pneumonia. PMID:24874767

  18. Empirical binary tomography calibration (EBTC) for the precorrection of beam hardening and scatter for flat panel CT

    SciTech Connect

    Grimmer, Rainer; Kachelriess, Marc

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Scatter and beam hardening are prominent artifacts in x-ray CT. Currently, there is no precorrection method that inherently accounts for tube voltage modulation and shaped prefiltration. Methods: A method for self-calibration based on binary tomography of homogeneous objects, which was proposed by B. Li et al. [''A novel beam hardening correction method for computed tomography,'' in Proceedings of the IEEE/ICME International Conference on Complex Medical Engineering CME 2007, pp. 891-895, 23-27 May 2007], has been generalized in order to use this information to preprocess scans of other, nonbinary objects, e.g., to reduce artifacts in medical CT applications. Further on, the method was extended to handle scatter besides beam hardening and to allow for detector pixel-specific and ray-specific precorrections. This implies that the empirical binary tomography calibration (EBTC) technique is sensitive to spectral effects as they are induced by the heel effect, by shaped prefiltration, or by scanners with tube voltage modulation. The presented method models the beam hardening correction by using a rational function, while the scatter component is modeled using the pep model of B. Ohnesorge et al. [''Efficient object scatter correction algorithm for third and fourth generation CT scanners,'' Eur. Radiol. 9(3), 563-569 (1999)]. A smoothness constraint is applied to the parameter space to regularize the underdetermined system of nonlinear equations. The parameters determined are then used to precorrect CT scans. Results: EBTC was evaluated using simulated data of a flat panel cone-beam CT scanner with tube voltage modulation and bow-tie prefiltration and using real data of a flat panel cone-beam CT scanner. In simulation studies, where the ground truth is known, the authors' correction model proved to be highly accurate and was able to reduce beam hardening by 97% and scatter by about 75%. Reconstructions of measured data showed significantly less artifacts than

  19. Luminescent studies of fluorescent chromophore-doped silica aerogels for flat panel display applications

    SciTech Connect

    Glauser, S.A.C.; Lee, H.W.H.

    1997-04-01

    The remarkable optical and electronic properties of doped and undoped silica aerogels establish their utility as unique, mulitfunctional host materials for fluorescent dyes and other luminescent materials for display and imaging applications. We present results on the photoluminescence, absorption, and photoluminescence excitation spectra of undoped silica aerogels and aerogels doped with Er{sup 3+}, rhodamine 6G (R6G), and fluorescein. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Cone-beam breast computed tomography with a displaced flat panel detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Mettivier, Giovanni; Russo, Paolo; Lanconelli, Nico; Meo, Sergio Lo

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: In cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and in particular in cone-beam breast computed tomography (CBBCT), an important issue is the reduction of the image artifacts produced by photon scatter and the reduction of patient dose. In this work, the authors propose to apply the detector displacement technique (also known as asymmetric detector or ''extended view'' geometry) to approach this goal. Potentially, this type of geometry, and the accompanying use of a beam collimator to mask the unirradiated half-object in each projection, permits some reduction of radiation dose with respect to conventional CBBCT and a sizeable reduction of the overall amount of scatter in the object, for a fixed contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Methods: The authors consider a scan configuration in which the projection data are acquired from an asymmetrically positioned detector that covers only one half of the scan field of view. Monte Carlo simulations and measurements, with their CBBCT laboratory scanner, were performed using PMMA phantoms of cylindrical (70-mm diameter) and hemiellipsoidal (140-mm diameter) shape simulating the average pendant breast, at 80 kVp. Image quality was evaluated in terms of contrast, noise, CNR, contrast-to-noise ratio per unit of dose (CNRD), and spatial resolution as width of line spread function for high contrast details. Results: Reconstructed images with the asymmetric detector technique deviate less than 1% from reconstruction with a conventional symmetric detector (detector view) and indicate a reduction of the cupping artifact in CT slices. The maximum scatter-to-primary ratio at the center of the phantom decreases by about 50% for both small and large diameter phantoms (e.g., from 0.75 in detector view to 0.40 in extended view geometry at the central axis of the 140-mm diameter PMMA phantom). Less cupping produces an increase of the CT number accuracy and an improved image detail contrast, but the associated increase of noise observed may

  1. Application of flat panel OLED display technology for the point-of-care detection of circulating cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Katchman, Benjamin A.; Smith, Joseph T.; Obahiagbon, Uwadiae; Kesiraju, Sailaja; Lee, Yong-Kyun; O’Brien, Barry; Kaftanoglu, Korhan; Blain Christen, Jennifer; Anderson, Karen S.

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care molecular diagnostics can provide efficient and cost-effective medical care, and they have the potential to fundamentally change our approach to global health. However, most existing approaches are not scalable to include multiple biomarkers. As a solution, we have combined commercial flat panel OLED display technology with protein microarray technology to enable high-density fluorescent, programmable, multiplexed biorecognition in a compact and disposable configuration with clinical-level sensitivity. Our approach leverages advances in commercial display technology to reduce pre-functionalized biosensor substrate costs to pennies per cm2. Here, we demonstrate quantitative detection of IgG antibodies to multiple viral antigens in patient serum samples with detection limits for human IgG in the 10 pg/mL range. We also demonstrate multiplexed detection of antibodies to the HPV16 proteins E2, E6, and E7, which are circulating biomarkers for cervical as well as head and neck cancers. PMID:27374875

  2. Color shifts at different viewing eccentricities on flat-panel rear projection displays in steps of perceptibility threshold units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, Mahalakshmi; Hovis, Jeffery; Zsivanov, Delia; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2013-08-01

    Nearly all-flat panel video display monitors have luminance and color variations as the angle of view vary from the monitor's perpendicular. The objective of this study was to measure the shift in hue and luminance of a simulated tiled monitor display at different viewing angles. The perceptibility experiment was carried out using three reference colors and 12 vectors heading towards the blue-green region of the L∗a∗b∗ color space. The reference colors used were white, skin-tone, and green. A uniform reference color was presented in three of the four quadrants on a CRT monitor and one quadrant changed color in the direction of the sampled vector. An adaptive, four alternate forced choice procedure was employed to determine thresholds for each of the three reference colors. Across the three reference colors, the thresholds were at least 20% lower than the conventional one ΔEL∗a∗b∗ unit used for calibrating monitors. Color difference thresholds were lowest for the blue-green region of the color space. Our results suggest that a one ΔEL∗a∗b∗ uniformity criterion typically used for calibrating monitors is too lenient for tiled displays.

  3. Theoretical investigation of flutter of two-dimensional flat panels with one surface exposed to supersonic potential flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Herbert C; Cunningham, Herbert J

    1956-01-01

    A Rayleigh type analysis involving chosen modes of the panel as degrees of freedom is used to treat the flutter of a two-dimensional flat panel supported at its leading and trailing edges and subjected to a middle-plane tensile force. The panel has a supersonic stream passing over its upper surface and still air below. The aerodynamic forces due to the supersonic stream are obtained from the theory for linearized two-dimensional unsteady flow and the forces due to the still air are obtained from acoustical theory. In order to study the effect of increasing the number of modes in the analysis, two and then four modes are employed. The modes used are the first four natural modes of the panel in a vacuum with no tensile force acting. The analysis includes these variables: Mach number, structural damping, tensile force, density of the still air, and edge fixity (clamped and pinned). For certain combinations of these variables, stability boundaries are obtained which can be used to determine the panel thickness required to prevent flutter for any panel material and altitude.

  4. An investigation of signal performance enhancements achieved through innovative pixel design across several generations of indirect detection, active matrix, flat-panel arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao Qihua; El-Mohri, Youcef; Du Hong; Wang Yi; Street, Robert A.; Ho, Jackson; Weisfield, Richard; Yao, William

    2009-07-15

    Active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) technology is being employed for an increasing variety of imaging applications. An important element in the adoption of this technology has been significant ongoing improvements in optical signal collection achieved through innovations in indirect detection array pixel design. Such improvements have a particularly beneficial effect on performance in applications involving low exposures and/or high spatial frequencies, where detective quantum efficiency is strongly reduced due to the relatively high level of additive electronic noise compared to signal levels of AMFPI devices. In this article, an examination of various signal properties, as determined through measurements and calculations related to novel array designs, is reported in the context of the evolution of AMFPI pixel design. For these studies, dark, optical, and radiation signal measurements were performed on prototype imagers incorporating a variety of increasingly sophisticated array designs, with pixel pitches ranging from 75 to 127 {mu}m. For each design, detailed measurements of fundamental pixel-level properties conducted under radiographic and fluoroscopic operating conditions are reported and the results are compared. A series of 127 {mu}m pitch arrays employing discrete photodiodes culminated in a novel design providing an optical fill factor of {approx}80% (thereby assuring improved x-ray sensitivity), and demonstrating low dark current, very low charge trapping and charge release, and a large range of linear signal response. In two of the designs having 75 and 90 {mu}m pitches, a novel continuous photodiode structure was found to provide fill factors that approach the theoretical maximum of 100%. Both sets of novel designs achieved large fill factors by employing architectures in which some, or all of the photodiode structure was elevated above the plane of the pixel addressing transistor. Generally, enhancement of the fill factor in either discrete or

  5. An investigation of signal performance enhancements achieved through innovative pixel design across several generations of indirect detection, active matrix, flat-panel arrays

    PubMed Central

    Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua; El-Mohri, Youcef; Du, Hong; Wang, Yi; Street, Robert A.; Ho, Jackson; Weisfield, Richard; Yao, William

    2009-01-01

    Active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) technology is being employed for an increasing variety of imaging applications. An important element in the adoption of this technology has been significant ongoing improvements in optical signal collection achieved through innovations in indirect detection array pixel design. Such improvements have a particularly beneficial effect on performance in applications involving low exposures and∕or high spatial frequencies, where detective quantum efficiency is strongly reduced due to the relatively high level of additive electronic noise compared to signal levels of AMFPI devices. In this article, an examination of various signal properties, as determined through measurements and calculations related to novel array designs, is reported in the context of the evolution of AMFPI pixel design. For these studies, dark, optical, and radiation signal measurements were performed on prototype imagers incorporating a variety of increasingly sophisticated array designs, with pixel pitches ranging from 75 to 127 μm. For each design, detailed measurements of fundamental pixel-level properties conducted under radiographic and fluoroscopic operating conditions are reported and the results are compared. A series of 127 μm pitch arrays employing discrete photodiodes culminated in a novel design providing an optical fill factor of ∼80% (thereby assuring improved x-ray sensitivity), and demonstrating low dark current, very low charge trapping and charge release, and a large range of linear signal response. In two of the designs having 75 and 90 μm pitches, a novel continuous photodiode structure was found to provide fill factors that approach the theoretical maximum of 100%. Both sets of novel designs achieved large fill factors by employing architectures in which some, or all of the photodiode structure was elevated above the plane of the pixel addressing transistor. Generally, enhancement of the fill factor in either discrete or continuous

  6. Novel Na(+) doped Alq3 hybrid materials for organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices and flat panel displays.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, S A; Borghate, S V; Kalyani, N Thejo; Dhoble, S J

    2015-05-01

    Pure and Na(+) -doped Alq3 complexes were synthesized by a simple precipitation method at room temperature, maintaining a stoichiometric ratio. These complexes were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV/Vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The X-ray diffractogram exhibits well-resolved peaks, revealing the crystalline nature of the synthesized complexes, FTIR confirms the molecular structure and the completion of quinoline ring formation in the metal complex. UV/Vis absorption and PL spectra of sodium-doped Alq3 complexes exhibit high emission intensity in comparison with Alq3 phosphor, proving that when doped in Alq3 , Na(+) enhances PL emission intensity. The excitation spectra of the synthesized complexes lie in the range 242-457 nm when weak shoulders are also considered. Because the sharp excitation peak falls in the blue region of visible radiation, the complexes can be employed for blue chip excitation. The emission wavelength of all the synthesized complexes lies in the bluish green/green region ranging between 485 and 531 nm. The intensity of the emission wavelength was found to be elevated when Na(+) is doped into Alq3 . Because both the excitation and emission wavelengths fall in the visible region of electromagnetic radiation, these phosphors can also be employed to improve the power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic cells by using the solar spectral conversion principle. Thus, the synthesized phosphors can be used as bluish green/green light-emitting phosphors for organic light-emitting diodes, flat panel displays, solid-state lighting technology - a step towards the desire to reduce energy consumption and generate pollution free light.

  7. Novel Na(+) doped Alq3 hybrid materials for organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices and flat panel displays.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, S A; Borghate, S V; Kalyani, N Thejo; Dhoble, S J

    2015-05-01

    Pure and Na(+) -doped Alq3 complexes were synthesized by a simple precipitation method at room temperature, maintaining a stoichiometric ratio. These complexes were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV/Vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The X-ray diffractogram exhibits well-resolved peaks, revealing the crystalline nature of the synthesized complexes, FTIR confirms the molecular structure and the completion of quinoline ring formation in the metal complex. UV/Vis absorption and PL spectra of sodium-doped Alq3 complexes exhibit high emission intensity in comparison with Alq3 phosphor, proving that when doped in Alq3 , Na(+) enhances PL emission intensity. The excitation spectra of the synthesized complexes lie in the range 242-457 nm when weak shoulders are also considered. Because the sharp excitation peak falls in the blue region of visible radiation, the complexes can be employed for blue chip excitation. The emission wavelength of all the synthesized complexes lies in the bluish green/green region ranging between 485 and 531 nm. The intensity of the emission wavelength was found to be elevated when Na(+) is doped into Alq3 . Because both the excitation and emission wavelengths fall in the visible region of electromagnetic radiation, these phosphors can also be employed to improve the power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic cells by using the solar spectral conversion principle. Thus, the synthesized phosphors can be used as bluish green/green light-emitting phosphors for organic light-emitting diodes, flat panel displays, solid-state lighting technology - a step towards the desire to reduce energy consumption and generate pollution free light. PMID:25045087

  8. Accuracy of thoracolumbar transpedicular and vertebral body percutaneous screw placement: coupling the Rosa® Spine robot with intraoperative flat-panel CT guidance--a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Lefranc, M; Peltier, J

    2015-12-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of a new robotic device when coupled with intraoperative flat-panel CT guidance. Screws (D8-S1) were implanted during two separate cadaver sessions by coupling the Rosa(®) Spine robot with the flat-panel CT device. Of 38 implanted screws, 37 (97.4 %) were fully contained within the pedicle. One screw breached the lateral cortical of one pedicle by <1 mm. The mean ± SD accuracy (relative to pre-operative planning) was 2.05 ± 1.2 mm for the screw head, 1.65 ± 1.11 for the middle of the pedicle and 1.57 ± 1.01 for the screw tip. When coupled with intraoperative flat-panel CT guidance, the Rosa(®) Spine robot appears to be accurate in placing pedicle screws within both pedicles and the vertebral body. Large clinical studies are mandatory to confirm this preliminary cadaveric report. PMID:26530846

  9. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O’Sullivan, Andrew W.; Catherall, David; Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC’s active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4 × 4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16 × 16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92 × 0.92 × 3 mm3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8 × 16.8 mm2. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4 × 8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm × 14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with Ge-68 source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module’s mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, +/−0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules. PMID:26085702

  10. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O`Sullivan, Andrew W.; Catherall, David; Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-09-01

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC's active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4×4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16×16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92×0.92×3 mm3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8×16.8 mm2. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4×8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm×14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with 68Ge source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module's mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, ±0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules.

  11. Generation of diverse neural cell types through direct conversion

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Gayle F; Strappe, Padraig M

    2016-01-01

    A characteristic of neurological disorders is the loss of critical populations of cells that the body is unable to replace, thus there has been much interest in identifying methods of generating clinically relevant numbers of cells to replace those that have been damaged or lost. The process of neural direct conversion, in which cells of one lineage are converted into cells of a neural lineage without first inducing pluripotency, shows great potential, with evidence of the generation of a range of functional neural cell types both in vitro and in vivo, through viral and non-viral delivery of exogenous factors, as well as chemical induction methods. Induced neural cells have been proposed as an attractive alternative to neural cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells, with prospective roles in the investigation of neurological disorders, including neurodegenerative disease modelling, drug screening, and cellular replacement for regenerative medicine applications, however further investigations into improving the efficacy and safety of these methods need to be performed before neural direct conversion becomes a clinically viable option. In this review, we describe the generation of diverse neural cell types via direct conversion of somatic cells, with comparison against stem cell-based approaches, as well as discussion of their potential research and clinical applications. PMID:26981169

  12. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Foral, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

  13. A novel potential source of β-carotene: Eustigmatos cf. polyphem (Eustigmatophyceae) and pilot β-carotene production in bubble column and flat panel photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Ma, Xiaoqin; Li, Aifen; Zhang, Chengwu

    2012-08-01

    Carotenoids profile of the unicellular Eustigmatos cf. polyphem (Eustigmatophyceae) and β-carotene production of the microalga in bubble column and large flat panel bioreactors were studied. The microalga which contained β-carotene, violaxanthin and vaucheriaxanthin as the major carotenoids accumulated large amount of β-carotene. The β-carotene production of this microalga in the bubble column bioreactor was considerable, with the maximum intracellular β-carotene content reaching 60.76 mg g(-1), biomass reaching 9.2 g L(-1), and β-carotene yield up to 470.2 mg L(-1). The β-carotene productions in two large flat panel bioreactors were relatively lower, whereas over 100 mg β-carotene L(-1) was achieved. Besides, high light intensity helped to accumulate intracellular β-carotene and biomass. Deficient nitrate supply inhibited biomass growth, though it helped to accumulate β-carotene. Our results first proved that E. cf. polyphem was a potential source and producer of β-carotene, making it an interesting subject for further β-carotene study or commercial exploration.

  14. A novel potential source of β-carotene: Eustigmatos cf. polyphem (Eustigmatophyceae) and pilot β-carotene production in bubble column and flat panel photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Ma, Xiaoqin; Li, Aifen; Zhang, Chengwu

    2012-08-01

    Carotenoids profile of the unicellular Eustigmatos cf. polyphem (Eustigmatophyceae) and β-carotene production of the microalga in bubble column and large flat panel bioreactors were studied. The microalga which contained β-carotene, violaxanthin and vaucheriaxanthin as the major carotenoids accumulated large amount of β-carotene. The β-carotene production of this microalga in the bubble column bioreactor was considerable, with the maximum intracellular β-carotene content reaching 60.76 mg g(-1), biomass reaching 9.2 g L(-1), and β-carotene yield up to 470.2 mg L(-1). The β-carotene productions in two large flat panel bioreactors were relatively lower, whereas over 100 mg β-carotene L(-1) was achieved. Besides, high light intensity helped to accumulate intracellular β-carotene and biomass. Deficient nitrate supply inhibited biomass growth, though it helped to accumulate β-carotene. Our results first proved that E. cf. polyphem was a potential source and producer of β-carotene, making it an interesting subject for further β-carotene study or commercial exploration. PMID:22617035

  15. Direct conversion of glucose to malate by synthetic metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaoting; Honda, Kohsuke; Morimoto, Yumi; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao

    2013-03-10

    Synthetic metabolic engineering enables us to construct an in vitro artificial synthetic pathways specialized for chemical manufacturing through the simple heat-treatment of the recombinant mesophiles having thermophilic enzymes, followed by rational combination of those biocatalytic modules. In this work, we constructed a synthetic pathway capable of direct conversion of glucose to malate. The reversible carboxylation of pyruvate catalyzed by a malic enzyme derived from Thermococcus kodakarensis (TkME) (ΔG°'=+7.3kJmol(-1)) was coupled with a thermodynamically favorable non-ATP-forming Embden-Meyerhof pathway to balance the consumption and regeneration of redox cofactors and to shift the overall equilibrium toward malate production (glucose+2HCO3(-)+2H→2 malate+2H2O; ΔG°'=-121.4kJmol(-1)). TkME exhibited both pyruvate carboxylation (malate-forming) and pyruvate reduction (lactate-forming) activities. By increasing HCO3(-) concentration, the reaction specificity could be redirected to malate production. As a result, the direct conversion of glucose to malate was achieved with a molar yield of 60%.

  16. Direct conversion technology: Annual summary report CY 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Massier, P.F.; Bankston, C.P.; Fabris, G.; Kirol, L.D.

    1988-12-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct thermal-to-electric energy conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1988 through December 1988. Research on these concepts was initiated during October 1987. In addition, status reviews and assessments are presented for thermomagnetic converter concepts and for thermoelastic converters (Nitinol heat engines). Reports prepared on previous occasions contain discussions on the following other direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic thermophotovoltaic and thermoacoustic; and also, more complete discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems. A tabulated summary of the various systems which have been reviewed thus far has been prepared. Some of the important technical research needs are listed and a schematic of each system is shown. These tabulations are included herein as figures. 43 refs., 26 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Method for direct conversion of gaseous hydrocarbons to liquids

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Lessing, Paul A.

    2006-03-07

    A chemical reactor for direct conversion of hydrocarbons includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell and a solid oxide electrochemical cell in fluid communication therewith. The discharge plasma cell comprises a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. The electrochemical cell comprises a mixed-conducting solid oxide electrolyte membrane tube positioned between a porous cathode and a porous anode, and a gas inlet tube for feeding oxygen containing gas to the porous cathode. An inlet is provided for feeding hydrocarbons to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a light source for directing ultraviolet light into the discharge plasma cell and the electrochemical cell.

  18. Direct conversion of terpenylalkanolamines to ethylidyne N-nitroso compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abidi, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    A series of mono- and diterpenylalkanolamines bearing isopropylidene functionality on the terpene group was reacted with sodium nitrite in aqueous acetic acid to yield ethylidyne N-nitroso analogues. The key feature of this direct conversion involved initial N-nitrosation followed by apparent elimination of a "CH4" unit (not necessarily methane) from the isopropylidene double bond. The product distribution data for ethylidyne nitrosamines derived from tertiary terpenyl alkanolamines reflect the conformational outcome of the nitrosative dealkylation process. For β,γ-unsaturated allylic diterpenylethanolamines, electronic effects appeared to be important for controlling the product distribution of ethylidyne nitrosamines in light of the highly selective α-cleavage observed in the nitrosation reactions.

  19. Photoelectrochemical based direct conversion systems for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Kocha, S.; Peterson, M.; Arent, D.

    1996-10-01

    Photon driven, direct conversion systems consist of a light absorber and a water splitting catalyst as a monolithic system; water is split directly upon illumination. This one-step process eliminates the need to generate electricity externally and subsequently feed it to an electrolyzer. These configurations require only the piping necessary for transport of hydrogen to an external storage system or gas pipeline. This work is focused on multiphoton photoelectrochemical devices for production of hydrogen directly using sunlight and water. Two types of multijunction cells, one consisting of a-Si triple junctions and the other GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs homojunctions, were studied for the photoelectrochemical decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen from an aqueous electrolyte solution. To catalyze the water decomposition process, the illuminated surface of the device was modified either by addition of platinum colloids or by coating with ruthenium dioxide. These colloids have been characterized by gel electrophoresis.

  20. Model-based iterative reconstruction for flat-panel cone-beam CT with focal spot blur, detector blur, and correlated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, Steven, II; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Webster Stayman, J.

    2016-01-01

    While model-based reconstruction methods have been successfully applied to flat-panel cone-beam CT (FP-CBCT) systems, typical implementations ignore both spatial correlations in the projection data as well as system blurs due to the detector and focal spot in the x-ray source. In this work, we develop a forward model for flat-panel-based systems that includes blur and noise correlation associated with finite focal spot size and an indirect detector (e.g. scintillator). This forward model is used to develop a staged reconstruction framework where projection data are deconvolved and log-transformed, followed by a generalized least-squares reconstruction that utilizes a non-diagonal statistical weighting to account for the correlation that arises from the acquisition and data processing chain. We investigate the performance of this novel reconstruction approach in both simulated data and in CBCT test-bench data. In comparison to traditional filtered backprojection and model-based methods that ignore noise correlation, the proposed approach yields a superior noise-resolution tradeoff. For example, for a system with 0.34 mm FWHM scintillator blur and 0.70 FWHM focal spot blur, using the correlated noise model instead of an uncorrelated noise model increased resolution by 42% (with variance matched at 6.9  ×  10-8 mm-2). While this advantage holds across a wide range of systems with differing blur characteristics, the improvements are greatest for systems where source blur is larger than detector blur.

  1. State-of-the-art for large area high resolution gray scale and full color AC plasma flat panel displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoller, Ray A.; Wedding, Donald K.; Friedman, Peter S.

    1993-01-01

    A development status evaluation is presented for gas plasma display technology, noting how tradeoffs among the parameters of size, resolution, speed, portability, color, and image quality can yield cost-effective solutions for medical imaging, CAD, teleconferencing, multimedia, and both civil and military applications. Attention is given to plasma-based large-area displays' suitability for radar, sonar, and IR, due to their lack of EM susceptibility. Both monochrome and color displays are available.

  2. Hybrid Pixel Detectors for gamma/X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzistratis, D.; Theodoratos, G.; Zografos, V.; Kazas, I.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are made by direct converting high-Z semi-insulating single crystalline material coupled to complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) readout electronics. They are attractive because direct conversion exterminates all the problems of spatial localization related to light diffusion, energy resolution, is far superior from the combination of scintillation crystals and photomultipliers and lithography can be used to pattern electrodes with very fine pitch. We are developing 2-D pixel CMOS ASICs, connect them to pixilated CdTe crystals with the flip chip and bump bonding method and characterize the hybrids. We have designed a series of circuits, whose latest member consists of a 50×25 pixel array with 400um pitch and an embedded controller. In every pixel a full spectroscopic channel with time tagging information has been implemented. The detectors are targeting Compton scatter imaging and they can be used for coded aperture imaging too. Hybridization using CMOS can overcome the limit put on pixel circuit complexity by the use of thin film transistors (TFT) in large flat panels. Hybrid active pixel sensors are used in dental imaging and other applications (e.g. industrial CT etc.). Thus X-ray imaging can benefit from the work done on dynamic range enhancement methods developed initially for visible and infrared CMOS pixel sensors. A 2-D CMOS ASIC with 100um pixel pitch to demonstrate the feasibility of such methods in the context of X-ray imaging has been designed.

  3. Flat-Panel Cone-Beam Ct-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Very Small (≤1.5 cm) Liver Tumors: Technical Note on a Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi Buy, Xavier Alberti, Nicolas Fonck, Mariane; Grasso, Rosario Francesco; Palussière, Jean

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThe aim of the present study was to investigate the technical feasibility of flat-panel cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of very small (<1.5 cm) liver tumors.Materials and MethodsPatients included were candidates for hepatic percutaneous RFA as they had single biopsy-proven hepatic tumors sized ≤1.5 cm and poorly defined on ultrasonography. Following apnea induction, unenhanced CBCT scans were acquired and used to deploy the RF electrode with the aid of a virtual navigation system. If the tumor was not clearly identified on the unenhanced CBCT scan, a right retrograde arterial femoral access was established to carry out hepatic angiography and localize the tumor. Patients’ lesions and procedural variables were recorded and analyzed.ResultsThree patients (2 male and 1 female), aged 68, 76, and 87 years were included; 3 lesions (2 hepato-cellular carcinoma and 1 metastasis from colorectal cancer) were treated. One patient required hepatic angiography. Cycles of apnea used to acquire CBCT images and to deploy the electrode lasted <120 s. Mean fluoroscopic time needed to deploy the electrode was 36.6 ± 5.7 min. Mean overall procedural time was 66.0 ± 22.9 min. No peri- or post-procedural complications were noted. No cases of incomplete ablation were noted at 1-month follow-up.ConclusionPercutaneous CBCT-guided liver RFA with or without arterial hepatic angiography is technically feasible.

  4. Uterine Artery Embolization for Leiomyomata: Optimization of the Radiation Dose to the Patient Using a Flat-Panel Detector Angiographic Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Sapoval, Marc Pellerin, Olivier; Rehel, Jean-Luc; Houdoux, Nicolas; Rahmoune, Ghizlaine; Aubert, Bernard; Fitton, Isabelle

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of low-dose/low-frame fluoroscopy/angiography with a flat-panel detector angiographic suite to reduce the dose delivered to patients during uterine fibroid embolization (UFE). A two-step prospective dosimetric study was conducted, with a flat-panel detector angiography suite (Siemens Axiom Artis) integrating automatic exposure control (AEC), during 20 consecutive UFEs. Patient dosimetry was performed using calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters placed on the lower posterior pelvis skin. The first step (10 patients; group A) consisted in UFE (bilateral embolization, calibrated microspheres) performed using the following parameters: standard fluoroscopy (15 pulses/s) and angiography (3 frames/s). The second step (next consecutive 10 patients; group B) used low-dose/low-frame fluoroscopy (7.5 pulses/s for catheterization and 3 pulses/s for embolization) and angiography (1 frame/s). We also recorded the total dose-area product (DAP) delivered to the patient and the fluoroscopy time as reported by the manufacturer's dosimetry report. The mean peak skin dose decreased from 2.4 {+-} 1.3 to 0.4 {+-} 0.3 Gy (P = 0.001) for groups A and B, respectively. The DAP values decreased from 43,113 {+-} 27,207 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} for group A to 9,515 {+-} 4,520 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} for group B (P = 0.003). The dose to ovaries and uterus decreased from 378 {+-} 238 mGy (group A) to 83 {+-} 41 mGy (group B) and from 388 {+-} 246 mGy (group A) to 85 {+-} 39 mGy (group B), respectively. Effective doses decreased from 112 {+-} 71 mSv (group A) to 24 {+-} 12 mSv (group B) (P = 0.003). In conclusion, the use of low-dose/low-frame fluoroscopy/angiography, based on a good understanding of the AEC system and also on the technique during uterine fibroid embolization, allows a significant decrease in the dose exposure to the patient.

  5. Hydrogen production by the engineered cyanobacterial strain Nostoc PCC 7120 ΔhupW examined in a flat panel photobioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Marcus; Heidorn, Thorsten; Lindblad, Peter

    2015-12-10

    Nitrogenase based hydrogen production was examined in a ΔhupW strain of the filamentous heterocystous cyanobacterium Nostoc PCC 7120, i.e., cells lacking the last step in the maturation system of the large subunit of the uptake hydrogenase and as a consequence with a non-functional uptake hydrogenase. The cells were grown in a developed flat panel photobioreactor system with 3.0L culture volume either aerobically (air) or anaerobically (Ar or 80% N2/20% Ar) and illuminated with a mixture of red and white LED. Aerobic growth of the ΔhupW strain of Nostoc PCC 7120 at 44μmolar photons m(-2)s(-1) PAR gave the highest hydrogen production of 0.7mL H2 L(-1)h(-1), 0.53mmol H2 mg chlorophyll a(-1)h(-1), and a light energy conversion efficiency of 1.2%. Anaerobic growth using 100% argon showed a maximal hydrogen production of 1.7mLL(-1)h(-1), 0.85mmol per mg chlorophyll a(-1) h(-1), and a light energy conversion efficiency of 2.7%. Altering between argon/N2 (20/80) and 100% argon phases resulted in a maximal hydrogen production at hour 128 (100% argon phase) with 6.2mL H2L(-1)h(-1), 0.71mL H2 mg chlorophyll a(-1)h(-1), and a light energy efficiency conversion of 4.0%. The highest buildup of hydrogen gas observed was 6.89% H2 (100% argon phase) of the total photobioreactor system with a maximal production of 4.85mL H2 L(-1)h(-1). The present study clearly demonstrates the potential to use purpose design cyanobacteria in developed flat panel photobioreactor systems for the direct production of the solar fuel hydrogen. Further improvements in the strain used, environmental conditions employed, and growth, production and collection systems used, are needed before a sustainable and economical cyanobacterial based hydrogen production can be realized.

  6. Hydrogen production by the engineered cyanobacterial strain Nostoc PCC 7120 ΔhupW examined in a flat panel photobioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Marcus; Heidorn, Thorsten; Lindblad, Peter

    2015-12-10

    Nitrogenase based hydrogen production was examined in a ΔhupW strain of the filamentous heterocystous cyanobacterium Nostoc PCC 7120, i.e., cells lacking the last step in the maturation system of the large subunit of the uptake hydrogenase and as a consequence with a non-functional uptake hydrogenase. The cells were grown in a developed flat panel photobioreactor system with 3.0L culture volume either aerobically (air) or anaerobically (Ar or 80% N2/20% Ar) and illuminated with a mixture of red and white LED. Aerobic growth of the ΔhupW strain of Nostoc PCC 7120 at 44μmolar photons m(-2)s(-1) PAR gave the highest hydrogen production of 0.7mL H2 L(-1)h(-1), 0.53mmol H2 mg chlorophyll a(-1)h(-1), and a light energy conversion efficiency of 1.2%. Anaerobic growth using 100% argon showed a maximal hydrogen production of 1.7mLL(-1)h(-1), 0.85mmol per mg chlorophyll a(-1) h(-1), and a light energy conversion efficiency of 2.7%. Altering between argon/N2 (20/80) and 100% argon phases resulted in a maximal hydrogen production at hour 128 (100% argon phase) with 6.2mL H2L(-1)h(-1), 0.71mL H2 mg chlorophyll a(-1)h(-1), and a light energy efficiency conversion of 4.0%. The highest buildup of hydrogen gas observed was 6.89% H2 (100% argon phase) of the total photobioreactor system with a maximal production of 4.85mL H2 L(-1)h(-1). The present study clearly demonstrates the potential to use purpose design cyanobacteria in developed flat panel photobioreactor systems for the direct production of the solar fuel hydrogen. Further improvements in the strain used, environmental conditions employed, and growth, production and collection systems used, are needed before a sustainable and economical cyanobacterial based hydrogen production can be realized. PMID:26325196

  7. SU-D-204-05: Quantitative Comparison of a High Resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscopic (MAF) Detector with a Standard Flat Panel Detector (FPD) Using the New Metric of Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD)

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, M; Ionita, C; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In endovascular image-guided neuro-interventions, visualization of fine detail is paramount. For example, the ability of the interventionist to visualize the stent struts depends heavily on the x-ray imaging detector performance. Methods: A study to examine the relative performance of the high resolution MAF-CMOS (pixel size 75µm, Nyquist frequency 6.6 cycles/mm) and a standard Flat Panel Detector (pixel size 194µm, Nyquist frequency 2.5 cycles/mm) detectors in imaging a neuro stent was done using the Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD) metric. Low quantum noise images of a deployed stent were obtained by averaging 95 frames obtained by both detectors without changing other exposure or geometric parameters. The square of the Fourier transform of each image is taken and divided by the generalized normalized noise power spectrum to give an effective measured task-specific signal-to-noise ratio. This expression is then integrated from 0 to each of the detector’s Nyquist frequencies, and the GM-ROD value is determined by taking a ratio of the integrals for the MAF-CMOS to that of the FPD. The lower bound of integration can be varied to emphasize high frequencies in the detector comparisons. Results: The MAF-CMOS detector exhibits vastly superior performance over the FPD when integrating over all frequencies, yielding a GM-ROD value of 63.1. The lower bound of integration was stepped up in increments of 0.5 cycles/mm for higher frequency comparisons. As the lower bound increased, the GM-ROD value was augmented, reflecting the superior performance of the MAF-CMOS in the high frequency regime. Conclusion: GM-ROD is a versatile metric that can provide quantitative detector and task dependent comparisons that can be used as a basis for detector selection. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  8. Does Preinterventional Flat-Panel Computer Tomography Pooled Blood Volume Mapping Predict Final Infarct Volume After Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Cerebral Artery Occlusion?

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Marlies; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Mesnil de Rochemont, Richard du; Singer, Oliver C.; Berkefeld, Joachim

    2013-08-01

    PurposeDecreased cerebral blood volume is known to be a predictor for final infarct volume in acute cerebral artery occlusion. To evaluate the predictability of final infarct volume in patients with acute occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) or the distal internal carotid artery (ICA) and successful endovascular recanalization, pooled blood volume (PBV) was measured using flat-panel detector computed tomography (FPD CT).Materials and MethodsTwenty patients with acute unilateral occlusion of the MCA or distal ACI without demarcated infarction, as proven by CT at admission, and successful Thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score (TICI 2b or 3) endovascular thrombectomy were included. Cerebral PBV maps were acquired from each patient immediately before endovascular thrombectomy. Twenty-four hours after recanalization, each patient underwent multislice CT to visualize final infarct volume. Extent of the areas of decreased PBV was compared with the final infarct volume proven by follow-up CT the next day.ResultsIn 15 of 20 patients, areas of distinct PBV decrease corresponded to final infarct volume. In 5 patients, areas of decreased PBV overestimated final extension of ischemia probably due to inappropriate timing of data acquisition and misery perfusion.ConclusionPBV mapping using FPD CT is a promising tool to predict areas of irrecoverable brain parenchyma in acute thromboembolic stroke. Further validation is necessary before routine use for decision making for interventional thrombectomy.

  9. A study on 100 MeV O7+ irradiated SnO2/Ag/SnO2 multilayer as transparent electrode for flat panel display application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Satyavir; Asokan, K.; Sachdev, Kanupriya

    2016-07-01

    The multilayer thin films of SnO2/Ag/SnO2 were deposited using electron-beam and thermal evaporation for flat panel display application. The as-prepared SnO2/Ag/SnO2 specimen was irradiated with 100 MeV O7+ ions by varying the fluences 1 × 1012 and 5 × 1012 ions/cm2. The pristine and irradiated films were investigated using XRD, SEM, AFM and Raman to find out modification in the structure and surface morphology of the films. UV-Vis and Hall measurement techniques were used to investigate the optical and electrical properties respectively. It was observed that the roughness of the film after irradiation (for the fluence of 1 × 1012 ions/cm2) ​ decreased to 0.68 nm from 1.6 nm and showed an increase in roughness to 1.35 nm on increasing the fluence to 5 × 1012 ions/cm2. This oxide/metal/oxide structure fulfills the basic requirements of a TCE, like high-transmittance >75% for pristine and >80% for the fluence of 1 × 1012 ions/cm2 over a broad spectrum of visible light for practical applications. The multilayer structure shows change in the electrical resistivity from 1.6 × 10-3 Ω cm to 6.3 × 10-3 Ω cm after irradiation.

  10. Percutaneous Bone Biopsies: Comparison between Flat-Panel Cone-Beam CT and CT-Scan Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Tselikas, Lambros Joskin, Julien; Roquet, Florian; Farouil, Geoffroy; Dreuil, Serge; Hakimé, Antoine Teriitehau, Christophe; Auperin, Anne; Baere, Thierry de Deschamps, Frederic

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to compare the accuracy of targeting and the radiation dose of bone biopsies performed either under fluoroscopic guidance using a cone-beam CT with real-time 3D image fusion software (FP-CBCT-guidance) or under conventional computed tomography guidance (CT-guidance).MethodsSixty-eight consecutive patients with a bone lesion were prospectively included. The bone biopsies were scheduled under FP-CBCT-guidance or under CT-guidance according to operating room availability. Thirty-four patients underwent a bone biopsy under FP-CBCT and 34 under CT-guidance. We prospectively compared the two guidance modalities for their technical success, accuracy, puncture time, and pathological success rate. Patient and physician radiation doses also were compared.ResultsAll biopsies were technically successful, with both guidance modalities. Accuracy was significantly better using FP-CBCT-guidance (3 and 5 mm respectively: p = 0.003). There was no significant difference in puncture time (32 and 31 min respectively, p = 0.51) nor in pathological results (88 and 88 % of pathological success respectively, p = 1). Patient radiation doses were significantly lower with FP-CBCT (45 vs. 136 mSv, p < 0.0001). The percentage of operators who received a dose higher than 0.001 mSv (dosimeter detection dose threshold) was lower with FP-CBCT than CT-guidance (27 vs. 59 %, p = 0.01).ConclusionsFP-CBCT-guidance for bone biopsy is accurate and reduces patient and operator radiation doses compared with CT-guidance.

  11. Direct conversion semiconductor detectors in positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, Joshua W.; Gu, Yi; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-05-01

    Semiconductor detectors are playing an increasing role in ongoing research to improve image resolution, contrast, and quantitative accuracy in preclinical applications of positron emission tomography (PET). These detectors serve as a medium for direct detection of annihilation photons. Early clinical translation of this technology has shown improvements in image quality and tumor delineation for head and neck cancers, relative to conventional scintillator-based systems. After a brief outline of the basics of PET imaging and the physical detection mechanisms for semiconductor detectors, an overview of ongoing detector development work is presented. The capabilities of semiconductor-based PET systems and the current state of these devices are discussed.

  12. Technical Note: Skin thickness measurements using high-resolution flat-panel cone-beam dedicated breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Linxi; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the mean and range of location-averaged breast skin thickness using high-resolution dedicated breast CT for use in Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients. Methods: This study retrospectively analyzed image data from a clinical study investigating dedicated breast CT. An algorithm similar to that described by Huang et al.['The effect of skin thickness determined using breast CT on mammographic dosimetry,' Med. Phys. 35(4), 1199-1206 (2008)] was used to determine the skin thickness in 137 dedicated breast CT volumes from 136 women. The location-averaged mean breast skin thickness for each breast was estimated and the study population mean and range were determined. Pathology results were available for 132 women, and were used to investigate if the distribution of location-averaged mean breast skin thickness varied with pathology. The effect of surface fitting to account for breast curvature was also studied. Results: The study mean ({+-} interbreast SD) for breast skin thickness was 1.44 {+-} 0.25 mm (range: 0.87-2.34 mm), which was in excellent agreement with Huang et al. Based on pathology, pair-wise statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) indicated that at the 0.05 significance level, there were no significant difference in the location-averaged mean breast skin thickness distributions between the groups: benign vs malignant (p= 0.223), benign vs hyperplasia (p= 0.651), hyperplasia vs malignant (p= 0.229), and malignant vs nonmalignant (p= 0.172). Conclusions: Considering this study used a different clinical prototype system, and the study participants were from a different geographical location, the observed agreement between the two studies suggests that the choice of 1.45 mm thick skin layer comprising the epidermis and the dermis for breast dosimetry is appropriate. While some benign and malignant conditions could cause skin thickening, in this study cohort the location-averaged mean breast skin thickness

  13. SU-E-I-53: Comparison of Kerma-Area-Product Between the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and a Flat Panel Detector (FPD) as Used in Neuro-Endovascular Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayan, S; Rana, V; Nagesh, S Setlur; Xiong, Z; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the reduction of integral dose to the patient when using the micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) compared to when using the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) for the techniques used during neurointerventional procedures. Methods: The MAF is a small field-of-view, high resolution x-ray detector which captures 1024 x 1024 pixels with an effective pixel size of 35μm and is capable of real-time imaging up to 30 frames per second. The MAF was used in neuro-interventions during those parts of the procedure when high resolution was needed and the FPD was used otherwise. The technique parameters were recorded when each detector was used and the kerma-area-product (KAP) per image frame was determined. KAP values were calculated for seven neuro interventions using premeasured calibration files of output as a function of kVp and beam filtration and included the attenuation of the patient table for the frontal projections to be more representative of integral patient dose. The air kerma at the patient entrance was multiplied by the beam area at that point to obtain the KAP values. The ranges of KAP values per frame were determined for the range of technique parameters used during the clinical procedures. To appreciate the benefit of the higher MAF resolution in the region of interventional activity, DA technique parameters were generally used with the MAF. Results: The lowest and highest values of KAP per frame for the MAF in DA mode were 4 and 50 times lower, respectively, compared to those of the FPD in pulsed fluoroscopy mode. Conclusion: The MAF was used in those parts of the clinical procedures when high resolution and image quality was essential. The integral patient dose as represented by the KAP value was substantially lower when using the MAF than when using the FPD due to the much smaller volume of tissue irradiated. This research was supported in part by Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation and NIH Grant R01EB002873.

  14. High-EPA Biomass from Nannochloropsis salina Cultivated in a Flat-Panel Photo-Bioreactor on a Process Water-Enriched Growth Medium.

    PubMed

    Safafar, Hamed; Hass, Michael Z; Møller, Per; Holdt, Susan L; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Nannochloropsis salina was grown on a mixture of standard growth media and pre-gasified industrial process water representing effluent from a local biogas plant. The study aimed to investigate the effects of enriched growth media and cultivation time on nutritional composition of Nannochloropsis salina biomass, with a focus on eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Variations in fatty acid composition, lipids, protein, amino acids, tocopherols and pigments were studied and results compared to algae cultivated on F/2 media as reference. Mixed growth media and process water enhanced the nutritional quality of Nannochloropsis salina in laboratory scale when compared to algae cultivated in standard F/2 medium. Data from laboratory scale translated to the large scale using a 4000 L flat panel photo-bioreactor system. The algae growth rate in winter conditions in Denmark was slow, but results revealed that large-scale cultivation of Nannochloropsis salina at these conditions could improve the nutritional properties such as EPA, tocopherol, protein and carotenoids compared to laboratory-scale cultivated microalgae. EPA reached 44.2% ± 2.30% of total fatty acids, and α-tocopherol reached 431 ± 28 µg/g of biomass dry weight after 21 days of cultivation. Variations in chemical compositions of Nannochloropsis salina were studied during the course of cultivation. Nannochloropsis salina can be presented as a good candidate for winter time cultivation in Denmark. The resulting biomass is a rich source of EPA and also a good source of protein (amino acids), tocopherols and carotenoids for potential use in aquaculture feed industry. PMID:27483291

  15. High-EPA Biomass from Nannochloropsis salina Cultivated in a Flat-Panel Photo-Bioreactor on a Process Water-Enriched Growth Medium

    PubMed Central

    Safafar, Hamed; Hass, Michael Z.; Møller, Per; Holdt, Susan L.; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Nannochloropsis salina was grown on a mixture of standard growth media and pre-gasified industrial process water representing effluent from a local biogas plant. The study aimed to investigate the effects of enriched growth media and cultivation time on nutritional composition of Nannochloropsis salina biomass, with a focus on eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Variations in fatty acid composition, lipids, protein, amino acids, tocopherols and pigments were studied and results compared to algae cultivated on F/2 media as reference. Mixed growth media and process water enhanced the nutritional quality of Nannochloropsis salina in laboratory scale when compared to algae cultivated in standard F/2 medium. Data from laboratory scale translated to the large scale using a 4000 L flat panel photo-bioreactor system. The algae growth rate in winter conditions in Denmark was slow, but results revealed that large-scale cultivation of Nannochloropsis salina at these conditions could improve the nutritional properties such as EPA, tocopherol, protein and carotenoids compared to laboratory-scale cultivated microalgae. EPA reached 44.2% ± 2.30% of total fatty acids, and α-tocopherol reached 431 ± 28 µg/g of biomass dry weight after 21 days of cultivation. Variations in chemical compositions of Nannochloropsis salina were studied during the course of cultivation. Nannochloropsis salina can be presented as a good candidate for winter time cultivation in Denmark. The resulting biomass is a rich source of EPA and also a good source of protein (amino acids), tocopherols and carotenoids for potential use in aquaculture feed industry. PMID:27483291

  16. Near-Field and Far-Field Directional Conversion of Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Heng-He; Tan, Yunhua; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2016-01-01

    A compact metallic meta-structure is proposed to realize directional conversion between spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) and propagating waves at millimeter wave and THz frequencies. The structure is constructed by embedding two slits or multi-slits array into a subwavelength metallic reflection grating. When the back-side of the structure is illuminated by an oblique beam with a fixed incident angle, the propagating wave will be unidirectionally converted into SSPPs with a considerable efficiency. Both the simulations and experiments demonstrate that the excitation ratio of the SSPPs between the two possible propagating directions (left and right) reaches up to about 340. Furthermore, assisted by the structure, near-field SSPPs can be also converted into far-field narrow beams with particular directions. Through frequency sweeping, wide-angle beam scanning is verified by theory and experiments. The work paves a new way for SSPPs launching and also provides fresh ideas for super-resolution imaging in the longer wavelength range. PMID:27629825

  17. Near-Field and Far-Field Directional Conversion of Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons.

    PubMed

    Tang, Heng-He; Tan, Yunhua; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2016-01-01

    A compact metallic meta-structure is proposed to realize directional conversion between spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) and propagating waves at millimeter wave and THz frequencies. The structure is constructed by embedding two slits or multi-slits array into a subwavelength metallic reflection grating. When the back-side of the structure is illuminated by an oblique beam with a fixed incident angle, the propagating wave will be unidirectionally converted into SSPPs with a considerable efficiency. Both the simulations and experiments demonstrate that the excitation ratio of the SSPPs between the two possible propagating directions (left and right) reaches up to about 340. Furthermore, assisted by the structure, near-field SSPPs can be also converted into far-field narrow beams with particular directions. Through frequency sweeping, wide-angle beam scanning is verified by theory and experiments. The work paves a new way for SSPPs launching and also provides fresh ideas for super-resolution imaging in the longer wavelength range. PMID:27629825

  18. Direct conversion of wet algae to crude biodiesel under supercritical ethanol conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Harvind K.; Muppaneni, Tapaswy; Patil, Prafulla D.; Ponnusamy, Sundaravadivelnathan; Cooke, Peter; Schaub, Tanner; Deng, Shuguang

    2013-08-06

    This paper presents a single-step, environmentally friendly approach for the direct conversion of wet algae to crude biodiesel under supercritical ethanol conditions. Ethanol was used for the simultaneous extraction and transesterification of lipids in algae to produce fatty acid ethyl esters at supercritical conditions. In this work the effects of process parameters dry algae to ethanol (wt./vol.) ratio (1:6-1:15), reaction temperature (245-270 C), and reaction time (2-30 min.) on the yield of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) were studied. 67% conversion was achieved at 265 C and 20 min of reaction time. The calorific value of a purified biodiesel sample produced at optimum conditions was measured to be 43 MJ/kg, which is higher than that of fatty acid methyl esters produced from the same biomass. The purified fatty acid ethyl esters were analyzed using GC-MS and FTIR. TGA analysis of algal biomass and purified FAEE was presented along with TEM images of the biomass captured before and after supercritical ethanol transesterification. This green conversion process has the potential to provide an energy-efficient and economical route for the production of renewable biodiesel production.

  19. Near-Field and Far-Field Directional Conversion of Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Heng-He; Tan, Yunhua; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2016-09-01

    A compact metallic meta-structure is proposed to realize directional conversion between spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) and propagating waves at millimeter wave and THz frequencies. The structure is constructed by embedding two slits or multi-slits array into a subwavelength metallic reflection grating. When the back-side of the structure is illuminated by an oblique beam with a fixed incident angle, the propagating wave will be unidirectionally converted into SSPPs with a considerable efficiency. Both the simulations and experiments demonstrate that the excitation ratio of the SSPPs between the two possible propagating directions (left and right) reaches up to about 340. Furthermore, assisted by the structure, near-field SSPPs can be also converted into far-field narrow beams with particular directions. Through frequency sweeping, wide-angle beam scanning is verified by theory and experiments. The work paves a new way for SSPPs launching and also provides fresh ideas for super-resolution imaging in the longer wavelength range.

  20. Near-Field and Far-Field Directional Conversion of Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons.

    PubMed

    Tang, Heng-He; Tan, Yunhua; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2016-01-01

    A compact metallic meta-structure is proposed to realize directional conversion between spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) and propagating waves at millimeter wave and THz frequencies. The structure is constructed by embedding two slits or multi-slits array into a subwavelength metallic reflection grating. When the back-side of the structure is illuminated by an oblique beam with a fixed incident angle, the propagating wave will be unidirectionally converted into SSPPs with a considerable efficiency. Both the simulations and experiments demonstrate that the excitation ratio of the SSPPs between the two possible propagating directions (left and right) reaches up to about 340. Furthermore, assisted by the structure, near-field SSPPs can be also converted into far-field narrow beams with particular directions. Through frequency sweeping, wide-angle beam scanning is verified by theory and experiments. The work paves a new way for SSPPs launching and also provides fresh ideas for super-resolution imaging in the longer wavelength range.

  1. X-ray imaging with amorphous selenium: Pulse height measurements of avalanche gain fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, Brian J. M.; Hunt, D. C.; Reznik, A.; Tanioka, K.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2006-09-15

    Avalanche multiplication in amorphous selenium (a-Se) can provide a large, adjustable gain for active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPI), enabling quantum noise limited x-ray imaging during both radiography and fluoroscopy. In the case of direct conversion AMFPI, the multiplication factor for each x ray is a function of its depth of interaction, and the resulting variations in gain can reduce the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the system. An experimental method was developed to measure gain fluctuations by analyzing images of individual x rays that were obtained using a video camera with an a-Se target operated in avalanche mode. Pulse height spectra (PHS) of the charge produced per x ray were recorded for monoenergetic 30.9, 49.4, and 73.8 keV x-ray sources. The rapid initial decay and long tail of each PHS can be explained by a model in which positive charge dominates the initiation of avalanche. The Swank information factor quantifies the effect of gain fluctuation on DQE and was calculated from the PHS. The information factor was found to be 0.5 for a 25 {mu}m a-Se layer with a maximum gain of {approx}300. Changing the energy of the incident x ray influenced the range of the primary photoelectron and noticeably affected the tail of the experimental PHS, but did not significantly change the avalanche Swank factor.

  2. Direct conversion Si and CdZnTe detectors for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shi; Tümer, Tümay O.; Maeding, Dale; Mainprize, James; Mawdsley, Gord; Yaffe, Martin J.; Gordon, Eli E.; Hamilton, William J.

    2000-07-01

    Hybrid pixel detector arrays that convert X-rays directly into charge signals are under development at NOVA for application to digital mammography. This technology also has wide application possibilities in other fields of radiology or in industrial imaging, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and nondestructive inspection (NDI). These detectors have potentially superior properties compared to either emulsion-based film-screen systems which has nonlinear response to X-rays, or phosphor-based detectors in which there is an intermediate step of X-ray to light photon conversion (Feig and Yaffe, Radiol. Clinics North America 33 (1995) 1205-1230). Potential advantages of direct conversion detectors are high quantum efficiencies (QE) of 98% or higher (for 0.3 mm thick CdZnTe detector with 20 keV X-rays), improved contrast, high sensitivity and low intrinsic noise. These factors are expected to contribute to high detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The prototype hybrid pixel detector developed has 50×50 μm pixel size, and is designed to have linear response to X-rays, and can support a dynamic range up to 14 bits. Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) is measured on a 1-mm silicon detector system where 10% or better modulations are obtained at 10 lp/mm spatial frequency. Preliminary DQE measurements of the same detector yields a value of 75% at zero spatial frequency. In this paper, we report results obtained from our first full size prototype readout ASIC chips hybridized with both silicon and CdZnTe detector arrays and present preliminary MTF and DQE measurement results as well as some test images.

  3. Direct conversion technology. Annual summary report CY 1991, January 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Massier, P.F.; Back, L.H.; Ryan, M.A.; Fabris, G.

    1992-01-07

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1991. Research on AMTEC and on LMMHD was initiated during October 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions (Refs. 1--5) contain descriptive and performance discussions of the following direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (Nitionol heat engine); and also, more complete descriptive discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

  4. Investigation of Properties of As x Se1- x Thin Films for Direct Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, P.

    2015-08-01

    The electrical characteristics of metal/As x Se1- x /metal structures for potential use in direct-conversion x-ray detectors and imaging applications are reported. The structures exhibit current rectification in both solid (amorphous, crystalline) and liquid As x Se1- x phases. Capacitance-voltage measurements of the device in the amorphous phase find that the capacitance is essentially independent of bias. Transport phenomenon in the amorphous phase of the film was found to be influenced by trapping and the space-charge effect. In the liquid and crystalline phases, transport in the devices was characteristic of thermionic emission. The indium tin oxide (ITO)/a-As0.01Se0.99/Au 2.85- μm-thick device gave a short-circuit current ( I sc) of 0.16 μA, an open-circuit voltage ( V oc) of 0.1 V, and a fill factor of 0.29 at 384 K under irradiation from visible light. An interpretation of the current-voltage characteristics in the amorphous phase has been made using the self-consistent drift-diffusion model of transport, and material parameters of a-As x Se1- x films have been extracted by fitting the experimentally measured I- V data. The model indicated that transport in the ITO/a-As0.01Se0.99/Au film was dominated by shallow-level traps with density of 5 × 1015 cm-3 at depth of 0.3 eV from the band edge. The photoconversion efficiency was found to be limited by low photogeneration efficiency, high amount of recombination losses, and the level of charge injection in the a-As x Se1- x films.

  5. Improved imaging performance of a 14"x17" direct radiography system using a Se/TFT detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Denny L. Y.; Cheung, Lawrence K.; Rodricks, Brian G.; Powell, Gregory F.

    1998-07-01

    Progress is discussed on the improvement of a Direct RadiographyTM solid state, flat panel, digital detector designed for use in general radiographic applications. This detector, now known as DirectRayTM, operates on the principle of direct detection of X-ray photons with a selenium photoconductor and consists of 500 micrometer thick amorphous selenium coupled to an amorphous silicon thin-film-transistor (TFT) readout array. This device is fabricated with a 14 X 17-inch (35 X 43-cm) active imaging area, corresponding to 2560 X 3072 pixels having dimensions of 139 micrometer X 139 micrometer and a geometrical fill factor of 86%. Improvements include a TFT array design upgrade with reduced noise characteristic, lower-noise readout electronics, and improved interfaces. Clinical radiographic images are currently being generated with the DirectRay detector using an X-ray exposure level equivalent to that of a 400 speed screen- film combination while maintaining the superior spatial resolution that is inherent in the direct conversion method. An effective sensor restoration technique has been implemented that eliminates the potential for selenium memory artifacts after a high dose. New results on NPS, MTF, DQE and signal linearity are presented. Detectability of low contrast objects using FAXiL test objects as well as the results of clinical studies are discussed.

  6. Direct Conversion of Free Space Millimeter Waves to Optical Domain by Plasmonic Modulator Antenna.

    PubMed

    Salamin, Yannick; Heni, Wolfgang; Haffner, Christian; Fedoryshyn, Yuriy; Hoessbacher, Claudia; Bonjour, Romain; Zahner, Marco; Hillerkuss, David; Leuchtmann, Pascal; Elder, Delwin L; Dalton, Larry R; Hafner, Christian; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-12-01

    A scheme for the direct conversion of millimeter and THz waves to optical signals is introduced. The compact device consists of a plasmonic phase modulator that is seamlessly cointegrated with an antenna. Neither high-speed electronics nor electronic amplification is required to drive the modulator. A built-in enhancement of the electric field by a factor of 35,000 enables the direct conversion of millimeter-wave signals to the optical domain. This high enhancement is obtained via a resonant antenna that is directly coupled to an optical field by means of a plasmonic modulator. The suggested concept provides a simple and cost-efficient alternative solution to conventional schemes where millimeter-wave signals are first converted to the electrical domain before being up-converted to the optical domain.

  7. Direct Conversion of Free Space Millimeter Waves to Optical Domain by Plasmonic Modulator Antenna

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A scheme for the direct conversion of millimeter and THz waves to optical signals is introduced. The compact device consists of a plasmonic phase modulator that is seamlessly cointegrated with an antenna. Neither high-speed electronics nor electronic amplification is required to drive the modulator. A built-in enhancement of the electric field by a factor of 35 000 enables the direct conversion of millimeter-wave signals to the optical domain. This high enhancement is obtained via a resonant antenna that is directly coupled to an optical field by means of a plasmonic modulator. The suggested concept provides a simple and cost-efficient alternative solution to conventional schemes where millimeter-wave signals are first converted to the electrical domain before being up-converted to the optical domain. PMID:26570995

  8. Direct Conversion of Plant Biomass to Ethanol by Engineered Caldicellulosiruptor bescii

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Daehwan; Cha, Minseok; Guss, Adam M; Westpheling, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol is the most widely used renewable transportation biofuel in the United States, with the production of 13.3 billion gallons in 2012 [John UM (2013) Contribution of the Ethanol Industry to the Economy of the United States]. Despite considerable effort to produce fuels from lignocellulosic biomass, chemical pretreatment and the addition of saccharolytic enzymes before microbial bioconversion remain economic barriers to industrial deployment [Lynd LR, et al. (2008) Nat Biotechnol 26(2):169-172]. We began with the thermophilic, anaerobic, cellulolytic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor bescii, which efficiently uses unpretreated biomass, and engineered it to produce ethanol. Here we report the direct conversion of switchgrass, a nonfood, renewable feedstock, to ethanol without conventional pretreatment of the biomass. This process was accomplished by deletion of lactate dehydrogenase and heterologous expression of a Clostridium thermocellum bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase. Whereas wild-type C. bescii lacks the ability to make ethanol, 70% of the fermentation products in the engineered strain were ethanol [12.8 mM ethanol directly from 2% (wt/vol) switchgrass, a real-world substrate] with decreased production of acetate by 38% compared with wild-type. Direct conversion of biomass to ethanol represents a new paradigm for consolidated bioprocessing, offering the potential for carbon neutral, cost-effective, sustainable fuel production.

  9. A field-shaping multi-well avalanche detector for direct conversion amorphous selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Goldan, A. H.; Zhao, W.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: A practical detector structure is proposed to achieve stable avalanche multiplication gain in direct-conversion amorphous selenium radiation detectors. Methods: The detector structure is referred to as a field-shaping multi-well avalanche detector. Stable avalanche multiplication gain is achieved by eliminating field hot spots using high-density avalanche wells with insulated walls and field-shaping inside each well. Results: The authors demonstrate the impact of high-density insulated wells and field-shaping to eliminate the formation of both field hot spots in the avalanche region and high fields at the metal-semiconductor interface. Results show a semi-Gaussian field distribution inside each well using the field-shaping electrodes, and the electric field at the metal-semiconductor interface can be one order-of-magnitude lower than the peak value where avalanche occurs. Conclusions: This is the first attempt to design a practical direct-conversion amorphous selenium detector with avalanche gain.

  10. Engineering of beam direct conversion for a 120-kV, 1-MW ion beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, W. L.; Doggett, J. N.; Hamilton, G. W.; Kinney, J. D.; Moir, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Practical systems for beam direct conversion are required to recover the energy from ion beams at high efficiency and at very high beam power densities in the environment of a high-power neutral-injection system. Such an experiment is now in progress using a 120-kV beam with a maximum total current of 20 A. After neutralization, the H(+) component to be recovered will have a power of approximately 1 MW. A system testing these concepts has been designed and tested at 15 kV, 2 kW in preparation for the full-power tests. The engineering problems involved in the full-power tests affect electron suppression, gas pumping, voltage holding, diagnostics, and measurement conditions. Planning for future experiments at higher power includes the use of cryopumping and electron suppression by a magnetic field rather than by an electrostatic field. Beam direct conversion for large fusion experiments and reactors will save millions of dollars in the cost of power supplies and electricity and will dispose of the charged beam under conditions that may not be possible by other techniques.

  11. Apparatus and methods for direct conversion of gaseous hydrocarbons to liquids

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Lessing, Paul A.

    2006-04-25

    A chemical reactor for direct conversion of hydrocarbons includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell and a solid oxide electrochemical cell in fluid communication therewith. The discharge plasma cell comprises a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. The electrochemical cell comprises a mixed-conducting solid oxide electrolyte membrane tube positioned between a porous cathode and a porous anode, and a gas inlet tube for feeding oxygen containing gas to the porous cathode. An inlet is provided for feeding hydrocarbons to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a light source for directing ultraviolet light into the discharge plasma cell and the electrochemical cell.

  12. Direct conversion of radioactive and chemical waste containing metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, and organics to glass

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1994-05-02

    The Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (CMODS) is a new process for direct conversion of radioactive, mixed, and chemical wastes to glass. The wastes can be in the chemical forms of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, and organics. GMODS destroys organics and it incorporates heavy metals and radionuclides into a glass. Processable wastes may include miscellaneous spent fuels (SF), SF hulls and hardware, plutonium wastes in different forms, high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, ion-exchange resins, failed equipment, and laboratory wastes. Thermodynamic calculations indicate theoretical feasibility. Small-scale laboratory experiments (< 100 g per test) have demonstrated chemical laboratory feasibility for several metals. Additional work is needed to demonstrate engineering feasibility.

  13. Direct conversion of methane to aromatics in a catalytic co-ionic membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Morejudo, S H; Zanón, R; Escolástico, S; Yuste-Tirados, I; Malerød-Fjeld, H; Vestre, P K; Coors, W G; Martínez, A; Norby, T; Serra, J M; Kjølseth, C

    2016-08-01

    Nonoxidative methane dehydroaromatization (MDA: 6CH4 ↔ C6H6 + 9H2) using shape-selective Mo/zeolite catalysts is a key technology for exploitation of stranded natural gas reserves by direct conversion into transportable liquids. However, this reaction faces two major issues: The one-pass conversion is limited by thermodynamics, and the catalyst deactivates quickly through kinetically favored formation of coke. We show that integration of an electrochemical BaZrO3-based membrane exhibiting both proton and oxide ion conductivity into an MDA reactor gives rise to high aromatic yields and improved catalyst stability. These effects originate from the simultaneous extraction of hydrogen and distributed injection of oxide ions along the reactor length. Further, we demonstrate that the electrochemical co-ionic membrane reactor enables high carbon efficiencies (up to 80%) that improve the technoeconomic process viability.

  14. Direct conversion of methane to aromatics in a catalytic co-ionic membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Morejudo, S H; Zanón, R; Escolástico, S; Yuste-Tirados, I; Malerød-Fjeld, H; Vestre, P K; Coors, W G; Martínez, A; Norby, T; Serra, J M; Kjølseth, C

    2016-08-01

    Nonoxidative methane dehydroaromatization (MDA: 6CH4 ↔ C6H6 + 9H2) using shape-selective Mo/zeolite catalysts is a key technology for exploitation of stranded natural gas reserves by direct conversion into transportable liquids. However, this reaction faces two major issues: The one-pass conversion is limited by thermodynamics, and the catalyst deactivates quickly through kinetically favored formation of coke. We show that integration of an electrochemical BaZrO3-based membrane exhibiting both proton and oxide ion conductivity into an MDA reactor gives rise to high aromatic yields and improved catalyst stability. These effects originate from the simultaneous extraction of hydrogen and distributed injection of oxide ions along the reactor length. Further, we demonstrate that the electrochemical co-ionic membrane reactor enables high carbon efficiencies (up to 80%) that improve the technoeconomic process viability. PMID:27493179

  15. Bi-directional conversion between microwave and optical frequencies in a piezoelectric optomechanical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainsencher, Amit; Satzinger, K. J.; Peairs, G. A.; Cleland, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the principles of design, fabrication, and operation of a piezoelectric optomechanical crystal with which we demonstrate bi-directional conversion of energy between microwave and optical frequencies. The optomechanical crystal has an optical mode at 1523 nm co-located with a mechanical breathing mode at 3.8 GHz, with a measured optomechanical coupling strength gom/2π of 115 kHz. The breathing mode is driven and detected by curved interdigitated transducers that couple to a Lamb mode in suspended membranes on either end of the optomechanical crystal, allowing the external piezoelectric modulation of the optical signal as well as the converse, the detection of microwave electrical signals generated by a modulated optical signal. We compare measurements to theory where appropriate.

  16. Low-power scan driver embedded with level shifter using depletion-mode amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors for high-resolution flat-panel displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hee; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2014-01-01

    A low-power scan driver embedded with a level shifter using depletion-mode amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) is proposed for high-resolution flat-panel displays (FPDs). In order to achieve low power consumption, the scan driver uses clock signals with a reduced voltage swing. Furthermore, the level shifter is implemented without using a diode-connected TFT. This scan driver is simulated at an output voltage swing of 30 V and an operating frequency (fop) of 153.6 kHz, which satisfy the driving conditions for 10-in. wide quadruple extended graphics array (WQXGA, 1600 × 2560) FPDs with a frame frequency of 60 Hz. The simulation results of the proposed scan driver demonstrate the successful operation even at a threshold voltage shift (ΔVth) of -2.0 V. The power consumption of the proposed scan driver per ten stages is 0.41 mW, which is 80.75% less than that reported in a previous work.

  17. Low power considerations and design for CMOS VCOs applied for direct conversion receivers at 5GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adin, Iñigo; Quemada, Carlos; Solar, Hector; Sedano, Beatriz; Gutierrez, Iñigo

    2007-05-01

    Low power design often requires direct conversion architectures, such as low-IF or zero-IF. Any of these two possibilities needs a low power, low phase noise voltage control oscillator (VCO) in the frequency synthesizer. This work is focused on low power considerations applied to the practical modern conception of this device. Fulfilling the standard specifications (output power, phase noise, frequency range) should be completed with this deeper step. A conscious design leads moreover to an improvement in the results obtained by the classical considerations. The increase of the quality factor of the passive elements is one of the key points, followed by an accurate design of the architecture scheme. Furthermore, lower current consumption provides higher oscillation frequencies and facilitates higher frequency ranges, which follow the trends of modern wireless and wideband communication standards. In order to validate the aforementioned assumptions, a CMOS VCO has been implemented in UMC 0.18μm 1P6M technology, with power consumption down to 3.4mW.

  18. Direct conversion of chitin biomass to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in concentrated ZnCl2 aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingxiong; Pedersen, Christian Marcus; Deng, Tiansheng; Qiao, Yan; Hou, Xianglin

    2013-09-01

    The direct conversion of chitin biomass to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) in ZnCl2 aqueous solution was studied systemically. D-Glucosamine (GlcNH2) was chosen as the model compound to investigate the reaction, and 5-HMF could be obtained in 21.9% yield with 99% conversion of GlcNH2. Optimization of the reaction parameters including the screening of 8 co-catalysts was carried out. Among them, AlCl3 and B(OH)3 improved 5-HMF yield, whereas CdCl2, CuCl2 and NH4Cl had no effect. CrCl3, SnCl4 and SnCl2 showed negative effects, i.e. lower yields. Consequently, the optimal reaction conditions were found to be 67 wt.% ZnCl2 aqueous solution, at 120 °C without co-catalyst. The reactions were further studied by in situ NMR, and no intermediate or other byproducts, except humins, were observed. Finally, the substrate scope was expanded from GlcNH2 to N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and various chitosan polymers with different molecular weights, 5-HMF yield from polymers were generally lower than that from GlcNH2. PMID:23819974

  19. Cell cycle and p53 gate the direct conversion of human fibroblasts to dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Houbo; Xu, Zhimin; Zhong, Ping; Ren, Yong; Liang, Gaoyang; Schilling, Haley A; Hu, Zihua; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Xiaomin; Chen, Shengdi; Yan, Zhen; Feng, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The direct conversion of fibroblasts to induced dopaminergic (iDA) neurons and other cell types demonstrates the plasticity of cell fate. The low efficiency of these relatively fast conversions suggests that kinetic barriers exist to safeguard cell-type identity. Here we show that suppression of p53, in conjunction with cell cycle arrest at G1 and appropriate extracellular environment, markedly increase the efficiency in the transdifferentiation of human fibroblasts to iDA neurons by Ascl1, Nurr1, Lmx1a and miR124. The conversion is dependent on Tet1, as G1 arrest, p53 knockdown or expression of the reprogramming factors induces Tet1 synergistically. Tet1 knockdown abolishes the transdifferentiation while its overexpression enhances the conversion. The iDA neurons express markers for midbrain DA neurons and have active dopaminergic transmission. Our results suggest that overcoming these kinetic barriers may enable highly efficient epigenetic reprogramming in general and will generate patient-specific midbrain DA neurons for Parkinson's disease research and therapy. PMID:26639555

  20. Small molecule–driven direct conversion of human pluripotent stem cells into functional osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Heemin; Shih, Yu-Ru V.; Nakasaki, Manando; Kabra, Harsha; Varghese, Shyni

    2016-01-01

    The abilities of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to proliferate without phenotypic alteration and to differentiate into tissue-specific progeny make them a promising cell source for regenerative medicine and development of physiologically relevant in vitro platforms. Despite this potential, efficient conversion of hPSCs into tissue-specific cells still remains a challenge. Herein, we report direct conversion of hPSCs into functional osteoblasts through the use of adenosine, a naturally occurring nucleoside in the human body. The hPSCs treated with adenosine not only expressed the molecular signatures of osteoblasts but also produced calcified bone matrix. Our findings show that the adenosine-mediated osteogenesis of hPSCs involved the adenosine A2bR. When implanted in vivo, using macroporous synthetic matrices, the human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)–derived donor cells participated in the repair of critical-sized bone defects through the formation of neobone tissue without teratoma formation. The newly formed bone tissues exhibited various attributes of the native tissue, including vascularization and bone resorption. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of adenosine-induced differentiation of hPSCs into functional osteoblasts and their subsequent use to regenerate bone tissues in vivo. This approach that uses a physiologically relevant single small molecule to generate hPSC-derived progenitor cells is highly appealing because of its simplicity, cost-effectiveness, scalability, and impact in cell manufacturing, all of which are decisive factors for successful translational applications of hPSCs. PMID:27602403

  1. Small molecule-driven direct conversion of human pluripotent stem cells into functional osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heemin; Shih, Yu-Ru V; Nakasaki, Manando; Kabra, Harsha; Varghese, Shyni

    2016-08-01

    The abilities of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to proliferate without phenotypic alteration and to differentiate into tissue-specific progeny make them a promising cell source for regenerative medicine and development of physiologically relevant in vitro platforms. Despite this potential, efficient conversion of hPSCs into tissue-specific cells still remains a challenge. Herein, we report direct conversion of hPSCs into functional osteoblasts through the use of adenosine, a naturally occurring nucleoside in the human body. The hPSCs treated with adenosine not only expressed the molecular signatures of osteoblasts but also produced calcified bone matrix. Our findings show that the adenosine-mediated osteogenesis of hPSCs involved the adenosine A2bR. When implanted in vivo, using macroporous synthetic matrices, the human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived donor cells participated in the repair of critical-sized bone defects through the formation of neobone tissue without teratoma formation. The newly formed bone tissues exhibited various attributes of the native tissue, including vascularization and bone resorption. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of adenosine-induced differentiation of hPSCs into functional osteoblasts and their subsequent use to regenerate bone tissues in vivo. This approach that uses a physiologically relevant single small molecule to generate hPSC-derived progenitor cells is highly appealing because of its simplicity, cost-effectiveness, scalability, and impact in cell manufacturing, all of which are decisive factors for successful translational applications of hPSCs. PMID:27602403

  2. Small molecule–driven direct conversion of human pluripotent stem cells into functional osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Heemin; Shih, Yu-Ru V.; Nakasaki, Manando; Kabra, Harsha; Varghese, Shyni

    2016-01-01

    The abilities of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to proliferate without phenotypic alteration and to differentiate into tissue-specific progeny make them a promising cell source for regenerative medicine and development of physiologically relevant in vitro platforms. Despite this potential, efficient conversion of hPSCs into tissue-specific cells still remains a challenge. Herein, we report direct conversion of hPSCs into functional osteoblasts through the use of adenosine, a naturally occurring nucleoside in the human body. The hPSCs treated with adenosine not only expressed the molecular signatures of osteoblasts but also produced calcified bone matrix. Our findings show that the adenosine-mediated osteogenesis of hPSCs involved the adenosine A2bR. When implanted in vivo, using macroporous synthetic matrices, the human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)–derived donor cells participated in the repair of critical-sized bone defects through the formation of neobone tissue without teratoma formation. The newly formed bone tissues exhibited various attributes of the native tissue, including vascularization and bone resorption. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of adenosine-induced differentiation of hPSCs into functional osteoblasts and their subsequent use to regenerate bone tissues in vivo. This approach that uses a physiologically relevant single small molecule to generate hPSC-derived progenitor cells is highly appealing because of its simplicity, cost-effectiveness, scalability, and impact in cell manufacturing, all of which are decisive factors for successful translational applications of hPSCs.

  3. Focal spot deblurring for high resolution direct conversion x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Rana, R.; Russ, M.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    Small pixel high resolution direct x-ray detectors have the advantage of higher spatial sampling and decreased blurring characteristic. The limiting factors for such systems becomes the degradation due to the focal spot size. One solution is a smaller focal spot; however, this can limit the output of the x-ray tube. Here a software solution of deconvolving with an estimated focal spot blur is presented. To simulate images from a direct detector affected with focal-spot blur, first a set of high-resolution stent images (FRED from Microvention, Inc., Tustin, CA) were acquired using a 75μm pixel size Dexela-Perkin-Elmer detector and frame averaged to reduce quantum noise. Then the averaged image was blurred with a known Gaussian blur. To add noise to the blurred image a flat-field image was multiplied with the blurred image. Both the ideal and the noisy-blurred images were then deconvolved with the known Gaussian function using either threshold-based inverse filtering or Weiner deconvolution. The blur in the ideal image was removed and the details were recovered successfully. However, the inverse filtering deconvolution process is extremely susceptible to noise. The Weiner deconvolution process was able to recover more of the details of the stent from the noisy-blurred image, but for noisier images, stent details are still lost in the recovery process.

  4. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Quarterly technical status report No. 11 for thrid quarter FY 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Foral, M.J.

    1990-12-31

    The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

  5. Medical imaging applications of amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Mireshghi, A.; Drewery, J.S.; Hong, W.S.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Lee, H.K.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1994-07-01

    Two dimensional hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) pixel arrays are good candidates as flat-panel imagers for applications in medical imaging. Various performance characteristics of these imagers are reviewed and compared with currently used equipments. An important component in the a-Si:H imager is the scintillator screen. A new approach for fabrication of high resolution CsI(Tl) scintillator layers, appropriate for coupling to a-Si:H arrays, are presented. For nuclear medicine applications, a new a-Si:H based gamma camera is introduced and Monte Carlo simulation is used to evaluate its performance.

  6. Neutron Imaging Developments at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen; Hunter, James F.; Schirato, Richard C.; Vogel, Sven C.; Swift, Alicia L.; Ickes, Timothy Lee; Ward, William Carl; Losko, Adrian Simon; Tremsin, Anton; Sevanto, Sanna Annika; Espy, Michelle A.; Dickman, Lee Thoresen; Malone, Michael

    2015-10-29

    Thermal, epithermal, and high-energy neutrons are available from two spallation sources at the 800 MeV proton accelerator. Improvements in detectors and computing have enabled new capabilities that use the pulsed beam properties at LANSCE; these include amorphous Si (aSi) detectors, intensified charge-coupled device cameras, and micro-channel plates. Applications include water flow in living specimens, inclusions and fission products in uranium oxide, and high-energy neutron imaging using an aSi flat panel with ZnS(Ag) scintillator screen. images of a metal/plastic cylinder from photons, low-energy and high-energy neutrons are compared.

  7. Research Update: Direct conversion of h-BN into pure c-BN at ambient temperatures and pressures in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Jagdish; Bhaumik, Anagh

    2016-02-01

    We report a direct conversion of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) into pure cubic boron nitride (c-BN) by nanosecond laser melting at ambient temperatures and atmospheric pressure in air. According to the phase diagram, the transformation from h-BN into c-BN can occur only at high temperatures and pressures, as the hBN-cBN-Liquid triple point is at 3500 K/9.5 GPa. Using nanosecond laser melting, we have created super undercooled state and shifted this triple point to as low as 2800 K and atmospheric pressure. The rapid quenching from super undercooled state leads to formation of super undercooled BN (Q-BN). The c-BN phase is nucleated from Q-BN depending upon the time allowed for nucleation and growth.

  8. Noise Characterization of Polycrystalline Silicon Thin Film Transistors for X-ray Imagers Based on Active Pixel Architectures.

    PubMed

    Antonuk, L E; Koniczek, M; McDonald, J; El-Mohri, Y; Zhao, Q; Behravan, M

    2008-01-01

    An examination of the noise of polycrystalline silicon thin film transistors, in the context of flat panel x-ray imager development, is reported. The study was conducted in the spirit of exploring how the 1/f, shot and thermal noise components of poly-Si TFTs, determined from current noise power spectral density measurements, as well as through calculation, can be used to assist in the development of imagers incorporating pixel amplification circuits based on such transistors. PMID:20862269

  9. Direct Conversion of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corliss, William R.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Direct energy conversion involves energy transformation without moving parts. The concepts of direct and dynamic energy conversion plus the laws governing energy conversion are investigated. Among the topics…

  10. New development of large-area direct conversion detector for digital radiography using amorphous selenium with a C60-doped polymer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nariyuki, F.; Imai, S.; Watano, H.; Nabeta, T.; Hosoi, Y.

    2010-04-01

    We have developed a novel direct conversion detector for digital radiography by using a fullerene (C60)-doped polymer layer added on a thick amorphous selenium (a-Se) layer coupled to an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (a-Si TFT) array. This detector exhibits considerable improvement in the lag characteristics and durability in high ambient temperatures. The C60-doped polymer layer, which is directly and uniformly solution cast on the a-Se layer and followed by an inorganic electron-transporting layer, smoothly changes the electronic junction between the a-Se layer and the inorganic layer. It lubricates the emission of photocurrents from the a-Se photo-conversion layer and leads to the improved lag characteristics. Another merit of using a C60-doped polymer is that it is stabile in high-temperature ambient conditions and is not degraded by humidity or a large amount of X-ray exposure. The polymer layer prevents the crystallization of a-Se, which otherwise occurs on exposure of a-Se to high temperature not only during the deposition of the inorganic layer or the metal electrode layer in the manufacturing process but also in actual use. A prototype detector, with a size of 17 in × 17 in and a pixel pitch of 150 μm, exhibited a good resolution; its DQE is approximately 48% at 1 cy/mm in 258 μC/kg (RQA5). This new development can simplify cooling apparatus and detector modules and also make a wide range of operational environments available. In addition, the improved lag characteristics make it possible to reduce the exposure intervals for static imaging, tomosynthesis, and other various exposure techniques.

  11. Enhanced Detection Efficiency of Direct Conversion X-ray Detector Using Polyimide as Hole-Blocking Layer

    PubMed Central

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Scott, Christopher C.; Bubon, Oleksandr; Reznik, Alla; Karim, Karim S.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we demonstrate the performance of a direct conversion amorphous selenium (a-Se) X-ray detector using biphenyldisnhydride/1,4 phenylenediamine (BPDA/PPD) polyimide (PI) as a hole-blocking layer. The use of a PI layer with a-Se allows detector operation at high electric fields (≥10 V/μm) while maintaining low dark current, without deterioration of transient performance. The hole mobility of the PI/a-Se device is measured by the time-of-flight method at different electric fields to investigate the effect of the PI layer on detector performance. It was found that hole mobility as high as 0.75 cm2/Vs is achievable by increasing the electric field in the PI/a-Se device structure. Avalanche multiplication is also shown to be achievable when using PI as a blocking layer. Increasing the electric field within a-Se reduces the X-ray ionization energy, increases hole mobility, and improves the dynamic range and sensitivity of the detector. PMID:24285255

  12. DESIGN OF 2.4 GHZ CMOS DIRECT CONVERSION LNA AND MIXER COMBINATION FOR WIRLESS DATA LINK TRANSCEIVER.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO, D.; OCONNOR, P.

    2002-04-10

    Three LNA and mixer combinations in 0.6{micro}m and 0.4{micro}m standard CMOS processes for direct-conversion receiver of 2.4GHz ISM band short-range wireless data-link applications are described in this paper. Taking low power dissipation as first consideration, these designs, employing differential common-source LNA and double balanced mixer architectures, achieve total conversion gain as high as 42.4dB, DSB noise figure as low as 9.5dB, output-referred IP3 as high as of 21.3dBm at about 4mA DC current consumption. This proves it is possible to apply standard CMOS process to implement receiver front-end with low power dissipation for this kind of application, but gain changeable LNA is needed to combat the dominant flicker noise of the mixer in order to achieve acceptable sensitivity and dynamic range at the same time.

  13. Direct Conversion of Pluripotent Human Embryonic Stem Cells Under Defined Culture Conditions into Human Neuronal or Cardiomyocyte Cell Therapy Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Xuejun H

    2016-01-01

    Developing novel strategies for well-controlled efficiently directing pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) exclusively and uniformly towards clinically relevant cell types in a lineage-specific manner is not only crucial for unveiling the molecular and cellular cues that direct human embryogenesis but also vital to harnessing the power of hESC biology for tissue engineering and cell-based therapies. Conventional hESC differentiation methods require uncontrollable simultaneous multi-lineage differentiation of pluripotent cells, which yield embryoid bodies (EB) or aggregates consisting of a mixed population of cell types of three embryonic germ layers, among which only a very small fraction of cells display targeted differentiation, impractical for commercial and clinical applications. Here, a protocol for lineage-specific differentiation of hESCs, maintained under defined culture systems, direct from the pluripotent stage using small-molecule induction exclusively and uniformly to a neural or a cardiac lineage is described. Lineage-specific differentiation of pluripotent hESCs by small-molecule induction enables well-controlled highly efficient direct conversion of nonfunctional pluripotent hESCs into a large supply of high-purity functional human neuronal or cardiomyocyte cell therapy derivatives for commercial and therapeutic uses.

  14. Using mastectomy specimens to develop breast models for breast tomosynthesis and CT breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. Michael; Das, Mini; Didier, Clay; Mah'D, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2008-03-01

    Dedicated x-ray computed tomography (CT) of the breast using a cone-beam flat-panel detector system is a modality under investigation by a number of research teams. As previously reported, we have fabricated a prototype, bench-top flat-panel CT breast imaging (CTBI) system and developed computer simulation software to model such a system. We are developing a methodology to use high resolution, low noise CT reconstructions of fresh mastectomy specimens for generating an ensemble of 3D digital breast phantoms that realistically model 3D compressed and uncompressed breast anatomy. These breast models can be used to simulate realistic projection data for both breast tomosynthesis (BT) and CT systems thereby providing a powerful evaluation and optimization mechanism.

  15. Mechanically stable, hierarchically porous Cu3(btc)2 (HKUST-1) monoliths via direct conversion of copper(II) hydroxide-based monoliths.

    PubMed

    Moitra, Nirmalya; Fukumoto, Shotaro; Reboul, Julien; Sumida, Kenji; Zhu, Yang; Nakanishi, Kazuki; Furukawa, Shuhei; Kitagawa, Susumu; Kanamori, Kazuyoshi

    2015-02-28

    The synthesis of highly crystalline macro-meso-microporous monolithic Cu3(btc)2 (HKUST-1; btc(3-) = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate) is demonstrated by direct conversion of Cu(OH)2-based monoliths while preserving the characteristic macroporous structure. The high mechanical strength of the monoliths is promising for possible applications to continuous flow reactors. PMID:25572361

  16. AgNO2-mediated direct nitration of the quinoxaline tertiary benzylic C-H bond and direct conversion of 2-methyl quinoxalines into related nitriles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Degui; Zhang, Jian; Cui, Jianhai; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Yunkui

    2014-09-25

    A unique method for AgNO2-mediated direct nitration of the quinoxaline tertiary C-H bond and direct conversion of 2-methyl quinoxalines into 2-quinoxaline nitriles under oxidative conditions has been developed. This protocol provides an efficient way to access quinoxaline containing nitroalkanes and nitriles depending on different substrate selection.

  17. Direct conversion of h-BN into c-BN and formation of epitaxial c-BN/diamond heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Jagdish; Bhaumik, Anagh; Xu, Weizong

    2016-05-01

    We have created a new state of BN (named Q-BN) through rapid melting and super undercooling and quenching by using nanosecond laser pulses. Phase pure c-BN is formed either by direct quenching of super undercooled liquid or by nucleation and growth from Q-BN. Thus, a direct conversion of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) into phase-pure cubic boron nitride (c-BN) is achieved by nanosecond pulsed laser melting at ambient temperatures and atmospheric pressure in air. According to the P-T phase diagram, the transformation from h-BN into c-BN under equilibrium processing can occur only at high temperatures and pressures, as the hBN-cBN-Liquid triple point is at 3500 K/9.5 GPa or 3700 K/7.0 GPa with a recent theoretical refinement. Using nonequilibrium nanosecond laser melting, we have created super undercooled state and shifted this triple point to as low as 2800 K and atmospheric pressure. The rapid quenching from super undercooled state leads to the formation of a new phase, named as Q-BN. We present detailed characterization of Q-BN and c-BN layers by using Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, electron-back-scatter diffraction, high-resolution TEM, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, and discuss the mechanism of formation of nanodots, nanoneedles, microneedles, and single-crystal c-BN on sapphire substrate. We have also deposited diamond by pulsed laser deposition of carbon on c-BN and created c-BN/diamond heterostructures, where c-BN acts as a template for epitaxial diamond growth. We discuss the mechanism of epitaxial c-BN and diamond growth on lattice matching c-BN template under pulsed laser evaporation of amorphous carbon, and the impact of this discovery on a variety of applications.

  18. Amorphous silicon x-ray image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabbal, Jean; Chaussat, Christophe; Ducourant, Thierry; Fritsch, Lionel; Michailos, Jean; Spinnler, Vincent; Vieux, Gerard; Arques, Marc; Hahm, Gerhard; Hoheisel, Martin; Horbaschek, Heinz; Schulz, Reiner F.; Spahn, Martin F.

    1996-04-01

    The design and the performance of a 20 cm by 20 cm flat panel x-ray detector for digital radiography and fluoroscopy is described: Thin film amorphous silicon (aSi) technology has been used to build a 1024 by 1024 photodetector matrix, each pixel including both a photodiode and a switching diode; the pixel size is 196 by 196 micrometers2. A high resolution and high absorption CsI(Tl) scintillator layer covers the top of the photodetector matrix in order to provide for x ray to light conversion. For low electronic noise and 30 fr/s operating rate we developed a custom design charge readout integrated circuit. The detector delivers a 12 bit digital output. The image quality, signal to noise ratio, and DQE are presented and discussed. The flat panel detector provides a MTF in excess of 30% at 2 lp/mm and a high contrast ratio without any distortion on the whole imaging area. The x-ray absorption is 70% for 50 KeV photons. The readout amplifier is optimized to reduce the electronic noise down to 1000 e-. This low noise level, combined with high sensitivity (1150 e-/incident x-ray quantum) provides the capability for fluoroscopic applications. The digital flat panel detector has been integrated in a C-arm system for cardiology and has been used on a regular basis in a European hospital since February 1995. The results are discussed for several operating modes: radiography and fluoroscopy. Conclusions on present detector performances, as well as further improvements, are presented.

  19. Bismuth(III) triflate-catalyzed direct conversion of corticosteroids into highly functionalized 17-ketosteroids by cleavage of the C17-dihydroxyacetone side chain.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Rui M A; Salvador, Jorge A R; Le Roux, Christophe; Paixão, José A

    2009-11-01

    The use of bismuth(III) triflate as catalyst for the direct conversion of corticosteroids into highly functionalized 17-ketosteroids by cleavage of the C17-dihydroxyacetone side chain is reported. This catalytic process is very chemoselective, since functionalities of the starting corticosteroids, such as Delta(4)-3-keto, Delta(1,4)-3-keto, 11beta-hydroxyl, and 9beta,11beta-epoxide, remained intact. PMID:19799442

  20. Design and image-quality performance of high resolution CMOS-based X-ray imaging detectors for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, B. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Yun, S.; Cho, G.; Kim, H. K.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In digital X-ray imaging systems, X-ray imaging detectors based on scintillating screens with electronic devices such as charge-coupled devices (CCDs), thin-film transistors (TFT), complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) flat panel imagers have been introduced for general radiography, dental, mammography and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. Recently, a large-area CMOS active-pixel sensor (APS) in combination with scintillation films has been widely used in a variety of digital X-ray imaging applications. We employed a scintillator-based CMOS APS image sensor for high-resolution mammography. In this work, both powder-type Gd2O2S:Tb and a columnar structured CsI:Tl scintillation screens with various thicknesses were fabricated and used as materials to convert X-ray into visible light. These scintillating screens were directly coupled to a CMOS flat panel imager with a 25 × 50 mm2 active area and a 48 μm pixel pitch for high spatial resolution acquisition. We used a W/Al mammographic X-ray source with a 30 kVp energy condition. The imaging characterization of the X-ray detector was measured and analyzed in terms of linearity in incident X-ray dose, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE).

  1. Characterization of a prototype tabletop x-ray CT breast imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. Michael; Glick, Stephen J.; Gong, Xing; Didier, Clay; Mah'd, Mufeed

    2007-03-01

    Planar X-ray mammography is the standard medical imaging modality for the early detection of breast cancer. Based on advancements in digital flat-panel detector technology, dedicated x-ray computed tomography (CT) mammography is a modality under investigation that offers the potential for improved breast tumor imaging. We have implemented a prototype half cone-beam CT breast imaging system that utilizes an indirect flat-panel detector. This prototype can be used to explore and evaluate the effect of varying acquisition and reconstruction parameters on image quality. This report describes our system and characterizes the performance of the system through the analysis of Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) and Noise Power Spectrum (NPS). All CT reconstructions were made using Feldkamp's filtered backprojection algorithm. The 3D MTF was determined by the analysis of the plane spread function (PlSF) derived from the surface spread function (SSF) of reconstructed 6.3mm spheres. 3D NPS characterization was performed through the analysis of a 3D volume extracted from zero-mean CT noise of air reconstructions. The effect of varying locations on MTF and the effect of different Butterworth filter cutoff frequencies on NPS are reported. Finally, we present CT images of mastectomy excised breast tissue. Breast specimen images were acquired on our CTMS using an x-ray technique similar to the one used during performance characterization. Specimen images demonstrate the inherent CT capability to reduce the masking effect of anatomical noise. Both the quantitative system characterization and the breast specimen images continue to reinforce the hope that dedicated flat-panel detector, x-ray cone-beam CT will eventually provide enhanced breast cancer detection capability.

  2. Cardiac Multidetector Computed Tomography: Basic Physics of Image Acquisition and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bardo, Dianna M.E; Brown, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac MDCT is here to stay. And, it is more than just imaging coronary arteries. Understanding the differences in and the benefits of one CT scanner from another will help you to optimize the capabilities of the scanner, but requires a basic understanding of the MDCT imaging physics. This review provides key information needed to understand the differences in the types of MDCT scanners, from 64 – 320 detectors, flat panels, single and dual source configurations, step and shoot prospective and retrospective gating, and how each factor influences radiation dose, spatial and temporal resolution, and image noise. PMID:19936200

  3. Lung imaging of laboratory rodents in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, Dianna D.; Cavanaugh, Dawn; Price, Roger E.; Rivera, Belinda; Gladish, Gregory; Travis, Elizabeth

    2004-10-01

    We have been acquiring respiratory-gated micro-CT images of live mice and rats for over a year with our General Electric (formerly Enhanced Vision Systems) hybrid scanner. This technique is especially well suited for the lung due to the inherent high tissue contrast. Our current studies focus on the assessment of lung tumors and their response to experimental agents, and the assessment of lung damage due to chemotherapy agents. We have recently installed a custom-built dual flat-panel cone-beam CT scanner with the ability to scan laboratory animals that vary in size from mice to large dogs. A breath-hold technique is used in place of respiratory gating on this scanner. The objective of this pilot study was to converge on scan acquisition parameters and optimize the visualization of lung damage in a mouse model of fibrosis. Example images from both the micro-CT scanner and the flat-panel CT scanner will be presented, as well as preliminary data describing spatial resolution, low contrast resolution, and radiation dose parameters.

  4. Video interfacing to flat panel displays for dynamic graphics portrayal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavone, J. J.

    This paper describes the basic process required to convert standard raster video signals to dot addressable matrix displays. The concepts developed were applied to a Litton Systems Advanced Development Model (ADM-1) multimode matrix light emitting diode (LED) display. The ADM-1 display head (320 x 256 pixel format) requires a unique digital interface that is not compatible with other forms of matrix displays. Although this paper describes the details of interfacing to this particular display, the concepts developed apply to all matrix display systems.

  5. 3ATI flat panel replaces CRT on Air Force platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coker, Byron L., Jr.; Willis, Michael J.

    1998-09-01

    Successful technology insertion programs must satisfy many system constraints in order to incorporate new capabilities into aging avionics systems while meeting program cost requirements. Such constraints frequently include form, fit, and functional replacement specifications, as well as power and electrical performance restrictions. This paper describes a technology insertion program undertaken by engineers at the Georgia Tech Research Institute. The program goal was to replace the 30-year-old azimuth indicator display of a radar warning receiver system. This necessitated the use of electroluminescent (EL) display technology to replace the analog cathode ray tube display currently used in the system. Because of the prohibitively high cost of aircraft wiring modifications, the replacement display was required to be completely form, fit, and functionally equivalent to its replacement. The form, fit, and, functional equivalency requirement imposed the following system constraints: (1) power consumption of less than 10 Watts, (2) the need to maintain the same stroke-deflection current electrical interface, and (3) the need to meet the maintenance and repair budget of the existing display unit. Additional requirements included night-vision compatibility and full sunlight readability. The display was also required to be MIL-STD-1553 Remote Terminal communication capable. All of these requirements posed a challenging technology insertion problem to program personnel. The case study described in this paper illustrates the approach to meeting the particular requirements of this technology insertion program.

  6. Beam-Steerable Flat-Panel Reflector Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choon Sae; Lee, Chanam; Miranda, Felix A.

    2005-01-01

    Many space applications require a high-gain antenna that can be easily deployable in space. Currently, the most common high-gain antenna for space-born applications is an umbrella-type reflector antenna that can be folded while being lifted to the Earth orbit. There have been a number of issues to be resolved for this type of antenna. The reflecting surface of a fine wire mesh has to be light in weight and flexible while opening up once in orbit. Also the mesh must be a good conductor at the operating frequency. In this paper, we propose a different type of high-gain antenna for easy space deployment. The proposed antenna is similar to reflector antennas except the curved main reflector is replaced by a flat reconfigurable surface for easy packing and deployment in space. Moreover it is possible to steer the beam without moving the entire antenna system.

  7. The effect of amorphous selenium detector thickness on dual-energy digital breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yue-Houng Zhao, Wei

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Contrast enhanced (CE) imaging techniques for both planar digital mammography (DM) and three-dimensional (3D) digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) applications requires x-ray photon energies higher than the k-edge of iodine (33.2 keV). As a result, x-ray tube potentials much higher (>40 kVp) than those typical for screening mammography must be utilized. Amorphous selenium (a-Se) based direct conversion flat-panel imagers (FPI) have been widely used in DM and DBT imaging systems. The a-Se layer is typically 200 μm thick with quantum detective efficiency (QDE) >87% for x-ray energies below 26 keV. However, QDE decreases substantially above this energy. To improve the object detectability of either CE-DM or CE-DBT, it may be advantageous to increase the thickness (d{sub Se}) of the a-Se layer. Increasing the d{sub Se} will improve the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) at the higher energies used in CE imaging. However, because most DBT systems are designed with partially isocentric geometries, where the gantry moves about a stationary detector, the oblique entry of x-rays will introduce additional blur to the system. The present investigation quantifies the effect of a-Se thickness on imaging performance for both CE-DM and CE-DBT, discussing the effects of improving photon absorption and blurring from oblique entry of x-rays. Methods: In this paper, a cascaded linear system model (CLSM) was used to investigate the effect of d{sub Se} on the imaging performance (i.e., MTF, NPS, and DQE) of FPI in CE-DM and CE-DBT. The results from the model are used to calculate the ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio, d′, which is used as a figure-of-merit to determine the total effect of increasing d{sub Se} for CE-DM and CE-DBT. Results: The results of the CLSM show that increasing d{sub Se} causes a substantial increase in QDE at the high energies used in CE-DM. However, at the oblique projection angles used in DBT, the increased length of penetration through a

  8. Dynamic X-ray direct conversion detector using a CdTe polycrystalline layer coupled to a CMOS readout chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arques, Marc; Renet, Sébastien; Brambilla, Andréa; Feuillet, Guy; Gasse, Adrien; Billon-Pierron, Nicolas; Jolliot, Muriel; Mathieu, Lydie; Rohr, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    A direct detection X-ray imager is presented. It uses polycrystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe) grown by close space sublimation technique for the X-ray photoconductor. A 15 mm×15 mm CdTe layer is connected to a 200×200 pixel readout CMOS by indium bumping. X-ray performance at 16 frames/s rate is measured. In particular a readout noise of 0.5 X-ray, an MTF of 50% at 4 lp/mm and a DQE of 20% at 4 lp/mm are obtained.

  9. Gene array analysis of neural crest cells identifies transcription factors necessary for direct conversion of embryonic fibroblasts into neural crest cells

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Natsuki; Nishioka, Masahiro; Nakatake, Yuhki; Yulan, Piao; Mochizuki, Hiromi; Kawamura, Yoshifumi; Ko, Minoru S. H.; Goshima, Naoki; Kunisada, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neural crest cells (NC cells) are multipotent cells that emerge from the edge of the neural folds and migrate throughout the developing embryo. Although the gene regulatory network for generation of NC cells has been elucidated in detail, it has not been revealed which of the factors in the network are pivotal to directing NC identity. In this study we analyzed the gene expression profile of a pure NC subpopulation isolated from Sox10-IRES-Venus mice and investigated whether these genes played a key role in the direct conversion of Sox10-IRES-Venus mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) into NC cells. The comparative molecular profiles of NC cells and neural tube cells in 9.5-day embryos revealed genes including transcription factors selectively expressed in developing trunk NC cells. Among 25 NC cell-specific transcription factor genes tested, SOX10 and SOX9 were capable of converting MEFs into SOX10-positive (SOX10+) cells. The SOX10+ cells were then shown to differentiate into neurons, glial cells, smooth muscle cells, adipocytes and osteoblasts. These SOX10+ cells also showed limited self-renewal ability, suggesting that SOX10 and SOX9 directly converted MEFs into NC cells. Conversely, the remaining transcription factors, including well-known NC cell specifiers, were unable to convert MEFs into SOX10+ NC cells. These results suggest that SOX10 and SOX9 are the key factors necessary for the direct conversion of MEFs into NC cells. PMID:26873953

  10. Development of breast phantoms for use in breast imaging simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. Michael

    Dedicated x-ray breast computed tomography (BCT) and breast tomosynthesis (BT) using a cone-beam flat-panel detector system are modalities under investigation by a number of research teams. Several teams, including the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) Tomographic Breast Imaging Lab (TBIL), have fabricated a prototype, bench-top flat-panel CT breast imaging (CTBI) system. TBIL researchers also use computer simulation software to investigate various x-ray acquisition and reconstruction parameters. I have developed a methodology to use high resolution, low noise CT reconstructions of fresh mastectomy specimens in order to create an ensemble of three-dimensional (3D) digital breast phantoms that realistically model 3D compressed and uncompressed breast anatomy. The resulting breast phantoms can then be used to simulate realistic projection data for both BCT and BT systems thereby providing a powerful evaluation and optimization mechanism for research and development of novel breast imaging systems as well as the optimization of imaging techniques for such systems.

  11. Direct conversion of bio-ethanol to isobutene on nanosized Zn(x)Zr(y)O(z) mixed oxides with balanced acid-base sites.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junming; Zhu, Kake; Gao, Feng; Wang, Chongmin; Liu, Jun; Peden, Charles H F; Wang, Yong

    2011-07-27

    We report the design and synthesis of nanosized Zn(x)Zr(y)O(z) mixed oxides for direct and high-yield conversion of bio-ethanol to isobutene (~83%). ZnO is addded to ZrO(2) to selectively passivate zirconia's strong Lewis acidic sites and weaken Brönsted acidic sites, while simultaneously introducing basicity. As a result, the undesired reactions of bio-ethanol dehydration and acetone polymerization/coking are suppressed. Instead, a surface basic site-catalyzed ethanol dehydrogenation to acetaldehyde, acetaldehyde to acetone conversion via a complex pathway including aldol-condensation/dehydrogenation, and a Brönsted acidic site-catalyzed acetone-to-isobutene reaction pathway dominates on the nanosized Zn(x)Zr(y)O(z) mixed oxide catalyst, leading to a highly selective process for direct conversion of bio-ethanol to isobutene. PMID:21682296

  12. Comparison of two detector systems for cone beam CT small animal imaging - a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yang; Shaw, Chris C; Liu, Xinming; Altunbas, Mustafa C; Wang, Tianpeng; Chen, Lingyun; Tu, Shu-Ju; Kappadath, S Cheenu; Lai, Chao-Jen

    2006-03-01

    To compare two detector systems - one based on the charge-coupled device (CCD) and image amplifier, the other based on a-Si/CsI flat panel, for cone beam computed-tomography (CT) imaging of small animals.A high resolution, high framing rate detector system for the cone beam CT imaging of small animals was developed. The system consists of a 2048x3072x12 bit CCD optically coupled to an image amplifier and an x-ray phosphor screen. The CCD has an intrinsic pixel size of 12 mum but the effective pixel size can be adjusted through the magnification adjustment of the optical coupling systems. The system is used in conjunction with an x-ray source and a rotating stage for holding and rotating the scanned object in the cone beam CT imaging experiments. The advantages of the system include but are not limited to the ability to adjust the effective pixel size and to achieve extremely high spatial resolution and temporal resolution. However, the need to use optical coupling compromises the detective quanta efficiency (DQE) of the system. In this paper, the imaging characteristics of the system were presented and compared with those of an a-Si/CsI flat-panel detector system. PMID:18160972

  13. Comparison of two detector systems for cone beam CT small animal imaging - a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yang; Shaw, Chris C.; Liu, Xinming; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Chen, Lingyun; Tu, Shu-Ju; Kappadath, S. Cheenu; Lai, Chao-Jen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To compare two detector systems - one based on the charge-coupled device (CCD) and image amplifier, the other based on a-Si/CsI flat panel, for cone beam computed-tomography (CT) imaging of small animals. A high resolution, high framing rate detector system for the cone beam CT imaging of small animals was developed. The system consists of a 2048×3072×12 bit CCD optically coupled to an image amplifier and an x-ray phosphor screen. The CCD has an intrinsic pixel size of 12 μm but the effective pixel size can be adjusted through the magnification adjustment of the optical coupling systems. The system is used in conjunction with an x-ray source and a rotating stage for holding and rotating the scanned object in the cone beam CT imaging experiments. The advantages of the system include but are not limited to the ability to adjust the effective pixel size and to achieve extremely high spatial resolution and temporal resolution. However, the need to use optical coupling compromises the detective quanta efficiency (DQE) of the system. In this paper, the imaging characteristics of the system were presented and compared with those of an a-Si/CsI flat-panel detector system. PMID:18160972

  14. Medical imaging using ionizing radiation: Optimization of dose and image quality in fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A. Kyle; Balter, Stephen; Rauch, Phillip; Wagner, Louis K.

    2014-01-15

    The 2012 Summer School of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) focused on optimization of the use of ionizing radiation in medical imaging. Day 2 of the Summer School was devoted to fluoroscopy and interventional radiology and featured seven lectures. These lectures have been distilled into a single review paper covering equipment specification and siting, equipment acceptance testing and quality control, fluoroscope configuration, radiation effects, dose estimation and measurement, and principles of flat panel computed tomography. This review focuses on modern fluoroscopic equipment and is comprised in large part of information not found in textbooks on the subject. While this review does discuss technical aspects of modern fluoroscopic equipment, it focuses mainly on the clinical use and support of such equipment, from initial installation through estimation of patient dose and management of radiation effects. This review will be of interest to those learning about fluoroscopy, to those wishing to update their knowledge of modern fluoroscopic equipment, to those wishing to deepen their knowledge of particular topics, such as flat panel computed tomography, and to those who support fluoroscopic equipment in the clinic.

  15. A multi-platform approach to image guided radiation therapy (IGRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Amies, Christopher . E-mail: christopher.amies@siemens.com; Bani-Hashemi, Ali; Celi, Juan-Carlos; Grousset, Guillaume; Ghelmansarai, Farhad; Hristov, Dimitre; Lane, Derek; Mitschke, Matthias; Singh, Ajit; Shukla, Himanshu; Stein, Joerg; Wofford, Mark

    2006-04-01

    Siemens Medical Solutions, Oncology Care Systems Group (SMSOCSG) is supporting the development of several technologies that enable image acquisition and decision making processes required for IGRT in various clinical settings. Four such technologies are presented including: (i) the integration of a traditional multi-slice computed tomography (CT) scanner 'on rails' with a C-arm gantry linear accelerator; (ii) the development of a high sensitivity, fast, megavoltage (MV) electronic portal imaging device capable of clinical MV Conebeam CT (MVCBCT) reconstruction and fluoroscopy mounted on a C-arm gantry linear accelerator; (iii) the modification of a mobile C-arm with flat panel kilovoltage (kV) diagnostic imager; and (iv) the development of an in-line megavoltage and kilovoltage flat panel imaging system that has the potential to image both anatomical and dosimetric information in 'real-time' utilizing the traditional C-arm gantry linear accelerator geometry. Each method of IGRT has unique as well as complementary qualities which are discussed from both a clinical and technical perspective.

  16. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    PubMed

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing.

  17. Simulated Thin-Film Growth and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, Michael

    2001-06-01

    Thin-films have become the cornerstone of the electronics, telecommunications, and broadband markets. A list of potential products includes: computer boards and chips, satellites, cell phones, fuel cells, superconductors, flat panel displays, optical waveguides, building and automotive windows, food and beverage plastic containers, metal foils, pipe plating, vision ware, manufacturing equipment and turbine engines. For all of these reasons a basic understanding of the physical processes involved in both growing and imaging thin-films can provide a wonderful research project for advanced undergraduate and first-year graduate students. After producing rudimentary two- and three-dimensional thin-film models incorporating ballsitic deposition and nearest neighbor Coulomb-type interactions, the QM tunneling equations are used to produce simulated scanning tunneling microscope (SSTM) images of the films. A discussion of computational platforms, languages, and software packages that may be used to accomplish similar results is also given.

  18. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    PubMed

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing. PMID:11567193

  19. Characterization of a novel Agrobacterium tumefaciens Galactarolactone Cycloisomerase Enzyme for Direct Conversion of d-Galactarolactone to 3-Deoxy-2-keto-l-threo-hexarate*

    PubMed Central

    Andberg, Martina; Maaheimo, Hannu; Boer, Harry; Penttilä, Merja; Koivula, Anu; Richard, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms use different pathways for d-galacturonate catabolism. In the known microbial oxidative pathway, d-galacturonate is oxidized to d-galactarolactone, the lactone hydrolyzed to galactarate, which is further converted to 3-deoxy-2-keto-hexarate and α-ketoglutarate. We have shown recently that Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain C58 contains an uronate dehydrogenase (At Udh) that oxidizes d-galacturonic acid to d-galactarolactone. Here we report identification of a novel enzyme from the same A. tumefaciens strain, which we named Galactarolactone cycloisomerase (At Gci) (E.C. 5.5.1.-), for the direct conversion of the d-galactarolactone to 3-deoxy-2-keto-hexarate. The At Gci enzyme is 378 amino acids long and belongs to the mandelate racemase subgroup in the enolase superfamily. At Gci was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified enzyme was found to exist as an octameric form. It is active both on d-galactarolactone and d-glucarolactone, but does not work on the corresponding linear hexaric acid forms. The details of the reaction mechanism were further studied by NMR and optical rotation demonstrating that the reaction product of At Gci from d-galactaro-1,4-lactone and d-glucaro-1,4-lactone conversion is in both cases the l-threo form of 3-deoxy-2-keto-hexarate. PMID:22493433

  20. Neutron Imaging Developments at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Ron; Hunter, James; Schirato, Richard; Vogel, Sven; Swift, Alicia; Ickes, Tim; Ward, Bill; Losko, Adrian; Tremsin, Anton

    2015-10-01

    Neutron imaging is complementary to x-ray imaging because of its sensitivity to light elements and greater penetration of high-Z materials. Energy-resolved neutron imaging can provide contrast enhancements for elements and isotopes due to the variations with energy in scattering cross sections due to nuclear resonances. These cross section differences exist due to compound nuclear resonances that are characteristic of each element and isotope, as well as broader resonances at higher energies. In addition, multi-probe imaging, such as combined photon and neutron imaging, is a powerful tool for discerning properties and features in materials that cannot be observed with a single probe. Recently, we have demonstrated neutron imaging, both radiography and computed tomography, using the moderated (Lujan Center) and high-energy (WNR facility) neutron sources at LANSCE. Flat panel x-ray detectors with suitable scintillator-converter screens provide good sensitivity for both low and high neutron energies. Micro-Channel-Plate detectors and iCCD scintillator camera systems that provide the fast time gating needed for energy-resolved imaging have been demonstrated as well. Examples of recent work will be shown including fluid flow in plants and imaging through dense thick objects. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, and performed by Los Alamos National Security LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  1. Biological object recognition in μ-radiography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, A.; Dammer, J.; Weyda, F.; Sopko, V.; Benes, J.; Zeman, J.; Jandejsek, I.

    2015-03-01

    This study presents an applicability of real-time microradiography to biological objects, namely to horse chestnut leafminer, Cameraria ohridella (Insecta: Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae) and following image processing focusing on image segmentation and object recognition. The microradiography of insects (such as horse chestnut leafminer) provides a non-invasive imaging that leaves the organisms alive. The imaging requires a high spatial resolution (micrometer scale) radiographic system. Our radiographic system consists of a micro-focus X-ray tube and two types of detectors. The first is a charge integrating detector (Hamamatsu flat panel), the second is a pixel semiconductor detector (Medipix2 detector). The latter allows detection of single quantum photon of ionizing radiation. We obtained numerous horse chestnuts leafminer pupae in several microradiography images easy recognizable in automatic mode using the image processing methods. We implemented an algorithm that is able to count a number of dead and alive pupae in images. The algorithm was based on two methods: 1) noise reduction using mathematical morphology filters, 2) Canny edge detection. The accuracy of the algorithm is higher for the Medipix2 (average recall for detection of alive pupae =0.99, average recall for detection of dead pupae =0.83), than for the flat panel (average recall for detection of alive pupae =0.99, average recall for detection of dead pupae =0.77). Therefore, we conclude that Medipix2 has lower noise and better displays contours (edges) of biological objects. Our method allows automatic selection and calculation of dead and alive chestnut leafminer pupae. It leads to faster monitoring of the population of one of the world's important insect pest.

  2. Imaging system fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holst, Gerald C.

    2011-05-01

    Point-and-shoot, TV studio broadcast, and thermal infrared imaging cameras have significantly different applications. A parameter that applies to all imaging systems is Fλ/d, where F is the focal ratio, λ is the wavelength, and d is the detector size. Fλ/d uniquely defines the shape of the camera modulation transfer function. When Fλ/d<2, aliased signal corrupts the imagery. Mathematically, the worst case analysis assumes that the scene contains all spatial frequencies with equal amplitudes. This quantifies the potential for aliasing and is called the spurious response. Digital data cannot be seen; it resides in a computer. Cathode ray tubes, flat panel displays, and printers convert the data into an analog format and are called reconstruction filters. The human visual system is an additional reconstruction filter. Different displays and variable viewing distance affect the perceived image quality. Simulated imagery illustrates different Fλ/d ratios, displays, and sampling artifacts. Since the human visual system is primarily sensitive to intensity variations, aliasing (a spatial frequency phenomenon) is not considered bothersome in most situations.

  3. A novel high resolution, high sensitivity SPECT detector for molecular imaging of cardiovascular diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusanno, F.; Argentieri, A.; Baiocchi, M.; Colilli, S.; Cisbani, E.; De Vincentis, G.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Magliozzi, M. L.; Majewski, S.; Marano, G.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Vitelli, L.; Wang, Y.

    2010-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in western countries. Understanding the rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques and monitoring the effect of innovative therapies of heart failure is of fundamental importance. A flexible, high resolution, high sensitivity detector system for molecular imaging with radionuclides on small animal models has been designed for this aim. A prototype has been built using tungsten pinhole and LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to Hamamatsu Flat Panel PMTs. Compact individual-channel readout has been designed, built and tested. Measurements with phantoms as well as pilot studies on mice have been performed, the results show that the myocardial perfusion in mice can be determined with sufficient precision. The detector will be improved replacing the Hamamatsu Flat Panel with Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) to allow integration of the system with MRI scanners. Application of LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to photosensor with high photon detection efficiency and excellent energy resolution will allow dual-label imaging to monitor simultaneously the cardiac perfusion and the molecular targets under investigation during the heart therapy.

  4. Clinical micro-CT for dental imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Cho, Min Kook; Shon, Cheol-Soon; Cho, Bong Hae; Kim, Chang Hyuk; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2009-02-01

    We exploit the development of a clinical computed microtomography (micro-CT) system for dental imaging. While the conventional dental CT simply serves implant treatment, the clinical dental micro-CT may provide clinicians with a histologic evaluation. To investigate the feasibility of the realization of a dental micro-CT, we have constructed an experimental test system which mainly consists of a microfocus x-ray source, a rotational subject holder, and a flat-panel detector. The flat-panel detector is based on a matrix-addressed photodiode array coupled to a CsI:Tl scintillator. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the detector was measured as a function of magnification based on the measured modulation-transfer function (MTF) and noise-power spectrum (NPS). The best MTF and DQE performances were achieved at the magnification factor of 3. Similar tendency of the spatial resolving power in tomography was also observed with a wire phantom having a 25 μm diameter. From the investigation of tomographs reconstructed from a humanoid skull phantom, the application of magnification in the system largely reduced both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for a fixed dose at the entrance surface of the detector, 1.2 mGy, while this setup increased the dose at the object plane from 4.7 mGy to 19.1 mGy for the magnification factor from 2 to 4, respectively. Although the quantum mottles at the high magnification factor tackled the practical use in the clinic, the information contained in the magnified CT images was quite promising.

  5. Fundamental Discovery of New Phases and Direct Conversion of Carbon into Diamond and hBN into cBN and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Jagdish; Bhaumik, Anagh

    2016-04-01

    We review the discovery of new phases of carbon (Q-carbon) and BN (Q-BN) and address critical issues related to direct conversion of carbon into diamond and hBN into cBN at ambient temperatures and pressures in air without any need for catalyst and the presence of hydrogen. The Q-carbon and Q-BN are formed as a result of quenching from super undercooled state by using high-power nanosecond laser pulses. We discuss the equilibrium phase diagram ( P vs T) of carbon, and show that by rapid quenching, kinetics can shift thermodynamic graphite/diamond/liquid carbon triple point from 5000 K/12 GPa to super undercooled carbon at atmospheric pressure in air. Similarly, the hBN-cBN-Liquid triple point is shifted from 3500 K/9.5 GPa to as low as 2800 K and atmospheric pressure. It is shown that nanosecond laser heating of amorphous carbon and nanocrystalline BN on sapphire, glass, and polymer substrates can be confined to melt in a super undercooled state. By quenching this super undercooled state, we have created a new state of carbon (Q-carbon) and BN (Q-BN) from which nanocrystals, microcrystals, nanoneedles, microneedles, and thin films are formed depending upon the nucleation and growth times allowed and the presence of growth template. The large-area epitaxial diamond and cBN films are formed, when appropriate planar matching or lattice matching template is provided for growth from super undercooled liquid. The Q-phases have unique atomic structure and bonding characteristics as determined by high-resolution SEM and backscatter diffraction, HRTEM, STEM-Z, EELS, and Raman spectroscopy, and exhibit new and improved mechanical hardness, electrical conductivity, and chemical and physical properties, including room-temperature ferromagnetism and enhanced field emission. The Q-carbon exhibits robust bulk ferromagnetism with estimated Curie temperature of about 500 K and saturation magnetization value of 20 emu g-1. We have also deposited diamond on cBN by using a novel

  6. Over-exposure correction in knee cone-beam CT imaging with automatic exposure control using a partial low dose scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Muller, Kerstin; Hsieh, Scott; Maier, Andreas; Gold, Garry; Levenston, Marc; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2016-03-01

    C-arm-based cone-beam CT (CBCT) systems with flat-panel detectors are suitable for diagnostic knee imaging due to their potentially flexible selection of CT trajectories and wide volumetric beam coverage. In knee CT imaging, over-exposure artifacts can occur because of limitations in the dynamic range of the flat panel detectors present on most CBCT systems. We developed a straightforward but effective method for correction and detection of over-exposure for an Automatic Exposure Control (AEC)-enabled standard knee scan incorporating a prior low dose scan. The radiation dose associated with the low dose scan was negligible (0.0042mSv, 2.8% increase) which was enabled by partially sampling the projection images considering the geometry of the knees and lowering the dose further to be able to just see the skin-air interface. We combined the line integrals from the AEC and low dose scans after detecting over-exposed regions by comparing the line profiles of the two scans detector row-wise. The combined line integrals were reconstructed into a volumetric image using filtered back projection. We evaluated our method using in vivo human subject knee data. The proposed method effectively corrected and detected over-exposure, and thus recovered the visibility of exterior tissues (e.g., the shape and density of the patella, and the patellar tendon), incorporating a prior low dose scan with a negligible increase in radiation exposure.

  7. Position detection accuracy of a novel linac-mounted intrafractional x-ray imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Martin F.; Krauss, Andreas; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: The authors have developed a system that monitors intrafractional target motion perpendicular to the treatment beam with the aid of radioopaque markers by means of separating kV image and megavoltage (MV) treatment field on a single flat-panel detector. Methods: They equipped a research Siemens Artiste linear accelerator (linac) with a 41 x 41 cm{sup 2} a-Si flat-panel detector underneath the treatment head. The in-line geometry allows kV (imaging) and MV (treatment) beams to share closely aligned beam axes. The kV source, usually mounted directly across from the flat-panel imager, was retracted toward the gantry by 13 cm to intentionally misalign kV and MV beams, resulting in a geometric separation of MV treatment field and kV image on the detector. Two consecutive images acquired within 140 ms (the first with MV-only and the second with kV and MV signal) were subtracted to generate a kV-only image. The images were then analyzed ''online'' with an automated threshold-based marker detection algorithm. They employed a 3D and a 4D phantom equipped with either a single radioopaque marker or three Calypso beacons to mimic respiratory motion. Measured room positions were either cross-referenced with a phantom voltage signal (single marker) or the Calypso system. The accuracy of the back-projection (from detected marker positions into room coordinates) was verified by a simulation study. Results: A phantom study has demonstrated that the imaging framework is capable of automatically detecting marker positions and sending this information to the tracking tool at an update rate of 7.14 Hz. The system latency is 86.9 {+-} 1.0 ms for single marker detection in the absence of MV radiation. In the presence of a circular MV field of 5 cm diameter, the latency is 87.1 {+-} 0.9 ms. The total RMS position detection accuracy is 0.20 mm (without MV radiation) and 0.23 mm (with MV). Conclusions: Based on the evaluated motion patterns and MV field size, the positional

  8. X-ray imaging with scintillator-sensitized hybrid organic photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büchele, Patric; Richter, Moses; Tedde, Sandro F.; Matt, Gebhard J.; Ankah, Genesis N.; Fischer, Rene; Biele, Markus; Metzger, Wilhelm; Lilliu, Samuele; Bikondoa, Oier; MacDonald, J. Emyr; Brabec, Christoph J.; Kraus, Tobias; Lemmer, Uli; Schmidt, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    Medical X-ray imaging requires cost-effective and high-resolution flat-panel detectors for the energy range between 20 and 120 keV. Solution-processed photodetectors provide the opportunity to fabricate detectors with a large active area at low cost. Here, we present a disruptive approach that improves the resolution of such detectors by incorporating terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator particles into an organic photodetector matrix. The X-ray induced light emission from the scintillators is absorbed within hundreds of nanometres, which is negligible compared with the pixel size. Hence, optical crosstalk, a limiting factor in the resolution of scintillator-based X-ray detectors, is minimized. The concept is validated with a 256 × 256 pixel detector with a resolution of 4.75 lp mm-1 at a MTF = 0.2, significantly better than previous stacked scintillator-based flat-panel detectors. We achieved a resolution that proves the feasibility of solution-based detectors in medical applications. Time-resolved electrical characterization showed enhanced charge carrier mobility with increased scintillator filling, which is explained by morphological changes.

  9. A quality assurance program for image quality of cone-beam CT guidance in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Moseley, Douglas J.; Jaffray, David A.

    2008-05-15

    The clinical introduction of volumetric x-ray image-guided radiotherapy systems necessitates formal commissioning of the hardware and image-guided processes to be used and drafts quality assurance (QA) for both hardware and processes. Satisfying both requirements provides confidence on the system's ability to manage geometric variations in patient setup and internal organ motion. As these systems become a routine clinical modality, the authors present data from their QA program tracking the image quality performance of ten volumetric systems over a period of 3 years. These data are subsequently used to establish evidence-based tolerances for a QA program. The volumetric imaging systems used in this work combines a linear accelerator with conventional x-ray tube and an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector mounted orthogonally from the accelerator central beam axis, in a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) configuration. In the spirit of the AAPM Report No. 74, the present work presents the image quality portion of their QA program; the aspects of the QA protocol addressing imaging geometry have been presented elsewhere. Specifically, the authors are presenting data demonstrating the high linearity of CT numbers, the uniformity of axial reconstructions, and the high contrast spatial resolution of ten CBCT systems (1-2 mm) from two commercial vendors. They are also presenting data accumulated over the period of several months demonstrating the long-term stability of the flat-panel detector and of the distances measured on reconstructed volumetric images. Their tests demonstrate that each specific CBCT system has unique performance. In addition, scattered x rays are shown to influence the imaging performance in terms of spatial resolution, axial reconstruction uniformity, and the linearity of CT numbers.

  10. Advanced Image Intensifier: a 60°field-of-view night vision system with integral electroluminescent display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenshaw, David A.; Branigan, Robert G.

    1996-06-01

    The Advanced Image Intensifier Advanced Technology Demonstrator is an Army program to develop and demonstrate the next generation of night vision goggle using revolutionary new technologies to improve system performance and expand the capability of currently fielded image intensifier devices. The Advanced Image Intensifier is a helmet mounted imaging and display system that exploits recent advances in diffractive optics, miniature flat panel displays, image intensifier tube technology and manufacturing processes. The system will demonstrate significantly enhanced operational performance by increasing low-light resolution by greater than 25 percent; increasing field of view from 40 degrees to 60 degrees; improving high light performance; and integrating a display for viewing thermal imagery, computer graphics, and symbology. The results of these improvements will increase the night fighting capability, operational effectiveness, mobilty, versatility, and survivability of the dismounted soldier and aviator.

  11. X-ray Induced Effects on Photocurrents in Amorphous Se Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimakawa, Koichi; Fukami, Kenji; Kishi, Hiroki; Belev, George; Kasap, Safa

    2007-03-01

    Amorphous selenium (a-Se) is one of the X-ray photoconductors that is available for use in recently developed direct conversion flat panel X-ray image detectors for medical imaging. To obtain a better understanding of trapping and recombination effects in a-Se, we have studied light and X-ray induced photocurrents in a-Se films. The residual photocurrent, after X-ray exposure, decreases in sandwich cells whereas it increases in coplanar cells. These effects are recovered over a time scale of hours. We show that the results can be interpreted by using valence alternation pair (VAP) type charged defects.

  12. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 03: A novel Čerenkov detector based on air-spaced light guiding taper for megavoltage x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Teymurazyan, A; Rowlands, J A; Pang, G

    2014-08-15

    Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs) have been used in radiation therapy and are still needed on linear accelerators (Linacs) equipped with kilovoltage cone beam CT (kV-CBCT) or MRI systems. Recently a new concept of a high quantum efficiency (QE) Čerenkov Portal Imaging Device (CPID) for MV x-ray imaging in radiation therapy was introduced. It relies on Čerenkov effect for x-ray detection. The proposed design consisted of a matrix of optical fibres aligned with the incident x-rays and coupled to an active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) for image readout. A weakness of such design is that too few Čerenkov light photons reach the AMFPI for each incident x-ray and an AMFPI with an avalanche gain is required. In this work we propose to replace the optical fibers in the CPID with light guides without a cladding layer that are suspended in air. The air between the light guides takes on the role of the cladding layer found in a regular optical fiber. Since air has a significantly lower refractive index, a much superior light collection efficiency is achieved. Our Monte Carlo studies have shown that the modified new CPID has a QE more than an order of magnitude greater than that of current clinical systems and yet a spatial resolution similar to that of current flat-panel based EPIDs. Furthermore it has been demonstrated that the new CPID does not require an avalanche gain in the AMFPI and is quantum noise limited at dose levels corresponding to a single Linac pulse.

  13. A feasibility study of X-ray phase-contrast mammographic tomography at the Imaging and Medical beamline of the Australian Synchrotron.

    PubMed

    Nesterets, Yakov I; Gureyev, Timur E; Mayo, Sheridan C; Stevenson, Andrew W; Thompson, Darren; Brown, Jeremy M C; Kitchen, Marcus J; Pavlov, Konstantin M; Lockie, Darren; Brun, Francesco; Tromba, Giuliana

    2015-11-01

    Results are presented of a recent experiment at the Imaging and Medical beamline of the Australian Synchrotron intended to contribute to the implementation of low-dose high-sensitivity three-dimensional mammographic phase-contrast imaging, initially at synchrotrons and subsequently in hospitals and medical imaging clinics. The effect of such imaging parameters as X-ray energy, source size, detector resolution, sample-to-detector distance, scanning and data processing strategies in the case of propagation-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) have been tested, quantified, evaluated and optimized using a plastic phantom simulating relevant breast-tissue characteristics. Analysis of the data collected using a Hamamatsu CMOS Flat Panel Sensor, with a pixel size of 100 µm, revealed the presence of propagation-based phase contrast and demonstrated significant improvement of the quality of phase-contrast CT imaging compared with conventional (absorption-based) CT, at medically acceptable radiation doses.

  14. A feasibility study of X-ray phase-contrast mammographic tomography at the Imaging and Medical beamline of the Australian Synchrotron.

    PubMed

    Nesterets, Yakov I; Gureyev, Timur E; Mayo, Sheridan C; Stevenson, Andrew W; Thompson, Darren; Brown, Jeremy M C; Kitchen, Marcus J; Pavlov, Konstantin M; Lockie, Darren; Brun, Francesco; Tromba, Giuliana

    2015-11-01

    Results are presented of a recent experiment at the Imaging and Medical beamline of the Australian Synchrotron intended to contribute to the implementation of low-dose high-sensitivity three-dimensional mammographic phase-contrast imaging, initially at synchrotrons and subsequently in hospitals and medical imaging clinics. The effect of such imaging parameters as X-ray energy, source size, detector resolution, sample-to-detector distance, scanning and data processing strategies in the case of propagation-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) have been tested, quantified, evaluated and optimized using a plastic phantom simulating relevant breast-tissue characteristics. Analysis of the data collected using a Hamamatsu CMOS Flat Panel Sensor, with a pixel size of 100 µm, revealed the presence of propagation-based phase contrast and demonstrated significant improvement of the quality of phase-contrast CT imaging compared with conventional (absorption-based) CT, at medically acceptable radiation doses. PMID:26524316

  15. Tomosynthesis imaging: At a translational crossroads

    PubMed Central

    Dobbins, James T.

    2009-01-01

    Tomosynthesis is a decades-old technique for section imaging that has seen a recent upsurge in interest due to its promise to provide three-dimensional information at lower dose and potentially lower cost than CT in certain clinical imaging situations. This renewed interest in tomosynthesis began in the late 1990s as a new generation of flat-panel detectors became available; these detectors were the one missing piece of the picture that had kept tomosynthesis from enjoying significant utilization earlier. In the past decade, tomosynthesis imaging has been investigated in a variety of clinical imaging situations, but the two most prominent have been in breast and chest imaging. Tomosynthesis has the potential to substantially change the way in which breast cancer and pulmonary nodules are detected and managed. Commercial tomosynthesis devices are now available or on the horizon. Many of the remaining research activities with tomosynthesis will be translational in nature and will involve physicist and clinician alike. This overview article provides a forward-looking assessment of the translational questions facing tomosynthesis imaging and anticipates some of the likely research and clinical activities in the next five years. PMID:19610284

  16. Development of a QA phantom and automated analysis tool for geometric quality assurance of on-board MV and kV x-ray imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Weihua; Lee, Louis; Xing Lei

    2008-04-15

    The medical linear accelerator (linac) integrated with a kilovoltage (kV) flat-panel imager has been emerging as an important piece of equipment for image-guided radiation therapy. Due to the sagging of the linac head and the flexing of the robotic arms that mount the x-ray tube and flat-panel detector, geometric nonidealities generally exist in the imaging geometry no matter whether it is for the two-dimensional projection image or three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography. Normally, the geometric parameters are established during the commissioning and incorporated in correction software in respective image formation or reconstruction. A prudent use of an on-board imaging system necessitates a routine surveillance of the geometric accuracy of the system like the position of the x-ray source, imager position and orientation, isocenter, rotation trajectory, and source-to-imager distance. Here we describe a purposely built phantom and a data analysis software for monitoring these important parameters of the system in an efficient and automated way. The developed tool works equally well for the megavoltage (MV) electronic portal imaging device and hence allows us to measure the coincidence of the isocenters of the MV and kV beams of the linac. This QA tool can detect an angular uncertainty of 0.1 deg. of the x-ray source. For spatial uncertainties, such as the source position, the imager position, or the kV/MV isocenter misalignment, the demonstrated accuracy of this tool was better than 1.6 mm. The developed tool provides us with a simple, robust, and objective way to probe and monitor the geometric status of an imaging system in a fully automatic process and facilitate routine QA workflow in a clinic.

  17. Development and operation of a prototype cone-beam computed tomography system for X-ray medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Chang-Woo; Cha, Bo Kyung; Kim, Ryun Kyung; Kim, Cho-Rong; Yang, Keedong; Huh, Young; Jeon, Sungchae; Park, Justin C.; Song, Bongyong; Song, William Y.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a prototype cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system for clinical use. The overall system design in terms of physical characteristics, geometric calibration methods, and three-dimensional image reconstruction algorithms are described. Our system consists of an X-ray source and a large-area flat-panel detector with the axial dimension large enough for most clinical applications when acquired in a full gantry rotation mode. Various elaborate methods are applied to measure, analyze and calibrate the system for imaging. The electromechanical and the radiographic subsystems through the synchronized control include: gantry rotation and speed, tube rotor, the high-frequency generator (kVp, mA, exposure time and repetition rate), and the reconstruction server (imaging acquisition and reconstruction). The operator can select between analytic and iterative reconstruction methods. Our prototype system contains the latest hardware and reconstruction algorithms and, thus, represents a step forward in CBCT technology.

  18. Temporal change analysis for improved tumor detection in dedicated CT breast imaging using affine and free-form deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Joyoni; O'Connor, J. Michael; Chen, Yu; Glick, Stephen J.

    2008-03-01

    Preliminary evidence has suggested that computerized tomographic (CT) imaging of the breast using a cone-beam, flat-panel detector system dedicated solely to breast imaging has potential for improving detection and diagnosis of early-stage breast cancer. Hypothetically, a powerful mechanism for assisting in early stage breast cancer detection from annual screening breast CT studies would be to examine temporal changes in the breast from year-to-year. We hypothesize that 3D image registration could be used to automatically register breast CT volumes scanned at different times (e.g., yearly screening exams). This would allow radiologists to quickly visualize small changes in the breast that have developed during the period since the last screening CT scan, and use this information to improve the diagnostic accuracy of early-stage breast cancer detection. To test our hypothesis, fresh mastectomy specimens were imaged with a flat-panel CT system at different time points, after moving the specimen to emulate the re-positioning motion of the breast between yearly screening exams. Synthetic tumors were then digitally inserted into the second CT scan at a clinically realistic location (to emulate tumor growth from year-to-year). An affine and a spline-based 3D image registration algorithm was implemented and applied to the CT reconstructions of the specimens acquired at different times. Subtraction of registered image volumes was then performed to better analyze temporal change. Results from this study suggests that temporal change analysis in 3D breast CT can potentially be a powerful tool in improving the visualization of small lesion growth.

  19. Dependence of x-ray sensitivity of direct conversion x-ray detectors on x-ray exposure and exposure history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Mohammad Z.; Yunus, Mohammad; Kasap, Safa O.

    2004-05-01

    The dependence of the x-ray sensitivity of a-Se based x-ray image detectors on repeated x-ray exposures and exposure history is studied by considering deep trapping of charge carriers, trapped charges due to previous exposures, bimolecular recombination, space charge effects and electric field dependent electron-hole pair creation energy. We numerically solve the continuity equations of both holes and electrons, trapping rate equations, and the Poison equation across the photoconductor for long pulse x-ray exposures. The electric field distribution across the photoconductor and the relative x-ray sensitivity as a function of cumulated x-ray exposure have been studied for both mammographic and chest radiographic applications. The electric field distribution across the photoconductor has been found to vary widely for high exposures. The relative x-ray sensitivity decreases with increasing cumulated x-ray exposure and tents to saturate. The sensitivity reduction at negative bias is more pronounced than at positive bias.

  20. A compact gamma camera for biological imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E L; Cella, J; Majewski, S; Popov, V; Qian, Jianguo; Saha, M S; Smith, M F; Weisenberger, A G; Welsh, R E

    2006-02-01

    A compact detector, sized particularly for imaging a mouse, is described. The active area of the detector is approximately 46 mm; spl times/ 96 mm. Two flat-panel Hamamatsu H8500 position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) are coupled to a pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator which views the animal through a copper-beryllium (CuBe) parallel-hole collimator specially designed for {sup 125}I. Although the PSPMTs have insensitive areas at their edges and there is a physical gap, corrections for scintillation light collection at the junction between the two tubes results in a uniform response across the entire rectangular area of the detector. The system described has been developed to optimize both sensitivity and resolution for in-vivo imaging of small animals injected with iodinated compounds. We demonstrate an in-vivo application of this detector, particularly to SPECT, by imaging mice injected with approximately 10-15; spl mu/Ci of {sup 125}I.

  1. Direct conversion nuclear reactor space power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, E.J.; Fitzpatrick, G.O.

    1982-08-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of space nuclear reactor power systems using either thermoelectric or thermionic energy converters. An in-core reactor design and two heat pipe cooled out-of-core reactor designs were considered. One of the out-of-core cases utilized, long heat pipes (LHP) directly coupled to the energy converter. The second utilized a larger number of smaller heat pipes (mini-pipe) radiatively coupled to the energy converter. In all cases the entire system, including power conditioning, was constrained to be launched in a single shuttle flight. Assuming presently available performance, both the LHP thermoelectric system and minipipe thermionic system, designed to produce 100 kWe for seven years, would have a specific mass near 22kg/kWe. The specific mass of the thermionic minipipe system designed for a one year mission is 165 kg/kWe due to less fuel swelling. Shuttle imposed growth limits are near 300 kWe and 1.2 MWe for the thermoelectric and thermionic systems, respectively. Converter performance improvements could double this potential, and over 10 MWe may be possible for very short missions.

  2. Direct Conversion of Radioisotope Energy to Electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Marks Prelas; Alexey Spitsyn; Alejandro Suarez; Eric Stienfelds; Dickerson Moreno; Bia-Ling Hsu; Tushar Ghosh; Robert Tompson; Sudarshan Loyalka; Dabir Viswanath

    2003-09-09

    A new chemical reactor has been tested for Field Enhanced Diffusion by Optical Activation doping and purification of SiC, GaN and AlN films. Different conditions have been used on SiC, GaN and AlN samples including temperature variation, electrical field variation, variations in electrical current and optical activation. A 5mW (630-680) nm laser was used for optical activation. It was observed that optical activation has a major effect on ion drift rates. It was also observed that the magnitude of the electrical current also enhanced ion drift rates by a postulated current drag mechanism. I-V characteristic curves were measured to verify changes in the electrical properties of the samples SIMS was used to analyze the concentrations of impurities in the film samples before and after treatment. It has been demonstrated that the field-enhanced diffusion by optical activation method can dope and purify the films. As a result, the electrical properties of the wafers have been significantly improved during treatment especially in cases where a laser is used.

  3. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system.

    PubMed

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S; Johnson, Perry B; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-04-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ~0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost. PMID:26958942

  4. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S.; Johnson, Perry B.; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ∼0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost. PMID:26958942

  5. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system.

    PubMed

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S; Johnson, Perry B; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-04-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ~0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost.

  6. Creation of a Reference Image with Monte Carlo Simulations for Online EPID Verification of Daily Patient Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Descalle, M-A; Chuang, C; Pouliot, J

    2002-01-30

    Patient positioning accuracy remains an issue for external beam radiotherapy. Currently, kilovoltage verification images are used as reference by clinicians to compare the actual patient treatment position with the planned position. These images are qualitatively different from treatment-time megavoltage portal images. This study will investigate the feasibility of using PEREGRINE, a 3D Monte Carlo calculation engine, to create reference images for portal image comparisons. Portal images were acquired using an amorphous-silicon flat-panel EPID for (1) the head and pelvic sections of an anthropomorphic phantom with 7-8 mm displacements applied, and (2) a prostate patient on five treatment days. Planning CT scans were used to generate simulated reference images with PEREGRINE. A correlation algorithm quantified the setup deviations between simulated and portal images. Monte Carlo simulated images exhibit similar qualities to portal images, the phantom slabs appear clearly. Initial positioning differences and applied displacements were detected and quantified. We find that images simulated with Monte Carlo methods can be used as reference images to detect and quantify set-up errors during treatment.

  7. Prediction of the niche effect for single flat panels with or without attached sound absorbing materials.

    PubMed

    Sgard, Franck; Atalla, Noureddine; Nélisse, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    The sound transmission loss (STL) of a test sample measured in sound transmission facilities is affected by the opening in which it is located. This is called the niche effect. This paper uses a modal approach to study the STL of a rectangular plate with or without an attached porous material located inside a box-shaped niche. The porous material is modeled as a limp equivalent fluid. The proposed model is validated by comparison with finite element/boundary element computations. Using a condensation of the pressure fields in the niche, the niche effect is interpreted in terms of a modification of the modal blocked pressure fields acting on the panel induced by the front cavity and by a modification of the radiation efficiency of the panel modes due to the presence of the back cavity. The modal approach is then used to investigate the impact of (1) the presence of a porous material attached to the panel on the niche effect and (2) the niche effect on the assessment of the porous material insertion loss. A simplified model for the porous material based on a transfer matrix approach is also proposed to predict the STL of the system and its validity is discussed.

  8. Prediction of the niche effect for single flat panels with or without attached sound absorbing materials.

    PubMed

    Sgard, Franck; Atalla, Noureddine; Nélisse, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    The sound transmission loss (STL) of a test sample measured in sound transmission facilities is affected by the opening in which it is located. This is called the niche effect. This paper uses a modal approach to study the STL of a rectangular plate with or without an attached porous material located inside a box-shaped niche. The porous material is modeled as a limp equivalent fluid. The proposed model is validated by comparison with finite element/boundary element computations. Using a condensation of the pressure fields in the niche, the niche effect is interpreted in terms of a modification of the modal blocked pressure fields acting on the panel induced by the front cavity and by a modification of the radiation efficiency of the panel modes due to the presence of the back cavity. The modal approach is then used to investigate the impact of (1) the presence of a porous material attached to the panel on the niche effect and (2) the niche effect on the assessment of the porous material insertion loss. A simplified model for the porous material based on a transfer matrix approach is also proposed to predict the STL of the system and its validity is discussed. PMID:25618044

  9. Hydrometallurgical Recovery of Indium from Flat-Panel Displays of Spent Liquid Crystal Televisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Katsutoshi; Alam, Shafiq

    2015-02-01

    A recovery process for indium from waste liquid crystal display panels was developed on the basis of hydrometallurgical technology. The powdered sample was leached with 3 M HCl to extract its various metal constituents (indium, aluminum, tin, etc.). The mutual separation and subsequent recovery of the dissolved metals was achieved using two column adsorption tests: The first column was packed with a porous resin impregnated with Aliquat 336, a commercially available solvent extraction reagent based on a quaternary ammonium compound, and the resin contained in the second column was impregnated with Cyanex 923, also a commercially available solvent extraction reagent based on trialkylphosphine oxide. In the first column, tin, iron, and zinc were removed from the leach liquor. In the second column, only indium was selectively recovered. The metal ions trapped in these columns were eluted with 0.1 M H2SO4, yielding a solution purified indium solution with a concentration 10 times that of the feed solution.

  10. Flat Panel Light Source with Lateral Gate Structure Based on SiC Nanowire Field Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youh, Meng-Jey; Tseng, Chun-Lung; Jhuang, Meng-Han; Chiu, Sheng-Cheng; Huang, Li-Hu; Gong, Jyun-An; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2015-06-01

    A field-emission light source with high luminance, excellent luminance uniformity, and tunable luminance characteristics with a novel lateral-gate structure is demonstrated. The lateral-gate triode structure comprises SiC nanowire emitters on a Ag cathode electrode and a pair of Ag gate electrodes placed laterally on both sides of the cathode. The simple and cost-effective screen printing technique is employed to pattern the lateral-gates and cathode structure on soda lime glass. The area coverage of the screen-printed cathode and gates on the glass substrate (area: 6 × 8 cm2) is in the range of 2.04% - 4.74% depending on the set of cathode-gate electrodes on the substrate. The lateral-gate structure with its small area coverage exhibits a two-dimensional luminance pattern with high brightness and good luminance uniformity. A maximum luminance of 10952 cd/cm2 and a luminance uniformity of >90% can be achieved with a gate voltage of 500 V and an anode voltage of 4000 V, with an anode current of 1.44 mA and current leakage to the gate from the cathode of about 10%.

  11. Low-impedance internal linear inductive antenna for large-area flat panel display plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.N.; Jung, S.J.; Lee, Y.J.; Yeom, G.Y.; Lee, S.H.; Lee, J.K.

    2005-03-15

    An internal-type linear inductive antenna, that is, a double-comb-type antenna, was developed for a large-area plasma source having the size of 1020 mmx830 mm, and high density plasmas on the order of 2.3x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} were obtained with 15 mTorr Ar at 5000 W of inductive power with good plasma stability. This is higher than that for the conventional serpentine-type antenna, possibly due to the low impedance, resulting in high efficiency of power transfer for the double-comb antenna type. In addition, due to the remarkable reduction of the antenna length, a plasma uniformity of less than 8% was obtained within the substrate area of 880 mmx660 mm at 5000 W without having a standing-wave effect.

  12. Postbuckling analysis of shear deformable composite flat panels taking into account geometrical imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, L.; Stein, M.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of initial geometrical imperfections on the postbuckling response of flat laminated composite panels to uniaxial and biaxial compressive loading are investigated analytically. The derivation of the mathematical model on the basis of first-order transverse shear deformation theory is outlined, and numerical results for perfect and imperfect, single-layer and three-layer square plates with free-free, clamped-clamped, or free-clamped edges are presented in graphs and briefly characterized. The present approach is shown to be more accurate than analyses based on the classical Kirchhoff plate model.

  13. Flat-panel display solutions for ground-environment military displays (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J., II; Roach, R.

    2005-05-01

    Displays for military vehicles have very distinct operational and cost requirements that differ from other military applications. These requirements demand that display suppliers to Army and Marine ground-environments provide low cost equipment that is capable of operation across environmental extremes. Inevitably, COTS components form the foundation of these "affordable" display solutions. This paper will outline the major display requirements and review the options that satisfy conflicting and difficult operational demands, using newly developed equipment as an example. Recently, a new supplier was selected for the Drivers Vision Enhancer (DVE) equipment, including the Display Control Module (DCM). The paper will outline the DVE and describe development of a new DCM solution. The DVE programme, with several thousand units presently in service and operational in conflicts such as "Operation Iraqi Freedom", represents a critical balance between cost and performance. We shall describe design considerations that include selection of COTS sources, the need to minimise display modification; video interfaces, power interfaces, operator interfaces and new provisions to optimise displayed video content.

  14. 76 FR 63657 - Certain Flat Panel Display Devices, and Products Containing the Same; Notice of Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... (collectively, ``AU Optronics''). 76 FR 45296 (July 28, 2011). The complaint alleged violations of section 337... respondents Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. of Seoul, Korea; Samsung Electronics America, Inc. of...

  15. System design and implementation for the glass panel alignment and sealing tool for flat panel displays

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J.D.; Stromberg, P.G.; Kuszmaul, S.S.

    1996-10-16

    This report describes the system designed and fabricated for the National Center for Advanced Information Component Manufacturing (NCAICM) project number 9322-135. The system is a device capable of simultaneously aligning two glass plates and sealing them together with glass frit. The process development was divided into two phases. The first was thermal sealing in an ambient environment. The second was sealing a controlled environment in a vacuum.

  16. Flat Panel Light Source with Lateral Gate Structure Based on SiC Nanowire Field Emitters

    PubMed Central

    Youh, Meng-Jey; Tseng, Chun-Lung; Jhuang, Meng-Han; Chiu, Sheng-Cheng; Huang, Li-Hu; Gong, Jyun-An; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2015-01-01

    A field-emission light source with high luminance, excellent luminance uniformity, and tunable luminance characteristics with a novel lateral-gate structure is demonstrated. The lateral-gate triode structure comprises SiC nanowire emitters on a Ag cathode electrode and a pair of Ag gate electrodes placed laterally on both sides of the cathode. The simple and cost-effective screen printing technique is employed to pattern the lateral-gates and cathode structure on soda lime glass. The area coverage of the screen-printed cathode and gates on the glass substrate (area: 6 × 8 cm2) is in the range of 2.04% – 4.74% depending on the set of cathode-gate electrodes on the substrate. The lateral-gate structure with its small area coverage exhibits a two-dimensional luminance pattern with high brightness and good luminance uniformity. A maximum luminance of 10952 cd/cm2 and a luminance uniformity of >90% can be achieved with a gate voltage of 500 V and an anode voltage of 4000 V, with an anode current of 1.44 mA and current leakage to the gate from the cathode of about 10%. PMID:26042359

  17. An experimental investigation of sandwich flat panels under low velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Timberlyn M.

    1994-12-01

    This study evaluated the failure modes and mechanisms associated with increasing face sheet thickness of flat sandwich panels under low velocity impact. The sandwich panels were fabricated using 1.27 cm thick, 145 kg/cu m (9 lb/cu ft), 3.175 mm (1/8 in.) cell size Nomex honeycomb core, FM 300-2 film adhesive and AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy face sheets. The thickness of the core remained 1.27 cm, and the thickness of the adhesive remained 0.25 mm. The thickness of the face sheets varied using the following stacking sequences: (O/90)s, (O/90)2s, (O/90)4s, (O/90)8s, and (O/90)12s. The sandwich panels were subjected to various low velocity impacts using the Dynatup Impact Test Machine. Pulse-Echo C-scans and optical microscopy of panel cross-sections were performed to characterize the damage. The cross-sections indicated that delamination and transverse cracking contribute to internal damage of the face sheets, while crushing, buckling, and crippling contribute to damage of the core. Cracks in the adhesive also contribute to damage in some cases.

  18. In-room CT techniques for image-guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C.-M. Charlie . E-mail: charlie.ma@fccc.edu; Paskalev, Kamen M.S.

    2006-04-01

    Accurate patient setup and target localization are essential to advanced radiation therapy treatment. Significant improvement has been made recently with the development of image-guided radiation therapy, in which image guidance facilitates short treatment course and high dose per fraction radiotherapy, aiming at improving tumor control and quality of life. Many imaging modalities are being investigated, including x-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonant imaging, magnetic resonant spectroscopic imaging, and kV/MV imaging with flat panel detectors. These developments provide unique imaging techniques and methods for patient setup and target localization. Some of them are different; some are complementary. This paper reviews the currently available kV x-ray CT systems used in the radiation treatment room, with a focus on the CT-on-rails systems, which are diagnostic CT scanners moving on rails installed in the treatment room. We will describe the system hardware including configurations, specifications, operation principles, and functionality. We will review software development for image fusion, structure recognition, deformation correction, target localization, and alignment. Issues related to the clinical implementation of in-room CT techniques in routine procedures are discussed, including acceptance testing and quality assurance. Clinical applications of the in-room CT systems for patient setup, target localization, and adaptive therapy are also reviewed for advanced radiotherapy treatments.

  19. Image quality improvement in megavoltage cone beam CT using an imaging beam line and a sintered pixelated array system

    SciTech Connect

    Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Maltz, Jonathan S.; Gangadharan, Bijumon; Bani-Hashemi, Ali; Anderson, Carryn M.; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Stiles, Jared; Edwards, Drake S.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify the improvement in megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) image quality enabled by the combination of a 4.2 MV imaging beam line (IBL) with a carbon electron target and a detector system equipped with a novel sintered pixelated array (SPA) of translucent Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S ceramic scintillator. Clinical MVCBCT images are traditionally acquired with the same 6 MV treatment beam line (TBL) that is used for cancer treatment, a standard amorphous Si (a-Si) flat panel imager, and the Kodak Lanex Fast-B (LFB) scintillator. The IBL produces a greater fluence of keV-range photons than the TBL, to which the detector response is more optimal, and the SPA is a more efficient scintillator than the LFB. Methods: A prototype IBL + SPA system was installed on a Siemens Oncor linear accelerator equipped with the MVision{sup TM} image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system. A SPA strip consisting of four neighboring tiles and measuring 40 cm by 10.96 cm in the crossplane and inplane directions, respectively, was installed in the flat panel imager. Head- and pelvis-sized phantom images were acquired at doses ranging from 3 to 60 cGy with three MVCBCT configurations: TBL + LFB, IBL + LFB, and IBL + SPA. Phantom image quality at each dose was quantified using the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and modulation transfer function (MTF) metrics. Head and neck, thoracic, and pelvic (prostate) cancer patients were imaged with the three imaging system configurations at multiple doses ranging from 3 to 15 cGy. The systems were assessed qualitatively from the patient image data. Results: For head and neck and pelvis-sized phantom images, imaging doses of 3 cGy or greater, and relative electron densities of 1.09 and 1.48, the CNR average improvement factors for imaging system change of TBL + LFB to IBL + LFB, IBL + LFB to IBL + SPA, and TBL + LFB to IBL + SPA were 1.63 (p < 10{sup -8}), 1.64 (p < 10{sup -13}), 2.66 (p < 10{sup -9}), respectively. For all imaging

  20. Combined system of fluorescence diffuse optical tomography and microcomputed tomography for small animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoquan; Gong, Hui; Quan, Guotao; Deng, Yong; Luo, Qingming

    2010-05-01

    We developed a dual-modality system that combines fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT) and flat panel detector-based microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) to simultaneously reveal molecular and structural information in small animals. In fDOT, a 748 nm diode laser was used as an excitation source, while a cooled charge coupled device camera was adopted to collect transmission fluorescence. In micro-CT, a flat panel detector based on amorphous silicon, with active area of 13 x 13 cm(2), and a microfocus x-ray tube were used. The fDOT system was mounted orthogonally to the micro-CT and the projection images were acquired without rotation of the sample, which is different from the method used for micro-CT alone. Both the finite element method and the algebraic reconstruction technique were used to reconstruct images from the fDOT. Phantom data showed that the resolution of the fDOT system was about 3 mm at an imaging depth of 7 mm. Quantitative error was no more than 5% and imaging sensitivity for 1,1(')-dioctadecyl-3,3,3('),3(')-etramethylindotricarbocyanine iodide bis-oleate (DiR-BOA) was estimated to be higher than 100 nM at a depth of 7 mm. Calculations of the phantom's center of mass showed that the location accuracy of fDOT was about 0.7 mm. We applied a Feldkamp algorithm to reconstruct the micro-CT image. By measuring the presampled modulation transfer function with a 30 microm tungsten thread, we estimated that the micro-CT has a resolution of 5 mm(-1) when the field of view was 6.5 cm. Our results indicate the uniformity of the transaxial micro-CT image and the contrast-to-noise ratio was measured as 1.95 for a radiation dose of 1 cGy. A non-image-based method was employed for merging images from the two imaging modalities. A nude mouse with DiR-BOA, imaged ex vivo, was used to validate the feasibility of the dual-modality system.

  1. Magnification Embossed Radiography Utilizing Image-Shifting Subtraction Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akihiro Osawa,; Manabu Watanabe,; Eiichi Sato,; Hiroshi Matsukiyo,; Toshiyuki Enomoto,; Jiro Nagao,; Purkhet Abderyim,; Katsuo Aizawa,; Etsuro Tanaka,; Hidezo Mori,; Toshiaki Kawai,; Akira Ogawa,; Kiyomi Takahashi,; Shigehiro Sato,; Jun Onagawa,

    2010-03-01

    We developed an image-shifting subtraction program and carried out magnification embossed radiography (MER) utilizing single- and dual-energy subtractions. In particular, dual-energy subtraction was carried out to decrease the absorption contrast of unnecessary regions. The contrast resolution of the target region was increased by the use of subtraction software and a linear-contrast system in a flat-panel detector (FPD). The X-ray generator had a 100-μm-focus tube, and the subtractions were performed at tube voltages of 40 and 70 kV, a tube current of 0.50 mA, and an X-ray exposure time of 5.0 s. MER images with threefold magnification were obtained using the FPD with a pixel size of 48× 48 μm2, and the shifting dimensions of the imaged object in the horizontal and vertical directions ranged from 48 to 192 μm. At a shifting distance ranging from 48 to 144 μm, the spatial resolutions in the horizontal and vertical directions measured with a lead test chart were both 50 μm. In the MER of nonliving animals, we obtained high-contrast embossed images of fine bones, gadolinium oxide particles in blood vessels, and iodine-based microspheres in coronary arteries of approximately 100 μm diameter.

  2. Magnification Embossed Radiography Utilizing Image-Shifting Subtraction Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Manabu; Sato, Eiichi; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Nagao, Jiro; Abderyim, Purkhet; Aizawa, Katsuo; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ogawa, Akira; Takahashi, Kiyomi; Sato, Shigehiro; Onagawa, Jun

    2010-03-01

    We developed an image-shifting subtraction program and carried out magnification embossed radiography (MER) utilizing single- and dual-energy subtractions. In particular, dual-energy subtraction was carried out to decrease the absorption contrast of unnecessary regions. The contrast resolution of the target region was increased by the use of subtraction software and a linear-contrast system in a flat-panel detector (FPD). The X-ray generator had a 100-µm-focus tube, and the subtractions were performed at tube voltages of 40 and 70 kV, a tube current of 0.50 mA, and an X-ray exposure time of 5.0 s. MER images with threefold magnification were obtained using the FPD with a pixel size of 48×48 µm2, and the shifting dimensions of the imaged object in the horizontal and vertical directions ranged from 48 to 192 µm. At a shifting distance ranging from 48 to 144 µm, the spatial resolutions in the horizontal and vertical directions measured with a lead test chart were both 50 µm. In the MER of nonliving animals, we obtained high-contrast embossed images of fine bones, gadolinium oxide particles in blood vessels, and iodine-based microspheres in coronary arteries of approximately 100 µm diameter.

  3. Incorporation of prior knowledge for region of change imaging from sparse scan data in image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Stayman, J. W.; Otake, Y.; Schafer, S.; Zbijewski, W.; Khanna, A. J.; Prince, J. L.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-02-01

    This paper proposes to utilize a patient-specific prior to augment intraoperative sparse-scan data to accurately reconstruct the aspects of the region that have changed by a surgical procedure in image-guided surgeries. When anatomical changes are introduced by a surgical procedure, only a sparse set of x-ray images are acquired, and the prior volume is registered to these data. Since all the information of the patient anatomy except for the surgical change is already known from the prior volume, we highlight only the change by creating difference images between the new scan and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) computed from the registered prior volume. The region of change (RoC) is reconstructed from these sparse difference images by a penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction method regularized by a compressed sensing penalty. When the surgical changes are local and relatively small, the RoC reconstruction involves only a small volume size and a small number of projections, allowing much faster computation and lower radiation dose than is needed to reconstruct the entire surgical volume. The reconstructed RoC merges with the prior volume to visualize an updated surgical field. We apply this novel approach to sacroplasty phantom data obtained from a conebeam CT (CBCT) test bench and vertebroplasty data with a fresh cadaver acquired from a C-arm CBCT system with a flat-panel detector (FPD).

  4. Grating-based phase contrast tomosynthesis imaging: Proof-of-concept experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ke; Ge, Yongshuai; Garrett, John; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: This paper concerns the feasibility of x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) tomosynthesis imaging using a grating-based DPC benchtop experimental system, which is equipped with a commercial digital flat-panel detector and a medical-grade rotating-anode x-ray tube. An extensive system characterization was performed to quantify its imaging performance. Methods: The major components of the benchtop system include a diagnostic x-ray tube with a 1.0 mm nominal focal spot size, a flat-panel detector with 96 μm pixel pitch, a sample stage that rotates within a limited angular span of ±30°, and a Talbot-Lau interferometer with three x-ray gratings. A total of 21 projection views acquired with 3° increments were used to reconstruct three sets of tomosynthetic image volumes, including the conventional absorption contrast tomosynthesis image volume (AC-tomo) reconstructed using the filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm with the ramp kernel, the phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (PC-tomo) reconstructed using FBP with a Hilbert kernel, and the differential phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (DPC-tomo) reconstructed using the shift-and-add algorithm. Three inhouse physical phantoms containing tissue-surrogate materials were used to characterize the signal linearity, the signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the three-dimensional noise power spectrum (3D NPS), and the through-plane artifact spread function (ASF). Results: While DPC-tomo highlights edges and interfaces in the image object, PC-tomo removes the differential nature of the DPC projection data and its pixel values are linearly related to the decrement of the real part of the x-ray refractive index. The SDNR values of polyoxymethylene in water and polystyrene in oil are 1.5 and 1.0, respectively, in AC-tomo, and the values were improved to 3.0 and 2.0, respectively, in PC-tomo. PC-tomo and AC-tomo demonstrate equivalent ASF, but their noise characteristics quantified by the 3D NPS

  5. Improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images: preliminary study for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Sakuta, Keita; Kawashima, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    The bone suppression technique based on advanced image processing can suppress the conspicuity of bones on chest radiographs, creating soft tissue images obtained by the dual-energy subtraction technique. This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of bone suppression image processing in image-guided radiation therapy. We demonstrated the improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images. Chest fluoroscopic images of nine patients with lung nodules during respiration were obtained using a flat-panel detector system (120 kV, 0.1 mAs/pulse, 5 fps). Commercial bone suppression image processing software was applied to the fluoroscopic images to create corresponding bone suppression images. Regions of interest were manually located on lung nodules and automatic target tracking was conducted based on the template matching technique. To evaluate the accuracy of target tracking, the maximum tracking error in the resulting images was compared with that of conventional fluoroscopic images. The tracking errors were decreased by half in eight of nine cases. The average maximum tracking errors in bone suppression and conventional fluoroscopic images were 1.3   ±   1.0 and 3.3   ±   3.3 mm, respectively. The bone suppression technique was especially effective in the lower lung area where pulmonary vessels, bronchi, and ribs showed complex movements. The bone suppression technique improved tracking accuracy without special equipment and implantation of fiducial markers, and with only additional small dose to the patient. Bone suppression fluoroscopy is a potential measure for respiratory displacement of the target. This paper was presented at RSNA 2013 and was carried out at Kanazawa University, JAPAN.

  6. Improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images: preliminary study for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Sakuta, Keita; Kawashima, Hiroki

    2015-05-21

    The bone suppression technique based on advanced image processing can suppress the conspicuity of bones on chest radiographs, creating soft tissue images obtained by the dual-energy subtraction technique. This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of bone suppression image processing in image-guided radiation therapy. We demonstrated the improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images. Chest fluoroscopic images of nine patients with lung nodules during respiration were obtained using a flat-panel detector system (120 kV, 0.1 mAs/pulse, 5 fps). Commercial bone suppression image processing software was applied to the fluoroscopic images to create corresponding bone suppression images. Regions of interest were manually located on lung nodules and automatic target tracking was conducted based on the template matching technique. To evaluate the accuracy of target tracking, the maximum tracking error in the resulting images was compared with that of conventional fluoroscopic images. The tracking errors were decreased by half in eight of nine cases. The average maximum tracking errors in bone suppression and conventional fluoroscopic images were 1.3 ± 1.0 and 3.3 ± 3.3 mm, respectively. The bone suppression technique was especially effective in the lower lung area where pulmonary vessels, bronchi, and ribs showed complex movements. The bone suppression technique improved tracking accuracy without special equipment and implantation of fiducial markers, and with only additional small dose to the patient. Bone suppression fluoroscopy is a potential measure for respiratory displacement of the target.

  7. A novel method and workflow for stereotactic surgery with a mobile intraoperative CT imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Senhu; Clinthorne, Neal

    2015-03-01

    xCAT®, (Xoran Technologies, LLC., Ann Arbor, MI) is a CT imaging device that has been used for minimally invasive surgeries. Designed with flat panel and cone-beam imaging technique, it provides a fast, low-dose CT imaging alternative for diagnosis and examination purposes at hospitals. With its unique compact and mobile characteristics, it allows scanning inside crowded operating rooms (OR). The xCAT allows acquisition of images in the OR that show the most recent morphology during the procedure. This can potentially improve outcomes of surgical procedures such as deep brain stimulation (DBS) and other neurosurgeries, since brain displacement and deformation (brain shift) often occur between pre-operative imaging and electrode placement during surgery. However, the small gantry size of the compact scanner obstructs scanning of patients with stereotactic frames or skull clamp. In this study, we explored a novel method, in which we first utilized the xCAT to obtain CT images with fiducial markers, registered the stereotactic frame with those markers, and finally, target measurements were calculated and set up on the frame. The new procedure workflow provides a means to use CT images obtained inside of OR for stereotactic surgery and can be used in current intraoperative settings. Our phantom validation study in lab shows that the procedure workflow with this method is easy to conduct.

  8. Flattening filter removal for improved image quality of megavoltage fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, James D.; Kirichenko, Alexander; Gayou, Olivier

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Removal of the linear accelerator (linac) flattening filter enables a high rate of dose deposition with reduced treatment time. When used for megavoltage imaging, an unflat beam has reduced primary beam scatter resulting in sharper images. In fluoroscopic imaging mode, the unflat beam has higher photon count per image frame yielding higher contrast-to-noise ratio. The authors’ goal was to quantify the effects of an unflat beam on the image quality of megavoltage portal and fluoroscopic images.Methods: 6 MV projection images were acquired in fluoroscopic and portal modes using an electronic flat-panel imager. The effects of the flattening filter on the relative modulation transfer function (MTF) and contrast-to-noise ratio were quantified using the QC3 phantom. The impact of FF removal on the contrast-to-noise ratio of gold fiducial markers also was studied under various scatter conditions.Results: The unflat beam had improved contrast resolution, up to 40% increase in MTF contrast at the highest frequency measured (0.75 line pairs/mm). The contrast-to-noise ratio was increased as expected from the increased photon flux. The visualization of fiducial markers was markedly better using the unflat beam under all scatter conditions, enabling visualization of thin gold fiducial markers, the thinnest of which was not visible using the unflat beam.Conclusions: The removal of the flattening filter from a clinical linac leads to quantifiable improvements in the image quality of megavoltage projection images. These gains enable observers to more easily visualize thin fiducial markers and track their motion on fluoroscopic images.

  9. Image

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Amber; Harsch, Tim; Pitt, Julie; Firpo, Mike; Lekin, April; Pardes, Elizabeth

    2007-08-31

    The computer side of the IMAGE project consists of a collection of Perl scripts that perform a variety of tasks; scripts are available to insert, update and delete data from the underlying Oracle database, download data from NCBI's Genbank and other sources, and generate data files for download by interested parties. Web scripts make up the tracking interface, and various tools available on the project web-site (image.llnl.gov) that provide a search interface to the database.

  10. Comparison of different phantoms used in digital diagnostic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bor, Dogan; Unal, Elif; Uslu, Anil

    2015-09-01

    The organs of extremity, chest, skull and lumbar were physically simulated using uniform PMMA slabs with different thicknesses alone and using these slabs together with aluminum plates and air gaps (ANSI Phantoms). The variation of entrance surface air kerma and scatter fraction with X-ray beam qualities was investigated for these phantoms and the results were compared with those measured from anthropomorphic phantoms. A flat panel digital radiographic system was used for all the experiments. Considerable variations of entrance surface air kermas were found for the same organs of different designs, and highest doses were measured for the PMMA slabs. A low contrast test tool and a contrast detail test object (CDRAD) were used together with each organ simulation of PMMA slabs and ANSI phantoms in order to test the clinical image qualities. Digital images of these phantom combinations and anthropomorphic phantoms were acquired in raw and clinically processed formats. Variation of image quality with kVp and post processing was evaluated using the numerical metrics of these test tools and measured contrast values from the anthropomorphic phantoms. Our results indicated that design of some phantoms may not be efficient enough to reveal the expected performance of the post processing algorithms.

  11. Embossed radiography utilizing an image-shifting subtraction program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Osawa, Akihiro; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Takahashi, Kiyomi; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2010-07-01

    We developed an image-shifting subtraction program and carried out embossed radiography (ER) utilizing single- and dual-energy subtractions. In particular, dual-energy subtraction was carried out to decrease the absorption contrast of unnecessary regions. The contrast resolution of a target region was increased using the subtraction program and a linear-contrast system in a flat panel detector (FPD). The X-ray generator had a 100 μm-focus tube, and the subtractions were performed at tube voltages of 40 and 70 kV, a tube current of 0.50 mA, and an X-ray exposure time of 5.0 s. ER was achieved with cohesion imaging using the FPD with pixel sizes of 48×48 μm 2, and the shifting dimension of an object in the horizontal and vertical directions ranged from 48 to 96 μm. At a shifting distance of 96 μm, the spatial resolutions in the horizontal and vertical directions measured with a lead test chart were both 83 μm. In ER of animal phantoms, we obtained high-contrast embossed images of fine bones, gadolinium oxide particles in blood vessels, iodine-based microspheres in coronary arteries approximately 100 μm in diameter.

  12. Automated localization of implanted seeds in 3D TRUS images used for prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Zhouping; Gardi, Lori; Downey, Donal B.; Fenster, Aaron

    2006-07-15

    An algorithm has been developed in this paper to localize implanted radioactive seeds in 3D ultrasound images for a dynamic intraoperative brachytherapy procedure. Segmentation of the seeds is difficult, due to their small size in relatively low quality of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images. In this paper, intraoperative seed segmentation in 3D TRUS images is achieved by performing a subtraction of the image before the needle has been inserted, and the image after the seeds have been implanted. The seeds are searched in a 'local' space determined by the needle position and orientation information, which are obtained from a needle segmentation algorithm. To test this approach, 3D TRUS images of the agar and chicken tissue phantoms were obtained. Within these phantoms, dummy seeds were implanted. The seed locations determined by the seed segmentation algorithm were compared with those obtained from a volumetric cone-beam flat-panel micro-CT scanner and human observers. Evaluation of the algorithm showed that the rms error in determining the seed locations using the seed segmentation algorithm was 0.98 mm in agar phantoms and 1.02 mm in chicken phantoms.

  13. Precise image-guided irradiation of small animals: a flexible non-profit platform.

    PubMed

    Tillner, Falk; Thute, Prasad; Löck, Steffen; Dietrich, Antje; Fursov, Andriy; Haase, Robert; Lukas, Mathias; Rimarzig, Bernd; Sobiella, Manfred; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael; Bütof, Rebecca; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2016-04-21

    Preclinical in vivo studies using small animals are essential to develop new therapeutic options in radiation oncology. Of particular interest are orthotopic tumour models, which better reflect the clinical situation in terms of growth patterns and microenvironmental parameters of the tumour as well as the interplay of tumours with the surrounding normal tissues. Such orthotopic models increase the technical demands and the complexity of preclinical studies as local irradiation with therapeutically relevant doses requires image-guided target localisation and accurate beam application. Moreover, advanced imaging techniques are needed for monitoring treatment outcome. We present a novel small animal image-guided radiation therapy (SAIGRT) system, which allows for precise and accurate, conformal irradiation and x-ray imaging of small animals. High accuracy is achieved by its robust construction, the precise movement of its components and a fast high-resolution flat-panel detector. Field forming and x-ray imaging is accomplished close to the animal resulting in a small penumbra and a high image quality. Feasibility for irradiating orthotopic models has been proven using lung tumour and glioblastoma models in mice. The SAIGRT system provides a flexible, non-profit academic research platform which can be adapted to specific experimental needs and therefore enables systematic preclinical trials in multicentre research networks.

  14. Precise image-guided irradiation of small animals: a flexible non-profit platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillner, Falk; Thute, Prasad; Löck, Steffen; Dietrich, Antje; Fursov, Andriy; Haase, Robert; Lukas, Mathias; Rimarzig, Bernd; Sobiella, Manfred; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael; Bütof, Rebecca; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Preclinical in vivo studies using small animals are essential to develop new therapeutic options in radiation oncology. Of particular interest are orthotopic tumour models, which better reflect the clinical situation in terms of growth patterns and microenvironmental parameters of the tumour as well as the interplay of tumours with the surrounding normal tissues. Such orthotopic models increase the technical demands and the complexity of preclinical studies as local irradiation with therapeutically relevant doses requires image-guided target localisation and accurate beam application. Moreover, advanced imaging techniques are needed for monitoring treatment outcome. We present a novel small animal image-guided radiation therapy (SAIGRT) system, which allows for precise and accurate, conformal irradiation and x-ray imaging of small animals. High accuracy is achieved by its robust construction, the precise movement of its components and a fast high-resolution flat-panel detector. Field forming and x-ray imaging is accomplished close to the animal resulting in a small penumbra and a high image quality. Feasibility for irradiating orthotopic models has been proven using lung tumour and glioblastoma models in mice. The SAIGRT system provides a flexible, non-profit academic research platform which can be adapted to specific experimental needs and therefore enables systematic preclinical trials in multicentre research networks.

  15. Feasibility of using energy-resolving detectors in differential phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, Pavlo

    2016-03-01

    In a common clinical setting, conventional absorption-based imaging provides relatively good contrast between bonelike and soft-tissue materials. The reliability of material differentiation, however, is hampered when materials with similar absorption properties are scanned. This problem can be addressed by utilizing a spectral imaging technique whereby multiple X-ray measurements are taken at different beam conditions. In this work, we discuss the possibility of using a spectral imaging approach in a grating-based, differential-phase contrast-imaging (DPCI) modality. Two approaches, dual exposure with a conventional flat-panel detector (FPD) and a single exposure with a photon-counting energy-resolving detector (PCD), were reviewed. The feasibility of a single-exposure DPCI and a two-bin PCD setup was assessed quantitatively by a least-squares minimization algorithm applied to an X-ray diffraction pattern. It was shown that a two-peak-shaped X-ray spectrum can allow PCDs to be placed unambiguously at single Talbot distances making it possible to simultaneously detect photons in each energy bin with comparable efficiencies. The results of this work can help build a bridge between two rapidly developing imaging modalities, X-ray spectral imaging and X-ray DPCI.

  16. From synchrotron radiation to lab source: advanced speckle-based X-ray imaging using abrasive paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-02-01

    X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques provide complementary and inaccessible information compared to conventional X-ray absorption or visible light imaging. However, such methods typically require sophisticated experimental apparatus or X-ray beams with specific properties. Recently, an X-ray speckle-based technique has shown great potential for X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a simple experimental arrangement. However, it still suffers from either poor resolution or the time consuming process of collecting a large number of images. To overcome these limitations, in this report we demonstrate that absorption, dark-field, phase contrast, and two orthogonal differential phase contrast images can simultaneously be generated by scanning a piece of abrasive paper in only one direction. We propose a novel theoretical approach to quantitatively extract the above five images by utilising the remarkable properties of speckles. Importantly, the technique has been extended from a synchrotron light source to utilise a lab-based microfocus X-ray source and flat panel detector. Removing the need to raster the optics in two directions significantly reduces the acquisition time and absorbed dose, which can be of vital importance for many biological samples. This new imaging method could potentially provide a breakthrough for numerous practical imaging applications in biomedical research and materials science.

  17. From synchrotron radiation to lab source: advanced speckle-based X-ray imaging using abrasive paper

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques provide complementary and inaccessible information compared to conventional X-ray absorption or visible light imaging. However, such methods typically require sophisticated experimental apparatus or X-ray beams with specific properties. Recently, an X-ray speckle-based technique has shown great potential for X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a simple experimental arrangement. However, it still suffers from either poor resolution or the time consuming process of collecting a large number of images. To overcome these limitations, in this report we demonstrate that absorption, dark-field, phase contrast, and two orthogonal differential phase contrast images can simultaneously be generated by scanning a piece of abrasive paper in only one direction. We propose a novel theoretical approach to quantitatively extract the above five images by utilising the remarkable properties of speckles. Importantly, the technique has been extended from a synchrotron light source to utilise a lab-based microfocus X-ray source and flat panel detector. Removing the need to raster the optics in two directions significantly reduces the acquisition time and absorbed dose, which can be of vital importance for many biological samples. This new imaging method could potentially provide a breakthrough for numerous practical imaging applications in biomedical research and materials science. PMID:26847921

  18. Breast density measurement: 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images versus 2D digital mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Lai, Chao-Jen; Chen, Lingyun; Liu, Xinming; Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Ge, Shuaiping; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Yang, Wei T.; Shaw, Chris C.

    2009-02-01

    Breast density has been recognized as one of the major risk factors for breast cancer. However, breast density is currently estimated using mammograms which are intrinsically 2D in nature and cannot accurately represent the real breast anatomy. In this study, a novel technique for measuring breast density based on the segmentation of 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) images was developed and the results were compared to those obtained from 2D digital mammograms. 16 mastectomy breast specimens were imaged with a bench top flat-panel based CBCT system. The reconstructed 3D CT images were corrected for the cupping artifacts and then filtered to reduce the noise level, followed by using threshold-based segmentation to separate the dense tissue from the adipose tissue. For each breast specimen, volumes of the dense tissue structures and the entire breast were computed and used to calculate the volumetric breast density. BI-RADS categories were derived from the measured breast densities and compared with those estimated from conventional digital mammograms. The results show that in 10 of 16 cases the BI-RADS categories derived from the CBCT images were lower than those derived from the mammograms by one category. Thus, breasts considered as dense in mammographic examinations may not be considered as dense with the CBCT images. This result indicates that the relation between breast cancer risk and true (volumetric) breast density needs to be further investigated.

  19. Chord-based image reconstruction in cone-beam CT with a curved detector

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo Nianming; Xia Dan; Zou Yu; Jiang Tianzi; Pan Xiaochuan

    2006-10-15

    Modern computed tomography (CT) scanners use cone-beam configurations for increasing volume coverage, improving x-ray-tube utilization, and yielding isotropic spatial resolution. Recently, there have been significant developments in theory and algorithms for exact image reconstruction from cone-beam projections. In particular, algorithms have been proposed for image reconstruction on chords; and advantages over the existing algorithms offered by the chord-based algorithms include the high flexibility of exact image reconstruction for general scanning trajectories and the capability of exact reconstruction of images within a region of interest from truncated data. These chord-based algorithms have been developed only for flat-panel detectors. Many cone-beam CT scanners employ curved detectors for important practical considerations. Therefore, in this work, we have derived chord-based algorithms for a curved detector so that they can be applied to reconstructing images directly from data acquired by use of a CT scanner with a curved detector. We have also conducted preliminary numerical studies to demonstrate and evaluate the reconstruction properties of the derived chord-based algorithms for curved detectors.

  20. Image guidance quality assurance of a G4 CyberKnife robotic stereotactic radiosurgery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelis, E.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Antypas, C.

    2009-05-01

    The image guidance of a CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery system was quality controlled, including the overall performance of the target locating subsystem and the performance of the x-ray generators and flat panel digital cameras subcomponents. Accuracy and precision of the kV and exposure time settings of the x-ray generators, linearity of the x-ray output, spatial resolution and geometrical distortion of the acquired x-ray images were measured. Total accuracy and precision of the target locating subsystem in defining the position of an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom placed on treatment couch was also measured. Accuracy and precision of the kV as well as exposure time settings and linearity of the x-ray output were found within the acceptance limits suggested in diagnostic radiology. The acquired x-ray images were found to depict the shapes of the imaging objects without any geometrical distortion, being able to resolve differences in the features of imaging objects with critical frequency of 1.3 lp/mm and 1.5 lp/mm for camera A and B, respectively. Total target locating system accuracy was found within 0.2 mm and 0.2° in translations and rotations, respectively. Corresponding precision was found lower than 0.5%. These findings render the target locating subsystem of the CyberKnife capable of accurately registering the patient to treatment position and monitoring patient's movement during treatment delivery.

  1. Detector system comparison using relative CNR for specific imaging tasks related to neuro-endovascular image-guided interventions (neuro-EIGIs)

    PubMed Central

    Loughran, Brendan; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Singh, Vivek; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Neuro-EIGIs require visualization of very small endovascular devices and small vessels. A Microangiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) x-ray detector was developed to improve on the standard flat panel detector’s (FPD’s) ability to visualize small objects during neuro-EIGIs. To compare the performance of FPD and MAF imaging systems, specific imaging tasks related to those encountered during neuro-EIGIs were used to assess contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of different objects. A bar phantom and a stent were placed at a fixed distance from the x-ray focal spot to mimic a clinical imaging geometry and both objects were imaged by each detector system. Imaging was done without anti-scatter grids and using the same conditions for each system including: the same x-ray beam quality, collimator position, source to imager distance (SID), and source to object distance (SOD). For each object, relative contrasts were found for both imaging systems using the peak and trough signals. The relative noise was found using mean background signal and background noise for varying detector exposures. Next, the CNRs were found for these values for each object imaged and for each imaging system used. A relative CNR metric is defined and used to compare detector imaging performance. The MAF utilizes a temporal filter to reduce the overall image noise. The effects of using this filter with the MAF while imaging the clinical object’s CNRs are reported. The relative CNR for the detectors demonstrated that the MAF has superior CNRs for most objects and exposures investigated for this specific imaging task. PMID:25301999

  2. A study of the x-ray image quality improvement in the examination of the respiratory system based on the new image processing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Yuichi; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Torii, Jun; Iwase, Takumi; Aso, Tomohiko; Ihara, Kanyu; Fujikawa, Mari; Takeuchi, Yumiko; Suzuki, Katsumi; Ishiguro, Takashi; Hara, Akio

    2014-03-01

    Recently, the double contrast technique in a gastrointestinal examination and the transbronchial lung biopsy in an examination for the respiratory system [1-3] have made a remarkable progress. Especially in the transbronchial lung biopsy, better quality of x-ray fluoroscopic images is requested because this examination is performed under a guidance of x-ray fluoroscopic images. On the other hand, various image processing methods [4] for x-ray fluoroscopic images have been developed as an x-ray system with a flat panel detector [5-7] is widely used. A recursive filtering is an effective method to reduce a random noise in x-ray fluoroscopic images. However it has a limitation for its effectiveness of a noise reduction in case of a moving object exists in x-ray fluoroscopic images because the recursive filtering is a noise reduction method by adding last few images. After recursive filtering a residual signal was produced if a moving object existed in x-ray images, and this residual signal disturbed a smooth procedure of the examinations. To improve this situation, new noise reduction method has been developed. The Adaptive Noise Reduction [ANR] is the brand-new noise reduction technique which can be reduced only a noise regardless of the moving object in x-ray fluoroscopic images. Therefore the ANR is a very suitable noise reduction method for the transbronchial lung biopsy under a guidance of x-ray fluoroscopic images because the residual signal caused of the moving object in x-ray fluoroscopic images is never produced after the ANR. In this paper, we will explain an advantage of the ANR by comparing of a performance between the ANR images and the conventional recursive filtering images.

  3. Detector system comparison using relative CNR for specific imaging tasks related to neuro-endovascular image-guided interventions (neuro-EIGIs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughran, Brendan; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Singh, Vivek; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Neuro-EIGIs require visualization of very small endovascular devices and small vessels. A Microangiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) x-ray detector was developed to improve on the standard flat panel detector's (FPD's) ability to visualize small objects during neuro-EIGIs. To compare the performance of FPD and MAF imaging systems, specific imaging tasks related to those encountered during neuro-EIGIs were used to assess contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of different objects. A bar phantom and a stent were placed at a fixed distance from the x-ray focal spot to mimic a clinical imaging geometry and both objects were imaged by each detector system. Imaging was done without anti-scatter grids and using the same conditions for each system including: the same x-ray beam quality, collimator position, source to imager distance (SID), and source to object distance (SOD). For each object, relative contrasts were found for both imaging systems using the peak and trough signals. The relative noise was found using mean background signal and background noise for varying detector exposures. Next, the CNRs were found for these values for each object imaged and for each imaging system used. A relative CNR metric is defined and used to compare detector imaging performance. The MAF utilizes a temporal filter to reduce the overall image noise. The effects of using this filter with the MAF while imaging the clinical object's CNRs are reported. The relative CNR for the detectors demonstrated that the MAF has superior CNRs for most objects and exposures investigated for this specific imaging task.

  4. Region-of-interest image reconstruction with intensity weighting in circular cone-beam CT for image-guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seungryong; Pearson, Erik; Pelizzari, Charles A; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2009-04-01

    Imaging plays a vital role in radiation therapy and with recent advances in technology considerable emphasis has been placed on cone-beam CT (CBCT). Attaching a kV x-ray source and a flat panel detector directly to the linear accelerator gantry has enabled progress in target localization techniques, which can include daily CBCT setup scans for some treatments. However, with an increasing number of CT scans there is also an increasing concern for patient exposure. An intensity-weighted region-of-interest (IWROI) technique, which has the potential to greatly reduce CBCT dose, in conjunction with the chord-based backprojection-filtration (BPF) reconstruction algorithm, has been developed and its feasibility in clinical use is demonstrated in this article. A nonuniform filter is placed in the x-ray beam to create regions of two different beam intensities. In this manner, regions outside the target area can be given a reduced dose but still visualized with a lower contrast to noise ratio. Image artifacts due to transverse data truncation, which would have occurred in conventional reconstruction algorithms, are avoided and image noise levels of the low- and high-intensity regions are well controlled by use of the chord-based BPF reconstruction algorithm. The proposed IWROI technique can play an important role in image-guided radiation therapy. PMID:19472624

  5. Region-of-interest image reconstruction with intensity weighting in circular cone-beam CT for image-guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Seungryong; Pearson, Erik; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Pan Xiaochuan

    2009-04-15

    Imaging plays a vital role in radiation therapy and with recent advances in technology considerable emphasis has been placed on cone-beam CT (CBCT). Attaching a kV x-ray source and a flat panel detector directly to the linear accelerator gantry has enabled progress in target localization techniques, which can include daily CBCT setup scans for some treatments. However, with an increasing number of CT scans there is also an increasing concern for patient exposure. An intensity-weighted region-of-interest (IWROI) technique, which has the potential to greatly reduce CBCT dose, in conjunction with the chord-based backprojection-filtration (BPF) reconstruction algorithm, has been developed and its feasibility in clinical use is demonstrated in this article. A nonuniform filter is placed in the x-ray beam to create regions of two different beam intensities. In this manner, regions outside the target area can be given a reduced dose but still visualized with a lower contrast to noise ratio. Image artifacts due to transverse data truncation, which would have occurred in conventional reconstruction algorithms, are avoided and image noise levels of the low- and high-intensity regions are well controlled by use of the chord-based BPF reconstruction algorithm. The proposed IWROI technique can play an important role in image-guided radiation therapy.

  6. The x-ray light valve: A potentially low-cost, digital radiographic imaging system-concept and implementation considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, Christie Ann; Koprinarov, Ivaylo; Germann, Stephen; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-03-15

    New x-ray radiographic systems based on large-area flat-panel technology have revolutionized our capability to produce digital x-ray images. However, these imagers are extraordinarily expensive compared to the systems they are replacing. Hence, there is a need for a low-cost digital imaging system for general applications in radiology. A novel potentially low-cost radiographic imaging system based on established technologies is proposed--the X-Ray Light Valve (XLV). This is a potentially high-quality digital x-ray detector made of a photoconducting layer and a liquid-crystal cell, physically coupled in a sandwich structure. Upon exposure to x rays, charge is collected on the surface of the photoconductor. This causes a change in the optical properties of the liquid-crystal cell and a visible image is generated. Subsequently, it is digitized by a scanned optical imager. The image formation is based on controlled modulation of light from an external source. The operation and practical implementation of the XLV system are described. The potential performance of the complete system and issues related to sensitivity, spatial resolution, noise, and speed are discussed. The feasibility of clinical use of an XLV device based on amorphous selenium (a-Se) as the photoconductor and a reflective electrically controlled birefringence cell is analyzed. The results of our analysis indicate that the XLV can potentially be adapted to a wide variety of radiographic tasks.

  7. Dual-gate photo thin-film transistor: a “smart” pixel for high- resolution and low-dose X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Ou, Hai; Chen, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Since its emergence a decade ago, amorphous silicon flat panel X-ray detector has established itself as a ubiquitous platform for an array of digital radiography modalities. The fundamental building block of a flat panel detector is called a pixel. In all current pixel architectures, sensing, storage, and readout are unanimously kept separate, inevitably compromising resolution by increasing pixel size. To address this issue, we hereby propose a “smart” pixel architecture where the aforementioned three components are combined in a single dual-gate photo thin-film transistor (TFT). In other words, the dual-gate photo TFT itself functions as a sensor, a storage capacitor, and a switch concurrently. Additionally, by harnessing the amplification effect of such a thin-film transistor, we for the first time created a single-transistor active pixel sensor. The proof-of-concept device had a W/L ratio of 250μm/20μm and was fabricated using a simple five-mask photolithography process, where a 130nm transparent ITO was used as the top photo gate, and a 200nm amorphous silicon as the absorbing channel layer. The preliminary results demonstrated that the photocurrent had been increased by four orders of magnitude due to light-induced threshold voltage shift in the sub-threshold region. The device sensitivity could be simply tuned by photo gate bias to specifically target low-level light detection. The dependence of threshold voltage on light illumination indicated that a dynamic range of at least 80dB could be achieved. The "smart" pixel technology holds tremendous promise for developing high-resolution and low-dose X-ray imaging and may potentially lower the cancer risk imposed by radiation, especially among paediatric patients.

  8. Characterization of image quality and image-guidance performance of a preclinical microirradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, R.; Lindsay, P. E.; Ansell, S.; Wilson, G.; Jelveh, S.; Hill, R. P.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To assess image quality and image-guidance capabilities of a cone-beam CT based small-animal image-guided irradiation unit (micro-IGRT). Methods: A micro-IGRT system has been developed in collaboration with the authors' laboratory as a means to study the radiobiological effects of conformal radiation dose distributions in small animals. The system, the X-Rad 225Cx, consists of a 225 kVp x-ray tube and a flat-panel amorphous silicon detector mounted on a rotational C-arm gantry and is capable of both fluoroscopic x-ray and cone-beam CT imaging, as well as image-guided placement of the radiation beams. Image quality (voxel noise, modulation transfer, CT number accuracy, and geometric accuracy characteristics) was assessed using water cylinder and micro-CT test phantoms. Image guidance was tested by analyzing the dose delivered to radiochromic films fixed to BB's through the end-to-end process of imaging, targeting the center of the BB, and irradiation of the film/BB in order to compare the offset between the center of the field and the center of the BB. Image quality and geometric studies were repeated over a 5-7 month period to assess stability. Results: CT numbers reported were found to be linear (R{sup 2}{>=}0.998) and the noise for images of homogeneous water phantom was 30 HU at imaging doses of approximately 1 cGy (to water). The presampled MTF at 50% and 10% reached 0.64 and 1.35 mm{sup -1}, respectively. Targeting accuracy by means of film irradiations was shown to have a mean displacement error of [{Delta}x,{Delta}y,{Delta}z]=[-0.12,-0.05,-0.02] mm, with standard deviations of [0.02, 0.20, 0.17] mm. The system has proven to be stable over time, with both the image quality and image-guidance performance being reproducible for the duration of the studies. Conclusions: The micro-IGRT unit provides soft-tissue imaging of small-animal anatomy at acceptable imaging doses ({<=}1 cGy). The geometric accuracy and targeting systems permit dose placement with

  9. Characterization of image quality and image-guidance performance of a preclinical microirradiator

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, R.; Lindsay, P. E.; Ansell, S.; Wilson, G.; Jelveh, S.; Hill, R. P.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess image quality and image-guidance capabilities of a cone-beam CT based small-animal image-guided irradiation unit (micro-IGRT). Methods: A micro-IGRT system has been developed in collaboration with the authors’ laboratory as a means to study the radiobiological effects of conformal radiation dose distributions in small animals. The system, the X-Rad 225Cx, consists of a 225 kVp x-ray tube and a flat-panel amorphous silicon detector mounted on a rotational C-arm gantry and is capable of both fluoroscopic x-ray and cone-beam CT imaging, as well as image-guided placement of the radiation beams. Image quality (voxel noise, modulation transfer, CT number accuracy, and geometric accuracy characteristics) was assessed using water cylinder and micro-CT test phantoms. Image guidance was tested by analyzing the dose delivered to radiochromic films fixed to BB’s through the end-to-end process of imaging, targeting the center of the BB, and irradiation of the film∕BB in order to compare the offset between the center of the field and the center of the BB. Image quality and geometric studies were repeated over a 5–7 month period to assess stability. Results: CT numbers reported were found to be linear (R2≥0.998) and the noise for images of homogeneous water phantom was 30 HU at imaging doses of approximately 1 cGy (to water). The presampled MTF at 50% and 10% reached 0.64 and 1.35 mm−1, respectively. Targeting accuracy by means of film irradiations was shown to have a mean displacement error of [Δx,Δy,Δz]=[−0.12,−0.05,−0.02] mm, with standard deviations of [0.02, 0.20, 0.17] mm. The system has proven to be stable over time, with both the image quality and image-guidance performance being reproducible for the duration of the studies. Conclusions: The micro-IGRT unit provides soft-tissue imaging of small-animal anatomy at acceptable imaging doses (≤1 cGy). The geometric accuracy and targeting systems permit dose placement with submillimeter

  10. Imaging acquisition display performance: an evaluation and discussion of performance metrics and procedures.

    PubMed

    Silosky, Michael S; Marsh, Rebecca M; Scherzinger, Ann L

    2016-07-08

    When The Joint Commission updated its Requirements for Diagnostic Imaging Services for hospitals and ambulatory care facilities on July 1, 2015, among the new requirements was an annual performance evaluation for acquisition workstation displays. The purpose of this work was to evaluate a large cohort of acquisition displays used in a clinical environment and compare the results with existing performance standards provided by the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). Measurements of the minimum luminance, maximum luminance, and luminance uniformity, were performed on 42 acquisition displays across multiple imaging modalities. The mean values, standard deviations, and ranges were calculated for these metrics. Additionally, visual evaluations of contrast, spatial resolution, and distortion were performed using either the Society of Motion Pictures and Television Engineers test pattern or the TG-18-QC test pattern. Finally, an evaluation of local nonuniformities was performed using either a uniform white display or the TG-18-UN80 test pattern. Displays tested were flat panel, liquid crystal displays that ranged from less than 1 to up to 10 years of use and had been built by a wide variety of manufacturers. The mean values for Lmin and Lmax for the displays tested were 0.28 ± 0.13 cd/m2 and 135.07 ± 33.35 cd/m2, respectively. The mean maximum luminance deviation for both ultrasound and non-ultrasound displays was 12.61% ± 4.85% and 14.47% ± 5.36%, respectively. Visual evaluation of display performance varied depending on several factors including brightness and contrast settings and the test pattern used for image quality assessment. This work provides a snapshot of the performance of 42 acquisition displays across several imaging modalities in clinical use at a large medical center. Comparison with existing performance standards reveals that changes in display technology and the move from cathode ray

  11. Imaging acquisition display performance: an evaluation and discussion of performance metrics and procedures.

    PubMed

    Silosky, Michael S; Marsh, Rebecca M; Scherzinger, Ann L

    2016-01-01

    When The Joint Commission updated its Requirements for Diagnostic Imaging Services for hospitals and ambulatory care facilities on July 1, 2015, among the new requirements was an annual performance evaluation for acquisition workstation displays. The purpose of this work was to evaluate a large cohort of acquisition displays used in a clinical environment and compare the results with existing performance standards provided by the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). Measurements of the minimum luminance, maximum luminance, and luminance uniformity, were performed on 42 acquisition displays across multiple imaging modalities. The mean values, standard deviations, and ranges were calculated for these metrics. Additionally, visual evaluations of contrast, spatial resolution, and distortion were performed using either the Society of Motion Pictures and Television Engineers test pattern or the TG-18-QC test pattern. Finally, an evaluation of local nonuniformities was performed using either a uniform white display or the TG-18-UN80 test pattern. Displays tested were flat panel, liquid crystal displays that ranged from less than 1 to up to 10 years of use and had been built by a wide variety of manufacturers. The mean values for Lmin and Lmax for the displays tested were 0.28 ± 0.13 cd/m2 and 135.07 ± 33.35 cd/m2, respectively. The mean maximum luminance deviation for both ultrasound and non-ultrasound displays was 12.61% ± 4.85% and 14.47% ± 5.36%, respectively. Visual evaluation of display performance varied depending on several factors including brightness and contrast settings and the test pattern used for image quality assessment. This work provides a snapshot of the performance of 42 acquisition displays across several imaging modalities in clinical use at a large medical center. Comparison with existing performance standards reveals that changes in display technology and the move from cathode ray

  12. Twin robotic x-ray system for 2D radiographic and 3D cone-beam CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieselmann, Andreas; Steinbrener, Jan; Jerebko, Anna K.; Voigt, Johannes M.; Scholz, Rosemarie; Ritschl, Ludwig; Mertelmeier, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we provide an initial characterization of a novel twin robotic X-ray system. This system is equipped with two motor-driven telescopic arms carrying X-ray tube and flat-panel detector, respectively. 2D radiographs and fluoroscopic image sequences can be obtained from different viewing angles. Projection data for 3D cone-beam CT reconstruction can be acquired during simultaneous movement of the arms along dedicated scanning trajectories. We provide an initial evaluation of the 3D image quality based on phantom scans and clinical images. Furthermore, initial evaluation of patient dose is conducted. The results show that the system delivers high image quality for a range of medical applications. In particular, high spatial resolution enables adequate visualization of bone structures. This system allows 3D X-ray scanning of patients in standing and weight-bearing position. It could enable new 2D/3D imaging workflows in musculoskeletal imaging and improve diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders.

  13. X-ray light valve (XLV): a novel detectors' technology for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcovici, Sorin; Sukhovatkin, Vlad; Oakham, Peter

    2014-03-01

    A novel method, based on X-ray Light Valve (XLV) technology, is proposed for making good image quality yet inexpensive flat panel detectors for digital mammography. The digital mammography markets, particularly in the developing countries, demand quality machines at substantially lower prices than the ones available today. Continuous pressure is applied on x-ray detectors' manufacturers to reduce the flat panel detectors' prices. XLV presents a unique opportunity to achieve the needed price - performance characteristics for direct conversion, x-ray detectors. The XLV based detectors combine the proven, superior, spatial resolution of a-Se with the simplicity and low cost of liquid crystals and optical scanning. The x-ray quanta absorbed by a 200 μm a-Se produce electron - hole pairs that move under an electric field to the top and bottom of a-Se layer. This 2D charge distribution creates at the interface with the liquid crystals a continuous (analog) charge image corresponding to the impinging radiation's information. Under the influence of local electrical charges next to them, the liquid crystals twist proportionally to the charges and vary their light reflectivity. A scanning light source illuminates the liquid crystals while an associated, pixilated photo-detector, having a 42 μm pixel size, captures the light reflected by the liquid crystals and converts it in16 bit words that are transmitted to the machine for image processing and display. The paper will describe a novel XLV, 25 cm x 30 cm, flat panel detector structure and its underlying physics as well as its preliminary performance measured on several engineering prototypes. In particular, the paper will present the results of measuring XLV detectors' DQE, MTF, dynamic range, low contrast resolution and dynamic behavior. Finally, the paper will introduce the new, low cost, XLV detector based, digital mammography machine under development at XLV Diagnostics Inc.

  14. Multispectral image-fused head-tracked vision system (HTVS) for driving applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Colin E.; Bender, Edward J.

    2001-08-01

    Current military thermal driver vision systems consist of a single Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) sensor mounted on a manually operated gimbal, which is normally locked forward during driving. The sensor video imagery is presented on a large area flat panel display for direct view. The Night Vision and Electronics Sensors Directorate and Kaiser Electronics are cooperatively working to develop a driver's Head Tracked Vision System (HTVS) which directs dual waveband sensors in a more natural head-slewed imaging mode. The HTVS consists of LWIR and image intensified sensors, a high-speed gimbal, a head mounted display, and a head tracker. The first prototype systems have been delivered and have undergone preliminary field trials to characterize the operational benefits of a head tracked sensor system for tactical military ground applications. This investigation will address the advantages of head tracked vs. fixed sensor systems regarding peripheral sightings of threats, road hazards, and nearby vehicles. An additional thrust will investigate the degree to which additive (A+B) fusion of LWIR and image intensified sensors enhances overall driving performance. Typically, LWIR sensors are better for detecting threats, while image intensified sensors provide more natural scene cues, such as shadows and texture. This investigation will examine the degree to which the fusion of these two sensors enhances the driver's overall situational awareness.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of a novel water-equivalent electronic portal imaging device using plastic scintillating fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Teymurazyan, A.; Pang, G.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Most electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) developed so far use a thin Cu plate/phosphor screen to convert x-ray energies into light photons, while maintaining a high spatial resolution. This results in a low x-ray absorption and thus a low quantum efficiency (QE) of approximately 2-4% for megavoltage (MV) x-rays. A significant increase of QE is desirable for applications such as MV cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). Furthermore, the Cu plate/phosphor screen contains high atomic number (high-Z) materials, resulting in an undesirable over-response to low energy x-rays (due to photoelectric effect) as well as high energy x-rays (due to pair production) when used for dosimetric verification. Our goal is to develop a new MV x-ray detector that has a high QE and uses low-Z materials to overcome the obstacles faced by current MV x-ray imaging technologies. Methods: A new high QE and low-Z EPID is proposed. It consists of a matrix of plastic scintillating fibers embedded in a water-equivalent medium and coupled to an optically sensitive 2D active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) for image readout. It differs from the previous approach that uses segmented crystalline scintillators made of higher density and higher atomic number materials to detect MV x-rays. The plastic scintillating fibers are focused toward the x-ray source to avoid image blurring due to oblique incidence of off-axis x-rays. When MV x-rays interact with the scintillating fibers in the detector, scintillation light will be produced. The light photons produced in a fiber core and emitted within the acceptance angle of the fiber will be guided toward the AMFPI by total internal reflection. A Monte Carlo simulation has been used to investigate imaging and dosimetric characteristics of the proposed detector under irradiation of MV x-rays. Results: Properties, such as detection efficiency, modulation transfer function, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), energy dependence of detector

  16. The x-ray light valve: A low-cost, digital radiographic imaging system—Spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    MacDougall, Robert D.; Koprinarov, Ivaylo; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    An x-ray light valve (XLV) coupled with an optical scanner has the potential to meet the need for a low-cost, high quality digital imaging system for general radiography. The XLV∕scanner concept combines three well-established, and hence, low-cost technologies: An amorphous selenium (a-Se) layer as an x-ray-to-charge transducer, a liquid crystal (LC) cell as an analog display, and an optical scanner for image digitization. The XLV consists of an a-Se layer and LC cell in a sandwich structure which produces an optical image in the LC layer upon x-ray exposure. The XLV∕scanner system consists of an XLV in combination with an optical scanner for image readout. Here, the effect of each component on the spatial resolution of an XLV∕scanner system is investigated. A theoretical model of spatial resolution of an XLV is presented based on calculations of the modulation transfer function (MTF) for a-Se and a LC cell. From these component MTFs, the theoretical MTF of the XLV is derived. The model was validated by experiments on a prototype XLV∕scanner system. The MTF of the scanner alone was obtained by scanning an optical test target and the MTF of the XLV∕scanner system was measured using x rays. From the measured MTF of the scanner, the theoretical MTF of the XLV∕scanner system was established and compared with the experimental results. Good general agreement exists between experimental and theoretical results in the frequency range of interest for general radiography, although the theoretical curves slightly overstate the measured MTFs. The experimental MTF of the XLV was compared with the MTF of two clinical systems and was shown to have the capability to exceed the resolution of flat-panel detectors. From this, the authors can conclude that the XLV has an adequate resolution for general radiography. The XLV∕scanner also has the potential to eliminate aliasing while maintaining a MTF that exceeds that of a flat-panel imager. PMID:18841872

  17. The x-ray light valve: A low-cost, digital radiographic imaging system--Spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    MacDougall, Robert D.; Koprinarov, Ivaylo; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-09-15

    An x-ray light valve (XLV) coupled with an optical scanner has the potential to meet the need for a low-cost, high quality digital imaging system for general radiography. The XLV/scanner concept combines three well-established, and hence, low-cost technologies: An amorphous selenium (a-Se) layer as an x-ray-to-charge transducer, a liquid crystal (LC) cell as an analog display, and an optical scanner for image digitization. The XLV consists of an a-Se layer and LC cell in a sandwich structure which produces an optical image in the LC layer upon x-ray exposure. The XLV/scanner system consists of an XLV in combination with an optical scanner for image readout. Here, the effect of each component on the spatial resolution of an XLV/scanner system is investigated. A theoretical model of spatial resolution of an XLV is presented based on calculations of the modulation transfer function (MTF) for a-Se and a LC cell. From these component MTFs, the theoretical MTF of the XLV is derived. The model was validated by experiments on a prototype XLV/scanner system. The MTF of the scanner alone was obtained by scanning an optical test target and the MTF of the XLV/scanner system was measured using x rays. From the measured MTF of the scanner, the theoretical MTF of the XLV/scanner system was established and compared with the experimental results. Good general agreement exists between experimental and theoretical results in the frequency range of interest for general radiography, although the theoretical curves slightly overstate the measured MTFs. The experimental MTF of the XLV was compared with the MTF of two clinical systems and was shown to have the capability to exceed the resolution of flat-panel detectors. From this, the authors can conclude that the XLV has an adequate resolution for general radiography. The XLV/scanner also has the potential to eliminate aliasing while maintaining a MTF that exceeds that of a flat-panel imager.

  18. Effects of the energy-separation filter on the performance of each detector layer in the sandwich detector for single-shot dual-energy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Kim, D. W.; Kam, S.; Park, E.; Youn, H.; Kim, H. K.

    2016-02-01

    A novel sandwich-style single-shot detector has been built by stacking two indirect-conversion flat-panel detectors for preclinical dual-energy mouse imaging. Although this single-shot method is more immune to motion artifacts compared with the conventional dual-shot method (i.e., fast kVp switching), it may suffer from reduced image quality because of poor spectral separation between the two detectors. Spectral separation can be improved by using an intermediate filter between the two detector layers. Adversely, the filter reduces the number of x-ray photons reaching the rear detector, hence probably increasing image noise. For a better design and practical use of the sandwich detector for single-shot dual-energy imaging, imaging performances of each detector layer in the sandwich detector are investigated for various spectral-separation extents and applied tube voltages. The imaging performances include the modulation-transfer function, the Wiener noise-power spectrum, and the detective quantum efficiency. According to the experimental results, impacts of the intermediate filter on the imaging performances of each detector layer are marginal. The detailed experimental results are shown in this study.

  19. New family of generalized metrics for comparative imaging system evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, M.; Singh, V.; Loughran, B.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-03-01

    A family of imaging task-specific metrics designated Relative Object Detectability (ROD) metrics was developed to enable objective, quantitative comparisons of different x-ray systems. Previously, ROD was defined as the integral over spatial frequencies of the Fourier Transform of the object function, weighted by the detector DQE for one detector, divided by the comparable integral for another detector. When effects of scatter and focal spot unsharpness are included, the generalized metric, GDQE, is substituted for the DQE, resulting in the G-ROD metric. The G-ROD was calculated for two different detectors with two focal spot sizes using various-sized simulated objects to quantify the improved performance of new high-resolution CMOS detector systems. When a measured image is used as the object, a Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD) value can be generated. A neuro-vascular stent (Wingspan) was imaged with the high-resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and a standard flat panel detector (FPD) for comparison using the GM-ROD calculation. As the lower integration bound increased from 0 toward the detector Nyquist frequency, increasingly superior performance of the MAF was evidenced. Another new metric, the R-ROD, enables comparing detectors to a reference detector of given imaging ability. R-RODs for the MAF, a new CMOS detector and an FPD will be presented. The ROD family of metrics can provide quantitative more understandable comparisons for different systems where the detector, focal spot, scatter, object, techniques or dose are varied and can be used to optimize system selection for given imaging tasks.

  20. Quantitative analysis of rib movement based on dynamic chest bone images: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, R.; Sanada, S.; Oda, M.; Mitsutaka, M.; Suzuki, K.; Sakuta, K.; Kawashima, H.

    2014-03-01

    Rib movement during respiration is one of the diagnostic criteria in pulmonary impairments. In general, the rib movement is assessed in fluoroscopy. However, the shadows of lung vessels and bronchi overlapping ribs prevent accurate quantitative analysis of rib movement. Recently, an image-processing technique for separating bones from soft tissue in static chest radiographs, called "bone suppression technique", has been developed. Our purpose in this study was to evaluate the usefulness of dynamic bone images created by the bone suppression technique in quantitative analysis of rib movement. Dynamic chest radiographs of 10 patients were obtained using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD). Bone suppression technique based on a massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN) was applied to the dynamic chest images to create bone images. Velocity vectors were measured in local areas on the dynamic bone images, which formed a map. The velocity maps obtained with bone and original images for scoliosis and normal cases were compared to assess the advantages of bone images. With dynamic bone images, we were able to quantify and distinguish movements of ribs from those of other lung structures accurately. Limited rib movements of scoliosis patients appeared as reduced rib velocity vectors. Vector maps in all normal cases exhibited left-right symmetric distributions, whereas those in abnormal cases showed nonuniform distributions. In conclusion, dynamic bone images were useful for accurate quantitative analysis of rib movements: Limited rib movements were indicated as a reduction of rib movement and left-right asymmetric distribution on vector maps. Thus, dynamic bone images can be a new diagnostic tool for quantitative analysis of rib movements without additional radiation dose.

  1. Modification of the NEMA XR21-2000 cardiac phantom for testing of imaging systems used in endovascular image guided interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, C. N.; Dohatcu, A.; Jain, A.; Keleshis, C.; Hoffmann, K. R.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2009-02-01

    X-ray equipment testing using phantoms that mimic the specific human anatomy, morphology, and structure is a very important step in the research, development, and routine quality assurance for such equipment. Although the NEMA XR21 phantom exists for cardiac applications, there is no such standard phantom for neuro-, peripheral and cardiovascular angiographic applications. We have extended the application of the NEMA XR21-2000 phantom to evaluate neurovascular x-ray imaging systems by structuring it to be head-equivalent; two aluminum plates shaped to fit into the NEMA phantom geometry were added to a 15 cm thick section. Also, to enable digital subtraction angiography (DSA) testing, two replaceable central plates with a hollow slot were made so that various angiographic sections could be inserted into the phantom. We tested the new modified phantom using a flat panel C-arm unit dedicated for endovascular image-guided interventions. All NEMA XR21-2000 standard test sections were used in evaluations with the new "headequivalent" phantom. DSA and DA are able to be tested using two standard removable blocks having simulated arteries of various thickness and iodine concentrations (AAPM Report 15). The new phantom modifications have the benefits of enabling use of the standard NEMA phantom for angiography in both neuro- and cardio-vascular applications, with the convenience of needing only one versatile phantom for multiple applications. Additional benefits compared to using multiple phantoms are increased portability and lower cost.

  2. Characterization of bias induced metastability of amorphous silicon thin film transistor based passive pixel sensor switch and its impact on biomedical x-ray imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Afrin; Safavian, N.; Izadi, M. H.; Karim, K. S.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2009-02-01

    Active Matrix Flat Panel Imagers (AMFPIs) based on amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistor (TFT) array is the most promising technology for large area biomedical x-ray imaging. a-Si:H TFT exhibits a metastable shift in its characteristics when subject to prolonged gate bias that results in a change in its threshold voltage (VΤ) and a corresponding change in ON resistance (RON). If not properly accounted for, the VΤ shift can be a major constraint in imaging applications as it contributes to the fixed pattern noise in the imager. In this work, we investigated the timedependent shift in VΤ (ΔVΤ) of a-Si:H TFTs stressed with the same bipolar pulsed bias used for static (chest radiography, mammography, and static protein crystallography) and real time imaging (low dose fluoroscopy at 15, 30 and 60 frames/second, and dynamic protein crystallography). We used the well known power law model of time dependent ΔVT to estimate the change in RON over time. Our calculation showed that RON can be decreased ~ 0.03 % per frame and ~ 5 % over 10,000 hours at 30 frames/second. We verified the theoretical results with measurement data. The implication of TFT metastability on the performance (NPS, and DQE) of biomedical imagers is discussed.

  3. Breathing motion compensated reconstruction for C-arm cone beam CT imaging: initial experience based on animal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, D.; Lin, M.; Rao, P. P.; Loffroy, R.; Liapi, E.; Noordhoek, N.; Eshuis, P.; Radaelli, A.; Grass, M.; Geschwind, J.-F. H.

    2012-03-01

    C-arm based tomographic 3D imaging is applied in an increasing number of minimal invasive procedures. Due to the limited acquisition speed for a complete projection data set required for tomographic reconstruction, breathing motion is a potential source of artifacts. This is the case for patients who cannot comply breathing commands (e.g. due to anesthesia). Intra-scan motion estimation and compensation is required. Here, a scheme for projection based local breathing motion estimation is combined with an anatomy adapted interpolation strategy and subsequent motion compensated filtered back projection. The breathing motion vector is measured as a displacement vector on the projections of a tomographic short scan acquisition using the diaphragm as a landmark. Scaling of the displacement to the acquisition iso-center and anatomy adapted volumetric motion vector field interpolation delivers a 3D motion vector per voxel. Motion compensated filtered back projection incorporates this motion vector field in the image reconstruction process. This approach is applied in animal experiments on a flat panel C-arm system delivering improved image quality (lower artifact levels, improved tumor delineation) in 3D liver tumor imaging.

  4. Optimization of dual-energy imaging systems using generalized NEQ and imaging task

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, S.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2007-01-15

    Dual-energy (DE) imaging is a promising advanced application of flat-panel detectors (FPDs) with a potential host of applications ranging from thoracic and cardiac imaging to interventional procedures. The performance of FPD-based DE imaging systems is investigated in this work by incorporating the noise-power spectrum associated with overlying anatomical structures (''anatomical noise'' modeled according to a 1/f characteristic) into descriptions of noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ) to yield the generalized NEQ (GNEQ). Signal and noise propagation in the DE imaging chain is modeled by cascaded systems analysis. A Fourier-based description of the imaging task is integrated with the GNEQ to yield a detectability index used as an objective function for optimizing DE image reconstruction, allocation of dose between low- and high-energy images, and selection of low- and high-kVp. Optimal reconstruction and acquisition parameters were found to depend on dose; for example, optimal kVp varied from [60/150] kVp at typical radiographic dose levels ({approx}0.5 mGy entrance surface dose, ESD) but increased to [90/150] kVp at high dose (ESD{approx}5.0 mGy). At very low dose (ESD{approx}0.05 mGy), detectability index indicates an optimal low-energy technique of 60 kVp but was largely insensitive to the choice of high-kVp in the range 120-150 kVp. Similarly, optimal dose allocation, defined as the ratio of low-energy ESD and the total ESD, varied from 0.2 to 0.4 over the range ESD=(0.05-5.0) mGy. Furthermore, two applications of the theoretical framework were explored: (i) the increase in detectability for DE imaging compared to conventional radiography; and (ii) the performance of single-shot vs double-shot DE imaging, wherein the latter is found to have a DQE approximately twice that of the former. Experimental and theoretical analysis of GNEQ and task-based detectability index provides a fundamental understanding of the factors governing DE imaging performance and offers a

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of a quantum noise limited Čerenkov detector based on air-spaced light guiding taper for megavoltage x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Teymurazyan, A.; Rowlands, J. A.; Pang, G.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs) have been widely used in radiation therapy and are still needed on linear accelerators (Linacs) equipped with kilovoltage cone beam CT (kV-CBCT) or MRI systems. Our aim is to develop a new high quantum efficiency (QE) Čerenkov Portal Imaging Device (CPID) that is quantum noise limited at dose levels corresponding to a single Linac pulse. Methods: Recently a new concept of CPID for MV x-ray imaging in radiation therapy was introduced. It relies on Čerenkov effect for x-ray detection. The proposed design consisted of a matrix of optical fibers aligned with the incident x-rays and coupled to an active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) for image readout. A weakness of such design is that too few Čerenkov light photons reach the AMFPI for each incident x-ray and an AMFPI with an avalanche gain is required in order to overcome the readout noise for portal imaging application. In this work the authors propose to replace the optical fibers in the CPID with light guides without a cladding layer that are suspended in air. The air between the light guides takes on the role of the cladding layer found in a regular optical fiber. Since air has a significantly lower refractive index (∼1 versus 1.38 in a typical cladding layer), a much superior light collection efficiency is achieved. Results: A Monte Carlo simulation of the new design has been conducted to investigate its feasibility. Detector quantities such as quantum efficiency (QE), spatial resolution (MTF), and frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency (DQE) have been evaluated. The detector signal and the quantum noise have been compared to the readout noise. Conclusions: Our studies show that the modified new CPID has a QE and DQE more than an order of magnitude greater than that of current clinical systems and yet a spatial resolution similar to that of current low-QE flat-panel based EPIDs. Furthermore it was demonstrated that the new CPID does not require an

  6. Automated marker tracking using noisy X-ray images degraded by the treatment beam.

    PubMed

    Wisotzky, E; Fast, M F; Oelfke, U; Nill, S

    2015-06-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of automated marker tracking for the real-time detection of intrafractional target motion using noisy kilovoltage (kV) X-ray images degraded by the megavoltage (MV) treatment beam. The authors previously introduced the in-line imaging geometry, in which the flat-panel detector (FPD) is mounted directly underneath the treatment head of the linear accelerator. They found that the 121 kVp image quality was severely compromised by the 6 MV beam passing through the FPD at the same time. Specific MV-induced artefacts present a considerable challenge for automated marker detection algorithms. For this study, the authors developed a new imaging geometry by re-positioning the FPD and the X-ray tube. This improved the contrast-to-noise-ratio between 40% and 72% at the 1.2 mAs/image exposure setting. The increase in image quality clearly facilitates the quick and stable detection of motion with the aid of a template matching algorithm. The setup was tested with an anthropomorphic lung phantom (including an artificial lung tumour). In the tumour one or three Calypso beacons were embedded to achieve better contrast during MV radiation. For a single beacon, image acquisition and automated marker detection typically took around 76 ± 6 ms. The success rate was found to be highly dependent on imaging dose and gantry angle. To eliminate possible false detections, the authors implemented a training phase prior to treatment beam irradiation and also introduced speed limits for motion between subsequent images.

  7. Low dose digital X-ray imaging with avalanche amorphous selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Goldan, Amir H.; Tousignant, Olivier; Léveillé, Sébastien; Zhao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Active Matrix Flat Panel Imagers (AMFPI) based on an array of thin film transistors (TFT) have become the dominant technology for digital x-ray imaging. In low dose applications, the performance of both direct and indirect conversion detectors are limited by the electronic noise associated with the TFT array. New concepts of direct and indirect detectors have been proposed using avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se), referred to as high gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP). The indirect detector utilizes a planar layer of HARP to detect light from an x-ray scintillator and amplify the photogenerated charge. The direct detector utilizes separate interaction (non-avalanche) and amplification (avalanche) regions within the a-Se to achieve depth-independent signal gain. Both detectors require the development of large area, solid state HARP. We have previously reported the first avalanche gain in a-Se with deposition techniques scalable to large area detectors. The goal of the present work is to demonstrate the feasibility of large area HARP fabrication in an a-Se deposition facility established for commercial large area AMFPI. We also examine the effect of alternative pixel electrode materials on avalanche gain. The results show that avalanche gain > 50 is achievable in the HARP layers developed in large area coaters, which is sufficient to achieve x-ray quantum noise limited performance down to a single x-ray photon per pixel. Both chromium (Cr) and indium tin oxide (ITO) have been successfully tested as pixel electrodes.

  8. Development of Electron Tracking Compton Camera using micro pixel gas chamber for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabuki, Shigeto; Hattori, Kaori; Kohara, Ryota; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kubo, Atsushi; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Nakahara, Tadaki; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Nishimura, Hironobu; Okada, Yoko; Orito, Reiko; Sekiya, Hiroyuki; Shirahata, Takashi; Takada, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Ueno, Kazuki

    2007-10-01

    We have developed the Electron Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC) with reconstructing the 3-D tracks of the scattered electron in Compton process for both sub-MeV and MeV gamma rays. By measuring both the directions and energies of not only the recoil gamma ray but also the scattered electron, the direction of the incident gamma ray is determined for each individual photon. Furthermore, a residual measured angle between the recoil electron and scattered gamma ray is quite powerful for the kinematical background rejection. For the 3-D tracking of the electrons, the Micro Time Projection Chamber (μ-TPC) was developed using a new type of the micro pattern gas detector. The ETCC consists of this μ-TPC (10×10×8 cm 3) and the 6×6×13 mm 3 GSO crystal pixel arrays with a flat panel photo-multiplier surrounding the μ-TPC for detecting recoil gamma rays. The ETCC provided the angular resolution of 6.6° (FWHM) at 364 keV of 131I. A mobile ETCC for medical imaging, which is fabricated in a 1 m cubic box, has been operated since October 2005. Here, we present the imaging results for the line sources and the phantom of human thyroid gland using 364 keV gamma rays of 131I.

  9. Use of a line-pair resolution phantom for comprehensive quality assurance of electronic portal imaging devices based on fundamental imaging metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Arun; Samant, Sanjiv S.

    2009-06-15

    linear systems metrics such as robustness, sensitivity across the full spatial frequency range of interest, and normalization to imaging conditions (magnification, system gain settings, and exposure), with the simplicity, ease, and speed of traditional phantom imaging. The algorithm was analyzed for accuracy and sensitivity by comparing with a commercial portal imaging QA method (PIPSPRO, Standard Imaging, Middleton, WI) on both first-generation lens-coupled and modern a-Si flat-panel based clinical EPID systems. The bar-pattern based QA measurements were found to be far more sensitive to even small levels of degradation in spatial resolution and noise. The bar-pattern based QA methodology offers a comprehensive image quality assessment tool suitable for both commissioning and routine EPID QA.

  10. Workflow for the use of a high-resolution image detector in endovascular interventional procedures

    PubMed Central

    Rana, R.; Loughran, B.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Pope, L.; Ionita, C. N.; Siddiqui, A.; Lin, N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular image-guided intervention (EIGI) has become the primary interventional therapy for the most widespread vascular diseases. These procedures involve the insertion of a catheter into the femoral artery, which is then threaded under fluoroscopic guidance to the site of the pathology to be treated. Flat Panel Detectors (FPDs) are normally used for EIGIs; however, once the catheter is guided to the pathological site, high-resolution imaging capabilities can be used for accurately guiding a successful endovascular treatment. The Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector provides needed high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities. An experimental MAF enabled with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, Image Display and Storage (CAPIDS) system was installed and aligned on a detector changer attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The CAPIDS system was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF including: fluoroscopy, roadmap, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). Using the automatic controls, the MAF detector can be moved to the deployed position, in front of a standard FPD, whenever higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. To minimize any possible negative impact to image guidance with the two detector systems, it is essential to have a well-designed workflow that enables smooth deployment of the MAF at critical stages of clinical procedures. For the ultimate success of this new imaging capability, a clear understanding of the workflow design is essential. This presentation provides a detailed description and demonstration of such a workflow design. PMID:25302003

  11. Workflow for the use of a high-resolution image detector in endovascular interventional procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, R.; Loughran, B.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Pope, L.; Ionita, C. N.; Siddiqui, A.; Lin, N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2014-03-01

    Endovascular image-guided intervention (EIGI) has become the primary interventional therapy for the most widespread vascular diseases. These procedures involve the insertion of a catheter into the femoral artery, which is then threaded under fluoroscopic guidance to the site of the pathology to be treated. Flat Panel Detectors (FPDs) are normally used for EIGIs; however, once the catheter is guided to the pathological site, high-resolution imaging capabilities can be used for accurately guiding a successful endovascular treatment. The Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector provides needed high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities. An experimental MAF enabled with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, Image Display and Storage (CAPIDS) system was installed and aligned on a detector changer attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The CAPIDS system was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF including: fluoroscopy, roadmap, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). Using the automatic controls, the MAF detector can be moved to the deployed position, in front of a standard FPD, whenever higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. To minimize any possible negative impact to image guidance with the two detector systems, it is essential to have a well-designed workflow that enables smooth deployment of the MAF at critical stages of clinical procedures. For the ultimate success of this new imaging capability, a clear understanding of the workflow design is essential. This presentation provides a detailed description and demonstration of such a workflow design.

  12. A novel Region of Interest (ROI) imaging technique for biplane imaging in interventional suites: high-resolution small field-of-view imaging in the frontal plane and dose-reduced, large field-of-view standard-resolution imaging in the lateral plane.

    PubMed

    Swetadri Vasan, S N; Ionita, C; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2014-03-19

    Endovascular-Image-Guided-Interventional (EIGI) treatment of neuro-vascular conditions such as aneurysms, stenosed arteries, and vessel thrombosis make use of treatment devices such as stents, coils, and balloons which have very small feature sizes, 10's of microns to a few 100's of microns, and hence demand a high resolution imaging system. The current state-of-the-art flat panel detector (FPD) has about a 200-um pixel size with the Nyquist of 2.5 lp/mm. For higher-resolution imaging a charge-coupled device (CCD) based Micro-Angio -Fluoroscope (MAF-CCD) with a pixel size of 35um (Nyquist of 11 lp/mm) was developed and previously reported. Although the detector addresses the high resolution needs, the Field-Of-View (FOV) is limited to 3.5 cm × 3.5 cm, which is much smaller than current FPDs. During the use of the MAF-CCD for delicate parts of the intervention, it may be desirable to have real-time monitoring outside the MAF FOV with a low dose, and lower, but acceptable, quality image. To address this need, a novel imaging technique for biplane imaging systems has been developed, using an MAF-CCD in the frontal plane and a dose-reduced standard large FOV imager in the lateral plane. The dose reduction is achieved by using a combination of ROI fluoroscopy and spatially different temporal filtering, a technique that has been previously presented. In order to evaluate this technique, a simulation using images acquired during an actual EIGI treatment on a patient, followed by an actual implementation on phantoms is presented.

  13. A novel Region of Interest (ROI) imaging technique for biplane imaging in interventional suites: high-resolution small field-of-view imaging in the frontal plane and dose-reduced, large field-of-view standard-resolution imaging in the lateral plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swetadri Vasan, Setlur Nagesh; Ionita, C.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Endovascular-Image-Guided-Interventional (EIGI) treatment of neuro-vascular conditions such as aneurysms, stenosed arteries, and vessel thrombosis make use of treatment devices such as stents, coils, and balloons which have very small feature sizes, 10's of microns to a few 100's of microns, and hence demand a high resolution imaging system. The current state-of-the-art flat panel detector (FPD) has about a 200-um pixel size with the Nyquist of 2.5 lp/mm. For higher-resolution imaging a charge-coupled device (CCD) based Micro-Angio - Fluoroscope (MAF-CCD) with a pixel size of 35um (Nyquist of 11 lp/mm) was developed and previously reported. Although the detector addresses the high resolution needs, the Field-Of-View (FOV) is limited to 3.5 cm x 3.5 cm, which is much smaller than current FPDs. During the use of the MAF-CCD for delicate parts of the intervention, it may be desirable to have real-time monitoring outside the MAF FOV with a low dose, and lower, but acceptable, quality image. To address this need, a novel imaging technique for biplane imaging systems has been developed, using an MAFCCD in the frontal plane and a dose-reduced standard large FOV imager in the lateral plane. The dose reduction is achieved by using a combination of ROI fluoroscopy and spatially different temporal filtering, a technique that has been previously presented. In order to evaluate this technique, a simulation using images acquired during an actual EIGI treatment on a patient, followed by an actual implementation on phantoms is presented.

  14. Focal spot motion of linear accelerators and its effect on portal image analysis.

    PubMed

    Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Brand, Bob; van Herk, Marcel

    2003-06-01

    The focal spot of a linear accelerator is often considered to have a fully stable position. In practice, however, the beam control loop of a linear accelerator needs to stabilize after the beam is turned on. As a result, some motion of the focal spot might occur during the start-up phase of irradiation. When acquiring portal images, this motion will affect the projected position of anatomy and field edges, especially when low exposures are used. In this paper, the motion of the focal spot and the effect of this motion on portal image analysis are quantified. A slightly tilted narrow slit phantom was placed at the isocenter of several linear accelerators and images were acquired (3.5 frames per second) by means of an amorphous silicon flat panel imager positioned approximately 0.7 m below the isocenter. The motion of the focal spot was determined by converting the tilted slit images to subpixel accurate line spread functions. The error in portal image analysis due to focal spot motionwas estimated by a subtraction of the relative displacement of the projected slit from the relative displacement of the field edges. It was found that the motion of the focal spot depends on the control system and design of the accelerator. The shift of the focal spot at the start of irradiation ranges between 0.05-0.7 mm in the gun-target (GT) direction. In the left-right (AB) direction the shift is generally smaller. The resulting error in portal image analysis due to focal spotmotion ranges between 0.05-1.1 mm for a dose corresponding to two monitor units (MUs). For 20 MUs, the effect of the focal spot motion reduces to 0.01-0.3 mm. The error in portal image analysis due to focal spot motion can be reduced by reducing the applied dose rate.

  15. Volume-of-change cone-beam CT for image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junghoon; Webster Stayman, J.; Otake, Yoshito; Schafer, Sebastian; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Khanna, A. Jay; Prince, Jerry L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2012-08-01

    C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) can provide intraoperative 3D imaging capability for surgical guidance, but workflow and radiation dose are the significant barriers to broad utilization. One main reason is that each 3D image acquisition requires a complete scan with a full radiation dose to present a completely new 3D image every time. In this paper, we propose to utilize patient-specific CT or CBCT as prior knowledge to accurately reconstruct the aspects of the region that have changed by the surgical procedure from only a sparse set of x-rays. The proposed methods consist of a 3D-2D registration between the prior volume and a sparse set of intraoperative x-rays, creating digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from the registered prior volume, computing difference images by subtracting DRRs from the intraoperative x-rays, a penalized likelihood reconstruction of the volume of change (VOC) from the difference images, and finally a fusion of VOC reconstruction with the prior volume to visualize the entire surgical field. When the surgical changes are local and relatively small, the VOC reconstruction involves only a small volume size and a small number of projections, allowing less computation and lower radiation dose than is needed to reconstruct the entire surgical field. We applied this approach to sacroplasty phantom data obtained from a CBCT test bench and vertebroplasty data with a fresh cadaver acquired from a C-arm CBCT system with a flat-panel detector. The VOCs were reconstructed from a varying number of images (10-66 images) and compared to the CBCT ground truth using four different metrics (mean squared error, correlation coefficient, structural similarity index and perceptual difference model). The results show promising reconstruction quality with structural similarity to the ground truth close to 1 even when only 15-20 images were used, allowing dose reduction by the factor of 10-20.

  16. Displacement tracking in single human trabecula with metal-plated micro-spheres using X-ray radiography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiroušek, O.; Kytýř, D.; Doktor, T.; Dammer, J.; Krejčí, F.

    2013-02-01

    This study presents an improved radiographic method for strain measurement in very small samples of a single trabeculae. X-ray micro-radiography was used to track the deformation behaviour of individual trabecula during mechanical loading. As the X-ray micro-radiography images of a single trabecula show no significant features applicable for digital image correlation (DIC) a random pattern of markers was created on the surfaces of the samples to improve the accuracy of tracking. Metal plated borosilicate glassmicro-spheres (mean diameter 10 μm) were used as the markers for trabecular displacement tracking. Two different X-ray imaging setups were used for this purpose. The specimens of isolated trabeculae were loaded by a micro-mechanical testing device developed with respect to radiographical observation. This compact device enables a high precision three-point bending measurement. The specimen was continuously irradiated during the loading procedure by a micro-focus X-ray source. The radiographs were acquired by a single-photon counting silicon pixel detector and s flat panel sensor with CsI flipped scintillator plate. Circular Hough transform was used to locate positions of the spherical markers in the sequence of acquired radiographs and to calculate the strain in the loaded sample. The gold-coated micro-spheres provide clearly visible features in the sequence of radiographs after beam hardening correction, which in conjunction with pattern recognition algorithm enables to substantially improve the accuracy of strain measurements.

  17. Synchrotron-based coherent scatter x-ray projection imaging using an array of monoenergetic pencil beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landheer, Karl; Johns, Paul C.

    2012-09-01

    Traditional projection x-ray imaging utilizes only the information from the primary photons. Low-angle coherent scatter images can be acquired simultaneous to the primary images and provide additional information. In medical applications scatter imaging can improve x-ray contrast or reduce dose using information that is currently discarded in radiological images to augment the transmitted radiation information. Other applications include non-destructive testing and security. A system at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron was configured which utilizes multiple pencil beams (up to five) to create both primary and coherent scatter projection images, simultaneously. The sample was scanned through the beams using an automated step-and-shoot setup. Pixels were acquired in a hexagonal lattice to maximize packing efficiency. The typical pitch was between 1.0 and 1.6 mm. A Maximum Likelihood-Expectation Maximization-based iterative method was used to disentangle the overlapping information from the flat panel digital x-ray detector. The pixel value of the coherent scatter image was generated by integrating the radial profile (scatter intensity versus scattering angle) over an angular range. Different angular ranges maximize the contrast between different materials of interest. A five-beam primary and scatter image set (which had a pixel beam time of 990 ms and total scan time of 56 min) of a porcine phantom is included. For comparison a single-beam coherent scatter image of the same phantom is included. The muscle-fat contrast was 0.10 ± 0.01 and 1.16 ± 0.03 for the five-beam primary and scatter images, respectively. The air kerma was measured free in air using aluminum oxide optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters. The total area-averaged air kerma for the scan was measured to be 7.2 ± 0.4 cGy although due to difficulties in small-beam dosimetry this number could be inaccurate.

  18. SU-E-I-11: A New Cone-Beam CT System for Bedside Head Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, H; Zeng, W; Xu, P; Wang, Z; Xing, X; Sun, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To design and develop a new mobile cone-beam CT (CBCT) system for head imaging with good soft-tissue visibility, to be used bedside in ICU and neurosurgery department to monitor treatment and operation outcome in brain patients. Methods: The imaging chain consists of a 30cmx25cm amorphous silicon flat panel detector and a pulsed, stationary anode monoblock x-ray source of 100kVp at a maximal tube current of 10mA. The detector and source are supported on motorized mechanisms to provide detector lateral shift and source angular tilt, enabling a centered digital radiographic imaging mode and half-fan CBCT, while maximizing the use of the x-ray field and keep the source to detector distance short. A focused linear anti-scatter grid is mounted on the detector, and commercial software with scatter and other corrective algorithms is used for data processing and image reconstruction. The gantry rotates around a horizontal axis, and is able to adjust its height for different patient table positions. Cables are routed through a custom protective sleeve over a large bore with an in-plane twister band, facilitating single 360-degree rotation without a slip-ring at a speed up to 5 seconds per rotation. A UPS provides about 10 minutes of operation off the battery when unplugged. The gantry is on locked casters, whose brake is control by two push handles on both sides for easy reposition. The entire system is designed to have a light weight and a compact size for excellent maneuverability. Results: System design is complete and main imaging components are tested. Initial results will be presented and discussed later in the presentation. Conclusion: A new mobile CBCT system for head imaging is being developed. With its compact size, a large bore, and quality design, it is expected to be a useful imaging tool for bedside uses. The work is supported by a grant from Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  19. Statistical iterative reconstruction to improve image quality for digital breast tomosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shiyu; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Chen, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a novel modality with the potential to improve early detection of breast cancer by providing three-dimensional (3D) imaging with a low radiation dose. 3D image reconstruction presents some challenges: cone-beam and flat-panel geometry, and highly incomplete sampling. A promising means to overcome these challenges is statistical iterative reconstruction (IR), since it provides the flexibility of accurate physics modeling and a general description of system geometry. The authors’ goal was to develop techniques for applying statistical IR to tomosynthesis imaging data. Methods: These techniques include the following: a physics model with a local voxel-pair based prior with flexible parameters to fine-tune image quality; a precomputed parameter λ in the prior, to remove data dependence and to achieve a uniform resolution property; an effective ray-driven technique to compute the forward and backprojection; and an oversampled, ray-driven method to perform high resolution reconstruction with a practical region-of-interest technique. To assess the performance of these techniques, the authors acquired phantom data on the stationary DBT prototype system. To solve the estimation problem, the authors proposed an optimization-transfer based algorithm framework that potentially allows fewer iterations to achieve an acceptably converged reconstruction. Results: IR improved the detectability of low-contrast and small microcalcifications, reduced cross-plane artifacts, improved spatial resolution, and lowered noise in reconstructed images. Conclusions: Although the computational load remains a significant challenge for practical development, the superior image quality provided by statistical IR, combined with advancing computational techniques, may bring benefits to screening, diagnostics, and intraoperative imaging in clinical applications. PMID:26328987

  20. Receiver operating characteristic analysis for the detection of simulated microcalcifications on mammograms using hardcopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chao-Jen; Shaw, Chris C.; Whitman, Gary J.; Yang, Wei T.; Dempsey, Peter J.; Nguyen, Victoria; Ice, Mary F.

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare mammography systems based on three different detectors—a conventional screen-film (SF) combination, an a-Si/CsI flat-panel (FP)-based detector, and a charge-coupled device (CCD)-based x-ray phosphor-based detector—for their performance in detecting simulated microcalcifications (MCs). 112-150 µm calcium carbonate grains were used to simulate MCs and were overlapped with a slab phantom of simulated 50% adipose/50% glandular breast tissue-equivalent material referred to as the uniform background. For the tissue structure background, 200-250 µm calcium carbonate grains were used and overlapped with an anthropomorphic breast phantom. All MC phantom images were acquired with and without magnification (1.8X). The hardcopy images were reviewed by five mammographers. A five-point confidence level rating was used to score each detection task. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed, and the areas under the ROC curves (Azs) were used to compare the performances of the three mammography systems under various conditions. The results showed that, with a uniform background and contact images, the FP-based system performed significantly better than the SF and the CCD-based systems. For magnified images with a uniform background, the SF and the FP-based systems performed equally well and significantly better than the CCD-based system. With tissue structure background and contact images, the SF system performed significantly better than the FP and the CCD-based systems. With magnified images and a tissue structure background, the SF and the CCD-based systems performed equally well and significantly better than the FP-based system. In the detection of MCs in the fibroglandular and the heterogeneously dense regions, no significant differences were found except that the SF system performed significantly better than the CCD-based system in the fibroglandular regions for the contact images.

  1. Imaging performance comparison between a LaBr3: Ce scintillator based and a CdTe semiconductor based photon counting compact gamma camera.

    PubMed

    Russo, P; Mettivier, G; Pani, R; Pellegrini, R; Cinti, M N; Bennati, P

    2009-04-01

    The authors report on the performance of two small field of view, compact gamma cameras working in single photon counting in planar imaging tests at 122 and 140 keV. The first camera is based on a LaBr3: Ce scintillator continuous crystal (49 x 49 x 5 mm3) assembled with a flat panel multianode photomultiplier tube with parallel readout. The second one belongs to the class of semiconductor hybrid pixel detectors, specifically, a CdTe pixel detector (14 x 14 x 1 mm3) with 256 x 256 square pixels and a pitch of 55 microm, read out by a CMOS single photon counting integrated circuit of the Medipix2 series. The scintillation camera was operated with selectable energy window while the CdTe camera was operated with a single low-energy detection threshold of about 20 keV, i.e., without energy discrimination. The detectors were coupled to pinhole or parallel-hole high-resolution collimators. The evaluation of their overall performance in basic imaging tasks is presented through measurements of their detection efficiency, intrinsic spatial resolution, noise, image SNR, and contrast recovery. The scintillation and CdTe cameras showed, respectively, detection efficiencies at 122 keV of 83% and 45%, intrinsic spatial resolutions of 0.9 mm and 75 microm, and total background noises of 40.5 and 1.6 cps. Imaging tests with high-resolution parallel-hole and pinhole collimators are also reported.

  2. 76 FR 9360 - In the Matter of Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... named the following respondents: LG Electronics, Inc. of South Korea and LG Electronics, Inc. of... August 19, 2010, based on a complaint filed by Vizio, Inc. of Irvine, California. 75 FR 51285-86...

  3. Flat panel X-ray detector with reduced internal scattering for improved attenuation accuracy and dynamic range

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Peter D.; Claytor, Thomas N.; Berry, Phillip C.; Hills, Charles R.

    2010-10-12

    An x-ray detector is disclosed that has had all unnecessary material removed from the x-ray beam path, and all of the remaining material in the beam path made as light and as low in atomic number as possible. The resulting detector is essentially transparent to x-rays and, thus, has greatly reduced internal scatter. The result of this is that x-ray attenuation data measured for the object under examination are much more accurate and have an increased dynamic range. The benefits of this improvement are that beam hardening corrections can be made accurately, that computed tomography reconstructions can be used for quantitative determination of material properties including density and atomic number, and that lower exposures may be possible as a result of the increased dynamic range.

  4. 76 FR 45296 - In the Matter of Certain Flat Panel Display Devices, and Products Containing the Same; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... further alleges that an industry in the United States exists as required by subsection (a)(2) of section... confidential information contained therein, is available for inspection during official business hours (8:45 a... patent; and claims 1-10 of the `729 patent, and whether an industry in the United States exists...

  5. Compressive Strength of 24S-T Aluminum-alloy Flat Panels with Longitudinal Formed Hat-section Stiffeners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuette, Evan H; Barab, Sual; Mccracken, Howard L

    1946-01-01

    Results are presented for a part of a test program on 24S-T aluminum alloy flat compression panels with longitudinal formed hat-section stiffeners. This part of the program is concerned with panels in which the thickness of the stiffener materials is 0.625 times the skin thickness. The results, presented in tabular and graphical form, show the effect of the relative dimensions of the panel on the buckling stress and the average stress at maximum load. Comparative envelope curves are presented for hat-stiffened and Z-stiffened panels having the same ratio of stiffener thickness to sheet thickness. These curves provide some indication of the relative structural efficiencies of the two types of panel.

  6. Impact Testing on Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Flat Panels with Ice Projectiles for the Space Shuttle Return to Flight Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, Michael J.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2009-01-01

    Following the tragedy of the Orbiter Columbia (STS-107) on February 1, 2003, a major effort commenced to develop a better understanding of debris impacts and their effect on the space shuttle subsystems. An initiative to develop and validate physics-based computer models to predict damage from such impacts was a fundamental component of this effort. To develop the models it was necessary to physically characterize reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) along with ice and foam debris materials, which could shed on ascent and impact the orbiter RCC leading edges. The validated models enabled the launch system community to use the impact analysis software LS-DYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corp.) to predict damage by potential and actual impact events on the orbiter leading edge and nose cap thermal protection systems. Validation of the material models was done through a three-level approach: Level 1--fundamental tests to obtain independent static and dynamic constitutive model properties of materials of interest, Level 2--subcomponent impact tests to provide highly controlled impact test data for the correlation and validation of the models, and Level 3--full-scale orbiter leading-edge impact tests to establish the final level of confidence for the analysis methodology. This report discusses the Level 2 test program conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Ballistic Impact Laboratory with ice projectile impact tests on flat RCC panels, and presents the data observed. The Level 2 testing consisted of 54 impact tests in the NASA GRC Ballistic Impact Laboratory on 6- by 6-in. and 6- by 12-in. flat plates of RCC and evaluated three types of debris projectiles: Single-crystal, polycrystal, and "soft" ice. These impact tests helped determine the level of damage generated in the RCC flat plates by each projectile and validated the use of the ice and RCC models for use in LS-DYNA.

  7. Force generation in transient deployment of square or triangular flat panels in the presence of a wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierides, Alexis; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2007-11-01

    We investigate the force generated by square or tringular flaps hinged at the wall beneath a flow during their transient deployment with an angular velocity between 10 and 100 rad/s. The objective of this study is to understand the mechanisms of unsteady flapping-wings motion and the system of vortices generated. The transient flow field has been simulated experimentally in a low speed wind tunnel and computationally by using CFD with moving boundaries capabilities. The results indicated that all lift and drag force coefficients during the transient deployment are different than the corresponding coefficients under stationary conditions at the same deployment angle after adjusting for inertial effects. These dynamic effects depend on the Strouhal number which can be considered as the ratio the Stokes to Reynolds number of the flow. It was found that these effects are augmented with increasing Strouhal number and decrease with increasing boundary layer thickness. Reasonable agreement has been found between computational and experimental data.

  8. System design of a photovoltaic flat-panel applications experiment at Busch Gardens, Tampa, Florida. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    The detailed system design for a photovoltaic roof shingle module installation at Busch Gardens, Tampa, FL, (also known as the Dark Continent) is discussed. This installation of 4312 shingle solar cell modules of a second-generation design, which was developed under this contract, produces 29.5 kW of peak output at 237 Vdc under Standard Operating Conditions (SOC) with an NOCT at 61/sup 0/C. With a total gross roof area of 330.7 m/sup 2/, this installation yields an areal specific power output of 89.2 watt/m/sup 2/ at SOC. The system which uses an improved, low loss direct-coupled, line-commutated inverter controlled to operate the solar array maximum power operating point, delivers 208Y/120 volt, 3 phase ac in parallel with the Busch Gardens distribution network. The calculated annual ac energy m/sup 2/. The resulting overall system conversion efficiency of 9.2% is considered high for a system using large area circular solar cells.

  9. C-arm perfusion imaging with a fast penalized maximum-likelihood approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frysch, Robert; Pfeiffer, Tim; Bannasch, Sebastian; Serowy, Steffen; Gugel, Sebastian; Skalej, Martin; Rose, Georg

    2014-03-01

    Perfusion imaging is an essential method for stroke diagnostics. One of the most important factors for a successful therapy is to get the diagnosis as fast as possible. Therefore our approach aims at perfusion imaging (PI) with a cone beam C-arm system providing perfusion information directly in the interventional suite. For PI the imaging system has to provide excellent soft tissue contrast resolution in order to allow the detection of small attenuation enhancement due to contrast agent in the capillary vessels. The limited dynamic range of flat panel detectors as well as the sparse sampling of the slow rotating C-arm in combination with standard reconstruction methods results in limited soft tissue contrast. We choose a penalized maximum-likelihood reconstruction method to get suitable results. To minimize the computational load, the 4D reconstruction task is reduced to several static 3D reconstructions. We also include an ordered subset technique with transitioning to a small number of subsets, which adds sharpness to the image with less iterations while also suppressing the noise. Instead of the standard multiplicative EM correction, we apply a Newton-based optimization to further accelerate the reconstruction algorithm. The latter optimization reduces the computation time by up to 70%. Further acceleration is provided by a multi-GPU implementation of the forward and backward projection, which fulfills the demands of cone beam geometry. In this preliminary study we evaluate this procedure on clinical data. Perfusion maps are computed and compared with reference images from magnetic resonance scans. We found a high correlation between both images.

  10. Characterization of scattered radiation in kV CBCT images using Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Jarry, Genevieve; Graham, Sean A.; Moseley, Douglas J.; Jaffray, David J.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Verhaegen, Frank

    2006-11-15

    Kilovoltage (kV) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images suffer from a substantial scatter contribution. In this study, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are used to evaluate the scattered radiation present in projection images. These predicted scatter distributions are also used as a scatter correction technique. Images were acquired using a kV CBCT bench top system. The EGSnrc MC code was used to model the flat panel imager, the phantoms, and the x-ray source. The x-ray source model was validated using first and second half-value layers (HVL) and profile measurements. The HVLs and the profile were found to agree within 3% and 6%, respectively. MC simulated and measured projection images for a cylindrical water phantom and for an anthropomorphic head phantom agreed within 8% and 10%. A modified version of the DOSXYZnrc MC code was used to score phase space files with identified scattered and primary particles behind the phantoms. The cone angle, the source-to-detector distance, the phantom geometry, and the energy were varied to determine their effect on the scattered radiation distribution. A scatter correction technique was developed in which the MC predicted scatter distribution is subtracted from the projections prior to reconstruction. Preliminary testing of the procedure was done with an anthropomorphic head phantom and a contrast phantom. Contrast and profile measurements were obtained for the scatter corrected and noncorrected images. An improvement of 3% for contrast between solid water and a liver insert and 11% between solid water and a Teflon insert were obtained and a significant reduction in cupping and streaking artifacts was observed.

  11. Dose optimization in cardiac x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gislason-Lee, Amber J.; McMillan, Catherine; Cowen, Arnold R.; Davies, Andrew G.

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The aim of this research was to optimize x-ray image quality to dose ratios in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. This study examined independently the effects of peak x-ray tube voltage (kVp), copper (Cu), and gadolinium (Gd) x-ray beam filtration on the image quality to radiation dose balance for adult patient sizes.Methods: Image sequences of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms representing two adult patient sizes were captured using a modern flat panel detector based x-ray imaging system. Tin and copper test details were used to simulate iodine-based contrast medium and stents/guide wires respectively, which are used in clinical procedures. Noise measurement for a flat field image and test detail contrast were used to calculate the contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Entrance surface dose (ESD) and effective dose measurements were obtained to calculate the figure of merit (FOM), CNR{sup 2}/dose. This FOM determined the dose efficiency of x-ray spectra investigated. Images were captured with 0.0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.4, and 0.9 mm Cu filtration and with a range of gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S) filtration.Results: Optimum x-ray spectra were the same for the tin and copper test details. Lower peak tube voltages were generally favored. For the 20 cm phantom, using 2 Lanex Fast Back Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S screens as x-ray filtration at 65 kVp provided the highest FOM considering ESD and effective dose. Considering ESD, this FOM was only marginally larger than that from using 0.4 mm Cu at 65 kVp. For the 30 cm phantom, using 0.25 mm copper filtration at 80 kVp was most optimal; considering effective dose the FOM was highest with no filtration at 65 kVp.Conclusions: These settings, adjusted for x-ray tube loading limits and clinically acceptable image quality, should provide a useful option for optimizing patient dose to image quality in cardiac x-ray imaging. The same optimal x-ray beam spectra were found for both the tin and copper details, suggesting

  12. Feasibility of Colliding-beam fast-fission reactor via 238U80++238 U80+ --> 4 FF + 5n + 430 MeV beam with suppressed plutonium and direct conversion of fission fragment (FF) energy into electricity and/or Rocket propellant with high specific impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maglich, Bogdan; Hester, Tim; Calsec Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Uranium-uranium colliding beam experiment1, used fully ionized 238U92+ at energy 100GeV --> <-- 100 GeV, has measured total σ = 487 b. Reaction rate of colliding beams is proportional to neutron flux-squared. First functional Auto-Collider3-6, a compact Migma IV, 1 m in diameter, had self-colliding deuterons, D+, of 725 KeV --> <-- 725 KeV, resulting in copious production of T and 3He. U +U Autocollider``EXYDER'' will use strong-focusing magnet7, which would increase reaction rate by 104. 80 times ionized U ions accelerated through 3 MV accelerator, will collide beam 240 MeV --> <-- 240 MeV. Reaction is: 238U80+ +238 U80+ --> 4 FF + 5n + 430 MeV. Using a simple model1 fission σf ~ 100 b. Suppression of Pu by a factor of 106 will be achieved because NO thermal neutron fission can take place; only fast, 1-3 MeV, where σabs is negligible. Direct conversion of 95% of 430 MeV produced is carried by electrically charged FFs which are magnetically funneled for direct conversion of energy of FFs via electrostatic decelerators4,11. 90% of 930 MeV is electrically recoverable. Depending on the assumptions, we project electric _ power density production of 20 to 200 MWe m-3, equivalent to Thermal 1.3 - 13 GWthm-3. If one-half of unburned U is used for propulsion while rest powers system, heavy FF ion mass provides specific impulse Isp = 106 sec., 103 times higher than current rocket engines.

  13. Evaluation of the image quality in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) employed with a compressed-sensing (CS)-based reconstruction algorithm by using the mammographic accreditation phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yeonok; Cho, Heemoon; Je, Uikyu; Cho, Hyosung; Park, Chulkyu; Lim, Hyunwoo; Kim, Kyuseok; Kim, Guna; Park, Soyoung; Woo, Taeho; Choi, Sungil

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we have developed a prototype digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system which mainly consists of an x-ray generator (28 kVp, 7 mA s), a CMOS-type flat-panel detector (70-μm pixel size, 230.5×339 mm2 active area), and a rotational arm to move the x-ray generator in an arc. We employed a compressed-sensing (CS)-based reconstruction algorithm, rather than a common filtered-backprojection (FBP) one, for more accurate DBT reconstruction. Here the CS is a state-of-the-art mathematical theory for solving the inverse problems, which exploits the sparsity of the image with substantially high accuracy. We evaluated the reconstruction quality in terms of the detectability, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and the slice-sensitive profile (SSP) by using the mammographic accreditation phantom (Model 015, CIRS Inc.) and compared it to the FBP-based quality. The CS-based algorithm yielded much better image quality, preserving superior image homogeneity, edge sharpening, and cross-plane resolution, compared to the FBP-based one.

  14. Kinematic Analysis of Healthy Hips during Weight-Bearing Activities by 3D-to-2D Model-to-Image Registration Technique

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Daisuke; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Hamai, Satoshi; Higaki, Hidehiko; Ikebe, Satoru; Shimoto, Takeshi; Hirata, Masanobu; Kanazawa, Masayuki; Kohno, Yusuke; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic hip kinematics during weight-bearing activities were analyzed for six healthy subjects. Continuous X-ray images of gait, chair-rising, squatting, and twisting were taken using a flat panel X-ray detector. Digitally reconstructed radiographic images were used for 3D-to-2D model-to-image registration technique. The root-mean-square errors associated with tracking the pelvis and femur were less than 0.3 mm and 0.3° for translations and rotations. For gait, chair-rising, and squatting, the maximum hip flexion angles averaged 29.6°, 81.3°, and 102.4°, respectively. The pelvis was tilted anteriorly around 4.4° on average during full gait cycle. For chair-rising and squatting, the maximum absolute value of anterior/posterior pelvic tilt averaged 12.4°/11.7° and 10.7°/10.8°, respectively. Hip flexion peaked on the way of movement due to further anterior pelvic tilt during both chair-rising and squatting. For twisting, the maximum absolute value of hip internal/external rotation averaged 29.2°/30.7°. This study revealed activity dependent kinematics of healthy hip joints with coordinated pelvic and femoral dynamic movements. Kinematics' data during activities of daily living may provide important insight as to the evaluating kinematics of pathological and reconstructed hips. PMID:25506056

  15. Multimode C-arm fluoroscopy, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT for image-guided interventions: from proof of principle to patient protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewerdsen, J. H.; Daly, M. J.; Bachar, G.; Moseley, D. J.; Bootsma, G.; Brock, K. K.; Ansell, S.; Wilson, G. A.; Chhabra, S.; Jaffray, D. A.; Irish, J. C.

    2007-03-01

    High-performance intraoperative imaging is essential to an ever-expanding scope of therapeutic procedures ranging from tumor surgery to interventional radiology. The need for precise visualization of bony and soft-tissue structures with minimal obstruction to the therapy setup presents challenges and opportunities in the development of novel imaging technologies specifically for image-guided procedures. Over the past ~5 years, a mobile C-arm has been modified in collaboration with Siemens Medical Solutions for 3D imaging. Based upon a Siemens PowerMobil, the device includes: a flat-panel detector (Varian PaxScan 4030CB); a motorized orbit; a system for geometric calibration; integration with real-time tracking and navigation (NDI Polaris); and a computer control system for multi-mode fluoroscopy, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT. Investigation of 3D imaging performance (noise-equivalent quanta), image quality (human observer studies), and image artifacts (scatter, truncation, and cone-beam artifacts) has driven the development of imaging techniques appropriate to a host of image-guided interventions. Multi-mode functionality presents a valuable spectrum of acquisition techniques: i.) fluoroscopy for real-time 2D guidance; ii.) limited-angle tomosynthesis for fast 3D imaging (e.g., ~10 sec acquisition of coronal slices containing the surgical target); and iii.) fully 3D cone-beam CT (e.g., ~30-60 sec acquisition providing bony and soft-tissue visualization across the field of view). Phantom and cadaver studies clearly indicate the potential for improved surgical performance - up to a factor of 2 increase in challenging surgical target excisions. The C-arm system is currently being deployed in patient protocols ranging from brachytherapy to chest, breast, spine, and head and neck surgery.

  16. A theoretical comparison of x-ray angiographic image quality using energy-dependent and conventional subtraction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, Jesse; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is widely used for vascular imaging. However, the need to subtract a mask image can result in motion artifacts and compromised image quality. The current interest in energy-resolving photon-counting (EPC) detectors offers the promise of eliminating motion artifacts and other advanced applications using a single exposure. The authors describe a method of assessing the iodine signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that may be achieved with energy-resolved angiography (ERA) to enable a direct comparison with other approaches including DSA and dual-energy angiography for the same patient exposure. Methods: A linearized noise-propagation approach, combined with linear expressions of dual-energy and energy-resolved imaging, is used to describe the iodine SNR. The results were validated by a Monte Carlo calculation for all three approaches and compared visually for dual-energy and DSA imaging using a simple angiographic phantom with a CsI-based flat-panel detector. Results: The linearized SNR calculations show excellent agreement with Monte Carlo results. While dual-energy methods require an increased tube heat load of 2x to 4x compared to DSA, and photon-counting detectors are not yet ready for angiographic imaging, the available iodine SNR for both methods as tested is within 10% of that of conventional DSA for the same patient exposure over a wide range of patient thicknesses and iodine concentrations. Conclusions: While the energy-based methods are not necessarily optimized and further improvements are likely, the linearized noise-propagation analysis provides the theoretical framework of a level playing field for optimization studies and comparison with conventional DSA. It is concluded that both dual-energy and photon-counting approaches have the potential to provide similar angiographic image quality to DSA.

  17. Development of a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled X-ray head

    SciTech Connect

    Kamino, Yuichiro . E-mail: daisaku_horiuchi@mhi.co.jp; Takayama, Kenji; Kokubo, Masaki; Narita, Yuichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Kawawda, Noriyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Nagata, Yasushi; Nishidai, Takehiro; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a new four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system, which enables precise setup, real-time tumor tracking, and pursuit irradiation. Methods and Materials: The system has an innovative gimbaled X-ray head that enables small-angle ({+-}2.4{sup o}) rotations (pan and tilt) along the two orthogonal gimbals. This design provides for both accurate beam positioning at the isocenter by actively compensating for mechanical distortion and quick pursuit of the target. The X-ray head is composed of an ultralight C-band linear accelerator and a multileaf collimator. The gimbaled X-ray head is mounted on a rigid O-ring structure with an on-board imaging subsystem composed of two sets of kilovoltage X-ray tubes and flat panel detectors, which provides a pair of radiographs, cone beam computed tomography images useful for image guided setup, and real-time fluoroscopic monitoring for pursuit irradiation. Results: The root mean square accuracy of the static beam positioning was 0.1 mm for 360{sup o} of O-ring rotation. The dynamic beam response and positioning accuracy was {+-}0.6 mm for a 0.75 Hz, 40-mm stroke and {+-}0.4 mm for a 2.0 Hz, 8-mm stroke. The quality of the images was encouraging for using the tomography-based setup. Fluoroscopic images were sufficient for monitoring and tracking lung tumors. Conclusions: Key functions and capabilities of our new system are very promising for precise image-guided setup and for tracking and pursuit irradiation of a moving target.

  18. Medical CT image reconstruction accuracy in the presence of metal objects using x-rays up to 1 MeV with x-ray targets of beryllium, carbon, aluminum, copper, and tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, James; Ganguly, Arundhuti; Virshup, Gary

    2012-04-01

    Flat panels imagers based on amorphous silicon technology (a-Si) for digital radiography have been accepted by the medical community as having several advantages over film-based systems. Radiotherapy treatment planning systems employ computed tomographic (CT) data sets and projection images to delineate tumor targets and normal structures that are to be spared from radiation treatment. The accuracy of CT numbers is crucial for radiotherapy dose calculations. Conventional CT scanners operating at kilovoltage X-ray energies typically exhibit significant image reconstruction artifacts in the presence of metal implants in human body. Megavoltage X-ray energies have problems maintaining contrast sensitivity for the same dose as kV X-ray systems. We intend to demonstrate significant improvement in metal artifact reductions and electron density measurements using an amorphous silicon a-Si imager obtained with an X-ray source that can operate at energies up to 1 MeV. We will investigate the ability to maintain contrast sensitivity at this higher X-ray energy by using targets with lower atomic numbers and appropriate amounts of Xray filtration than are typically used as X-ray production targets and filters.

  19. Feasibility of an image planning system for kilovoltage image-guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Thapa, Bishnu B.; Molloy, Janelle A.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Image guidance has become a standard of care for many treatment scenarios in radiation therapy. This is most typically accomplished by use of kV x-ray devices mounted onto the linear accelerator (Linac) gantry that yield planar, fluoroscopic, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Image acquisition parameters are chosen via preset techniques that rely on broad categorizations in patient anatomy and imaging goal. However, the optimal imaging technique results in detectability of the features of interest while exposing the patient to minimum dose. Herein, the authors present an investigation into the feasibility of developing an image planning system (IPS) for radiotherapy.Methods: In this first phase, the authors focused on developing an algorithm to predict tissue contrast produced by a common radiotherapy planar imaging chain. Input parameters include a CT dataset and simulated planar imaging technique settings that include kV and mAs. Energy-specific attenuation through each voxel of the CT dataset was calculated in the algorithm to derive a net transmitted intensity. The response of the flat panel detector was integrated into the image simulation algorithm. Verification was conducted by comparing simulated and measured images using four phantoms. Comparisons were made in both high and low contrast settings, as well as changes in the geometric appearance due to image saturation. Results: The authors studied a lung nodule test object to assess the planning system's ability to predict object contrast and detectability. Verification demonstrated that the slope of the pixel intensities is similar, the presence of the nodule is evident, and image saturation at high mAs values is evident in both images. The appearance of the lung nodule is a function of the image detector saturation. The authors assessed the dimensions of the lung nodule in measured and simulated images. Good quantitative agreement affirmed the algorithm's predictive capabilities

  20. Process for direct conversion of reactive metals to glass

    DOEpatents

    Rajan, John B.; Kumar, Romesh; Vissers, Donald R.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive alkali metal is introduced into a cyclone reactor in droplet form by an aspirating gas. In the cyclone metal reactor the aspirated alkali metal is contacted with silica powder introduced in an air stream to form in one step a glass. The sides of the cyclone reactor are preheated to ensure that the initial glass formed coats the side of the reactor forming a protective coating against the reactants which are maintained in excess of 1000.degree. C. to ensure the formation of glass in a single step.

  1. Direct Conversion from Terminal Borylene into Terminal Phosphinidene.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Holger; Jimenez-Halla, J Oscar C; Radacki, Krzysztof; Shang, Rong

    2016-10-01

    The first terminal manganese phosphinidene complex was quantitatively synthesized from a terminal alkylborylene complex. Its structure and bonding, as well as the reaction mechanism, were investigated through a combination of experimental and computational studies. PMID:27621216

  2. Direct conversion of human fibroblasts to induced serotonergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Jiang, H; Zhong, P; Yan, Z; Chen, S; Feng, J

    2016-01-01

    Serotonergic (5HT) neurons exert diverse and widespread functions in the brain. Dysfunction of the serotonergic system gives rise to a variety of mental illnesses including depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, autism and eating disorders. Here we show that human primary fibroblasts were directly converted to induced serotonergic (i5HT) neurons by the expression of Ascl1, Foxa2, Lmx1b and FEV. The transdifferentiation was enhanced by p53 knockdown and appropriate culture conditions including hypoxia. The i5HT neurons expressed markers for mature serotonergic neurons, had Ca(2+)-dependent 5HT release and selective 5HT uptake, exhibited spontaneous action potentials and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Application of serotonin significantly increased the firing rate of spontaneous action potentials, demonstrating the functional utility of i5HT neurons for studying serotonergic neurotransmission. The availability of human i5HT neurons will be very useful for research and drug discovery on many serotonin-related mental disorders. PMID:26216300

  3. Direct conversion of halogen-containing wastes to borosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Rudolph, J.C.

    1996-12-09

    Glass has become a preferred waste form worldwide for radioactive wastes: however, there are limitations. Halogen-containing wastes can not be converted to glass because halogens form poor-quality waste glasses. Furthermore, halides in glass melters often form second phases that create operating problems. A new waste vitrification process, the Glass Material Oxidation and dissolution System (GMODS), removes these limitations by converting halogen-containing wastes into borosilicate glass and a secondary, clean, sodium-halide stream.

  4. Photoelectrochemical based direct conversion systems for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Khaselev, O.; Bansal, A.; Kocha, S.; Turner, J.A.

    1998-08-01

    With an eye towards developing a photoelectrochemical system for hydrogen production using sunlight as the only energy input, two types of systems were studied, both involving multijunction devices. One set of cells consisted of a-Si triple junctions and the other a GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs tandem cell combination. Additional investigations were carried out on semiconductor surface modifications to move semiconductor band edges to more favorable energetic positions.

  5. Direct Conversion from Terminal Borylene into Terminal Phosphinidene.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Holger; Jimenez-Halla, J Oscar C; Radacki, Krzysztof; Shang, Rong

    2016-10-01

    The first terminal manganese phosphinidene complex was quantitatively synthesized from a terminal alkylborylene complex. Its structure and bonding, as well as the reaction mechanism, were investigated through a combination of experimental and computational studies.

  6. Direct Conversion Provides Old Neurons from Aged Donor's Skin.

    PubMed

    Koch, Philipp

    2015-12-01

    Modeling human neuronal aging at a cellular level remains challenging. Human neurons are accessible from iPSCs, but during reprogramming age-associated traits of somatic cells get lost. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Mertens et al. (2015) demonstrate that neurons obtained by direct cell conversion retain age-associated transcriptional traits and functional deficits of the donor cell population. PMID:26637936

  7. Near-infrared imaging system for detecting small organic foreign substances in foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashima, Hiroto; Genta, Tsuneaki; Ishii, Yuya; Ishiyama, Takeshi; Arai, Shinichi; Fukuda, Mitsuo

    2013-09-01

    Contamination of foodstuffs with foreign substances is a serious problem because it often has negative effects on consumer health. However, detection of small organic substances in foods can be difficult because they are undetectable with traditional inspection apparatus. In this work, we developed new equipment that can detect small organic contaminant substances in food at high speed using a near-infrared (NIR) imaging technique. The absorption spectra of various foods were measured, and the spectra showed low absorbance at wavelengths from 600 nm to 1150 nm. Based on the observable wavelength range of a CMOS camera, which has a high dynamic range, superluminescent diodes (SLDs) with a wavelength of 830 nm were selected as light sources. We arranged 40 SLDs on a flat panel and placed a diffusion panel over them. As a result, uniformly distributed light with an intensity of 0.26 mW/cm2 illuminated an area of 6.0 cm × 6.0 cm. Insects (3 mm wide) and hairs (0.1 mm in diameter) were embedded in stacked ham slices and in chocolate, with a total thickness of 5 mm in each case, and the transmission images were observed. Both insects and hairs were clearly observed as dark shadows with high contrast. We also compensated the images by using software developed in this study to eliminate low spatial frequency components in the images and improve the sharpness and contrast. As a result, the foreign substances were more clearly distinguished in the 5-mm-thick ham.

  8. Study of Stent Deployment Mechanics Using a High-Resolution X-ray Imaging Detector

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian N; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    To treat or prevent some of the 795,000 annual strokes in the U.S., self-expanding endo-vascular stents deployed under fluoroscopic image guidance are often used. Neuro-interventionalists need to know the deployment behavior of each stent in order to place them in the correct position. Using the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) which has about 3 times higher resolution than commercially available flat panel detectors (FPD) we studied the deployment mechanics of two of the most important commercially available nitinol stents: the Pipeline embolization device (EV3), and the Enterprise stent (Codman). The Pipeline stent's length extends to about 3 times that of its deployed length when it is contained inside a catheter. From the high-resolution images with the MAF we found that upon the sudden release of the distal end of the Pipeline from a helical wire cap, the stent expands radially but retracts to about 30% (larger than for patient deployments) of its length. When released from the catheter proximally, it retracts additionally about 50% contributing to large uncertainty in the final deployed location. In contrast, the MAF images clearly show that the Enterprise stent self expands with minimal length retraction during deployment from its catheter and can be retrieved and repositioned until the proximal markers are released from clasping structures on its guide-wire thus enabling more accurate placement at the center of an aneurysm or stenosis. The high-resolution imaging demonstrated in this study should help neurointerventionalists understand and control endovascular stent deployment mechanisms and hence perform more precise treatments. PMID:21804747

  9. A reconfigurable image tube using an external electronic image readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, J. S.; Howorth, J. R.; Milnes, J. S.

    2005-08-01

    We have designed and built a sealed tube microchannel plate (MCP) intensifier for optical/NUV photon counting applications suitable for 18, 25 and 40 mm diameter formats. The intensifier uses an electronic image readout to provide direct conversion of event position into electronic signals, without the drawbacks associated with phosphor screens and subsequent optical detection. The Image Charge technique is used to remove the readout from the intensifier vacuum enclosure, obviating the requirement for additional electrical vacuum feedthroughs and for the readout pattern to be UHV compatible. The charge signal from an MCP intensifier is capacitively coupled via a thin dielectric vacuum window to the electronic image readout, which is external to the sealed intensifier tube. The readout pattern is a separate item held in proximity to the dielectric window and can be easily detached, making the system easily reconfigurable. Since the readout pattern detects induced charge and is external to the tube, it can be constructed as a multilayer, eliminating the requirement for narrow insulator gaps and allowing it to be constructed using standard PCB manufacturing tolerances. We describe two readout patterns, the tetra wedge anode (TWA), an optimized 4 electrode device similar to the wedge and strip anode (WSA) but with a factor 2 improvement in resolution, and an 8 channel high speed 50 ohm device, both manufactured as multilayer PCBs. We present results of the detector imaging performance, image resolution, linearity and stability, and discuss the development of an integrated readout and electronics device based on these designs.

  10. Comparison of image quality among three X-ray systems for chest radiography: first step in optimisation.

    PubMed

    Nocetti, D; Ubeda, C; Calcagno, S; Acevedo, J; Pardo, D

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance of three digital X-ray systems [one flat-panel (DR) and two computed radiography (CR)] for chest radiography in terms of the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) delivered to a polymethyl methacrylate phantom of 20 cm (equivalent to an adult patient) and image quality through of numerical evaluations using a test object (TO). The tube charge applied was ranged from 0.6 to 32 mAs, to a fixed tension of 125 kVp. The DR system presented the highest mean values of ESAK (615.9 µGy) along with the highest signal-to-noise ratio values, whereas CR systems showed a better high-contrast spatial resolution. Differences were statistically significant in both cases regarding the tube charge used. Thus, this parameter should be mainly considered to optimise the radiological protection through exposure settings selected. This survey represents the first effort to achieve optimisation in digital radiology for Chile. PMID:25821212

  11. Radiotherapy treatment verification using radiological thickness measured with an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device: Monte Carlo simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairn, T.; Cassidy, D.; Sandford, P. M.; Fielding, A. L.

    2008-07-01

    This work validates the use of an amorphous-silicon, flat-panel electronic portal imaging device (a-Si EPID) for use as a gauge of patient or phantom radiological thickness, as an alternative to dosimetry. The response of the a-Si EPID is calibrated by adapting a technique previously applied to scanning liquid ion chamber EPIDs, and the stability, accuracy and reliability of this calibration are explored in detail. We find that the stability of this calibration, between different linacs at the same centre, is sufficient to justify calibrating only one of the EPIDs every month and using the calibration data thus obtained to perform measurements on all of the other linacs. Radiological thickness is shown to provide a reliable means of relating experimental measurements to the results of BEAMnrc Monte Carlo simulations of the linac-phantom-EPID system. For these reasons we suggest that radiological thickness can be used to verify radiotherapy treatment delivery and identify changes in the treatment field, patient position and target location, as well as patient physical thickness.

  12. Cilengitide inhibits progression of experimental breast cancer bone metastases as imaged noninvasively using VCT, MRI and DCE-MRI in a longitudinal in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Bäuerle, Tobias; Komljenovic, Dorde; Merz, Maximilian; Berger, Martin R; Goodman, Simon L; Semmler, Wolfhard

    2011-05-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of inhibiting αvβ(3)/α(v) β(5) integrins by cilengitide in experimentally induced breast cancer bone metastases using noninvasive imaging techniques. For this purpose, nude rats bearing established breast cancer bone metastases were treated with cilengitide, a small molecule inhibitor of αvβ(3) and αvβ(5) integrins (75 mg/kg, five days per week; n = 12 rats) and compared to vehicle-treated control rats (n = 12). In a longitudinal study, conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and flat panel volumetric computed tomography were used to assess the volume of the soft tissue tumor and osteolysis, respectively, and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI was performed to determine functional parameters of the tumor vasculature reflecting blood volume and blood vessel permeability. In rats treated with cilengitide, VCT and MRI showed that osteolytic lesions and the respective bone metastatic soft tissue tumors progressed more slowly than in vehicle-treated controls. DCE-MRI indicated a decrease in blood volume and an increase in vessel permeability and immunohistology revealed increased numbers of immature vessels in cilengitide-treated rats compared to vehicle controls. In conclusion, treatment of experimental breast cancer bone metastases with cilengitide resulted in pronounced antiresorptive and antitumor effects, suggesting that αvβ(3)/αvβ(5) inhibition may be a promising therapeutic approach for bone metastases. PMID:20648558

  13. Evaluation of flow with dynamic x-ray imaging for aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohatcu, Andreea Cristina

    characteristics as a result of interaction with an AVS. A comparison with optical-dye-dilution data and 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics virtual angiography (CFD) data in similar conditions was also performed. Task oriented optimization of x-ray system parameters with regard to the needs of obtaining TDCs so as to obtain more accurate information of contrast media flow into aneurysms from angiographic images, were done. This includes a comparison between a commercial x-ray Flat Panel Detector (FPD) and an in-house new x-ray micro detector prototype, the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF). X-ray dose levels given in clinical procedures similar in length and complexity to aneurysm treatments, were studied on a statistical representative batch. It was concluded that there is a need for reduction of radiation-induced skin injuries to patients following interventional procedures. Hence, we developed and assessed a method to evaluate the variation of image quality (which impacts the success of TDC analysis) and dose with the acquisition mode operation logic and the automatic-brightness-control (ABC); this method was applied to two clinical interventional fluoroscopic imaging systems: one with an Image Intensifier (II) and the other with a Flat Panel Detector (FPD). The resultant ABC tracking curves obtained for the various imaging modes available on a given system can then be used for proper selection of technique to achieve the needed contrast signal to noise ratio to acquire adequate data for TDC evaluation, while controlling the patient dose.

  14. Prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice using carbon nanotube field emission x-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Guohua; Burk, Laurel M.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source technology has recently been investigated for diagnostic imaging applications because of its attractive characteristics including electronic programmability, fast switching, distributed source, and multiplexing. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the potential of this technology for high-resolution prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging. Methods: A dynamic cone-beam micro-CT scanner was constructed using a rotating gantry, a stationary mouse bed, a flat-panel detector, and a sealed CNT based microfocus x-ray source. The compact single-beam CNT x-ray source was operated at 50 KVp and 2 mA anode current with 100 {mu}mx100 {mu}m effective focal spot size. Using an intravenously administered iodinated blood-pool contrast agent, prospective cardiac and respiratory-gated micro-CT images of beating mouse hearts were obtained from ten anesthetized free-breathing mice in their natural position. Four-dimensional cardiac images were also obtained by gating the image acquisition to different phases in the cardiac cycle. Results: High-resolution CT images of beating mouse hearts were obtained at 15 ms temporal resolution and 6.2 lp/mm spatial resolution at 10% of system MTF. The images were reconstructed at 76 {mu}m isotropic voxel size. The data acquisition time for two cardiac phases was 44{+-}9 min. The CT values observed within the ventricles and the ventricle wall were 455{+-}49 and 120{+-}48 HU, respectively. The entrance dose for the acquisition of a single phase of the cardiac cycle was 0.10 Gy. Conclusions: A high-resolution dynamic micro-CT scanner was developed from a compact CNT microfocus x-ray source and its feasibility for prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice under their natural position was demonstrated.

  15. WE-A-BRF-01: Dual-Energy CT Imaging in Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Molloi, S; Li, B; Yin, F; Chen, H

    2014-06-15

    The quantification accuracy of dual-energy imaging is influenced by the fundamentals of x-ray physics, system geometry, data acquisition hardware/protocol, system calibration, and image processing technique. This symposium will provide updates on the following advanced application areas: Mammography. Volumetric breast density techniques based on standard mammograms require estimation of breast thickness, which is difficult to accurately measure. By comparison, calculation of breast density using dual energy mammography does not require measurement of breast thickness. Dual energy mammography has been implemented using both energy integrating flat panel detectors in conjunction with beam energy switching and energy resolved photon counting detectors. These techniques have been optimized using simulation studies and validated using physical phantoms and postmortem breasts. Chemical decomposition was used as the gold standard for volumetric breast density measurement in postmortem breasts. Breast density measurements have also been compared with results from four-category BI-RADS density rankings, standard image thresholding and Fuzzy k-mean clustering techniques. These studies indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to accurately measure volumetric breast density. Cardiovascular CT. The predicative accuracy of risk models for recurrent stroke and cardiac arrest depends heavily on accurate differentiation of thrombus or calcium from iodine in left atrial appendage or coronary arteries. The amount of energy separation is constrained by image noise; therefore, optimal kVp, beam filtration, and balanced flux are essential for the quantification accuracy of iodine and calcium. The basis materials are combined linearly to generate monochromatic energy images, where CT# accuracy and CNR are energy dependent. With optimal monochromatic energy, the mean iodine concentration for the thrombus, circulatory stasis, and control groups are significantly different. Risk

  16. IMAGES, IMAGES, IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, A.

    1980-07-01

    The role of images of information (charts, diagrams, maps, and symbols) for effective presentation of facts and concepts is expanding dramatically because of advances in computer graphics technology, increasingly hetero-lingual, hetero-cultural world target populations of information providers, the urgent need to convey more efficiently vast amounts of information, the broadening population of (non-expert) computer users, the decrease of available time for reading texts and for decision making, and the general level of literacy. A coalition of visual performance experts, human engineering specialists, computer scientists, and graphic designers/artists is required to resolve human factors aspects of images of information. The need for, nature of, and benefits of interdisciplinary effort are discussed. The results of an interdisciplinary collaboration are demonstrated in a product for visualizing complex information about global energy interdependence. An invited panel will respond to the presentation.

  17. The Solid-State X-Ray Image Intensifier (SSXII): An EMCCD-Based X-Ray Detector

    PubMed Central

    Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Yadava, Girijesh; Patel, Vikas; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The solid-state x-ray image intensifier (SSXII) is an EMCCD-based x-ray detector designed to satisfy an increasing need for high-resolution real-time images, while offering significant improvements over current flat panel detectors (FPDs) and x-ray image intensifiers (XIIs). FPDs are replacing XIIs because they reduce/eliminate veiling glare, pincushion or s-shaped distortions and are physically flat. However, FPDs suffer from excessive lag and ghosting and their performance has been disappointing for low-exposure-per-frame procedures due to excessive instrumentation-noise. XIIs and FPDs both have limited resolution capabilities of ~3 cycles/mm. To overcome these limitations a prototype SSXII module has been developed, consisting of a 1k × 1k, 8 μm pixel EMCCD with a fiber-optic input window, which views a 350 μm thick CsI(Tl) phosphor via a 4:1 magnifying fiber-optic-taper (FOT). Arrays of such modules will provide a larger field-of-view. Detector MTF, DQE, and instrumentation-noise equivalent exposure (INEE) were measured to evaluate the SSXIIs performance using a standard x-ray spectrum (IEC RQA5), allowing for comparison with current state-of-the-art detectors. The MTF was 0.20 at 3 cycles/mm, comparable to standard detectors, and better than 0.05 up to 7 cycles/mm, well beyond current capabilities. DQE curves indicate no degradation from high-angiographic to low-fluoroscopic exposures (< 2% deviation in overall DQE from 1.3 mR to 2.7 μR), demonstrating negligible instrumentation-noise, even with low input signal intensities. An INEE of < 0.2 μR was measured for the highest-resolution mode (32 μm effective pixel size). Comparison images between detector technologies qualitatively demonstrate these improved imaging capabilities provided by the SSXII. PMID:18836568

  18. NDE of spacecraft materials using 3D Compton backscatter x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, E. R.; Grubsky, V.; Romanov, V.; Shoemaker, K.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of testing of the NDE performance of a Compton Imaging Tomography (CIT) system for single-sided, penetrating 3D inspection. The system was recently developed by Physical Optics Corporation (POC) and delivered to NASA for testing and evaluation. The CIT technology is based on 3D structure mapping by collecting the information on density profiles in multiple object cross sections through hard x-ray Compton backscatter imaging. The individual cross sections are processed and fused together in software, generating a 3D map of the density profile of the object which can then be analyzed slice-by-slice in x, y, or z directions. The developed CIT scanner is based on a 200-kV x-ray source, flat-panel x-ray detector (FPD), and apodized x-ray imaging optics. The CIT technology is particularly well suited to the NDE of lightweight aerospace materials, such as the thermal protection system (TPS) ceramic and composite materials, micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shielding, spacecraft pressure walls, inflatable habitat structures, composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), and aluminum honeycomb materials. The current system provides 3D localization of defects and features with field of view 20x12x8 cm3 and spatial resolution ˜2 mm. In this paper, we review several aerospace NDE applications of the CIT technology, with particular emphasis on TPS. Based on the analysis of the testing results, we provide recommendations for continued development on TPS applications that can benefit the most from the unique capabilities of this new NDE technology.

  19. Statistical Reconstruction for Cone-Beam CT with a Post-Artifact-Correction Noise Model: Application to High-Quality Head Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Sisniega, A.; Xu, J.; Zbijewski, W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V.

    2015-01-01

    Non-contrast CT reliably detects fresh blood in the brain and is the current front-line imaging modality for intracranial hemorrhage such as that occurring in acute traumatic brain injury (contrast ~40-80 HU, size > 1 mm). We are developing flat-panel detector (FPD) cone-beam CT (CBCT) to facilitate such diagnosis in a low-cost, mobile platform suitable for point-of-care deployment. Such a system may offer benefits in the ICU, urgent care/concussion clinic, ambulance, and sports and military theatres. However, current FPD-CBCT systems face significant challenges that confound low-contrast, soft-tissue imaging. Artifact correction can overcome major sources of bias in FPD-CBCT but imparts noise amplification in filtered backprojection (FBP). Model-based reconstruction improves soft-tissue image quality compared to FBP by leveraging a high-fidelity forward model and image regularization. In this work, we develop a novel penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) image reconstruction method with a noise model that includes accurate modeling of the noise characteristics associated with the two dominant artifact corrections (scatter and beam-hardening) in CBCT and utilizes modified weights to compensate for noise amplification imparted by each correction. Experiments included real data acquired on a FPD-CBCT test-bench and an anthropomorphic head phantom emulating intra-parenchymal hemorrhage. The proposed PWLS method demonstrated superior noise-resolution tradeoffs in comparison to FBP and PWLS with conventional weights (viz., at matched 0.50 mm spatial resolution, CNR = 11.9 compared to CNR = 5.6 and CNR = 9.9, respectively) and substantially reduced image noise especially in challenging regions such as skull base. The results support the hypothesis that with high-fidelity artifact correction and statistical reconstruction using an accurate post-artifact-correction noise model, FPD-CBCT can achieve image quality allowing reliable detection of intracranial hemorrhage

  20. Component Level Modular Design of a Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier for an M×N Array

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Qu, Bin; Sharma, Prateek; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Wang, Weiyuan; Titus, Albert H.; Cartwright, Alexander N.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The Solid-State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) is a novel dynamic x-ray imager, based on an array of electron-multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs), that can significantly improve performance compared to conventional x-ray image intensifiers (XIIs) and flat panel detectors (FPDs). To expand the field-of-view (FOV) of the SSXII detectors while maintaining high resolution, a scalable component level modular design is presented. Each module can be fit together with minimum dead-space and optically coupled to one contiguous x-ray converter plate. The electronics of each of the modules consists of a detachable head-board, on which is mounted the EMCCD, and a driver board. The size of the head-boards is minimized to ensure that the modules fit together properly. The driver boards connect with the head-boards via flat cables and are designed to be plugged into the main mother-board that contains an FPGA chip that generates the driving clock signals for the EMCCDs and analog-to-digital converter (ADC). At the front-end, a high speed ADC on each of the driver boards samples and digitizes the EMCCD analog output signal and an extensible modular digital multiplexer back-end is used to acquire and combine image data from multiple modules. The combined digital data is then transmitted to a PC via a standard Camera Link interface. Eventually, this modular design will be extended to a 3×3 or larger array to accomplish full clinical FOVs and enable the SSXII to replace conventional lower-resolution XIIs or FPDs. PMID:23505331

  1. Real time implementation of distortion corrections for a tiled EMCCD-based solid state x-ray image intensifier (SSXII)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keleshis, Christos; Hoffmann, K. R.; Lee, J.; Hamwi, H.; Wang, W.; Ionita, C. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Verevkin, A.; Rudin, S.

    2009-02-01

    The new Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) is being designed based on a modular imaging array of Electron Multiplying Charge Couple Devices (EMCCD). Each of the detector modules consists of a CsI(Tl) phosphor coupled to a fiber-optic plate, a fiber-optic taper (FOT), and an EMCCD sensor with its electronics. During the optical coupling and alignment of the modules into an array form, small orientation misalignments, such as rotation and translation of the EMCCD sensors, are expected. In addition, barrel distortion will result from the FOTs. Correction algorithms have been developed by our group for all the above artifacts. However, it is critical for the system's performance to correct these artifacts in real-time (30 fps). To achieve this, we will use two-dimensional Look-Up-Tables (LUT) (each for x and y coordinates), which map the corrected pixel locations to the acquired-image pixel locations. To evaluate the feasibility of this approach, this process is simulated making use of parallel coding techniques to allow real-time distortion corrections for up to sixteen modules when a standard quad processor is used. The results of this simulation confirm that tiled field-of-views (FOV) comparable with those of flat panel detectors can be generated in ~17 ms (>30 fps). The increased FOV enabled through correction of tiled images, combined with the EMCCD characteristics of low noise, negligible lag and high sensitivity, should make possible the practical use of the SSXII with substantial advantages over conventional clinical systems. (Support: NIH Grants R01EB008425, R01NS43924, R01EB002873)

  2. Intraoperative imaging for patient safety and QA: detection of intracranial hemorrhage using C-arm cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Sebastian; Wang, Adam; Otake, Yoshito; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Xia, Xuewei; Gallia, Gary L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2013-03-01

    Intraoperative imaging could improve patient safety and quality assurance (QA) via the detection of subtle complications that might otherwise only be found hours after surgery. Such capability could therefore reduce morbidity and the need for additional intervention. Among the severe adverse events that could be more quickly detected by high-quality intraoperative imaging is acute intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), conventionally assessed using post-operative CT. A mobile C-arm capable of high-quality cone-beam CT (CBCT) in combination with advanced image reconstruction techniques is reported as a means of detecting ICH in the operating room. The system employs an isocentric C-arm with a flat-panel detector in dual gain mode, correction of x-ray scatter and beam-hardening, and a penalized likelihood (PL) iterative reconstruction method. Performance in ICH detection was investigated using a quantitative phantom focusing on (non-contrast-enhanced) blood-brain contrast, an anthropomorphic head phantom, and a porcine model with injection of fresh blood bolus. The visibility of ICH was characterized in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and qualitative evaluation of images by a neurosurgeon. Across a range of size and contrast of the ICH as well as radiation dose from the CBCT scan, the CNR was found to increase from ~2.2-3.7 for conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) to ~3.9-5.4 for PL at equivalent spatial resolution. The porcine model demonstrated superior ICH detectability for PL. The results support the role of high-quality mobile C-arm CBCT employing advanced reconstruction algorithms for detecting subtle complications in the operating room at lower radiation dose and lower cost than intraoperative CT scanners and/or fixedroom C-arms. Such capability could present a potentially valuable aid to patient safety and QA.

  3. The positron emission mammography/tomography breast imaging and biopsy system (PEM/PET): design, construction and phantom-based measurements.

    PubMed

    Raylman, Raymond R; Majewski, Stan; Smith, Mark F; Proffitt, James; Hammond, William; Srinivasan, Amarnath; McKisson, John; Popov, Vladimir; Weisenberger, Andrew; Judy, Clifford O; Kross, Brian; Ramasubramanian, Srikanth; Banta, Larry E; Kinahan, Paul E; Champley, Kyle

    2008-02-01

    Tomographic breast imaging techniques can potentially improve detection and diagnosis of cancer in women with radiodense and/or fibrocystic breasts. We have developed a high-resolution positron emission mammography/tomography imaging and biopsy device (called PEM/PET) to detect and guide the biopsy of suspicious breast lesions. PET images are acquired to detect suspicious focal uptake of the radiotracer and guide biopsy of the area. Limited-angle PEM images could then be used to verify the biopsy needle position prior to tissue sampling. The PEM/PET scanner consists of two sets of rotating planar detector heads. Each detector consists of a 4 x 3 array of Hamamatsu H8500 flat panel position sensitive photomultipliers (PSPMTs) coupled to a 96 x 72 array of 2 x 2 x 15 mm(3) LYSO detector elements (pitch = 2.1 mm). Image reconstruction is performed with a three-dimensional, ordered set expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm parallelized to run on a multi-processor computer system. The reconstructed field of view (FOV) is 15 x 15 x 15 cm(3). Initial phantom-based testing of the device is focusing upon its PET imaging capabilities. Specifically, spatial resolution and detection sensitivity were assessed. The results from these measurements yielded a spatial resolution at the center of the FOV of 2.01 +/- 0.09 mm (radial), 2.04 +/- 0.08 mm (tangential) and 1.84 +/- 0.07 mm (axial). At a radius of 7 cm from the center of the scanner, the results were 2.11 +/- 0.08 mm (radial), 2.16 +/- 0.07 mm (tangential) and 1.87 +/- 0.08 mm (axial). Maximum system detection sensitivity of the scanner is 488.9 kcps microCi(-1) ml(-1) (6.88%). These promising findings indicate that PEM/PET may be an effective system for the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer.

  4. Edge effects in a small pixel CdTe for X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, D. D.; Bell, S. J.; Lipp, J.; Schneider, A.; Seller, P.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Baker, M. A.; Sellin, P. J.; Kachkanov, V.; Sawhney, K. J. S.

    2013-10-01

    Large area detectors capable of operating with high detection efficiency at energies above 30 keV are required in many contemporary X-ray imaging applications. The properties of high Z compound semiconductors, such as CdTe, make them ideally suitable to these applications. The STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory has developed a small pixel CdTe detector with 80 × 80 pixels on a 250 μm pitch. Historically, these detectors have included a 200 μm wide guard band around the pixelated anode to reduce the effect of defects in the crystal edge. The latest version of the detector ASIC is capable of four-side butting that allows the tiling of N × N flat panel arrays. To limit the dead space between modules to the width of one pixel, edgeless detector geometries have been developed where the active volume of the detector extends to the physical edge of the crystal. The spectroscopic performance of an edgeless CdTe detector bump bonded to the HEXITEC ASIC was tested with sealed radiation sources and compared with a monochromatic X-ray micro-beam mapping measurements made at the Diamond Light Source, U.K. The average energy resolution at 59.54 keV of bulk and edge pixels was 1.23 keV and 1.58 keV, respectively. 87% of the edge pixels present fully spectroscopic performance demonstrating that edgeless CdTe detectors are a promising technology for the production of large panel radiation detectors for X-ray imaging.

  5. A Novel Technique for Image-Guided Local Heart Irradiation in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunil; Moros, Eduardo G.; Boerma, Marjan; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Han, Eun Young; Clarkson, Richard; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Corry, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    In radiotherapy treatment of thoracic, breast and chest wall tumors, the heart may be included (partially or fully) in the radiation field. As a result, patients may develop radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) several years after exposure to radiation. There are few methods available to prevent or reverse RIHD and the biological mechanisms remain poorly understood. In order to further study the effects of radiation on the heart, we developed a model of local heart irradiation in rats using an image-guided small animal conformal radiation therapy device (SACRTD) developed at our institution. First, Monte Carlo based simulations were used to design an appropriate collimator. EBT-2 films were used to measure relative dosimetry, and the absolute dose rate at the isocenter was measured using the AAPM protocol TG-61. The hearts of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with a total dose of 21 Gy. For this purpose, rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and placed in a custom-made vertical rat holder. Each heart was irradiated with a 3-beam technique (one AP field and 2 lateral fields), with each beam delivering 7 Gy. For each field, the heart was visualized with a digital flat panel X-ray imager and placed at the isocenter of the 1.8 cm diameter beam. In biological analysis of radiation exposure, immunohistochemistry showed γH2Ax foci and nitrotyrosine throughout the irradiated hearts but not in the lungs. Long-term follow-up of animals revealed histopathological manifestations of RIHD, including myocardial degeneration and fibrosis. The results demonstrate that the rat heart irradiation technique using the SACRTD was successful and that surrounding untargeted tissues were spared, making this approach a powerful tool for in vivo radiobiological studies of RIHD. Functional and structural changes in the rat heart after local irradiation are ongoing. PMID:24000983

  6. Low-dose megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging using thick, segmented scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua; Choroszucha, Richard B.; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Langechuan

    2011-03-01

    Megavoltage, cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) employing an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is a highly promising technique for providing soft-tissue visualization in image-guided radiotherapy. However, current EPIDs based on active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), which are regarded as the gold standard for portal imaging and referred to as conventional MV AMFPIs, require high radiation doses to achieve this goal due to poor x-ray detection efficiency (~2% at 6 MV). To overcome this limitation, the incorporation of thick, segmented, crystalline scintillators, as a replacement for the phosphor screens used in these AMFPIs, has been shown to significantly improve the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) performance, leading to improved image quality for projection imaging at low dose. Toward the realization of practical AMFPIs capable of low dose, soft-tissue visualization using MV CBCT imaging, two prototype AMFPIs incorporating segmented scintillators with ~11 mm thick CsI:Tl and Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) crystals were evaluated. Each scintillator consists of 120 × 60 crystalline elements separated by reflective septal walls, with an element-to-element pitch of 1.016 mm. The prototypes were evaluated using a bench-top CBCT system, allowing the acquisition of 180 projection, 360° tomographic scans with a 6 MV radiotherapy photon beam. Reconstructed images of a spatial resolution phantom, as well as of a water-equivalent phantom, embedded with tissue equivalent objects having electron densities (relative to water) varying from ~0.28 to ~1.70, were obtained down to one beam pulse per projection image, corresponding to a scan dose of ~4 cGy--a dose similar to that required for a single portal image obtained from a conventional MV AMFPI. By virtue of their significantly improved DQE, the prototypes provided low contrast visualization, allowing clear delineation of an object with an electron density difference of ~2.76%. Results of contrast, noise and contrast

  7. Progress in the Development of a new Angiography Suite including the High Resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF), a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS), and a New Detector Changer Integrated into a Commercial C-Arm Angiography Unit to Enable Clinical Use.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian N; Keleshis, Christos; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-03-23

    Due to the high-resolution needs of angiographic and interventional vascular imaging, a Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS) was installed on a detector changer which was attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The MAF detector provides high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities and consists of a 300 μm-thick CsI phosphor, a dual stage micro-channel plate light image intensifier (LII) coupled to a fiber optic taper (FOT), and a scientific grade frame-transfer CCD camera, providing an image matrix of 1024×1024 35 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The Solid-State X-Ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) is an EMCCD (Electron Multiplying charge-coupled device) based detector which provides an image matrix of 1k×1k 32 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The changer allows the MAF or a SSXII region-of-interest (ROI) detector to be inserted in front of the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) when higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. The CAPIDS was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF or SSXII including: fluoroscopy, roadmapping, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). The total system has been used for image guidance during endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI) using prototype self-expanding asymmetric vascular stents (SAVS) in over 10 rabbit aneurysm creation and treatment experiments which have demonstrated the system's potential benefits for future clinical use. PMID:21243037

  8. Progress in the Development of a new Angiography Suite including the High Resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF), a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS), and a New Detector Changer Integrated into a Commercial C-Arm Angiography Unit to Enable Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian N; Keleshis, Christos; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Due to the high-resolution needs of angiographic and interventional vascular imaging, a Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS) was installed on a detector changer which was attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The MAF detector provides high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities and consists of a 300 μm-thick CsI phosphor, a dual stage micro-channel plate light image intensifier (LII) coupled to a fiber optic taper (FOT), and a scientific grade frame-transfer CCD camera, providing an image matrix of 1024×1024 35 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The Solid-State X-Ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) is an EMCCD (Electron Multiplying charge-coupled device) based detector which provides an image matrix of 1k×1k 32 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The changer allows the MAF or a SSXII region-of-interest (ROI) detector to be inserted in front of the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) when higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. The CAPIDS was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF or SSXII including: fluoroscopy, roadmapping, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). The total system has been used for image guidance during endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI) using prototype self-expanding asymmetric vascular stents (SAVS) in over 10 rabbit aneurysm creation and treatment experiments which have demonstrated the system's potential benefits for future clinical use. PMID:21243037

  9. Progress in the development of a new angiography suite including the high resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF): a control, acquisition, processing, and image display system (CAPIDS), and a new detector changer integrated into a commercial C-arm angiography unit to enable clinical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Keleshis, Christos; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-04-01

    Due to the high-resolution needs of angiographic and interventional vascular imaging, a Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS) was installed on a detector changer which was attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The MAF detector provides high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities and consists of a 300 μm-thick CsI phosphor, a dual stage micro-channel plate light image intensifier (LII) coupled to a fiber optic taper (FOT), and a scientific grade frame-transfer CCD camera, providing an image matrix of 1024×1024 35 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The Solid-State X-Ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) is an EMCCD (Electron Multiplying charge-coupled device) based detector which provides an image matrix of 1k×1k 32 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The changer allows the MAF or a SSXII region-of-interest (ROI) detector to be inserted in front of the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) when higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. The CAPIDS was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF or SSXII including: fluoroscopy, roadmapping, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). The total system has been used for image guidance during endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI) using prototype self-expanding asymmetric vascular stents (SAVS) in over 10 rabbit aneurysm creation and treatment experiments which have demonstrated the system's potential benefits for future clinical use.

  10. SU-E-I-09: The Impact of X-Ray Scattering On Image Noise for Dedicated Breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, K; Gazi, P; Boone, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of detected x-ray scatter on image noise in flat panel based dedicated breast CT systems and to determine the optimal scanning geometry given practical trade-offs between radiation dose and scatter reduction. Methods: Four different uniform polyethylene cylinders (104, 131, 156, and 184 mm in diameter) were scanned as the phantoms on a dedicated breast CT scanner developed in our laboratory. Both stationary projection imaging and rotational cone-beam CT imaging was performed. For each acquisition type, three different x-ray beam collimations were used (12, 24, and 109 mm measured at isocenter). The aim was to quantify image noise properties (pixel variance, SNR, and image NPS) under different levels of x-ray scatter, in order to optimize the scanning geometry. For both projection images and reconstructed CT images, individual pixel variance and NPS were determined and compared. Noise measurement from the CT images were also performed with different detector binning modes and reconstruction matrix sizes. Noise propagation was also tracked throughout the intermediate steps of cone-beam CT reconstruction, including the inverse-logarithmic process, Fourier-filtering before backprojection. Results: Image noise was lower in the presence of higher scatter levels. For the 184 mm polyethylene phantom, the image noise (measured in pixel variance) was ∼30% lower with full cone-beam acquisition compared to a narrow (12 mm) fan-beam acquisition. This trend is consistent across all phantom sizes and throughout all steps of CT image reconstruction. Conclusion: From purely a noise perspective, the cone-beam geometry (i.e. the full cone-angle acquisition) produces lower image noise compared to the lower-scatter fan-beam acquisition for breast CT. While these results are relevant in homogeneous phantoms, the full impact of scatter on noise in bCT should involve contrast-to-noise-ratio measurements in heterogeneous phantoms if the goal is to optimize

  11. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: Spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Li Dan; Zhao Wei

    2008-07-15

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator/HARP (SHARP) combination is read out by the electron beams emitted from the FEA. The proposed detector is called scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The programmable avalanche gain of HARP can improve the low dose performance of indirect FPI while the FEA can be made with pixel sizes down to 50 {mu}m. Because of the avalanche gain, a high resolution type of CsI (Tl), which has not been widely used in indirect FPI due to its lower light output, can be used to improve the high spatial frequency performance. The purpose of the present article is to investigate the factors affecting the spatial resolution of SAPHIRE. Since the resolution performance of the SHARP combination has been well studied, the focus of the present work is on the inherent resolution of the FEA readout method. The lateral spread of the electron beam emitted from a 50 {mu}mx50 {mu}m pixel FEA was investigated with two different electron-optical designs: mesh-electrode-only and electrostatic focusing. Our results showed that electrostatic focusing can limit the lateral spread of electron beams to within the pixel size of down to 50 {mu}m. Since electrostatic focusing is essentially independent of signal intensity, it will provide excellent spatial uniformity.

  12. Microscopic x-ray imaging system for biomedical applications using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, Keiji; Kobatake, Makito; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamashita, Takenori; Imai, Shigeki

    2007-02-01

    An X-ray direct-conversion type detector with a spatial resolution of 10-11 μm was developed for real-time biomedical imaging. The detector incorporates the X-ray SATICON pickup tube with a photoconductive target layer of amorphous selenium. For high-resolution imaging, the X-ray image is directly converted into an electric signal in the photoconductive layer without image blur. Microangiography experiments were carried out for depicting angiogenic vessels in a rabbit model of cancer using the direct-conversion detector and a third generation synchrotron radiation source at SPring-8. In synchrotron radiation radiography, a long source-to-object distance and a small source spot can produce high-resolution images. After transplantation of cancer cells into the rabbit auricle, small tumor blood vessels with diameters of 20-30 μm in an immature vascular network produced by angiogenesis were visualized by contrast material injection into the auricular artery at a monochromatic X-ray energy of 33.2 keV just above the iodine K-edge energy. The synchrotron radiation system is a useful tool to evaluate the micro-angioarchitecture of malignant tumors in animal models of cancer for in vivo preclinical studies.

  13. Task-driven image acquisition and reconstruction in cone-beam CT.

    PubMed

    Gang, Grace J; Stayman, J Webster; Ehtiati, Tina; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2015-04-21

    This work introduces a task-driven imaging framework that incorporates a mathematical definition of the imaging task, a model of the imaging system, and a patient-specific anatomical model to prospectively design image acquisition and reconstruction techniques to optimize task performance. The framework is applied to joint optimization of tube current modulation, view-dependent reconstruction kernel, and orbital tilt in cone-beam CT. The system model considers a cone-beam CT system incorporating a flat-panel detector and 3D filtered backprojection and accurately describes the spatially varying noise and resolution over a wide range of imaging parameters in the presence of a realistic anatomical model. Task-based detectability index (d') is incorporated as the objective function in a task-driven optimization of image acquisition and reconstruction techniques. The orbital tilt was optimized through an exhaustive search across tilt angles ranging ± 30°. For each tilt angle, the view-dependent tube current and reconstruction kernel (i.e. the modulation profiles) that maximized detectability were identified via an alternating optimization. The task-driven approach was compared with conventional unmodulated and automatic exposure control (AEC) strategies for a variety of imaging tasks and anthropomorphic phantoms. The task-driven strategy outperformed the unmodulated and AEC cases for all tasks. For example, d' for a sphere detection task in a head phantom was improved by 30% compared to the unmodulated case by using smoother kernels for noisy views and distributing mAs across less noisy views (at fixed total mAs) in a manner that was beneficial to task performance. Similarly for detection of a line-pair pattern, the task-driven approach increased d' by 80% compared to no modulation by means of view-dependent mA and kernel selection that yields modulation transfer function and noise-power spectrum optimal to the task. Optimization of orbital tilt identified the tilt

  14. High-fidelity artifact correction for cone-beam CT imaging of the brain.

    PubMed

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Xu, J; Dang, H; Stayman, J W; Yorkston, J; Aygun, N; Koliatsos, V; Siewerdsen, J H

    2015-02-21

    CT is the frontline imaging modality for diagnosis of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI), involving the detection of fresh blood in the brain (contrast of 30-50 HU, detail size down to 1 mm) in a non-contrast-enhanced exam. A dedicated point-of-care imaging system based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) could benefit early detection of TBI and improve direction to appropriate therapy. However, flat-panel detector (FPD) CBCT is challenged by artifacts that degrade contrast resolution and limit application in soft-tissue imaging. We present and evaluate a fairly comprehensive framework for artifact correction to enable soft-tissue brain imaging with FPD CBCT. The framework includes a fast Monte Carlo (MC)-based scatter estimation method complemented by corrections for detector lag, veiling glare, and beam hardening.The fast MC scatter estimation combines GPU acceleration, variance reduction, and simulation with a low number of photon histories and reduced number of projection angles (sparse MC) augmented by kernel de-noising to yield a runtime of ~4 min per scan. Scatter correction is combined with two-pass beam hardening correction. Detector lag correction is based on temporal deconvolution of the measured lag response function. The effects of detector veiling glare are reduced by deconvolution of the glare response function representing the long range tails of the detector point-spread function. The performance of the correction framework is quantified in experiments using a realistic head phantom on a testbench for FPD CBCT.Uncorrected reconstructions were non-diagnostic for soft-tissue imaging tasks in the brain. After processing with the artifact correction framework, image uniformity was substantially improved, and artifacts were reduced to a level that enabled visualization of ~3 mm simulated bleeds throughout the brain. Non-uniformity (cupping) was reduced by a factor of 5, and contrast of simulated bleeds was improved from ~7 to 49.7 HU, in good agreement

  15. High-fidelity artifact correction for cone-beam CT imaging of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Xu, J.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Yorkston, J.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-02-01

    CT is the frontline imaging modality for diagnosis of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI), involving the detection of fresh blood in the brain (contrast of 30-50 HU, detail size down to 1 mm) in a non-contrast-enhanced exam. A dedicated point-of-care imaging system based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) could benefit early detection of TBI and improve direction to appropriate therapy. However, flat-panel detector (FPD) CBCT is challenged by artifacts that degrade contrast resolution and limit application in soft-tissue imaging. We present and evaluate a fairly comprehensive framework for artifact correction to enable soft-tissue brain imaging with FPD CBCT. The framework includes a fast Monte Carlo (MC)-based scatter estimation method complemented by corrections for detector lag, veiling glare, and beam hardening. The fast MC scatter estimation combines GPU acceleration, variance reduction, and simulation with a low number of photon histories and reduced number of projection angles (sparse MC) augmented by kernel de-noising to yield a runtime of ~4 min per scan. Scatter correction is combined with two-pass beam hardening correction. Detector lag correction is based on temporal deconvolution of the measured lag response function. The effects of detector veiling glare are reduced by deconvolution of the glare response function representing the long range tails of the detector point-spread function. The performance of the correction framework is quantified in experiments using a realistic head phantom on a testbench for FPD CBCT. Uncorrected reconstructions were non-diagnostic for soft-tissue imaging tasks in the brain. After processing with the artifact correction framework, image uniformity was substantially improved, and artifacts were reduced to a level that enabled visualization of ~3 mm simulated bleeds throughout the brain. Non-uniformity (cupping) was reduced by a factor of 5, and contrast of simulated bleeds was improved from ~7 to 49.7 HU, in good agreement

  16. A new phantom for image quality, geometric destortion, and HU calibration in MSCT and CBCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Johannes M.; Blendl, Christian; Selbach, Markus; Uphoff, Clemens; Fiebich, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Flat panel cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is developing to the state-of-the-art technique in several medical disciplines such as dental and otorhinolaryngological imaging. Dental and otorhinolaryngological CBCT systems offer a variety of different field-of-view sizes from 6.0 to 17.0 cm. Standard phantoms are only designed for the use in multi-slices CT (MSCT) and there is no phantom which provides detail structures for all common characteristic values and Hounsfield calibration. In this study we present a new phantom specially designed for use with MSCT and CBCT systems providing detail structures for MTF, 3D MTF, NPS, SNR, geometric distortion and HU calibration. With this phantom you'll only need one acquisition for image quality investigation and assurance. Materials and methods: The phantom design is shown in figure 1. To investigate the practicability, the phantom was scanned using dedicated MSCT-scanners, 3D C-arms und digital volume tomographs. The acquired axial image stacks were analyzed using a dedicated computer program, which is provided as an ImageJ plugin. The MTF was compared to other methodologies such as a thin wire, a sphere or noise response [10, 13, 14]. The HU values were also computed using other common methods. Results: These results are similar to the results of others studies [10, 13, 14]. The method has proven to be stable and delivers comparable results to other methodologies such as using a thin wire. The NPS was calculated for all materials. Furthermore, CT numbers for all materials were computed and compared to the desired values. The measurement of geometric deformation has proven to be accurate. Conclusion: A unique feature of this phantom is to compute the geometric deformation of the 3D-volume image. This offers the chance to improve accuracy, e.g. in dental implant planning. Another convenient feature is that the phantom needs to be scanned only once with otorhinolaryngological volume tomographs to be fully displayed. It is

  17. Integration of optical imaging with a small animal irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Weersink, Robert A.; Ansell, Steve; Wang, An; Wilson, Graham; Shah, Duoaud; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jaffray, David A.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The authors describe the integration of optical imaging with a targeted small animal irradiator device, focusing on design, instrumentation, 2D to 3D image registration, 2D targeting, and the accuracy of recovering and mapping the optical signal to a 3D surface generated from the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. The integration of optical imaging will improve targeting of the radiation treatment and offer longitudinal tracking of tumor response of small animal models treated using the system. Methods: The existing image-guided small animal irradiator consists of a variable kilovolt (peak) x-ray tube mounted opposite an aSi flat panel detector, both mounted on a c-arm gantry. The tube is used for both CBCT imaging and targeted irradiation. The optical component employs a CCD camera perpendicular to the x-ray treatment/imaging axis with a computer controlled filter for spectral decomposition. Multiple optical images can be acquired at any angle as the gantry rotates. The optical to CBCT registration, which uses a standard pinhole camera model, was modeled and tested using phantoms with markers visible in both optical and CBCT images. Optically guided 2D targeting in the anterior/posterior direction was tested on an anthropomorphic mouse phantom with embedded light sources. The accuracy of the mapping of optical signal to the CBCT surface was tested using the same mouse phantom. A surface mesh of the phantom was generated based on the CBCT image and optical intensities projected onto the surface. The measured surface intensity was compared to calculated surface for a point source at the actual source position. The point-source position was also optimized to provide the closest match between measured and calculated intensities, and the distance between the optimized and actual source positions was then calculated. This process was repeated for multiple wavelengths and sources. Results: The optical to CBCT registration error was 0.8 mm. Two

  18. Component analysis of a new Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) using photon transfer and Instrumentation Noise Equivalent Exposure (INEE) measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The SSXII is a novel x-ray imager designed to improve upon the performance limitations of conventional dynamic radiographic/fluoroscopic imagers related to resolution, charge-trapping, frame-rate, and instrumentation-noise. The SSXII consists of a CsI:Tl phosphor coupled via a fiber-optic taper (FOT) to an electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD). To facilitate investigational studies, initial designs enable interchangeability of such imaging components. Measurements of various component and configuration characteristics enable an optimization analysis with respect to overall detector performance. Photon transfer was used to characterize the EMCCD performance including ADC sensitivity, read-noise, full-well capacity and quantum efficiency. X-ray sensitivity was measured using RQA x-ray spectra. Imaging components were analyzed in terms of their MTF and transmission efficiency. The EMCCD was measured to have a very low effective read-noise of less than 1 electron rms at modest EMCCD gains, which is more than two orders-of-magnitude less than flat panel (FPD) and CMOS-based detectors. The variable signal amplification from 1 to 2000 times enables selectable sensitivities ranging from 8.5 (168) to over 15k (300k) electrons per incident x-ray photon with (without) a 4:1 FOT; these sensitivities could be readily increased with further component optimization. MTF and DQE measurements indicate the SSXII performance is comparable to current state-of-the-art detectors at low spatial frequencies and far exceeds them at higher spatial frequencies. The instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE) was measured to be less than 0.3 μR out to 10 cycles/mm, which is substantially better than FPDs. Component analysis suggests that these improvements can be substantially increased with further detector optimization. PMID:19763251

  19. Real-time implementation of distortion corrections for a tiled EMCCD-based Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII)

    PubMed Central

    Keleshis, C; Hoffmann, KR; Lee, J; Hamwi, H; Wang, W; Ionita, CN; Bednarek, DR; Verevkin, A.; Rudin, S

    2009-01-01

    The new Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) is being designed based on a modular imaging array of Electron Multiplying Charge Couple Devices (EMCCD). Each of the detector modules consists of a CsI(Tl) phosphor coupled to a fiber-optic plate, a fiber-optic taper (FOT), and an EMCCD sensor with its electronics. During the optical coupling and alignment of the modules into an array form, small orientation misalignments, such as rotation and translation of the EMCCD sensors, are expected. In addition, barrel distortion will result from the FOTs. Correction algorithms have been developed by our group for all the above artifacts. However, it is critical for the system’s performance to correct these artifacts in real-time (30 fps). To achieve this, we will use two-dimensional Look-Up-Tables (LUT) (each for x and y coordinates), which map the corrected pixel locations to the acquired-image pixel locations. To evaluate the feasibility of this approach, this process is simulated making use of parallel coding techniques to allow real-time distortion corrections for up to sixteen modules when a standard quad processor is used. The results of this simulation confirm that tiled field-of-views (FOV) comparable with those of flat panel detectors can be generated in ~17 ms (>30 fps). The increased FOV enabled through correction of tiled images, combined with the EMCCD characteristics of low noise, negligible lag and high sensitivity, should make possible the practical use of the SSXII with substantial advantages over conventional clinical systems. PMID:19777121

  20. Real-time implementation of distortion corrections for a tiled EMCCD-based Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII).

    PubMed

    Keleshis, C; Hoffmann, Kr; Lee, J; Hamwi, H; Wang, W; Ionita, Cn; Bednarek, Dr; Verevkin, A; Rudin, S

    2009-01-01

    The new Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) is being designed based on a modular imaging array of Electron Multiplying Charge Couple Devices (EMCCD). Each of the detector modules consists of a CsI(Tl) phosphor coupled to a fiber-optic plate, a fiber-optic taper (FOT), and an EMCCD sensor with its electronics. During the optical coupling and alignment of the modules into an array form, small orientation misalignments, such as rotation and translation of the EMCCD sensors, are expected. In addition, barrel distortion will result from the FOTs. Correction algorithms have been developed by our group for all the above artifacts. However, it is critical for the system's performance to correct these artifacts in real-time (30 fps). To achieve this, we will use two-dimensional Look-Up-Tables (LUT) (each for x and y coordinates), which map the corrected pixel locations to the acquired-image pixel locations. To evaluate the feasibility of this approach, this process is simulated making use of parallel coding techniques to allow real-time distortion corrections for up to sixteen modules when a standard quad processor is used. The results of this simulation confirm that tiled field-of-views (FOV) comparable with those of flat panel detectors can be generated in ~17 ms (>30 fps). The increased FOV enabled through correction of tiled images, combined with the EMCCD characteristics of low noise, negligible lag and high sensitivity, should make possible the practical use of the SSXII with substantial advantages over conventional clinical systems.

  1. Achieving high-resolution soft-tissue imaging with cone-beam CT: a two-pronged approach for modulation of x-ray fluence and detector gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, S. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Moseley, D. J.; Keller, H.; Shkumat, N. A.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2005-04-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) presents a highly promising and challenging advanced application of flat-panel detectors (FPDs). The great advantage of this adaptable technology is in the potential for sub-mm 3D spatial resolution in combination with soft-tissue detectability. While the former is achieved naturally by CBCT systems incorporating modern FPD designs (e.g., 200 - 400 um pixel pitch), the latter presents a significant challenge due to limitations in FPD dynamic range, large field of view, and elevated levels of x-ray scatter in typical CBCT configurations. We are investigating a two-pronged strategy to maximizing soft-tissue detectability in CBCT: 1) front-end solutions, including novel beam modulation designs (viz., spatially varying compensators) that alleviate detector dynamic range requirements, reduce x-ray scatter, and better distribute imaging dose in a manner suited to soft-tissue visualization throughout the field of view; and 2) back-end solutions, including implementation of an advanced FPD design (Varian PaxScan 4030CB) that features dual-gain and dynamic gain switching that effectively extends detector dynamic range to 18 bits. These strategies are explored quantitatively on CBCT imaging platforms developed in our laboratory, including a dedicated CBCT bench and a mobile isocentric C-arm (Siemens PowerMobil). Pre-clinical evaluation of improved soft-tissue visibility was carried out in phantom and patient imaging with the C-arm device. Incorporation of these strategies begin to reveal the full potential of CBCT for soft-tissue visualization, an essential step in realizing broad utility of this adaptable technology for diagnostic and image-guided procedures.

  2. Imaging performance comparison between a LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillator based and a CdTe semiconductor based photon counting compact gamma camera

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, P.; Mettivier, G.; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; Bennati, P.

    2009-04-15

    The authors report on the performance of two small field of view, compact gamma cameras working in single photon counting in planar imaging tests at 122 and 140 keV. The first camera is based on a LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillator continuous crystal (49x49x5 mm{sup 3}) assembled with a flat panel multianode photomultiplier tube with parallel readout. The second one belongs to the class of semiconductor hybrid pixel detectors, specifically, a CdTe pixel detector (14x14x1 mm{sup 3}) with 256x256 square pixels and a pitch of 55 {mu}m, read out by a CMOS single photon counting integrated circuit of the Medipix2 series. The scintillation camera was operated with selectable energy window while the CdTe camera was operated with a single low-energy detection threshold of about 20 keV, i.e., without energy discrimination. The detectors were coupled to pinhole or parallel-hole high-resolution collimators. The evaluation of their overall performance in basic imaging tasks is presented through measurements of their detection efficiency, intrinsic spatial resolution, noise, image SNR, and contrast recovery. The scintillation and CdTe cameras showed, respectively, detection efficiencies at 122 keV of 83% and 45%, intrinsic spatial resolutions of 0.9 mm and 75 {mu}m, and total background noises of 40.5 and 1.6 cps. Imaging tests with high-resolution parallel-hole and pinhole collimators are also reported.

  3. Development of solid-state avalanche amorphous selenium for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Scheuermann, James R. Goldan, Amir H.; Zhao, Wei; Tousignant, Olivier; Léveillé, Sébastien

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPI) have limited performance in low dose applications due to the electronic noise of the thin film transistor (TFT) array. A uniform layer of avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) called high gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP) allows for signal amplification prior to readout f